Science.gov

Sample records for active region formed

  1. Large-scale patterns formed by solar active regions during the ascending phase of cycle 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaizauskas, V.; Harvey, K. L.; Harvey, J. W.; Zwaan, C.

    1983-02-01

    Synoptic maps of photospheric magnetic fields prepared at the Kitt Peak National Observatory are used in investigating large-scale patterns in the spatial and temporal distribution of solar active regions for 27 solar rotations between 1977 and 1979. The active regions are found to be distributed in 'complexes of activity' (Bumba and Howard, 1965). With the working definition of a complex of activity based on continuity and proximity of the constituent active regions, the phenomenology of complexes is explored. It is found that complexes of activity form within one month and that they are typically maintained for 3 to 6 solar rotations by fresh injections of magnetic flux. During the active lifetime of a complex of activity, the total magnetic flux in the complex remains steady to within a factor of 2. The magnetic polarities are closely balanced, and each complex rotates about the sun at its own special, constant rate. In certain cases, the complexes form two diverging branches.

  2. Determination of GMPE functional form for an active region with limited strong motion data: application to the Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Ketan; Anbazhagan, P.

    2018-01-01

    Advancement in the seismic networks results in formulation of different functional forms for developing any new ground motion prediction equation (GMPE) for a region. Till date, various guidelines and tools are available for selecting a suitable GMPE for any seismic study area. However, these methods are efficient in quantifying the GMPE but not for determining a proper functional form and capturing the epistemic uncertainty associated with selection of GMPE. In this study, the compatibility of the recent available functional forms for the active region is tested for distance and magnitude scaling. Analysis is carried out by determining the residuals using the recorded and the predicted spectral acceleration values at different periods. Mixed effect regressions are performed on the calculated residuals for determining the intra- and interevent residuals. Additionally, spatial correlation is used in mixed effect regression by changing its likelihood function. Distance scaling and magnitude scaling are respectively examined by studying the trends of intraevent residuals with distance and the trend of the event term with magnitude. Further, these trends are statistically studied for a respective functional form of a ground motion. Additionally, genetic algorithm and Monte Carlo method are used respectively for calculating the hinge point and standard error for magnitude and distance scaling for a newly determined functional form. The whole procedure is applied and tested for the available strong motion data for the Himalayan region. The functional form used for testing are five Himalayan GMPEs, five GMPEs developed under NGA-West 2 project, two from Pan-European, and one from Japan region. It is observed that bilinear functional form with magnitude and distance hinged at 6.5 M w and 300 km respectively is suitable for the Himalayan region. Finally, a new regression coefficient for peak ground acceleration for a suitable functional form that governs the attenuation

  3. Star Formation Activity Beyond the Outer Arm. I. WISE -selected Candidate Star-forming Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Natsuko; Yasui, Chikako; Saito, Masao

    The outer Galaxy beyond the Outer Arm provides a good opportunity to study star formation in an environment significantly different from that in the solar neighborhood. However, star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy have never been comprehensively studied or cataloged because of the difficulties in detecting them at such large distances. We studied 33 known young star-forming regions associated with 13 molecular clouds at R {sub G} ≥ 13.5 kpc in the outer Galaxy with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE ) mid-infrared all-sky survey. From their color distribution, we developed a simple identification criterion of star-forming regions inmore » the outer Galaxy with the WISE color. We applied the criterion to all the WISE sources in the molecular clouds in the outer Galaxy at R {sub G} ≥ 13.5 kpc detected with the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) {sup 12}CO survey of the outer Galaxy, of which the survey region is 102.°49 ≤  l  ≤ 141.°54, −3.°03 ≤  b  ≤ 5.°41, and successfully identified 711 new candidate star-forming regions in 240 molecular clouds. The large number of samples enables us to perform the statistical study of star formation properties in the outer Galaxy for the first time. This study is crucial to investigate the fundamental star formation properties, including star formation rate, star formation efficiency, and initial mass function, in a primordial environment such as the early phase of the Galaxy formation.« less

  4. Meeting the Challenge of Webb - Spectroscopic Simulations of Star-Forming Regions and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, Gary

    Understanding the chemical evolution of the universe, together with closely related questions concerning the formation of cosmic structure, is a major theme running across current astrophysics. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will offer a unique perspective on this activity, with its high sensitivity and superb resolution. Basic questions include the role of feedback in the formation and evolution of galaxies, interactions between the AGN and the surrounding intracluster medium, and their effects on the metagalactic background. The central theme in this proposal is the development of the theoretical tools needed to realize the diagnostic potential of the 0.6 to 5 micron NIRSpec and 5 to 28 micron MIRI spectroscopic windows offered by JWST, with correspondingly shorter wavelengths at higher redshift. The particular regimes to be addressed include ionic and molecular emission in an evolving environment with a mix of star formation and AGN activity, the physics of dust emission in gas-rich surroundings, in environments that are optically thick to portions of the radiation field. The gas and dust are far from equilibrium, so their spectra depend on detailed atomic and molecular physics. This is a complication, but is also why quantitative spectroscopy reveals so much about the emitting environment. This project supports the development and application of the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. Cloudy is designed to solve the coupled plasma, chemistry, radiation transport, and dynamics problems simultaneously and self consistently, building from a foundation of ab initio atomic and molecular cross sections and rate coefficients. By treating the microphysics without compromise, the macrophysics, including the observed spectrum, will be correct. This makes the code suitable for application to a very wide range of astronomical problems, ranging from the intracluster medium in cool-core clusters, to the innermost regions of an AGN, including the accretion disk and

  5. STAR-FORMING ACTIVITY IN THE H ii REGIONS ASSOCIATED WITH THE IRAS 17160–3707 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Nandakumar, G.; Veena, V. S.; Vig, S.

    2016-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of star formation activity toward the southern H ii regions associated with IRAS 17160–3707, located at a distance of 6.2 kpc with a bolometric luminosity of 8.3 × 10{sup 5} L {sub ⊙}. The ionized gas distribution and dust clumps in the parental molecular cloud are examined in detail using measurements at infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths. The radio continuum images at 1280 and 610 MHz obtained using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope reveal the presence of multiple compact sources as well as nebulous emission. At submillimeter wavelengths, we identify seven dust clumps and estimate their physical properties suchmore » as temperature: 24–30 K, mass: 300–4800 M {sub ⊙} and luminosity: 9–317 × 10{sup 2} L {sub ⊙} using modified blackbody fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) between 70 and 870 μ m. We find 24 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the mid-infrared, with a few of them coincident with the compact radio sources. The SEDs of the YSOs have been fitted by the Robitaille models and the results indicate that those having radio compact sources as counterparts host massive objects in early evolutionary stages with best fit age ≤0.2 Myr. We compare the relative evolutionary stages of clumps using various signposts such as masers, ionized gas, presence of YSOs and infrared nebulosity, and find six massive star-forming clumps and one quiescent clump. Of the former, five are in a relatively advanced stage and one in an earlier stage.« less

  6. Rapid intranasal delivery of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in the active form to different brain regions as a model for enzyme therapy in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Appu, Abhilash P; Arun, Peethambaran; Krishnan, Jishnu K S; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2016-02-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is critical for maintaining central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis by restricting entry of potentially toxic substances. However, the BBB is a major obstacle in the treatment of neurotoxicity and neurological disorders due to the restrictive nature of the barrier to many medications. Intranasal delivery of active enzymes to the brain has therapeutic potential for the treatment of numerous CNS enzyme deficiency disorders and CNS toxicity caused by chemical threat agents. The aim of this work is to provide a sensitive model system for analyzing the rapid delivery of active enzymes into various regions of the brain with therapeutic bioavailability. We tested intranasal delivery of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), a relatively large (75kD) enzyme, in its active form into different regions of the brain. CAT was delivered intranasally to anaesthetized rats and enzyme activity was measured in different regions using a highly specific High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HP-TLC)-radiometry coupled assay. Active enzyme reached all examined areas of the brain within 15min (the earliest time point tested). In addition, the yield of enzyme activity in the brain was almost doubled in the brains of rats pre-treated with matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Intranasal administration of active enzymes in conjunction with MMP-9 to the CNS is both rapid and effective. The present results suggest that intranasal enzyme therapy is a promising method for counteracting CNS chemical threat poisoning, as well as for treating CNS enzyme deficiency disorders. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Active Regions Blossoming

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-28

    As a pair of active regions began to rotate into view, their towering magnetic field lines above them bloomed into a dazzling display of twisting arches (Oct. 27-28, 2015). Some of the lines reached over and connected with the neighboring active region. Active regions are usually the source of solar storms. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20048

  8. The Evolution of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Lucie

    2016-10-01

    The solar corona is a highly dynamic environment which exhibits the largest releases of energy in the Solar System in the form of solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This activity predominantly originates from active regions, which store and release free magnetic energy and dominate the magnetic face of the Sun. Active regions can be long-lived features, being affected by the Sun's convective flows, differential rotation and meridional flows. The Sun's global coronal field can be seen as the superposed growth and subsequent diffusion of all previously formed active regions. This talk will look at active regions as an observable product of the solar dynamo and will discuss the physical processes that are at play which lead to the storage and release of free magnetic energy. What happens to flux that emerges into the corona so that it goes down an evolutionary path that leads to dynamic activity? And how does this activity vary with active region age? When an active region reaches the end of its lifetime, his much of the magnetic flux is recycled back into subsequent solar cycles? The current status of observations and modelling will be reviewed with a look to the future and fundamental questions that are still be be answered.

  9. Gyrating Active Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-26

    On Jan. 20, 2017, NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory captured a small area of the sun highlighted three active region. Over half a day this active region sent dark swirls of plasma and bright magnetic arches twisting and turning above it. All the activity in the three areas was driven by competing magnetic forces. The dynamic action was observed in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11703

  10. Active Regions' Magnetic Connection

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-22

    Several bright bands of plasma connect from one active region to another, even though they are tens of thousands of miles away from each other (May 17-18, 2017). Active regions are, by their nature, strong magnetic areas with north and south poles. The plasma consists of charged particles that stream along the magnetic field lines between these two regions. These connecting lines are clearly visible in this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Other loops and strands of bright plasma can be seen rising up and out of smaller active regions as well. The video covers about one day's worth of activity. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21638

  11. Energized Active Regions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-02

    A pair of relatively small (but frenetic) active regions rotated into view, spouting off numerous small flares and sweeping loops of plasma (May 31-June 2, 2017). At first, only the one active region was observed, but mid-way though the video clip a second one behind the first can be picked out. The dynamic regions were easily the most remarkable areas on the sun during this 42-hour period. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21756

  12. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  13. Agitated Active Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-11

    An active region just rotating into view gave us a perfect view of the tussle of magnetic field lines above it (Oct. 10-11, 2016). The particles spiraling along the magnetic field lines become visible in extreme ultraviolet light, helping us to see the struggle going on. There were no eruptions during this period, although active regions are usually the source for solar storms. The video clip covers just one day's worth of activity. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21109

  14. Jumpy Active Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-03

    A close-up view of one day in the life of a rather small active region shows the agitation and dynamism of its magnetic field (Dec. 21, 2016). This wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light reveals particles as they spin along the cascading arches of magnetic field lines above the active region. Some darker plasma rises up and spins around at the edge of the sun near the end of the video clip also being pulled by unseen magnetic forces. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA15032

  15. Disk Evaporation in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Young stars produce sufficient ultraviolet photon luminosity and mechanical luminosity in their winds to significantly affect the structure and evolution of the accretion disks surrounding them. The Lyman continuum photons create a nearly static, ionized, isothermal 10(exp 4) K atmosphere forms above the neutral disk at small distances from the star. Further out, they create a photoevaporative flow which relatively rapidly destroys the disk. The resulting slow (10-50 km/s) ionized outflow, which persists for approx. greater than 10(exp 5) years for disk masses M(sub d) approx. 0.3M(sub *), may explain the observational characteristics of many ultracompact HII regions. We compare model results to the observed radio free-free spectra and luminosities of ultracompact HII regions and to the interesting source MWC349, which is observed to produce hydrogen masers. We apply the results to Ae and Be stars in order to determine the lifetimes of disks around such stars. We also apply the results to the early solar nebula to explain the the dispersal of the solar nebula and the differences in hydrogen content in the giant planets. Finally, we model the small bright objects ("proplyds") observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV photons from the nearby massive star Theta(sup 1) C.

  16. Spasmodic Active Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-30

    An active region that was rotating out of view off the sun's western limb, displayed a dazzling variety of dozens of spurts and eruptions in about 2.5 days (Apr. 19-21, 2014). The frames, taken in extreme ultraviolet light, show ionized Helium not far above the Sun's surface. All of the activity near this region was caused by intense magnetic forces in a powerful struggling with each other. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  17. Tangled up Active Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    This close-up image of the sun presents an active region in profile as it rotated out of view. We can observe both the bright arching field lines and smaller pieces of darker matter in their midst being pulled back and forth just above the Sun's surface over about 36 hours (July 20-22, 2011). Both of these physical responses were caused by strong, tangled magnetic forces that are constantly evolving and reorganizing within the active region. Other active regions can be seen in the foreground as well. The image and movie were taken in extreme ultraviolet light of ionized iron heated to one million degrees. To view a hd video of this event go here: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/6006013038 Credit: NASA/GSFC/SDO NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  18. Distributions of Dusty Star Forming Region in Local Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateuchi, K.; Motohara, K.; Konishi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Kato, N.; Kitagawa, Y.; Yoshii, Y.; Doi, M.; Kohno, K.; Kawara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Miyata, T.; Tanabe, T.; Minezaki, T.; Sako, S.; Morokuma, T.; Tamura, Y.; Aoki, T.; Soyano, T.; Tarusawa, K.; Koshida, S.; Kamizuka, T.; Asano, K.; Uchiyama, M.; Okada, K.

    2013-10-01

    Since the first light observation of ANIR in June 2009, we have been carrying out a Paα narrow-band imaging survey of nearby luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). Because Paα is the strongest hydrogen recombination line in the infrared wavelength ranges, it is a good and direct tracer of dust-enshrouded star forming regions, and enables us to probe the star formation activities in LIRGs. We find that LIRGs have two star-forming modes. The origin of the two modes probably come from differences between merging stage and/or star-forming process.

  19. Extreme Variables in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Peña, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    in two multi-epoch infrared surveys: the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) and the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV). In order to further investigate the nature of the selected variable stars, we use photometric information arising from public surveys at near- to far-infrared wavelengths. In addition we have performed spectroscopic and photometric follow-up for a large subset of the samples arising from GPS and VVV. We analyse the widely separated two-epoch K-band photometry in the 5th, 7th and 8th data releases of the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey. We find 71 stars with ΔK > 1 mag, including 2 previously known OH/IR stars and a Nova. Even though the mid-plane is mostly excluded from the dataset, we find the majority (66%) of our sample to be within known star forming regions (SFRs), with two large concentrations in the Serpens OB2 association (11 stars) and the Cygnus-X complex (27 stars). The analysis of the multi-epoch K-band photometry of 2010-2012 data from VVV covering the Galactic disc at |b| < 1° yields 816 high amplitude variables, which include known variables of different classes such as high mass X-ray binaries, Novae and eclipsing binaries among others. Remarkably, 65% of the sample are found concentrated towards areas of star formation, similar to the results from GPS. In both surveys, sources in SFRs show spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that support classification as YSOs. This indicates that YSOs dominate the Galactic population of high amplitude infrared variable stars at low luminosities and therefore likely dominate the total high amplitude population. Spectroscopic follow-up allows us to confirm the pre-main sequence nature of several GPS and VVV Objects. Most objects in both samples show spectroscopic signatures that can be attributed to YSOs undergoing high states of accretion, such as veiling of photospheric features and CO emission, or show FUor-like spectra. We also find a large fraction of objects with 2.12 μm H2 emission that

  20. Active region flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of observations has shown that active region phenomena in the photospheric, chromospheric and coronal temperature regimes are dynamical in nature. At the photosphere, recent observations of full line profiles place an upper limit of about + or - 20/msec on any downflows at supergranule cell edges. Observations of the full Stokes 5 profiles in the network show no evidence for downflows in magnetic flux tubes. In the area of chromospheric dynamics, several models were put forward recently to reproduce the observed behavior of spicules. However, it is pointed out that these adiabatic models do not include the powerful radiative dissipation which tend to damp out the large amplitude disturbances that produce the spicular acceleration in the models. In the corona, loop flows along field lines clearly transport mass and energy at rates important for the dynamics of these structures. However, advances in understanding the heating and mass balance of the loop structures seem to require new kinds of observations. Some results are presented using a remote sensing diagnostic of the intensity and orientation of macroscopic plasma electric fields predicted by models of reconnective heating and also wave heating.

  1. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures…

  2. Thermal shielding of an emerging active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régnier, S.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The interaction between emerging active regions and the pre-existing coronal magnetic field is important for better understanding the mechanisms of storage and release of magnetic energy from the convection zone to the high corona. Aims: We describe the first steps of an emerging active region within a pre-existing quiet-Sun corona in terms of the thermal and magnetic structure. Methods: We used unprecedented spatial, temporal and spectral coverage from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results: Starting on 30 May 2010 at 17:00 UT, we followed the emerging active region AR11076 within a quiet-Sun region for 8 h. Using several SDO/AIA filters that cover temperatures from 50 000 K to 10 MK, we show that the emerging process is characterised by a thermal shield at the interface between the emerging flux and pre-existing quiet-Sun corona. Conclusions: The active region 11076 is a peculiar example of an emerging active region because (i) the polarities emerge in a photospheric quiet-Sun region near a supergranular-like distribution, and (ii) the polarities that form the bipolar emerging structure do not rotate with respect to each other, which indicates a slight twist in the emerging flux bundle. There is a thermal shield at the interface between the emerging active region and the pre-existing quiet-Sun region. The thermal shielding structure deduced from all SDO/AIA channels is strongly asymmetric between the two polarities of the active region, suggesting that the heating mechanism for one polarity is probably magnetic reconnection, whilst it is caused by increasing magnetic pressure for the opposite polarity. Appendix A and two movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Spatial and kinematic structure of Monoceros star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costado, M. T.; Alfaro, E. J.

    2018-05-01

    The principal aim of this work is to study the velocity field in the Monoceros star-forming region using the radial velocity data available in the literature, as well as astrometric data from the Gaia first release. This region is a large star-forming complex formed by two associations named Monoceros OB1 and OB2. We have collected radial velocity data for more than 400 stars in the area of 8 × 12 deg2 and distance for more than 200 objects. We apply a clustering analysis in the subspace of the phase space formed by angular coordinates and radial velocity or distance data using the Spectrum of Kinematic Grouping methodology. We found four and three spatial groupings in radial velocity and distance variables, respectively, corresponding to the Local arm, the central clusters forming the associations and the Perseus arm, respectively.

  4. Free-Form Region Description with Second-Order Pooling.

    PubMed

    Carreira, João; Caseiro, Rui; Batista, Jorge; Sminchisescu, Cristian

    2015-06-01

    Semantic segmentation and object detection are nowadays dominated by methods operating on regions obtained as a result of a bottom-up grouping process (segmentation) but use feature extractors developed for recognition on fixed-form (e.g. rectangular) patches, with full images as a special case. This is most likely suboptimal. In this paper we focus on feature extraction and description over free-form regions and study the relationship with their fixed-form counterparts. Our main contributions are novel pooling techniques that capture the second-order statistics of local descriptors inside such free-form regions. We introduce second-order generalizations of average and max-pooling that together with appropriate non-linearities, derived from the mathematical structure of their embedding space, lead to state-of-the-art recognition performance in semantic segmentation experiments without any type of local feature coding. In contrast, we show that codebook-based local feature coding is more important when feature extraction is constrained to operate over regions that include both foreground and large portions of the background, as typical in image classification settings, whereas for high-accuracy localization setups, second-order pooling over free-form regions produces results superior to those of the winning systems in the contemporary semantic segmentation challenges, with models that are much faster in both training and testing.

  5. Small but Dynamic Active Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-20

    The sun featured just one, rather small active region over the past few days, but it developed rapidly and sported a lot of magnetic activity in just one day (Apr. 11-12, 2018). The activity was observed in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. The loops and twisting arches above it are evidence of magnetic forces tangling with each other. The video clip was produced using Helioviewer software. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06676

  6. Acoustic holograms of active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi

    2008-10-01

    We propose a method to study solar magnetic regions in the solar interior with the principle of optical holography. A magnetic region in the solar interior scatters the solar background acoustic waves. The scattered waves and background waves could form an interference pattern on the solar surface. We investigate the feasibility of detecting this interference pattern on the solar surface, and using it to construct the three-dimensional scattered wave from the magnetic region with the principle of optical holography. In solar acoustic holography, the background acoustic waves play the role of reference wave; the magnetic region plays the role of the target object; the interference pattern, acoustic power map, on the solar surface plays the role of the hologram.

  7. The formation of prebiotic molecules in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.

    New sensitive observations using the current generation of (sub)millimeter telescopes have revealed in several star-forming regions molecular species of different chemical families (e.g. sugars, esters, isocyanates, phosphorus-bearing species) that may play an important role in prebiotic chemistry, and eventually in the origin of life. The observed molecular abundances of complex organic molecules (glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol and ethyl formate) are better explained by surface-phase chemistry on dust grains, although gas-phase reactions can also play an important role, as in the case of methyl isocyanate. The PO molecule - a basic chemical bond to build-up the backbone of the DNA - has been detected for the first time in star-forming regions. These new observations indicate that phosphorus, a key element for the development of life, is much more abundant in star-forming regions than previously thought.

  8. Proton Form Factors Measurements in the Time-Like Region

    SciTech Connect

    Anulli, F.; /Frascati

    2007-10-22

    I present an overview of the measurement of the proton form factors in the time-like region. BABAR has recently measured with great accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} reaction from production threshold up to an energy of {approx} 4.5 GeV, finding evidence for a ratio of the electric to magnetic form factor greater than unity, contrary to expectation. In agreement with previous measurements, BABAR confirmed the steep rise of the magnetic form factor close to the p{bar p} mass threshold, suggesting the possible presence of an under-threshold N{bar N} vector state. These and other open questions related tomore » the nucleon form factors both in the time-like and space-like region, wait for more data with different experimental techniques to be possibly solved.« less

  9. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Summary The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  10. Coronal loops and active region structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Zirin, H.

    1981-01-01

    Synoptic H-alpha Ca K, magnetograph and Skylab soft X-ray and EUV data were compared for the purpose of identifying the basic coronal magnetic structure of loops in a 'typical' active region and studying its evolution. A complex of activity in July 1973, especially McMath 12417, was emphasized. The principal results are: (1) most of the brightest loops connected the bright f plage to either the sunspot penumbra or to p satellite spots; no non-flaring X-ray loops end in umbrae; (2) short, bright loops had one or both ends in regions of emergent flux, strong field or high field gradients; (3) stable, strongly sheared loop arcades formed over filaments; (4) EFRs were always associated with compact X-ray arcades; and (5) loops connecting to other active regions had their bases in outlying plage of weak field strength in McM 417 where H-alpha fibrils marked the direction of the loops

  11. Solar active region display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M.; Raben, V.; Weyland, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS) is a client-server application that automatically collects a wide range of solar data and displays it in a format easy for users to assimilate and interpret. Users can rapidly identify active regions of interest or concern from color-coded indicators that visually summarize each region's size, magnetic configuration, recent growth history, and recent flare and CME production. The active region information can be overlaid onto solar maps, multiple solar images, and solar difference images in orthographic, Mercator or cylindrical equidistant projections. Near real-time graphs display the GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, flare events, and daily F10.7 value as a function of time; color-coded indicators show current trends in soft x-ray flux, flare temperature, daily F10.7 flux, and x-ray flare occurrence. Through a separate window up to 4 real-time or static graphs can simultaneously display values of KP, AP, daily F10.7 flux, GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, GOES >10 and >100 MeV proton flux, and Thule neutron monitor count rate. Climatologic displays use color-valued cells to show F10.7 and AP values as a function of Carrington/Bartel's rotation sequences - this format allows users to detect recurrent patterns in solar and geomagnetic activity as well as variations in activity levels over multiple solar cycles. Users can customize many of the display and graph features; all displays can be printed or copied to the system's clipboard for "pasting" into other applications. The system obtains and stores space weather data and images from sources such as the NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, the joint ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft, and the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, and can be extended to include other data series and image sources. Data and images retrieved from the system's database are converted to XML and transported from a central server using HTTP and SOAP protocols, allowing

  12. Pluto's elongated dark regions formed by the Charon-forming giant impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genda, Hidenori; Sekine, Yusuhito; Kamata, Shunichi; Funatsu, Taro

    2017-04-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft has found elongated dark areas in the equatorial region of Pluto, which were informally called "the Whale" or Cthulhu Region (Stern et al. 2015). Here we examine the possibility that the dark areas on Pluto were formed by thermal alterations and polymerization of interstellar volatiles caused by a Charon-forming giant impact. Pluto is one of the largest Kuiper belt objects, which is highly likely to contain various interstellar volatiles, including aldehyde and ammonia. The previous study (Cordy et al. 2011) shows that these interstellar volatiles are thermally polymerized in solutions at high temperatures, forming complex insoluble organic solids. Given the satellite-to-planet mass ratio, the Pluto-Charon system is suggested to be of a giant impact origin (Canup 2005). Impact-induced heating on Pluto could have converted these volatile into complex organic matter in solution near the surface, which may explain the presence of dark areas in the equatorial region of Pluto. Here, we produce complex organic matter for various temperatures by thermal polymerization of formaldehyde and ammonia in solutions. By measuring the UV-VIS absorption spectra of the produced organic matter, we found that the color of the solution changes to be dark if the temerature is above 50 degree C for months or more. This duration corresponds to the cooling timescale of a water pond with 500-km thickness. By using SPH code (Genda et al. 2015), we carried out many simulations of a giant impact, and we found that a molten hot pond with > 500-km thickness is formed around the equatorial region of Pluto by a Charon-forming giant impact, if the water/rock mixing mass ratio is less than 1 or if the pre-impact interior temperature is 150 K. Both the dark equatorial region and a Charon-sized moon are formed when the pre-impact Pluto is undifferentiated. To keep a rock-rich Pluto undifferentiated at time of the giant impact, Pluto may have been formed >100 Myrs after CAIs

  13. ASTE Surveys of Galactic Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Kotaro

    2008-05-01

    We report some recent highlights on the observational studies of Galactic star formation based on surveys using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE), a new 10 m telescope in the Atacama desert in northern Chile (Kohno et al., 2008, ApSS, 313, 279). The highlights will include (1) a large scale CO(3-2) imaging survey of the Galactic Center, unveiling the presence of numerous compact high velocity clouds with high CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratios as a "fossil” of the recent burst of star formation in the Galactic Center region (Oka et al., 2007, PASJ, 59, 15; Nagai et al., 2007, PASJ, 59, 25; Tanaka et al., 2007, PASJ, 59, 323), (2) a large scale CO(3-2) imaging survey of the Sgr arm and inter-am regions, revealing the distinct difference on the morphology and physical property of molecular gas between the arm and inter-arm regions for the first time (Sawada, Koda, et al., in prep.), and (3) a wide area 1.1 mm imaging survey of Southern low mass star-forming regions such as Chamaeleon and Lupus molecular clouds using the bolometer camera AzTEC (Wilson et al., 2008, MNRAS, in press) mounted on ASTE, yielding detections of starless cores with a very low mass detection limist down to 0.1 solar masses (Hiramatsu, Tsukagoshi, Kawabe et al., in prep.). Related topics on the massive star-forming regions in very nearby galaxies such as LMC (Minamidani et al., 2008, ApJS, in press) and M 33 (Tosaki et al., 2007, ApJ, 664, L27; Onodera et al., in prep.; Komugi et al., in prep.) will also be reviewed.

  14. Physical conditions in star-forming regions around S235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanova, M. S.; Wiebe, D. S.; Sobolev, A. M.; Henkel, C.; Tsivilev, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Gas density and temperature in star-forming regions around Sh2-235 are derived from ammonia line observations. This information is used to evaluate formation scenarios and to determine evolutionary stages of the young embedded clusters S235 East 1, S235 East 2 and S235 Central. We also estimate the gas mass in the embedded clusters and its ratio to the stellar mass. S235 East 1 appears to be less evolved than S235 East 2 and S235 Central. In S235 East 1 the molecular gas mass exceeds that in the other clusters. Also, this cluster is more embedded in the parent gas cloud than the other two. Comparison with a theoretical model shows that the formation of these three clusters could have been stimulated by the expansion of the Sh2-235 H II region (hereafter S235) via a collect-and-collapse process, provided the density in the surrounding gas exceeds 3 × 103 cm-3, or via collapse of pre-existing clumps. The expansion of S235 cannot be responsible for star formation in the southern S235 A-B region. However, formation of the massive stars in this region might have been triggered by a large-scale supernova shock. Thus, triggered star formation in the studied region may come in three varieties, namely collect-and-collapse and collapse of pre-existing clumps, both initiated by expansion of the local H II regions, and triggered by an external large-scale shock. We argue that the S235 A H II region expands into a highly non-uniform medium with increasing density. It is too young to trigger star formation in its vicinity by a collect-and-collapse process. There is an age spread inside the S235 A-B region. Massive stars in the S235 A-B region are considerably younger than lower mass stars in the same area. This follows from the estimates of their ages and the ages of associated H II regions.

  15. Collapse scenarios in magnetized star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence, magnetic fields and gravity driven flows are important for the formation of new stars. Although magnetic fields have been proven to be important in the formation of stars, only a few works have been done combining magnetic field and kinematic information. Such studies are important to analyze both gravity and gas dynamics and be able to compare them with the magnetic field. In this thesis we will combine dust polarization studies with kinematic analysis towards different star-forming regions. We aim to study the physical properties at core scales (<0.1 pc) from molecular line and dust emission, and study the role of the magnetic field in their dynamic evolution. For this, we will use millimeter and submillimeter observational data taken towards low- and high- mass star-forming regions in different environments and evolutionary states. The first project is the study of the physical, chemical and magnetic properties of the pre-stellar core FeSt1-457 in the Pipe nebula. We studied the emission of the molecular line N2H+(1-0) which is a good tracer of dense gas and therefore describes well the structure of the core. In addition, we detected more than 15 molecular lines and found a clear chemical spatial differentiation for molecules with nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. Using the ARTIST radiative transfer code (Brinch & Hogerheijde 2010, Padovani et al., 2011, 2012, Jørgensen et al., 2014), we simulated the emission of the different molecules detected and estimated their abundance. In addition, we estimated the magnetic field properties of the core (using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi approximation) from polarization data previously obtained by Alves et al., (2014). Finally, we found interesting correlations between the polarization properties and the chemistry in the region. The second project is the study of a high-mass star-forming region called NGC6334V. NGC6334V is in a more advanced evolutionary state and in an environment surrounded by other massive star-forming

  16. The Eagle Nebula: a spectral template for star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, Nicolas; Boulanger, Francois; Carey, Sean; Compiegne, Mathieu; Dwek, Eli; Habart, Emilie; Indebetouw, Remy; Montmerle, Thierry; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    IRAC and MIPS have revealed spectacular images of massive star forming regions in the Galaxy. These vivid illustrations of the interaction between the stars, through their winds and radiation, and their environment, made of gas and dust, still needs to be explained. The large scale picture of layered shells of gas components, is affected by the small scale interaction of stars with the clumpy medium that surrounds them. To understand spatial variations of physical conditions and dust properties on small scales, spectroscopic imaging observations are required on a nearby object. The iconic Eagle Nebula (M16) is one of the nearest and most observed star forming region of our Galaxy and as such, is a well suited template to obtain this missing data set. We thus propose a complete spectral map of the Eagle Nebula (M16) with the IRS/Long Low module (15-38 microns) and MIPS/SED mode (55-95 microns). Analysis of the dust emission, spectral features and continuum, and of the H2 and fine-structure gas lines within our models will provide us with constraints on the physical conditions (gas ionization state, pressure, radiation field) and dust properties (temperature, size distribution) at each position within the nebula. Only such a spatially and spectrally complete map will allow us to characterize small scale structure and dust evolution within the global context and understand the impact of small scale structure on the evolution of dusty star forming regions. This project takes advantage of the unique ability of IRS at obtaining sensitive spectral maps covering large areas.

  17. Testing Feedback Models with Nearby Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, E.; Crowther, P.

    2012-12-01

    The feedback from massive stars plays a crucial role in the evolution of galaxies. Accurate modelling of this feedback is essential in understanding distant star forming regions. Young nearby, high mass (> 104 M⊙) clusters such as R136 (in the 30 Doradus region) are ideal test beds for population synthesis since they host large numbers of spatially resolved massive stars at a pre-supernovae stage. We present a quantitative comparison of empirical calibrations of radiative and mechanical feedback from individual stars in R136, with instantaneous burst predictions from the popular Starburst99 evolution synthesis code. We find that empirical results exceed predictions by factors of ˜3-9, as a result of limiting simulations to an upper limit of 100 M⊙. 100-300 M⊙ stars should to be incorporated in population synthesis models for high mass clusters to bring predictions into close agreement with empirical results.

  18. Massive star-forming regions across the galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygl, Kazi Lucie Jessica

    2010-04-01

    Star-forming regions trace the spiral structure of the Galaxy. They are regions of increased column density and therefore traced well by the extinction in the mid-infrared based on the Spitzer/GLIMPSE 3.6-4.5 micron color excess maps. A sample of 25 high extinction clouds (HECs) was studied in the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission, and followed up by observations of ammonia plus several other molecules using the Effelsberg 100m, IRAM 30m and APEX telescopes. With these data we want to investigate the most early stages of massive star formation, which are currently still largely unknown. Three cloud classes were defined from their morphology in the 1.2 mm continuum maps: the early diffuse HECs, with a low contrast between the clump and cloud emission; the peaked HECs, with an increased contrast; the late multiply peaked HECs, with more than one clump and a high contrast between the clump and the cloud emission. The clouds are cold (T 16 K) and massive (M 800 M_sun) and contain dense clumps (n 10^5 cm^{-3}) of 0.3 pc in size. These clumps were investigated for evidence of gravitational collapse or expansion, for high velocity outflows, and for the presence of young stellar objects. Based on these results we interpret the three cloud classes as an evolutionary sequence of star-forming clouds. Accurate distances are a crucial parameter for establishing the mass, size, and luminosity of an object. Also, for understanding the spiral structure of the Galaxy trustworthy distances are necessary. The most accurate method to measure these is the trigonometric parallax. Using the European Very Large Baseline Interferometry Network of radio antennas we measured, for the first time, parallaxes of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. This transition belongs to the strongest maser species in the Galaxy, it is stable and observed toward numerous massive star-forming regions. We measured distances and proper motions toward L 1287, L 1206, NGC 281-W, ON 1 and S 255, and obtained their 3-dimensional

  19. Molecular line tracers of high-mass star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Zsofia

    2013-09-01

    High-mass stars influence their environment in different ways including feedback via their far-UV radiation and mechanical feedback via shocks and stellar winds. The penetration of FUV photons into molecular clouds creates Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) with different chemical layers where the mainly ionized medium changes into mainly molecular. Different chemical layers in PDRs are traced by different species observable at sub-mm and far-infrared wavelengths. In this thesis we present results from two molecular line surveys. One of them is the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Spectral Legacy Survey (SLS) toward the luminous (>10^7 L_Sun), massive (~10^6 M_Sun), and distant (11.4 kpc) star-forming region W49A. The SLS images a 2x2 arcminute field around W49A in the 330-373 GHz frequency range. The detected molecular lines reveal a complex chemistry and the importance of FUV-irradiation and shocks in the heating and chemistry of the region. The other line survey presented in this thesis is part of the HEXOS (Herschel observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources) key program using the Herschel Space Observatory and is toward the nearby (~420 pc) prototypical edge-on Orion Bar PDR and the dense molecular condensation Orion S. Reactive ions, such as CH+, SH+, and CO+, detected as a part of this line survey trace the warm (~500-1000 K) surface region of PDRs. Spectroscopic data from the HIFI and PACS instruments of Herschel give constraints on the chemistry and excitation of reactive ions in these regions.

  20. Molecular line tracers of high-mass star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Zsofia; Van der Tak, Floris; Ossenkopf, Volker; Bergin, Edwin; Black, John; Faure, Alexandre; Fuller, Gary; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goicoechea, Javier; Joblin, Christine; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; Makai, Zoltan; Plume, Rene; Roellig, Markus; Spaans, Marco; Tolls, Volker

    2013-07-01

    High-mass stars influence their environment in different ways including feedback via their FUV radiation. The penetration of FUV photons into molecular clouds creates Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) with different chemical layers where the mainly ionized medium changes into mainly molecular. Different chemical layers in PDRs are traced by different species observable at sub-mm and Far Infrared wavelengths. In this poster we present results from two molecular line surveys. One of them is the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Spectral Legacy Survey (SLS) toward the luminous (>10^7 L_Sun), massive (~10^6 M_Sun), and distant (11.4 kpc) star-forming region W49A. The SLS images a 2x2 arcminute field toward W49A in the 330-373 GHz frequency range. The detected molecular lines reveal a complex chemistry and the importance of FUV-irradiation in the heating and chemistry of the region. The other line survey presented in the poster is part of the HEXOS (Herschel observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources, PI: E. Bergin) key program using the Herschel Space Observatory and is toward the nearby (~420 pc) prototypical edge-on Orion Bar PDR and the dense molecular condensation Orion S. Reactive ions, such as CH+, SH+, and CO+, detected as a part of this line survey trace the warm (~500-1000 K) surface region of PDRs. Spectrally resolved HIFI and spectrally unresolved PACS spectra give constraints on the chemistry and excitation of reactive ions in these regions.

  1. The chemistry of planet-forming regions is not interstellar.

    PubMed

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Blevins, Sandra M

    2014-01-01

    Advances in infrared and submillimeter technology have allowed for detailed observations of the molecular content of the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks. In particular, disks around solar-type stars now have growing molecular inventories that can be directly compared with both prestellar chemistry and that inferred for the early solar nebula. The data directly address the old question of whether the chemistry of planet-forming matter is similar or different and unique relative to the chemistry of dense clouds and protostellar envelopes. The answer to this question may have profound consequences for the structure and composition of planetary systems. The practical challenge is that observations of emission lines from disks do not easily translate into chemical concentrations. Here, we present a two-dimensional radiative transfer model of RNO 90, a classical protoplanetary disk around a solar-mass star, and retrieve the concentrations of dominant molecular carriers of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen in the terrestrial region around 1 AU. We compare our results to the chemical inventory of dense clouds and protostellar envelopes, and argue that inner disk chemistry is, as expected, fundamentally different from prestellar chemistry. We find that the clearest discriminant may be the concentration of CO2, which is extremely low in disks, but one of the most abundant constituents of dense clouds and protostellar envelopes.

  2. HUBBLE'S PANORAMIC PORTRAIT OF A VAST STAR-FORMING REGION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a panoramic portrait of a vast, sculpted landscape of gas and dust where thousands of stars are being born. This fertile star-forming region, called the 30 Doradus Nebula, has a sparkling stellar centerpiece: the most spectacular cluster of massive stars in our cosmic neighborhood of about 25 galaxies. The mosaic picture shows that ultraviolet radiation and high-speed material unleashed by the stars in the cluster, called R136 [the large blue blob left of center], are weaving a tapestry of creation and destruction, triggering the collapse of looming gas and dust clouds and forming pillar-like structures that are incubators for nascent stars. The photo offers an unprecedented, detailed view of the entire inner region of 30 Doradus, measuring 200 light-years wide by 150 light-years high. The nebula resides in the Large Magellanic Cloud (a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way), 170,000 light-years from Earth. Nebulas like 30 Doradus are the 'signposts' of recent star birth. High-energy ultraviolet radiation from the young, hot, massive stars in R136 causes the surrounding gaseous material to glow. Previous Hubble telescope observations showed that R136 contains several dozen of the most massive stars known, each about 100 times the mass of the Sun and about 10 times as hot. These stellar behemoths all formed at the same time about 2 million years ago. The stars in R136 are producing intense 'stellar winds' (streams of material traveling at several million miles an hour), which are wreaking havoc on the gas and dust in the surrounding neighborhood. The winds are pushing the gas away from the cluster and compressing the inner regions of the surrounding gas and dust clouds [the pinkish material]. The intense pressure is triggering the collapse of parts of the clouds, producing a new generation of star formation around the central cluster. The new stellar nursery is about 30 to 50 light-years from R136. Most of the stars in the

  3. 76 FR 61725 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form; (Form DHS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ..., Case Assistance Form; (Form DHS-7001), Online Ombudsman Form DHS-7001 AGENCY: Office of the Citizenship... System'' to ``Online Ombudsman Form DHS-7001''. The instructions have been updated to reflect the... Services Ombudsman--001 Virtual Ombudsman System (March 2010) to reflect the name change to Online...

  4. Outflow and Infall in Star-forming Region L1221

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2005-10-01

    We have mapped the 3.3 mm continuum, CO, HCO+, N2H+, and CS emission around a nearby Class I source, IRAS 22266+6845, in the L1221 cometary dark cloud. L1221 is a complicated star-forming region. It hosts three infrared sources: a close binary consisting of an east source and a west source around the IRAS source position and a southeast source ~45" to the southeast (T. Bourke 2004, private communication). The east source is identified as the IRAS source. Continuum emission is seen around the east and southeast sources, probably tracing the dust around them. No continuum emission is seen toward the west source, probably indicating that there is not much dust there. An east-west molecular outflow is seen in CO, HCO+, and CS originated from around the binary. It is bipolar with an east lobe and a west lobe, both appearing as a wide-opening outflow shell originated from around the binary. It is likely powered by the east source, which shows a southeast extension along the outflow axis in the K' image. A ringlike envelope is seen in N2H+ around the binary surrounding the outflow waist. It is tilted with the major axis perpendicular to the outflow axis. The kinematics is well reproduced by a thin-disk model with both infall and rotation, and a column density peak in a ring. The ringlike envelope is not rotationally supported, as the rotation velocity is smaller than the infall velocity.

  5. Four Brown Dwarfs in the Taurus Star-Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, E. L.; Dougados, C.; Magnier, E.; Ménard, F.; Magazzù, A.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Delfosse, X.

    2001-11-01

    We have identified four brown dwarfs in the Taurus star-forming region. They were first selected from R and I CCD photometry of 2.29 deg2 obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Subsequently, they were recovered in the Two Micron All Sky Survey second incremental data release point source catalog. Low-resolution optical spectra obtained at the William Herschel Telescope allow us to derive spectral types in the range M7-M9. One of the brown dwarfs has very strong Hα emission (EW=-340 Å). It also displays Brγ emission in an infrared spectrum obtained with the Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope, suggesting that it is accreting matter from a disk. The K I resonance doublet and the Na I subordinate doublet at 818.3 and 819.5 nm in these Taurus objects are weaker than in field dwarfs of similar spectral type, consistent with low surface gravities as expected for young brown dwarfs. Two of the objects are cooler and fainter than GG Tau Bb, the lowest mass known member of the Taurus association. We estimate masses of only 0.03 Msolar for them. The spatial distribution of brown dwarfs in Taurus hints at a possible anticorrelation between the density of stars and the density of brown dwarfs. Based on data collected at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  6. Evolution of high-mass star-forming regions .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, A.; Leurini, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Urquhart, J.; König, C.; Csengeri, T.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.

    Observational identification of a coherent evolutionary sequence for high-mass star-forming regions is still missing. We use the progressive heating of the gas caused by the feedback of high-mass young stellar objects to prove the statistical validity of the most common schemes used to observationally define an evolutionary sequence for high-mass clumps, and identify which physical process dominates in the different phases. From the spectroscopic follow-ups carried out towards the TOP100 sample between 84 and 365 km s^-1 giga hertz, we selected several multiplets of CH3CN, CH3CCH, and CH3OH lines to derive the physical properties of the gas in the clumps along the evolutionary sequence. We demonstrate that the evolutionary sequence is statistically valid, and we define intervals in L/M separating the compression, collapse and accretion, and disruption phases. The first hot cores and ZAMS stars appear at L/M≈10usk {L_ȯ}msun-1

  7. Kinked Loop Stretching Between Two Active Regions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-25

    Numerous arches of magnetic field lines danced and swayed above a large active region over about a 30-hour period (July 17-18, 2017). We can also see the magnetic field lines from the large active region reached out and connected with a smaller active region. Those linked lines then strengthened (become brighter), but soon began to develop a kink in them and rather swiftly faded from view. All of this activity is driven by strong magnetic forces associated with the active regions. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21838

  8. Open magnetic fields in active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Solodyna, C. V.; Howard, R.; Levine, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Soft X-ray images and magnetograms of several active regions and coronal holes are examined which support the interpretation that some of the dark X-ray gaps seen between interconnecting loops and inner cores of active regions are foot points of open field lines inside the active regions. Characteristics of the investigated dark gaps are summarized. All the active regions with dark X-ray gaps at the proper place and with the correct polarity predicted by global potential extrapolation of photospheric magnetic fields are shown to be old active regions, indicating that field opening is accomplished only in a late phase of active-region development. It is noted that some of the observed dark gaps probably have nothing in common with open fields, but are either due to the decreased temperature in low-lying portions of interconnecting loops or are the roots of higher and less dense or cooler loops.

  9. The Main Sequence of Explosive Solar Active Regions: Comparison of Emerging and Mature Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For mature active regions, an active region s magnetic flux content determines the maximum free energy the active region can have. Most Large flares and CMEs occur in active regions that are near their free-energy limit. Active-region flare power radiated in the GOES 1-8 band increases steeply as the free-energy limit is approached. We infer that the free-energy limit is set by the rate of release of an active region s free magnetic energy by flares, CMEs and coronal heating balancing the maximum rate the Sun can put free energy into the active region s magnetic field. This balance of maximum power results in explosive active regions residing in a "mainsequence" in active-region (flux content, free energy content) phase space, which sequence is analogous to the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) phase space.

  10. The Twist Limit for Bipolar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Gary, Allen

    2008-01-01

    We present new evidence that further supports the standard idea that active regions are emerged magnetic-flux-rope omega loops. When the axial magnetic twist of a cylindrical flux rope exceeds a critical amount, the flux rope becomes unstable to kinking, and the excess axial twist is converted into writhe twist by the kinking. This suggests that, if active regions are emerged omega loops, then (1) no active region should have magnetic twist much above the limit set by kinking, (2) active regions having twist near the limit should often arise from kinked omega loops, and (3) since active regions having large delta sunspots are outstandingly twisted, these arise from kinked omega loops and should have twist near the limit for kinking. From each of 36 vector magnetograms of bipolar active regions, we have measured (1) the total flux of the vertical field above 100 G, (2) the area covered by this flux, and (3) the net electric current that arches over the polarity inversion line. These three quantities yield an estimate of the axial magnetic twist in a simple model cylindrical flux rope that corresponds to the top of the active region s hypothetical omega loop prior to emergence. In all 36 cases, the estimated twist is below the critical limit for kinking. The 11 most twisted active regions (1) have estimated twist within a factor of approx.3 of the limit, and (2) include all of our 6 active regions having large delta sunspots. Thus, our observed twist limit for bipolar active regions is in good accord with active regions being emerged omega loops.

  11. Depth of origin of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1984-01-01

    Observations show that the individual bipolar magnetic regions on the sun remain confined during their decay phase, with much of the magnetic field pulling back under the surface, in reverse of the earlier emergence. This suggests that the magnetic field is held on a short rein by subsurface forces, for otherwise the region would decay entirely by dispersing across the face of the sun. With the simple assumption that the fields at the surface are controlled from well-defined anchor points at a depth h, it is possible to relate the length l of the bipolar region at the surface to the depth h, with h about equal to l. The observed dimensions l about equal to 100,000 km for normal active regions, and l about equal to 10,000 km for the ephemeral active regions, indicate comparable depths of origin. More detailed observational studies of the active regions may be expected to shed further light on the problem.

  12. NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IS MORE PREVALENT IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.

    2013-07-01

    We explore the question of whether low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially found in galaxies that are undergoing a transition from active star formation (SF) to quiescence. This notion has been suggested by studies of the UV-optical colors of AGN hosts, which find them to be common among galaxies in the so-called Green Valley, a region of galaxy color space believed to be composed mostly of galaxies undergoing SF quenching. Combining the deepest current X-ray and Herschel/PACS far-infrared (FIR) observations of the two Chandra Deep Fields with redshifts, stellar masses, and rest-frame photometry derived from themore » extensive and uniform multi-wavelength data in these fields, we compare the rest-frame U - V color distributions and star formation rate distributions of AGNs and carefully constructed samples of inactive control galaxies. The UV-to-optical colors of AGNs are consistent with equally massive inactive galaxies at redshifts out to z {approx} 2, but we show that such colors are poor tracers of SF. While the FIR distributions of both star-forming AGNs and star-forming inactive galaxies are statistically similar, we show that AGNs are preferentially found in star-forming host galaxies, or, in other words, AGNs are less likely to be found in weakly star-forming or quenched galaxies. We postulate that, among X-ray-selected AGNs of low and moderate accretion luminosities, the supply of cold gas primarily determines the accretion rate distribution of the nuclear black holes.« less

  13. Gemini Spectroscopic Survey of Young Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael; Kobulnicky, Henry

    2018-01-01

    The majority of stars form in embedded clusters. Current research into star formation has focused on either high-mass star-forming regions or low-mass star-forming regions. We present the results from a Gemini spectroscopic survey of young intermediate-mass star-forming regions. These are star forming regions selected to produce stars up to but not exceeding 8 solar masses. We obtained spectra of these regions with GNIRS on Gemini North and Flamingos-2 on Gemini South. We also combine this with near-infrared imaging from 2MASS, UKIDSS, and VVV to study the stellar content.

  14. Millimeter wavelength observations of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    Polarization properties of active regions at 9 mm are discussed, and the observed degree of polarization is used to obtain an estimate of chromospheric magnetic fields. Also discussed is the polarization structure at 9 mm of an active region that produced a minor flare around 1900 UT on September 28, 1971. Total power observations indicate that new regions develop, or weak regions intensify at millimeter wavelengths as a result of bursts at distant sites. The spectra of the peak flux density of moderately strong bursts observed at 9 mm show a sharp drop toward the shorter millimeter wavelengths. The weak bursts at 3.5 mm are manifest mainly as heating phenomena.

  15. New far infrared images of bright, nearby, star-forming regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, D. AL, Jr.; Cole, David M.; Dowell, C. Darren; Lees, Joanna F.; Lowenstein, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    Broadband imaging in the far infrared is a vital tool for understanding how young stars form, evolve, and interact with their environment. As the sensitivity and size of detector arrays has increased, a richer and more detailed picture has emerged of the nearest and brightest regions of active star formation. We present data on M 17, M 42, and S 106 taken recently on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory with the Yerkes Observatory 60-channel far infrared camera, which has pixel sizes of 17 in. at 60 microns, 27 in. at 100 microns, and 45 in. at 160 and 200 microns. In addition to providing a clearer view of the complex central cores of the regions, the images reveal new details of the structure and heating of ionization fronts and photodissociation zones where radiation form luminous stars interacts with adjacent molecular clouds.

  16. Molecular line study of massive star-forming regions from the Red MSX Source survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Naiping; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we have selected a sample of massive star-forming regions from the Red MSX Source survey, in order to study star formation activities (mainly outflow and inflow signatures). We have focused on three molecular lines from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team Survey at 90 GHz: HCO+(1-0), H13CO+(1-0) and SiO(2-1). According to previous observations, our sources can be divided into two groups: nine massive young stellar object candidates (radio-quiet) and 10 H II regions (which have spherical or unresolved radio emissions). Outflow activities have been found in 11 sources, while only three show inflow signatures in all. The high outflow detection rate means that outflows are common in massive star-forming regions. The inflow detection rate was relatively low. We suggest that this was because of the beam dilution of the telescope. All three inflow candidates have outflow(s). The outward radiation and thermal pressure from the central massive star(s) do not seem to be strong enough to halt accretion in G345.0034-00.2240. Our simple model of G318.9480-00.1969 shows that it has an infall velocity of about 1.8 km s-1. The spectral energy distribution analysis agrees our sources are massive and intermediate-massive star formation regions.

  17. Distances, Kinematics, And Structure Of Nearby Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounkel, Marina

    2017-08-01

    In this thesis I present an analysis of the structure and kinematics of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex in an effort to better characterize the dynamical state of the closest region of the ongoing massive star formation and to provide a baseline for comparison of the upcoming results from the Gaia space telescope. In order to achieve this goal, I measured stellar parallax and proper motions, using very large baseline radio interferometry of non-thermally-emitting sources.. Based on these observations I measured the average distance in Orion A molecular cloud of 388±5 pc toward the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), 428±10 pc toward the southern portion of L1641, as well as the distance in Orion B of 388±10 pc toward NGC 2068, and roughly ˜420 pc toward NGC 2024. These are the first direct distance measurements with < 5% uncertainty to the regions within the Orion Complex outside of the ONC. Little can be said about the proper motions due to the sparcity of the sample size; however, I identified a number of binary systems and fitted their orbital motion, which allows for the direct measurement of the masses of the individual components. I also identified three stars that have been ejected from the ONC due to the gravitational interactions with its most massive stars.I complemented the parallax and proper motion measurements with the observations of radial velocities (RV) of the stars toward the Orion Complex, probing the histories of both dynamic evolution and star formation in the region. I found that in the Orion A cloud and in NGC 2024 there exists an asymmetry between the stellar RVs and those of the molecular gas, with a small fraction of the stars stars being preferentially blueshifted relative to the gas. Several possible explanations for this have been proposed, although presently there is not yet a definitive solution. I also analyzed the multiplicity fraction of the spectroscopic binaries in the ONC, and found that it is largely consistent to what is

  18. The Physics of Molecular Shocks in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Molecular shocks are produced by the impact of the supersonic infall of gas and dust onto protostars and by the interaction of the supersonic outflow from the protostar with the circumstellar material. Infalling gas creates an accretion shock around the circumstellar disk which emits a unique infrared spectrum and which processes the interstellar dust as it enters the disk. The winds and jets from protostars also impact the disk, the infalling material, and the ambient molecular cloud core creating shocks whose spectrum and morphology diagnose the mass loss processes of the protostar and the orientation and structure of the star forming system. We discuss the physics of these shocks, the model spectra derived from theoretical models, and comparisons with observations of H2O masers, H2 emission, as well as other shocks tracers. We show the strong effect of magnetic fields on molecular shock structure, and elucidate the chemical changes induced by the shock heating and compression.

  19. Molecular Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium and Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.

    1996-03-01

    Selected examples of the use of observationally inferred molecular level populations and chemical compositions in the diagnosis of interstellar sources and processes important in them (and in other diffuse astrophysical sources) are given. The sources considered include the interclump medium of a giant molecular cloud, dark cores which are the progenitors of star formation, material responding to recent star formation and which may form further stars, and stellar ejecta (including those of supernovae) about to merge with the interstellar medium. The measurement of the microwave background, mixing of material between different nuclear burning zones in evolved stars and turbulent boundary layers (which are present in and influence the structures and evolution of all diffuse astrophysical sources) are treated.

  20. New Active Region Sputtering with Small Flares

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-29

    An active region rotated into view and sputtered with numerous small flares and towering magnetic field lines that stretched out many times the diameter of Earth (May 23-25, 2018). Active regions are areas of intense magnetic energy. The field lines are illuminated by charged particles spiraling along them and easiest to discern when viewed in profile. The colorized images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22461

  1. Software Displays Data on Active Regions of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golightly, Mike; Weyland, Mark; Raben, Vern

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System is a computer program that generates, in near real time, a graphical display of parameters indicative of the spatial and temporal variations of activity on the Sun. These parameters include histories and distributions of solar flares, active region growth, coronal mass ejections, size, and magnetic configuration. By presenting solar-activity data in graphical form, this program accelerates, facilitates, and partly automates what had previously been a time-consuming mental process of interpretation of solar-activity data presented in tabular and textual formats. Intended for original use in predicting space weather in order to minimize the exposure of astronauts to ionizing radiation, the program might also be useful on Earth for predicting solar-wind-induced ionospheric effects, electric currents, and potentials that could affect radio-communication systems, navigation systems, pipelines, and long electric-power lines. Raw data for the display are obtained automatically from the Space Environment Center (SEC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Other data must be obtained from the NOAA SEC by verbal communication and entered manually. The Solar Active Region Display System automatically accounts for the latitude dependence of the rate of rotation of the Sun, by use of a mathematical model that is corrected with NOAA SEC active-region position data once every 24 hours. The display includes the date, time, and an image of the Sun in H light overlaid with latitude and longitude coordinate lines, dots that mark locations of active regions identified by NOAA, identifying numbers assigned by NOAA to such regions, and solar-region visual summary (SRVS) indicators associated with some of the active regions. Each SRVS indicator is a small pie chart containing five equal sectors, each of which is color-coded to provide a semiquantitative indication of the degree of hazard posed by one aspect of the activity at

  2. The quest for infall in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2018-06-01

    Observation of infall is key to our understanding of the accretion process in star formation. High-resolution spectroscopy allows us to resolve molecular lines originating from the dense molecular envelopes of the forming (proto-) stars to deduce the kinematics of the gas. In this contribution, I'll describe how SOFIA can significantly contribute to the quest for and characterisation of infall by providing unique access to molecular lines at THz frequencies that allow red-shifted absorption studies as direct probe of infall and that provide access to fine structure and high excitation lines that probe outflowing gas as indirect evidence for accretion. In particular, I will report on a recent study using the GREAT high-spectral resolution instrument on-board of SOFIA to observe ammonia at 1.8 THz. Eight out of eleven observed massive clumps have been found with red-shifted absorption that is indicative of infall motions. This fraction of 72% is substantially higher than that found in past searches for the blue-skewed profile signature. The observations show that infall on clump scales is ubiquitous through a wide range of evolutionary stages.

  3. Active Region Formation and Subsurface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, F.; Nordlund, Robert A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from emerging magnetic flux simulations showing how several different active regions form and their very different subsurface structures. The simulations assumed an infinite sheet of uniform, untwisted, horizontal field advected into the computational domain by inflows at a depth of 20 Mm. Results from two different horizontal field strengths, 1 and 5 kG, will be presented. Convective up and down flows buckle the horizontal field into Omega and U loops. Upflows and magnetic buoyancy carry the field toward the surface, while fast downflows pin down the field. Small (granular) convective motions, near the surface, shred the emerging field into fine filaments that emerge as the observed "pepper and salt" pattern. The large (supergranular) motions, at depth, keep the overall loop structure intact, so that as the overall omega-loop emerges through the surface the opposite polarity fields counter-stream into large unipolar flux concentrations producing first pores which then coalesce into spots. These tend to be located over the supergranular downflow lanes near the bottom of the domain. The pores and spots exhibit a great variety of subsurface field structures - from monolithic but twisted bundles to intertwined separate spaghetti sturctures. We will show movies of the surface evolution of the field and emergent continuum intensity and of the subsurface evolution of the magnetic field lines.

  4. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2017-09-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  5. Tribal Minor NSR Synthetic Minor Limit Application Form in EPA's South Central Region

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Tribal Minor NSR application form should be used to notify the EPA Region 6 Tribal NSR Permitting Program of requested synthetic minor emission limits associated with a new source general application form.

  6. The Smad3 linker region contains a transcriptional activation domain

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smads regulate a wide variety of biological responses through transcriptional regulation of target genes. Smad3 plays a key role in TGF-β/Smad-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we show that the proline-rich linker region of Smad3 contains a transcriptional activation domain. When the linker region is fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, it activates transcription. We show that the linker region physically interacts with p300. The adenovirus E1a protein, which binds to p300, inhibits the transcriptional activity of the linker region, and overexpression of p300 can rescue the linker-mediated transcriptional activation. In contrast, an adenovirus E1a mutant, which cannot bind to p300, does not inhibit the linker-mediated transcription. The native Smad3 protein lacking the linker region is unable to mediate TGF-β transcriptional activation responses, although it can be phosphorylated by the TGF-β receptor at the C-terminal tail and has a significantly increased ability to form a heteromeric complex with Smad4. We show further that the linker region and the C-terminal domain of Smad3 synergize for transcriptional activation in the presence of TGF-β. Thus our findings uncover an important function of the Smad3 linker region in Smad-mediated transcriptional control. PMID:15588252

  7. The Smad3 linker region contains a transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Long, Jianyin; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2005-02-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/Smads regulate a wide variety of biological responses through transcriptional regulation of target genes. Smad3 plays a key role in TGF-beta/Smad-mediated transcriptional responses. Here, we show that the proline-rich linker region of Smad3 contains a transcriptional activation domain. When the linker region is fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, it activates transcription. We show that the linker region physically interacts with p300. The adenovirus E1a protein, which binds to p300, inhibits the transcriptional activity of the linker region, and overexpression of p300 can rescue the linker-mediated transcriptional activation. In contrast, an adenovirus E1a mutant, which cannot bind to p300, does not inhibit the linker-mediated transcription. The native Smad3 protein lacking the linker region is unable to mediate TGF-beta transcriptional activation responses, although it can be phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the C-terminal tail and has a significantly increased ability to form a heteromeric complex with Smad4. We show further that the linker region and the C-terminal domain of Smad3 synergize for transcriptional activation in the presence of TGF-beta. Thus our findings uncover an important function of the Smad3 linker region in Smad-mediated transcriptional control.

  8. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  9. Complex organic molecules toward low-mass and high-mass star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bergin, E.; Carvajal, M.; Brouillet, N.; Despois, D.; Jørgensen, J.; Kleiner, I.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important questions in molecular astrophysics is how, when, and where complex organic molecules, COMs (≥ 6 atoms) are formed. In the Interstellar-Earth connection context, could this have a bearing on the origin of life on Earth? Formation mechanisms of COMs, which include potentially prebiotic molecules, are still debated and may include grain-mantle and/or gas-phase chemistry. Understanding the mechanisms that lead to the interstellar molecular complexification, along with the involved physicochemical processes, is mandatory to answer the above questions. In that context, active researches are ongoing in theory, laboratory experiment, chemical modeling and observations. Thanks to recent progress in radioastronomy instrumentation for both single-dish and millimeter array (e.g. Herschel, NOEMA, ALMA), new results have been obtained. I will review some notable results on the detection of COMs, including prebiotic molecules, towards star forming regions.

  10. Active Region Coming Around the Bend

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-23

    A good-sized active region with bright, towering arches began to rotate into view (Apr. 18-19, 2018). The arches consist of charged particles spiraling along magnetic field lines revealed in this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. They rise up above the sun's surface many times the size of Earth. The video covers just 16 hours of activity. We will keep our eyes on this region to see if it has the kind of dynamism to produce solar storms. Videos are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22430

  11. New Forms of Student Activism: Lobbying, Trusteeing, and Collective Bargaining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeler, Kent D.

    1979-01-01

    This article focuses on three new forms of student activism: lobbying, trusteeing, and collective bargaining. Related aspects of student involvement in the political, legal, and consumer areas are discussed briefly. (Author)

  12. Recurrent flares in active region NOAA 11283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Berrilli, F.; Bruno, R.; Carbone, V.; Consolini, G.; de Lauretis, M.; Del Moro, D.; Elmhamdi, A.; Ermolli, I.; Fineschi, S.; Francia, P.; Kordi, A. S.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Laurenza, M.; Lepreti, F.; Marcucci, M. F.; Pallocchia, G.; Pietropaolo, E.; Romoli, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vellante, M.; Villante, U.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are solar phenomena that are not yet fully understood. Several investigations have been performed to single out their related physical parameters that can be used as indices of the magnetic complexity leading to their occurrence. Aims: In order to shed light on the occurrence of recurrent flares and subsequent associated CMEs, we studied the active region NOAA 11283 where recurrent M and X GOES-class flares and CMEs occurred. Methods: We use vector magnetograms taken by HMI/SDO to calculate the horizontal velocity fields of the photospheric magnetic structures, the shear and the dip angles of the magnetic field, the magnetic helicity flux distribution, and the Poynting fluxes across the photosphere due to the emergence and the shearing of the magnetic field. Results: Although we do not observe consistent emerging magnetic flux through the photosphere during the observation time interval, we detected a monotonic increase of the magnetic helicity accumulated in the corona. We found that both the shear and the dip angles have high values along the main polarity inversion line (PIL) before and after all the events. We also note that before the main flare of X2.1 GOES class, the shearing motions seem to inject a more significant energy than the energy injected by the emergence of the magnetic field. Conclusions: We conclude that the very long duration (about 4 days) of the horizontal displacement of the main photospheric magnetic structures along the PIL has a primary role in the energy release during the recurrent flares. This peculiar horizontal velocity field also contributes to the monotonic injection of magnetic helicity into the corona. This process, coupled with the high shear and dip angles along the main PIL, appears to be responsible for the consecutive events of loss of equilibrium leading to the recurrent flares and CMEs. A movie associated to Fig. 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Local Helioseismology of Emerging Active Regions: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Zhao, Junwei; Ilonidis, Stathis

    2018-04-01

    Local helioseismology provides a unique opportunity to investigate the subsurface structure and dynamics of active regions and their effect on the large-scale flows and global circulation of the Sun. We use measurements of plasma flows in the upper convection zone, provided by the Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline developed for analysis of solar oscillation data obtained by Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), to investigate the subsurface dynamics of emerging active region NOAA 11726. The active region emergence was detected in deep layers of the convection zone about 12 hours before the first bipolar magnetic structure appeared on the surface, and 2 days before the emergence of most of the magnetic flux. The speed of emergence determined by tracking the flow divergence with depth is about 1.4 km/s, very close to the emergence speed in the deep layers. As the emerging magnetic flux becomes concentrated in sunspots local converging flows are observed beneath the forming sunspots. These flows are most prominent in the depth range 1-3 Mm, and remain converging after the formation process is completed. On the larger scale converging flows around active region appear as a diversion of the zonal shearing flows towards the active region, accompanied by formation of a large-scale vortex structure. This process occurs when a substantial amount of the magnetic flux emerged on the surface, and the converging flow pattern remains stable during the following evolution of the active region. The Carrington synoptic flow maps show that the large-scale subsurface inflows are typical for active regions. In the deeper layers (10-13 Mm) the flows become diverging, and surprisingly strong beneath some active regions. In addition, the synoptic maps reveal a complex evolving pattern of large-scale flows on the scale much larger than supergranulation

  14. Asia Section. Regional Activities Division. Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Two papers on library and information activities in developing nations, particularly in India and other Asian countries, were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "IFLA in Asia: A Review of the Work of the Regional Section for Asia," Edward Lim Huck Tee (Malaysia) describes the low…

  15. Neogene-Quaternary Volcanic forms in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexa, Jaroslav; Seghedi, Ioan; Németh, Karoly; Szakács, Alexandru; Koneĉny, Vlastimil; Pécskay, Zoltan; Fülöp, Alexandrina; Kovacs, Marinel

    2010-09-01

    Neogene to Quaternary volcanic/magmatic activity in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region (CPR) occurred between 21 and 0.1 Ma with a distinct migration in time from west to east. It shows a diverse compositional variation in response to a complex interplay of subduction with rollback, back-arc extension, collision, slab break-off, delamination, strike-slip tectonics and microplate rotations, as well as in response to further evolution of magmas in the crustal environment by processes of differentiation, crustal contamination, anatexis and magma mixing. Since most of the primary volcanic forms have been affected by erosion, especially in areas of post-volcanic uplift, based on the level of erosion we distinguish: (1) areas eroded to the basement level, where paleovolcanic reconstruction is not possible; (2) deeply eroded volcanic forms with secondary morphology and possible paleovolcanic reconstruction; (3) eroded volcanic forms with remnants of original morphology preserved; and (4) the least eroded volcanic forms with original morphology quite well preserved. The large variety of volcanic forms present in the area can be grouped in a) monogenetic volcanoes and b) polygenetic volcanoes and their subsurface/intrusive counterparts that belong to various rock series found in the CPR such as calc-alkaline magmatic rock-types (felsic, intermediate and mafic varieties) and alkalic types including K-alkalic, shoshonitic, ultrapotassic and Na-alkalic. The following volcanic/subvolcanic forms have been identified: (i) domes, shield volcanoes, effusive cones, pyroclastic cones, stratovolcanoes and calderas with associated intrusive bodies for intermediate and basic calclkaline volcanism; (ii) domes, calderas and ignimbrite/ash-flow fields for felsic calc-alkaline volcanism and (iii) dome flows, shield volcanoes, maars, tuffcone/tuff-rings, scoria-cones with or without related lava flow/field and their erosional or subsurface forms (necks/ plugs, dykes, shallow intrusions

  16. Thoughts on the development of active regional public health systems.

    PubMed

    Reis, Ademar Arthur Chioro Dos; Sóter, Ana Paula Menezes; Furtado, Lumena Almeida Castro; Pereira, Silvana Souza da Silva

    2017-04-01

    Decentralization and regionalization are strategic themes for reforms in the health system. This paper analyzes the complex process of health regionalization being developed in Brazil. This paper identifies that the normative framework from the Brazilian National Health System, SUS has made advances with respect to its institutionalization and overcoming the initial centrality involved in municipalization. This has strengthened the development of regionalization and the intergovernmental agreement on health but the evidence points to the need to promote a revision. Based on document analysis, literature review and the views given by the authors involved in management in SUS as well as generating radically different views, the challenges for the construction of a regionalization that is active, is debated. We also discuss: its relations with planning and the dimensioning of service networks, the production of active care networks and shared management spaces, the inter-federative agreements and regional regulations, the capacity to coordinate regional systems and financing and the impact of the political dimension and electoral cycles. Regionalization (and SUS itself) is an open book, therefore ways and possibilities on how to maintain an active form of regionalization can be recommended.

  17. Earthquake Activity in the North Greenland Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Tine B.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Voss, Peter H.

    2017-04-01

    Many local and regional earthquakes are recorded on a daily basis in northern Greenland. The majority of the earthquakes originate at the Arctic plate boundary between the Eurasian and the North American plates. Particularly active regions away from the plate boundary are found in NE Greenland and in northern Baffin Bay. The seismograph coverage in the region is sparse with the main seismograph stations located at the military outpost, Stations Nord (NOR), the weather station outpost Danmarkshavn (DAG), Thule Airbase (TULEG), and the former ice core drilling camp (NEEM) in the middle of the Greenland ice sheet. Furthermore, data is available from Alert (ALE), Resolute (RES), and other seismographs in northern Canada as well as from a temporary deployment of BroadBand seismographs along the north coast of Greenland from 2004 to 2007. The recorded earthquakes range in magnitude from less than 2 to a 4.8 event, the largest in NE Greenland, and a 5.7 event, the largest recorded in northern Baffin Bay. The larger events are recorded widely in the region allowing for focal mechanisms to be calculated. Only a few existing focal mechanisms for the region can be found in the ISC bulletin. Two in NE Greenland representing primarily normal faulting and one in Baffin Bay resulting from reverse faulting. New calculations of focal mechanisms for the region will be presented as well as improved hypocenters resulting from analysis involving temporary stations and regional stations that are not included in routine processing.

  18. 77 FR 67792 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Permit Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Permit Family of Forms AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... offered in the Northeast region. Exemption programs may allow a vessel to fish in an area that is limited.... Vessels are also required to request gillnet and lobster tags through the Northeast region permit office...

  19. 76 FR 27077 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR, Extension of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR- 11SR, Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection under Review: Form AR- 11 and Form AR-11SR, Alien... evaluating whether to revise the Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR (Forms AR-11). Should USCIS decide to revise...

  20. Form-Focused Discovery Activities in English Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogeyik, Muhlise Cosgun

    2011-01-01

    Form-focused discovery activities allow language learners to grasp various aspects of a target language by contributing implicit knowledge by using discovered explicit knowledge. Moreover, such activities can assist learners to perceive and discover the features of their language input. In foreign language teaching environments, they can be used…

  1. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  2. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  3. The Structure of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, A.; Bastian, T. S.

    1992-05-01

    In past years, x-ray observations of solar active regions have lead to the expectation of greater brightness temperatures at radio wavelengths than those typically observed. It has been suggested that cool plasma in the corona along the line of sight attenuates radio emission via free-free absorption. If such plasma is present, it has consequences for both the microwave spectrum and its polarization properties. In order to test these ideas, high quality radio and x-ray maps are required. We present a comprehensive set of observations of a large solar active region (NOAO/USAF number 5131) made during the IAU sanctioned International Solar Month in September, 1988. The VLA was used to image the Sun in the 90, 20, 6 and 3.6 cm bands between 1--4 September. To improve the image quality we used the technique of frequency synthesis at 3.6, 6 and 20 cm. The final maps are among the best in dynamic range yet obtained. In addition to the radio maps, the data base includes images from the SMM XRP in Fe XVII, magnetograms, and Hα observations. We reconcile the x-ray and radio observations with a simple model which differs somewhat from past models. Rather than relying on a screen of cool plasma between the source and the observer, we take explicit account of the highly inhomogeneous structure of solar active regions. We briefly compare and contrast the consequences of this model with existing models.

  4. A NEAR-INFRARED STUDY OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION RCW 34

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Walt, D. J.; De Villiers, H. M.; Czanik, R. J.

    2012-07-15

    We report the results of a near-infrared imaging study of a 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 7.8 arcmin{sup 2} region centered on the 6.7 GHz methanol maser associated with the RCW 34 star-forming region using the 1.4 m IRSF telescope at Sutherland. A total of 1283 objects were detected simultaneously in J, H, and K for an exposure time of 10,800 s. The J - H, H - K two-color diagram revealed a strong concentration of more than 700 objects with colors similar to what is expected of reddened classical T Tauri stars. The distribution of the objects on the K versus Jmore » - K color-magnitude diagram is also suggestive that a significant fraction of the 1283 objects is made up of lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. We also present the luminosity function for the subset of about 700 pre-main-sequence stars and show that it suggests ongoing star formation activity for about 10{sup 7} years. An examination of the spatial distribution of the pre-main-sequence stars shows that the fainter (older) part of the population is more dispersed over the observed region and the brighter (younger) subset is more concentrated around the position of the O8.5V star. This suggests that the physical effects of the O8.5V star and the two early B-type stars on the remainder of the cloud out of which they formed could have played a role in the onset of the more recent episode of star formation in RCW 34.« less

  5. 76 FR 17839 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Permit Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Permit Family of Forms AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to...

  6. 78 FR 10600 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region Logbook Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region Logbook Family of Forms AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its...

  7. The Role of Grain Surface Reactions in the Chemistry of Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Roberge, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    The importance of reactions at the surfaces of dust grains has long been recognized to be one of the two main chemical processes that form molecules in cold, dark interstellar clouds where simple, saturated (fully-hydrogenated) molecules such as H2 water, methanol, H2CO, H2S, ammonia and CH4 are present in quantities far too high to be consistent with their extremely low gas phase formation rates. In cold dark regions of interstellar space, dust grains provide a substrate onto which gas-phase species can accrete and react. Grains provide a "third body" or a sink for the energy released in the exothermic reactions that form chemical bonds. In essence, the surfaces of dust grains open up alternative reaction pathways to form observed molecules whose abundances cannot be explained with gas-phase chemistry alone. This concept is taken one step further in this work: instead of merely acting as a substrate onto which radicals and molecules may physically adsorb, some grains may actively participate in the reaction itself, forming chemical bonds with the accreting species. Until recently, surface chemical reactions had not been thought to be important in warm circumstellar media because adspecies rapidly desorb from grains at very low temperatures; thus, the residence times of molecules and radicals on the surface of grains at all but the lowest temperatures are far too short to allow these reactions to occur. However, if the adspecies could adsorb more strongly, via a true chemical bond with surfaces of some dust grains, then grain surface reactions will play an important role in warm circumstellar regions as well. In this work, the surface-catalyzed reaction CO + 3 H2 yields CH4 + H2O is studied in the context that it may be very effective at converting the inorganic molecule CO into the simplest organic compound, methane. H2 and CO are the most abundant molecules in space, and the reaction converting them to methane, while kinetically inhibited in the gas phase under

  8. Pore-forming activity of clostridial binary toxins.

    PubMed

    Knapp, O; Benz, R; Popoff, M R

    2016-03-01

    Clostridial binary toxins (Clostridium perfringens Iota toxin, Clostridium difficile transferase, Clostridium spiroforme toxin, Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin) as Bacillus binary toxins, including Bacillus anthracis toxins consist of two independent proteins, one being the binding component which mediates the internalization into cell of the intracellularly active component. Clostridial binary toxins induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin and are responsible for enteric diseases. Clostridial and Bacillus binary toxins share structurally and functionally related binding components which recognize specific cell receptors, oligomerize, form pores in endocytic vesicle membrane, and mediate the transport of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Binding components retain the global structure of pore-forming toxins (PFTs) from the cholesterol-dependent cytotoxin family such as perfringolysin. However, their pore-forming activity notably that of clostridial binding components is more related to that of heptameric PFT family including aerolysin and C. perfringens epsilon toxin. This review focuses upon pore-forming activity of clostridial binary toxins compared to other related PFTs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Development of hospital-substituting forms of medical care in the Samara region].

    PubMed

    Galkin, R A; Pavlov, V V; Kuznetsov, S I

    2000-01-01

    Development of hospital-substituting forms of medical care in the Samara region is discussed, 13% of patients treated at hospitals were rendered medical care through hospital-substituting institutions, which resulted in economy of 137 million roubles. The authors make their suggestions on optimizing statistical forms of files and records to be used in registration of medical care at day-time hospitals.

  10. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferredmore » in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.« less

  11. Exoplanet Transits of Stellar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampapa, Mark S.; Andretta, Vincenzo; Covino, Elvira; Reiners, Ansgar; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2018-01-01

    We report preliminary results of a program to obtain high spectral- and temporal-resolution observations of the neutral helium triplet line at 1083.0 nm in transiting exoplanet systems. The principal objective of our program is to gain insight on the properties of active regions, analogous to solar plages, on late-type dwarfs by essentially using exoplanet transits as high spatial resolution probes of the stellar surface within the transit chord. The 1083 nm helium line is a particularly appropriate diagnostic of magnetized areas since it is weak in the quiet photosphere of solar-type stars but appears strongly in absorption in active regions. Therefore, during an exoplanet transit over the stellar surface, variations in its absorption equivalent width can arise that are functions of the intrinsic strength of the feature in the active region and the known relative size of the exoplanet. We utilized the Galileo Telescope and the GIANO-B near-IR echelle spectrograph to obtain 1083 nm spectra during transits in bright, well-known systems that include HD 189733, HD 209458, and HD 147506 (HAT-P-2). We also obtained simultaneous auxiliary data on the same telescope with the HARPS-N UV-Visible echelle spectrograph. We will present preliminary results from our analysis of the observed variability of the strength of the He I 1083 nm line during transits.Acknowledgements: Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. The NSO is operated by AURA under a cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  12. The evolution of active region loop plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krall, K. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    The adjustment of coronal active-region loops to changes in their heating rate is investigated numerically. The one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations are solved subject to boundary conditions in which heat flux-induced mass exchange between coronal and chromospheric components is allowed. The calculated evolution of physical parameters suggests that (1) mass supplied during chromospheric evaporation is much more effective in moderating coronal temperature excursions than when downward heat flux is dissipated by a static chromosphere, and (2) the method by which the chromosphere responds to changing coronal conditions can significantly influence coronal readjustment time scales. Observations are cited which illustrate the range of possible fluctuations in the heating rates.

  13. An X-shooter survey of star forming regions: Low-mass stars and sub-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, J. M.; Stelzer, B.; Covino, E.; Cupani, G.; Natta, A.; Randich, S.; Rigliaco, E.; Spezzi, L.; Testi, L.; Bacciotti, F.; Bonito, R.; Covino, S.; Flaccomio, E.; Frasca, A.; Gandolfi, D.; Leone, F.; Micela, G.; Nisini, B.; Whelan, E.

    2011-03-01

    We present preliminary results of our X-shooter survey in star forming regions. In this contribution we focus on sub-samples of young stellar and sub-stellar objects (YSOs) in the Lupus star forming region and in the TW Hya association. We show that the X-shooter spectra are suitable for conducting several parallel studies such as YSO + disk fundamental parameters, accretion and outflow activity in the very low-mass (VLM) and sub-stellar regimes, as well as magnetic activity in young VLM YSOs, and Li abundance determinations. The capabilities of X-shooter in terms of wide spectral coverage, resolution and limiting magnitudes, allow us to assess simultaneously the accretion/outflow, magnetic activity, and disk diagnostics, from the UV and optical to the near-IR, avoiding ambiguities due to possible YSO variability. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under Programmes 084.C-0269 and 085.C-0238.

  14. Functional Specificity of the Visual Word Form Area: General Activation for Words and Symbols but Specific Network Activation for Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Karen; Fernandes, Myra; Schwindt, Graeme; O'Craven, Kathleen; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2008-01-01

    The functional specificity of the brain region known as the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) was examined using fMRI. We explored whether this area serves a general role in processing symbolic stimuli, rather than being selective for the processing of words. Brain activity was measured during a visual 1-back task to English words, meaningful symbols…

  15. The Lifetimes of Phases in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Bally, John; Svoboda, Brian

    2017-02-01

    High-mass stars form within star clusters from dense, molecular regions (DMRs), but is the process of cluster formation slow and hydrostatic or quick and dynamic? We link the physical properties of high-mass star-forming regions with their evolutionary stage in a systematic way, using Herschel and Spitzer data. In order to produce a robust estimate of the relative lifetimes of these regions, we compare the fraction of DMRs above a column density associated with high-mass star formation, N(H2) > 0.4-2.5 × 1022 cm-2, in the “starless” (no signature of stars ≳10 {M}⊙ forming) and star-forming phases in a 2° × 2° region of the Galactic Plane centered at ℓ = 30°. Of regions capable of forming high-mass stars on ˜1 pc scales, the starless (or embedded beyond detection) phase occupies about 60%-70% of the DMR lifetime, and the star-forming phase occupies about 30%-40%. These relative lifetimes are robust over a wide range of thresholds. We outline a method by which relative lifetimes can be anchored to absolute lifetimes from large-scale surveys of methanol masers and UCHII regions. A simplistic application of this method estimates the absolute lifetime of the starless phase to be 0.2-1.7 Myr (about 0.6-4.1 fiducial cloud free-fall times) and the star-forming phase to be 0.1-0.7 Myr (about 0.4-2.4 free-fall times), but these are highly uncertain. This work uniquely investigates the star-forming nature of high column density gas pixel by pixel, and our results demonstrate that the majority of high column density gas is in a starless or embedded phase.

  16. HEROES Observations of a Quiescent Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Christe, S.; Gaskin, J.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) observations of solar flares reveal the signatures of energetic electrons, and HXR images with high dynamic range and high sensitivity can distinguish between where electrons are accelerated and where they stop. Even in the non-flaring corona, high-sensitivity HXR measurements may be able to detect the presence of electron acceleration. The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) balloon mission added the capability of solar observations to an existing astrophysics balloon payload, HERO, which used grazing-incidence optics for direct HXR imaging. HEROES measures HXR emission from ~20 to ~75 keV with an angular resolution of 33" HPD. HEROES launched on 2013 September 21 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, and had a successful one-day flight. We present the detailed analysis of the 7-hour observation of AR 11850, which sets new upper limits on the HXR emission from a quiescent active region, with corresponding constraints on the numbers of tens of keV energetic electrons present. Using the imaging capability of HEROES, HXR upper limits are also obtained for the quiet Sun surrounding the active region. We also discuss what can be achieved with new and improved HXR instrumentation on balloons.

  17. Dynamic Precursors of Flares in Active Region NOAA 10486

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsós, M. B.; Gyenge, N.; Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A.

    2015-03-01

    Four different methods are applied here to study the precursors of flare activity in the Active Region NOAA 10486. Two approaches track the temporal behaviour of suitably chosen features (one, the weighted hori- zontal gradient W G M , is the generalized form of the horizontal gradient of the magnetic field, G M ; the other is the sum of the horizontal gradient of the magnetic field, G S , for all sunspot pairs). W G M is a photospheric indicator, that is a proxy measure of magnetic non-potentiality of a specific area of the active region, i.e., it captures the temporal variation of the weighted horizontal gradient of magnetic flux summed up for the region where opposite magnetic polarities are highly mixed. The third one, referred to as the separateness parameter, S l- f , considers the overall morphology. Further, G S and S l- f are photospheric, newly defined quick-look indicators of the polarity mix of the entire active region. The fourth method is tracking the temporal variation of small X-ray flares, their times of succession and their energies observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager instrument. All approaches yield specific pre-cursory signatures for the imminence of flares.

  18. Distribution of water in the G327.3-0.6 massive star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Herpin, F.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: Following our past study of the distribution of warm gas in the G327.3-0.6 massive star-forming region, we aim here at characterizing the large-scale distribution of water in this active region of massive star formation made of individual objects in different evolutionary phases. We investigate possible variations of the water abundance as a function of evolution. Methods: We present Herschel/PACS (4'× 4') continuum maps at 89 and179 μm encompassing the whole region (Hii region and the infrared dark cloud, IRDC) and an APEX/SABOCA (2'× 2') map at 350 μm of the IRDC. New spectral Herschel/HIFI maps toward the IRDC region covering the low-energy water lines at 987 and 1113 GHz (and their H218O counterparts) are also presented and combined with HIFI pointed observations toward the G327 hot core region. We infer the physical properties of the gas through optical depth analysis and radiative transfer modeling of the HIFI lines. Results: The distribution of the continuum emission at 89 and 179 μm follows the thermal continuum emission observed at longer wavelengths, with a peak at the position of the hot core and a secondary peak in the Hii region, and an arch-like layer of hot gas west of this Hii region. The same morphology is observed in the p-H2O 111-000 line, in absorption toward all submillimeter dust condensations. Optical depths of approximately 80 and 15 are estimated and correspond to column densities of 1015 and 2 × 1014 cm-2, respectively, for the hot core and IRDC position. These values indicate an abundance of water relative to H2 of 3 × 10-8 toward the hot core, while the abundance of water does not change along the IRDC with values close to some 10-8. Infall (over at least 20″) is detected toward the hot core position with a rate of 1-1.3 × 10-2M⊙ /yr, high enough to overcome the radiation pressure that is due to the stellar luminosity. The source structure of the hot core region appears complex, with a cold outer gas envelope in

  19. FIP bias in a sigmoidal active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in an anemone active region (AR) - coronal hole (CH) complex using an abundance map derived from Hinode/EIS spectra. The detailed, spatially resolved abundance map has a large field of view covering 359'' × 485''. Plasma with high FIP bias, or coronal abundances, is concentrated at the footpoints of the AR loops whereas the surrounding CH has a low FIP bias, ~1, i.e. photospheric abundances. A channel of low FIP bias is located along the AR's main polarity inversion line containing a filament where ongoing flux cancellation is observed, indicating a bald patch magnetic topology characteristic of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  20. The coronal structure of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landini, M.; Monsignori Fossi, B. C.; Krieger, A.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    A four-parameter model, which assumes a Gaussian dependence of both temperature and pressure on distance from center, is used to fit the compact part of coronal active regions as observed in X-ray photographs from a rocket experiment. The four parameters are the maximum temperature, the maximum pressure, the width of the pressure distribution, and the width of the temperature distribution. The maximum temperature ranges from 2.2 to 2.8 million K, and the maximum density from 2 to 9 by 10 to the 9th power per cu cm. The range of the pressure-distribution width is from 2 to 4 by 10 to the 9th power cm and that of the temperature-distribution width from 2 to 7.

  1. Star-Forming Regions in Orion as a Dust Evolution Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, D.; Murga, M.; Sivkova, E.

    2017-06-01

    Star-forming regions (SFR) represent a convenient opportunity to study various processes related both to dust growth and to dust destruction. While extragalactic SFRs allow considering these processes in a wide range of metallicities, UV field intensities, etc., the Orion star-forming complex opens up a possibility to observe dust evolution with an unprecedented angular resolution. We review various observations related to dust evolution in some most prominent Orion regions, paying special attention to organic dust evolution, and introduce a new model of organic dust evolution.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Parallaxes of high mass star forming regions (Reid+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Zheng, X. W.; Dame, T. M.; Xu, Y.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, B.; Sanna, A.; Sato, M.; Hachisuka, K.; Choi, Y. K.; Immer, K.; Moscadelli, L.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2016-04-01

    Table1 lists the parallaxes and proper motions of 103 regions of high-mass star formation measured with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) techniques, using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), the Japanese VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA; http://veraserver.mtk.nao.ac.jp) project, and the European VLBI Network (EVN). We have include three red supergiants (NML Cyg, S Per, VY CMa) as indicative of high-mass star forming regions. (2 data files).

  3. 75 FR 16492 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-28, and Form G-28I, Revision of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Collection Activities: Form G-28, and Form G- 28I, Revision of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection under Review: Form G- 28, Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Accredited Representative, and Form G-28I, Notice of Entry of Appearance of Foreign...

  4. 76 FR 30738 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-845 and Form G-845 Supplement, Revision of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Collection Activities: Form G-845 and Form G- 845 Supplement, Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection under Review: Form G- 845 and Form G-845 Supplement, Document Verification Request and Document Verification Request Supplement; OMB...

  5. High Resolution IRS Mapping of the Star-Forming Region NGC 6334 A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Anuj; Abel, Nicholas; Ferland, Gary; Mayo, Elizabeth; Troland, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Star formation involves the interplay of thermal, gravitational and magnetic forces. These processes lead to a dynamically evolving region in which O stars ionize the surrounding medium, and the ionized gas expands into the molecular cloud. Of these forces, magnetic effects are the least understood. A detailed analysis of the conditions in star-forming environments requires that one combine magnetic field observations with observations of the ionized, atomic, and molecular gas along with dust. We propose to carry out high-resolution IRS spectroscopy between 9.9-37.2 microns of the nearby (1.7 kpc) star-forming region NGC 6334 A. Maps of the magnetic field strength in the molecular gas exist for NGC 6334 A, yet the conditions in the H II region, the surrounding photodissociated region (PDR), and the dynamical interaction between the two regions are poorly understood. In the H II region, our proposed observation will allow us to use well-known infrared diagnostic ratios to determine the electron density, temperature, and the hardness of the continuum source. Spitzer observations of rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen and PAH emission, combined with previous observations, will allow us to determine the hydrogen density, UV radiation flux, and temperature in the PDR. We will combine our observations with theoretical calculations, using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. Recent improvements to Cloudy include a ~1000 reaction molecular network, the ability to treat the dynamical flow of ionized gas into a molecular cloud, and the effects of magnetic pressure. Matching the observed spectra with theoretical calculations will tell us the physical conditions in the H II region and PDR, the role of magnetic fields in NGC 6334 A, and the importance of dynamics in the region. Overall, IRS observations of NGC 6334 A offers a unique opportunity to study, at high spatial resolution, many of the physical processes in star-forming regions.

  6. 13CO Survey of Northern Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Kerton, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a survey of 13CO with the OSO 20-m telescope toward 68 intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs) visible in the northern hemisphere. These regions have mostly been excluded from previous CO surveys and were selected from IRAS colors that specify cool dust and large PAH contribution. These regions are known to host stars up to, but not exceeding, about 8 solar masses. We detect 13CO in 57 of the 68 IM SFRs down to a typical RMS of ~50 mK. We present kinematic distances, minimum column densities, and minimum masses for these IM SFRs.

  7. Observational Signatures of Cloud-Cloud Collision in the Extended Star-forming Region S235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.

    2017-11-01

    We present a multi-wavelength data analysis of the extended star-forming region S235 (hereafter E-S235), where two molecular clouds are present. In E-S235, using the 12CO (1-0) and 13CO (1-0) line data, a molecular cloud linked with the site “S235main” is traced in a velocity range [-24, -18] km s-1, while the other one containing the sites S235A, S235B, and S235C (hereafter “S235ABC”) is depicted in a velocity range [-18, -13] km s-1. In the velocity space, these two clouds are separated by ˜4 km s-1, and are interconnected by a lower-intensity intermediate velocity emission, tracing a broad bridge feature. In the velocity channel maps, a possible complementary molecular pair at [-21, -20] km s-1 and [-16, -15] km s-1 is also evident. The sites, “S235ABC,” east 1, and south-west, are spatially seen in the interface of two clouds. Together, these observed features are consistent with the predictions of numerical models of the cloud-cloud collision (CCC) process, favoring the onset of the CCC in E-S235 about 0.5 Myr ago. Deep UKIDSS near-infrared photometric analysis of point-like sources reveals significant clustering of young stellar populations toward the sites located at the junction, and the “S235main.” The sites “S235ABC” harbor young compact H II regions with dynamical ages of ˜0.06-0.22 Myr, and these sites (including south-west and east 1) also contain dust clumps (having M clump ˜ 40 to 635 {M}⊙ ). Our observational findings suggest that the star formation activities (including massive stars) appear to be influenced by the CCC mechanism at the junction.

  8. Chemical modelling of complex organic molecules with peptide-like bonds in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quénard, David; Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Viti, Serena; Holdship, Jonathan; Coutens, Audrey

    2018-02-01

    Peptide bonds (N-C = O) play a key role in metabolic processes since they link amino acids into peptide chains or proteins. Recently, several molecules containing peptide-like bonds have been detected across multiple environments in the interstellar medium, growing the need to fully understand their chemistry and their role in forming larger pre-biotic molecules. We present a comprehensive study of the chemistry of three molecules containing peptide-like bonds: HNCO, NH2CHO, and CH3NCO. We also included other CHNO isomers (HCNO, HOCN) and C2H3NO isomers (CH3OCN, CH3CNO) to the study. We have used the UCLCHEM gas-grain chemical code and included in our chemical network all possible formation/destruction pathways of these peptide-like molecules recently investigated either by theoretical calculations or in laboratory experiments. Our predictions are compared to observations obtained towards the proto-star IRAS 16293-2422 and the L1544 pre-stellar core. Our results show that some key reactions involving the CHNO and C2H3NO isomers need to be modified to match the observations. Consistently with recent laboratory findings, hydrogenation is unlikely to produce NH2CHO on grain surfaces, while a combination of radical-radical surface reactions and gas-phase reactions is a better alternative. In addition, better results are obtained for NH2CHO when a slightly higher activation energy of 25 K is considered for the gas-phase reaction NH2 + H2CO → NH2CHO + H. Finally, our modelling shows that the observed correlation between NH2CHO and HNCO in star-forming regions may come from the fact that HNCO and NH2CHO react to temperature in the same manner rather than from a direct chemical link between the two species.

  9. Emission Measure Distribution and Heating of Two Active Region Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode, we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions. Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emission measure distributions having an approximate power-law form EM/T(exp 2.4) from log T = 5.55 up to a peak at log T = 6.57. The observations are explained extremely well by a simple nanoflare model. However, in the absence of additional constraints, the observations could possibly also be explained by steady heating.

  10. 77 FR 47370 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Logbook Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Logbook Family of Forms AGENCY: National Oceanic and... the Northeast are required to submit logbooks containing catch and effort information about their... requirement for Northeast multispecies permit holders participating in the special access programs (SAPs), the...

  11. Region 9 Tribal Minor NSR: New Source General Application (Form NEW)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This form should be used to register New or Modified Minor Sources (except Oil and Gas Industry Sources until March 2, 2016) with proposed construction or modifications that are subject to minor NSR with the EPA Region 9 Tribal NSR Permitting Program.

  12. Submillimeter-wave Observations of Complex Organic Molecules in Southern Massive Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Hirota, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2013-03-01

    Submillimeter-wave observations of complex organic molecules toward southern massive star forming regions were carried out with ASTE 10m telescope. Methyl formate (HCOOCH3) and dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3) were detected in some molecular cloud cores with young protostars. Differences in chemical composition among neighboring cores were also found.

  13. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars.We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks.We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  14. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  15. A study of the cold cores population in the Serpens star-forming region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorellino, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Liu, S. J.; Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Ladjelate, B.; Herschel Gould Belt Survey Consortium

    As part of the Herschel Gould Belt survey, the Serpens star-forming region was observed with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. Data analysis is ongoing and a first version of the source catalog is ready; here we show some preliminary results.

  16. Armenia as a Regional Centre for Astronomy for Development activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A.

    2015-03-01

    The Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO, Armenia, http://www.bao.am) are among the candidate IAU Regional Nodes for Astronomy for Development activities. It is one of the main astronomical centers of the former Soviet Union and the Middle East region. At present there are 48 qualified researchers at BAO, including six Doctors of Science and 30 PhDs. Five important observational instruments are installed at BAO, the larger ones being 2.6m Cassegrain (ZTA-2.6) and 1m Schmidt (the one that provided the famous Markarian survey). BAO is regarded as a national scientific-educational center, where a number of activities are being organized, such as: international conferences (4 IAU symposia and 1 IAU colloquium, JENAM-2007, etc.), small workshops and discussions, international summer schools (1987, 2006, 2008 and 2010), and Olympiads. BAO collaborates with scientists from many countries. The Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS, http://www.aras.am/) is an NGO founded in 2001; it has 93 members and it is rather active in the organization of educational, amateur, popular, promotional and other matters. The Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, http://www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) is one of the 17 national VO projects forming the International Virtual Observatories Alliance (IVOA) and is the only VO project in the region serving also for educational purposes. A number of activities are planned, such as management, coordination and evaluation of the IAU programs in the area of development and education, establishment of the new IAU endowed lectureship program and organization of seminars and public lectures, coordination and initiation of fundraising activities for astronomy development, organization of regional scientific symposia, conferences and workshops, support to Galileo Teacher Training Program (GTTP), production/publication of educational and promotional materials, etc.

  17. The growth of the central region by acquisition of counterrotating gas in star-forming galaxies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Mei; Shi, Yong; Tremonti, Christy A; Bershady, Matt; Merrifield, Michael; Emsellem, Eric; Jin, Yi-Fei; Huang, Song; Fu, Hai; Wake, David A; Bundy, Kevin; Stark, David; Lin, Lihwai; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Bergmann, Thaisa Storchi; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel; Bureau, Martin; Chisholm, John; Drory, Niv; Guo, Qi; Hao, Lei; Hu, Jian; Li, Cheng; Li, Ran; Lopes, Alexandre Roman; Pan, Kai-Ke; Riffel, Rogemar A; Thomas, Daniel; Wang, Lan; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Ren-Bin

    2016-10-19

    Galaxies grow through both internal and external processes. In about 10% of nearby red galaxies with little star formation, gas and stars are counter-rotating, demonstrating the importance of external gas acquisition in these galaxies. However, systematic studies of such phenomena in blue, star-forming galaxies are rare, leaving uncertain the role of external gas acquisition in driving evolution of blue galaxies. Here, based on new measurements with integral field spectroscopy of a large representative galaxy sample, we find an appreciable fraction of counter-rotators among blue galaxies (9 out of 489 galaxies). The central regions of blue counter-rotators show younger stellar populations and more intense, ongoing star formation than their outer parts, indicating ongoing growth of the central regions. The result offers observational evidence that the acquisition of external gas in blue galaxies is possible; the interaction with pre-existing gas funnels the gas into nuclear regions (<1 kpc) to form new stars.

  18. Inner and outer star forming regions over the disks of spiral galaxies. I. Sample characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Baras, M.; Díaz, A. I.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The knowledge of abundance distributions is central to understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. Most of the relations employed for the derivation of gas abundances have so far been derived from observations of outer disk H ii regions, despite the known differences between inner and outer regions. Aims: Using integral field spectroscopy (IFS) observations we aim to perform a systematic study and comparison of two inner and outer H ii regions samples. The spatial resolution of the IFS, the number of objects and the homogeneity and coherence of the observations allow a complete characterization of the main observational properties and differences of the regions. Methods: We analyzed a sample of 725 inner H ii regions and a sample of 671 outer H ii regions, all of them detected and extracted from the observations of a sample of 263 nearby, isolated, spiral galaxies observed by the CALIFA survey. Results: We find that inner H ii regions show smaller equivalent widths, greater extinction and luminosities, along with greater values of [N ii] λ6583/Hα and [O ii] λ3727/[O iii] λ5007 emission-line ratios, indicating higher metallicities and lower ionization parameters. Inner regions have also redder colors and higher photometric and ionizing masses, although MionMphot is slighty higher for the outer regions. Conclusions: This work shows important observational differences between inner and outer H ii regions in star forming galaxies not previously studied in detail. These differences indicate that inner regions have more evolved stellar populations and are in a later evolution state with respect to outer regions, which goes in line with the inside-out galaxy formation paradigm. Table 4 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/609/A102

  19. A {sup 13}CO SURVEY OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kerton, Charles R.

    2015-06-10

    We have conducted a {sup 13}CO survey of a sample of 128 infrared color-selected intermediate-mass star-forming region (IM SFR) candidates. We utilized the Onsala 20 m telescope to observe {sup 13}CO (1–0) toward 67 northern IM SFRs, used the 12 m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope to observe {sup 13}CO (2–1) toward 22 southern IM SFRs, and incorporated an additional 39 sources from the Boston University Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey which observed {sup 13}CO (1–0). We detect {sup 13}CO (1–0) in 58 of the 67 northern sources and {sup 13}CO (2–1) in 20 of the 22 southernmore » sources. The mean molecular column densities and {sup 13}CO linewidths in the inner Galaxy are higher by factors of 3.4 and 1.5, respectively, than the outer Galaxy. We attribute this difference to molecular clouds in the inner Galaxy being more massive and hosting star forming regions with higher luminosities on average than the outer Galaxy. IM SFRs have mean a molecular column density of 7.89 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup −2}, a factor of 3.1 lower than that for a sample of high-mass regions, and have a mean {sup 13}CO linewidth of 1.84 km s{sup −1}, a factor of 1.5 lower than that for high-mass regions. We demonstrate a correlation between {sup 13}CO linewidth and infrared luminosity as well as between molecular column density and infrared luminosity for the entire sample of intermediate-mass and high-mass regions. IM SFRs appear to form in distinctly lower-density environments with mean linewidths and beam-averaged column densities a factor of several lower than high-mass star-forming regions.« less

  20. Auditory Selective Attention to Speech Modulates Activity in the Visual Word Form Area

    PubMed Central

    Yoncheva, Yuliya N.; Zevin, Jason D.; Maurer, Urs

    2010-01-01

    Selective attention to speech versus nonspeech signals in complex auditory input could produce top-down modulation of cortical regions previously linked to perception of spoken, and even visual, words. To isolate such top-down attentional effects, we contrasted 2 equally challenging active listening tasks, performed on the same complex auditory stimuli (words overlaid with a series of 3 tones). Instructions required selectively attending to either the speech signals (in service of rhyme judgment) or the melodic signals (tone-triplet matching). Selective attention to speech, relative to attention to melody, was associated with blood oxygenation level–dependent (BOLD) increases during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in left inferior frontal gyrus, temporal regions, and the visual word form area (VWFA). Further investigation of the activity in visual regions revealed overall deactivation relative to baseline rest for both attention conditions. Topographic analysis demonstrated that while attending to melody drove deactivation equivalently across all fusiform regions of interest examined, attending to speech produced a regionally specific modulation: deactivation of all fusiform regions, except the VWFA. Results indicate that selective attention to speech can topographically tune extrastriate cortex, leading to increased activity in VWFA relative to surrounding regions, in line with the well-established connectivity between areas related to spoken and visual word perception in skilled readers. PMID:19571269

  1. A Multi-Wavelength Survey of Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kerton, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Current research into Galactic star formation has focused on either massive star-forming regions or nearby low-mass regions. We present results from a survey of Galactic intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs). These regions were selected from IRAS colors that specify cool dust and large PAH contribution, suggesting that they produce stars up to but not exceeding about 8 solar masses. Using WISE data we have classified 984 candidate IM SFRs as star-like objects, galaxies, filamentary structures, or blobs/shells based on their mid-infrared morphologies. Focusing on the blobs/shells, we combined follow-up observations of deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging with optical and NIR spectroscopy to study the stellar content, confirming the intermediate-mass nature of these regions. We also gathered CO data from OSO and APEX to study the molecular content and dynamics of these regions. We compare these results to those of high-mass star formation in order to better understand their role in the star-formation paradigm.

  2. Tracing the potential planet-forming regions around seven pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schegerer, A. A.; Wolf, S.; Hummel, C. A.; Quanz, S. P.; Richichi, A.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: We investigate the nature of the innermost regions with radii of several AUs of seven circumstellar disks around pre-main-sequence stars, T Tauri stars in particular. Our object sample contains disks apparently at various stages of their evolution. Both single stars and spatially resolved binaries are considered. In particular, we search for inner disk gaps as proposed for several young stellar objects (YSOs). When analyzing the underlying dust population in the atmosphere of circumstellar disks, the shape of the 10 μm feature should additionally be investigated. Methods: We performed interferometric observations in N band (8-13 μm) with the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument (MIDI) at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) using baseline lengths of between 54 m and 127 m. The data analysis is based on radiative-transfer simulations using the Monte Carlo code MC3D by modeling simultaneously the spectral energy distribution (SED), N band spectra, and interferometric visibilities. Correlated and uncorrelated N band spectra are compared to investigate the radial distribution of the dust composition of the disk atmosphere. Results: Spatially resolved mid-infrared (MIR) emission was detected in all objects. For four objects (DR Tau, RU Lup, S CrA N, and S CrA S), the observed N band visibilities and corresponding SEDs could be simultaneously simulated using a parameterized active disk-model. For the more evolved objects of our sample, HD 72106 and HBC 639, a purely passive disk-model provides the closest fit. The visibilities inferred for the source RU Lup allow the presence of an inner disk gap. For the YSO GW Ori, one of two visibility measurements could not be simulated by our modeling approach. All uncorrelated spectra reveal the 10 μm silicate emission feature. In contrast to this, some correlated spectra of the observations of the more evolved objects do not show this feature, indicating a lack of small silicates in the inner versus the outer

  3. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy,more » W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.« less

  4. NGVLA Observations of Dense Gas Filaments in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, James; Chen, Mike; Keown, Jared; GAS Team, KEYSTONE Team

    2018-01-01

    Recent observations of continuum emission from nearby star-forming regions with Herschel and JCMT have revealed that filaments are ubiquitous structures within molecular clouds. Such filaments appear to be intimately connected to star formation, with those having column densities of AV > 8 hosting the majority of prestellar cores and young protostars in clouds. Indeed, this “threshold” can be explained simply as the result of supercritical cylinder fragmentation. How specifically star-forming filaments form in molecular clouds, however, remains unclear, though gravity and turbulence are likely involved. Observations of their kinematics are needed to understand how mass flows both onto and through these filaments. We show here results from two recent surveys, the Green Bank Ammonia Survey (GAS) and the K-band Examinations of Young Stellar Object Natal Environments (KEYSTONE) that have used the Green Bank Telescope’s K-band Focal Plane Array instrument to map NH3 (1,1) emission from dense gas in nearby star-forming regions. Data from both surveys show that NH3 emission traces extremely well the high column density gas across these star-forming regions. In particular, the GAS results for NGC 1333 show NH3-based velocity gradients either predominantly parallel or perpendicular to the filament spines. Though the GAS and KEYSTONE data are vital for probing filaments, higher resolutions than possible with the GBT alone are needed to examine the kinematic patterns on the 0.1-pc scales of star-forming cores within filaments. We describe how the Next Generation Very Large Array (NGVLA) will uniquely provide the key wide-field data of high sensitivity needed to explore how ambient gas in molecular clouds forms filaments that evolve toward star formation.

  5. [Establishment of regional active neonatal transport network].

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-yong; Gao, Xin; Yin, Xiao-juan; Hong, Xiao-yang; Fang, Huan-sheng; Wang, Zi-zhen; Li, Ai-hua; Luo, Fen-ping; Feng, Zhi-chun

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical function and significance of establishing a regional active neonatal transport network (ANTN) in Beijing. The authors retrospectively studied intensive care and the role of ANTN system in management of critically ill neonates and compared the outcome of newborn infants transported to our NICU before and after we established standardized NICU and ANTN system (phase 1: July 2004 to June 2006 vs phase 2: July 2006 to May 2008). The number of neonatal transport significantly increased from 587 during phase 1 to 2797 during phase 2. Success rate of transport and the total cure rate in phase 2 were 97.85% and 91.99% respectively, which were significantly higher than those in phase 1 (94.36% and 88.69%, respectively, P < 0.01). The neonatal mortality significantly decreased in phase 2 compared with that in phase 1 (2.29% vs 4.31%, P < 0.01). The capacity of our NICU was enlarged following the development of ANTN. There are 200 beds for level 3 infants in phase 2, but there were only 20 beds in phase 1. Significantly less patients in the phase 2 had hypothermia, acidosis and the blood glucose instability than those in phase 1 (P < 0.01, 0.05, 0.01 and 0.05, respectively). The proportion of preterm infants transported to our NICU were higher in phase 2 compared with that in phase 1, especially infants whose gestational age was below 32 weeks. The proportions of asphyxia and respiratory distress syndrome were lower in phase 2 than that in phase 1, but the total cure rates of these two diseases had no significant changes between the two phases. The most important finding was that the improvement of outcome of premature infants and those with asphyxia and aspiration syndrome was noted following the development of ANTN. Establishing regional ANTN for a tertiary hospital is very important to elevate the total level in management of critically ill newborn infants. It plays a very important role in reducing mortality and improving total outcomes of newborn

  6. A Comparative Observational Study of YSO Classification in Four Small Star-forming H ii Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung-Ju; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju

    We have developed a new young stellar object (YSO) identification and classification technique using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. We compare this new technique with previous WISE YSO detection and classification methods that used either infrared colors or spectral energy distribution slopes. In this study, we also use the new technique to detect and examine the YSO population associated with four small H ii regions: KR 7, KR 81, KR 120, and KR 140. The relatively simple structure of these regions allows us to effectively use both spatial and temporal constraints to identify YSOs that are potential productsmore » of triggered star formation. We are also able to identify regions of active star formation around these H ii regions that are clearly not influenced by the H ii region expansion, and thus demonstrate that star formation is on-going on megayear timescales in some of these molecular clouds.« less

  7. Inclusion bodies and purification of proteins in biologically active forms.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, A

    1997-01-01

    Even though recombinant DNA technology has made possible the production of valuable therapeutic proteins, its accumulation in the host cell as inclusion body poses serious problems in the recovery of functionally active proteins. In the last twenty years, alternative techniques have been evolved to purify biologically active proteins from inclusion bodies. Most of these remain only as inventions and very few are commercially exploited. This review summarizes the developments in isolation, refolding and purification of proteins from inclusion bodies that could be used for vaccine and non-vaccine applications. The second section involves a discussion on inclusion bodies, how they are formed, and their physicochemical properties. In vivo protein folding in Escherichia coli and kinetics of in vitro protein folding are the subjects of the third and fourth sections respectively. The next section covers the recovery of bioactive protein from inclusion bodies: it includes isolation of inclusion body from host cell debris, purification in denatured state alternate refolding techniques, and final purification of active molecules. Since purity and safety are two important issues in therapeutic grade proteins, the following three sections are devoted to immunological and biological characterization of biomolecules, nature, and type of impurities normally encountered, and their detection. Lastly, two case studies are discussed to demonstrate the sequence of process steps involved.

  8. Inflammasome - activated gasdermin D causes pyroptosis by forming membrane pores

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Zhang, Zhibin; Ruan, Jianbin; Pan, Youdong; Magupalli, Venkat Giri; Wu, Hao; Lieberman, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory caspases (caspases 1, 4, 5 and 11) are activated in response to microbial infection and danger signals. When activated, they cleave mouse and human gasdermin D (GSDMD) after Asp276 and Asp275, respectively, to generate an N-terminal cleavage product (GSDMD-NT) that triggers inflammatory death (pyroptosis) and release of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β1,2. Cleavage removes the C-terminal fragment (GSDMD-CT), which is thought to fold back on GSDMD-NT to inhibit its activation. However, how GSDMD-NT causes cell death is unknown. Here we show that GSDMD-NT oligomerizes in membranes to form pores that are visible by electron microscopy. GSDMD-NT binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates and phosphatidylserine (restricted to the cell membrane inner leaflet) and cardiolipin (present in the inner and outer leaflets of bacterial membranes). Mutation of four evolutionarily conserved basic residues blocks GSDMD-NT oligomerization, membrane binding, pore formation and pyroptosis. Because of its lipid-binding preferences, GSDMD-NT kills from within the cell, but does not harm neighbouring mammalian cells when it is released during pyroptosis. GSDMD-NT also kills cell-free bacteria in vitro and may have a direct bactericidal effect within the cytosol of host cells, but the importance of direct bacterial killing in controlling in vivo infection remains to be determined. PMID:27383986

  9. {sup 13}C ISOTOPIC FRACTIONATION OF HC{sub 3}N IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS: LOW-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION L1527 AND HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION G28.28-0.36

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Kotomi; Saito, Masao; Ozeki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kotomi.taniguchi@nao.ac.jp

    2016-10-20

    We observed the J = 9–8 and 10–9 rotational lines of three {sup 13}C isotopologues of HC{sub 3}N in L1527 and G28.28-0.36, with the 45 m radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, in order to constrain the main formation mechanisms of HC{sub 3}N in each source. The abundance ratios of the three {sup 13}C isotopologues of HC{sub 3}N are found to be 0.9 (±0.2) : 1.00 : 1.29 (±0.19) (1 σ ), and 1.0 (±0.2) : 1.00 : 1.47 (±0.17) (1 σ ), for [H{sup 13}CCCN : HC{sup 13}CCN : HCC{sup 13}CN] in L1527 and G28.28-0.36, respectively. We recognize,more » from a similar {sup 13}C isotopic fractionation pattern, that the abundances of H{sup 13}CCCN and HC{sup 13}CCN are comparable, and HCC{sup 13}CN is more abundant than the others. Based on the results, we discuss the main formation pathway of HC{sub 3}N. The {sup 13}C isotopic fractionation pattern derived from our observations can be explained by the neutral-neutral reaction between C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and CN in both the low-mass (L1527) and high-mass (G28.28-0.36) star-forming regions.« less

  10. Intensity attenuation for active crustal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Trevor I.; Wald, David J.; Worden, C. Bruce

    2012-07-01

    We develop globally applicable macroseismic intensity prediction equations (IPEs) for earthquakes of moment magnitude M W 5.0-7.9 and intensities of degree II and greater for distances less than 300 km for active crustal regions. The IPEs are developed for two distance metrics: closest distance to rupture ( R rup) and hypocentral distance ( R hyp). The key objective for developing the model based on hypocentral distance—in addition to more rigorous and standard measure R rup—is to provide an IPE which can be used in near real-time earthquake response systems for earthquakes anywhere in the world, where information regarding the rupture dimensions of a fault may not be known in the immediate aftermath of the event. We observe that our models, particularly the model for the R rup distance metric, generally have low median residuals with magnitude and distance. In particular, we address whether the direct use of IPEs leads to a reduction in overall uncertainties when compared with methods which use a combination of ground-motion prediction equations and ground motion to intensity conversion equations. Finally, using topographic gradient as a proxy and median model predictions, we derive intensity-based site amplification factors. These factors lead to a small reduction of residuals at shallow gradients at strong shaking levels. However, the overall effect on total median residuals is relatively small. This is in part due to the observation that the median site condition for intensity observations used to develop these IPEs is approximately near the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program CD site-class boundary.

  11. The mineralogy of newly formed dust in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Sundar; Kemper, F.; Zhou, Yeyan; Hao, Lei; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Shangguan, Jinyi; Ho, Luis C.; Xie, Yanxia; Scicluna, Peter; Foucaud, Sebastien; Peng, Rita H. T.

    2017-12-01

    The tori around active galactic nuclei (AGN) are potential formation sites for large amounts of dust, and they may help resolve the so-called dust budget crisis at high redshift. We investigate the dust composition in 53 of the 87 Palomar Green (PG) quasars showing the 9.7 μm silicate feature in emission. By simultaneously fitting the mid-infrared spectroscopic features and the underlying continuum, we estimate the mass fraction in various amorphous and crystalline dust species. We find that the dust consists predominantly of alumina and amorphous silicates, with a small fraction in crystalline form. The mean crystallinity is 8 ±6%, with more than half of the crystallinities greater than 5%, well above the upper limit determined for the Galaxy. Higher values of crystallinity are found for higher oxide fractions and for more luminous sources.

  12. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  13. Young Stellar Populations in MYStIX Star-forming Regions: Candidate Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romine, Gregory; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Kuhn, Michael A.; Povich, Matthew S.

    2016-12-01

    The Massive Young Star-Forming Complex in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) project provides a new census on stellar members of massive star-forming regions within 4 kpc. Here the MYStIX Infrared Excess catalog and Chandra-based X-ray photometric catalogs are mined to obtain high-quality samples of Class I protostars using criteria designed to reduce extragalactic and Galactic field star contamination. A total of 1109 MYStIX Candidate Protostars (MCPs) are found in 14 star-forming regions. Most are selected from protoplanetary disk infrared excess emission, but 20% are found from their ultrahard X-ray spectra from heavily absorbed magnetospheric flare emission. Two-thirds of the MCP sample is newly reported here. The resulting samples are strongly spatially associated with molecular cores and filaments on Herschel far-infrared maps. This spatial agreement and other evidence indicate that the MCP sample has high reliability with relatively few “false positives” from contaminating populations. But the limited sensitivity and sparse overlap among the infrared and X-ray subsamples indicate that the sample is very incomplete with many “false negatives.” Maps, tables, and source descriptions are provided to guide further study of star formation in these regions. In particular, the nature of ultrahard X-ray protostellar candidates without known infrared counterparts needs to be elucidated.

  14. YOUNG STELLAR POPULATIONS IN MYStIX STAR-FORMING REGIONS: CANDIDATE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Gregory; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.

    The Massive Young Star-Forming Complex in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) project provides a new census on stellar members of massive star-forming regions within 4 kpc. Here the MYStIX Infrared Excess catalog and Chandra -based X-ray photometric catalogs are mined to obtain high-quality samples of Class I protostars using criteria designed to reduce extragalactic and Galactic field star contamination. A total of 1109 MYStIX Candidate Protostars (MCPs) are found in 14 star-forming regions. Most are selected from protoplanetary disk infrared excess emission, but 20% are found from their ultrahard X-ray spectra from heavily absorbed magnetospheric flare emission. Two-thirds of the MCP sample ismore » newly reported here. The resulting samples are strongly spatially associated with molecular cores and filaments on Herschel far-infrared maps. This spatial agreement and other evidence indicate that the MCP sample has high reliability with relatively few “false positives” from contaminating populations. But the limited sensitivity and sparse overlap among the infrared and X-ray subsamples indicate that the sample is very incomplete with many “false negatives.” Maps, tables, and source descriptions are provided to guide further study of star formation in these regions. In particular, the nature of ultrahard X-ray protostellar candidates without known infrared counterparts needs to be elucidated.« less

  15. Active region upflows. I. Multi-instrument observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanninathan, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Galsgaard, K.; Huang, Z.; Doyle, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    responsible for the formation of the upflow region. High cadence Hα observations are used to study the chromosphere at the footpoints of the upflow region. We find no significant jet-like (spicule/rapid blue excursion) activity to account for several hours/days of plasma upflow. The jet-like activity in this region is not continuous and blueward asymmetries are a bare minimum. Using an image enhancement technique for imaging and spectral data, we show that the coronal structures seen in the AIA 193 Å channel are comparable to the EIS Fe xii images, while images in the AIA 171 Å channel reveal additional loops that are a result of contribution from cooler emission to this channel. Conclusions: Our results suggest that at chromospheric heights there are no signatures that support the possible contribution of spicules to active region upflows. We suggest that magnetic flux diffusion is responsible for the formation of the coronal upflows. The existence of two velocity components possibly indicates the presence of two different flows, which are produced by two different physical mechanisms, e.g. magnetic reconnection and pressure-driven jets. Movies associated to Figs. A.1-A.3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Chemical modelling of glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Viti, S.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Beltrán, M. T.; Holdship, J.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Quénard, D.; Rivilla, V. M.

    2018-04-01

    Glycolaldehyde (HOCH2CHO) and ethylene glycol ((CH2OH)2) are two complex organic molecules detected in the hot cores and hot corinos of several star-forming regions. The ethylene glycol/glycolaldehyde abundance ratio seems to show an increase with the source luminosity. In the literature, several surface-chemistry formation mechanisms have been proposed for these two species. With the UCLCHEM chemical code, we explored the different scenarios and compared the predictions for a range of sources of different luminosities with the observations. None of the scenarios reproduce perfectly the trend. A better agreement is, however, found for a formation through recombination of two HCO radicals followed by successive hydrogenations. The reaction between HCO and CH2OH could also contribute to the formation of glycolaldehyde in addition to the hydrogenation pathway. The predictions are improved when a trend of decreasing H2 density within the core region with T≥100 K as a function of luminosity is included in the model. Destruction reactions of complex organic molecules in the gas phase would also need to be investigated, since they can affect the abundance ratios once the species have desorbed in the warm inner regions of the star-forming regions.

  17. Base-unpaired regions in supercoiled replicative form DNA of coliphage M13

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.; Allison, D.P.; Snyder, C.E.

    Superhelical covalently closed circular replicative form DNA (RF I) of coliphage M13 appears as a relaxed molecule that has a base-unpaired region in the form of a bubble (100 to 200 base pairs long) seen in electron micrographs when spread in the presence of formaldehyde and formamide or after pretreatment with glyoxal. S1 endonuclease, specific for single-stranded DNA, converts superhelical M13 RF I DNA, but not nonsuperhelical M13 RF I to a significant extent, into unit-length linear molecules by sequential nicking of two strands. The locations of S1 nuclease-susceptible sites and glyoxal-fixed base-unpaired regions were both related to the fivemore » A-T-rich regions in M13 RF DNA. While S1 nuclease does not show preference for any of these sites, glyoxal-fixed bubbles occur predominantly at the major A-T-rich region in M13 RF DNA.« less

  18. Dynamical histories of the IC 348 and NGC 1333 star-forming regions in Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard J.; Alves de Oliveira, Catarina

    2017-07-01

    We present analyses of the spatial distributions of stars in the young (1-3 Myr) star-forming regions IC 348 and NGC 1333 in the Perseus giant molecular cloud. We quantify the spatial structure using the Q-parameter and find that both IC 348 and NGC 1333 are smooth and centrally concentrated with Q-parameters of 0.98 and 0.89, respectively. Neither region exhibits mass segregation (Λ _MSR = 1.1^{+0.2}_{-0.3} for IC 348 and Λ _MSR = 1.2^{+0.4}_{-0.3} for NGC 1333, where ΛMSR ˜ 1 corresponds to no mass segregation) nor do the most massive stars reside in areas of enhanced stellar surface density compared to the average surface density, according to the ΣLDR method. We then constrain the dynamical histories and hence initial conditions of both regions by comparing the observed values to N-body simulations at appropriate ages. Stars in both regions likely formed with subvirial velocities that contributed to merging of substructure and the formation of smooth clusters. The initial stellar densities were no higher than ρ ˜ 100-500 M⊙ pc-3 for IC 348 and ρ ˜ 500-2000 M⊙ pc-3 for NGC 1333. These initial densities, in particular that of NGC 1333, are high enough to facilitate dynamical interactions that would likely affect ˜10 per cent of protoplanetary discs and binary stars.

  19. Lipid droplets form from distinct regions of the cell in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Alex; del Rio, Zuania P.; Beaver, Rachael A.

    Eukaryotic cells store cholesterol/sterol esters (SEs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets, which form from the contiguous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. However, it is not known if droplets preferentially form from certain regions of the ER over others. Here, we used fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells where the nuclear and cortical/peripheral ER domains are distinguishable by light microscopy to show that SE-enriched lipid droplets form away from the nucleus at the cell tips, whereas TAG-enriched lipid droplets form around the nucleus. Sterols localize to the regions of the cells where droplets enriched in SEs are observed. TAG droplet formation aroundmore » the nucleus appears to be a strong function of diacylglycerol (DAG) homeostasis with Cpt1p, which coverts DAG into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine localized exclusively to the nuclear ER. Also, Dgk1p, which converts DAG into phosphatidic acid localized strongly to the nuclear ER over the cortical/peripheral ER. We also show that TAG more readily translocates from the ER to lipid droplets than do SEs. Lastly, the results augment the standard lipid droplet formation model, which has SEs and TAGs flowing into the same nascent lipid droplet regardless of its biogenesis point in the cell.« less

  20. Lipid droplets form from distinct regions of the cell in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DOE PAGES

    Meyers, Alex; del Rio, Zuania P.; Beaver, Rachael A.; ...

    2016-04-29

    Eukaryotic cells store cholesterol/sterol esters (SEs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets, which form from the contiguous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. However, it is not known if droplets preferentially form from certain regions of the ER over others. Here, we used fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells where the nuclear and cortical/peripheral ER domains are distinguishable by light microscopy to show that SE-enriched lipid droplets form away from the nucleus at the cell tips, whereas TAG-enriched lipid droplets form around the nucleus. Sterols localize to the regions of the cells where droplets enriched in SEs are observed. TAG droplet formation aroundmore » the nucleus appears to be a strong function of diacylglycerol (DAG) homeostasis with Cpt1p, which coverts DAG into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine localized exclusively to the nuclear ER. Also, Dgk1p, which converts DAG into phosphatidic acid localized strongly to the nuclear ER over the cortical/peripheral ER. We also show that TAG more readily translocates from the ER to lipid droplets than do SEs. Lastly, the results augment the standard lipid droplet formation model, which has SEs and TAGs flowing into the same nascent lipid droplet regardless of its biogenesis point in the cell.« less

  1. On Issue of Algorithm Forming for Assessing Investment Attractiveness of Region Through Its Technospheric Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, L. A.; Skvortsova, N. K.

    2017-11-01

    The article examines the problematic aspects of assessing the investment attractiveness of a region associated with the consideration of methodological issues that require refinement from the point of view of its technospheric security. Such issues include the formation of a sound system of indicators for the assessment of man-made risk which has a particular impact on the level of investment attractiveness of the region. In the context of the instability of the economic situation in Russia, the problem of man-made risks assessing in the context of the regional investment attractiveness based on an integrated approach and taking into account such principles as flexibility, adaptability, innovative orientation has not only lost its relevance but was also transformed into one of the most important conditions for ensuring the effective management of all spheres of the regional activities. The article poses the classical problem of making decisions on the results of the assessment of the investment attractiveness of the region in a matrix format evaluating the utility function. The authors of the article recommended a universal risk assessment model with its subsequent synthesis into technospheric security for the comprehensive assessment of regional investment attractiveness. The principal distinguishing feature of the study results are the schemes for manipulation in the evaluation activity associated with the selection of the optimality criteria groups and models for their study. These iterations make it possible to substantiate the choice of the solution for preserving the technospheric security of the region, a field of compromises or an “ideal” solution to the problem of the regional investment attractiveness loss.

  2. Image Patch Analysis of Sunspots and Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, K.; Delouille, V.; Hero, A.

    2017-12-01

    The flare productivity of an active region has been observed to be related to its spatial complexity. Separating active regions that are quiet from potentially eruptive ones is a key issue in space weather applications. Traditional classification schemes such as Mount Wilson and McIntosh have been effective in relating an active region large scale magnetic configuration to its ability to produce eruptive events. However, their qualitative nature does not use all of the information present in the observations. In our work, we present an image patch analysis for characterizing sunspots and active regions. We first propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity such as intrinsic dimension, and we relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. Second, we introduce a new clustering of active regions that is based on the local geometry observed in Line of Sight magnetogram and continuum images. To obtain this local geometry, we use a reduced-dimension representation of an active region that is obtained by factoring the corresponding data matrix comprised of local image patches using the singular value decomposition. The resulting factorizations of active regions can be compared via the definition of appropriate metrics on the factors. The distances obtained from these metrics are then used to cluster the active regions. Results. We find that these metrics result in natural clusterings of active regions. The clusterings are related to large scale descriptors of an active region such as its size, its local magnetic field distribution, and its complexity as measured by the Mount Wilson classification scheme. We also find that including data focused on the neutral line of an active region can result in an increased correspondence between our clustering results and other active region descriptors such as the Mount Wilson classifications and the R-value.

  3. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide: A tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions.

    PubMed

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, José; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. We decided to investigate the suitability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation propagation (i.e., perpendicular to the oscillating magnetic field of the radiation). To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O 2 has been carried out. An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Revised g factors have been obtained from a large number of SO rotational transitions between 86 and 389 GHz. In particular, the rotational transitions showing the largest Zeeman shifts are: N , J = 2, 2 ← 1, 1 (86.1 GHz), N , J = 4, 3 ← 3, 2 (159.0 GHz), N , J = 1, 1 ← 0, 1 (286.3 GHz), N , J = 2, 2 ← 1, 2 (309.5 GHz), and N , J = 2, 1 ← 1, 0 (329.4 GHz). Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions.

  4. Infall and outflow motions towards a sample of massive star-forming regions from the RMS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, N.; Lumsden, S. L.; Moore, T. J. T.; Maud, L. T.; Mendigutía, I.

    2018-06-01

    We present the results of an outflow and infall survey towards a distance-limited sample of 31 massive star-forming regions drawn from the Red MSX source (RMS) survey. The presence of young, active outflows is identified from SiO (8-7) emission and the infall dynamics are explored using HCO+/H13CO+ (4-3) emission. We investigate if the infall and outflow parameters vary with source properties, exploring whether regions hosting potentially young active outflows show similarities or differences with regions harbouring more evolved, possibly momentum-driven, `fossil' outflows. SiO emission is detected towards approximately 46 per cent of the sources. When considering sources with and without an SiO detection (i.e. potentially active and fossil outflows, respectively), only the 12CO outflow velocity shows a significant difference between samples, indicating SiO is more prevalent towards sources with higher outflow velocities. Furthermore, we find the SiO luminosity increases as a function of the Herschel 70 μm to WISE 22 μm flux ratio, suggesting the production of SiO is prevalent in younger, more embedded regions. Similarly, we find tentative evidence that sources with an SiO detection have a smaller bolometric luminosity-to-mass ratio, indicating SiO (8-7) emission is associated with potentially younger regions. We do not find a prevalence towards sources displaying signatures of infall in our sample. However, the higher energy HCO+ transitions may not be the best suited tracer of infall at this spatial resolution in these regions.

  5. Structure of the cleavage-activated prefusion form of the parainfluenza virus 5 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brett D; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kors, Christopher A; Leser, George P; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Lamb, Robert A

    2012-10-09

    The paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) enters cells by fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane through the concerted action of the fusion (F) protein and the receptor binding protein hemagglutinin-neuraminidase. The F protein folds initially to form a trimeric metastable prefusion form that is triggered to undergo large-scale irreversible conformational changes to form the trimeric postfusion conformation. It is thought that F refolding couples the energy released with membrane fusion. The F protein is synthesized as a precursor (F0) that must be cleaved by a host protease to form a biologically active molecule, F1,F2. Cleavage of F protein is a prerequisite for fusion and virus infectivity. Cleavage creates a new N terminus on F1 that contains a hydrophobic region, known as the FP, which intercalates target membranes during F protein refolding. The crystal structure of the soluble ectodomain of the uncleaved form of PIV5 F is known; here we report the crystal structure of the cleavage-activated prefusion form of PIV5 F. The structure shows minimal movement of the residues adjacent to the protease cleavage site. Most of the hydrophobic FP residues are buried in the uncleaved F protein, and only F103 at the newly created N terminus becomes more solvent-accessible after cleavage. The conformational freedom of the charged arginine residues that compose the protease recognition site increases on cleavage of F protein.

  6. Structure of the cleavage-activated prefusion form of the parainfluenza virus 5 fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brett D.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kors, Christopher A.; Leser, George P.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) enters cells by fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane through the concerted action of the fusion (F) protein and the receptor binding protein hemagglutinin-neuraminidase. The F protein folds initially to form a trimeric metastable prefusion form that is triggered to undergo large-scale irreversible conformational changes to form the trimeric postfusion conformation. It is thought that F refolding couples the energy released with membrane fusion. The F protein is synthesized as a precursor (F0) that must be cleaved by a host protease to form a biologically active molecule, F1,F2. Cleavage of F protein is a prerequisite for fusion and virus infectivity. Cleavage creates a new N terminus on F1 that contains a hydrophobic region, known as the FP, which intercalates target membranes during F protein refolding. The crystal structure of the soluble ectodomain of the uncleaved form of PIV5 F is known; here we report the crystal structure of the cleavage-activated prefusion form of PIV5 F. The structure shows minimal movement of the residues adjacent to the protease cleavage site. Most of the hydrophobic FP residues are buried in the uncleaved F protein, and only F103 at the newly created N terminus becomes more solvent-accessible after cleavage. The conformational freedom of the charged arginine residues that compose the protease recognition site increases on cleavage of F protein. PMID:23012473

  7. Global Infrared–Radio Spectral Energy Distributions of Galactic Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew Samuel; Binder, Breanna Arlene

    2018-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of 30 Galactic massive star-forming regions. We fit multicomponent dust, blackbody, and power-law continuum models to 3.6 µm through 10 mm spectral energy distributions obtained from Spitzer, MSX, IRAS, Herschel, and Planck archival survey data. Averaged across our sample, ~20% of Lyman continuum photons emitted by massive stars are absorbed by dust before contributing to the ionization of H II regions, while ~50% of the stellar bolometric luminosity is absorbed and reprocessed by dust in the H II regions and surrounding photodissociation regions. The most luminous, infrared-bright regions that fully sample the upper stellar initial mass function (ionizing photon rates NC ≥ 1050 s–1 and total infrared luminosity LTIR ≥ 106.8 L⊙) have higher percentages of absorbed Lyman continuum photons (~40%) and dust-reprocessed starlight (~80%). The monochromatic 70-µm luminosity L70 is linearly correlated with LTIR, and on average L70/LTIR = 50%, in good agreement with extragalactic studies. Calibrated against the known massive stellar content in our sampled H II regions, we find that star formation rates based on L70 are in reasonably good agreement with extragalactic calibrations, when corrected for the smaller physical sizes of the Galactic regions. We caution that absorption of Lyman continuum photons prior to contributing to the observed ionizing photon rate may reduce the attenuation-corrected Hα emission, systematically biasing extragalactic calibrations toward lower star formation rates when applied to spatially-resolved studies of obscured star formation.This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under award CAREER-1454333.

  8. Formation of ethylene glycol and other complex organic molecules in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Cesaroni, R.; Fontani, F.; Codella, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The detection of complex organic molecules related with prebiotic chemistry in star-forming regions allows us to investigate how the basic building blocks of life are formed. Aims: Ethylene glycol (CH2OH)2 is the simplest sugar alcohol and the reduced alcohol of the simplest sugar glycoladehyde (CH2OHCHO). We study the molecular abundance and spatial distribution of (CH2OH)2, CH2OHCHO and other chemically related complex organic species (CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH) towards the chemically rich massive star-forming region G31.41+0.31. Methods: We analyzed multiple single-dish (Green Bank Telescope and IRAM 30 m) and interferometric (Submillimeter Array) spectra towards G31.41+0.31, covering a range of frequencies from 45 to 258 GHz. We fitted the observed spectra with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectra, and obtained excitation temperatures and column densities. We compared our findings in G31.41+0.31 with the results found in other environments, including low- and high-mass star-forming regions, quiescent clouds and comets. Results: We report for the first time the presence of the aGg' conformer of (CH2OH)2 towards G31.41+0.31, detecting more than 30 unblended lines. We also detected multiple transitions of other complex organic molecules such as CH2OHCHO, CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH. The high angular resolution images show that the (CH2OH)2 emission is very compact, peaking towards the maximum of the 1.3 mm continuum. These observations suggest that low abundance complex organic molecules, like (CH2OH)2 or CH2OHCHO, are good probes of the gas located closer to the forming stars. Our analysis confirms that (CH2OH)2 is more abundant than CH2OHCHO in G31.41+0.31, as previously observed in other interstellar regions. Comparing different star-forming regions we find evidence of an increase of the (CH2OH)2/CH2OHCHO abundance ratio with the luminosity of the source. The CH3OCH3/CH3OCHO and (CH2OH)2/C2H5OH ratios are nearly constant with

  9. The growth of the central region by acquisition of counterrotating gas in star-forming galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan-Mei; Shi, Yong; Tremonti, Christy A.; Bershady, Matt; Merrifield, Michael; Emsellem, Eric; Jin, Yi-Fei; Huang, Song; Fu, Hai; Wake, David A.; Bundy, Kevin; Stark, David; Lin, Lihwai; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Bergmann, Thaisa Storchi; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel; Bureau, Martin; Chisholm, John; Drory, Niv; Guo, Qi; Hao, Lei; Hu, Jian; Li, Cheng; Li, Ran; Lopes, Alexandre Roman; Pan, Kai-Ke; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wang, Lan; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Ren-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies grow through both internal and external processes. In about 10% of nearby red galaxies with little star formation, gas and stars are counter-rotating, demonstrating the importance of external gas acquisition in these galaxies. However, systematic studies of such phenomena in blue, star-forming galaxies are rare, leaving uncertain the role of external gas acquisition in driving evolution of blue galaxies. Here, based on new measurements with integral field spectroscopy of a large representative galaxy sample, we find an appreciable fraction of counter-rotators among blue galaxies (9 out of 489 galaxies). The central regions of blue counter-rotators show younger stellar populations and more intense, ongoing star formation than their outer parts, indicating ongoing growth of the central regions. The result offers observational evidence that the acquisition of external gas in blue galaxies is possible; the interaction with pre-existing gas funnels the gas into nuclear regions (<1 kpc) to form new stars. PMID:27759033

  10. Multi-wavelength Morphological Study Of Star Forming Regions In Nearby Cluster-rich Lirgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilkin, Tatjana; Evans, A.; Mazzarella, J.; Surace, J.; Kim, D.; Howell, J.; Armus, L.; GOALS Team

    2009-05-01

    Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) are believed to play an important role in star formation history of the universe. Many LIRGs undergo intense bursts of star formation as a result of interaction/merger process. Given the dusty nature of LIRGs, it is necessary to probe Luminous Infrared Galaxies at multiple wavelengths. The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Hubble, Chandra and GALEX observatories and offers a unique opportunity to gain insights into the physical processes in these highly dust enshrouded systems. We examine a sample of 11 nearby (z < 0.03) cluster-rich (> 200 clusters as seen in HST ACS images) LIRG systems at various interaction stages. The combined HST ACS optical imaging, Spitzer IRAC 8 micron channel and GALEX near-UV imaging allows us to access the properties of visible and obscured star forming regions. We study the spatial distribution of star forming regions at these wavelengths, correlate locations of young stellar clusters with PAH and UV emission regions and trace changes with merger stage.

  11. 77 FR 50520 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Regional Center Under the Immigrant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ...-0061] Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Regional Center Under the Immigrant... collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Application for Regional Center under the Immigrant Investor... behalf of an entity under the Immigrant Investor Pilot Program. (5) An estimate of the total number of...

  12. Material Supply and Magnetic Configuration of an Active Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-11-01

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the Hα filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5-10 km s-1. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7-9 km s-1 in the Hα red-wing filtergrams and 9-25 km s-1 in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  13. Tracking Photospheric Energy Transport in Active Regions with SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attié, R.; Thompson, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    The solar photosphere presents flow fields at all observable scales. Where energy-bearing magnetic active regions break through the photosphere these flows are particularly strong, as sheared and twisted magnetic fields come into equilibrium with their surroundings while transporting magnetic energy into the corona. A part of this magnetic energy - the so-called `free energy' stored in the magnetic field in the form of "twisted" and shear of the field - is released in flares and eruptions. We can quantify the energy arrival and build-up in the corona by tracking flow fields and magnetic features at the photosphere as magnetic flux emerges and evolves before and after a flare or eruption.To do this reliably requires two things: a long series of photospheric observations at high sensitivity, spatial and temporal resolution, and an efficient, reliable and robust framework that tracks the photospheric plasma flows and magnetic evolution in both the quiet sun and active regions. SDO/HMI provides the observations, and we present here an innovative high resolution tracking framework that involves the `Balltracking' and `Magnetic Balltracking' algorithms. We show the first results of a systematic, quantitative and comprehensive measurements of the flows and transport of magnetic energy into the solar atmosphere and investigate whether this dynamic view can improve predictions of flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs).

  14. Tracked Active Region Patches for MDI and HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, Michael; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Bobra, Monica

    2014-06-01

    We describe tracked active-region patch data products that have been developed for HMI (HMI Active Region Patches, or HARPs) and for MDI (MDI Tracked Active Region Patches, or MDI TARPs). Both data products consist of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions. The now-released HARP data product covers 2010-present (>2000 regions to date). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. The TARPs contain 6170 regions spanning 72000 images taken over 1996-2010, and will be availablein the MDI resident archive (RA).MDI TARPs are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that they are in. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Also, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a cross-calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HMI HARPs and the MDI TARPs. We show results demonstrating region correspondence, region boundary agreement, and agreement of flux metadata using the approximately 140 regions in the May 2010-October 2010 time period. We envision several uses for these data

  15. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Raymore » Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).« less

  16. Desert Pavement Process and Form: Modes and Scales of Landscape Stability and Instability in Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Stephen G.; McFadden, Leslie D.; McDonald, Eric V.; Eppes, Martha C.; Young, Michael H.; Wood, Yvonne A.

    2014-05-01

    Desert pavements are recognized in arid landscapes around the world, developing via diminution of constructional/depositional landform relief and creating a 1-2 stone thick armor over a "stone free" layer. Surface exposure dating demonstrates that clasts forming the desert pavements are maintained at the land surface over hundreds of thousands of years, as aeolian fines are deposited on the land surface, transported into the underlying parent material and incorporated into accretionary soil horizons (e.g., the stone free or vesicular [Av] horizon). This surface armor provides long-term stability over extensive regions of the landscape. Over shorter time periods and at the landform-element scale, dynamic surficial processes (i.e., weathering, runoff) continue to modify the pavement form. Clast size reduction in comparison to underlying parent material, along with armoring and packing of clasts in pavements contribute to their persistence, and studies of crack orientations in pavement clasts indicate physical weathering and diminution of particle size are driven by diurnal solar insolation. Over geologic time, cracks form and propagate from tensile stresses related to temporal and spatial gradients in temperature that evolve and rotate in alignment with the sun's rays. Observed multimodal nature of crack orientations appear related to seasonally varying, latitude-dependent temperature fields resulting from solar angle and weather conditions. Surface properties and their underlying soil profiles vary across pavement surfaces, forming a landscape mosaic and controlling surface hydrology, ecosystem function and the ultimate life-cycle of arid landscapes. In areas of well-developed pavements, surface infiltration and soluble salt concentrations indicate that saturated hydraulic conductivity of Av horizons decline on progressively older alluvial fan surfaces. Field observations and measurements from well-developed desert pavement surfaces landforms also yield

  17. The Lambda Orionis Star Forming Region: a Test for the Universality of the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrado Y Navascues, David

    2005-10-01

    We propose observations with XMM-EPIC/MOS in five distinct sibling associations belonging to the Lambda Orionis Star Forming Region (2--5 Myr, 340 pc). We have already optical, near-IR, and Spitzer photometry, and spectroscopy for objects down to 0.015 M(sun). The goals are: i) Assess the membership of our candidates and detect new members. ii) Derive accurate IMFs for each association, checking the universality of the IMF. iii) Study the properties and evolution of the X-ray Luminosity Functions.

  18. A Survey of Large Molecules of Biological Interest toward Selected High Mass Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remijan, A.; Shiao, Y.-S.; Friedel, D. N.; Meier, D. S.; Snyder, L. E.

    2004-01-01

    We have surveyed three high mass Galactic star forming regions for interstellar methanol (CH3OH), formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), methyl formate (HCOOCH3), methyl cyanide (CH3CN), and ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) with the BIMA Array. From our observations, we have detected two new sources of interstellar HCOOH toward the hot core regions G19.61-0.23 and W75N. We have also made the first detections of CH3CH2CN and HCOOCH3 toward G19.61-0.23. The relative HCOOH/HCOOCH3 abundance ratio toward G19.61-0.23 is 0.18 which is comparable to the abundance ratios found by Liu and colleagues toward Sgr B2(N-LMH), Orion and W51(approximately 0.10). We have made the first detection of HCOOCH3 toward W75N. The relative HCOOH/HCOOCH3 abundance ratio toward W75N is 0.26 which is more than twice as large as the abundance ratios found by Liu and colleagues. Furthermore, the hot core regions around W75N show a chemical differentiation between the O and N cores similar to what is seen toward the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge and W3(OH) and W3(H2O). It is also apparent from our observations that the high mass star forming region G45.47+0.05 does not contain any compact hot molecular core and as a consequence its chemistry may be similar to cold dark clouds. Finally, the formation of CH3COOH appears to favor HMCs with well mixed N and O, despite the fact that CH3COOH does not contain a N atom. If proved to be true, this is an important constraint on CH3COOH formation and possibly other structurally similar biomolecules.

  19. Iron meteorites as remnants of planetesimals formed in the terrestrial planet region.

    PubMed

    Bottke, William F; Nesvorný, David; Grimm, Robert E; Morbidelli, Alessandro; O'Brien, David P

    2006-02-16

    Iron meteorites are core fragments from differentiated and subsequently disrupted planetesimals. The parent bodies are usually assumed to have formed in the main asteroid belt, which is the source of most meteorites. Observational evidence, however, does not indicate that differentiated bodies or their fragments were ever common there. This view is also difficult to reconcile with the fact that the parent bodies of iron meteorites were as small as 20 km in diameter and that they formed 1-2 Myr earlier than the parent bodies of the ordinary chondrites. Here we show that the iron-meteorite parent bodies most probably formed in the terrestrial planet region. Fast accretion times there allowed small planetesimals to melt early in Solar System history by the decay of short-lived radionuclides (such as 26Al, 60Fe). The protoplanets emerging from this population not only induced collisional evolution among the remaining planetesimals but also scattered some of the survivors into the main belt, where they stayed for billions of years before escaping via a combination of collisions, Yarkovsky thermal forces, and resonances. We predict that some asteroids are main-belt interlopers (such as (4) Vesta). A select few may even be remnants of the long-lost precursor material that formed the Earth.

  20. Water in Star-forming Regions with Herschel (WISH): recent results and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2012-03-01

    Water is a key molecule in the physics and chemistry of star- and planet-forming regions. In the `Water in Star-forming Regions with Herschel' (WISH) Key Program, we have obtained a comprehensive set of water data toward a large sample of well-characterized protostars, covering a wide range of masses and luminosities --from the lowest to the highest mass protostars--, as well as evolutionary stages --from pre-stellar cores to disks. Lines of both ortho- and para-H_2O and their isotopologues, as well as chemically related hydrides, are observed with the HIFI and PACS instruments. The data elucidate the physical processes responsible for the warm gas, probe dynamical processes associated with forming stars and planets (outflow, infall, expansion), test basic chemical processes and reveal the chemical evolution of water and the oxygen-reservoir into planet-forming disks. In this brief talk a few recent WISH highlights will be presented, including determinations of the water abundance in each of the different physical components (inner and outer envelope, outflow) and constraints on the ortho/para ratio. Special attention will be given to trends found across the sample, especially the similarity in profiles from low to high-mass protostars and the evolution of the gas-phase water abundance from prestellar cores to disks. More details can be found at http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/WISH, whereas overviews are given in van Dishoeck et al. (2011, PASP 123, 138), Kristensen & van Dishoeck (2011, Astronomische Nachrichten 332, 475) and Bergin & van Dishoeck (2012, Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. A).

  1. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  2. A multi-wavelength database of water vapor in planet-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus

    The inner few astronomical units of gas-rich protoplanetary disk are environments characterized by a rich and active gaseous chemistry. Primitive material left over from the formation of our own Solar System has for a long time yielded tantalizing clues to a heterogenous nebula with intricate dynamical, thermal and chemical structure that ultimately led to a great diversity in the planets and planetesimals of the Solar System. The discovery of a rich chemistry in protoplanetary disks via a forest of strong 3-40 micron molecular emission lines (H2O, OH, CO2, HCN, C2H2,...) allows us for the first time to investigate chemical diversity in other planet-forming environmments (Salyk et al. 2008; Carr & Najita 2008). Further efforts, supported by the Origins program, has established that this molecular forest is seen in the disks surrounding most young solar- type stars (Pontoppidan et al. 2010). We propose a 3-year program to analyze our growing multi-wavelength database of observations of water, OH and organic molecules in the surfaces of protoplanetary disks. The database includes high (R~25,000-100,000) and medium resolution (R~600-3000) 3- 200 micron spectra from a wide range of facilities (Keck-NIRSPEC, VLT-CRIRES, Spitzer-IRS, VLT-VISIR, Gemini-Michelle and Herschel-PACS). Our previous efforts have focused on demonstrating feasibility for observing water and other molecules in planet-forming regions, building statistics to show that the molecular forest is ubiquitous in disks around low-mass and solar-type stars and taking the first steps in understanding the implied chemical abundances. Now, as the next logical step, we will combine multi- wavelength data from our unique multi-wavelength database to map the radial distribution of, in particular, water and its derivatives. 1) We will use both line profile information from the high-resolution spectra, as well as line strengths, from a combination of high and low temperature lines to constrain the radial abundance

  3. A multi-wavelength database of water vapor in planet-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus

    The inner few astronomical units of gas-rich protoplanetary disk are environments characterized by a rich and active gaseous chemistry. Primitive material left over from the formation of our own Solar System has for a long time yielded tantalizing clues to a heterogenous nebula with intricate dynamical, thermal and chemical structure that ultimately led to a great diversity in the planets and planetesimals of the Solar System. The discovery of a rich chemistry in protoplanetary disks via a forest of strong 3-40 micron molecular emission lines (H2O, OH, CO2, HCN, C2H2,...) allows us for the first time to investigate chemical diversity in other planet-forming environmments (Salyk et al. 2008; Carr & Najita 2008). Further efforts, supported by the Origins program, has established that this molecular forest is seen in the disks surrounding most young solar- type stars (Pontoppidan et al. 2010). We propose a 3-year program to analyze our growing multi-wavelength database of observations of water, OH and organic molecules in the surfaces of protoplanetary disks. The database includes high (R~25,000-100,000) and medium resolution (R~600-3000) 3- 200 micron spectra from a wide range of facilities (Keck-NIRSPEC, VLT-CRIRES, Spitzer-IRS, VLT-VISIR, Gemini-Michelle and Herschel-PACS). Our previous efforts have focused on demonstrating feasibility for observing water and other molecules in planet-forming regions, building statistics to show that the molecular forest is ubiquitous in disks around low-mass and solar-type stars and taking the first steps in understanding the implied chemical abundances. Now, as the next logical step, we will combine multi- wavelength data from our unique multi-wavelength database to map the radial distribution of, in particular, water and its derivatives. 1) Â We will use both line profile information from the high-resolution spectra, as well as line strengths, from a combination of high and low temperature lines to constrain the radial

  4. The Essay: Theory and Pedagogy for an Active Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilker, Paul

    Calling for a radical reexamination of the traditional foundation of composition instruction--the thesis/support form, this book argues that the essay, with its informality, conversational tone, meditative mood, and integration of form and content, is better suited to developmental, epistemological, ideological, and feminist rhetorical…

  5. Cool and hot emission in a recurring active region jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Sargam M.; Zanna, Giulio Del; Mason, Helen

    2017-09-01

    Aims: We present a thorough investigation of the cool and hot temperature components in four recurring active region jets observed on July 10, 2015 using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), X-ray Telescope (XRT), and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) instruments. Methods: A differential emission measure (DEM) analysis was performed on areas in the jet spire and footpoint regions by combining the IRIS spectra and the AIA observations. This procedure better constrains the low temperature DEM values by adding IRIS spectral lines. Plasma parameters, such as Doppler velocities, electron densities, nonthermal velocities and a filling factor were also derived from the IRIS spectra. Results: In the DEM analysis, significant cool emission was found in the spire and the footpoint regions. The hot emission was peaked at log T [K] = 5.6-5.9 and 6.5 respectively. The DEM curves show the presence of hot plasma (T = 3 MK) in the footpoint region. We confirmed this result by estimating the Fe XVIII emission from the AIA 94 Å channel which was formed at an effective temperature of log T [K] = 6.5. The average XRT temperatures were also found to be in agreement with log T [K] = 6.5. The emission measure (EM) was found to be three orders of magnitude higher in the AIA-IRIS DEM compared with that obtained using only AIA. The O IV (1399/1401 Å) electron densities were found to be 2.0×1010 cm-3 in the spire and 7.6 × 1010 cm-3 in the footpoint. Different threads along the spire show different plane-of-sky velocities both in the lower corona and transition region. Doppler velocities of 32 km s-1 (blueshifted) and 13 km s-1 (redshifted) were obtained in the spire and footpoint, respectively from the Si IV 1402.77 Å spectral line. Nonthermal velocities of 69 and 53 km s-1 were recorded in the spire and footpoint region, respectively. We obtained a filling factor of 0.1 in the spire at log T [K] = 5. Conclusions: The recurrent jet observations confirmed the presence of

  6. Young Stellar Objects in the Massive Star-forming Regions W51 and W43

    SciTech Connect

    Saral, G.; Audard, M.; Hora, J. L.

    We present the results of our investigation of the star-forming complexes W51 and W43, two of the brightest in the first Galactic quadrant. In order to determine the young stellar object (YSO) populations in W51 and W43 we used color–magnitude relations based on Spitzer mid-infrared and 2MASS/UKIDSS near-infrared data. We identified 302 Class I YSOs and 1178 Class II/transition disk candidates in W51, and 917 Class I YSOs and 5187 Class II/transition disk candidates in W43. We also identified tens of groups of YSOs in both regions using the Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) method. We found similar cluster densities inmore » both regions, even though Spitzer was not able to probe the densest part of W43. By using the Class II/I ratios, we traced the relative ages within the regions and, based on the morphology of the clusters, we argue that several sites of star formation are independent of one another in terms of their ages and physical conditions. We used spectral energy distribution-fitting to identify the massive YSO (MYSO) candidates since they play a vital role in the star formation process, and then examined them to see if they are related to any massive star formation tracers such as UCH ii regions, masers, or dense fragments. We identified 17 MYSO candidates in W51, and 14 in W43, respectively, and found that groups of YSOs hosting MYSO candidates are positionally associated with H ii regions in W51, though we do not see any MYSO candidates associated with previously identified massive dense fragments in W43.« less

  7. Smoking Discriminately Changes the Serum Active and Non-Active Forms of Vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Shekoohi, Niloofar; Javanbakht, Mohammad Hassan; Sohrabi, Marjan; Zarei, Mahnaz; Mohammadi, Hamed; Djalali, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    Smoking may modify the appetite, and consequently affect nutrient intake and serum micronutrients. The effect of smoking on vitamin B12 status has been considered in several studies. The research proposed that organic nitrites, nitro oxide, cyanides, and isocyanides of cigarette smoke interfere with vitamin B12 metabolism, and convert it to inactive forms. This research was carried out to determine the serum level of active and inactive forms of vitamin B12 in male smokers in comparison with male nonsmokers. This is a case-control study, in which the participants were 85 male smokers and 85 male nonsmokers. The serum levels of total and active form of vitamin B12 were measured. Dietary intake was recorded by a quantitative food frequency questionnaire and one-day 24-hour dietary recall method. Independent two sample T test was used to compare quantitative variables between the case and control groups. The serum level of total vitamin B12 was not significantly different between two groups, but serum level of active form of vitamin B12 in the smoking group was significantly lower than non-smoking group (P<0.001). This is one of the first studies that evaluated the serum level of active form of vitamin B12 in smokers in the Iranian community. The results of this study identified that serum level of total vitamin B12 might be not different between smoking and non-smoking people, but the function of this vitamin is disturbed in the body of smokers through the reduction of serum level of active form of vitamin B12.

  8. Tracing the atomic nitrogen abundance in star-forming regions with ammonia deuteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Kenji; Persson, Magnus V.

    2018-06-01

    Partitioning of elemental nitrogen in star-forming regions is not well constrained. Most nitrogen is expected to be partitioned among atomic nitrogen (N I), molecular nitrogen (N_2), and icy N-bearing molecules, such as NH_3 and N_2. N I is not directly observable in the cold gas. In this paper, we propose an indirect way to constrain the amount of N I in the cold gas of star-forming clouds, via deuteration in ammonia ice, the [ND2H/NH2D]/[NH2D/NH3] ratio. Using gas-ice astrochemical simulations, we show that if atomic nitrogen remains as the primary reservoir of nitrogen during cold ice formation stages, the [ND2H/NH2D]/[NH2D/NH3] ratio is close to the statistical value of 1/3 and lower than unity, whereas if atomic nitrogen is largely converted into N-bearing molecules, the ratio should be larger than unity. Observability of ammonia isotopologues in the inner hot regions around low-mass protostars, where ammonia ice has sublimated, is also discussed. We conclude that the [ND2H/NH2D]/[NH2D/NH3] ratio can be quantified using a combination of Very Large Array and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations with reasonable integration times, at least towards IRAS 16293-2422, where high molecular column densities are expected.

  9. 76 FR 64379 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; eForm 6 Access...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ...] Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested; eForm 6 Access Request... Form/Collection: eForm 6 Access Request. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component...: Respondents must complete the eForm 6 Access Request form in order to receive a user ID and password to obtain...

  10. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide. A tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, José; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. Aims: We decided to investigate the suitability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. Methods: We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation propagation (I.e., perpendicular to the oscillating magnetic field of the radiation). To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O2 has been carried out. Results: An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Revised g factors have been obtained from a large number of SO rotational transitions between 86 and 389 GHz. In particular, the rotational transitions showing the largest Zeeman shifts are: N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 1 (86.1 GHz), N,J = 4, 3 ← 3, 2 (159.0 GHz), N,J = 1, 1 ← 0, 1 (286.3 GHz), N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 2 (309.5 GHz), and N,J = 2, 1 ← 1, 0 (329.4 GHz). Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions. The complete list of measured Zeeman components is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  11. Remote sensing application to regional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahrokhi, F.; Jones, N. L.; Sharber, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Two agencies within the State of Tennessee were identified whereby the transfer of aerospace technology, namely remote sensing, could be applied to their stated problem areas. Their stated problem areas are wetland and land classification and strip mining studies. In both studies, LANDSAT data was analyzed with the UTSI video-input analog/digital automatic analysis and classification facility. In the West Tennessee area three land-use classifications could be distinguished; cropland, wetland, and forest. In the East Tennessee study area, measurements were submitted to statistical tests which verified the significant differences due to natural terrain, stripped areas, various stages of reclamation, water, etc. Classifications for both studies were output in the form of maps of symbols and varying shades of gray.

  12. Very Large Array OH Zeeman Observations of the Star-forming Region S88B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, A. P.; Brogan, C. L.; Bourke, T. L.; Eftimova, M.; Troland, T. H.

    2013-04-01

    We present observations of the Zeeman effect in OH thermal absorption main lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz taken with the Very Large Array toward the star-forming region S88B. The OH absorption profiles toward this source are complicated, and contain several blended components toward a number of positions. Almost all of the OH absorbing gas is located in the eastern parts of S88B, toward the compact continuum source S88B-2 and the eastern parts of the extended continuum source S88B-1. The ratio of 1665/1667 MHz OH line intensities indicates the gas is likely highly clumped, in agreement with other molecular emission line observations in the literature. S88-B appears to present a similar geometry to the well-known star-forming region M17, in that there is an edge-on eastward progression from ionized to molecular gas. The detected magnetic fields appear to mirror this eastward transition; we detected line-of-sight magnetic fields ranging from 90 to 400 μG, with the lowest values of the field to the southwest of the S88B-1 continuum peak, and the highest values to its northeast. We used the detected fields to assess the importance of the magnetic field in S88B by a number of methods; we calculated the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressures, we calculated the critical field necessary to completely support the cloud against self-gravity and compared it to the observed field, and we calculated the ratio of mass to magnetic flux in terms of the critical value of this parameter. All these methods indicated that the magnetic field in S88B is dynamically significant, and should provide an important source of support against gravity. Moreover, the magnetic energy density is in approximate equipartition with the turbulent energy density, again pointing to the importance of the magnetic field in this region.

  13. Method of forming thermally stable high-resistivity regions in n-type indium phosphide by oxygen implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.E.; Dietrich, H.B.

    1985-12-12

    Objects of this invention are: to form high-temperature stable isolation regions in InP; to provide InP wafers that allow greater flexibility in the design and fabrication of discrete devices; to provide new and improved InP semiconductor devices in n-type InP; to provide high-resisitivity isolation regions in InP; to extend the usefulness of damage-induced isolation in n-type InP by making possible processes in which the isolation implantation precedes the alloying of ohmic contacts; and to provide n-type InP substrates without unwanted conductive layers. The above and other object are realized by an InP wafer comprising a S.I. InP substrate; a n-typemore » InP active layer disposed on the substrate; and oxygen ion implanted isolation regions disposed in the active layer. The S.I. InP dopant may comprise either Fe or Cr.« less

  14. Structure and Form. Elementary Science Activity Series, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Frank F.

    This book is number 2 of a series of elementary science books that presents a wealth of ideas for science activities for the elementary school teacher. Each activity includes a standard set of information designed to help teachers determine the activity's appropriateness for their students, plan its implementation, and help children focus on a…

  15. Is the filamentary dark cloud GF 6 a star forming region? — Stability analysis and infrared properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeheon; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Kim, Sang Joon; Zhang, Bo

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of mapping observations and stability analyses toward the filamentary dark cloud GF 6. We investigate the internal structures of a typical filamentary dark cloud GF 6 to know whether the filamentary dark cloud will form stars. We perform radio observations with both 12CO (J=1-0) and 13CO (J=1-0) emission lines to examine the mass distribution and its evolutionary status. The 13CO gas column density map shows eight subclumps in the GF 6 region with sizes on a sub-pc scale. The resulting local thermodynamic equilibrium masses of all the subclumps are too low to form stars against the turbulent dissipation. We also investigate the properties of embedded infrared point sources to know whether they are newly formed stars. The infrared properties also indicate that these point sources are not related to star forming activities associated with GF 6. Both radio and infrared properties indicate that the filamentary dark cloud GF 6 is too light to contract gravitationally and will eventually be dissipated away.

  16. Long-term Variability of H2CO Masers in Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, N.; Araya, E. D.; Hoffman, I. M.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.; Lorran-Costa, I.

    2017-10-01

    We present results of a multi-epoch monitoring program on variability of 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) masers in the massive star-forming region NGC 7538 IRS 1 from 2008 to 2015, conducted with the Green Bank Telescope, the Westerbork Radio Telescope , and the Very Large Array. We found that the similar variability behaviors of the two formaldehyde maser velocity components in NGC 7538 IRS 1 (which was pointed out by Araya and collaborators in 2007) have continued. The possibility that the variability is caused by changes in the maser amplification path in regions with similar morphology and kinematics is discussed. We also observed 12.2 GHz methanol and 22.2 GHz water masers toward NGC 7538 IRS 1. The brightest maser components of CH3OH and H2O species show a decrease in flux density as a function of time. The brightest H2CO maser component also shows a decrease in flux density and has a similar LSR velocity to the brightest H2O and 12.2 GHz CH3OH masers. The line parameters of radio recombination lines and the 20.17 and 20.97 GHz CH3OH transitions in NGC 7538 IRS 1 are also reported. In addition, we observed five other 6 cm formaldehyde maser regions. We found no evidence of significant variability of the 6 cm masers in these regions with respect to previous observations, the only possible exception being the maser in G29.96-0.02. All six sources were also observed in the {{{H}}}213{CO} isotopologue transition of the 6 cm H2CO line; {{{H}}}213{CO} absorption was detected in five of the sources. Estimated column density ratios [{{{H}}}212{CO}]/[{{{H}}}213{CO}] are reported.

  17. 76 FR 41279 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Form I-864, Form I-864A, Form I-864EZ, and Form I-864W...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Immigrant's Affidavit of Support Exemption. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and.... These forms are used by family-based and certain employment-based immigrants to have the petitioning...

  18. Chemical characterization of the early evolutionary phases of high-mass star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is a very complex process and up to date no comprehensive theory about it exists. This thesis studies the early stages of high-mass star-forming regions and employs astrochemistry as a tool to probe their different physical conditions. We split the evolutionary sequence into four observationally motivated stages that are based on a classification proposed in the literature. The sequence is characterized by an increase of the temperatures and densities that strongly influences the chemistry in the different stages. We observed a sample of 59 high-mass star-forming regions that cover the whole sequence and statistically characterized the chemical compositions of the different stages. We determined average column densities of 18 different molecular species and found generally increasing abundances with stage. We fitted them for each stage with a 1D model, such that the result of the best fit to the previous stage was used as new input for the following. This is a unique approach and allowed us to infer physical properties like the temperature and density structure and yielded a typical chemical lifetime for the high-mass star-formation process of 1e5 years. The 18 analyzed molecular species also included four deuterated molecules whose chemistry is particularly sensitive to thermal history and thus is a promising tool to infer chemical ages. We found decreasing trends of the D/H ratios with evolutionary stage for 3 of the 4 molecular species and that the D/H ratio depends more on the fraction of warm and cold gas than on the total amount of gas. That indicates different chemical pathways for the different molecules and confirms the potential use of deuterated species as chemical age indicators. In addition, we mapped a low-mass star forming region in order to study the cosmic ray ionization rate, which is an important parameter in chemical models. While in chemical models it is commonly fixed, we found that it ! strongly varies with

  19. Active Gaming as a Form of Exercise to Induce Hypoalgesia.

    PubMed

    Carey, Christopher; Naugle, Keith E; Aqeel, Dania; Ohlman, Thomas; Naugle, Kelly M

    2017-08-01

    An acute bout of moderate-to-vigorous exercise temporarily reduces pain sensitivity in healthy adults. Recently, active gaming has been rising in popularity as a means of light-to-moderate exercise and may be particularly suitable for deconditioned individuals. Whether the physical activity elicited in active games can produce a hypoalgesic effect remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether active videogames can reduce pressure and heat pain sensitivity in healthy adults. We also evaluated the relationship between the physical activity elicited by the games and the magnitude of the hypoalgesic response. Twenty-one healthy adults played four different active games on separate days, including Microsoft ® Kinect Xbox ® One's Fighter Within and Sports Rival's Tennis, and Nintendo ® Wii™ Sports' Boxing and Tennis. Heat pain thresholds on the forearm and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) on the trapezius and forearm were assessed immediately before and after a 15-minute active gaming or control session. Minutes spent in sedentary time and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during active gaming were measured with an accelerometer. The analyses revealed that PPTs at the forearm and trapezius significantly increased from pretest to posttest following Kinect Fighter Within. PPTs at the trapezius also significantly increased from pretest to posttest following Wii Boxing. The magnitude of the hypoalgesic response was significantly correlated with MVPA and sedentary time during gameplay. These results suggest that an active gaming session played at a moderate intensity is capable of temporarily reducing pain sensitivity.

  20. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  1. Sports participation, physical activity, and health in the European regions.

    PubMed

    Lera-López, Fernando; Marco, Rocio

    2018-08-01

    In a context of stagnation of the level of health-enhancing physical activity in Europe, this study examines the geographical stratification of sports participation and physical activity (PA) at the regional level in 28 European countries. While previous research has focused on the national approach, this study considers the regional level across 208 European regions. Individual survey data from the Eurobarometer 80.2 is combined with a regional-level approach to the 208 regions to quantify sports participation and PA at the regional level. The results show important differences and a geographical stratification of sports participation and PA among the European regions, albeit following different patterns. In particular, a north-south gap is identified in terms of PA rates and an east-west gap is detected in terms of sports participation levels. Applying the cluster technique, a taxonomy of four different European regions is developed considering both types of indicators. Finally, the existence of sports spatial spillovers among regions is verified, obtaining a positive autocorrelation among neighbouring regions for being involved in PA and sporting activities. The results may have significant implications in terms of policy measures to improve health through PA and sports participation at the regional level in Europe.

  2. Mid-Infrared Observations of Possible Intergalactic Star Forming Regions in the Leo Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroux, Mark; Smith, B.; Struck, C.

    2011-05-01

    Within the Leo group of galaxies lies a gigantic loop of intergalactic gas known as the Leo Ring. Not clearly associated with any particular galaxy, its origin remains uncertain. It may be a primordial intergalactic cloud alternatively, it may be a collision ring, or have a tidal origin. Combining archival Spitzer images of this structure with published UV and optical data, we investigate the mid-infrared properties of possible knots of star formation in the ring. These sources are very faint in the mid-infrared compared to star forming regions in the tidal features of interacting galaxies. This suggests they are either deficient in dust, or they may not be associated with the ring.

  3. Deep Near-Infrared Surveys and Young Brown Dwarf Populations in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, M.; Naoi, T.; Oasa, Y.; Nakajima, Y.; Nagashima, C.; Nagayama, T.; Baba, D.; Nagata, T.; Sato, S.; Kato, D.; Kurita, M.; Sugitani, K.; Itoh, Y.; Nakaya, H.; Pickles, A.

    2003-06-01

    We are currently conducting three kinds of IR surveys of star forming regions (SFRs) in order to seek for very low-mass young stellar populations. First is a deep JHKs-bands (simultaneous) survey with the SIRIUS camera on the IRSF 1.4m or the UH 2.2m telescopes. Second is a very deep JHKs survey with the CISCO IR camera on the Subaru 8.2m telescope. Third is a high resolution companion search around nearby YSOs with the CIAO adaptive optics coronagraph IR camera on the Subaru. In this contribution, we describe our SIRIUS camera and present preliminary results of the ongoing surveys with this new instrument.

  4. Phosphorylated Nuclear Receptor CAR Forms a Homodimer To Repress Its Constitutive Activity for Ligand Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shizu, Ryota; Osabe, Makoto; Perera, Lalith; Moore, Rick; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear receptor CAR (NR1I3) regulates hepatic drug and energy metabolism as well as cell fate. Its activation can be a critical factor in drug-induced toxicity and the development of diseases, including diabetes and tumors. CAR inactivates its constitutive activity by phosphorylation at threonine 38. Utilizing receptor for protein kinase 1 (RACK1) as the regulatory subunit, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) dephosphorylates threonine 38 to activate CAR. Here we demonstrate that CAR undergoes homodimer-monomer conversion to regulate this dephosphorylation. By coexpression of two differently tagged CAR proteins in Huh-7 cells, mouse primary hepatocytes, and mouse livers, coimmunoprecipitation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that CAR can form a homodimer in a configuration in which the PP2A/RACK1 binding site is buried within its dimer interface. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was found to stimulate CAR homodimerization, thus constraining CAR in its inactive form. The agonistic ligand CITCO binds directly to the CAR homodimer and dissociates phosphorylated CAR into its monomers, exposing the PP2A/RACK1 binding site for dephosphorylation. Phenobarbital, which is not a CAR ligand, binds the EGF receptor, reversing the EGF signal to monomerize CAR for its indirect activation. Thus, the homodimer-monomer conversion is the underlying molecular mechanism that regulates CAR activation, by placing phosphorylated threonine 38 as the common target for both direct and indirect activation of CAR. PMID:28265001

  5. ACTIVE REGION MORPHOLOGIES SELECTED FROM NEAR-SIDE HELIOSEISMIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, G. A.; McAteer, R. T. J.; Henney, C. J.

    We estimate the morphology of near-side active regions using near-side helioseismology. Active regions from two data sets, Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport synchronic maps and Global Oscillation Network Group near-side helioseismic maps, were matched and their morphologies compared. Our algorithm recognizes 382 helioseismic active regions between 2002 April 25 and 2005 December 31 and matches them to their corresponding magnetic active regions with 100% success. A magnetic active region occupies 30% of the area of its helioseismic signature. Recovered helioseismic tilt angles are in good agreement with magnetic tilt angles. Approximately 20% of helioseismic active regions can bemore » decomposed into leading and trailing polarity. Leading polarity components show no discernible scaling relationship, but trailing magnetic polarity components occupy approximately 25% of the area of the trailing helioseismic component. A nearside phase-magnetic calibration is in close agreement with a previous far-side helioseismic calibration and provides confidence that these morphological relationships can be used with far-side helioseismic data. Including far-side active region morphology in synchronic maps will have implications for coronal magnetic topology predictions and solar wind forecasts.« less

  6. A Chandra X-ray Mosaic of the Onsala 2 Star-Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Steve L.; Sokal, Kimberly; Guedel, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence for active high-mass star-formation in the Onsala 2 (ON2) complex in Cygnus include masers, compact HII (cHII) regions, and massive outflows. ON2 is thought to be physically associated with the young stellar cluster Berkeley 87 which contains several optically-identified OB stars and the rare oxygen-type (WO) Wolf-Rayet star WR 142. WO stars are undergoing advanced nuclear core burning as they approach the end of their lives as supernovae, and only a few are known in the Galaxy. We present results of a sensitive 70 ks Chandra ACIS-I observation of the northern half of ON2 obtained in 2016. This new observation, when combined with our previous 70 ks ACIS-I observation of the southern half in 2009, provides a complete X-ray mosaic of ON2 at arcsecond spatial resolution and reveals several hundred X-ray sources. We will summarize key results emerging from our ongoing analysis including the detection of an embedded population of young stars revealed as a tight grouping of X-ray sources surrounding the cHII region G75.77+0.34, possible diffuse X-ray emission (or unresolved faint point sources) near the cHII region G75.84+0.40, and confirmation of hard heavily-absorbed X-ray emission from WR 142 that was seen in the previous 2009 Chandra observation.

  7. The Massive Star-Forming Regions Omnibus X-Ray Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Povich, Matthew S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2014-07-01

    We present the Massive Star-forming Regions (MSFRs) Omnibus X-ray Catalog (MOXC), a compendium of X-ray point sources from Chandra/ACIS observations of a selection of MSFRs across the Galaxy, plus 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. MOXC consists of 20,623 X-ray point sources from 12 MSFRs with distances ranging from 1.7 kpc to 50 kpc. Additionally, we show the morphology of the unresolved X-ray emission that remains after the cataloged X-ray point sources are excised from the ACIS data, in the context of Spitzer and WISE observations that trace the bubbles, ionization fronts, and photon-dominated regions that characterize MSFRs. In previous work, we have found that this unresolved X-ray emission is dominated by hot plasma from massive star wind shocks. This diffuse X-ray emission is found in every MOXC MSFR, clearly demonstrating that massive star feedback (and the several-million-degree plasmas that it generates) is an integral component of MSFR physics.

  8. Characterization of methanol as a magnetic field tracer in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankhaar, Boy; Vlemmings, Wouter; Surcis, Gabriele; van Langevelde, Huib Jan; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; van der Avoird, Ad

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role during star formation1. Direct magnetic field strength observations have proven particularly challenging in the extremely dynamic protostellar phase2-4. Because of their occurrence in the densest parts of star-forming regions, masers, through polarization observations, are the main source of magnetic field strength and morphology measurements around protostars2. Of all maser species, methanol is one of the strongest and most abundant tracers of gas around high-mass protostellar disks and in outflows. However, as experimental determination of the magnetic characteristics of methanol has remained largely unsuccessful5, a robust magnetic field strength analysis of these regions could hitherto not be performed. Here, we report a quantitative theoretical model of the magnetic properties of methanol, including the complicated hyperfine structure that results from its internal rotation6. We show that the large range in values of the Landé g factors of the hyperfine components of each maser line lead to conclusions that differ substantially from the current interpretation based on a single effective g factor. These conclusions are more consistent with other observations7,8 and confirm the presence of dynamically important magnetic fields around protostars. Additionally, our calculations show that (nonlinear) Zeeman effects must be taken into account to further enhance the accuracy of cosmological electron-to-proton mass ratio determinations using methanol9-12.

  9. A Study of THT Cold Cores Population in the Star-Forming Region in Serpens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorellino, Eleonora

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to produce the Core Mass Function (CMF) of the Serpens star-forming region and confront it with the Initial Mass Function (IMF), the statistical distribution of initial star mass. As Testi & Sergent (1998) discovered, the power-law index of the slope of the CMF is very close to the one of the Salpeter's IMF (Salpeter, 1955): dN/dM / M2.35. This strongly suggests that the stellar IMF results from the fragmentation process in turbulent cloud cores rather than from stellar accretion mechanisms and gives a huge contribute to undestanding the star formation. For this work, we started from the data delivered by the European satellite Herschel and produced the maps of the Serpens with Unimap code (Piazzo et al, 2015). Hence we obtained a core catalogue with two different softwares getsources (Men'shchikov et al, 2012) and CuTEx (Molinari et al, 2011) and we eliminated from it any source that is not a core. A full discussion of the cores physical propreties as well as the whole region is under preparation.

  10. VLBA SURVEYS OF OH MASERS IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS. I. SATELLITE LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Felli, D.; Migenes, V.

    2016-05-10

    Using the Very Long Baseline Array we performed a high-resolution OH maser survey in Galactic star-forming regions (SFRs). We observed all the ground state spectral lines: the main lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz and the satellite lines at 1612 and 1720 MHz. Due to the exceptionality of finding satellite lines in SFRs, we will focus our discussion on those lines. In our sample of 41 OH maser sources, five (12%) showed the 1612 MHz line and ten (24%) showed the 1720 MHz line, with only one source showing both lines. We find that 1720 MHz emission is correlated withmore » the presence of H ii regions, suggesting that this emission could be used to diagnose or trace high-mass star formation. We include an analysis of the possible mechanisms that could be causing this correlation as well as assessing the possible relationships between lines in our sample. In particular, the presence of magnetic fields seems to play an important role as we found Zeeman splitting in four of our sources (W75 N, W3(OH), W51 and NGC 7538). Our results have implications for current understanding of the formation of high-mass stars as well as on the masing processes present in SFRs.« less

  11. The Massive Star-forming Regions Omnibus X-ray Catalog, Second Installment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Anderson, Gemma E.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Naylor, Tim; Povich, Matthew S.

    2018-04-01

    We present the second installment of the Massive Star-forming Regions (MSFRs) Omnibus X-ray Catalog (MOXC2), a compilation of X-ray point sources detected in Chandra/ACIS observations of 16 Galactic MSFRs and surrounding fields. MOXC2 includes 13 ACIS mosaics, three containing a pair of unrelated MSFRs at different distances, with a total catalog of 18,396 point sources. The MSFRs sampled range over distances of 1.3 kpc to 6 kpc and populations varying from single massive protostars to the most massive Young Massive Cluster known in the Galaxy. By carefully detecting and removing X-ray point sources down to the faintest statistically significant limit, we facilitate the study of the remaining unresolved X-ray emission. Through comparison with mid-infrared images that trace photon-dominated regions and ionization fronts, we see that the unresolved X-ray emission is due primarily to hot plasmas threading these MSFRs, the result of feedback from the winds and supernovae of massive stars. The 16 MSFRs studied in MOXC2 more than double the MOXC1 sample, broadening the parameter space of ACIS MSFR explorations and expanding Chandra's substantial contribution to contemporary star formation science.

  12. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star-Forming Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), t Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  13. Regional Observation of Seismic Activity in Baekdu Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Che, Il-Young; Shin, Jin-Soo; Chi, Heon-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Seismic unrest in Baekdu Mountain area between North Korea and Northeast China region has called attention to geological research community in Northeast Asia due to her historical and cultural importance. Seismic bulletin shows level of seismic activity in the area is higher than that of Jilin Province of Northeast China. Local volcanic observation shows a symptom of magmatic unrest in period between 2002 and 2006. Regional seismic data have been used to analyze seismic activity of the area. The seismic activity could be differentiated from other seismic phenomena in the region by the analysis.

  14. Multi-wavelength observations of the star forming region in L1616

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, J. M.; Wachter, S.; Covino, E.; Sterzik, M. F.; Durisen, R. H.; Freyberg, M. J.; Hoard, D. W.; Cooksey, K.

    2004-03-01

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength study of the star forming region in L1616. Our observations include ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and High Resolution Imager (HRI) X-ray observations, optical wide-field imaging and near-IR imaging data and optical long-slit and multi-object spectroscopic follow-up. 22 new low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars are found to be distributed mainly to the East of the L1616 cometary cloud, in about a one-square-degree field. We find that the class-III infrared sources outnumber the class-II infrared sources by a factor of about three. The X-ray properties of the PMS stars in L1616 are quite similar to those of PMS stars detected in the Orion Nebula Cluster. The comparison of the position of the L1616 PMS stars in the HR diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks yields an average age of 1-2 Myr, with a very small age spread of about 1 Myr. Unlike the fossil star forming regions in Orion, L1616 appears to be a region of on-going star formation relatively far from the Orion A and B clouds. Given the small age spread, the spatial distribution of the PMS stars relative to the head of the cloud, as well as its cometary shape and high star formation efficiency, we conclude that the star formation in L1616 was most likely induced by a single event, the impact of the winds of the massive stars of the Orion OB association or a supernova explosion being the possible triggers. The Initial Mass Function (IMF) in L1616 is roughly consistent with that of the field in the mass range 0.3< M/M⊙ < 2.5. Several faint objects, detected in our optical images, are good candidates for young Brown Dwarfs (BDs). We might expect the number of BDs in L1616 to be intermediate between Taurus and the Trapezium. Based on observations carried out at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile under proposals numbers 56.E-0566 and 64.I-0355, and at the Calar Alto observatory.

  15. Interactive flare sites within an active region complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, G.; Gary, G. A.; Machado, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    We examine here a set of images of an active region complex, acquired on June 24-25, 1980, by the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on SMM, with the purpose of establishing whether there was any interplay between the frequent activity observed at different sites in the activity center and, in such a case, how the interaction was established. By analyzing both quiet and active orbits we show that, as a rule, activity originating in one region triggers the other region's activity. However, we find little unambiguous evidence for the presence of large-scale interconnecting loops. A comparison of X-ray images with magnetic field observations suggested that we interpret the active region behavior in terms of the interaction between different loop systems, in a scenario quite analogous to the interacting bipole representation of individual flares. We conclude that active region interplay provides an easily observable case to study the time-dependent topology and the mechanisms for the spreading of activity in transient events over all energy scales.

  16. An x-ray study of massive star forming regions with CHANDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2007-08-01

    Massive stars are characterized by powerful stellar winds, strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and consequently devastating supernovae explosions, which have a profound influence on their natal clouds and galaxy evolution. However, the formation and evolution of massive stars themselves and how their low-mass siblings are affected in the wind-swept and UV-radiation-dominated environment are not well understood. Much of the stellar populations inside of the massive star forming regions (MSFRs) are poorly studied in the optical and IR wavelengths because of observational challenges caused by large distance, high extinction, and heavy contamination from unrelated sources. Although it has long been recognized that X-rays open a new window to sample the young stellar populations residing in the MSFRs, the low angular resolution of previous generation X-ray telescopes has limited the outcome from such studies. The sensitive high spatial resolution X-ray observations enabled by the Chandra X- ray Observatory and the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) have significantly improved our ability to study the X-ray-emitting populations in the MSFRs in the last few years. In this thesis, I analyzed seven high spatial resolution Chandra /ACIS images of two massive star forming complexes, namely the NGC 6357 region hosting the 1 Myr old Pismis 24 cluster (Chapter 3) and the Rosette Complex including the 2 Myr old NGC 2244 cluster immersed in the Rosette Nebula (Chapter 4), embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC; Chapter 5), and a triggered cluster NGC 2237 (Chapter 6). The X-ray sampled stars were studied in great details. The unique power of X-ray selection of young stellar cluster members yielded new knowledge in the stellar populations, the cluster structures, and the star formation histories. The census of cluster members is greatly improved in each region. A large fraction of the X-ray detections have optical or near-infrared (NIR) stellar counterparts

  17. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality

  18. Hemisphere Rule in Active Regions with Different Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Xiong, X.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic twist in solar active regions has been found to have a hemispheric preferencein sign (hemisphere rule): negative in the northern hemisphere and positive in the southern.The strength of the preference reported in previous studies ranges greatly, from 58% to 82%.In this presentation, we will show an investigation that examines this hemispheric preference bystudying active regions in Solar Cycle 24 using the vector magnetic field data taken by the Helioseismicand Magnetic Imager (HMI). While in general the strength of the hemisphere preference is wellwithin the range reported by the previous studies, it differs substantially in different groupsof active regions that possess different properties in magnetic helicity: the group with theopposite signs of magnetic twist and writhe has a much stronger preference strength than thegroup with the same signs. This difference becomes even more significant in emerging activeregions. We place here a discussion on possible links between origin of magnetic twist, hemispherepreference, and emergence and evolution of active regions.

  19. Active tectonics of the Qom region, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Fattahi, M.; Jackson, J. A.; Talebian, M.; Nazari, H.; Bahroudi, A.

    2009-12-01

    Between 50-57°E shortening across the Arabian-Eurasian collision zone is accommodated primarily in the Zagros and Alborz mountains of Iran, which bound the relatively aseismic Central Iranian block. Both the lack of seismicity and the minor variation in GPS velocities across Central Iran suggest this region plays a negligible role in accommodating Arabia-Eurasia shortening at the present day. We examine recent deformation in the Qom region, which lies 100 km south of Tehran within the Central Iran block. This region is notable for a number of large earthquakes over the last 30 years: 1980.12.18 (Mw 6.0), 1980.12.22 (Mw 5.7), and 2007.06.18 (Mw 5.4). Body-waveform modeling of these events indicates N-S shortening on a S-dipping thrust fault which projects to the surface along the Qom thrust. Evidence for longer-term uplift is indicated by the increased topography south of the fault, and the exposure of folded Miocene (U. Red Fmtn) and Late Oligocene (Qom Fmtn) deposits. River incision has resulted in numerous river terraces, and in one location an alluvial fan has been offset across the fault. Four samples were collected from the surface of this fan and their ages determined using OSL dating. The results indicate fan abandonment at ~30 kybp. A DEM of the fan was produced using kinematic GPS surveying data, from which 1.0±0.3 m vertical offset was measured. A minimum uplift rate of 0.02 mm/yr and a minimum shortening rate of 0.01 mm/yr are obtained. If the age of the lower (and youngest) terrace is 10 ky, as is typically seen in other locations throughout Iran, the likely range of uplift rates are 0.02-0.2 mm/yr and shortening rates 0.01-0.2 mm/yr. North of Qom city, U. Red Fmtn deposits have been folded into an asymmetric N-verging anticline known as the Alborz anticline. Seismic, well and surface data all indicate this structure has formed as a fault-bend fold above a decollement at 3 km depth which ramps to the surface along the northern limit of the fold. A

  20. THE COLD SHOULDER: EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu

    2012-09-10

    The coronal heating mechanism for active region core loops is difficult to determine because these loops are often not resolved and cannot be studied individually. Rather, we concentrate on the 'inter-moss' areas between loop footpoints. We use observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-Ray Telescope to calculate the emission measure distributions of eight inter-moss areas in five different active regions. The combined data sets provide both high- and low-temperature constraints and ensure complete coverage in the temperature range appropriate for active regions. For AR 11113, the emission can be modeled with heating events that occur on timescalesmore » less than the cooling time. The loops in the core regions appear to be close to equilibrium and are consistent with steady heating. The other regions studied, however, appear to be dominated by nanoflare heating. Our results are consistent with the idea that active region age is an important parameter in determining whether steady or nanoflare heating is primarily responsible for the core emission, that is, older regions are more likely to be dominated by steady heating, while younger regions show more evidence of nanoflares.« less

  1. Forming a Learning Culture to Promote Fracture Prevention Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjalmarson, Helene V.; Strandmark, Margaretha

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore interprofessional experiences of incorporating fracture prevention activities in clinical practice inspired by an empowerment approach. Design/methodology/approach: Data collection consisted primarily of focus groups interviews, systematized and analyzed by the grounded theory method. The study took…

  2. Evidence for magnetic energy storage in coronal active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, A. S.; De Feiter, L. D.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Examination of X-ray images obtained by the S-054 X-ray spectrographic telescope on Skylab shows the presence of some atypical X-ray-emitting coronal structures in active regions which are not consistent with potential extrapolations of photospheric magnetic fields. Analysis of the observed temporal changes in the X-ray-emitting active-region structures demonstrates that the majority of these consist of brightness changes representing temperature (and perhaps density) variations of the material in the loops.

  3. Photospheric Magnetic Diffusion by Measuring Moments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Photospheric magnetic surface diffusion is an important constraint for the solar dynamo. The HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) program automatically identify all magnetic regions above a certain flux. In our study we measure the moments of ARs that are no longer actively emerging and can thereby give us good statistical constraints on photospheric diffusion. We also present the diffusion properties as a function of latitude, flux density, and single polarity (leading or following) within each HARP.

  4. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  5. Extreme Trust Region Policy Optimization for Active Object Recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaping; Wu, Yupei; Sun, Fuchun; Huaping Liu; Yupei Wu; Fuchun Sun; Sun, Fuchun; Liu, Huaping; Wu, Yupei

    2018-06-01

    In this brief, we develop a deep reinforcement learning method to actively recognize objects by choosing a sequence of actions for an active camera that helps to discriminate between the objects. The method is realized using trust region policy optimization, in which the policy is realized by an extreme learning machine and, therefore, leads to efficient optimization algorithm. The experimental results on the publicly available data set show the advantages of the developed extreme trust region optimization method.

  6. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) evolved to permeate the plasma membrane of target cells. This is achieved in a multistep mechanism that usually involves binding of soluble protein monomer to the lipid membrane, oligomerization at the plane of the membrane, and insertion of part of the polypeptide chain across the lipid membrane to form a conductive channel. Introduced pores allow uncontrolled transport of solutes across the membrane, inflicting damage to the target cell. PFTs are usually studied from the perspective of structure-function relationships, often neglecting the important role of the bulk membrane properties on the PFT mechanism of action. In this Account, we discuss how membrane lateral heterogeneity, thickness, and fluidity influence the pore forming process of PFTs. In general, lipid molecules are more accessible for binding in fluid membranes due to steric reasons. When PFT specifically binds ordered domains, it usually recognizes a specific lipid distribution pattern, like sphingomyelin (SM) clusters or SM/cholesterol complexes, and not individual lipid species. Lipid domains were also suggested to act as an additional concentration platform facilitating PFT oligomerization, but this is yet to be shown. The last stage in PFT action is the insertion of the transmembrane segment across the membranes to build the transmembrane pore walls. Conformational changes are a spontaneous process, and sufficient free energy has to be available for efficient membrane penetration. Therefore, fluid bilayers are permeabilized more readily in comparison to highly ordered and thicker liquid ordered lipid phase (Lo). Energetically more costly insertion into the Lo phase can be driven by the hydrophobic mismatch between the thinner liquid disordered phase (Ld) and large protein complexes, which are unable to tilt like single transmembrane segments. In the case of proteolipid pores, membrane properties can directly modulate pore size, stability, and even selectivity. Finally

  7. A Search for Companions to Brown Dwarfs in the Taurus and Chamaeleon Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, K. O.; Luhman, K. L.; Konopacky, Q. M.; McLeod, K. K.; Apai, D.; Ghez, A. M.; Pascucci, I.; Robberto, M.

    2014-06-01

    We have used WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain images of 47 members of the Taurus and Chamaeleon I star-forming regions that have spectral types of M6-L0 (M ~ 0.01-0.1 M ⊙). An additional late-type member of Taurus, FU Tau (M7.25+M9.25), was also observed with adaptive optics at Keck Observatory. In these images, we have identified promising candidate companions to 2MASS J04414489+2301513 (ρ = 0.''105/15 AU), 2MASS J04221332+1934392 (ρ = 0.''05/7 AU), and ISO 217 (ρ = 0.''03/5 AU). We reported the first candidate in a previous study, showing that it has a similar proper motion as the primary in images from WFPC2 and Gemini adaptive optics. We have collected an additional epoch of data with Gemini that further supports that result. By combining our survey with previous high-resolution imaging in Taurus, Chamaeleon I, and Upper Sco (τ ~ 10 Myr), we measure binary fractions of 14/93 = 0.15^{+0.05}_{-0.03} for M4-M6 (M ~ 0.1-0.3 M ⊙) and 4/108 = 0.04^{+0.03}_{-0.01} for >M6 (M <~ 0.1 M ⊙) at separations of >10 AU. Given the youth and low density of these regions, the lower binary fraction at later types is probably primordial rather than due to dynamical interactions among association members. The widest low-mass binaries (>100 AU) also appear to be more common in Taurus and Chamaeleon I than in the field, which suggests that the widest low-mass binaries are disrupted by dynamical interactions at >10 Myr, or that field brown dwarfs have been born predominantly in denser clusters where wide systems are disrupted or inhibited from forming. Based on observations performed with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini Observatory, and the W. M. Keck Observatory. The Hubble observations are associated with proposal IDs 11203, 11204, and 11983 and were obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  8. Companions and Environments of Low-Mass Stars: From Star-Forming Regions to the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Patience, Jenny; De Rosa, Robert J.; Bulger, Joanna; Rajan, Abhijith; Goodwin, Simon; Parker, Richard J.; McCarthy, Donald W.; Kulesa, Craig; van der Plas, Gerrit; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Jackson, Alan Patrick; Bryden, Geoffrey; Turner, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M.; Hales, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We present results from two studies probing the multiplicity and environmental properties of low-mass stars: (1) The MinMs (M-dwarfs in Multiples) Survey, a large, volume-limited survey of 245 field M-dwarfs within 15 pc, and (2) the TBOSS (Taurus Boundary of Stellar/Substellar) Survey, an ongoing study of disk properties for the lowest-mass members within the Taurus star-forming region. The MinMs Survey provides new measurements of the companion star fraction, separation distribution, and mass ratio distribution for the nearest K7-M6 dwarfs, utilizing a combination of high-resolution adaptive optics imaging and digitized widefield archival plates to cover an unprecedented separation range of ~1-10,000 AU. Within these data, we also identify companions below the stellar/brown dwarf boundary, enabling characterization of the substellar companion population to low-mass field stars. For the much younger population in Taurus, we present results from ALMA Band 7 continuum observations of low-mass stellar and substellar Class II objects, spanning spectral types from M4-M7.75. The sub-millimeter detections of these disks provide key estimates of the dust mass in small grains, which is then assessed within the context of region age, environment, and viability for planet formation. This young population also includes a number of interesting young binary systems. Covering both young (1-2 Myr) and old (>5 Gyr) populations of low-mass stars, the results from these studies provide benchmark measurements on the population statistics of low-mass field stars, and on the early protoplanetary environments of their younger M-star counterparts.

  9. The Depletion of Water During Dispersal of Planet-forming Disk Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzatti, A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Salyk, C.; Herczeg, G. J.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Blake, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new velocity-resolved survey of 2.9 μm spectra of hot H2O and OH gas emission from protoplanetary disks, obtained with the Cryogenic Infrared Echelle Spectrometer at the VLT (R ˜ 96,000). With the addition of archival Spitzer-IRS spectra, this is the most comprehensive spectral data set of water vapor emission from disks ever assembled. We provide line fluxes at 2.9-33 μm that probe from the dust sublimation radius at ˜0.05 au out to the region of the water snow line. With a combined data set for 55 disks, we find a new correlation between H2O line fluxes and the radius of CO gas emission, as measured in velocity-resolved 4.7 μm spectra (R {}{co}), which probes molecular gaps in inner disks. We find that H2O emission disappears from 2.9 μm (hotter water) to 33 μm (colder water) as {R}{co} increases and expands out to the snow line radius. These results suggest that the infrared water spectrum is a tracer of inside-out water depletion within the snow line. It also helps clarify an unsolved discrepancy between water observations and models by finding that disks around stars of {M}\\star > 1.5 {M}⊙ generally have inner gaps with depleted molecular gas content. We measure radial trends in H2O, OH, and CO line fluxes that can be used as benchmarks for models to study the chemical composition and evolution of planet-forming disk regions at 0.05-20 au. We propose that JWST spectroscopy of molecular gas may be used as a probe of inner disk gas depletion, complementary to the larger gaps and holes detected by direct imaging and by ALMA.

  10. Multiple forms of endopeptidase activity from jojoba seeds.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M J; Storey, R D

    1990-01-01

    The cotyledons of 27 day post-germination jojoba seedlings (Simmondsia chinensis) contained five distinct endopeptidase activities separable by DEAE Bio-Gel and CM-cellulose ion exchange chromatography. The endopeptidases were purified 108- to 266-fold and their individuality was confirmed by activity-specific assays in native acrylamide gels along with differences in their Mr and catalytic properties. The five endopeptidases, which showed activity on model substrates and protein, were named EP Ia, EP Ib, EP II, EP III and EP IV. EP Ia was a serine proteinase with a pH optimum of ca 8 and Mr of 58,000. EP Ib, II and III were discrete cysteine proteinases showing pH optima of ca 6.8, 6.0 and 5.4 and Mr of 41,000, 47,000 and 35,000 respectively. EP IV was an aspartic acid proteinase with a ca pH optimum of 3.5 and Mr of 33,000.

  11. Earth resources-regional transfer activity contracts review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensko, J., Jr.; Daniels, J. L.; Downs, S. W., Jr.; Jones, N. L.; Morton, R. R.; Paludan, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    A regional transfer activity contracts review held by the Earth Resources Office was summarized. Contracts in the earth resources field primarily directed toward applications of satellite data and technology in solution of state and regional problems were reviewed. A summary of the progress of each contract was given in order to share experiences of researchers across a seven state region. The region included Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina. Research in several earth science disciplines included forestry, limnology, water resources, land use, geology, and mathematical modeling. The use of computers for establishment of information retrieval systems was also emphasized.

  12. Active Curved Polymers Form Vortex Patterns on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Denk, Jonas; Huber, Lorenz; Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2016-04-29

    Recent in vitro experiments with FtsZ polymers show self-organization into different dynamic patterns, including structures reminiscent of the bacterial Z ring. We model FtsZ polymers as active particles moving along chiral, circular paths by Brownian dynamics simulations and a Boltzmann approach. Our two conceptually different methods point to a generic phase behavior. At intermediate particle densities, we find self-organization into vortex structures including closed rings. Moreover, we show that the dynamics at the onset of pattern formation is described by a generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  13. EXTERNALLY HEATED PROTOSTELLAR CORES IN THE OPHIUCHUS STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Johan E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.

    We present APEX 218 GHz observations of molecular emission in a complete sample of embedded protostars in the Ophiuchus star-forming region. To study the physical properties of the cores, we calculate H{sub 2}CO and c -C{sub 3}H{sub 2} rotational temperatures, both of which are good tracers of the kinetic temperature of the molecular gas. We find that the H{sub 2}CO temperatures range between 16 K and 124 K, with the highest H{sub 2}CO temperatures toward the hot corino source IRAS 16293-2422 (69–124 K) and the sources in the ρ Oph A cloud (23–49 K) located close to the luminous Herbigmore » Be star S1, which externally irradiates the ρ Oph A cores. On the other hand, the c -C{sub 3}H{sub 2} rotational temperature is consistently low (7–17 K) in all sources. Our results indicate that the c -C{sub 3}H{sub 2} emission is primarily tracing more shielded parts of the envelope whereas the H{sub 2}CO emission (at the angular scale of the APEX beam; 3600 au in Ophiuchus) mainly traces the outer irradiated envelopes, apart from in IRAS 16293-2422, where the hot corino emission dominates. In some sources, a secondary velocity component is also seen, possibly tracing the molecular outflow.« less

  14. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the central star forming region in NGC 1140 (exp 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Gallagher, John S. Iii

    1994-01-01

    We present broadband images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope's Planetary Camera of the central supergiant H II region in the amorphous galaxy NGC 1140. These images allow observations to a resolution of about 13 pc at the galaxy, and they reveal that its central 1/2 kpc contains 6-7 blue, luminous, compact super star clusters, many of which would be comparable in luminosity to globular clusters at the same age. A blue arc-shaped structure near the center may be a grouping of less luminous, R136/NGC 2070-sized clusters or a sheet of OB stars. Additional somewhat less luminous and redder clusters are also found farther out from the center. If these clusters are older, they too could have had luminosities comparable to those of the central six clusters at a comparable age. Thus, we find that NGC 1140 is remarkable in the number of extreme clusters that it has formed recently in a relatively small area of the galaxy. Since NGC 1140 exhibits global characteristics that are consistent with a recent merger, these clusters are likely to be a product of that event. This galaxy adds to the number of cases where rapid star formation has evidently produced super star clusters.

  15. Molecular maser flares in the high-mass star-forming region IRAS18566+0408

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbe, Daniel M.

    We report results of a long-termmonitoring study of 6cmformaldehyde (H 2CO), 6.035GHz hydroxyl (OH), and 6.7GHz methanol (CH3OH) masers in the young high-mass protostellar object IRAS18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20). This is the only high-mass star-forming region where correlated variability of three different maser species has been reported. The observations were conducted with the 305m Arecibo Radio Telescope, and together with data from the literature, we present H2CO flux density measurements from 2002 to 2014, CH3OH data from 2006 to 2013, and discuss OH observations obtained between 2008 and 2012. Our extended monitoring observations of the H2CO maser agree with the quasi-periodic flare phenomenon and exponential decrease in quiescent and flare flux densities proposed by Araya and collaborators in 2010. We also confirm the occurrence of 6.035GHz OH flares and a time delay with respect to the H2CO flares. An analysis between the variability behavior of different CH3OH maser components and the H2CO maser suggests that multiple variability mechanisms are responsible for CH3OH flux density changes.

  16. The HIFI spectral survey of massive star-forming region AFGL 2591

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmierczak, Maja; van der Tak, Floris; Helmich, Frank; Chvarria, Luis; Wang, Kuo-Song; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2013-07-01

    AFGL 2591 is a massive protostellar object with a bipolar outflow. It has been widely studied before since it is a relatively isolated and nearby star-forming region. Here we present an overview of the Herschel/HIFI spectral survey, as a part of CHESS Key Project. The survey covers a frequency range from 480 up to 1240 GHz as well as some particular lines from 1267 to 1901 GHz. From the spectral survey a total of 32 species were identified. The data analysis is divided into various families of molecules, eg. CO and its isotopologues, nitrogen-bearing molecules, sulfur-bearing species, organic molecules. We will discuss different types of observed molecules and their physical parameters. The radial abundance profiles of some molecules will be presented to learn about the chemical processes leading to their formation and destruction. One of the studied molecule is ammonia, which is concentrated in the inner part of the protostellar envelope (when T > 100K i.e. where water ice evaporates), with the abundance of 3x10e-7.

  17. Chandra/ACIS Spectra of the 30 Doradus Star Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsley, L.; Broos, P.; Feigelson, E.; Burrows, D.; Chu, Y.-H.; Garmire, G.; Griffiths, R.; Maeda, Y.; Tsuboi, Y.

    2000-12-01

    We present the first high-spatial-resolution X-ray spectra of constituents of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud, obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our continuing efforts to remove the spectral effects of CCD charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) due to radiation damage are described. The central cluster of young high-mass stars, R136, is resolved at the arcsecond level by ACIS, allowing spectral analysis of several constituents. Other Wolf-Rayet stars and multiple systems (e.g. R139, R140) are also detected. Spatially-resolved spectra are presented for N157B, the plerion SNR recently shown by X-ray observations to contain a 16-msec pulsar (Marshall et al., ApJ 499, L179). The spectrally soft superbubble structures seen by ROSAT are visible in the Chandra image; a composite spectrum, improved with CTI correction, is presented. Support for this effort was provided by NASA contract NAS8-38252 to Gordon Garmire, the ACIS Principal Investigator.

  18. H I-to-H2 Transition Layers in the Star-forming Region W43

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialy, Shmuel; Bihr, Simon; Beuther, Henrik; Henning, Thomas; Sternberg, Amiel

    2017-02-01

    The process of atomic-to-molecular (H I-to-H2) gas conversion is fundamental for molecular-cloud formation and star formation. 21 cm observations of the star-forming region W43 revealed extremely high H I column densities, of 120-180 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2, a factor of 10-20 larger than predicted by H I-to-H2 transition theories. We analyze the observed H I with a theoretical model of the H I-to-H2 transition, and show that the discrepancy between theory and observation cannot be explained by the intense radiation in W43, nor be explained by variations of the assumed volume density or H2 formation rate coefficient. We show that the large observed H I columns are naturally explained by several (9-22) H I-to-H2 transition layers, superimposed along the sightlines of W43. We discuss other possible interpretations such as a non-steady-state scenario and inefficient dust absorption. The case of W43 suggests that H I thresholds reported in extragalactic observations are probably not associated with a single H I-to-H2 transition, but are rather a result of several transition layers (clouds) along the sightlines, beam-diluted with diffuse intercloud gas.

  19. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions. I. Reliable Mock Observations from SPH Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Biscani, Francesco

    Through synthetic observations of a hydrodynamical simulation of an evolving star-forming region, we assess how the choice of observational techniques affects the measurements of properties that trace star formation. Testing and calibrating observational measurements requires synthetic observations that are as realistic as possible. In this part of the series (Paper I), we explore different techniques for mapping the distributions of densities and temperatures from the particle-based simulations onto a Voronoi mesh suitable for radiative transfer and consequently explore their accuracy. We further test different ways to set up the radiative transfer in order to produce realistic synthetic observations. We give amore » detailed description of all methods and ultimately recommend techniques. We have found that the flux around 20 μ m is strongly overestimated when blindly coupling the dust radiative transfer temperature with the hydrodynamical gas temperature. We find that when instead assuming a constant background dust temperature in addition to the radiative transfer heating, the recovered flux is consistent with actual observations. We present around 5800 realistic synthetic observations for Spitzer and Herschel bands, at different evolutionary time-steps, distances, and orientations. In the upcoming papers of this series (Papers II, III, and IV), we will test and calibrate measurements of the star formation rate, gas mass, and the star formation efficiency using our realistic synthetic observations.« less

  20. Externally Heated Protostellar Cores in the Ophiuchus Star-Forming Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, Johan E.; Charnley, Steven B.; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Bjerkeli, Per

    2017-01-01

    We present APEX 218 GHz observations of molecular emission in a complete sample of embedded protostars in the Ophiuchus star-forming region. To study the physical properties of the cores, we calculate H2CO and c-C3H2 rotational temperatures, both of which are good tracers of the kinetic temperature of the molecular gas. We find that the H2CO temperatures range between 16K and 124K, with the highest H2CO temperatures toward the hot corino source IRAS 16293-2422 (69-124 K) and the sources in the rho Oph A cloud (23-49 K) located close to the luminous Herbig Be star S1, which externally irradiates the rho Oph A cores. On the other hand, the c-C3H2 rotational temperature is consistently low (7-17 K) in all sources. Our results indicate that the c-C3H2 emission is primarily tracing more shielded parts of the envelope whereas the H2CO emission (at the angular scale of the APEX beam; 3600 au in Ophiuchus) mainly traces the outer irradiated envelopes, apart from in IRAS?16293-2422, where the hot corino emission dominates. In some sources, a secondary velocity component is also seen, possibly tracing the molecular outflow.

  1. THE FORMATION AND MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OF ACTIVE-REGION FILAMENTS OBSERVED BY NVST, SDO, AND HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.

    2015-08-15

    To better understand the properties of solar active-region filaments, we present a detailed study on the formation and magnetic structures of two active-region filaments in active region NOAA 11884 during a period of four days. It is found that the shearing motion of the opposite magnetic polarities and the rotation of the small sunspots with negative polarity play an important role in the formation of two active-region filaments. During the formation of these two active-region filaments, one foot of the filaments was rooted in a small sunspot with negative polarity. The small sunspot rotated not only around another small sunspotmore » with negative polarity, but also around the center of its umbra. By analyzing the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation using the vector magnetic fields in the photosphere, twisted structures were found in the two active-region filaments prior to their eruptions. These results imply that the magnetic fields were dragged by the shearing motion between opposite magnetic polarities and became more horizontal. The sunspot rotation twisted the horizontal magnetic fields and finally formed the twisted active-region filaments.« less

  2. Abundances and Excitation of H2, H3+ & CO in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesa, Craig A.

    Although most of the 123 reported interstellar molecules to date have been detected through millimeter-wave emission-line spectroscopy, this technique is inapplicable to non-polar molecules like H2 and H3+, which are central to our understanding of interstellar chemistry. Thus high resolution infrared absorption-line spectroscopy bears an important role in interstellar studies: chemically important non-polar molecules can be observed, and their abundances and excitation conditions can be referred to the same ``pencil beam'' absorbing column. In particular, through a weak quadrupole absorption line spectrum at near-infrared wavelengths, the abundance of cold H2 in dark molecular clouds and star forming regions can now be accurately measured and compared along the same ``pencil beam'' line of sight with the abundance of its most commonly cited surrogate, CO, and its rare isotopomers. Also detected via infrared line absorption is the pivotal molecular ion H3+, whose abundance provides the most direct measurement of the cosmic ray ionization rate in dark molecular clouds, a process that initiates the formation of many other observed molecules there. Our growing sample of H2 and CO detections now includes detailed multi-beam studies of the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud and NGC 2024 in Orion. We explore the excitation and degree of ortho- and para-H2 thermalization in dark clouds, variation of the CO abundance over a cloud, and the relation of H2 column density to infrared extinction mapping, far-infrared/submillimeter dust continuum emission, and large scale submillimeter CO, [C I] and HCO+ line emission -- all commonly invoked to indirectly trace H2 during the past 30+ years. For each of the distinct velocity components seen toward some embedded young stellar objects, we are also able to determine the temperature, density, and a CO/H2 abundance ratio, thus unraveling some of the internal structure of a star-forming cloud. H2 and H3+ continue to surprise and delight us

  3. 77 FR 65702 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition, Form Number I-730...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ...-0037] Agency Information Collection Activities: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition, Form Number I-730... request. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Refugee/Asylee Relative Petition. (3) Agency form number, if... households. Form I- 730 will be used by an asylee or refugee to file on behalf of his or her spouse and/or...

  4. 78 FR 4858 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Immigrant Petition for Alien Workers, Form I-140...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ...-0015] Agency Information Collection Activities: Immigrant Petition for Alien Workers, Form I-140... Approved Collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker. (3) Agency form... other for-profit. The information furnished on Form I-140 will be used by USCIS to classify aliens under...

  5. 77 FR 65706 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker, Form I-140...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ...-0015] Agency Information Collection Activities: Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker, Form I-140... Form/Collection: Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the... information furnished on Form I-140 will be used by USCIS to classify aliens under sections 203(b)(1), 203(b...

  6. 78 FR 26766 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 580); Comment Request; Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 580); Comment Request; Revision AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... collection, FERC Form No. 580 (Interrogatory on Fuel and Energy Purchase Practices). DATES: Comments on the... (FERC Form No. 580). OMB Control No.: 1902-0131. Type of Request: Three-year approval of the FERC Form...

  7. 76 FR 27078 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-426, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Collection Activities: Form N-426, Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 426, Request for Certification of... whether to revise the Form N-426. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-426 we will advise the public when...

  8. 75 FR 51094 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ...-0057] Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600; Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection under Review; Form N- 600... be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-600. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-600 we will...

  9. 75 FR 51096 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-400; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Collection Activities: Form N-400; Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review; Form N- 400, Application for Naturalization... the Form N-400. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-400 we will advise the public when we publish the...

  10. 75 FR 51096 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-470; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Collection Activities: Form N-470; Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review; Form N- 470, Application To Preserve Residence... evaluating whether to revise the Form N-470. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-470 we will advise the...

  11. 76 FR 24908 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-639; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Collection Activities: Form G-639; Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review; Form G- 639, Freedom of Information/Privacy Act... Form G-639. Should USCIS decide to revise Form G-639 we will advise the [[Page 24909

  12. 75 FR 61508 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... information collection requirement concerning the Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (Form I- [[Page 61509... Boat Landing Permit. OMB Number: 1651-0108. Form Number: CBP Form I-68. Abstract: The Canadian Border...

  13. Universities and Economic Development Activities: A UK Regional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decter, Moira; Cave, Frank; Rose, Mary; Peers, Gill; Fogg, Helen; Smith, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    A number of UK universities prioritize economic development or regeneration activities and for some of these universities such activities are the main focus of their knowledge transfer work. This study compares two regions of the UK--the North West and the South East of England--which have very different levels of economic performance.…

  14. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Regional Activities. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on regional library activities which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Importance of Information Resources in National Development with Particular Reference to the Asian Scene" (Yogendra P. Dubey, India); (2) "Report of the Activities of the Regional…

  15. Surface active complexes formed between keratin polypeptides and ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fang; Lu, Zhiming; Tucker, Ian; Hosking, Sarah; Petkov, Jordan; Lu, Jian R

    2016-12-15

    Keratins are a group of important proteins in skin and hair and as biomaterials they can provide desirable properties such as strength, biocompatibility, and moisture regaining and retaining. The aim of this work is to develop water-soluble keratin polypeptides from sheep wool and then explore how their surface adsorption behaves with and without surfactants. Successful preparation of keratin samples was demonstrated by identification of the key components from gel electrophoresis and the reproducible production of gram scale samples with and without SDS (sodium dodecylsulphate) during wool fibre dissolution. SDS micelles could reduce the formation of disulphide bonds between keratins during extraction, reducing inter-molecular crosslinking and improving keratin polypeptide solubility. However, Zeta potential measurements of the two polypeptide batches demonstrated almost identical pH dependent surface charge distributions with isoelectric points around pH 3.5, showing complete removal of SDS during purification by dialysis. In spite of different solubility from the two batches of keratin samples prepared, very similar adsorption and aggregation behavior was revealed from surface tension measurements and dynamic light scattering. Mixing of keratin polypeptides with SDS and C 12 TAB (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide) led to the formation of keratin-surfactant complexes that were substantially more effective at reducing surface tension than the polypeptides alone, showing great promise in the delivery of keratin polypeptides via the surface active complexes. Neutron reflection measurements revealed the coexistence of surfactant and keratin polypeptides at the interface, thus providing the structural support to the observed surface tension changes associated with the formation of the surface active complexes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. CO2 infrared emission as a diagnostic of planet-forming regions of disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Arthur D.; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The infrared ro-vibrational emission lines from organic molecules in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks are unique probes of the physical and chemical structure of planet-forming regions and the processes that shape them. These observed lines are mostly interpreted with local thermal equilibrium (LTE) slab models at a single temperature. Aims: We aim to study the non-LTE excitation effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a full disk model to evaluate: (I) what the emitting regions of the different CO2 ro-vibrational bands are; (II) how the CO2 abundance can be best traced using CO2 ro-vibrational lines using future JWST data and; (III) what the excitation and abundances tell us about the inner disk physics and chemistry. CO2 is a major ice component and its abundance can potentially test models with migrating icy pebbles across the iceline. Methods: A full non-LTE CO2 excitation model has been built starting from experimental and theoretical molecular data. The characteristics of the model are tested using non-LTE slab models. Subsequently the CO2 line formation was modelled using a two-dimensional disk model representative of T Tauri disks where CO2 is detected in the mid-infrared by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Results: The CO2 gas that emits in the 15 μm and 4.5 μm regions of the spectrum is not in LTE and arises in the upper layers of disks, pumped by infrared radiation. The v2 15 μm feature is dominated by optically thick emission for most of the models that fit the observations and increases linearly with source luminosity. Its narrowness compared with that of other molecules stems from a combination of the low rotational excitation temperature ( 250 K) and the inherently narrower feature for CO2. The inferred CO2 abundances derived for observed disks range from 3 × 10-9 to 1 × 10-7 with respect to total gas density for typical gas/dust ratios of 1000, similar to earlier LTE disk estimates. Line-to-continuum ratios are low, in the order of a

  17. A multi-wavelength study of pre-main sequence stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, E. W.; Stelzer, B.; Neuhäuser, R.; Hillwig, T. C.; Durisen, R. H.; Menten, K. M.; Greimel, R.; Barwig, H.; Englhauser, J.; Robb, R. M.

    2000-05-01

    Although many lowmass pre-main sequence stars are strong X-ray sources, the origin of the X-ray emission is not well known. Since these objects are variable at all frequencies, simultaneous observations in X-rays and in other wavelengths are able to constrain the properties of the X-ray emitting regions. In this paper, we report quasi-simultaneous observations in X-rays, the optical, and the radio regime for classical and weak-line T Tauri stars from the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. We find that all detected T Tauri stars show significant night-to-night variations of the X-ray emission. For three of the stars, FM Tau and CW Tau, both classical T Tauri stars, and V773 Tau, a weak-line T Tauri star, the variations are especially large. From observations taken simultaneously, we also find that there is some correspondence between the strength of Hα and the X-ray brightness in V773 Tau. The lack of a strong correlation leads us to conclude that the X-ray emission of V773 Tau is not a superposition of flares. However, we suggest that a weak correlation occurs because chromospherically active regions and regions of strong X-ray emission are generally related. V773 Tau was detected at 8.46 GHz as a weakly circularly polarised but highly variable source. We also find that the X-ray emission and the equivalent width of Hα remained unchanged, while large variations of the flux density in the radio regime were observed. This clearly indicates that the emitting regions are different. Using optical spectroscopy we detected a flare in Hα and event which showed a flare-like light-curve of the continuum brightness in FM Tau. However, ROSAT did not observe the field at the times of these flares. Nevertheless, an interesting X-ray event was observed in V773 Tau, during which the flux increased for about 8 hours and then decreased back to the same level in 5 hours. We interpret this as a long-duration event similar to those seen on the sun and other active stars. In the

  18. Gamma-ray Bursts May Originate in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-04-01

    New findings from two X-ray satellites suggest that gamma-ray bursts, some of the most intense blasts in the universe, may be created in the same area where stars are born. Dr. Luigi Piro of the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) in Rome, Italy, presented data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Italian-Dutch ASI BeppoSAX observatory today at the Gamma Ray 2001 conference in Baltimore, MD. "We know that when a gamma-ray burst explodes, it produces a blast of material called a fireball, which expands at relativistic speeds like a rapidly inflating bubble," said Piro, who works within CNR's Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale. "Our team found evidence that the blast wave caused by the fireball brakes against a wall of very dense gas, which we believe is the crowded region where stars form." Several theories exist about what causes gamma-ray bursts. Among more popular theories are that gamma-ray bursts come from various combinations of merging neutron stars and black holes, or, from the explosion of massive stars, called hypernovae. "Because gamma-ray bursts are going off in extremely distant galaxies, it is difficult to 'see' the regions that harbor them," said Piro. "We can only gather circumstantial evidence as to where and how they form." Piro's observations support the hypernova model. Scientists believe that within dense star-forming regions, the massive star required for a hypernova explosion evolves extremely rapidly. On astronomical time scales, the supermassive star would evolve over the course of only about one million years. Thus, the hypernova explosion may occur in the same stellar environment that originally produced the massive star itself, and perhaps may trigger even more star formation. The hint that gamma-ray bursts can occur in dense media came during a Chandra observation of an afterglow that occurred on September 26, 2000. Prof. Gordon Garmire of Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, found X-ray emission to be greater

  19. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nasol, D.

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulantsmore » of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.« less

  20. Wound Healing Activity of Topical Application Forms Based on Ayurveda

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Mitra, Shankar Kumar; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    The traditional Indian medicine—Ayurveda, describes various herbs, fats, oils and minerals with anti-aging as well as wound healing properties. With aging, numerous changes occur in skin, including decrease in tissue cell regeneration, decrease in collagen content, loss of skin elasticity and mechanical strength. We prepared five topical anti-aging formulations using cow ghee, flax seed oil, Phyllanthus emblica fruits, Shorea robusta resin, Yashada bhasma as study materials. For preliminary efficacy evaluation of the anti-aging activity we chose excision and incision wound healing animal models and studied the parameters including wound contraction, collagen content and skin breaking strength which in turn is indicative of the tissue cell regeneration capacity, collagenation capacity and mechanical strength of skin. The group treated with the formulations containing Yashada bhasma along with Shorea robusta resin and flax seed oil showed significantly better wound contraction (P < .01), higher collagen content (P < .05) and better skin breaking strength (P < .01) as compared to control group; thus proposing them to be effective prospective anti-aging formulations. PMID:19252191

  1. 75 FR 41216 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... Collection Activities: Form N-644, Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous...

  2. Weak and Compact Radio Emission in Early High-Mass Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosero, Viviana; P. Hofner, M. Claussen, S. Kurtz, R. Cesaroni, E. D. Araya, C. Carrasco-González, L. F. Rodríguez, K. M. Menten, F. Wyrowski, L. Loinard, S. P. Ellingsen

    2018-01-01

    High-mass protostars are difficult to detect: they have short evolutionary timescales, they tend to be located at large distances, and they are usually embedded within complicated cluster environments. In this work, we aimed to identify and analyze candidates at the earliest stages of high-mass star formation, where only low-level (< 1 mJy) radio emission is expected. We used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to achieve one of the most sensitive (image RMS < 3 -- 10 μJy/beam) centimeter continuum surveys towards high-mass star forming regions to date, with observations at 1.3 and 6 cm and an angular resolution < 0.5". The sample is composed of cold molecular clumps with and without infrared sources (CMC--IRs and CMCs, respectively) and hot molecular cores (HMCs), covering a wide range of parameters such as bolometric luminosity and distance. We detected 70 radio continuum sources that are associated with dust clumps, most of which are weak and compact. We detected centimeter wavelength sources in 100% of our HMCs, which is a higher fraction than previously expected and suggests that radio continuum may be detectable at weak levels in all HMCs. The lack of radio detections for some objects in the sample (including most CMCs) contributes strong evidence that these are prestellar clumps, providing interesting constraints and ideal follow up candidates for studies of the earliest stages of high-mass stars. Our results show further evidence for an evolutionary sequence in the formation of high-mass stars, from starless cores (i.e., CMCs) to relatively more evolved ones (i.e., HMCs). Many of our detections have morphologies and other observational parameters that resemble collimated ionized jets, which is highly relevant for recent theoretical models based on core accretion that predict that the first stages of ionization from high-mass stars are in the form of jets. Additionally, we found that properties of ionized jets from low and high-mass stars are extremely well

  3. Role of C-terminal heptapeptide in pore-forming activity of antimicrobial agent, gaegurin 4.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Kim, S S; Lee, M H; Lee, B J; Ryu, P D

    2004-10-01

    Gaegurin 4 (GGN4) is an antimicrobial peptide of 37 amino acids isolated from the skin of a frog, Rana rugosa. GGN4 has a disulfide bond between the residues 31 and 37, which is highly conserved among the antimicrobial peptides isolated from skin of the genus, Rana. However, the role of this C-terminal heptapeptide motif is not well understood. In this work, we compared the membrane effects of the full-length GGN4 (C37) and GGN4 1-30 (C30), which is devoid of the C-terminal seven amino acids to elucidate the function of the C-terminal motif. C37 induced significantly larger membrane conductance (>10x) in the model lipid bilayers formed with acidic and neutral phospholipids and larger K+ efflux from gram-positive (>30x) and gram-negative bacteria. However, the pores induced by C37 and C30 were not different in their permeability to K+ over Cl- (permeability ratio of K+ to Cl- = 4.8-7.1). In addition, the pore-forming effect of C37 or C30 in acidic membranes was not different from that in neutral membranes. Furthermore, C37-induced K+ efflux was not significantly decreased by the reducing agent, dithiothreitol. The results indicate that C-terminal heptapeptide sequence plays an important role in maintaining the high pore-forming activity of GGN4, but does not participate in forming GGN4-induced pore structure. The disulfide bond in this region does not appear critical for such high ionophoric activity of GGN4.

  4. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  5. [L forms of Staphylococcus aureus. Behavior of coagulase, hemolytic and desoxyribonuclease activities and antibiotic sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Loschiavo, F; Giarrizzo, S

    1977-01-01

    L Forms derived from strains of coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus, have, on the whole, preserved their DNAsic, haemolitic and coagulastic activities. L. forms showed high resistence to antibiotics acting on the bacterial cell-wall. The sensibility to other antibiotics was, roughly, analogous for the L forms as well as for the bacterial strains ones, with the exception of the clortetraciclin and the diidrostreptomicin, ehich proved to be comparatively more active on the L forms.

  6. A Survey for Planetary-mass Brown Dwarfs in the Chamaeleon I Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L.; Faherty, J. K.; Mamajek, E. E.; Bochanski, J. J.

    2017-08-01

    We have performed a search for planetary-mass brown dwarfs in the Chamaeleon I star-forming region using proper motions and photometry measured from optical and infrared images from the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based facilities. Through near-IR spectroscopy at Gemini Observatory, we have confirmed six of the candidates as new late-type members of Chamaeleon I (≥M8). One of these objects, Cha J11110675-7636030, has the faintest extinction-corrected M K among known members, which corresponds to a mass of 3-6 {M}{Jup} according to evolutionary models. That object and two other new members have redder mid-IR colors than young photospheres at ≤M9.5, which may indicate the presence of disks. However, since those objects may be later than M9.5 and the mid-IR colors of young photospheres are ill-defined at those types, we cannot determine conclusively whether color excesses from disks are present. If Cha J11110675-7636030 does have a disk, it would be a contender for the least-massive known brown dwarf with a disk. Since the new brown dwarfs that we have found extend below our completeness limit of 6-10 M {}{Jup}, deeper observations are needed to measure the minimum mass of the initial mass function in Chamaeleon I. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini Observatory, the ESO Telescopes at Paranal Observatory, Magellan Observatory, the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the ESA Gaia mission.

  7. A Multi-Wavelength View of Planet Forming Regions: Unleashing the Full Power of ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazzari, Marco

    2017-11-01

    Observations at sub-mm/mm wavelengths allow us to probe the solids in the interior of protoplanetary disks, where the bulk of the dust is located and planet formation is expected to occur. However, the actual size of dust grains is still largely unknown due to the limited angular resolution and sensitivity of past observations. The upgraded VLA and, especially, the ALMA observatories provide now powerful tools to resolve grain growth in disks, making the time ripe for developing a multi-wavelength analysis of sub-mm/mm observations of disks. In my contribution I will present a novel analysis method for multi-wavelength ALMA/VLA observations which, based on the self-consistent modelling of the sub-mm/mm disk continuum emission, allows us to constrain simultaneously the size distribution of dust grains and the disk's physical structure (Tazzari et al. 2016, A&A 588 A53). I will also present the recent analysis of spatially resolved ALMA Band 7 observations of a large sample of disks in the Lupus star forming region, from which we obtained a tentative evidence of a disk size-disk mass correlation (Tazzari et al. 2017, arXiv:1707.01499). Finally, I will introduce galario, a GPU Accelerated Library for the Analysis of Radio Interferometry Observations. Fitting the observed visibilities in the uv-plane is computationally demanding: with galario we solve this problem for the current as well as for the full-science ALMA capabilities by leveraging on the computing power of GPUs, providing the computational breakthrough needed to fully exploit the new wealth of information delivered by ALMA.

  8. Distribution of 26Al in the CR chondrite chondrule-forming region of the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Devin L.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Ogliore, Ryan C.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Amelin, Yuri; Stirling, Claudine H.; Kaltenbach, Angela

    2017-03-01

    trends with major and minor element or O-isotope compositions between these populations. The weighted mean (26Al/27Al)0 of 22 CR chondrules measured is (1.8 ± 0.3) × 10-6. An apparent agreement between the 26Al-26Mg ages (using weighted mean value) and the revised (using 238U/235U ratio for bulk CR chondrites of 137.7789 ± 0.0085) 207Pb-206Pb age of a set of chondrules from CR chondrites (Amelin et al., 2002, Science297, 1678) is consistent with the initial 26Al/27Al ratio in the CR chondrite chondrule-forming region at the canonical level (∼5.2 × 10-5), allowing the use of 26Al-26Mg systematics as a chronometer for CR chondrules. To prove chronological significance of 26Al for CR chondrules, measurements of Al-Mg and U-Pb isotope systematics on individual chondrules are required. The presence of several generations among CR chondrules indicates some chondrules that accreted into the CR chondrite parent asteroid avoided melting by later chondrule-forming events, suggesting chondrule-forming processes may have occurred on relatively limited spatial scales. Accretion of the CR chondrite parent body occurred at >4.0-0.3+0.5 Ma after the formation of CAIs with the canonical 26Al/27Al ratio, although rapid accretion after formation of the major population of CR chondrules is not required by our data.

  9. The early evolution of giant H II regions formed by supernova explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M. C.

    1971-01-01

    The evolution of a giant H II region, which cools after an initial ionization, is discussed. The discussion is applied to the Vela X and Tycho supernovae. Other giant H II regions might not be as easily detectable as the Vela X region. The Tycho region may be just detectable in the O(II) or O(III) optical lines or as a hole in the 21-cm emission line profiles, as is suggested in the data. These giant H II regions last appreciably longer than the continuum radio sources within them.

  10. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Akihiro, E-mail: a-wada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Wong, Pooi-Fong; Hojo, Hironobu

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radialmore » diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.« less

  11. TARPs: Tracked Active Region Patches from SoHO/MDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.

    2013-12-01

    We describe progress toward creating a retrospective MDI data product consisting of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions, abbreviated TARPs (Tracked Active Region Patches). The TARPs are being developed as a backward-looking extension (covering approximately 3500 regions spanning 1996-2010) to the HARP (HMI Active Region Patch) data product that has already been released for HMI (2010-present). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is designed to be a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. TARPs from MDI are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and pseudo-continuum intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that the faculae/sunspots are part of. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. The final data product is indexed by a nominal AR number and time. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Additionaly, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu, Hoeksema et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HARPs (from HMI) and the MDI TARPs. We anticipate that this will allow a consistent catalog spanning both instruments. We envision several uses for the TARP data product, which will be

  12. Active Region Moss: Doppler Shifts from Hinode/EIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) onboard Hinode on 12-Dec- 2007 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low density cut-off as derived by Tripathi et al. (2010). We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described in Young, O Dwyer and Mason (2012). For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km/s with an estimated error of 4 km/s. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blue shift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries towards blue-shift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. Further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

  13. 75 FR 30098 - Reports, Forms and RecordKeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Reports, Forms and... Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork... INFORMATION CONTACT: Tamara Webster at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Office of Regional...

  14. THz quantum cascade lasers with wafer bonded active regions.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, M; Deutsch, C; Benz, A; Cole, G D; Detz, H; Andrews, A M; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G; Unterrainer, K

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate terahertz quantum-cascade lasers with a 30 μm thick double-metal waveguide, which are fabricated by stacking two 15 μm thick active regions using a wafer bonding process. By increasing the active region thickness more optical power is generated inside the cavity, the waveguide losses are decreased and the far-field is improved due to a larger facet aperture. In this way the output power is increased by significantly more than a factor of 2 without reducing the maximum operating temperature and without increasing the threshold current.

  15. Integral field spectroscopy of local LCBGs: NGC 7673, a case study. Physical properties of star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Morales, A.; Gallego, J.; Pérez-Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Zamorano, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2011-03-01

    Physical properties of the star-forming regions in the local Luminous Compact Blue Galaxy (LCBG) NGC 7673 are studied in detail using 3D spectroscopic data taken with the PMAS fibre pack (PPAK) integral field unit at the 3.5-m telescope in the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA). We derive integrated and spatially resolved properties such as extinction, star formation rate (SFR) and metallicity for this galaxy. Our data show an extinction map with maximum values located at the position of the main clumps of star formation showing small spatial variations [E(B-V)t= 0.12-0.21 mag]. We derive an Hα-based SFR for this galaxy of 6.2 ± 0.8 M⊙ yr-1 in agreement with the SFR derived from infrared and radio continuum fluxes. The star formation is located mainly in clumps A, B, C and F. Different properties measured in clump B make this region peculiar. We find the highest Hα luminosity with an SFR surface density of 0.5 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 in this clump. In our previous work, the kinematic analysis for this galaxy shows an asymmetrical ionized gas velocity field with a kinematic decoupled component located at the position of clump B. This region shows the absence of strong absorption features and the presence of a Wolf-Rayet stellar population indicating that this is a young burst of massive stars. Furthermore, we estimate a gas metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.20 ± 0.15 (0.32 solar) for the integrated galaxy using the R23 index. The values derived for the different clumps with this method show small metallicity variations in this galaxy, with values in the range 8.12 (for clump A) to 8.23 (for clump B) for 12 + log(O/H). The analysis of the emission-line ratios discards the presence of any active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity or shocks as the ionization source in this galaxy. Between the possible mechanisms to explain the starburst activity in this galaxy, our 3D spectroscopic data support the scenario of an on-going interaction with the possibility for clump B

  16. Photospheric Magnetic Evolution in the WHI Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsch, B. T.; McTiernan, J. M.; Christe, S.

    2012-01-01

    Sequences of line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms recorded by the Michelson Doppler Imager are used to quantitatively characterize photospheric magnetic structure and evolution in three active regions that rotated across the Sun s disk during the Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI), in an attempt to relate the photospheric magnetic properties of these active regions to flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Several approaches are used in our analysis, on scales ranging from whole active regions, to magnetic features, to supergranular scales, and, finally, to individual pixels. We calculated several parameterizations of magnetic structure and evolution that have previously been associated with flare and CME activity, including total unsigned magnetic flux, magnetic flux near polarity-inversion lines, amount of canceled flux, the "proxy Poynting flux," and helicity flux. To catalog flare events, we used flare lists derived from both GOES and RHESSI observations. By most such measures, AR 10988 should have been the most flare- and CME-productive active region, and AR 10989 the least. Observations, however, were not consistent with this expectation: ARs 10988 and 10989 produced similar numbers of flares, and AR 10989 also produced a few CMEs. These results highlight present limitations of statistics-based flare and CME forecasting tools that rely upon line-of-sight photospheric magnetic data alone.

  17. ON THE ACTIVE REGION BRIGHT GRAINS OBSERVED IN THE TRANSITION REGION IMAGING CHANNELS OF IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Skogsrud, H.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Pontieu, B. De

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provides spectroscopy and narrow band slit-jaw (SJI) imaging of the solar chromosphere and transition region at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Combined with high-resolution context spectral imaging of the photosphere and chromosphere as provided by the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST), we can now effectively trace dynamic phenomena through large parts of the solar atmosphere in both space and time. IRIS SJI 1400 images from active regions, which primarily sample the transition region with the Si iv 1394 and 1403 Å lines, reveal ubiquitous bright “grains” which are short-lived (two to five minute)more » bright roundish small patches of sizes 0.″5–1.″7 that generally move limbward with velocities up to about 30 km s{sup −1}. In this paper, we show that many bright grains are the result of chromospheric shocks impacting the transition region. These shocks are associated with dynamic fibrils (DFs), most commonly observed in Hα. We find that the grains show the strongest emission in the ascending phase of the DF, that the emission is strongest toward the top of the DF, and that the grains correspond to a blueshift and broadening of the Si iv lines. We note that the SJI 1400 grains can also be observed in the SJI 1330 channel which is dominated by C ii lines. Our observations show that a significant part of the active region transition region dynamics is driven from the chromosphere below rather than from coronal activity above. We conclude that the shocks that drive DFs also play an important role in the heating of the upper chromosphere and lower transition region.« less

  18. Evidence of Twisted Flux-Tube Emergence in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, M.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.; López Fuentes, M.

    2015-03-01

    Elongated magnetic polarities are observed during the emergence phase of bipolar active regions (ARs). These extended features, called magnetic tongues, are interpreted as a consequence of the azimuthal component of the magnetic flux in the toroidal flux-tubes that form ARs. We develop a new systematic and user-independent method to identify AR tongues. Our method is based on determining and analyzing the evolution of the AR main polarity inversion line (PIL). The effect of the tongues is quantified by measuring the acute angle [ τ] between the orientation of the PIL and the direction orthogonal to the AR main bipolar axis. We apply a simple model to simulate the emergence of a bipolar AR. This model lets us interpret the effect of magnetic tongues on parameters that characterize ARs ( e.g. the PIL inclination and the tilt angles, and their evolution). In this idealized kinematic emergence model, τ is a monotonically increasing function of the twist and has the same sign as the magnetic helicity. We systematically apply our procedure to a set of bipolar ARs (41 ARs) that were observed emerging in line-of-sight magnetograms over eight years. For most of the cases studied, the tongues only have a small influence on the AR tilt angle since tongues have a much lower magnetic flux than the more concentrated main polarities. From the observed evolution of τ, corrected for the temporal evolution of the tilt angle and its final value when the AR is fully emerged, we estimate the average number of turns in the subphotospherically emerging flux-rope. These values for the 41 observed ARs are below unity, except for one. This indicates that subphotospheric flux-ropes typically have a low amount of twist, i.e. highly twisted flux-tubes are rare. Our results demonstrate that the evolution of the PIL is a robust indicator of the presence of tongues and constrains the amount of twist in emerging flux-tubes.

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  17. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. METHODS By using data from the Health section of 2008’s Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. RESULTS A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. CONCLUSIONS Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making PMID:27355465

  18. Magnetic structure of an activated filament in a flaring active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasso, C.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: While the magnetic field in quiescent prominences has been widely investigated, less is known about the field in activated prominences. We report observational results on the magnetic field structure of an activated filament in a flaring active region. In particular, we studied its magnetic structure and line-of-sight flows during its early activated phase, shortly before it displayed signs of rotation. Methods: We inverted the Stokes profiles of the chromospheric He i 10 830 Å triplet and the photospheric Si i 10 827 Å line observed in this filament by the Vacuum Tower Telescope on Tenerife. Using these inversion results, we present and interpret the first maps of the velocity and magnetic field obtained in an activated filament, both in the photosphere and the chromosphere. Results: Up to five different magnetic components are found in the chromospheric layers of the filament, while outside the filament a single component is sufficient to reproduce the observations. Magnetic components displaying an upflow are preferentially located towards the centre of the filament, while the downflows are concentrated along its periphery. Moreover, the upflowing gas is associated with an opposite-polarity magnetic configuration with respect to the photosphere, while the downflowing gas is associated with a same-polarity configuration. Conclusions: The activated filament has a very complex structure. Nonetheless, it is compatible with a flux rope, albeit a distorted one, in the normal configuration. The observations are best explained by a rising flux rope in which part of the filament material is still stably stored (upflowing material, rising with the field), while the rest is no longer stably stored and flows down along the field lines. The movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Analysis of nucleon electromagnetic form factors from light-front holographic QCD: The spacelike region

    DOE PAGES

    Sufian, Raza Sabbir; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; ...

    2017-01-10

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the space-like nucleon electromagnetic form factors and their flavor decomposition within the framework of light-front holographic QCD. We show that the inclusion of the higher Fock componentsmore » $$|{qqqq\\bar{q}}$$ has a significant effect on the spin-flip elastic Pauli form factor and almost zero effect on the spin-conserving Dirac form factor. We present light-front holographic QCD results for the proton and neutron form factors at any momentum transfer range, including asymptotic predictions, and show that our results agree with the available experimental data with high accuracy. In order to correctly describe the Pauli form factor we need an admixture of a five quark state of about 30$$\\%$$ in the proton and about 40$$\\%$$ in the neutron. We also extract the nucleon charge and magnetic radii and perform a flavor decomposition of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. The free parameters needed to describe the experimental nucleon form factors are very few: two parameters for the probabilities of higher Fock states for the spin-flip form factor and a phenomenological parameter $r$, required to account for possible SU(6) spin-flavor symmetry breaking effects in the neutron, whereas the Pauli form factors are normalized to the experimental values of the anomalous magnetic moments. As a result, the covariant spin structure for the Dirac and Pauli nucleon form factors prescribed by AdS$$_5$$ semiclassical gravity incorporates the correct twist scaling behavior from hard scattering and also leads to vector dominance at low energy.« less

  20. Analysis of nucleon electromagnetic form factors from light-front holographic QCD: The spacelike region

    SciTech Connect

    Sufian, Raza Sabbir; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the space-like nucleon electromagnetic form factors and their flavor decomposition within the framework of light-front holographic QCD. We show that the inclusion of the higher Fock componentsmore » $$|{qqqq\\bar{q}}$$ has a significant effect on the spin-flip elastic Pauli form factor and almost zero effect on the spin-conserving Dirac form factor. We present light-front holographic QCD results for the proton and neutron form factors at any momentum transfer range, including asymptotic predictions, and show that our results agree with the available experimental data with high accuracy. In order to correctly describe the Pauli form factor we need an admixture of a five quark state of about 30$$\\%$$ in the proton and about 40$$\\%$$ in the neutron. We also extract the nucleon charge and magnetic radii and perform a flavor decomposition of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. The free parameters needed to describe the experimental nucleon form factors are very few: two parameters for the probabilities of higher Fock states for the spin-flip form factor and a phenomenological parameter $r$, required to account for possible SU(6) spin-flavor symmetry breaking effects in the neutron, whereas the Pauli form factors are normalized to the experimental values of the anomalous magnetic moments. As a result, the covariant spin structure for the Dirac and Pauli nucleon form factors prescribed by AdS$$_5$$ semiclassical gravity incorporates the correct twist scaling behavior from hard scattering and also leads to vector dominance at low energy.« less

  1. The gross energy balance of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, K. D.; Pye, J. P.; Hutcheon, R. J.; Gerassimenko, M.; Krieger, A. S.; Davis, J. M.; Vesecky, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Parker's (1974) model in which sunspots denote regions of increased heat transport from the convection zone is briefly described. The amount of excess mechanically transported power supposed to be delivered to the atmosphere is estimated for a typical active region, and the total radiative power output of the active-region atmosphere is computed. It is found that only a very small fraction (about 0.001) of the sunspot 'missing flux' can be accounted for by radiative emission from the atmosphere above a spot group in the manner suggested by Parker. The power-loss mechanism associated with mass loss to the solar wind is briefly considered and shown not to be sufficient to account for the sunspot missing flux.

  2. Does High Plasma-β Dynamics ``Load'' Active Regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Scott W.

    2007-03-01

    Using long-duration observations in the He II 304 Å passband of SOHO EIT, we investigate the spatial and temporal appearance of impulsive intensity fluctuations in the pixel light curves. These passband intensity fluctuations come from plasma emitting in the chromosphere, in the transition region, and in the lowest portions of the corona. We see that they are spatially tied to the supergranular scale and that their rate of occurrence is tied to the unsigned imbalance of the magnetic field in which they are observed. The signature of the fluctuations (in space and time) is consistent with their creation by magnetoconvection-forced reconnection, which is driven by the flow field in the high-β plasma. The signature of the intensity fluctuations around an active region suggests that the bulk of the mass and energy going into the active region complex observed in the hotter coronal plasma is supplied by this process, dynamically forcing the looped structure from beneath.

  3. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament,more » we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.« less

  4. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Regional Activities. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six of the seven papers in this collection focus on regional library activities in Africa, Asia and Oceania, and Latin America and the Caribbean: (1) "Libraries and Information Services in a Changing World: The Challenges African Information Services Face at the End of the 1980s" (Dejen Abate, Ethiopia); (2) "The Computer and…

  5. Urban, Rural, and Regional Variations in Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sarah Levin; Kirkner, Gregory J.; Mayo, Kelly; Matthews, Charles E.; Durstine, Larry; Hebert, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: There is some speculation about geographic differences in physical activity (PA) levels. We examined the prevalence of physical inactivity (PIA) and whether US citizens met the recommended levels of PA across the United States. In addition, the association between PIA/PA and degree of urbanization in the 4 main US regions (Northeast,…

  6. A solar cycle timing predictor - The latitude of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1990-01-01

    A 'Spoerer butterfly' method is used to examine solar cycle 22. It is shown from the latitude of active regions that the cycle can now be expected to peak near November 1989 + or - 8 months, basically near the latter half of 1989.

  7. Ride-sharing activities in the Richmond regional planning district.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1977-01-01

    This report gives the results of a survey made of industries in the Richmond Regional Planning District to determine the current and expected ride-sharing activities there and the type of information deemed most useful in planning ride-sharing progra...

  8. Inferred flows of electric currents in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Y. J.; Hong, Q. F.; Hagyard, M. J.; Deloach, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to identify sources of major current systems in active regions and their channels of flow are explored. Measured photospheric vector magnetic fields together with high resolution white light and H-alpha photographs provide the data base to derive the current systems in the photosphere and chromosphere of a solar active region. Simple mathematical constructions of active region fields and currents are used to interpret these data under the assumptions that the fields in the lower atmosphere (below 200 km) may not be force free but those in the chromosphere and higher are. The results obtained for the complex active region AR 2372 are: (1) Spots exhibiting significant spiral structure in the penumbral filaments were the source of vertical currents at the photospheric surface; (2) Magnetic neutral lines where the transverse magnetic field was strongly sheared were channels along which a strong current system flowed; (3) The inferred current systems produced a neutral sheet and oppositely-flowing currents in the area of the magnetic delta configuration that was the site of flaring.

  9. Skylab observations of X-ray loops connecting separate active regions. [solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, R. C.; Krieger, A. S.; Svestka, Z.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    One hundred loops interconnecting 94 separate active solar regions detectable in soft X-rays were identified during the Skylab mission. While close active regions are commonly interconnected with loops, the number of such interconnections decreases steeply for longer distances; the longest interconnecting loop observed in the Skylab data connected regions separated by 37 deg. Several arguments are presented which support the point of view that this is the actual limit of the size of magnetic interconnections between active regions. No sympathetic flares could be found in the interconnected regions. These results cast doubt on the hypothesis that accelerated particles can be guided in interconnecting loops from one active region to another over distances of 100 deg or more and eventually produce sympathetic flares in them.

  10. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R.; Rogers, Troy D.; Stutts, M. Jackson; Randell, Scott H.; Grubb, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na+ transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface. PMID:22814399

  11. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R; Rogers, Troy D; Stutts, M Jackson; Randell, Scott H; Grubb, Barbara R; Boucher, Richard C

    2012-10-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface.

  12. HARPs: Tracked Active Region Patch Data Product from SDO/HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Sun, X.; Bobra, M.

    2012-12-01

    We describe an HMI data product consisting of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions, abbreviated HARPs (HMI Active Region Patches). The HARP data series has been helpful for subsetting individual active regions, for development of near-real-time (NRT) space weather indices for individual active regions, and for defining closed magnetic structures for computationally-intensive algorithms like vector field disambiguation. The data series builds upon the 720s cadence activity masks, which identify large-scale instantaneously-observed magnetic features. Using these masks as a starting point, large spatially-coherent structures are identified using convolution with a longitudinally-extended kernel on a spherical domain. The resulting set of identified regions is then tracked from image to image. The metric for inter-image association is area of overlap between the best current estimate of AR location, as predicted by temporally extrapolating each currently tracked object, and the set of instantaneously-observed magnetic structures. Once completed tracks have been extracted, they are made into a standardized HARP data series by finding the smallest constant-angular-velocity box, of constant width in latitude and longitude, that encompasses all appearances of the active region. This data product is currently available, in definitive and near-real-time forms, with accompanying region-strength, location, and NOAA-AR metadata, on HMI's Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) data portal.; HARP outlines for three days (2001 February 14, 15, and 16, 00:00 TAI, flipped N-S, selected from the 12-minute cadence original data product). HARPs are shown in the same color (some colors repeated) with a thin white box surrounding each HARP. HARPs are tracked and associated from image to image. HARPs, such as the yellow one in the images above, need not be connected regions. Merges and splits, such as the light blue region, are accounted for automatically.

  13. A study of the cold cores population in the Perseus star-forming regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzuto, S.; Fiorellino, E.; Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Ladjelate, B.; Di Francesco, J.; Piccotti, L.; Herschel Gould Belt Survey Consortium

    As part of the Herschel Gould Belt survey, the Perseus star-forming cloud was observed with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE instruments. Source catalogs are preliminary, as well as the here presented core mass function.

  14. Lower solar chromosphere-corona transition region. II - Wave pressure effects for a specific form of the heating function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, D. Tod; Holzer, Thomas E.; Macgregor, Keith B.

    1990-01-01

    Lower transition region models with a balance between mechanical heating and radiative losses are expanded to include wave pressure effects. The models are used to study the simple damping length form of the heating function. The results are compared to the results obtained by Woods et al. (1990) for solutions in the lower transition region. The results suggest that a mixture of fast-mode and slow-mode waves may provide the appropriate heating mechanism in the lower transition region, with the decline in effective vertical wave speed caused by the refraction and eventual total reflection of the fast-mode wave resulting from the decreasing atmospheric density.

  15. The Effect of "Rogue" Active Regions on the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Melinda; Lemerle, Alexandre; Labonville, François; Petrovay, Kristóf; Charbonneau, Paul

    2017-11-01

    The origin of cycle-to-cycle variations in solar activity is currently the focus of much interest. It has recently been pointed out that large individual active regions with atypical properties can have a significant impact on the long-term behavior of solar activity. We investigate this possibility in more detail using a recently developed 2×2D dynamo model of the solar magnetic cycle. We find that even a single "rogue" bipolar magnetic region (BMR) in the simulations can have a major effect on the further development of solar activity cycles, boosting or suppressing the amplitude of subsequent cycles. In extreme cases, an individual BMR can completely halt the dynamo, triggering a grand minimum. Rogue BMRs also have the potential to induce significant hemispheric asymmetries in the solar cycle. To study the effect of rogue BMRs in a more systematic manner, a series of dynamo simulations were conducted, in which a large test BMR was manually introduced in the model at various phases of cycles of different amplitudes. BMRs emerging in the rising phase of a cycle can modify the amplitude of the ongoing cycle, while BMRs emerging in later phases will only affect subsequent cycles. In this model, the strongest effect on the subsequent cycle occurs when the rogue BMR emerges around cycle maximum at low latitudes, but the BMR does not need to be strictly cross-equatorial. Active regions emerging as far as 20° from the equator can still have a significant effect. We demonstrate that the combined effect of the magnetic flux, tilt angle, and polarity separation of the BMR on the dynamo is via their contribution to the dipole moment, δ D_{BMR}. Our results indicate that prediction of the amplitude, starting epoch, and duration of a cycle requires an accurate accounting of a broad range of active regions emerging in the previous cycle.

  16. DIVERGENT HORIZONTAL SUB-SURFACE FLOWS WITHIN ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S. C.; Hill, F., E-mail: kjain@nso.edu, E-mail: stripathy@nso.edu, E-mail: fhill@nso.edu

    We measure the horizontal subsurface flow in a fast emerging active region (AR; NOAA 11158) using the ring-diagram technique and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager high spatial resolution Dopplergrams. This AR had a complex magnetic structure and displayed significant changes in morphology during its disk passage. Over a period of six days from 2011 February 11 to 16, the temporal variation in the magnitude of the total velocity is found to follow the trend of magnetic field strength. We further analyze regions of individual magnetic polarity within AR 11158 and find that the horizontal velocity components in these sub-regions havemore » significant variation with time and depth. The leading and trailing polarity regions move faster than the mixed-polarity region. Furthermore, both zonal and meridional components have opposite signs for trailing and leading polarity regions at all depths showing divergent flows within the AR. We also find a sharp decrease in the magnitude of total horizontal velocity in deeper layers around major flares. It is suggested that the re-organization of magnetic fields during flares, combined with the sunspot rotation, decreases the magnitude of horizontal flows or that the flow kinetic energy has been converted into the energy released by flares. After the decline in flare activity and sunspot rotation, the flows tend to follow the pattern of magnetic activity. We also observe less variation in the velocity components near the surface but these tend to increase with depth, further demonstrating that the deeper layers are more affected by the topology of ARs.« less

  17. PEERING INTO THE GIANT-PLANET-FORMING REGION OF THE TW HYDRAE DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Valerie A.; Kastner, Joel H.; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A.

    2015-12-20

    We present Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) adaptive optics near-infrared images of the giant-planet-forming regions of the protoplanetary disk orbiting the nearby (D = 54 pc), pre-main-sequence (classical T Tauri) star TW Hydrae. The GPI images, which were obtained in coronagraphic/polarimetric mode, exploit starlight scattered off small dust grains to elucidate the surface density structure of the TW Hya disk from ∼80 AU to within ∼10 AU of the star at ∼1.5 AU resolution. The GPI polarized intensity images unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in the radial surface brightness distribution of the inner disk. The gap is centered near ∼23 AU,more » with a width of ∼5 AU and a depth of ∼50%. In the context of recent simulations of giant-planet formation in gaseous, dusty disks orbiting pre-main-sequence stars, these results indicate that at least one young planet with a mass ∼0.2 M{sub J} could be present in the TW Hya disk at an orbital semimajor axis similar to that of Uranus. If this (proto)planet is actively accreting gas from the disk, it may be readily detectable by GPI or a similarly sensitive, high-resolution infrared imaging system.« less

  18. Extreme storm activity in North Atlantic and European region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazilova, N.

    2010-09-01

    The extreme storm activity study over North Atlantic and Europe includes the analyses of extreme cyclone (track number, integral cyclonic intensity) and extreme storm (track number) during winter and summer seasons in the regions: 1) 55°N-80N, 50°W-70°E; 2) 30°N-55°N, 50°W-70°E. Extreme cyclones were selected based on cyclone centre pressure (P<=970 mbar). Extreme storms were selected from extreme cyclones based on wind velocity on 925 mbar. The Bofort scala was used for this goal. Integral cyclonic intensity (for region) includes the calculation cyclone centers number and sum of MSLP anomalies in cyclone centers. The analyses based on automated cyclone tracking algorithm, 6-hourly MSLP and wind data (u and v on 925 gPa) from the NCEP/NCAR reanalyses from January 1948 to March 2010. The comparision of mean, calculated for every ten years, had shown, that in polar region extreme cyclone and storm track number, and integral cyclonic intensity gradually increases and have maximum during last years (as for summer, as for winter season). Every ten years means for summer season are more then for winter season, as for polar, as for tropical region. Means (ten years) for tropical region are significance less then for polar region.

  19. Patterns of Activity in A Global Model of A Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Viall, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of frequencies. What differs is the average frequency of the distributions. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes with a magnetic field extrapolation to create a model active region and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is not to reproduce a particular set of observations in detail, but to recover some typical properties and patterns observed in active regions. Our key findings are the following. (1) Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. (2) Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. (3) All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line of sight passes through coronal loop footpoints. (4) There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a timescale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies are operating across active regions. (5) Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  20. Similarity of urinary risk factors among stone-forming patients in five regions of the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, J. A.; Hill, K. D.; Pak, C. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Study Objective: To compare urinary biochemical risk factors among stone-forming patients in the Southeast (SE) or "stone belt" versus four other regions of the United States. Design: Prospective biochemical survey for regional comparisons. Setting: Referral-based nephrolithiasis clinics, urologists, nephrologists, and family practitioners. Patients: Consecutive sample of 3473 stone-forming patients who submitted 24-hour urine collections for biochemical analyses of stone-forming risk factors. Interventions: None. Subjects taking medication known to interfere with stone-forming risk factors were deleted from the final data compilation. Measurements and Main Results: Overall, the mean values for each urinary parameter spanned a narrow range without significant difference between the five regions. Among "metabolic" factors, 40% in the SE had hypercalciuria (> 6.25 mmol/d), compared to 35%-43% in other regions, and hyperuricosuria (> 4.2 mmol/d) was found in 16% in the SE versus 17%-19% elsewhere. Among "environmental" factors, low urine volume ( < 2 L/d) was found in 77% patients in the SE compared to 69%-78% elsewhere, and high sodium was encountered in 27% in the SE versus 24%-29% elsewhere. No differences were noted in occurrence of other abnormal risk factors: hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia, low pH, high sulfate, high phosphorus, or low magnesium. Conclusions: Despite expected regional differences in nutritional and environmental influences, the results of this study showed a striking similarity in urinary biochemical risk factor profiles of stone-formers in all five regions of the United States.

  1. 76 FR 41763 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Region Logbook Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... (NMFS) Alaska Region manages the United States (U.S.) groundfish fisheries of the Exclusive Economic... monitoring of the groundfish fisheries of the EEZ off Alaska. II. Method of Collection Paper and electronic logbooks, paper and electronic reports, and telephone calls are required from participants, and methods of...

  2. 78 FR 19649 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southwest Region Permit Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Federally-managed fisheries off the West Coast. There are three types of permits: Basic fishery permits for... fishing permits (EFPs). Appeals and certain waiver requests may also be submitted. Transfer applications... Species permits by April 30, 2013. III. Data OMB Control Number: 0648-0204. Form Number: None. Type of...

  3. Coronal Jets from Minifilament Eruptions in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Francisco; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are transient (frequently of lifetime approx.10 min) features that shoot out from near the solar surface, become much longer than their width, and occur in all solar regions, including coronal holes, quiet Sun, and active regions (e.g., Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007). Sterling et al. (2015) and other studies found that in coronal holes and in quiet Sun the jets result when small-scale filaments, called "minifilaments" erupt onto nearby open or high-reaching field lines. Additional studies found that coronal-jet-onset locations (and hence presumably the minifilament-eruption-onset locations) coincided with locations of magnetic-flux cancelation. For active region (AR) jets however the situation is less clear. Sterling et al. (2016) studied jets in one active region over a 24-hour period; they found that some AR jets indeed resulted from minifilament eruptions, usually originating from locations of episodes of magnetic-flux cancelation. In some cases however they could not determine whether flux was emerging or canceling at the polarity inversion line from which the minifilament erupted, and for other jets of that region minifilaments were not conclusively apparent prior to jet occurrence. Here we further study AR jets, by observing them in a single AR over a one-week period, using X-ray images from Hinode/XRT and EUV/UV images from SDO/AIA, and line-of-sight magnetograms and white-light intensity-grams from SDO/HMI. We initially identified 13 prominent jets in the XRT data, and examined corresponding AIA and HMI data. For at least several of the jets, our findings are consistent with the jets resulting from minifilament eruptions, and originating from sites of magnetic-field cancelation.

  4. 78 FR 28820 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request; Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request; Revision AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... notification of activity in this docket or in viewing/downloading comments and issuances in this docket may do... the resources that are affected by their activities and to play a role in protecting such resources...

  5. 78 FR 24402 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request; Extension AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... automatic notification of activity in this docket or in viewing/downloading comments and issuances in this... jurisdiction to recognize the resources that are affected by their activities and to play a role in protecting...

  6. Evidence of active region imprints on the solar wind structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    A common descriptive framework for discussing the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere uses the global magnetic field as a reference: low density, high velocity solar wind emanates from open magnetic fields, with high density, low speed solar wind flowing outward near the current sheet. In this picture, active regions, underlying closed magnetic field structures in the streamer belt, leave little or no imprint on the solar wind. We present evidence from interplanetary scintillation measurements of the 'disturbance factor' g that active regions play a role in modulating the solar wind and possibly contribute to the solar wind mass output. Hence we find that the traditional view of the solar wind, though useful in understanding many features of solar wind structure, is oversimplified and possibly neglects important aspects of solar wind dynamics

  7. Electric currents and coronal heating in NOAA active region 6952

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, T. R.; Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Wulser, J. -P.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tsuneta, S.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal relationship between coronal structures observed with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft and the vertical electric current density derived from photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the Stokes Polarimeter at the Mees Solar Observatory. We focus on a single active region: AR 6952 which we observed on 7 days during 1991 December. For 11 independent maps of the vertical electric current density co-aligned with non-flaring X-ray images, we search for a morphological relationship between sites of high vertical current density in the photosphere and enhanced X-ray emission in the overlying corona. We find no compelling spatial or temporal correlation between the sites of vertical current and the bright X-ray structures in this active region.

  8. A Survey of Nanoflare Properties in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, N. M.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate coronal heating using a systematic technique to analyze the properties of nanoflares in active regions (AR). Our technique computes cooling times, or time-lags, on a pixel-by-pixel basis using data taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Our technique has the advantage that it allows us to analyze all of the coronal AR emission, including the so-called diffuse emission. We recently presented results using this time-lag analysis on NOAA AR 11082 (Viall & Klimchuk 2012) and found that the majority of the pixels contained cooling plasma along their line of sight, consistent with impulsive coronal nanoflare heating. Additionally, our results showed that the nanoflare energy is stronger in the AR core and weaker in the active region periphery. Are these results representative of the nanoflare properties exhibited in the majority of ARs, or is AR 11082 unique? Here we present the time-lag results for a survey of ARs and show that these nanoflare patterns are born out in other active regions, for a range of ages, magnetic complexity, and total unsigned magnetic flux. Other aspects of the nanoflare properties, however, turn out to be dependent on certain AR characteristics.

  9. Modification of "Pressed" Atmospheres in Active Regions of Ultracool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Kronshtadtov, P. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Ultracool stars usually have active regions, which is confirmed by their high-power radiofrequency emission modulated by the star axial rotation. The interpretation of this emission is commonly based on the electron cyclotron maser mechanism realized in the active regions. A plasma mechanism of radiofrequency emission is not considered, because ultracool star atmospheres are tightly "pressed" against the star surface, and the plasma frequency is much lower than the electron gyrofrequency ( f L ≪ f B) at the coronal levels. This paper explores active regions of ultracool stars for the possible existence of a system of coronal magnetic loops carrying electric current generated by photospheric convection. It is shown that current dissipation induces a temperature increase inside the loops to about 107 K, which causes an increase in the scale of height of the inhomogeneous atmosphere and, at the coronal levels, effectuates condition f L ≫ f B, at which the plasma mechanism of radiofrequency emission prevails over the electron cyclotron maser mechanism. The magnetic loop parameters, intensity of electric currents generated by the photospheric convection, and efficiency of plasma heating inside the magnetic loops are evaluated on the example of the brown dwarf TVLM513-46546. The scale of the height of the modified atmosphere, which appears to be comparable to the star radius, is calculated; it is shown that the soft X-ray flow created by the hot modified atmosphere inside a coronal magnetic loop is about equal to that observed for brown dwarf TVLM513-46546.

  10. SPITZER IRAC COLOR DIAGNOSTICS FOR EXTENDED EMISSION IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Tapia, Mauricio; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.

    2014-10-20

    The infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope are an invaluable tool for identifying physical processes in star formation. In this study, we calculate the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color space of UV fluorescent H{sub 2} and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in photodissociation regions (PDRs) using the Cloudy code with PAH opacities from Draine and Li. We create a set of color diagnostics that can be applied to study the structure of PDRs and to distinguish between FUV-excited and shock-excited H{sub 2} emission. To test this method, we apply these diagnostics to Spitzer IRAC data of NGC 2316. Our analysismore » of the structure of the PDR is consistent with previous studies of the region. In addition to UV excited emission, we identify shocked gas that may be part of an outflow originating from the cluster.« less

  11. Asymmetric introgression between sympatric molestus and pipiens forms of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Comporta region, Portugal

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Culex pipiens L. is the most widespread mosquito vector in temperate regions. This species consists of two forms, denoted molestus and pipiens, that exhibit important behavioural and physiological differences. The evolutionary relationships and taxonomic status of these forms remain unclear. In northern European latitudes molestus and pipiens populations occupy different habitats (underground vs. aboveground), a separation that most likely promotes genetic isolation between forms. However, the same does not hold in southern Europe where both forms occur aboveground in sympatry. In these southern habitats, the extent of hybridisation and its impact on the extent of genetic divergence between forms under sympatric conditions has not been clarified. For this purpose, we have used phenotypic and genetic data to characterise Cx. pipiens collected aboveground in Portugal. Our aims were to determine levels of genetic differentiation and the degree of hybridisation between forms occurring in sympatry, and to relate these with both evolutionary and epidemiological tenets of this biological group. Results Autogeny and stenogamy was evaluated in the F1 progeny of 145 individual Cx. pipiens females. Bayesian clustering analysis based on the genotypes of 13 microsatellites revealed two distinct genetic clusters that were highly correlated with the alternative traits that define pipiens and molestus. Admixture analysis yielded hybrid rate estimates of 8-10%. Higher proportions of admixture were observed in pipiens individuals suggesting that more molestus genes are being introgressed into the pipiens form than the opposite. Conclusion Both physiological/behavioural and genetic data provide evidence for the sympatric occurrence of molestus and pipiens forms of Cx. pipiens in the study area. In spite of the significant genetic differentiation between forms, hybridisation occurs at considerable levels. The observed pattern of asymmetric introgression probably relates to

  12. Asymmetric introgression between sympatric molestus and pipiens forms of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Comporta region, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Bruno; Sousa, Carla A; Novo, Maria T; Freitas, Ferdinando B; Alves, Ricardo; Côrte-Real, Ana R; Salgueiro, Patrícia; Donnelly, Martin J; Almeida, António P G; Pinto, João

    2009-11-06

    Culex pipiens L. is the most widespread mosquito vector in temperate regions. This species consists of two forms, denoted molestus and pipiens, that exhibit important behavioural and physiological differences. The evolutionary relationships and taxonomic status of these forms remain unclear. In northern European latitudes molestus and pipiens populations occupy different habitats (underground vs. aboveground), a separation that most likely promotes genetic isolation between forms. However, the same does not hold in southern Europe where both forms occur aboveground in sympatry. In these southern habitats, the extent of hybridisation and its impact on the extent of genetic divergence between forms under sympatric conditions has not been clarified. For this purpose, we have used phenotypic and genetic data to characterise Cx. pipiens collected aboveground in Portugal. Our aims were to determine levels of genetic differentiation and the degree of hybridisation between forms occurring in sympatry, and to relate these with both evolutionary and epidemiological tenets of this biological group. Autogeny and stenogamy was evaluated in the F1 progeny of 145 individual Cx. pipiens females. Bayesian clustering analysis based on the genotypes of 13 microsatellites revealed two distinct genetic clusters that were highly correlated with the alternative traits that define pipiens and molestus. Admixture analysis yielded hybrid rate estimates of 8-10%. Higher proportions of admixture were observed in pipiens individuals suggesting that more molestus genes are being introgressed into the pipiens form than the opposite. Both physiological/behavioural and genetic data provide evidence for the sympatric occurrence of molestus and pipiens forms of Cx. pipiens in the study area. In spite of the significant genetic differentiation between forms, hybridisation occurs at considerable levels. The observed pattern of asymmetric introgression probably relates to the different mating

  13. IRX– β RELATION OF STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN NGC 628 BASED ON INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chengyun; Lian, Jianhui; Hu, Ning

    2016-08-01

    It has been found that the infrared-to-ultraviolet luminosity ratio (IRX) and ultraviolet spectral slope ( β ) have a tight correlation in starburst galaxies, while in normal galaxies the relation is deviated and has a much larger scatter. Star formation regions are much simpler in both morphology and physical properties than galaxies, so their photometric and spectroscopic properties are more easily and accurately determined. We have used the integral field spectroscopy and multiband photometric images to study the IRX– β relation of H ii regions in a nearby galaxy, NGC 628. There are obvious correlations between the D{sub n} (4000),more » stellar population age, star formation rate, especially H α equivalent width EW(H α), and deviation distance d {sub p} from the starburst IRX– β relation. However, there is little correlation between the Balmer decrement, metallicity, and d {sub p}. It is much more complicated than expected, so that we cannot introduce a single second parameter to describe the scatter and deviation of the H ii region IRX– β relation.« less

  14. A New Probe of the Planet-Forming Region in T Tauri Disks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-20

    each object finds the presence of inner disk gaps with sizes of a few AU in each of these young (∼1 Myr) stellar systems. We propose that the...young (≤10 Myr) protoplanetary accretion disks (Beckwith et al. 2000; D’Alessio 2003 and references therein). The onset of this evolution lies in the...Gravitational inter- action between the disk and the forming planet results in the formation of a gap as the mass of the planet increases (Bryden 1

  15. Geological characteristics and ore-forming process of the gold deposits in the western Qinling region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajun; Liu, Chonghao; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Li, Yujie; Mao, Zhihao; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Yinhong; Zhang, Jing; Zhai, Degao; Zhang, Huafeng; Shan, Liang; Zhu, Laimin; Lu, Rukui

    2015-05-01

    The western Qinling, belonging to the western part of the Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogen between the North China Block and South China Block, is one of the most important gold regions in China. Isotopic dates suggest that the Mesozoic granitoids in the western Qinling region emplaced during the Middle-Late Triassic, and the deposits formed during the Late Triassic. Almost all gold deposits in the western Qinling region are classified as orogenic, Carlin-type, and Carlin-like gold deposits, and they are the products of Qinling Orogenesis caused by the final collision between the North China Block and the South China Block. The early subduction of the Mian-Lue oceanic crust and the latter collision between South Qinling Terrane and the South China Block along the Mian-Lue suture generated lithosphere-scale thermal anomalies to drive orogen-scale hydrothermal systems. The collision-related magmatism also provided heat source for regional ore-forming fluids in the Carlin-like gold deposits. Orogenic gold deposits such as Huachanggou, Liziyuan, and Baguamiao lie between the Shang-Dan and Mian-Lue sutures and are confined to WNW-trending brittle-ductile shear zones in Devonian and Carboniferous greenschist-facies metasedimentary rocks that were highly-deformed and regionally-metamorphosed. These deposits are typical orogenic gold deposits and formed within a Late Triassic age. The deposits show a close relationship between Au and Ag. Ores contain mainly microscopic gold, and minor electrum and visible gold, along with pyrite. The ore-forming fluids were main metamorphic fluids. Intensive tectonic movements caused by orogenesis created fluid-migrating channels for precipitation locations. Although some orogenic gold deposits occur adjacent to granitoids, mineralization is not synchronous with magmatism; that is, the granitoids have no genetic relations to orogenic gold deposits. As ore-forming fluids converged into dilated fractures during the extension stage of orogenesis

  16. Does the Functional Form of the Association Between Education and Mortality Differ by U.S. Region?

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Connor; Montez, Jennifer Karas; Sasson, Isaac

    2018-01-01

    To understand the education-mortality association among U.S. adults, recent studies have documented its national functional form. However, the functional form of education-mortality relationship may vary across geographic contexts. The four U.S. Census regions differ considerably in their social and economic policies, employment opportunities, income levels, and other factors that may affect how education lowers the risk of mortality. Thus, we documented regional differences in the functional form of the education-mortality association and examined the role of employment and income in accounting for regional differences. We used data on non-Hispanic white adults (2,981,672, person years) aged 45-84 in the 2000-2009 National Health Interview Survey, with Linked Mortality File through 2011 (37,598 deaths) and estimated discrete-time hazard models. The functional form of education and adult mortality was best characterized by credentialism in the Midwest, Northeast, and for Western men. For Western women, the association was linear, consistent with the human capital model. In the South, we observed a combination of mechanisms, with mortality risk declining with each year of schooling and a step change with high school graduation, followed by steeper decline thereafter. Our work adds to the increasing body of research that stresses the importance of contexts in shaping the education-mortality relationship.

  17. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both C-terminal truncated form and full length form of Pleiotrophin failed to activate vertebrate ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)?

    PubMed

    Mathivet, Thomas; Mazot, Pierre; Vigny, Marc

    2007-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. ALK expression persists at a lower level in the adult brain. Thus, it might play an important role in both the normal development and function of the nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in vertebrates is still a matter of debate. Pleiotrophin and midkine have been proposed as ligands of ALK but several independent studies do not confirm this hypothesis. Interestingly, a recent study proposed that a C-terminal truncated form of Pleiotrophin (Pleiotrophin.15) and not the full length form (Pleiotrophin.18) promotes glioblastoma proliferation in an ALK-dependent fashion. These data were obviously a strong basis to conciliate the conflicting results so far reported in the literature. In the present study, we first purified to homogeneity the two forms of Pleiotrophin secreted by HEK 293 cells. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both Pleiotrophin.15 and Pleiotrophin.18 failed to activate ALK in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells expressing this receptor. Thus, for our point of view, ALK is still an orphan receptor in vertebrates.

  18. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions. III. Calibration of Measurement and Techniques of Star Formation Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Dale, James E., E-mail: koepferl@usm.lmu.de

    Through an extensive set of realistic synthetic observations (produced in Paper I), we assess in this part of the paper series (Paper III) how the choice of observational techniques affects the measurement of star formation rates (SFRs) in star-forming regions. We test the accuracy of commonly used techniques and construct new methods to extract the SFR, so that these findings can be applied to measure the SFR in real regions throughout the Milky Way. We investigate diffuse infrared SFR tracers such as those using 24 μ m, 70 μ m and total infrared emission, which have been previously calibrated formore » global galaxy scales. We set up a toy model of a galaxy and show that the infrared emission is consistent with the intrinsic SFR using extra-galactic calibrated laws (although the consistency does not prove their reliability). For local scales, we show that these techniques produce completely unreliable results for single star-forming regions, which are governed by different characteristic timescales. We show how calibration of these techniques can be improved for single star-forming regions by adjusting the characteristic timescale and the scaling factor and give suggestions of new calibrations of the diffuse star formation tracers. We show that star-forming regions that are dominated by high-mass stellar feedback experience a rapid drop in infrared emission once high-mass stellar feedback is turned on, which implies different characteristic timescales. Moreover, we explore the measured SFRs calculated directly from the observed young stellar population. We find that the measured point sources follow the evolutionary pace of star formation more directly than diffuse star formation tracers.« less

  19. Membrane Treatment of Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) Wastes for Recovery of Its Active Ingredients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    T ME1MBRANE TREATMENT OF AQUEOUS FILM FORMING FOAM~ (AFFF) WASTES FOR RECOVERY OFI Fts ACTIVE INGREDIENTS FINAL REPORT October 1980 by Edward S. K...OF THIS PAGEOPMn Date AVntr* d)__ ---- Ultrafiltration (UF) and Reverse Osmosis (RO) treatment of Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) solutions was...of Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) solutions was investigated to determine the feasibility of employing membrane processes to separate and recover

  20. 76 FR 24561 - Reports, Forms and Recordkeeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

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  16. Active Region Jets II: Triggering and Evolution of Violent Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Martinez, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    We study a series of X-ray-bright, rapidly evolving active-region coronal jets outside the leading sunspot of AR 12259, using Hinode/XRT, SDO/AIA and HMI, and IRIS/SJ data. The detailed evolution of such rapidly evolving “violent” jets remained a mystery after our previous investigation of active region jets (Sterling et al. 2016, ApJ, 821, 100). The jets we investigate here erupt from three localized subregions, each containing a rapidly evolving (positive) minority-polarity magnetic-flux patch bathed in a (majority) negative-polarity magnetic-flux background. At least several of the jets begin with eruptions of what appear to be thin (thickness ˜<2‧‧) miniature-filament (minifilament) “strands” from a magnetic neutral line where magnetic flux cancelation is ongoing, consistent with the magnetic configuration presented for coronal-hole jets in Sterling et al. (2015, Nature, 523, 437). For some jets strands are difficult/ impossible to detect, perhaps due to their thinness, obscuration by surrounding bright or dark features, or the absence of erupting cool-material minifilaments in those jets. Tracing in detail the flux evolution in one of the subregions, we find bursts of strong jetting occurring only during times of strong flux cancelation. Averaged over seven jetting episodes, the cancelation rate was ~1.5×10^19 Mx/hr. An average flux of ~5×10^18 Mx canceled prior to each episode, arguably building up ~10^28—10^29 ergs of free magnetic energy per jet. From these and previous observations, we infer that flux cancelation is the fundamental process responsible for the pre-eruption buildup and triggering of at least many jets in active regions, quiet regions, and coronal holes.

  17. Tactile interactions activate mirror system regions in the human brain.

    PubMed

    McKyton, Ayelet

    2011-12-07

    Communicating with others is essential for the development of a society. Although types of communications, such as language and visual gestures, were thoroughly investigated in the past, little research has been done to investigate interactions through touch. To study this we used functional magnetic resonance imaging. Twelve participants were scanned with their eyes covered while stroking four kinds of items, representing different somatosensory stimuli: a human hand, a realistic rubber hand, an object, and a simple texture. Although the human and the rubber hands had the same overall shape, in three regions there was significantly more blood oxygen level dependent activation when touching the real hand: the anterior medial prefrontal cortex, the ventral premotor cortex, and the posterior superior temporal cortex. The last two regions are part of the mirror network and are known to be activated through visual interactions such as gestures. Interestingly, in this study, these areas were activated through a somatosensory interaction. A control experiment was performed to eliminate confounds of temperature, texture, and imagery, suggesting that the activation in these areas was correlated with the touch of a human hand. These results reveal the neuronal network working behind human tactile interactions, and highlight the participation of the mirror system in such functions.

  18. Study of diffuse H II regions potentially forming part of the gas streams around Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijos-Abendaño, J.; López, E.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Báez-Rubio, A.; Aravena, M.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Martín, S.; Llerena, M.; Aldás, F.; Logan, C.; Rodríguez-Franco, A.

    2018-05-01

    We present a study of diffuse extended ionized gas towards three clouds located in the Galactic Centre (GC). One line of sight (LOS) is towards the 20 km s-1 cloud (LOS-0.11) in the Sgr A region, another LOS is towards the 50 km s-1 cloud (LOS-0.02), also in Sgr A, while the third is towards the Sgr B2 cloud (LOS+0.693). The emission from the ionized gas is detected from Hnα and Hmβ radio recombination lines (RRLs). Henα and Hemβ RRL emission is detected with the same n and m as those from the hydrogen RRLs only towards LOS+0.693. RRLs probe gas with positive and negative velocities towards the two Sgr A sources. The Hmβ to Hnα ratios reveal that the ionized gas is emitted under local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in these regions. We find a He to H mass fraction of 0.29±0.01 consistent with the typical GC value, supporting the idea that massive stars have increased the He abundance compared to its primordial value. Physical properties are derived for the studied sources. We propose that the negative velocity component of both Sgr A sources is part of gas streams considered previously to model the GC cloud kinematics. Associated massive stars with what are presumably the closest H II regions to LOS-0.11 (positive velocity gas), LOS-0.02, and LOS+0.693 could be the main sources of ultraviolet photons ionizing the gas. The negative velocity components of both Sgr A sources might be ionized by the same massive stars, but only if they are in the same gas stream.

  19. Dynamic positional fate map of the primary heart-forming region.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng; Cheuvront, Tracey J; Lansford, Rusty D; Moreno-Rodriguez, Ricardo A; Schultheiss, Thomas M; Rongish, Brenda J

    2009-08-15

    Here we show the temporal-spatial orchestration of early heart morphogenesis at cellular level resolution, in vivo, and reconcile conflicting positional fate mapping data regarding the primary heart-forming field(s). We determined the positional fates of precardiac cells using a precision electroporation approach in combination with wide-field time-lapse microscopy in the quail embryo, a warm-blooded vertebrate (HH Stages 4 through 10). Contrary to previous studies, the results demonstrate the existence of a "continuous" circle-shaped heart field that spans the midline, appearing at HH Stage 4, which then expands to form a wide arc of progenitors at HH Stages 5-7. Our time-resolved image data show that a subset of these cardiac progenitor cells do not overlap with the expression of common cardiogenic factors, Nkx-2.5 and Bmp-2, until HH Stage 10, when a tubular heart has formed, calling into question when cardiac fate is specified and by which key factors. Sub-groups and anatomical bands (cohorts) of heart precursor cells dramatically change their relative positions in a process largely driven by endodermal folding and other large-scale tissue deformations. Thus, our novel dynamic positional fate maps resolve the origin of cardiac progenitor cells in amniotes. The data also establish the concept that tissue motion contributes significantly to cellular position fate - i.e., much of the cellular displacement that occurs during assembly of a midline heart tube (HH Stage 9) is NOT due to "migration" (autonomous motility), a commonly held belief. Computational analysis of our time-resolved data lays the foundation for more precise analyses of how cardiac gene regulatory networks correlate with early heart tissue morphogenesis in birds and mammals.

  20. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  1. Far-infrared observations of a star-forming region in the Corona Australis dark cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz-Gonzalez, I.; Mcbreen, B.; Fazio, G. G.

    1984-01-01

    A high-resolution far-IR (40-250-micron) survey of a 0.9-sq-deg section of the core region of the Corona Australis dark cloud (containing very young stellar objects such as T Tauri stars, Herbig Ae and Be stars, Herbig-Haro objects, and compact H II regions) is presented. Two extended far-IR sources were found, one associated with the Herbig emission-line star R CrA and the other with the irregular emission-line variable star TY CrA. The two sources have substantially more far-IR radiation than could be expected from a blackbody extrapolation of their near-IR fluxes. The total luminosities of these sources are 145 and 58 solar luminosity, respectively, implying that the embedded objects are of intermediate or low mass. The infrared observations of the sources associated with R CrA and TY CrA are consistent with models of the evolution of protostellar envelopes of intermediate mass. However, the TY CrA source appears to have passed the evolutionary stage of expelling most of the hot dust near the central source, yielding an age of about 1 Myr.

  2. Coronal Jets from Minifilament Eruptions in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Martinez, F.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Solar coronal jets are transient (frequently of lifetime 10 min) features that shoot out from near the solar surface, become much longer than their width, and occur in all solar regions, including coronal holes, quiet Sun, and active regions (e.g., Shimojo et al. 1996, Certain et al. 2007). Sterling et al. (2015) and other studies found that in coronal holes and in quiet Sun the jets result when small-scale filaments, called ``minifilaments,'' erupt onto nearby open or high-reaching field lines. Additional studies found that coronal-jet-onset locations (and hence presumably the minifilament-eruption-onset locations) coincided with locations of magnetic-flux cancellation. For active region (AR) jets however the situation is less clear. Sterling et al. (2016) studied jets in one active region over a 24-hour period; they found that some AR jets indeed resulted from minifilament eruptions, usually originating from locations of episodes of magnetic-flux cancelation. In some cases however they could not determine whether flux was emerging or canceling at the polarity inversion line from which the minifilament erupted; and for other jets of that region minifilaments were not conclusively apparent prior to jet occurrence. Here we further study AR jets, by observing them in a single AR over a one-week period, using X-ray images from Hinode/XRT and EUV/UV images from SDO/AIA, and line-of-sight magnetograms and white-light intensity-grams from SDO/HMI. We initially identified 13 prominent jets in the XRT data, and examined corresponding AIA and HMI data. For at least several of the jets, our findings are consistent with the jets resulting from minifilament eruptions, and originating from sights of magnetic-field cancelation. Thus our findings support that, at least in many cases, AR coronal jets result from the same physical processes that produce coronal jets in quiet-Sun and coronal-hole regions. FM was supportedby the Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at

  3. On Heating the Sun's Corona by Magnetic Explosions: Feasibility in Active Regions and prospects for Quiet Regions and Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, D. A.; Porter, Jason G.; Suess, Steven T.

    1999-01-01

    We build a case for the persistent strong coronal heating in active regions and the pervasive quasi-steady heating of the corona in quiet regions and coronal holes being driven in basically the same way as the intense transient heating in solar flares: by explosions of sheared magnetic fields in the cores of initially closed bipoles. We begin by summarizing the observational case for exploding sheared core fields being the drivers of a wide variety of flare events, with and without coronal mass ejections. We conclude that the arrangement of an event's flare heating, whether there is a coronal mass ejection, and the time and place of the ejection relative to the flare heating are all largely determined by four elements of the form and action of the magnetic field: (1) the arrangement of the impacted, interacting bipoles participating in the event, (2) which of these bipoles are active (have sheared core fields that explode) and which are passive (are heated by injection from impacted active bipoles), (3) which core field explodes first, and (4) which core-field explosions are confined within the closed field of their bipoles and which ejectively open their bipoles. We then apply this magnetic-configuration framework for flare heating to the strong coronal heating observed by the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope in an active region with strongly sheared core fields observed by the MSFC vector magnetograph. All of the strong coronal heating is in continually microflaring sheared core fields or in extended loops rooted against the active core fields. Thus, the strong heating occurs in field configurations consistent with the heating being driven by frequent core-field explosions that are smaller but similar to those in confined flares and flaring arches. From analysis of the thermal and magnetic energetics of two selected core-field microflares and a bright extended loop, we find that (1) it is energetically feasible for the sheared core fields to drive all of the coronal

  4. Oscillations In Emerging Active Regions on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. A.; Muglach, K.

    2017-12-01

    Active regions (ARs) on the Sun are directly related to space weather phenomena like flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). It is well known that both can have impacts not only on Earth, but also on nearby orbits and beyond. Predicting when and where active regions will emerge at the surface of the Sun would strengthen space weather forecasting abilities. In this study, data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are used to produce images of the magnetic field and Doppler Velocity at the photosphere of the Sun. This data is used to study the emergence of ARs at the surface of the Sun. Since global oscillations that travel through the solar interior are modified by the magnetic field, the oscillation patterns in and around ARs should be different from the oscillation patterns in the quiet, non-active Sun. Thus, a change in oscillation patterns can be determined before an AR is visible at the Sun's surface. Using Fast Fourier Transforms, the oscillation patterns can be calculated from the SDO Dopplergrams. Magnetograms provide the time when the magnetic field of the active region reaches the solar surface. Thus, both the calculated oscillation frequencies and power can be compared to the information of an AR's emergence in the magnetograms. In particular, it can be determined if there is any time delay between the change of oscillation power and magnetic field emergence. For this particular AR studied, it was found that the 5-min oscillation power starts to decrease at the time the AR emerges. The 3-min oscillation power also decreases first but increases again a few hours after the start of the emergence. This observation is probably due to 3-min oscillation power halos around the AR and has been observed before. A few hours before the AR starts to emerge, an increase was found in both 5-min and 3-min oscillation power. This effect is promising, however, it has not been observed before and has to be verified with additional observations.

  5. Effect of chemical form of selenium on tissue glutathione peroxidase activity in developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Strength, Ralph; Johnson, Janet; White, Marguerite T.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that the stage of development of rats may affect the availability of various forms of selenium for the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) in the rat was experimentally investigated. One experiment evaluated the availability of selenium as selenite or selenomethionine for GSPHx activity during three developmental states in rats: fetus and 7-day old and 14-day old nursing pups. In all tissues studied, GSHPx activity was highest in the 14-day-old pups whose dams were in the selenomethionine group. Rat pups given intraperitoneal selenite had higher liver and kidney GSHPx activity than pups given the same amount of selenium as intraperitoneal selenomethionine. In a second experiment, all dams were fed the same basal diet and pups were weaned to diets containing one of two levels of selenium and one of three forms of selenium (selenite, selenomethionine, or selenocystine). The results also supported the hypothesis these dietary forms of selenium are differentially available for GSHPx activity.

  6. Helioseismology of pre-emerging active regions. III. Statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Braun, D. C.

    The subsurface properties of active regions (ARs) prior to their appearance at the solar surface may shed light on the process of AR formation. Helioseismic holography has been applied to samples taken from two populations of regions on the Sun (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, that were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Paper I. Paper II showed that there are statistically significant signatures in the average helioseismic properties that precede the formation of an AR. This paper describes a more detailed analysis of the samples of pre-emergence regions and regions without emergencemore » based on discriminant analysis. The property that is best able to distinguish the populations is found to be the surface magnetic field, even a day before the emergence time. However, after accounting for the correlations between the surface field and the quantities derived from helioseismology, there is still evidence of a helioseismic precursor to AR emergence that is present for at least a day prior to emergence, although the analysis presented cannot definitively determine the subsurface properties prior to emergence due to the small sample sizes.« less

  7. Spatial taxation effects on regional coal economic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.W.; Labys, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Spatial taxation effects related to economic activities at the regional level can be directly evaluated using the Kuhn-Tucker system of equations based on a commodity model. In particular, the impacts of a specific tax are predictable within a given set of trade patterns. However, the impacts of an ad valorem tax are difficult to evaluate analytically, mainly because of nonlinearity in the associated response surface. The aspect of spatial-taxation analysis of present relevance for the coal industry related to coal policy, i.e., the share of tax burdens coal producers and consumers are able to bear. Each supplier in a givenmore » market boundary shares the same amount of tax burden, which may eliminate the weakest coal producers, i.e., Southern West Virginia coal mines. The same analogy also applies to the weakest demand region, i.e., Illinois, Wisconsin, and Minnesota utilities. Consequently, a proper policy requires that some preferential tax treatment be given to these regions. Since the taxation effects depend critically on the trade patterns and market boundaries, the successful policy application of present regional energy models will not be possible unless effects of this type are included in the evaluation.« less

  8. WEAK AND COMPACT RADIO EMISSION IN EARLY HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS. I. VLA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P.; Claussen, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a high-sensitivity radio continuum survey at 6 and 1.3 cm using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array toward a sample of 58 high-mass star-forming regions. Our sample was chosen from dust clumps within infrared dark clouds with and without IR sources (CMC–IRs and CMCs, respectively), and hot molecular cores (HMCs), with no previous, or relatively weak radio continuum detection at the 1 mJy level. Due to the improvement in the continuum sensitivity of the Very Large Array, this survey achieved map rms levels of ∼3–10  μ Jy beam{sup −1} at sub-arcsecond angular resolution. We extracted 70 continuum sourcesmore » associated with 1.2 mm dust clumps. Most sources are weak, compact, and prime candidates for high-mass protostars. Detection rates of radio sources associated with the millimeter dust clumps for CMCs, CMC–IRs, and HMCs are 6%, 53%, and 100%, respectively. This result is consistent with increasing high-mass star formation activity from CMCs to HMCs. The radio sources located within HMCs and CMC–IRs occur close to the dust clump centers, with a median offset from it of 12,000 au and 4000 au, respectively. We calculated 5–25 GHz spectral indices using power-law fits and obtained a median value of 0.5 (i.e., flux increasing with frequency), suggestive of thermal emission from ionized jets. In this paper we describe the sample, observations, and detections. The analysis and discussion will be presented in Paper II.« less

  9. INTERACTION BETWEEN THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT HB 3 AND THE NEARBY STAR-FORMING REGION W3

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min

    We performed millimeter observations of CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) HB 3. Substantial molecular gas around −45 km s{sup −1} is detected in the conjunction region between the SNR HB 3 and the nearby W3 complex. This molecular gas is distributed along the radio continuum shell of the remnant. Furthermore, the shocked molecular gas indicated by line wing broadening features is also distributed along the radio shell and inside it. By both morphological correspondence and dynamical evidence, we confirm that the SNR HB 3 interacts with the −45 km s{sup −1} molecular cloud (MC), in essence, with the nearby H ii region/MC complexmore » W3. The redshifted line wing broadening features indicate that the remnant is located at the nearside of the MC. With this association, we could place the remnant at the same distance as the W3/W4 complex, which is 1.95 ± 0.04 kpc. The spatial distribution of aggregated young stellar object candidates shows a correlation with the shocked molecular strip associated with the remnant. We also find a binary clump of CO at ( l = 132.°94, b = 1.°12) around −51.5 km s{sup −1} inside the projected extent of the remnant, and it is associated with significant mid-infrared emission. The binary system also has a tail structure resembling the tidal tails of interacting galaxies. According to the analysis of CO emission lines, the larger clump in this binary system is about stable, and the smaller clump is significantly disturbed.« less

  10. Physical properties and H-ionizing-photon production rates of extreme nearby star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallard, Jacopo; Charlot, Stéphane; Senchyna, Peter; Stark, Daniel P.; Vidal-García, Alba; Feltre, Anna; Gutkin, Julia; Jones, Tucker; Mainali, Ramesh; Wofford, Aida

    2018-06-01

    Measurements of the galaxy UV luminosity function at z ≳ 6 suggest that young stars hosted in low-mass star-forming galaxies produced the bulk of hydrogen-ionizing photons necessary to reionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) by redshift z ˜ 6. Whether star-forming galaxies dominated cosmic reionization, however, also depends on their stellar populations and interstellar medium properties, which set, among other things, the production rate of H-ionizing photons, ξ _{ion}^\\star, and the fraction of these escaping into the IGM. Given the difficulty of constraining with existing observatories the physical properties of z ≳ 6 galaxies, in this work we focus on a sample of ten nearby objects showing UV spectral features comparable to those observed at z ≳ 6. We use the new-generation BEAGLE tool to model the UV-to-optical photometry and UV/optical emission lines of these Local `analogues' of high-redshift galaxies, finding that our relatively simple, yet fully self-consistent, physical model can successfully reproduce the different observables considered. Our galaxies span a broad range of metallicities and are characterised by high ionization parameters, low dust attenuation, and very young stellar populations. Through our analysis, we derive a novel diagnostic of the production rate of H-ionizing photons per unit UV luminosity, ξ _{ion}^\\star, based on the equivalent width of the bright [O III]49595007 line doublet, which does not require measurements of H-recombination lines. This new diagnostic can be used to estimate ξ _{ion}^\\star from future direct measurements of the [O III]49595007 line using JWST/NIRSpec (out to z ˜ 9.5), and by exploiting the contamination by Hβ +[O III]{4959}{5007}} of photometric observations of distant galaxies, for instance from existing Spitzer/IRAC data and from future ones with JWST/NIRCam.

  11. Active tectonics and earthquake potential of the Myanmar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Sieh, Kerry; Tun, Soe Thura; Lai, Kuang-Yin; Myint, Than

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes geomorphologic evidence for the principal neotectonic features of Myanmar and its immediate surroundings. We combine this evidence with published structural, geodetic, and seismic data to present an overview of the active tectonic architecture of the region and its seismic potential. Three tectonic systems accommodate oblique collision of the Indian plate with Southeast Asia and extrusion of Asian territory around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalayan mountain range. Subduction and collision associated with the Sunda megathrust beneath and within the Indoburman range and Naga Hills accommodate most of the shortening across the transpressional plate boundary. The Sagaing fault system is the predominant locus of dextral motion associated with the northward translation of India. Left-lateral faults of the northern Shan Plateau, northern Laos, Thailand, and southern China facilitate extrusion of rocks around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalaya. All of these systems have produced major earthquakes within recorded history and continue to present major seismic hazards in the region.

  12. Soil phosphorus forms and profile distributions in the tidal river network region in the Yellow River Delta estuary.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junbao; Qu, Fanzhu; Wu, Huifeng; Meng, Ling; Du, Siyao; Xie, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    Modified Hedley fraction method was used to study the forms and profile distribution in the tidal river network region subjected to rapid deposition and hydrologic disturbance in the Yellow River Delta (YRD) estuary, eastern China. The results showed that the total P (Pt) ranged from 612.1 to 657.8 mg kg(-1). Dilute HCl extractable inorganic P (Pi) was the predominant form in all profiles, both as absolute values and as a percentage of total extracted Pi. The NaOH extractable organic P (Po) was the predominant form of total extracted Po, while Bicarb-Pi and C.HCl-Po were the lowest fractions of total extracted Pi and Po in all the P forms. The Resin-P concentrations were high in the top soil layer and decreased with depth. The Pearson correlation matrix indicated that Resin-P, Bicarb-Pi, NaOH-Pi, and C.HCl-Pi were strongly positively correlated with salinity, TOC, Ca, Al, and Fe but negatively correlated with pH. The significant correlation of any studied form of organic P (Bicarb-Po, NaOH-Po, and C.HCl-Po) with geochemical properties were not observed in the study. Duncan multiple-range test indicated that the P forms and distribution heterogeneity in the profiles could be attributed to the influences of vegetation cover and hydrologic disturbance.

  13. The infield varietu of available forms in the forest-steppe of western part Central Chernozemic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belik, Anton; Devyatova, Tatiana; Bozhko, Svetlana; Gorbunova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    The infield varietu of available forms in the forest-steppe of western part Central Chernozemic region The Central Chernozemic region of Russia has been a region with a strong agricultural industry and determines the food security of the state by most part. The soil cover of the region is represented mainly by chernozems and is favorable for the cultivation of major crops and produce high crop yields. However, the high development of agriculture in the territory of Central Chernozemic region are led to the development of agrogenic degradation processes which impacts on the growth of the soil cover complexity and contrast, and as a consequence a significant infield variety of soil fertility and yields of major crops. In this regard, very promising direction in CChR is the development and practical application technologies of precision agriculture, which implies the spatial variety of soil fertility analysis within specific fields and work areas, especially the content of available forms of nutrients. The aim of our research was a study of the agro-ecological characteristics of the spatial variety of the content by available forms to plants of major nutrients in representative areas of sloping agricultural landscapes with forest-steppe chernozems in the western part of Central Chernozemic region of Russia. The research of infield variety by content of available forms of major nutrients are carried in the fields of Russian Research Institute of Agriculture and Protect the Soil from Erosion experimental and industrial farm in Medvensky district of Kursk region. The area characterized by a complex organization of relief. The soil cover is represented by full-profile typical (conventional and carbonate), leached chernozems. The growth of contrast of the soil cover are largely determined by the appearance of eroded soils of these analogues, as well as zoogenic dug and accumulative soils All of the studied areas with the forest-steppe chernozems were characterized by

  14. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  15. 78 FR 45919 - Commission Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request; Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Information Collection Activities (FERC Form 80); Comment Request; Extension AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory... Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs: [email protected] . Attention: Federal Energy... receiving automatic notification of activity in this docket or in viewing/downloading comments and issuances...

  16. Education Technologies in Addressing the Problem of Forming the Socially Active Individual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popova, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the analysis of technological support of the educational process in solving the problem of forming the socially active individual. The authors studied the value of the category "social activity" and analyzed educational technologies that have an impact on its formation. The obtained results gave the possibility…

  17. Comparing Two Forms of Concept Map Critique Activities to Facilitate Knowledge Integration Processes in Evolution Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendimann, Beat A.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    Concept map activities often lack a subsequent revision step that facilitates knowledge integration. This study compares two collaborative critique activities using a Knowledge Integration Map (KIM), a form of concept map. Four classes of high school biology students (n?=?81) using an online inquiry-based learning unit on evolution were assigned…

  18. Effects of Three Forms of Reading-Based Output Activity on L2 Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rassaei, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of three forms of output activity on EFL learners' recognition and recall of second language (L2) vocabulary. To this end, three groups of learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) were instructed to employ the following three output activities after reading two narrative texts: (1) summarizing the…

  19. ON THE STRENGTH OF THE HEMISPHERIC RULE AND THE ORIGIN OF ACTIVE-REGION HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil

    Vector magnetograph and morphological observations have shown that the solar magnetic field tends to have negative (positive) helicity in the northern (southern) hemisphere, although only ∼60%-70% of active regions appear to obey this 'hemispheric rule'. In contrast, at least ∼80% of quiescent filaments and filament channels that form during the decay of active regions follow the rule. We attribute this discrepancy to the difficulty in determining the helicity sign of newly emerged active regions, which are dominated by their current-free component; as the transverse field is canceled at the polarity inversion lines, however, the axial component becomes dominant there, allowingmore » a more reliable determination of the original active-region chirality. We thus deduce that the hemispheric rule is far stronger than generally assumed, and cannot be explained by stochastic processes. Earlier studies have shown that the twist associated with the axial tilt of active regions is too small to account for the observed helicity; here, both tilt and twist are induced by the Coriolis force acting on the diverging flow in the emerging flux tube. However, in addition to this east-west expansion about the apex of the loop, each of its legs must expand continually in cross section during its rise through the convection zone, thereby acquiring a further twist through the Coriolis force. Since this transverse pressure effect is not limited by drag or tension forces, the final twist depends mainly on the rise time, and may be large enough to explain the observed active-region helicity.« less

  20. Ice Mapping Observations in Galactic Star-Forming Regions: the AKARI Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Helen Jane; Suutarinnen, Aleksi; Noble, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that explaining the small-scale distribution of many gas-phase molecules relies on our interpretation of the complex inter-connectivity between gas- and solid-phase interstellar chemistries. Inputs to proto-stellar astrochemical models are required that exploit ice compositions reflecting the historical physical conditions in pre-stellar environments when the ices first formed. Such data are required to translate the near-universe picture of ice-composition to our understanding of the role of extra-galactic ices in star-formation at higher redshifts.Here we present the first attempts at multi-object ice detections, and the subsequent ice column density mapping. The AKARI space telescope was uniquely capable of observing all the ice features between 2 and 5 microns, thereby detecting H2O, CO and CO2 ices concurrently, through their stretching vibrational features. Our group has successfully extracted an unprecedented volume of ice spectra from AKARI, including sources with not more than 2 mJy flux at 3 microns, showing:(a) H2O CO and CO2 ices on 30 lines of sight towards pre-stellar and star-forming cores, which when combined with laboratory experiments indicate how the chemistries of these three ices are interlinked (Noble et al (2013)),(b) ice maps showing the spatial distribution of water ice across 12 pre-stellar cores, in different molecular clouds (Suutarinnen et al (2015)), and the distribution of ice components within these cores on 1000 AU scales (Noble et al (2015)),(c) over 200 new detections of water ice, mostly on lines of sight towards background sources (> 145), indicating that water ice column density has a minimum value as a function of Av, but on a cloud-by-cloud basis typically correlates with Av, and dust emissivity at 250 microns (Suutarinnen et al (2015)),(d) the first detections of HDO ice towards background stars (Fraser et al (2015)).We discuss whether these results support the picture of a generic chemical

  1. Differential cellulolytic activity of native-form and C-terminal tagged-form cellulase derived from coptotermes formosanus and expressed in E. coli

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The endogenous cellulase gene (CfEG3a) of Coptotermes formosanus, an economically important pest termite, was cloned and overexpressed in both native form (nCfEG) and C-terminal His-tagged form (tCfEG) in E.coli. Both forms of recombinant cellulases showed hydrolytic activity on cellulosic substrate...

  2. Measurement and interpretation of magnetic shear in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Rabin, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a summary and synthesis are presented for results on the role of magnetic shear in the flare process that have been derived from the series of Flare Buildup Study Workshops in the Solar Maximum Analysis program. With emphasis on observations, the mechanisms that seem to produce the sheared magnetic configurations observed in flaring active regions are discussed. The spatial and temporal correlations of this shear with the onset of solar flares are determined from quantitative analyses of measurements of the vector magnetic field. The question of why some areas of sheared magnetic fields are the sites of flares and others are not is investigated observationally.

  3. Observations of vector magnetic fields in flaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jimin; Wang, Haimin; Zirin, Harold; Ai, Guoxiang

    1994-01-01

    We present vector magnetograph data of 6 active regions, all of which produced major flares. Of the 20 M-class (or above) flares, 7 satisfy the flare conditions prescribed by Hagyard (high shear and strong transverse fields). Strong photospheric shear, however, is not necessarily a condition for a flare. We find an increase in the shear for two flares, a 6-deg shear increase along the neutral line after a X-2 flare and a 13-deg increase after a M-1.9 flare. For other flares, we did not detect substantial shear changes.

  4. C IV Doppler shifts observed in active region filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Doppler shift properties of 21 active region filaments were studied using C IV Dopplergram data. Most are associated with corridors of weak magnetic field that separate opposite polarity strong fields seen in photospheric magnetograms. A majority of the filaments are relatively blue shifted, although several lie very close to the dividing lines between blue and red shift. Only one filament in the samples is clearly red shifted. A new calibration procedure for Dopplergrams indicates that sizable zero point offsets are often required. The center-to-limb behavior of the resulting absolute Doppler shifts suggests that filament flows are usually quite small. It is possible that they vanish.

  5. Redundant mechanisms to form silent chromatin at pericentromeric regions rely on BEND3 and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Saksouk, Nehmé; Barth, Teresa K; Ziegler-Birling, Celine; Olova, Nelly; Nowak, Agnieszka; Rey, Elodie; Mateos-Langerak, Julio; Urbach, Serge; Reik, Wolf; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena; Imhof, Axel; Déjardin, Jérome; Simboeck, Elisabeth

    2014-11-20

    Constitutive heterochromatin is typically defined by high levels of DNA methylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9Me3), whereas facultative heterochromatin displays DNA hypomethylation and high H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27Me3). The two chromatin types generally do not coexist at the same loci, suggesting mutual exclusivity. During development or in cancer, pericentromeric regions can adopt either epigenetic state, but the switching mechanism is unknown. We used a quantitative locus purification method to characterize changes in pericentromeric chromatin-associated proteins in mouse embryonic stem cells deficient for either the methyltransferases required for DNA methylation or H3K9Me3. DNA methylation controls heterochromatin architecture and inhibits Polycomb recruitment. BEND3, a protein enriched on pericentromeric chromatin in the absence of DNA methylation or H3K9Me3, allows Polycomb recruitment and H3K27Me3, resulting in a redundant pathway to generate repressive chromatin. This suggests that BEND3 is a key factor in mediating a switch from constitutive to facultative heterochromatin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. On the origin of phosphorus nitride in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mininni, C.; Fontani, F.; Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Caselli, P.; Vasyunin, A.

    2018-05-01

    We present multitransition observations of phosphorus nitride (PN) towards a sample of nine massive dense cores in different evolutionary stages. Using transitions with different excitation conditions, we have found for the first time that the excitation temperatures of PN are in the range ˜5-30 K. To investigate the main chemical route for the PN formation (surface-chemistry versus gas-phase chemistry), and the dominant desorption mechanism (thermal versus shock), we have compared our results with those obtained from molecules tracing different chemical and physical conditions (SiO, SO, CH3OH, and N2H+). We have found that the PN line profiles are very well correlated with those of SiO and SO in six out of the nine targets, which indicate that PN may be released by sputtering of dust grains due to shocks. This finding is corroborated by a faint but statistically significant positive trend between the PN abundance and those of SiO and SO. However, in three objects the PN lines have no hints of high-velocity wings, which indicates an alternative origin of PN. Overall, our results indicate that the origin of PN is not unique, as it can be formed not only in protostellar shocks, but also in colder and more quiescent gas through alternative pathways.

  7. Theta Frequency Stimulation Induces a Local Form of Late Phase LTP in the CA1 Region of the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation. This form of LTP requires activation of transcription and translation and results in the cell-wide distribution of gene products that can be captured by other marked synapses. Here we report that theta frequency stimulation (5 Hz, 30 sec) applied to the…

  8. THE EFFECTS OF EPISODIC STAR FORMATION ON THE FUV-NUV COLORS OF STAR FORMING REGIONS IN OUTER DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Dowell, Jayce D., E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: jdowell@unm.edu

    2013-09-20

    We run stellar population synthesis models to examine the effects of a recently episodic star formation history (SFH) on UV and Hα colors of star forming regions. Specifically, the SFHs we use are an episodic sampling of an exponentially declining star formation rate (SFR; τ model) and are intended to simulate the SFHs in the outer disks of spiral galaxies. To enable comparison between our models and observational studies of star forming regions in outer disks, we include in our models sensitivity limits that are based on recent deep UV and Hα observations in the literature. We find significant dispersionmore » in the FUV-NUV colors of simulated star forming regions with frequencies of star formation episodes of 1 × 10{sup –8} to 4 × 10{sup –9} yr{sup –1}. The dispersion in UV colors is similar to that found in the outer disk of nearby spiral galaxies. As expected, we also find large variations in L{sub H{sub α}}/L{sub FUV}. We interpret our models within the context of inside-out disk growth, and find that a radially increasing τ and decreasing metallicity with an increasing radius will only produce modest FUV-NUV color gradients, which are significantly smaller than what is found for some nearby spiral galaxies. However, including moderate extinction gradients with our models can better match the observations with steeper UV color gradients. We estimate that the SFR at which the number of stars emitting FUV light becomes stochastic is ∼2 × 10{sup –6} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which is substantially lower than the SFR of many star forming regions in outer disks. Therefore, we conclude that stochasticity in the upper end of the initial mass function is not likely to be the dominant cause of dispersion in the FUV-NUV colors of star forming regions in outer disks. Finally, we note that if outer disks have had an episodic SFH similar to that used in this study, this should be taken into account when estimating gas depletion timescales and modeling

  9. Chromospheric Evolution and the Flare Activity of Super-Active Region NOAA 6555

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PrasadC, Debi; Ambastha, Ashok; Srivastava, Nandita; Tripathy, Sushanta C.; Hagyard, Mona J.

    1997-01-01

    Super-active region NOAA 6555 was highly flare productive during the period March 21st - 27th, 1991 of its disk passage. We have studied its chromospheric activity using high spatial resolution H alpha filtergrams taken at Udaipur along with MSFC vector magnetograms. A possible relationship of flare productivity and the variation in shear has been explored. Flares were generally seen in those subareas of the active region which possessed closed magnetic field configuration, whereas only minor flares and/or surges occurred in subareas showing open magnetic field configuration. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed surges are also discussed.

  10. Peptides of the Constant Region of Antibodies Display Fungicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C.; Pinto, Marcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  11. Ultraviolet spectra of extreme nearby star-forming regions - approaching a local reference sample for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchyna, Peter; Stark, Daniel P.; Vidal-García, Alba; Chevallard, Jacopo; Charlot, Stéphane; Mainali, Ramesh; Jones, Tucker; Wofford, Aida; Feltre, Anna; Gutkin, Julia

    2017-12-01

    Nearby dwarf galaxies provide a unique laboratory in which to test stellar population models below Z⊙/2. Such tests are particularly important for interpreting the surprising high-ionization ultraviolet (UV) line emission detected at z > 6 in recent years. We present HST/COS UV spectra of 10 nearby metal-poor star-forming galaxies selected to show He II emission in SDSS optical spectra. The targets span nearly a dex in gas-phase oxygen abundance (7.8 < 12 + log O/H < 8.5) and present uniformly large specific star formation rates (sSFR ∼102 Gyr-1). The UV spectra confirm that metal-poor stellar populations can power extreme nebular emission in high-ionization UV lines, reaching C III] equivalent widths comparable to those seen in systems at z ∼ 6-7. Our data reveal a marked transition in UV spectral properties with decreasing metallicity, with systems below 12 + log O/H ≲ 8.0 (Z/Z⊙ ≲ 1/5) presenting minimal stellar wind features and prominent nebular emission in He II and C IV. This is consistent with nearly an order of magnitude increase in ionizing photon production beyond the He+-ionizing edge relative to H-ionizing flux as metallicity decreases below a fifth solar, well in excess of standard stellar population synthesis predictions. Our results suggest that often-neglected sources of energetic radiation such as stripped binary products and very massive O-stars produce a sharper change in the ionizing spectrum with decreasing metallicity than expected. Consequently, nebular emission in C IV and He II powered by these stars may provide useful metallicity constraints in the reionization era.

  12. The Border Health Consortium of the Californias—Forming a Binational (California–Baja California) Entity to Address the Health of a Border Region: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Kozo, Justine; Zapata-Garibay, Rogelio; Rangel-Gomez, María Gudelia; Fernandez, April; Hirata-Okamoto, Ricardo; Wooten, Wilma; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana; Jiménez, Barbara; Zepeda-Cisneros, Hector; Matthews, Charles Edwards

    2018-01-01

    The California–Baja California border region is one of the most frequently traversed areas in the world with a shared population, environment, and health concerns. The Border Health Consortium of the Californias (the “Consortium”) was formed in 2013 to bring together leadership working in the areas of public health, health care, academia, government, and the non-profit sector, with the goal of aligning efforts to improve health outcomes in the region. The Consortium utilizes a Collective Impact framework which supports a shared vision for a healthy border region, mutually reinforcing activities among member organizations and work groups, and a binational executive committee that ensures continuous communication and progress toward meeting its goals. The Consortium is comprised of four binational work groups which address human immunodeficiency virus, tuberculosis, obesity, and mental health, all mutual priorities in the border region. The Consortium holds two general binational meetings each year alternating between California and Baja California. The work groups meet regularly to share information, resources and provide binational training opportunities. Since inception, the Consortium has been successful in strengthening binational communication, coordination, and collaboration by providing an opportunity for individuals to meet one another, learn about each other systems, and foster meaningful relationships. With binational leadership support and commitment, the Consortium could certainly be replicated in other border jurisdictions both nationally and internationally. The present article describes the background, methodology, accomplishments, challenges, and lessons learned in forming the Consortium. PMID:29404318

  13. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. II - NOAA active region 5747 (1989 October)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leka, K. D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Mcclymont, A. N.; De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Fan, Yuhong; Tang, F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes October 1989 observations in NOAA Active Region 5747 of the morphology of energetic electron precipitation and high-pressure coronal flare plasmas of three flares and their relation to the vector magnetic field and vertical electric currents. The H-alpha spectroheliograms were coaligned with the vector magnetograms using continuum images of sunspots, enabling positional accuracy of a few arcsec. It was found that, during the gradual phase, the regions of the H-alpha flare that show the effects of enhanced pressure in the overlying corona often encompass extrema of the vertical current density, consistent with earlier work showing a close relationship between H-alpha emission and line-of-sight currents. The data are also consistent with the overall morphology and evolution described by erupting-filament models such as those of Kopp and Pneuman (1976) and Sturrock (1989).

  14. New Insights into the Nature of Transition Disks from a Complete Disk Survey of the Lupus Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, Nienke; Williams, Jonathan P.; Ansdell, M.; Manara, Carlo F.; Miotello, Anna; Tazzari, Marco; Testi, Leonardo; Hogerheijde, Michiel; Bruderer, Simon; van Terwisga, Sierk E.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2018-02-01

    Transition disks with large dust cavities around young stars are promising targets for studying planet formation. Previous studies have revealed the presence of gas cavities inside the dust cavities, hinting at recently formed, giant planets. However, many of these studies are biased toward the brightest disks in the nearby star-forming regions, and it is not possible to derive reliable statistics that can be compared with exoplanet populations. We present the analysis of 11 transition disks with large cavities (≥20 au radius) from a complete disk survey of the Lupus star-forming region, using ALMA Band 7 observations at 0.″3 (22–30 au radius) resolution of the 345 GHz continuum, 13CO and C18O 3–2 observations, and the spectral energy distribution of each source. Gas and dust surface density profiles are derived using the physical–chemical modeling code DALI. This is the first study of transition disks of large cavities within a complete disk survey within a star-forming region. The dust cavity sizes range from 20 to 90 au radius, and in three cases, a gas cavity is resolved as well. The deep drops in gas density and large dust cavity sizes are consistent with clearing by giant planets. The fraction of transition disks with large cavities in Lupus is ≳ 11 % , which is inconsistent with exoplanet population studies of giant planets at wide orbits. Furthermore, we present a hypothesis of an evolutionary path for large massive disks evolving into transition disks with large cavities.

  15. Photospheric electric current and transition region brightness within an active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, A. C.; Hagyard, M. J.; Rabin, D.; Moore, R. L.; Smith, B. J., Jr.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1984-01-01

    Distributions of vertical electrical current density J(z) calculated from vector measurements of the photospheric magnetic field are compared with ultraviolet spectroheliograms to investigate whether resistive heating is an important source of enhanced emission in the transition region. The photospheric magnetic fields in Active Region 2372 were measured on April 6 and 7, 1980 with the Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph; ultraviolet wavelength spectroheliograms (L-alpha and N V 1239 A) were obtained with the UV Spectrometer and Polarimeter experiment aboard the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Spatial registration of the J(z) (5 arcsec resolution) and UV (3 arcsec resolution) maps indicates that the maximum current density is cospatial with a minor but persistent UV enhancement, but there is little detected current associated with other nearby bright areas. It is concluded that, although resistive heating may be important in the transition region, the currents responsible for the heating are largely unresolved in the present measurements and have no simple correlation with the residual current measured on 5-arcsec scales.

  16. 15N fractionation in star-forming regions and Solar System objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirström, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, Gilles; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristine molecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N/15N ~ 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N/15N < 100.The coherent 15N enrichment in comets from different formation zones suggests that these isotopic enhancements are remnants of the interstellar chemistry in the natal molecular cloud core and the outer protosolar nebula. Indeed, early chemical models of gas-phase ion-molecule nitrogen fractionation showed that HCN and HNC (nitriles) can hold significant 15N enrichments in cold dark clouds where CO is depleted onto dust grains. In addition, 15N fractionation in nitriles and amines (NH2, NH3) follow different chemical pathways. More recently we have shown that once the spin-state dependence in rates of reactions with H2 is included in the models, amines can either be enhanced or depleted in 15N, depending on the core’s evolutionary stage. Observed 15N fractionation in amines and nitriles therefore cannot be expected to be the same, instead their ratio is a potential chemical clock.Observations of molecular isotope ratios in dark cores are challenging. Limited published results in general show higher 15N/14N ratios in HCN and HNC than ammonia, but more measurements are necessary to confirm these trends. We will present recent results from our ongoing observing campaign of 14N/15N isotopic ratios in HCN, HNC and NH3 in dense cores and protostars which seem consistent with significant fractionation in nitriles as compared to other molecules in each object. The few 14N/15N ratios observed in N2H+ are similar to

  17. X-ray and microwave observations of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Davis, J. M.; Kundu, M. R.; Velusamy, T.

    1983-01-01

    Coordinated high-resolution (1-3 arcsec) observations of two active solar regions (H 421 and H 419) on November 16, 1979, are reported: soft-X-ray filtergrams from a sounding rocket flight, VLA total-intensity and circular-polarization microwave (6-cm) radio maps, KPNO full-disk photospheric magnetograms, and BBSO H-alpha data. The images were converted to 4.8-arcsec/mm-scale transparencies and coaligned on the basis of sunspot positions for comparison. The two active regions are characterized in detail, and intensity, size, and polarization data for the brightest microwave components (BMC) are listed. It is found that 19 of the 32 BMC are farther than 5 arcsec from any sunspot, and that X-ray-emitting structures only rarely correspond to sunspots, or BMC. About one third of the BMC are located at the feet or legs of coronal loops smaller than about 50,000 km. The limitations implied by these obervations for proposed thermal-bremsstrahlung, thermal-gyro-resonance, and nonthermal microwave-emission mechanisms are discussed.

  18. THE MAGNETIC CLASSIFICATION OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS 1992–2015

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeggli, S. A.; Norton, A. A., E-mail: sarah.jaeggli@nasa.gov

    The purpose of this Letter is to address a blindspot in our knowledge of solar active region (AR) statistics. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all ARs reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the α and β class ARs (including all sub-groups, e.g., βγ, βδ) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample, respectively. This fraction ismore » relatively constant during high levels of activity; however, an increase in the α fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the β fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and are statistically significant at the 2σ level. Over 30% of all ARs observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications γ and/or δ, while these classifications account for only a fraction of a percent during the years near the solar minima. This variation in the AR types indicates that the formation of complex ARs may be due to the pileup of frequent emergence of magnetic flux during solar maximum, rather than the emergence of complex, monolithic flux structures.« less

  19. ACTIVE REGION FILAMENTS MIGHT HARBOR WEAK MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz Baso, C. J.; Martínez González, M. J.; Asensio Ramos, A., E-mail: cdiazbas@iac.es

    Recent spectropolarimetric observations of active region filaments have revealed polarization profiles with signatures typical of the strong field Zeeman regime. The conspicuous absence in those observations of scattering polarization and Hanle effect signatures was then pointed out by some authors. This was interpreted as either a signature of mixed “turbulent” field components or as a result of optical thickness. In this article, we present a natural scenario to explain these Zeeman-only spectropolarimetric observations of active region (AR) filaments. We propose a two-component model, one on top of the other. Both components have horizontal fields, with the azimuth difference between themmore » being close to 90°. The component that lies lower in the atmosphere is permeated by a strong field of the order of 600 G, while the upper component has much weaker fields, of the order of 10 G. The ensuing scattering polarization signatures of the individual components have opposite signs, so its combination along the line of sight reduces—and even can cancel out—the Hanle signatures, giving rise to an apparent Zeeman-only profile. This model is also applicable to other chromospheric structures seen in absorption above ARs.« less

  20. Biochemical analyses are instrumental in identifying the impact of mutations on holo and/or apo-forms and on the region(s) of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase variants associated with Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I☆

    PubMed Central

    Oppici, Elisa; Montioli, Riccardo; Lorenzetto, Antonio; Bianconi, Silvia; Borri Voltattorni, Carla; Cellini, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I (PH1) is a disorder of glyoxylate metabolism caused by mutations in the human AGXT gene encoding liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme. Previous investigations highlighted that, although PH1 is characterized by a significant variability in terms of enzymatic phenotype, the majority of the pathogenic variants are believed to share both structural and functional defects, as mainly revealed by data on AGT activity and expression level in crude cellular extracts. However, the knowledge of the defects of the AGT variants at a protein level is still poor. We therefore performed a side-by-side comparison between normal AGT and nine purified recombinant pathogenic variants in terms of catalytic activity, coenzyme binding mode and affinity, spectroscopic features, oligomerization, and thermal stability of both the holo- and apo-forms. Notably, we chose four variants in which the mutated residues are located in the large domain of AGT either within the active site and interacting with the coenzyme or in its proximity, and five variants in which the mutated residues are distant from the active site either in the large or in the small domain. Overall, this integrated analysis of enzymatic activity, spectroscopic and stability information is used to (i) reassess previous data obtained with crude cellular extracts, (ii) establish which form(s) (i.e. holoenzyme and/or apoenzyme) and region(s) (i.e. active site microenvironment, large and/or small domain) of the protein are affected by each mutation, and (iii) suggest the possible therapeutic approach for patients bearing the examined mutations. PMID:22018727

  1. Biochemical analyses are instrumental in identifying the impact of mutations on holo and/or apo-forms and on the region(s) of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase variants associated with primary hyperoxaluria type I.

    PubMed

    Oppici, Elisa; Montioli, Riccardo; Lorenzetto, Antonio; Bianconi, Silvia; Borri Voltattorni, Carla; Cellini, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I (PH1) is a disorder of glyoxylate metabolism caused by mutations in the human AGXT gene encoding liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme. Previous investigations highlighted that, although PH1 is characterized by a significant variability in terms of enzymatic phenotype, the majority of the pathogenic variants are believed to share both structural and functional defects, as mainly revealed by data on AGT activity and expression level in crude cellular extracts. However, the knowledge of the defects of the AGT variants at a protein level is still poor. We therefore performed a side-by-side comparison between normal AGT and nine purified recombinant pathogenic variants in terms of catalytic activity, coenzyme binding mode and affinity, spectroscopic features, oligomerization, and thermal stability of both the holo- and apo-forms. Notably, we chose four variants in which the mutated residues are located in the large domain of AGT either within the active site and interacting with the coenzyme or in its proximity, and five variants in which the mutated residues are distant from the active site either in the large or in the small domain. Overall, this integrated analysis of enzymatic activity, spectroscopic and stability information is used to (i) reassess previous data obtained with crude cellular extracts, (ii) establish which form(s) (i.e. holoenzyme and/or apoenzyme) and region(s) (i.e. active site microenvironment, large and/or small domain) of the protein are affected by each mutation, and (iii) suggest the possible therapeutic approach for patients bearing the examined mutations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Physics of the Solar Active Regions from Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfreikh, G. B.

    1999-12-01

    Localized increase of the magnetic field observed by routine methods on the photosphere result in the growth of a number of active processes in the solar atmosphere and the heliosphere. These localized regions of increased magnetic field are called active regions (AR). The main processes of transfer, accumulation and release of energy in an AR is, however, out of scope of photospheric observations being essentially a 3D-process and happening either under photosphere or up in the corona. So, to investigate these plasma structures and processes we are bound to use either extrapolation of optical observational methods or observations in EUV, X-rays and radio. In this review, we stress and illustrate the input to the problem gained from radio astronomical methods and discuss possible future development of their applicatications. Historically speaking each new step in developing radio technique of observations resulted in detecting some new physics of ARs. The most significant progress in the last few years in radio diagnostics of the plasma structures of magnetospheres of the solar ARs is connected with the developing of the 2D full disk analysis on regular basis made at Nobeyama and detailed multichannel spectral-polarization (but one-dimensional and one per day) solar observations at the RATAN-600. In this report the bulk of attention is paid to the new approach to the study of solar activity gained with the Nobeyama radioheliograph and analyzing the ways for future progress. The most important new features of the multicomponent radio sources of the ARs studied using Nobeyama radioheliograph are as follow: 1. The analysis of magnetic field structures in solar corona above sunspot with 2000 G. Their temporal evolution and fluctuations with the periods around 3 and 5 minutes, due to MHD-waves in sunspot magnetic tubes and surrounding plasma. These investigations are certainly based on an analysis of thermal cyclotron emission of lower corona and CCTR above sunspot

  3. Magnetized Converging Flows toward the Hot Core in the Intermediate/High-mass Star-forming Region NGC 6334 V

    SciTech Connect

    Juárez, Carmen; Girart, Josep M.; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz toward the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern toward the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km s{sup −1}, converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with magnetohydrodynamicmore » simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (∼0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V toward the higher-density hot core region (∼0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.« less

  4. Expression, purification and characterization of inactive and active forms of ERK2 from insect expression system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kelly; Merritt, Hanne; Crawford, Kenneth; Pardee, Gwynn; Cheng, Jan Marie; Widger, Stephania; Hekmat-Nejad, Mohammad; Zaror, Isabel; Sim, Janet

    2015-06-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in many cellular programs, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, motility and programed cell-death. It is therefore considered an important target in the treatment of cancer. In an effort to support biochemical screening and small molecule drug discovery, we established a robust system to generate both inactive and active forms of ERK2 using insect expression system. We report here, for the first time, that inactive ERK2 can be expressed and purified with 100% homogeneity in the unphosphorylated form using insect system. This resulted in a significant 20-fold yield improvement compared to that previously reported using bacterial expression system. We also report a newly developed system to generate active ERK2 in insect cells through in vivo co-expression with a constitutively active MEK1 (S218D S222D). Isolated active ERK2 was confirmed to be doubly phosphorylated at the correct sites, T185 and Y187, in the activation loop of ERK2. Both ERK2 forms, inactive and active, were well characterized by biochemical activity assay for their kinase function. Inactive and active ERK2 were the two key reagents that enabled successful high through-put biochemical assay screen and structural drug discovery studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Photonic crystal lasers using wavelength-scale embedded active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari; Takeda, Koji; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Fujii, Takuro; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Lasers with ultra-low operating energy are desired for use in chip-to-chip and on-chip optical interconnects. If we are to reduce the operating energy, we must reduce the active volume. Therefore, a photonic crystal (PhC) laser with a wavelength-scale cavity has attracted a lot of attention because a PhC provides a large Q-factor with a small volume. To improve this device's performance, we employ an embedded active region structure in which the wavelength-scale active region is buried with an InP PhC slab. This structure enables us to achieve effective confinement of both carriers and photons, and to improve the thermal resistance of the device. Thus, we have obtained a large external differential quantum efficiency of 55% and an output power of -10 dBm by optical pumping. For electrical pumping, we use a lateral p-i-n structure that employs Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation for p-type and n-type doping, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature continuous-wave operation with a threshold current of 7.8 µA and a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz. The results of an experimental bit error rate measurement with a 10 Gbit s-1 NRZ signal reveal the minimum operating energy for transferring a single bit of 5.5 fJ. These results show the potential of this laser to be used for very short reach interconnects. We also describe the optimal design of cavity quality (Q) factor in terms of achieving a large output power with a low operating energy using a calculation based on rate equations. When we assume an internal absorption loss of 20 cm-1, the optimized coupling Q-factor is 2000.

  6. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire-long form overestimates self-reported physical activity of Brazilian adults.

    PubMed

    Sebastião, E; Gobbi, S; Chodzko-Zajko, W; Schwingel, A; Papini, C B; Nakamura, P M; Netto, A V; Kokubun, E

    2012-11-01

    To explore issues associated with measuring physical activity using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)-long form in adults living in a mid-sized Brazilian city. A stratified random sampling procedure was used to select a representative sample of adults living in Rio Claro. This yielded 1572 participants who were interviewed using the IPAQ-long form. The data were analysed using standard statistical procedures. Overall, 83% of men and 89% of women reported at least 150 min of combined moderate and/or vigorous physical activity per week. Reliable values of leisure and transportation-related physical activity were observed for both males and females. With regard to the household and work-related physical activity domains, both males and females reported unusually high levels of participation. The IPAQ-long form appears to overestimate levels of physical activity for both males and females, suggesting that the instrument has problems in measuring levels of physical activity in Brazilian adults. Accordingly, caution is warranted before using IPAQ data to support public policy decisions related to physical activity. Copyright © 2012 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characteristics, location and origin of flare activity in a complex active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.; Gary, G. A.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hernandez, A. M.; Rovira, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    The observational characteristics of series of multiple-loop flares from a complex active region are summarized. The location of the highest observed photospheric magnetic shear is found to be the commonly observed site of flare onset, but not, in many cases, the magnetic region where the largest time-integrated energy release is observed. The observations thus reveal a consistent pattern of energy-release processes related to the magnetic-field topology.

  8. A pore-forming protein implements VLR-activated complement cytotoxicity in lamprey.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenfang; Feng, Bo; Ren, Yong; Wu, Di; Chen, Yue; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2017-01-01

    Lamprey is a basal vertebrate with a unique adaptive immune system, which uses variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) for antigen recognition. Our previous study has shown that lamprey possessed a distinctive complement pathway activated by VLR. In this study, we identified a natterin family member-lamprey pore-forming protein (LPFP) with a jacalin-like lectin domain and an aerolysin-like pore-forming domain. LPFP had a high affinity with mannan and could form oligomer in the presence of mannan. LPFP could deposit on the surface of target cells, form pore-like complex resembling a wheel with hub and spokes, and mediate powerful cytotoxicity on target cells. These pore-forming proteins along with VLRs and complement molecules were essential for the specific cytotoxicity against exogenous pathogens and tumor cells. This unique cytotoxicity implemented by LPFP might emerge before or in parallel with the IgG-based classical complement lytic pathway completed by polyC9.

  9. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  10. A Cryptosporidium parvum genomic region encoding hemolytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Steele, M I; Kuhls, T L; Nida, K; Meka, C S; Halabi, I M; Mosier, D A; Elliott, W; Crawford, D L; Greenfield, R A

    1995-01-01

    Successful parasitization by Cryptosporidium parvum requires multiple disruptions in both host and protozoan cell membranes as cryptosporidial sporozoites invade intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently develop into asexual and sexual life stages. To identify cryptosporidial proteins which may play a role in these membrane alterations, hemolytic activity was used as a marker to screen a C. parvum genomic expression library. A stable hemolytic clone (H4) containing a 5.5-kb cryptosporidial genomic fragment was identified. The hemolytic activity encoded on H4 was mapped to a 1-kb region that contained a complete 690-bp open reading frame (hemA) ending in a common stop codon. A 21-kDa plasmid-encoded recombinant protein was expressed in maxicells containing H4. Subclones of H4 which contained only a portion of hemA did not induce hemolysis on blood agar or promote expression of the recombinant protein in maxicells. Reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR analysis of total RNA isolated from excysted sporozoites and the intestines of infected adult mice with severe combined immunodeficiency demonstrated that hemA is actively transcribed during the cryptosporidial life cycle. PMID:7558289

  11. REGION 4-SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: OCTOBER 2006 – JULY 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, the Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities, Federal Agencies, and other audiences outs...

  12. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sá, Thiago Hérick de; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-06-27

    To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. By using data from the Health section of 2008's Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil's National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making. Apresentar estimativas nacionais sobre o deslocamento a pé ou de bicicleta no trajeto casa-trabalho no Brasil e em 10 de suas regiões metropolitanas. Utilizando dados do Suplemento sobre Saúde da Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílios de 2008, estimamos a frequência de pessoas empregadas que se deslocam a pé ou de bicicleta no trajeto casa-trabalho estratificada por sexo, e segundo faixa etária, escolaridade, renda domiciliar per capita, residência em área urbana ou rural, regiões metropolitanas e macrorregiões do país. Adicionalmente, estimamos a distribuição da mesma frequ

  13. SIGN SINGULARITY AND FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Sorriso-Valvo, L.; De Vita, G.; Kazachenko, M. D.

    Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares and the presence of correlation with Extreme-Ultra-Violet and X-ray flux suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small-scale properties of the current structures.

  14. On the modified active region design of interband cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, M.; Ryczko, K.; Dyksik, M.

    2015-02-28

    Type II InAs/GaInSb quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaSb or InAs substrates and designed to be integrated in the active region of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the mid infrared have been investigated. Optical spectroscopy, combined with band structure calculations, has been used to probe their electronic properties. A design with multiple InAs QWs has been compared with the more common double W-shaped QW and it has been demonstrated that it allows red shifting the emission wavelength and enhancing the transition oscillator strength. This can be beneficial for the improvements of the ICLs performances, especially when considering their long-wavelengthmore » operation.« less

  15. Spectropolarimetric Observations of a Small Active Region with IBIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas; Judge, Philip G.

    2014-06-01

    We have used the Interferometric BI--dimensional Spectrograph (IBIS) instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope to measure the polarimetric Stokes IQUV signals for the small active region, NOAA 11304. We used three lines generally corresponding to three atmospheric heights ranging from the photosphere to low corona: Fe I 6302Å, NaI 5896Å, and CaII 8542Å. Each set of profiles has been inverted using the NICOLE code to determine the vector magnetic field at the three heights throughout the field of view, or the line--of--sight field, as allowed by the level of polarization signal. Comparisons are made between the magnetic and thermal structures with the goal of constraining chromospheric models with the information obtained at multiple heights.

  16. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  17. Particle acceleration in solar active regions being in the state of self-organized criticality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    We review the recent observational results on flare initiation and particle acceleration in solar active regions. Elaborating a statistical approach to describe the spatiotemporally intermittent electric field structures formed inside a flaring solar active region, we investigate the efficiency of such structures in accelerating charged particles (electrons and protons). The large-scale magnetic configuration in the solar atmosphere responds to the strong turbulent flows that convey perturbations across the active region by initiating avalanche-type processes. The resulting unstable structures correspond to small-scale dissipation regions hosting strong electric fields. Previous research on particle acceleration in strongly turbulent plasmas provides a general framework for addressing such a problem. This framework combines various electromagnetic field configurations obtained by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) or cellular automata (CA) simulations, or by employing a statistical description of the field’s strength and configuration with test particle simulations. We work on data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations, based on a self-organized criticality models (SOC). A relativistic test-particle simulation traces each particle’s guiding center within these configurations. Using the simulated particle-energy distributions we test our results against observations, in the framework of the collisional thick target model (CTTM) of solar hard X-ray (HXR) emission and compare our results with the current observations.

  18. 76 FR 53144 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-508 and Form I-508F, Extension of a Currently...

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  19. 76 FR 31972 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-508 and Form I-508F, Extension of a Currently...

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  20. Tracking Organs Composed of One or Multiple Regions Using Geodesic Active Region Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, A.; Jiménez, J. J.

    In radiotherapy treatment it is very important to find out the target organs on the medical image sequence in order to determine and apply the proper dose. The techniques to achieve this goal can be classified into extrinsic and intrinsic. Intrinsic techniques only use image processing with medical images associated to the radiotherapy treatment, as we deal in this chapter. To accurately perform this organ tracking it is necessary to find out segmentation and tracking models that were able to be applied to several image modalities involved on a radiotherapy session (CT See Modality , MRI , etc.). The movements of the organs are mainly affected by two factors: breathing and involuntary movements associated with the internal organs or patient positioning. Among the several alternatives to track the organs of interest, a model based on geodesic active regions is proposed. This model has been tested over CT images from the pelvic, cardiac, and thoracic area. A new model for the segmentation of organs composed by more than one region is proposed.

  1. Tracking Organs Composed of One or Multiple Regions Using Geodesic Active Region Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, A.; Jiménez, J. J.

    In radiotherapy treatment it is very important to find out the target organs on the medical image sequence in order to determine and apply the proper dose. The techniques to achieve this goal can be classified into extrinsic and intrinsic. Intrinsic techniques only use image processing with medical images associated to the radiotherapy Radiotherapy treatment, as we deal in this chapter. To accurately perform this organ tracking it is necessary to find out segmentation and tracking models that were able to be applied to several image modalities involved on a radiotherapy session (CT CT See Modality , MRI Magnetic resoance imaging , etc.). The movements of the organs are mainly affected by two factors: breathing and involuntary movements associated with the internal organs or patient positioning. Among the several alternatives to track the organs of interest, a model based on geodesic active regions is proposed. This model has been tested over CT Computed tomography images from the pelvic, cardiac, and thoracic area. A new model for the segmentation of organs composed by more than one region is proposed.

  2. The development and characterization of an ELISA specifically detecting the active form of cathepsin K.

    PubMed

    Sun, S; Karsdal, M A; Bay-Jensen, A C; Sørensen, M G; Zheng, Q; Dziegiel, M H; Maksymowych, W P; Henriksen, K

    2013-10-01

    Cathepsin K plays essential roles in bone resorption and is intensely investigated as a therapeutic target for the treatment of osteoporosis. Hence an assessment of the active form of cathepsin K may provide important biological information in metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or ankylosing spondylitis. Presently there are no robust assays for the assessment of active cathepsin K in serum, and therefore an ELISA specifically detecting the N-terminal of the active form of cathepsin K was developed. The assay was technically robust, with a lowest limit of detection (LOD) of 0.085 ng/mL. The average intra- and inter-assay CV% were 6.60% and 8.56% respectively. The dilution recovery and spike recovery tests in human serum were within 100±20% within the range of the assay. A comparison of latent and active cathepsin K confirmed specificity towards the active form. Quantification of the levels of active cathepsin K in supernatants of purified human osteoclasts compared to corresponding macrophages showed a 30-fold induction (p<0.001). In contrast, in serum samples from osteoporotic women on estrogen or bisphosphonate therapy and from ankylosing spondylitis patients no clinically relevant differences were observed. In summary, we have developed a robust and sensitive assay specifically detecting the active form of cathepsin K; however, while it monitors osteoclasts with high specificity in vitro, it appears that circulating levels of active cathepsin K do not reflect bone changes under these circumstances. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Project Activities as a Form of English Language Teaching Based on the Interdisciplinary Approach to Form Intercultural Communicative Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redchenko, Nadezhda N.

    2016-01-01

    The authors of this article suggest a thesis about the purpose of teaching a foreign language--it is student's communicative activities, i.e. learning a foreign language in practice. The teacher's task is to encourage activities of every student and to create situations to develop their creative activities in a learning process. New information…

  4. CASPASE-9 CARD:CORE DOMAIN INTERACTIONS REQUIRE A PROPERLY-FORMED ACTIVE SITE

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Kristen L.; Serrano, Banyuhay P.; Hardy, Jeanne A.

    2018-01-01

    Caspase-9 is a critical factor in the initiation of apoptosis, and as a result is tightly regulated by a number of mechanisms. Caspase-9 contains a Caspase Activation and Recruitment Domain (CARD), which enables caspase-9 to form a tight interaction with the apoptosome, a heptameric activating platform. The caspase-9 CARD has been thought to be principally involved in recruitment to the apoptosome, but its roles outside this interaction have yet to be uncovered. In this work we show that the CARD is involved in physical interactions with the catalytic core of caspase-9 in the absence of the apoptosome; this interaction requires a properly formed caspase-9 active site. The active sites of caspases are composed of four extremely mobile loops. When the active-site loops are not properly ordered, the CARD and core domains of caspase-9 do not interact and behave independently, like loosely tethered beads. When the active-site loop bundle is properly ordered, the CARD domain interacts with the catalytic core, forming a single folding unit. Together these findings provide mechanistic insight into a new level of caspase-9 regulation, prompting speculation that the CARD may also play a role in the recruitment or recognition of substrate. PMID:29500231

  5. Process for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase of catalytically active material

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Dale L.; Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei

    1995-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase reaction product of catalytically active material comprising one or more alkali metals, one or more alkaline earth metals, and one or more Group VIII transition metals. The process comprises reacting together one or more alkali metal oxides and/or salts, one or more alkaline earth metal oxides and/or salts, one or more Group VIII transition metal oxides and/or salts, capable of forming a catalytically active reaction product, in the optional presence of an additional source of oxygen, using a laser beam to ablate from a target such metal compound reactants in the form of a vapor in a deposition chamber, resulting in the deposition, on a heated substrate in the chamber, of the desired oxide phase reaction product. The resulting product may be formed in variable, but reproducible, stoichiometric ratios. The homogeneous oxide solid phase product is useful as a catalyst, and can be produced in many physical forms, including thin films, particulate forms, coatings on catalyst support structures, and coatings on structures used in reaction apparatus in which the reaction product of the invention will serve as a catalyst.

  6. OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L.

    Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for daysmore » and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.« less

  7. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-08-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT) and Köhler theory (KT) to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite) present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  8. PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF AN ACTIVATED FORM OF UO$sub 2$

    DOEpatents

    Polissar, M.J.

    1957-09-24

    A process for producing a highly active form of UO/sub 2/ characterized both by rapid oxidation in air and by rapid chlorination with CCl/sub 4/ vapor at an elevated temperature is reported. In accordance with the process, commercial UO/sub 2/, is subjected to a series of oxidation-reduction operations to produce a form of UC/sub 2/ of enhanced reactivity. By treatimg commercial UO/sub 2/ at a temperature between 335 and 485 deg C with methane, then briefly with an oxygen containing gas and followimg this by a second treatment with a methane containing gas, the original relatively stable charge of UO/sub 2/ will be transformed into an active form of UO/sub 2/.

  9. 78 FR 26648 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Passenger List/Crew List (CBP Form I-418)

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  17. X-RAY AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, V. A.; Hofner, P.; Anderson, C.

    2015-08-15

    We present results from Chandra ACIS-I and Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 6 cm continuum observations of the IRAS 20126+4104 massive star-forming region. We detect 150 X-ray sources within the 17′ × 17′ ACIS-I field, and a total of 13 radio sources within the 9.′2 primary beam at 4.9 GHz. Among these observtions are the first 6 cm detections of the central sources reported by Hofner et al., namely, I20N1, I20S, and I20var. A new variable radio source is also reported. Searching the 2MASS archive, we identified 88 near-infrared (NIR) counterparts to the X-ray sources. Only four of the X-raymore » sources had 6 cm counterparts. Based on an NIR color–color analysis and on the Besançon simulation of Galactic stellar populations, we estimate that approximately 80 X-ray sources are associated with this massive star-forming region. We detect an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and infer the presence of a cluster of at least 43 young stellar objects within a distance of 1.2 pc from the massive protostar.« less

  18. HIFI Spectroscopy of H2O Submillimeter Lines in Nuclei of Actively Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Weiß, A.; Perez-Beaupuits, J. P.; Güsten, R.; Liu, D.; Gao, Y.; Menten, K. M.; van der Werf, P.; Israel, F. P.; Harris, A.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Stutzki, J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a systematic survey of multiple velocity-resolved H2O spectra using Herschel/Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) toward nine nearby actively star-forming galaxies. The ground-state and low-excitation lines (E up ≤ 130 K) show profiles with emission and absorption blended together, while absorption-free medium-excitation lines (130 K ≤ E up ≤ 350 K) typically display line shapes similar to CO. We analyze the HIFI observation together with archival SPIRE/PACS H2O data using a state-of-the-art 3D radiative transfer code that includes the interaction between continuum and line emission. The water excitation models are combined with information on the dust and CO spectral line energy distribution to determine the physical structure of the interstellar medium (ISM). We identify two ISM components that are common to all galaxies: a warm ({T}{dust}˜ 40{--}70 K), dense (n({{H}})˜ {10}5{--}{10}6 {{cm}}-3) phase that dominates the emission of medium-excitation H2O lines. This gas phase also dominates the far-IR emission and the CO intensities for {J}{up}> 8. In addition, a cold ({T}{dust}˜ 20{--}30 K), dense (n({{H}})˜ {10}4{--}{10}5 {{cm}}-3), more extended phase is present. It outputs the emission in the low-excitation H2O lines and typically also produces the prominent line absorption features. For the two ULIRGs in our sample (Arp 220 and Mrk 231) an even hotter and more compact (R s ≤ 100 pc) region is present, which is possibly linked to AGN activity. We find that collisions dominate the water excitation in the cold gas and for lines with {E}{up}≤slant 300 K and {E}{up}≤slant 800 K in the warm and hot component, respectively. Higher-energy levels are mainly excited by IR pumping.

  19. The evolution of flaring and non-flaring active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcik, A.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Sahin, S.; Sarp, V.; Obridko, V.; Ozguc, A.; Rozelot, J. P.

    2018-06-01

    According to the modified Zurich classification, sunspot groups are classified into seven different classes (A, B, C, D, E, F and H) based on their morphology and evolution. In this classification, classes A and B, which are small groups, describe the beginning of sunspot evolution, while classes D, E and F describe the large and evolved groups. Class C describes the middle phase of sunspot evolution and the class H describes the end of sunspot evolution. Here, we compare the lifetime and temporal evolution of flaring and non-flaring active regions (ARs), and the flaring effect on ARs in these groups in detail for the last two solar cycles (1996 through 2016). Our main findings are as follows: (i) Flaring sunspot groups have longer lifetimes than non-flaring ones. (ii) Most of the class A, B and C flaring ARs rapidly evolve to higher classes, while this is not applicable for non-flaring ARs. More than 50 per cent of the flaring A, B and C groups changed morphologically, while the remaining D, E, F and H groups did not change remarkably after the flare activity. (iii) 75 per cent of all flaring sunspot groups are large and complex. (iv) There is a significant increase in the sunspot group area in classes A, B, C, D and H after flaring activity. In contrast, the sunspot group area of classes E and F decreased. The sunspot counts of classes D, E and F decreased as well, while classes A, B, C and H showed an increase.

  20. Regional Triggering of Volcanic Activity Following Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill-Butler, Charley; Blackett, Matthew; Wright, Robert

    2015-04-01

    There are numerous reports of a spatial and temporal link between volcanic activity and high magnitude seismic events. In fact, since 1950, all large magnitude earthquakes have been followed by volcanic eruptions in the following year - 1952 Kamchatka M9.2, 1960 Chile M9.5, 1964 Alaska M9.2, 2004 & 2005 Sumatra-Andaman M9.3 & M8.7 and 2011 Japan M9.0. While at a global scale, 56% of all large earthquakes (M≥8.0) in the 21st century were followed by increases in thermal activity. The most significant change in volcanic activity occurred between December 2004 and April 2005 following the M9.1 December 2004 earthquake after which new eruptions were detected at 10 volcanoes and global volcanic flux doubled over 52 days (Hill-Butler et al. 2014). The ability to determine a volcano's activity or 'response', however, has resulted in a number of disparities with <50% of all volcanoes being monitored by ground-based instruments. The advent of satellite remote sensing for volcanology has, therefore, provided researchers with an opportunity to quantify the timing, magnitude and character of volcanic events. Using data acquired from the MODVOLC algorithm, this research examines a globally comparable database of satellite-derived radiant flux alongside USGS NEIC data to identify changes in volcanic activity following an earthquake, February 2000 - December 2012. Using an estimate of background temperature obtained from the MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) product (Wright et al. 2014), thermal radiance was converted to radiant flux following the method of Kaufman et al. (1998). The resulting heat flux inventory was then compared to all seismic events (M≥6.0) within 1000 km of each volcano to evaluate if changes in volcanic heat flux correlate with regional earthquakes. This presentation will first identify relationships at the temporal and spatial scale, more complex relationships obtained by machine learning algorithms will then be examined to establish favourable

  1. Regional variations in the observed morphology and activity of martian linear gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Kimberly Marie; Diniega, Serina; Austria, Mia; Ochoa, Vincent; HiRISE Science and Instrument Team

    2017-10-01

    The formation mechanism for martian linear gullies has been much debated, because they have been suggested as possible evidence of liquid water on Mars. This class of dune gullies is defined by long (up to 2 km), narrow channels that are relatively uniform in width, and range in sinuosity index. Unlike other gullies on Earth and Mars that end in depositional aprons, linear gullies end in circular depressions referred to as terminal pits. This particular morphological difference, along with the difficulty of identifying a source of water to form these features, has led to several ‘dry’ hypotheses. Recent observations on the morphology, distribution, and present-day activity of linear gullies suggests that they could be formed by subliming blocks of seasonal CO2 ice (“dry ice”) sliding downslope on dune faces. In our study, we aimed to further constrain the possible mechanism(s) responsible for the formation of linear gullies by using HiRISE images to collect morphological data and track seasonal activity within three regions in the southern hemisphere-Hellespontus (~45°S, 40°E), Aonia Terra (~50°S, 290°E), and Jeans (~70°S, 155°E) over the last four Mars years. General similarities in these observations were reflective of the proposed formation process (sliding CO2 blocks) while differences were correlated with regional environmental conditions related to the latitude or general geologic setting. This presentation describes the observed regional differences in linear gully morphology and activity, and investigates how environmental factors such as surface properties and local levels of frost may explain these variations while still supporting the proposed model. Determining the formation mechanism that forms these martian features can improve our understanding of both the climatic and geological processes that shape the Martian surface.

  2. The Formation of Glycine in Hot Cores: New Gas-grain Chemical Simulations of Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, Robin

    2012-07-01

    Organic molecules of increasing complexity have been detected in the warm envelopes of star-forming cores, commonly referred to as "hot cores". Spectroscopic searches at mm/sub-mm wavelengths have uncovered both amines and carboxylic acids in these regions, as well as a range of other compounds including alcohols, ethers, esters, and nitriles. However, the simplest amino acid, glycine (NH2CH2COOH), has not yet been reliably detected in the ISM. There has been much interest in this molecule, due to its importance to the formation of proteins, and to life, while the positive identification of interstellar molecules of similar or greater complexity suggests that its existence in star-forming regions is plausible. I will present the results of recent models of hot-core chemistry that simulate the formation of both simple and complex molecules on the surfaces or within the ice mantles of dust grains. I will also present results from the first gas-grain astrochemical model to approach the question of amino-acid formation in hot cores. The formation of glycine in moderate abundance is found to be as efficient as that for similarly complex species, while its sublimation from the grains occurs at somewhat higher temperatures. However, simulated emission spectra based on the model results show that the degree of compactness of high-abundance regions, and the density and temperature profiles of the cores may be the key variables affecting the future detection of glycine, as well as other amino acids, and may explain its non-detection to date.

  3. Unprecedented Proliferation of Novel Pelagic Sargassum Form has Implications for Ecosystem Function and Regional Diversity in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siuda, A. N.; Schell, J. M.; Goodwin, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    Pelagic Sargassum is a planktonic macroalgae comprised of two species, S. fluitans and S. natans, each exhibiting a variety of morphological forms; it is found throughout the North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico. Drifting open ocean Sargassum provides essential habitat and food resources to organisms across multiple trophic levels, from resident shrimp to migratory sea turtles. Historic observations, including Sea Education Association's (SEA) 22-year field sampling dataset, indicate that S. natans-I and S. fluitans-III are most common and that S. natans-VIII is rare. Furthermore, SEA's long-term record shows very low pelagic Sargassum abundance in the Eastern Caribbean in contrast to the Sargasso Sea. During April 2014, Sargassum began washing ashore along Caribbean coastlines in unprecedented quantities. Shipboard observations of the recent inundation event occurred November 2014 to May 2015. In total, 30.5 kg of pelagic Sargassum was collected in 92.6% of surface neuston tows, sorted and weighed by morphological form. Notably, the predominant Sargassum form observed during the 2014/15 event is S. natans-VIII, a documented change in Sargassum diversity. Strong spatial patterns were also observed, with S. natans-VIII dominant in the Western Tropical Atlantic (87.3% wet weight) and Eastern Caribbean (95.3% wet weight) and S. natans-I most common in the South Sargasso Sea (87.5% wet weight). S. fluitans-III was observed in low abundance across all regions. These sudden assemblage and abundance changes, the biophysical mechanisms of which are not yet understood, have significant ecological consequences at multiple scales. Impacts to associated mobile fauna diversity and community structure, dependent fisheries and iconic species, and coastal ecosystem function will echo throughout the Caribbean, and should comprise focal areas of future research efforts across the region.

  4. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. III - NOAA active region 6233 (1990 August)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Canfield, Richard C.; Leka, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the spatial relationship between vertical electric currents and flare phenomena in NOAA Active Region 6233, which was observed 1990, August 28-31 at Mees Solar Observatory. The two flares studied are the 1N/M1.8 flare on August 28, 22:30 UT and the 1N/M1.6 flare on August 29, 20:35 UT. Using Stokes polarimetry we make magnetograms of the region and compute the vertical current density. Using H-alpha imaging spectroscopy we identify sites of intense nonthermal electron precipitation or of high coronal pressure. The precipitation in these flares is barely strong enough to be detectable. We find that both precipitation and high pressure tend to occur near vertical currents, but that neither phenomenon is cospatial with current maxima. In contrast with the conclusion of other authors, we argue that these observations do not support a current-interruption model for flares, unless the relevant currents are primarily horizontal. The magnetic morphology and temporal evolution of these flares suggest that an erupting filament model may be relevant, but this model does not explicitly predict the relationship between precipitation, high pressure, and vertical currents.

  5. Polarization Properties and Magnetic Field Structures in the High-mass Star-forming Region W51 Observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Patrick M.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Ho, Paul T. P.; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Su, Yu-Nung; Takakuwa, Shigehisa

    2018-03-01

    We present the first ALMA dust polarization observations toward the high-mass star-forming regions W51 e2, e8, and W51 North in Band 6 (230 GHz) with a resolution of about 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 26 (∼5 mpc). Polarized emission in all three sources is clearly detected and resolved. Measured relative polarization levels are between 0.1% and 10%. While the absolute polarization shows complicated structures, the relative polarization displays the typical anticorrelation with Stokes I, although with a large scatter. Inferred magnetic (B) field morphologies are organized and connected. Detailed substructures are resolved, revealing new features such as comet-shaped B-field morphologies in satellite cores, symmetrically converging B-field zones, and possibly streamlined morphologies. The local B-field dispersion shows some anticorrelation with the relative polarization. Moreover, the lowest polarization percentages together with largest dispersions coincide with B-field convergence zones. We put forward \\sin ω , where ω is the measurable angle between a local B-field orientation and local gravity, as a measure of how effectively the B field can oppose gravity. Maps of \\sin ω for all three sources show organized structures that suggest a locally varying role of the B field, with some regions where gravity can largely act unaffectedly, possibly in a network of narrow magnetic channels, and other regions where the B field can work maximally against gravity.

  6. a Search for the HOCO Radical in the Massive Star-Forming Region Sgr B2(M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Takahiro; Araki, Mitsunori; Takano, Shuro; Kuze, Nobuhiko; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Endo, Yasuki

    2017-06-01

    Despite importance of the origin of life, long lasting challenges to detect the simplest amino acid glycine (H_2NCH_2COOH) in interstellar medium has not been successful. As a preliminary step toward search for glycine, detection of its precursor has received attention. It is considered that glycine is produced by the reaction of the HOCO radical and the aminomethyl radical(CH_2NH_2) on interstellar grain surface: HOCO + CH_2NH_2 → H_2NCH_2COOH. (1) HOCO is produced by the reaction of OH + CO → HOCO and/or HCOOH → HOCO + H. However, HOCO and CH_2NH_2 have not been investigated in interstellar medium. Recently, we determined the accurate molecular constants of HOCO. Thus, accurate rest frequencies were derived from the constants. In the present study, we carried out the observations of HOCO in the massive star-forming region Sgr B2(M), having variety of interstellar molecules, with Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. Although HOCO could not be detected in Sgr B2(M), the upper limit of the column density was derived to be 9.0× 10^{12} cm^{-2} via the spectrum in the 88 GHz region by the rotational diagram method. If the reaction (1) is a main process of the glycine production in this region, an extremely deep search is needed to detect glycine. T. Oyama et al., J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174303 (2011).

  7. Search for Wide Planetary-Mass Companions in Young Star-Forming Regions with UKIDSS and Pan-STARRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Kimberly M.; Kraus, A. L.; Liu, M. C.; Bowler, B. P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, planetary-mass (<15 MJup) companions have been discovered in very wide orbits (>100 AU) around young stars. It is unclear whether these objects formed like planets or like stars. If these are planets, then modifications to core accretion or disk instability models are needed to allow formation at such wide orbits, or planet scattering must be an important mechanism. On the other hand, if these objects formed like stars, we need to understand the frequency of these extremely low mass ratio binary companions which challenge brown dwarf formation models. Regardless of their origins, these wide companions are easier to observe than close-in planets and can be used as benchmarks to understand the properties of young planets. We have combined optical and NIR photometry from UKIDSS and Pan-STARRS-1 to search the young star-forming region of Upper Scorpius and Taurus for new planetary-mass objects, going ≈3 mag deeper than previous work with 2MASS. We identified several candidates with very wide separations (≈400-4000 AU) from known members using a combination of color selection and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to templates of known low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Furthermore, we have obtained followup NIR spectra of several Upper Scorpius candidates to spectroscopically identify three new wide very low-mass companions (≈15-25 MJup spectral type of M8-L0).

  8. Does the Sound of a Barking Dog Activate its Corresponding Visual Form? An fMRI Investigation of Modality-Specific Semantic Access

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Jamie; Garcia, Amanda; Binney, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Much remains to be learned about the neural architecture underlying word meaning. Fully distributed models of semantic memory predict that the sound of a barking dog will conjointly engage a network of distributed sensorimotor spokes. An alternative framework holds that modality-specific features additionally converge within transmodal hubs. Participants underwent functional MRI while covertly naming familiar objects versus newly learned novel objects from only one of their constituent semantic features (visual form, characteristic sound, or point-light motion representation). Relative to the novel object baseline, familiar concepts elicited greater activation within association regions specific to that presentation modality. Furthermore, visual form elicited activation within high-level auditory association cortex. Conversely, environmental sounds elicited activation in regions proximal to visual association cortex. Both conditions commonly engaged a putative hub region within lateral anterior temporal cortex. These results support hybrid semantic models in which local hubs and distributed spokes are dually engaged in service of semantic memory. PMID:27289210

  9. Tooth development in Ambystoma mexicanum: phosphatase activities, calcium accumulation and cell proliferation in the tooth-forming tissues.

    PubMed

    Wistuba, Joachim; Ehmcke, Jens; Clemen, Günter

    2003-06-01

    Prerequisites of tooth formation, cell proliferation in the tooth-forming tissues, calcium accumulation and the enzymatic activities of alkaline (ALP) and acid phosphatases (ACP) were investigated by immunohistochemical and histochemical methods in various developmental stages of the Mexican Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum. During the growth of replacement teeth, the tooth-forming tissues continually recruit cells from the surrounding regions. The basal layer of the oral epithelium, the dental lamina and sometimes even the outer enamel epithelium provide cells for the differentiated inner enamel epithelium, in which the active ameloblasts are localized. The differentiating odontoblasts are derived from proliferating cells situated basally to the replacement teeth in the mesenchymal tissue. When differentiation has started and the cells have become functional, proliferative activity can no longer be observed. Calcium is accumulated close to the site of mineralization in the inner enamel epithelium and in the odontoblasts as it is in mammals, elasmobranchii and teleostei. The activities of ACP and ALP related to the mineralization of the replacement teeth are separated spatially and not sequentially as they are in mammals. However, the results indicate a similar function of these enzymatic components in relation to tooth formation and maturation of mineral deposition. Most of the substantial processes related to tooth formation reported from other vertebrates occur in a manner similar to that in Ambystoma mexicanum, but there also seem to be basic mechanisms present that are realised in a unique way in this urodele.

  10. Small Coronal Holes Near Active Regions as Sources of Slow Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil

    We discuss the nature of the small areas of rapidly diverging, open magnetic flux that form in the strong unipolar fields at the peripheries of active regions (ARs), according to coronal extrapolations of photospheric field measurements. Because such regions usually have dark counterparts in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images, we refer to them as coronal holes, even when they appear as narrow lanes or contain sunspots. Revisiting previously identified “AR sources” of slow solar wind from 1998 and 1999, we find that they are all associated with EUV coronal holes; the absence of well-defined He i 1083.0 nm counterparts to some ofmore » these holes is attributed to the large flux of photoionizing radiation from neighboring AR loops. Examining a number of AR-associated EUV holes during the 2014 activity maximum, we confirm that they are characterized by wind speeds of ∼300–450 km s{sup −1}, O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} ratios of ∼0.05–0.4, and footpoint field strengths typically of order 30 G. The close spacing between ARs at sunspot maximum limits the widths of unipolar regions and their embedded holes, while the continual emergence of new flux leads to rapid changes in the hole boundaries. Because of the highly nonradial nature of AR fields, the smaller EUV holes are often masked by the overlying canopy of loops, and may be more visible toward one solar limb than at central meridian. As sunspot activity declines, the AR remnants merge to form much larger, weaker, and longer-lived unipolar regions, which harbor the “classical” coronal holes that produce recurrent high-speed streams.« less

  11. The proteolytic system of pineapple stems revisited: Purification and characterization of multiple catalytically active forms.

    PubMed

    Matagne, André; Bolle, Laetitia; El Mahyaoui, Rachida; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Azarkan, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Crude pineapple proteases extract (aka stem bromelain; EC 3.4.22.4) is an important proteolytic mixture that contains enzymes belonging to the cysteine proteases of the papain family. Numerous studies have been reported aiming at the fractionation and characterization of the many molecular species present in the extract, but more efforts are still required to obtain sufficient quantities of the various purified protease forms for detailed physicochemical, enzymatic and structural characterization. In this work, we describe an efficient strategy towards the purification of at least eight enzymatic forms. Thus, following rapid fractionation on a SP-Sepharose FF column, two sub-populations with proteolytic activity were obtained: the unbound (termed acidic) and bound (termed basic) bromelain fractions. Following reversible modification with monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG), both fractions were further separated on Q-Sepharose FF and SP-Sepharose FF, respectively. This procedure yielded highly purified molecular species, all titrating ca. 1 mol of thiol group per mole of enzyme, with distinct biochemical properties. N-terminal sequencing allowed identifying at least eight forms with proteolytic activity. The basic fraction contained previously identified species, i.e. basic bromelain forms 1 and 2, ananain forms 1 and 2, and comosain (MEROPS identifier: C01.027). Furthermore, a new proteolytic species, showing similarities with basic bomelain forms 1 and 2, was discovered and termed bromelain form 3. The two remaining species were found in the acidic bromelain fraction and were arbitrarily named acidic bromelain forms 1 and 2. Both, acidic bromelain forms 1, 2 and basic bromelain forms 1, 2 and 3 are glycosylated, while ananain forms 1 and 2, and comosain are not. The eight protease forms display different amidase activities against the various substrates tested, namely small synthetic chromogenic compounds (DL-BAPNA and Boc-Ala-Ala-Gly-pNA), fluorogenic compounds

  12. OBSERVATIONS OF THE GROWTH OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan

    We present observations of the growth of an active region filament caused by magnetic interactions among the filament and its adjacent superpenumbral filament (SF) and dark thread-like structures (T). Multistep reconnections are identified during the whole growing process. Magnetic flux convergence and cancellation occurring at the positive footpoint region of the filament is the first step reconnection, which resulted in the filament bifurcating into two sets of intertwined threads. One set anchored in situ, while the other set moved toward and interacted with the SF and part of T. This indicates the second step reconnection, which gave rise to themore » disappearance of the SF and the formation of a long thread-like structure that connects the far ends of the filament and T. The long thread-like structure further interacted with the T and then separated into two parts, representing the third step reconnection. Finally, another similar long thread-like structure, which intertwined with the fixed filament threads, appeared. H {sub α} observations show that this twisted structure is a longer sinistral filament. Based on the observed photospheric vector magnetograms, we performed a non-linear force-free field extrapolation to reconstruct the magnetic fields above the photosphere and found that the coronal magnetic field lines associated with the filament consists of two twisted flux ropes winding around each other. These results suggest that magnetic interactions among filaments and their adjacent SFs and T could lead to the growth of the filaments, and the filament is probably supported in a flux rope.« less

  13. Observations of the Growth of an Active Region Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We present observations of the growth of an active region filament caused by magnetic interactions among the filament and its adjacent superpenumbral filament (SF) and dark thread-like structures (T). Multistep reconnections are identified during the whole growing process. Magnetic flux convergence and cancellation occurring at the positive footpoint region of the filament is the first step reconnection, which resulted in the filament bifurcating into two sets of intertwined threads. One set anchored in situ, while the other set moved toward and interacted with the SF and part of T. This indicates the second step reconnection, which gave rise to the disappearance of the SF and the formation of a long thread-like structure that connects the far ends of the filament and T. The long thread-like structure further interacted with the T and then separated into two parts, representing the third step reconnection. Finally, another similar long thread-like structure, which intertwined with the fixed filament threads, appeared. Hαobservations show that this twisted structure is a longer sinistral filament. Based on the observed photospheric vector magnetograms, we performed a non-linear force-free field extrapolation to reconstruct the magnetic fields above the photosphere and found that the coronal magnetic field lines associated with the filament consists of two twisted flux ropes winding around each other. These results suggest that magnetic interactions among filaments and their adjacent SFs and T could lead to the growth of the filaments, and the filament is probably supported in a flux rope.

  14. Cytochrome P450-mediated activation of the fragrance compound geraniol forms potent contact allergens.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Lina; Baron, Jens Malte; Börje, Anna; Weidolf, Lars; Merk, Hans; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2008-12-01

    Contact sensitization is caused by low molecular weight compounds which penetrate the skin and bind to protein. In many cases, these compounds are activated to reactive species, either by autoxidation on exposure to air or by metabolic activation in the skin. Geraniol, a widely used fragrance chemical, is considered to be a weak allergen, although its chemical structure does not indicate it to be a contact sensitizer. We have shown that geraniol autoxidizes and forms allergenic oxidation products. In the literature, it is suggested but not shown that geraniol could be metabolically activated to geranial. Previously, a skin-like CYP cocktail consisting of cutaneous CYP isoenzymes, was developed as a model system to study cutaneous metabolism. In the present study, we used this system to investigate CYP-mediated activation of geraniol. In incubations with the skin-like CYP cocktail, geranial, neral, 2,3-epoxygeraniol, 6,7-epoxygeraniol and 6,7-epoxygeranial were identified. Geranial was the main metabolite formed followed by 6,7-epoxygeraniol. The allergenic activities of the identified metabolites were determined in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Geranial, neral and 6,7-epoxygeraniol were shown to be moderate sensitizers, and 6,7-epoxygeranial a strong sensitizer. Of the isoenzymes studied, CYP2B6, CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 showed high activities. It is likely that CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 are mainly responsible for the metabolic activation of geraniol in the skin, as they are expressed constitutively at significantly higher levels than CYP2B6. Thus, geraniol is activated through both autoxidation and metabolism. The allergens geranial and neral are formed via both oxidation mechanisms, thereby playing a large role in the sensitization to geraniol.

  15. Cytochrome P450-mediated activation of the fragrance compound geraniol forms potent contact allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Hagvall, Lina; Baron, Jens Malte; Boerje, Anna

    2008-12-01

    Contact sensitization is caused by low molecular weight compounds which penetrate the skin and bind to protein. In many cases, these compounds are activated to reactive species, either by autoxidation on exposure to air or by metabolic activation in the skin. Geraniol, a widely used fragrance chemical, is considered to be a weak allergen, although its chemical structure does not indicate it to be a contact sensitizer. We have shown that geraniol autoxidizes and forms allergenic oxidation products. In the literature, it is suggested but not shown that geraniol could be metabolically activated to geranial. Previously, a skin-like CYP cocktailmore » consisting of cutaneous CYP isoenzymes, was developed as a model system to study cutaneous metabolism. In the present study, we used this system to investigate CYP-mediated activation of geraniol. In incubations with the skin-like CYP cocktail, geranial, neral, 2,3-epoxygeraniol, 6,7-epoxygeraniol and 6,7-epoxygeranial were identified. Geranial was the main metabolite formed followed by 6,7-epoxygeraniol. The allergenic activities of the identified metabolites were determined in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Geranial, neral and 6,7-epoxygeraniol were shown to be moderate sensitizers, and 6,7-epoxygeranial a strong sensitizer. Of the isoenzymes studied, CYP2B6, CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 showed high activities. It is likely that CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 are mainly responsible for the metabolic activation of geraniol in the skin, as they are expressed constitutively at significantly higher levels than CYP2B6. Thus, geraniol is activated through both autoxidation and metabolism. The allergens geranial and neral are formed via both oxidation mechanisms, thereby playing a large role in the sensitization to geraniol.« less

  16. Contribution of regional brain melanocortin receptor subtypes to elevated activity energy expenditure in lean, active rats

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Charu; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Cai, Minying; Hruby, Victor J.; Bednarek, Maria; Novak, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity and non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) are crucial factors accounting for individual differences in body weight, interacting with genetic predisposition. In the brain, a number of neuroendocrine intermediates regulate food intake and energy expenditure (EE); this includes the brain melanocortin (MC) system, consisting of melanocortin peptides as well as their receptors (MCR). MC3R and MC4R have emerged as critical modulators of EE and food intake. To determine how variance in MC signaling may underlie individual differences in physical activity levels, we examined behavioral response to MC receptor agonists and antagonists in rats that show high and low levels of physical activity and NEAT, that is, high- and low-capacity runners (HCR, LCR), developed by artificial selection for differential intrinsic aerobic running capacity. Focusing on the hypothalamus, we identified brain region-specific elevations in expression of MCR 3, 4, and also MC5R, in the highly active, lean HCR relative to the less active and obesity-prone LCR. Further, the differences in activity and associated EE as a result of MCR activation or suppression using specific agonists and antagonists were similarly region-specific and directly corresponded to the differential MCR expression patterns. The agonists and antagonists investigated here did not significantly impact food intake at the doses used, suggesting that the differential pattern of receptor expression may by more meaningful to physical activity than to other aspects of energy balance regulation. Thus, MCR-mediated physical activity may be a key neural mechanism in distinguishing the lean phenotype and a target for enhancing physical activity and NEAT. PMID:26404873

  17. Integration of active pharmaceutical ingredient solid form selection and particle engineering into drug product design.

    PubMed

    Ticehurst, Martyn David; Marziano, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    This review seeks to offer a broad perspective that encompasses an understanding of the drug product attributes affected by active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) physical properties, their link to solid form selection and the role of particle engineering. While the crucial role of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) solid form selection is universally acknowledged in the pharmaceutical industry, the value of increasing effort to understanding the link between solid form, API physical properties and drug product formulation and manufacture is now also being recognised. A truly holistic strategy for drug product development should focus on connecting solid form selection, particle engineering and formulation design to both exploit opportunities to access simpler manufacturing operations and prevent failures. Modelling and predictive tools that assist in establishing these links early in product development are discussed. In addition, the potential for differences between the ingoing API physical properties and those in the final product caused by drug product processing is considered. The focus of this review is on oral solid dosage forms and dry powder inhaler products for lung delivery. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Structure of the active form of human origin recognition complex and its ATPase motor module

    SciTech Connect

    Tocilj, Ante; On, Kin Fan; Yuan, Zuanning

    Binding of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) to origins of replication marks the first step in the initiation of replication of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the structure of the active form of human ORC determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. The complex is composed of an ORC1/4/5 motor module lobe in an organization reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp loader complexes. A second lobe contains the ORC2/3 subunits. The complex is organized as a double-layered shallow corkscrew, with the AAA+ and AAA+-like domains forming one layer, and the winged-helix domains (WHDs) forming a topmore » layer. CDC6 fits easily between ORC1 and ORC2, completing the ring and the DNA-binding channel, forming an additional ATP hydrolysis site. Analysis of the ATPase activity of the complex provides a basis for understanding ORC activity as well as molecular defects observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutations.« less

  19. Structure of the active form of human origin recognition complex and its ATPase motor module

    PubMed Central

    Tocilj, Ante; On, Kin Fan; Yuan, Zuanning; Sun, Jingchuan; Elkayam, Elad; Li, Huilin; Stillman, Bruce; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2017-01-01

    Binding of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) to origins of replication marks the first step in the initiation of replication of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the structure of the active form of human ORC determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. The complex is composed of an ORC1/4/5 motor module lobe in an organization reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp loader complexes. A second lobe contains the ORC2/3 subunits. The complex is organized as a double-layered shallow corkscrew, with the AAA+ and AAA+-like domains forming one layer, and the winged-helix domains (WHDs) forming a top layer. CDC6 fits easily between ORC1 and ORC2, completing the ring and the DNA-binding channel, forming an additional ATP hydrolysis site. Analysis of the ATPase activity of the complex provides a basis for understanding ORC activity as well as molecular defects observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20818.001 PMID:28112645

  20. Regionalization and dependence of coda Q on frequency and lapse time in the seismically active Peloritani region (northeastern Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampiccolo, Elisabetta; Tuvè, Tiziana

    2018-05-01

    The Peloritani region is one of the most seismically active regions in Italy and, consequently, the quantification of attenuation of the medium plays an important role for seismic risk evaluation. Moreover, it is necessary for the prediction of earth ground motion and future seismic source studies. An in depth analysis has been made here to understand the frequency and lapse time dependence of attenuation characteristics of the region by using the coda of local earthquakes. A regionalization is likewise performed in order to investigate the spatial variation of coda Q across the whole region. Finally, our results are jointly interpreted with those obtained from recently published 3D velocity tomographies for further insights.

  1. A statistical study of current-sheet formation above solar active regions based on selforganized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulou, M.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Georgoulis, M.; Anastasiadis, A.; Toutountzi, A.

    2013-09-01

    We treat flaring solar active regions as physical systems having reached the self-organized critical state. Their evolving magnetic configurations in the low corona may satisfy an instability criterion, related to the excession of a specific threshold in the curl of the magnetic field. This imposed instability criterion implies an almost zero resistivity everywhere in the solar corona, except in regions where magnetic-field discontinuities and. hence, local currents, reach the critical value. In these areas, current-driven instabilities enhance the resistivity by many orders of magnitude forming structures which efficiently accelerate charged particles. Simulating the formation of such structures (thought of as current sheets) via a refined SOC cellular-automaton model provides interesting information regarding their statistical properties. It is shown that the current density in such unstable regions follows power-law scaling. Furthermore, the size distribution of the produced current sheets is best fitted by power laws, whereas their formation probability is investigated against the photospheric magnetic configuration (e.g. Polarity Inversion Lines, Plage). The average fractal dimension of the produced current sheets is deduced depending on the selected critical threshold. The above-mentioned statistical description of intermittent electric field structures can be used by collisional relativistic test particle simulations, aiming to interpret particle acceleration in flaring active regions and in strongly turbulent media in astrophysical plasmas. The above work is supported by the Hellenic National Space Weather Research Network (HNSWRN) via the THALIS Programme.

  2. REGION 4-SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: OCTOBER 2005 – SEPTEMBER 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, the Science and Ecosytem Support Division (SESD) provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students in EPA Region 4. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities and other Federal Agencies in the are...

  3. FIP BIAS EVOLUTION IN A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Yardley, S. L.; Driel-Gesztelyi, L. van

    Solar coronal plasma composition is typically characterized by first ionization potential (FIP) bias. Using spectra obtained by Hinode’s EUV Imaging Spectrometer instrument, we present a series of large-scale, spatially resolved composition maps of active region (AR)11389. The composition maps show how FIP bias evolves within the decaying AR during the period 2012 January 4–6. Globally, FIP bias decreases throughout the AR. We analyzed areas of significant plasma composition changes within the decaying AR and found that small-scale evolution in the photospheric magnetic field is closely linked to the FIP bias evolution observed in the corona. During the AR’s decay phase,more » small bipoles emerging within supergranular cells reconnect with the pre-existing AR field, creating a pathway along which photospheric and coronal plasmas can mix. The mixing timescales are shorter than those of plasma enrichment processes. Eruptive activity also results in shifting the FIP bias closer to photospheric in the affected areas. Finally, the FIP bias still remains dominantly coronal only in a part of the AR’s high-flux density core. We conclude that in the decay phase of an AR’s lifetime, the FIP bias is becoming increasingly modulated by episodes of small-scale flux emergence, i.e., decreasing the AR’s overall FIP bias. Our results show that magnetic field evolution plays an important role in compositional changes during AR development, revealing a more complex relationship than expected from previous well-known Skylab results showing that FIP bias increases almost linearly with age in young ARs.« less

  4. An ELISA method detecting the active form of suPAR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolei; Xu, Mingming; Huang, Hailong; Mazar, Andrew; Iqbal, Zafar; Yuan, Cai; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-11-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) exists in a number of formats in human plasma, including soluble uPAR (suPAR) and uPAR fragments. We developed an ELISA method to detect specifically the active form suPAR, which binds to its natural ligand uPA. The intra CV and inter CV of this ELISA assay is 8.5% and 9.6% respectively, and the assay can recover 99.74% of added recombinant suPAR from 10% plasma. This assay is quite sensitive, capable of detecting down to 15pg/ml of suPAR, and can measure suPAR concentrations in the range of 0.031-8ng/ml with high linear relationship. Plasma samples from pregnant women were also measured for the active form of suPAR with this assay, giving an averaged level of 1.39ng/ml, slightly higher than the level of pooled plasma from healthy donors (0.96ng/ml). This study demonstrates the feasibility to measure the active form of suPAR, which will likely have value in clinical applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. [Active form of vitamin D in overweight and obese pediatric patients in northwest Mexico].

    PubMed

    Valle-Leal, Jaime; Limón-Armenta, Jasmin; Serrano-Osuna, Ricardo; López-Morales, Cruz Mónica; Alvárez-Bastidas, Lucia

    Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with a range of clinical conditions such as obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes mellitus, among others. There are few studies that measure the active form of vitamin D (1,25 (OH) 2 vitamin D) in obese children. However, published data are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to determine the active levels of vitamin D in obese and overweight children and to find an association between low levels of vitamin D, obesity and impaired glucose metabolism. A cross-sectional, analytical study was conducted in 6 to 12-year-old children with excess adiposity determined by waist-stature index and body mass index. Levels of glucose, insulin, complete lipid profile, homeostatic model assessment and the active form of vitamin D were measured in each patient. Levels < 30 pg/ml were considered as low levels of vitamin D. The prevalence of low levels of active vitamin D was 36%. A significant association between low levels of active vitamin D and high levels of insulin was found. No significant association was found between vitamin levels and adiposity measures. Low levels of active vitamin D were found in 36% of the population studied. A significant association with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia was demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative analysis of activator-Eσ54 complexes formed with nucleotide-metal fluoride analogues

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Patricia C.; Joly, Nicolas; Nixon, B. Tracy; Buck, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) containing the major variant σ54 factor forms open promoter complexes in a reaction in which specialized activator proteins hydrolyse ATP. Here we probe binding interactions between σ54-RNAP (Eσ54) and the ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain of the Escherichia coli activator protein, PspF, using nucleotide-metal fluoride (BeF and AlF) analogues representing ground and transition states of ATP, which allow complexes (that are otherwise too transient with ATP) to be captured. We show that the organization and functionality of the ADP–BeF- and ADP–AlF-dependent complexes greatly overlap. Our data support an activation pathway in which the initial ATP-dependent binding of the activator to the Eσ54 closed complex results in the re-organization of Eσ54 with respect to the transcription start-site. However, the nucleotide-dependent binding interactions between the activator and the Eσ54 closed complex are in themselves insufficient for forming open promoter complexes when linear double-stranded DNA is present in the initial closed complex. PMID:19553192

  7. Nitric oxide (NO), the only nitrogen monoxide redox form capable of activating soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Dierks, E A; Burstyn, J N

    1996-06-28

    In the present study, we determined that of the redox forms of nitrogen monoxide, NO-, NO and NO+, only NO significantly activates soluble guanylyl cyclase (GTP pyrophosphate-lyase cyclizing, EC 4.6.1.2). Neither of the NO-donors tested, Angeli's salt (Na2N2O3) or Piloty's acid (C6H5SO2NHOH), caused a change in the guanylyl cyclase activity relative to the basal activity level. Interference by other reaction products was eliminated as a possible explanation for the lack of activation. To the extent that NO+ could be stabilized in aqueous solution, by dissolution of the nitrosonium salt NOPF6 in dry organic solvent prior to addition to the enzyme in buffer, NO+ had no effect on the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase. The counter-ion, PF6-, had a minimal effect on the enzyme activity and, therefore was, not responsible for the lack of activation by NO+. These observations suggest that NO- is the natural activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase and is reasonably identical with endothelium-derived relaxing factor, the physiological regulator of soluble guanylyl cyclase activity.

  8. Activation of cutaneous immune responses in complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Birklein, Frank; Drummond, Peter D.; Li, Wenwu; Schlereth, Tanja; Albrecht, Nahid; Finch, Philip M.; Dawson, Linda F.; Clark, J. David; Kingery, Wade S.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is unresolved, but TNF-α and IL-6 are elevated in experimental skin blister fluid from CRPS affected limbs, as is tryptase, a marker for mast cells. In the rat fracture model of CRPS exaggerated sensory and sympathetic neural signaling stimulate keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation, causing the local production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines leading to pain behavior. The current investigation used CRPS patient skin biopsies to determine whether keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation occur in CRPS skin and to identify the cellular source of the up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6, and tryptase observed in CRPS experimental skin blister fluid. Skin biopsies were collected from the affected skin and the contralateral mirror site in 55 CRPS patients and the biopsy sections were immunostained for keratinocyte, cell proliferation, mast cell markers, TNF-α, and IL-6. In early CRPS keratinocytes were activated in the affected skin, resulting in proliferation, epidermal thickening, and up-regulated TNF-α and IL-6 expression. In chronic CRPS there was reduced keratinocyte proliferation with epidermal thinning in the affected skin. Acute CRPS patients also had increased mast cell accumulation in the affected skin, but there was no increase in mast cell numbers in chronic CRPS. PMID:24462502

  9. Plasma Composition in a Sigmoidal Anemone Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2013-11-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  10. Static and Impulsive Models of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The physical modeling of active regions (ARs) and of the global coronal is receiving increasing interest lately. Recent attempts to model ARs using static equilibrium models were quite successful in reproducing AR images of hot soft X-ray (SXR) loops. They however failed to predict the bright EUV warm loops permeating ARs: the synthetic images were dominated by intense footpoint emission. We demonstrate that this failure is due to the very weak dependence of loop temperature on loop length which cannot simultaneously account for both hot and warm loops in the same AR. We then consider time-dependent AR models based on nanoflare heating. We demonstrate that such models can simultaneously reproduce EUV and SXR loops in ARs. Moreover, they predict radial intensity variations consistent with the localized core and extended emissions in SXR and EUV AR observations respectively. We finally show how the AR morphology can be used as a gauge of the properties (duration, energy, spatial dependence, repetition time) of the impulsive heating.

  11. Acetylcholine Activity in Selective Striatal Regions Supports Behavioral Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ragozzino, Michael E.; Mohler, Eric G.; Prior, Margaret; Palencia, Carlos A.; Rozman, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Daily living often requires individuals to flexibly respond to new circumstances. There is considerable evidence that the striatum is part of a larger neural network that supports flexible adaptations. Cholinergic interneurons are situated to strongly influence striatal output patterns which may enable flexible adaptations. The present experiments investigated whether acetylcholine actions in different striatal regions support behavioral flexibility by measuring acetylcholine efflux during place reversal learning. Acetylcholine efflux selectively increased in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral or ventromedial striatum during place reversal learning. In order to modulate the M2-class of autoreceptors, administration of oxotremorine sesquifumurate (100 nM) into the dorsomedial striatum, concomitantly impaired reversal learning and an increase in acetylcholine output. These effects were reversed by the m2 muscarinic receptor antagonist, AF-DX-116 (20 nM). The effects of oxotremorine sesquifumurate and AF-DX-116 on acetylcholine efflux were selective to behaviorally-induced changes as neither treatment affected acetylcholine output in a resting condition. In contrast to reversal learning, acetylcholine efflux in the dorsomedial striatum did not change during place acquisition. The results reveal an essential role for cholinergic activity and define its locus of control to the dorsomedial striatum in cognitive flexibility. PMID:18845266

  12. Acetylcholine activity in selective striatal regions supports behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ragozzino, Michael E; Mohler, Eric G; Prior, Margaret; Palencia, Carlos A; Rozman, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Daily living often requires individuals to flexibly respond to new circumstances. There is considerable evidence that the striatum is part of a larger neural network that supports flexible adaptations. Cholinergic interneurons are situated to strongly influence striatal output patterns which may enable flexible adaptations. The present experiments investigated whether acetylcholine actions in different striatal regions support behavioral flexibility by measuring acetylcholine efflux during place reversal learning. Acetylcholine efflux selectively increased in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral or ventromedial striatum during place reversal learning. In order to modulate the M2-class of autoreceptors, administration of oxotremorine sesquifumurate (100 nM) into the dorsomedial striatum, concomitantly impaired reversal learning and an increase in acetylcholine output. These effects were reversed by the m(2) muscarinic receptor antagonist, AF-DX-116 (20 nM). The effects of oxotremorine sesquifumurate and AF-DX-116 on acetylcholine efflux were selective to behaviorally-induced changes as neither treatment affected acetylcholine output in a resting condition. In contrast to reversal learning, acetylcholine efflux in the dorsomedial striatum did not change during place acquisition. The results reveal an essential role for cholinergic activity and define its locus of control to the dorsomedial striatum in cognitive flexibility.

  13. THE ORIGIN OF NET ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Démoulin, P.

    There is a recurring question in solar physics regarding whether or not electric currents are neutralized in active regions (ARs). This question was recently revisited using three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence into the solar atmosphere. Such simulations showed that flux emergence can generate a substantial net current in ARs. Other sources of AR currents are photospheric horizontal flows. Our aim is to determine the conditions for the occurrence of net versus neutralized currents with this second mechanism. Using 3D MHD simulations, we systematically impose line-tied, quasi-static, photospheric twisting and shearing motions to a bipolar potentialmore » magnetic field. We find that such flows: (1) produce both direct and return currents, (2) induce very weak compression currents—not observed in 2.5D—in the ambient field present in the close vicinity of the current-carrying field, and (3) can generate force-free magnetic fields with a net current. We demonstrate that neutralized currents are in general produced only in the absence of magnetic shear at the photospheric polarity inversion line—a special condition that is rarely observed. We conclude that  photospheric flows, as magnetic flux emergence, can build up net currents in the solar atmosphere, in agreement with recent observations. These results thus provide support for eruption models based on pre-eruption magnetic fields that possess a net coronal current.« less

  14. Medium-scale gravity wave activity in the bottomside F region in tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huixin; Pedatella, Nicholas; Hocke, Klemens

    2017-07-01

    Thermospheric gravity waves (GWs) in the bottomside F region have been proposed to play a key role in the generation of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs). However, direct observations of such waves are scarce. This study provides a systematic survey of medium-scale (<620 km) neutral atmosphere perturbations at this critical altitude in the tropics, using 4 years of in situ Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer satellite measurements of thermospheric density and zonal wind. The analysis reveals pronounced features on their global distribution and seasonal variability: (1) A prominent three-peak longitudinal structure exists in all seasons, with stronger perturbations over continents than over oceans. (2) Their seasonal variation consists of a primary semiannual oscillations (SAO) and a secondary annual oscillation (AO). The SAO component maximizes around solstices and minimizes around equinoxes, while the AO component maximizes around June solstice. These GW features resemble those of EPBs in spatial distribution but show opposite trend in climatological variations. This may imply that stronger medium-scale GW activity does not always lead to more EPBs. Possible origins of the bottomside GWs are discussed, among which tropical deep convection appears to be most plausible.

  15. Extended gamma-ray emission from the G25.0+0.0 region: A star-forming region powered by the newly found OB association?

    DOE PAGES

    Katsuta, J.; Uchiyama, Y.; Funk, S.

    2017-04-20

    We report a study of extended γ-ray emission with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which is likely to be the second case of a γ-ray detection from a star-forming region (SFR) in our Galaxy. The LAT source is located in the G25 region, 1°7 × 2°1 around (l, b) = (25°0, 0°0). The γ-ray emission is found to be composed of two extended sources and one pointlike source. The extended sources have similar sizes of about 1°4 × 0fdg6. An ~0°4 diameter subregion of one has a photon index of Γ = 1.53more » ± 0.15, and is spatially coincident with HESS J1837–069, likely a pulsar wind nebula. The other parts of the extended sources have a photon index of Γ = 2.1 ± 0.2 without significant spectral curvature. Given their spatial and spectral properties, they have no clear associations with sources at other wavelengths. Their γ-ray properties are similar to those of the Cygnus cocoon SFR, the only firmly established γ-ray detection of an SFR in the Galaxy. Indeed, we find bubble-like structures of atomic and molecular gas in G25, which may be created by a putative OB association/cluster. The γ-ray emitting regions appear confined in the bubble-like structure; similar properties are also found in the Cygnus cocoon. In addition, using observations with the XMM-Newton, we find a candidate young massive OB association/cluster G25.18+0.26 in the G25 region. Here, we propose that the extended γ-ray emission in G25 is associated with an SFR driven by G25.18+0.26. Based on this scenario, we discuss possible acceleration processes in the SFR and compare them with the Cygnus cocoon.« less

  16. Age gradients in the stellar populations of massive star forming regions based on a new stellar chronometer

    SciTech Connect

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    A major impediment to understanding star formation in massive star-forming regions (MSFRs) is the absence of a reliable stellar chronometer to unravel their complex star formation histories. We present a new estimation of stellar ages using a new method that employs near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray photometry, Age {sub JX} . Stellar masses are derived from X-ray luminosities using the L{sub X} -M relation from the Taurus cloud. J-band luminosities are compared to mass-dependent pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models to estimate ages. Age {sub JX} is sensitive to a wide range of evolutionary stages, from disk-bearing stars embedded in a cloud tomore » widely dispersed older PMS stars. The Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) project characterizes 20 OB-dominated MSFRs using X-ray, mid-infrared, and NIR catalogs. The Age {sub JX} method has been applied to 5525 out of 31,784 MYStIX Probable Complex Members. We provide a homogeneous set of median ages for over 100 subclusters in 15 MSFRs; median subcluster ages range between 0.5 Myr and 5 Myr. The important science result is the discovery of age gradients across MYStIX regions. The wide MSFR age distribution appears as spatially segregated structures with different ages. The Age {sub JX} ages are youngest in obscured locations in molecular clouds, intermediate in revealed stellar clusters, and oldest in distributed populations. The NIR color index J – H, a surrogate measure of extinction, can serve as an approximate age predictor for young embedded clusters.« less

  17. A study of the Galactic star forming region IRAS 02593+6016/S 201 in infrared and radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Kulkarni, V. K.; Testi, L.; Verma, R. P.; Vig, S.

    2004-03-01

    We present infrared and radio continuum observations of the S 201 star forming region. A massive star cluster is seen, which contains different classes of young stellar objects. The near-infrared colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams are studied to determine the nature of these sources. We have discovered knots of molecular hydrogen emission at 2.122 μm in the central region of S 201. These knots are clearly seen along the diffuse emission to the north-west and are probably obscured Herbig-Haro objects. High sensitivity and high resolution radio continuum images from GMRT observations at 610 and 1280 MHz show an arc-shaped structure due to the interaction between the HII region and the adjacent molecular cloud. The ionization front at the interface between the HII region and the molecular cloud is clearly seen comparing the radio, molecular hydrogen and Brγ images. The emission from the carriers of Unidentified Infrared Bands in the mid-infrared 6-9 μm (possibly due to PAHs) as extracted from the Midcourse Space Experiment survey (at 8, 12, 14 and 21 μm) is compared with the radio emission. The HIRES processed IRAS maps at 12, 25, 60 and 100 μm have also been used for comparison. The spatial distribution of the temperature and the optical depth of the warm dust component around the S 201 region has been generated from the mid-infrared images. This paper is based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Centro Galileo Galilei of the CNAA (Consorzio Nazionale per l'Astronomia e l'Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the

  18. Forming a negative impression of another person correlates with activation in medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, Tetsuya; Harada, Tokiko; Sadato, Norihiro

    2011-09-01

    Neural correlates involved in the formation of negative impression from face were investigated using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and a partial conditioning paradigm. Eighteen normal volunteers underwent imaging while they viewed the faces of two unfamiliar individuals: one individual's face was partially accompanied by negative emotion but the other's was not. After the volunteers learned the relationship between the faces and the emotion, they formed a more negative impression of the person's face when the emotion was presented. Subtraction analysis of the individuals' neutral faces revealed activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus, but this activity did not correlate with the change of impression from face. On the other hand, the response in the left amygdala negatively correlated with the change of impression from face in the first run. Time modulation analysis revealed that activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex associated with negative emotion was the largest in the initial part of the acquisition. These results suggest that a negative impression from face may be formed by orchestrated activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, and that the activity has a prominent role in the initial acquisition of negative emotion.

  19. Validity and Reliability of International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form in Chinese Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The psychometric profiles of the widely used International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF) in Chinese youth have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the IPAQ-SF using a sample of Chinese youth. Method: One thousand and twenty-one youth (M[subscript age] = 14.26 ±…

  20. A Natural Chimeric Pseudomonas Bacteriocin with Novel Pore-Forming Activity Parasitizes the Ferrichrome Transporter.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Kemland, Lieselore; Anoz-Carbonell, Ernesto; Buchanan, Susan K; De Mot, René

    2017-02-21

    Modular bacteriocins represent a major group of secreted protein toxins with a narrow spectrum of activity, involved in interference competition between Gram-negative bacteria. These antibacterial proteins include a domain for binding to the target cell and a toxin module at the carboxy terminus. Self-inhibition of producers is provided by coexpression of linked immunity genes that transiently inhibit the toxin's activity through formation of bacteriocin-immunity complexes or by insertion in the inner membrane, depending on the type of toxin module. We demonstrate strain-specific inhibitory activity for PmnH, a Pseudomonas bacteriocin with an unprecedented dual-toxin architecture, hosting both a colicin M domain, potentially interfering with peptidoglycan synthesis, and a novel colicin N-type domain, a pore-forming module distinct from the colicin Ia-type domain in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocin S5. A downstream-linked gene product confers PmnH immunity upon susceptible strains. This protein, ImnH, has a transmembrane topology similar to that of Pseudomonas colicin M-like and pore-forming immunity proteins, although homology with either of these is essentially absent. The enhanced killing activity of PmnH under iron-limited growth conditions reflects parasitism of the ferrichrome-type transporter for entry into target cells, a strategy shown here to be used as well by monodomain colicin M-like bacteriocins from pseudomonads. The integration of a second type of toxin module in a bacteriocin gene could offer a competitive advantage against bacteria displaying immunity against only one of both toxic activities. IMPORTANCE In their continuous struggle for ecological space, bacteria face a huge load of contenders, including phylogenetically related strains that compete for the same niche. One important group of secreted antibacterial proteins assisting in eliminating these rivals are modular bacteriocins of Gram-negative bacteria, comprising a domain for docking onto the

  1. A GALEX-BASED SEARCH FOR THE SPARSE YOUNG STELLAR POPULATION IN THE TAURUS-AURIGAE STAR FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez de Castro, Ana I.; Lopez-Santiago, Javier; López-Martínez, Fatima

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we identify 63 bona fide new candidates to T Tauri stars (TTSs) in the Taurus-Auriga region, using its ultraviolet excess as our baseline. The initial data set was defined from the GALEX all sky survey (AIS). The GALEX satellite obtained images in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) and far-ultraviolet (FUV) bands where TTSs show a prominent excess compared with main-sequence or giants stars. GALEX AIS surveyed the Taurus-Auriga molecular complex, as well as a fraction of the California Nebula and the Perseus complex; bright sources and dark clouds were avoided. The properties of TTSs in the ultraviolet (GALEX), opticalmore » (UCAC4), and infrared (2MASS) have been defined using the TTSs observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer reference sample. The candidates were identified by means of a mixed ultraviolet-optical-infrared excess set of colors; we found that the FUV-NUV versus J–K color-color diagram is ideally suited for this purpose. From an initial sample of 163,313 bona fide NUV sources, a final list of 63 new candidates to TTSs in the region was produced. The search procedure has been validated by its ability to detect all known TTSs in the area surveyed: 31 TTSs. Also, we show that the weak-lined TTSs are located in a well-defined stripe in the FUV-NUV versus J–K diagram. Moreover, in this work, we provide a list of TTSs photometric standards for future GALEX-based studies of the young stellar population in star forming regions.« less

  2. An AZTEC/ASTE 1.1mm Survey Of The Young, Dense, Nearby Star-forming Region, Serpens South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutermuth, Robert A.; Bourke, T.; Matthews, B.; Dunham, M.; Allen, L.; Myers, P.; Jorgensen, J.; Wilson, G.; Yun, M.; Hughes, D.; Aretxaga, I.; Ryohei, K.; Kotaro, K.; Scott, K.; Austermann, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Serpens South embedded cluster, recently discovered by the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey, stands out among over 100 clusters and groups surveyed by Spitzer as the densest (>430 pc-2) and youngest (77% Class I protostars) clustered star forming region known within the nearest 400 pc. In order to better characterize the primordial structure of the cluster's natal cloud, we have made a 1.1mm dust continuum map of Serpens South from the AzTEC instrument on the 10m Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). The projected morphology of the emission is best described by a central dense hub with numerous 0.5 pc-long filaments radiating away from the center. Large scale flux features that are typically removed via modern sky subtraction techniques are recovered using a novel iterative flux retrieval algorithm. Using standard assumptions (emissivity, dust-to-gas ratio, and T=10K), we compute the total mass of the Serpens South cloud core and filaments to be 480 Msun. We construct separate large and small scale structure maps via wavelet decomposition, and deploy a watershed structure isolation technique separately to each map in order to isolate all empirically observed substructure. This technique confirms our qualitative observation that the filaments north of the hub are notably less clumpy than those to the south, while the total mass is similar between the two regions. Both regions have relatively small numbers of young stellar objects, thus we speculate that we have caught this cloud in the act of fragmenting into pre-stellar cores.

  3. Formation of Penumbra in a Sample of Active Regions Observed by the SDO Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murabito, Mariarita; Zuccarello, Francesca; Guglielmino, Salvo L.; Romano, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    Recently, high-resolution observations improved our understanding of the penumbra formation process around sunspots. In particular, two aspects have been carefully investigated: whether the settlement of the penumbra can occur between the main opposite magnetic polarities where new magnetic flux is still emerging, and the establishment of the Evershed flow. In this paper, we present the analysis of twelve active regions (ARs) where both the penumbra formation and the onset of the Evershed flow were observed. We used data acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) satellite analyzing continuum images, magnetograms, and Dopplergrams of the selected ARs. The results obtained in our sample provided the following information about the stable settlement of the penumbra: eight spots formed the first stable penumbral sector in the region between the two opposite polarities, and nine spots formed on the opposite side. Moreover, eleven sunpots showed an inverse Evershed flow (i.e., a plasma motion directed toward the protospot border) before the penumbra formation, which changes within 1–6 hr into the classical Evershed flow as soon as the penumbra forms. Comparing our results with recent observations, we are able to discriminate between the different ways of penumbra formation. Moreover, we suggest that the change from inverse Evershed flow, visible before the penumbra appears, into the classical Evershed flow may be a signature of the formation of penumbral filaments.

  4. Effects of pharmaceutical processing on pepsin activity during the formulation of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kristó, Katalin; Pintye-Hódi, Klára

    2013-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pharmaceutical technological methods on pepsin activity during the formulation of solid dosage forms. The circumstances of direct compression and wet granulation were modeled. During direct compression, the heat and the compression force must be taken into consideration. The effects of these parameters were investigated in three materials (pure pepsin, and 1:1 (w/w) pepsin-tartaric acid and 1:1 (w/w) pepsin-citric acid powder mixtures). It was concluded that direct compression is appropriate for the formulation of solid dosage forms containing pepsin through application without acids or with acids at low compression force. The effects of wet granulation were investigated with a factorial design for the same three materials. The factors were time, temperature and moisture content. There was no significant effect of the factors when acids were not applied. Temperature was a significant factor when acids were applied. The negative effect was significantly higher for citric acid than for tartaric acid. It was found that wet granulation can be utilized for the processing of pepsin into solid dosage forms under well-controlled circumstances. The application of citric acid is not recommended during the formulation of solid dosage forms through wet granulation. A mathematically based optimization may be necessary for preformulation studies of the preparation of dosage forms containing sensitive enzymes.

  5. 78 FR 24429 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Inter-Agency Alien Witness and Informant Record, Form I...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ...-0046] Agency Information Collection Activities: Inter-Agency Alien Witness and Informant Record, Form I... the Form/Collection: Inter-Agency Alien Witness and Informant Record. (3) Agency form number, if any... Government. Form I-854 is used by law enforcement agencies to bring alien witnesses and informants to the...

  6. The Formation of a Sunspot Penumbra Sector in Active Region NOAA 12574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaoling; Yan, Xiaoli; Wang, Jincheng; Kong, DeFang; Xue, Zhike; Yang, Liheng; Cao, Wenda

    2018-04-01

    We present a particular case of the formation of a penumbra sector around a developing sunspot in the active region NOAA 12574 on 2016 August 11 by using the high-resolution data observed by the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory and the data acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. Before the new penumbra sector formed, the developing sunspot already had two umbrae with some penumbral filaments. The penumbra sector gradually formed at the junction of two umbrae. We found that the formation of the penumbra sector can be divided into two stages. First, during the initial stage of penumbral formation, the region where the penumbra sector formed always appeared blueshifted in a Dopplergram. The area, mean transverse magnetic field strength, and total magnetic flux of the umbra and penumbra sector all increased with time. The initial penumbral formation was associated with magnetic emergence. Second, when the penumbra sector appeared, the magnetic flux and area of the penumbra sector increased after the umbra’s magnetic flux and area decreased. These results indicate that the umbra provided magnetic flux for penumbral development after the penumbra sector appeared. We also found that the newly formed penumbra sector was associated with sunspot rotation. Based on these findings, we suggest that the penumbra sector was the result of the emerging flux that was trapped in the photosphere at the initial stage of penumbral formation, and when the rudimentary penumbra formed, the penumbra sector developed at the cost of the umbra.

  7. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Field in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Tiwari, S. K.; Winebarger, A. R.; Moore, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    A strong dependence of active-region (AR) coronal heating on the magnetic field is demonstrated by the strong correlation of AR X-ray luminosity with AR total magnetic flux (Fisher et al 1998 ApJ). AR X-ray luminosity is also correlated with AR length of strong-shear neutral line in the photospheric magnetic field (Falconer 1997). These two whole-AR magnetic parameters are also correlated with each other. From 150 ARs observed within 30 heliocentric degrees from disk center by AIA and HMI on SDO, using AR luminosity measured from the hot component of the AIA 94 Å band (Warren et al 2012, ApJ) near the time of each of 3600 measured HMI vector magnetograms of these ARs and a wide selection of whole-AR magnetic parameters from each vector magnetogram after it was deprojected to disk center, we find: (1) The single magnetic parameter having the strongest correlation with AR 94-hot luminosity is the length of strong-field neutral line. (2) The two-parameter combination having the strongest still-stronger correlation with AR 94-hot luminosity is a combination of AR total magnetic flux and AR neutral-line length weighted by the vertical-field gradient across the neutral line. We interpret these results to be consistent with the results of both Fisher et al (1998) and Falconer (1997), and with the correlation of AR coronal loop heating with loop field strength recently found by Tiwari et al (2017, ApJ Letters). Our interpretation is that, in addition to depending strongly on coronal loop field strength, AR coronal heating has a strong secondary positive dependence on the rate of flux cancelation at neutral lines at coronal loop feet. This work was funded by the Living With a Star Science and Heliophysics Guest Investigators programs of NASA's Heliophysics Division.

  8. ASYMMETRY OF HELICITY INJECTION FLUX IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Lirong; Alexander, David

    Observational and modeling results indicate that typically the leading magnetic field of bipolar active regions (ARs) is often spatially more compact, while more dispersed and fragmented in following polarity. In this paper, we address the origin of this morphological asymmetry, which is not well understood. Although it may be assumed that, in an emerging {omega}-shaped flux tube, those portions of the flux tube in which the magnetic field has a higher twist may maintain its coherence more readily, this has not been tested observationally. To assess this possibility, it is important to characterize the nature of the fragmentation and asymmetrymore » in solar ARs and this provides the motivation for this paper. We separately calculate the distribution of the helicity flux injected in the leading and following polarities of 15 emerging bipolar ARs, using the Michelson Doppler Image 96 minute line-of-sight magnetograms and a local correlation tracking technique. We find from this statistical study that the leading (compact) polarity injects several times more helicity flux than the following (fragmented) one (typically 3-10 times). This result suggests that the leading polarity of the {omega}-shaped flux tube possesses a much larger amount of twist than the following field prior to emergence. We argue that the helicity asymmetry between the leading and following magnetic field for the ARs studied here results in the observed magnetic field asymmetry of the two polarities due to an imbalance in the magnetic tension of the emerging flux tube. We suggest that the observed imbalance in the helicity distribution results from a difference in the speed of emergence between the leading and following legs of an inclined {omega}-shaped flux tube. In addition, there is also the effect of magnetic flux imbalance between the two polarities with the fragmented following polarity displaying spatial fluctuation in both the magnitude and sign of helicity measured.« less

  9. The SMM UV observations of Active Region 5395

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Gurman, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft was used extensively to study the spatial morphology and time variability of solar active regions in the far UV (at approx. wavelength of 1370 A) since July 1985. The normal spatial resolution of UVSP observations in this 2nd-order mode is 10 sec., and the highest temporal resolution is 64 milliseconds. To make a full-field, 4 min. by 4 min. image this wavelength using 5 sec. raster steps takes about 3 minutes. UVSP can also make observations of the Sun at approx. wavelength of 2790 with 3 sec. spatial resolution when operated in its 1st-order mode; a full-field image at this wavelength (a so-called SNEW image) takes about 8 minutes. UVSP made thousands of observations (mostly in 2nd-order) of AR 5395 during its transit across the visible solar hemisphere (from 7 to 19 March, inclusive). During this period, UVSP's duty cycle for observing AR 5395 was roughly 40 percent, with the remaining 60 percent of the time being fairly evenly divided between aeronomy studies of the Earth's atmosphere and dead time due to Earth occultation of the Sun. UVSP observed many of the flares tagged to AR 5395, including 26 GOES M-level flares and 3 X-level flares, one of which produced so much UV emission that the safety software of UVSP turned off the detector to avoid damage due to saturation. Images and light curves of some of the more spectacular of the AR 5395 events are presented.

  10. Poliovirus 2C protein forms homo-oligomeric structures required for ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Adams, Peter; Kandiah, Eaazhisai; Effantin, Grégory; Steven, Alasdair C; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2009-08-14

    The poliovirus protein 2C plays an essential role in viral RNA replication, although its precise biochemical activities or structural requirements have not been elucidated. The protein has several distinctive properties, including ATPase activity and membrane and RNA binding, that are conserved among orthologs of many positive-strand RNA viruses. Sequence alignments have placed these proteins in the SF3 helicase family, a subset of the AAA+ ATPase superfamily. A feature common to AAA+ proteins is the formation of oligomeric rings that are essential for their catalytic functions. Here we show that a recombinant protein, MBP-2C, in which maltose-binding protein was fused to 2C, formed soluble oligomers and that ATPase activity was restricted to oligomer-containing fractions from gel-filtration chromatography. The active fraction was visualized by negative-staining electron microscopy as ring-like particles composed of 5-8 protomers. This conclusion was confirmed by mass measurements obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Mutation of amino acid residues in the 2C nucleotide-binding domain demonstrated that loss of the ability to bind or hydrolyze ATP did not affect oligomerization. Co-expression of active MBP-2C and inactive mutant proteins generated mixed oligomers that exhibited little ATPase activity, suggesting that incorporation of inactive subunits eliminates the function of the entire particle. Finally, deletion of the N-terminal 38 amino acids blocked oligomerization of the fusion protein and eliminated ATPase activity, despite retention of an unaltered nucleotide-binding domain.

  11. Poliovirus 2C Protein Forms Homo-oligomeric Structures Required for ATPase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Peter; Kandiah, Eaazhisai; Effantin, Grégory; Steven, Alasdair C.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2009-01-01

    The poliovirus protein 2C plays an essential role in viral RNA replication, although its precise biochemical activities or structural requirements have not been elucidated. The protein has several distinctive properties, including ATPase activity and membrane and RNA binding, that are conserved among orthologs of many positive-strand RNA viruses. Sequence alignments have placed these proteins in the SF3 helicase family, a subset of the AAA+ ATPase superfamily. A feature common to AAA+ proteins is the formation of oligomeric rings that are essential for their catalytic functions. Here we show that a recombinant protein, MBP-2C, in which maltose-binding protein was fused to 2C, formed soluble oligomers and that ATPase activity was restricted to oligomer-containing fractions from gel-filtration chromatography. The active fraction was visualized by negative-staining electron microscopy as ring-like particles composed of 5–8 protomers. This conclusion was confirmed by mass measurements obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Mutation of amino acid residues in the 2C nucleotide-binding domain demonstrated that loss of the ability to bind or hydrolyze ATP did not affect oligomerization. Co-expression of active MBP-2C and inactive mutant proteins generated mixed oligomers that exhibited little ATPase activity, suggesting that incorporation of inactive subunits eliminates the function of the entire particle. Finally, deletion of the N-terminal 38 amino acids blocked oligomerization of the fusion protein and eliminated ATPase activity, despite retention of an unaltered nucleotide-binding domain. PMID:19520852

  12. Pixantrone can be activated by formaldehyde to generate a potent DNA adduct forming agent

    PubMed Central

    Evison, Ben J.; Mansour, Oula C.; Menta, Ernesto; Phillips, Don R.; Cutts, Suzanne M.

    2007-01-01

    Mitoxantrone is an anti-cancer agent used in the treatment of breast and prostate cancers. It is classified as a topoisomerase II poison, however can also be activated by formaldehyde to generate drug–DNA adducts. Despite identification of this novel form of mitoxantrone–DNA interaction, excessively high, biologically irrelevant drug concentrations are necessary to generate adducts. A search for mitoxantrone analogues that could potentially undergo this reaction with DNA more efficiently identified Pixantrone as an ideal candidate. An in vitro crosslinking assay demonstrated that Pixantrone is efficiently activated by formaldehyde to generate covalent drug–DNA adducts capable of stabilizing double-stranded DNA in denaturing conditions. Pixantrone–DNA adduct formation is both concentration and time dependent and the reaction exhibits an absolute requirement for formaldehyde. In a direct comparison with mitoxantrone–DNA adduct formation, Pixantrone exhibited a 10- to 100-fold greater propensity to generate adducts at equimolar formaldehyde and drug concentrations. Pixantrone–DNA adducts are thermally and temporally labile, yet they exhibit a greater thermal midpoint temperature and an extended half-life at 37°C when compared to mitoxantrone–DNA adducts. Unlike mitoxantrone, this enhanced stability, coupled with a greater propensity to form covalent drug–DNA adducts, may endow formaldehyde-activated Pixantrone with the attributes required for Pixantrone–DNA adducts to be biologically active. PMID:17483512

  13. Complete secretion of activable bovine prochymosin by genetically engineered L forms of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Klessen, C; Schmidt, K H; Gumpert, J; Grosse, H H; Malke, H

    1989-01-01

    To circumvent problems encountered in the synthesis of active chymosin in a number of bacteria and fungi, a recombinant DNA L-form expression system that directed the complete secretion of fully activable prochymosin into the extracellular culture medium was developed. The expression plasmid constructions involved the in-frame fusion of prochymosin cDNA minus codons 1 to 4 to streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin type A gene (speA') sequences, including the speA promoter, ribosomal binding site, and signal sequence and five codons of mature SpeA. Secretion of fusion prochymosin enzymatically and immunologically indistinguishable from bovine prochymosin was achieved after transformation of two stable protoplast type L-form strains derived from Proteus mirabilis. The secreted proenzyme was converted by autocatalytic processing to chymosin showing milk-clotting activity. In controlled laboratory fermentation processes, a maximum specific rate of activable prochymosin synthesis of 0.57 x 10(-3)/h was determined from the time courses of biomass dry weight and product formation. Yields as high as 40 +/- 10 micrograms/ml were obtained in the cell-free culture fluid of strain L99 carrying a naturally altered expression plasmid of increased segregational stability. The expression-secretion system described may be generally useful for production of recombinant mammalian proteins synthesized intracellularly as aberrantly folded insoluble aggregates. Images PMID:2499253

  14. Neuroserpin Differentiates Between Forms of Tissue Type Plasminogen Activator via pH Dependent Deacylation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Karen-Sue B.; Nguyen, Lan; Schwartz, Kat; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Bradford S.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), initially characterized for its critical role in fibrinolysis, also has key functions in both physiologic and pathologic processes in the CNS. Neuroserpin (NSP) is a t-PA specific serine protease inhibitor (serpin) found almost exclusively in the CNS that regulates t-PA’s proteolytic activity and protects against t-PA mediated seizure propagation and blood–brain barrier disruption. This report demonstrates that NSP inhibition of t-PA varies profoundly as a function of pH within the biologically relevant pH range for the CNS, and reflects the stability, rather than the formation of NSP: t-PA acyl-enzyme complexes. Moreover, NSP differentiates between the zymogen-like single chain form (single chain t-PA, sct-PA) and the mature protease form (two chain t-PA, tct-PA) of t-PA, demonstrating different pH profiles for protease inhibition, different pH ranges over which catalytic deacylation occurs, and different pH dependent profiles of deacylation rates for each form of t-PA. NSP’s pH dependent inhibition of t-PA is not accounted for by differential acylation, and is specific for the NSP-t-PA serpin-protease pair. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the differential regulation of the two forms of t-PA in the CNS, and suggest a potential specific regulatory role for CNS pH in controlling t-PA proteolytic activity. PMID:27378851

  15. Hi-C and AIA observations of transverse magnetohydrodynamic waves in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, R. J.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    The recent launch of the High resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) provided a unique opportunity of studying the EUV corona with unprecedented spatial resolution. We utilize these observations to investigate the properties of low-frequency (50-200 s) active region transverse waves, whose omnipresence had been suggested previously. The five-fold improvement in spatial resolution over SDO/AIA reveals coronal loops with widths 150-310 km and that these loops support transverse waves with displacement amplitudes <50 km. However, the results suggest that wave activity in the coronal loops is of low energy, with typical velocity amplitudes <3 km s-1. An extended time-series of SDO data suggests that low-energy wave behaviour is typical of the coronal structures both before and after the Hi-C observations. Appendix A and five movies associated to Figs. A.2-A.6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Formation and Eruption Process of a Filament in Active Region NOAA 12241

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jincheng; Yan, Xiaoli; Qu, ZhongQuan

    In order to better understand active-region filaments, we present an intensive study on the formation and eruption of a filament in active region NOAA 12241 during the period from 2014 December 18 to 19. Using observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms, we investigate the helicity injection rate, Lorentz force, and vertical electric current in the entire region associated with the filament. The helicity injection rate before eruption is found to be larger than that after eruption, while the vertical electric current undergoes an increase at first and then a gradual decrease, similar to what the magneticmore » flux undergoes. Meanwhile, we find that the right part of the filament is formed by magnetic reconnection between two bundles of magnetic field lines while the left part originated from shearing motion. The interaction of the two parts causes the eruption of this filament. The mean horizontal magnetic fields in the vicinity of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) enhance rapidly during the eruption. Another striking phenomenon, where the vertical electric currents close to the magnetic PIL suddenly expand toward two sides during the eruption, is found. We propose that this fascinating feature is associated with the release of energy during the eruption.« less

  17. The Maximum Free Magnetic Energy Allowed in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Two whole-active-region magnetic quantities that can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram are (sup L) WL(sub SG), a gauge of the total free energy in an active region's magnetic field, and sup L(sub theta), a measure of the active region's total magnetic flux. From these two quantities measured from 1865 SOHO/MDI magnetograms that tracked 44 sunspot active regions across the 0.5 R(sub Sun) central disk, together with each active region's observed production of CMEs, X flares, and M flares, Falconer et al (2009, ApJ, submitted) found that (1) active regions have a maximum attainable free magnetic energy that increases with the magnetic size (sup L) (sub theta) of the active region, (2) in (Log (sup L)WL(sub SG), Log(sup L) theta) space, CME/flare-productive active regions are concentrated in a straight-line main sequence along which the free magnetic energy is near its upper limit, and (3) X and M flares are restricted to large active regions. Here, from (a) these results, (b) the observation that even the greatest X flares produce at most only subtle changes in active region magnetograms, and (c) measurements from MSFC vector magnetograms and from MDI line-of-sight magnetograms showing that practically all sunspot active regions have nearly the same area-averaged magnetic field strength: =- theta/A approximately equal to 300 G, where theta is the active region's total photospheric flux of field stronger than 100 G and A is the area of that flux, we infer that (1) the maximum allowed ratio of an active region's free magnetic energy to its potential-field energy is 1, and (2) any one CME/flare eruption releases no more than a small fraction (less than 10%) of the active region's free magnetic energy. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division and NSF's Division of Atmospheric Sciences.

  18. DFT study of quercetin activated forms involved in antiradical, antioxidant, and prooxidant biological processes.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Sébastien; Golebiowski, Jérôme; Cabrol-Bass, Daniel; Antonczak, Serge

    2007-02-07

    Quercetin, one of the most representative flavonoid compounds, is involved in antiradical, antioxidant, and prooxidant biological processes. Despite a constant increase of knowledge on both positive and negative activities of quercetin, it is unclear which activated form (quinone, semiquinone, or deprotonated) actually plays a role in each of these processes. Structural, electronic, and energetic characteristics of quercetin, as well as the influence of a copper ion on all of these parameters, are studied by means of quantum chemical electronic structure calculations. Introduction of thermodynamic cycles together with the role of coreactive compounds, such as reactive oxygen species, gives a glimpse of the most probable reaction schemes. Such a theoretical approach provides another hint to clarify which reaction is likely to occur within the broad range of quercetin biological activities.

  19. Special Form Testing of Sealed Source Encapsulation for High-Alpha-Activity Actinide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Oscar A

    In the United States all transportation of radioactive material is regulated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Beginning in 2008 a new type of sealed-source encapsulation package was developed and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These packages contain high-alpha-activity actinides and are regulated and transported in accordance with the requirements for DOT Class 7 hazardous material. The DOT provides specific regulations pertaining to special form encapsulation designs. The special form designation indicates that the encapsulated radioactive contents have a very low probability of dispersion even when subjected to significant structural events. The special form designs have beenmore » shown to simplify the delivery, transport, acceptance, and receipt processes. It is intended for these sealed-source encapsulations to be shipped to various facilities making it very advantageous for them to be certified as special form. To this end, DOT Certificates of Competent Authority (CoCAs) have been sought for the design suitable for containing high-alpha-activity actinide materials. This design consists of the high-alpha-activity material encapsulated within a triangular zirconia canister, referred to as a ZipCan, tile that is then enclosed by a spherical shell. The spherical shell design, with ZipCan tile inside, was tested for compliance with the special form regulations found in 49 CFR 173.469. The spherical enclosure was subjected to 9-m impact, 1 m percussion, and 10-minute thermal tests at the Packaging Evaluation Facility located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, TN USA and operated by ORNL. Before and after each test, the test units were subjected to a helium leak check and a bubble test. The ZipCan tiles and core were also subjected to the tests required for ISO 2919:2012(E), including a Class IV impact test and heat test and subsequently subjected to helium leakage rate tests [49 CFR 173.469(a)(4)(i)]. The

  20. Ceragenins are active against drug-resistant Candida auris clinical isolates in planktonic and biofilm forms.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Marjan M; Rovig, John; Holden, Brett S; Taylor, Maddison F; Weber, Scott; Wilson, John; Hilton, Brian; Zaugg, Aaron L; Ellis, Samuel W; Yost, Connor D; Finnegan, Patrick M; Kistler, Charles K; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Deng, Shenglou; Lockhart, Shawn R; Peterson, Marnie; Savage, Paul B

    2018-06-01

    Candida auris has emerged as a serious threat to human health. Of particular concern are the resistance profiles of many clinical isolates, with some being resistant to multiple classes of antifungals. Measure susceptibilities of C. auris isolates, in planktonic and biofilm forms, to ceragenins (CSAs). Determine the effectiveness of selected ceragenins in gel and cream formulations in eradicating fungal infections in tissue explants. A collection of 100 C. auris isolates available at CDC was screened for susceptibility to a lead ceragenin. A smaller collection was used to characterize antifungal activities of other ceragenins against organisms in planktonic and biofilm forms. Effects of ceragenins on fungal cells and biofilms were observed via microscopy. An ex vivo model of mucosal fungal infection was used to evaluate formulated forms of lead ceragenins. Lead ceragenins displayed activities comparable to those of known antifungal agents against C. auris isolates with MICs of 0.5-8 mg/L and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of 2-64 mg/L. No cross-resistance with other antifungals was observed. Fungal cell morphology was altered in response to ceragenin treatment. Ceragenins exhibited activity against sessile organisms in biofilms. Gel and cream formulations including 2% CSA-44 or CSA-131 resulted in reductions of over 4 logs against established fungal infections in ex vivo mucosal tissues. Ceragenins demonstrated activity against C. auris, suggesting that these compounds warrant further study to determine whether they can be used for topical applications to skin and mucosal tissues for treatment of infections with C. auris and other fungi.