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Sample records for active region formed

  1. Unique SMAD1/5/8 activity at the phalanx-forming region determines digit identity

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Hasso, Sean M.; Fallon, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The zone of polarizing activity is the primary signaling center controlling anterior–posterior patterning of the amniote limb bud. The autopodial interdigits (IDs) are secondary signaling centers proposed to determine digit identity by acting on the cells of the digital ray. Here, we focus on events accompanying digital fate determination and define a region of the digital ray that expresses Sox9 and Bmpr1b and is phosphorylated-SMAD1/5/8 (p-SMAD1/5/8) positive. We name this region the phalanx-forming region (PFR), and show that the PFR cells arise from the distal subridge mesenchyme of digital ray. This phalanx-forming cell lineage is subsequently committed to the cartilage lineage; the fate of these cells is initially labile but becomes fixed as they are incorporated into the condensed cartilage of the digit primordium. Using an in vivo reporter assay, we establish that each digital PFR has a unique p-SMAD1/5/8 activity signature. In addition, we show that changes in this activity correlate with the identity of the digit that forms after experimental manipulation, supporting the idea that threshold signaling levels can lead to different developmental outcomes in a morphogenetic field. Our data define the molecular profile of the PFR, and we propose a model for understanding formation and variation of digits during autopodial development. PMID:18334652

  2. Broca's region and Visual Word Form Area activation differ during a predictive Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Skakkebæk, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Competing theories attempt to explain the function of Broca's area in single word processing. Studies have found the region to be more active during processing of pseudo words than real words and during infrequent words relative to frequent words and during Stroop (incongruent) color words compared to Non-Stroop (congruent) words. Two related theories explain these findings as reflecting either "cognitive control" processing in the face of conflicting input or a linguistic prediction error signal, based on a predictive coding approach. The latter implies that processing cost refers to violations of expectations based on the statistical distributions of input. In this fMRI experiment we attempted to disentangle single word processing cost originating from cognitive conflict and that stemming from predictive expectation violation. Participants (N = 49) responded to whether the words "GREEN" or "RED" were displayed in green or red (incongruent vs congruent colors). One of the colors, however, was presented three times as often as the other, making it possible to study both congruency and frequency effects independently. Auditory stimuli saying "GREEN" or "RED" had the same distribution, making it possible to study frequency effects across modalities. We found significant behavioral effects of both incongruency and frequency. A significant effect (p < .05 FWE) of incongruency was found in Broca's region, but no effect of frequency was observed and no interaction. Conjoined effects of incongruency and frequency were found in parietal regions as well as in the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA). No interaction between perceptual modality and frequency was found in VWFA suggesting that the region is not strictly visual. These findings speak against a strong version of the prediction error processing hypothesis in Broca's region. They support the idea that prediction error processes in the intermediate timeframe are allocated to more posterior parts of the brain. PMID:26478962

  3. Broca's region and Visual Word Form Area activation differ during a predictive Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Skakkebæk, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Competing theories attempt to explain the function of Broca's area in single word processing. Studies have found the region to be more active during processing of pseudo words than real words and during infrequent words relative to frequent words and during Stroop (incongruent) color words compared to Non-Stroop (congruent) words. Two related theories explain these findings as reflecting either "cognitive control" processing in the face of conflicting input or a linguistic prediction error signal, based on a predictive coding approach. The latter implies that processing cost refers to violations of expectations based on the statistical distributions of input. In this fMRI experiment we attempted to disentangle single word processing cost originating from cognitive conflict and that stemming from predictive expectation violation. Participants (N = 49) responded to whether the words "GREEN" or "RED" were displayed in green or red (incongruent vs congruent colors). One of the colors, however, was presented three times as often as the other, making it possible to study both congruency and frequency effects independently. Auditory stimuli saying "GREEN" or "RED" had the same distribution, making it possible to study frequency effects across modalities. We found significant behavioral effects of both incongruency and frequency. A significant effect (p < .05 FWE) of incongruency was found in Broca's region, but no effect of frequency was observed and no interaction. Conjoined effects of incongruency and frequency were found in parietal regions as well as in the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA). No interaction between perceptual modality and frequency was found in VWFA suggesting that the region is not strictly visual. These findings speak against a strong version of the prediction error processing hypothesis in Broca's region. They support the idea that prediction error processes in the intermediate timeframe are allocated to more posterior parts of the brain.

  4. Sejong Open Cluster Survey (SOS) - V. The Active Star Forming Region SH 2-255-257

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Beomdu; Sung, Hwankyung; Hur, Hyeonoh; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Bessell, Michael S.; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Lee, Kang Hwan; Park, Byeong-Gon; Jeong, Gwanghui

    2015-12-01

    There is much observational evidence that active star formation is taking place in the H II regions Sh 2-255-257. We present a photometric study of this star forming region (SFR) using imaging data obtained in passbands from the optical to the mid-infrared, in order to study the star formation process. A total of 218 members were identified using various selection criteria based on their observational properties. The SFR is reddened by at least E(B-V) = 0.8 mag, and the reddening law toward the region is normal (R_V = 3.1). From the zero-age main sequence fitting method it is confirmed that the SFR is 2.1 ± 0.3 kpc from the Sun. The median age of the identified members is estimated to be about 1.3 Myr from a comparison of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) with stellar evolutionary models. The initial mass function (IMF) is derived from the HRD and the near-infrared (J, J-H) color-magnitude diagram. The slope of the IMF is about Γ = -1.6 ± 0.1, which is slightly steeper than that of the Salpeter/Kroupa IMF. It implies that low-mass star formation is dominant in the SFR. The sum of the masses of all the identified members provides the lower limit of the cluster mass (169 M_{⊙}). We also analyzed the spectral energy distribution (SED) of pre-main sequence stars using the SED fitting tool of Robitaille et al., and confirm that there is a significant discrepancy between stellar mass and age obtained from two different methods based on the SED fitting tool and the HRD.

  5. Star-forming Activity in the H II Regions Associated with the IRAS 17160–3707 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumar, G.; Veena, V. S.; Vig, S.; Tej, A.; Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of star formation activity toward the southern H ii regions associated with IRAS 17160–3707, located at a distance of 6.2 kpc with a bolometric luminosity of 8.3 × 105 L ⊙. The ionized gas distribution and dust clumps in the parental molecular cloud are examined in detail using measurements at infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths. The radio continuum images at 1280 and 610 MHz obtained using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope reveal the presence of multiple compact sources as well as nebulous emission. At submillimeter wavelengths, we identify seven dust clumps and estimate their physical properties such as temperature: 24–30 K, mass: 300–4800 M ⊙ and luminosity: 9–317 × 102 L ⊙ using modified blackbody fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) between 70 and 870 μm. We find 24 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the mid-infrared, with a few of them coincident with the compact radio sources. The SEDs of the YSOs have been fitted by the Robitaille models and the results indicate that those having radio compact sources as counterparts host massive objects in early evolutionary stages with best fit age ≤0.2 Myr. We compare the relative evolutionary stages of clumps using various signposts such as masers, ionized gas, presence of YSOs and infrared nebulosity, and find six massive star-forming clumps and one quiescent clump. Of the former, five are in a relatively advanced stage and one in an earlier stage.

  6. Carbon Dioxide in Star-forming Regions.

    PubMed

    Charnley; Kaufman

    2000-02-01

    We consider the gas-phase chemistry of CO2 molecules in active regions. We show that CO2 molecules evaporated from dust in hot cores cannot be efficiently destroyed and are in fact copiously produced in cooler gas. When CO2-rich ices are sputtered in strong MHD shock waves, the increase in atomic hydrogen, due to H2 dissociation by ion-neutral streaming, means that CO2 can be depleted by factors of approximately 500 from its injected abundance. We find that a critical shock speed exists at higher preshock densities below which CO2 molecules can be efficiently sputtered but survive in the postshock gas. These calculations offer an explanation for the low gas/solid CO2 ratios detected by the Infrared Space Observatory in star-forming cores as being due to shock destruction followed by partial reformation in warm gas. The presence of high abundances of CO2 in the strongly shocked Galactic center clouds Sgr B2 and Sgr A also find a tentative explanation in this scenario. Shock activity plays an important role in determining the chemistry of star-forming regions, and we suggest that most hot cores are in fact shocked cores.

  7. Accurate positions of SiO masers in active star-forming regions - Orion-KL, W51-IRS2, and Sagittarius-B2 MD5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Ukita, Nobuharu; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Ishiguro, Masato

    1992-08-01

    Accurate positional measurements of SiO J = 1-0 masers in active star-forming regions, Orion-KL, W51-IRS2, and Sgr-B2 MD5, were made with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Absolute positional accuracies of 0.12-0.6 arcsec were achieved. The SiO maser in W51-IRS2 is located within 0.4 arcsec (0.5 x 10 exp 17 cm at the distance of W51-IRS2) of the strongest H2O masers. In Sgr-B2 MD5, the SiO maser coincides with the strongest H2O masers, most of the strong OH masers, and the peak of radio continuum emission from the ultracompact H II region within 0.7 arcsec (0.8 x 10 exp 17 cm at the distance of Sgr-B2). Peaks of the emission from hot NH3 were found to exist within about 1 arcsec of the SiO masers in both regions. The precise positional coincidence confirms our former conclusion that the SiO masers in W51-IRS2 and Sgr-B2 MD5 are actually associated with the ongoing activity of star formation, as is the case of Orion-KL.

  8. Z-DNA-forming sites identified by ChIP-Seq are associated with actively transcribed regions in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Shin, So-I.; Ham, Seokjin; Park, Jihwan; Seo, Seong Hye; Lim, Chae Hyun; Jeon, Hyeongrin; Huh, Jounghyun; Roh, Tae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Z-DNA, a left-handed double helical DNA is structurally different from the most abundant B-DNA. Z-DNA has been known to play a significant role in transcription and genome stability but the biological meaning and positions of Z-DNA-forming sites (ZFSs) in the human genome has not been fully explored. To obtain genome-wide map of ZFSs, Zaa with two Z-DNA-binding domains was used for ChIP-Seq analysis. A total of 391 ZFSs were found and their functions were examined in vivo. A large portion of ZFSs was enriched in the promoter regions and contain sequences with high potential to form Z-DNA. Genes containing ZFSs were occupied by RNA polymerase II at the promoters and showed high levels of expression. Moreover, ZFSs were significantly related to active histone marks such as H3K4me3 and H3K9ac. The association of Z-DNA with active transcription was confirmed by the reporter assay system. Overall, our results suggest that Z-DNA formation depends on chromatin structure as well as sequence composition, and is associated with active transcription in human cells. The global information about ZFSs positioning will provide a useful resource for further understanding of DNA structure-dependent transcriptional regulation. PMID:27374614

  9. Multiline Study of Galactic Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, B.; Kramer, C.; Jakob, H.; Stutzki, J.

    We present first results of observations with SMART at KOSMA of selected Galactic star forming regions in mid-J (4-3) and (7-6) rotational transitions of CO and the two fine structure transitions of C I at 492 and 810 GHz. The aim of this study is to understand the interplay of the physical and chemical structure of the interstellar matter and the UV radiation field from the stars within the molecular clouds by observing the Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs). During this ongoing observational programme, regions around Orion BN/KL, W3, S106, S140 have been observed. Here we present the first results of observations of the W3 region (Jakob et al. 2002). These observations will be combined with existing observations of the emission due to low-J transitions of CO and other tracers of PDRs. The database of intensities of different lines from each of these regions will be used to derive a self-consistent interpretation using the PDR model developed by Störzer, Stutzki, & Sternberg (1996).

  10. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  11. Active region seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Tom; Braun, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Active region seismology is concerned with the determination and interpretation of the interaction of the solar acoustic oscillations with near-surface target structures, such as magnetic flux concentration, sunspots, and plage. Recent observations made with a high spatial resolution and a long temporal duration enabled measurements of the scattering matrix for sunspots and solar active regions to be carried out as a function of the mode properties. Based on this information, the amount of p-mode absorption, partial-wave phase shift, and mode mixing introduced by the sunspot, could be determined. In addition, the possibility of detecting the presence of completely submerged magnetic fields was raised, and new procedures for performing acoustic holography of the solar interior are being developed. The accumulating evidence points to the mode conversion of p-modes to various magneto-atmospheric waves within the magnetic flux concentration as being the unifying physical mechanism responsible for these diverse phenomena.

  12. [Molecular spectral diagnosis of star forming regions].

    PubMed

    Xi, S; Qin, S; Deng, L; Yang, J

    2001-08-01

    Stars are the basic building blocks of our universe, therefore it is one of the most important research topics in astrophysics to understand the origin and the early evolution of these objects. The current picture is that stars are formed during the collapse of a large enough self-gravitating interstellar molecular cloud. The early collapse gives birth to a fetus of a star, which is surrounded by a rotating accretion disk. The proto-star accretes interstellar matter through the disk which in turn transfer the accumulated matter to the central proto-star, then the star gets weight during the process. Observation shows that gorgeous ejection of matter always come along with the accretion process. In the presence of disks, these outflows usually escape from the system along the axis of the disk, forming so called bipolar outflows. Typical tracers of these activities are rich molecules such as CO, SiC2, C3H, C3H2 etc. Observationally, such typical molecular outflows can be detected using Doppler effect by spectroscopic measurements. Using the 13.7 m radio telescope in Delingha station of Purple Mountain Observatory, we performed a survey for 12 low temperature IRAS objects, some of the sources show high velocity properties. Detailed analysis of the Doppler profiles of IRS34 is presented. Star forming activities are clearly seen in this field. PMID:12945260

  13. Chemistry of star-forming regions.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric

    2005-05-12

    The space between stars is not empty but contains gas-phase and particulate matter under varying conditions. Neutral matter is found mainly in large regions of the interstellar medium known as "clouds", the largest of which, termed "giant molecular clouds", are essentially molecular in nature. Stars and planetary systems form inside these giant clouds when portions collapse and heat up. The details of the collapse can be followed by observation of the chemical changes in the molecular composition of the gas and dust particles. Moreover, an understanding of the chemical processes yields much information on the time scales and histories of the assorted stages. Among the most recent additions to our chemical knowledge of star formation are a deeper understanding of isotopic fractionation, especially involving deuterium, and a realization that the role of neutral-neutral reactions is more salient than once thought possible.

  14. Disk Evaporation in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Young stars produce sufficient ultraviolet photon luminosity and mechanical luminosity in their winds to significantly affect the structure and evolution of the accretion disks surrounding them. The Lyman continuum photons create a nearly static, ionized, isothermal 10(exp 4) K atmosphere forms above the neutral disk at small distances from the star. Further out, they create a photoevaporative flow which relatively rapidly destroys the disk. The resulting slow (10-50 km/s) ionized outflow, which persists for approx. greater than 10(exp 5) years for disk masses M(sub d) approx. 0.3M(sub *), may explain the observational characteristics of many ultracompact HII regions. We compare model results to the observed radio free-free spectra and luminosities of ultracompact HII regions and to the interesting source MWC349, which is observed to produce hydrogen masers. We apply the results to Ae and Be stars in order to determine the lifetimes of disks around such stars. We also apply the results to the early solar nebula to explain the the dispersal of the solar nebula and the differences in hydrogen content in the giant planets. Finally, we model the small bright objects ("proplyds") observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV photons from the nearby massive star Theta(sup 1) C.

  15. Disc accretion in star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalari, V. M.

    2015-05-01

    In this thesis, I present new ultraviolet/optical/infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of pre-main sequence stars that have formed in either metal-poor conditions, or in the vicinity of strong ionising radiation. This includes observations of 235 Classical T Tauri stars in the Lagoon Nebula; 63 Classical T Tauri/Herbig Ae stars in the Carina Nebula open cluster Trumpler 14; 24 intermediate mass T Tauri stars in the low-Z Sh 2-284 SFR; and one Herbig B[e] PMS candidate in the metal-poor 30 Doradus SFR. I measure the accretion rates of these PMS stars using the intensities of the U/Hα band excess measured through either optical spectra or imaging. Where possible, I use archive infrared photometry in the 1.2-8 micron wavelength range to measure the PMS disc evolutionary stage. The influence of the surrounding environment on the accretion rate evolution of pre-main sequence stars in these regions is explored using the spatial, and temporal distributions of accretion rate, mass, age and disc stage of PMS stars.

  16. Ab Initio Active Region Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, A.

    2013-01-01

    The tachocline is not necessary to produce active regions with their global properties. Dynamo action within the convection zone can produce large scale reversing polarity magnetic fields as shown by ASH code and Charboneau et al simulations. Magneto-convection acting on this large scale field produces Omega-loops which emerge through the surface to produce active regions. The field first emerges as small bipoles with horizontal field over granules anchored in vertical fields in the intergranular lanes. The fields are quickly swept into the intergranular lanes and produce a mixed polarity "pepper and salt" pattern. The opposite polarities then migrate toward separate unipolar regions due to the underlying large scale loop structure. When sufficient flux concentrates, pores and sunspots form. We will show movies of magneto-convection simulations of the emerging flux, its migration, and concentration to form pores and spots, as well as the underlying magnetic field evolution. In addition, the same atmospheric data has been used as input to the LILIA Stokes Inversion code to calculate Stokes spectra for the Fe I 630 nm lines and then invert them to determine the magnetic field. Comparisons of the inverted field with the simulation field shows that small-scale, weak fields, less than 100 G, can not be accurately determined because of vertical gradients that are difficult to match in fitting the line profiles. Horizontal smoothing by telescope diffraction further degrades the inversion accuracy.

  17. Active region flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of observations has shown that active region phenomena in the photospheric, chromospheric and coronal temperature regimes are dynamical in nature. At the photosphere, recent observations of full line profiles place an upper limit of about + or - 20/msec on any downflows at supergranule cell edges. Observations of the full Stokes 5 profiles in the network show no evidence for downflows in magnetic flux tubes. In the area of chromospheric dynamics, several models were put forward recently to reproduce the observed behavior of spicules. However, it is pointed out that these adiabatic models do not include the powerful radiative dissipation which tend to damp out the large amplitude disturbances that produce the spicular acceleration in the models. In the corona, loop flows along field lines clearly transport mass and energy at rates important for the dynamics of these structures. However, advances in understanding the heating and mass balance of the loop structures seem to require new kinds of observations. Some results are presented using a remote sensing diagnostic of the intensity and orientation of macroscopic plasma electric fields predicted by models of reconnective heating and also wave heating.

  18. Extreme Variables in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Peña, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    in two multi-epoch infrared surveys: the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) and the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV). In order to further investigate the nature of the selected variable stars, we use photometric information arising from public surveys at near- to far-infrared wavelengths. In addition we have performed spectroscopic and photometric follow-up for a large subset of the samples arising from GPS and VVV. We analyse the widely separated two-epoch K-band photometry in the 5th, 7th and 8th data releases of the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey. We find 71 stars with ΔK > 1 mag, including 2 previously known OH/IR stars and a Nova. Even though the mid-plane is mostly excluded from the dataset, we find the majority (66%) of our sample to be within known star forming regions (SFRs), with two large concentrations in the Serpens OB2 association (11 stars) and the Cygnus-X complex (27 stars). The analysis of the multi-epoch K-band photometry of 2010-2012 data from VVV covering the Galactic disc at |b| < 1° yields 816 high amplitude variables, which include known variables of different classes such as high mass X-ray binaries, Novae and eclipsing binaries among others. Remarkably, 65% of the sample are found concentrated towards areas of star formation, similar to the results from GPS. In both surveys, sources in SFRs show spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that support classification as YSOs. This indicates that YSOs dominate the Galactic population of high amplitude infrared variable stars at low luminosities and therefore likely dominate the total high amplitude population. Spectroscopic follow-up allows us to confirm the pre-main sequence nature of several GPS and VVV Objects. Most objects in both samples show spectroscopic signatures that can be attributed to YSOs undergoing high states of accretion, such as veiling of photospheric features and CO emission, or show FUor-like spectra. We also find a large fraction of objects with 2.12 μm H2 emission that

  19. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  20. Chemical evolution of star-forming regions.

    PubMed

    van Dishoeck, E F; Blake, G A

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the chemical processes that occur during all stages of the formation of stars, from the collapse of molecular clouds to the assemblage of icy planetesimals in protoplanetary accretion disks, are reviewed. Observational studies of the circumstellar material within 100-10,000 AU of the young star with (sub)millimeter single-dish telescopes, millimeter interferometers, and ground-based as well as space-borne infrared observatories have only become possible within the past few years. Results are compared with detailed chemical models that emphasize the coupling of gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry. Molecules that are particularly sensitive to different routes of formation and that may be useful in distinguishing between a variety of environments and histories are outlined. In the cold, low-density prestellar cores, radicals and long unsaturated carbon chains are enhanced. During the cold collapse phase, most species freeze out onto the grains in the high-density inner region. Once young stars ignite, their surroundings are heated through radiation and/or shocks, whereupon new chemical characteristics appear. Evaporation of ices drives a ''hot core'' chemistry rich in organic molecules, whereas shocks propagating through the dense envelope release both refractory and volatile grain material, resulting in prominent SiO, OH, and H2O emission. The role of future instrumentation in further developing these chemical and temporal diagnostics is discussed.

  1. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  2. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  3. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  4. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  5. Evolution of active region outflows throughout an active region lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrilli, L.; Poletto, G.

    2016-10-01

    Context. We have shown previously that SOHO/UVCS data allow us to detect active region (AR) outflows at coronal altitudes higher than those reached by other instrumentation. These outflows are thought to be a component of the slow solar wind. Aims: Our purpose is to study the evolution of the outflows in the intermediate corona from AR 8100, from the time the AR first forms until it dissolves, after several transits at the solar limb. Methods: Data acquired by SOHO/UVCS at the time of the AR limb transits, at medium latitudes and at altitudes ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 R⊙, were used to infer the physical properties of the outflows through the AR evolution. To this end, we applied the Doppler dimming technique to UVCS spectra. These spectra include the H i Lyα line and the O vi doublet lines at 1031.9 and 1037.6 Å. Results: Plasma speeds and electron densities of the outflows were inferred over several rotations of the Sun. AR outflows are present in the newly born AR and persist throughout the entire AR life. Moreover, we found two types of outflows at different latitudes, both possibly originating in the same negative polarity area of the AR. We also analyzed the behavior of the Si xii 520 Å line along the UVCS slit in an attempt to reveal changes in the Si abundance when different regions are traversed. Although we found some evidence for a Si enrichment in the AR outflows, alternative interpretations are also plausible. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that outflows from ARs are detectable in the intermediate corona throughout the whole AR lifetime. This confirms that outflows contribute to the slow wind.

  6. Active Region Release Two CMEs

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material can be seen blowing off the sun in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on the night of Feb. 5, 2013. This active region on the sun sent out two coronal ...

  7. Rigorous pion electromagnetic form factor behavior in the spacelike region

    SciTech Connect

    Belicka, M.; Dubnickova, A. Z.; Dubnicka, S.; Liptaj, A.

    2011-02-15

    Precise experimental information on {sigma}{sub tot}(e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) is transferred into the spacelike region by taking advantage of the analyticity. As a result, rigorous pion electromagnetic form factor behavior in spacelike region is obtained. The latter is compared with some existing model predictions.

  8. SDO Sees Active Region Outbursts

    NASA Video Gallery

    This close up video by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows an active region near the right-hand edge of the sun’s disk, which erupted with at least a dozen minor events over a 30-hour period fr...

  9. New Molecular Views of Southern Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Y.

    1999-10-01

    I will present new molecular views of southern sky based on the CO survey for star forming regions conducted by Nagoya University with the NANTEN 4-m millimeter wave telescope. The NANTEN telescope is installed at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile under a mutual agreement between Nagoya University and the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Through the survey, molecular gas distribution and the physical properties of cluster forming regions in the Magellanic Clouds, Galactic star forming GMCs, dark clouds, high latitude clouds, and interacting clouds with HII regions and/or SNRs are studied at a beam size of 2.'7 in the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (J=1-0) molecular emission. I will review the expected contribution of the southern CO survey to the ALMA project, and discuss the scientific targets related with star formation at the time the ALMA becomes available.

  10. $sup 238$Pu fuel form activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report for STYPu Fuel Form Activities has one main section: SRP-PuFF Facility. The SRL portion of this program has been completed. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed. The SRP portion of this report summarizes production of STYPuO2 fuel forms for use in radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG's) in the Plutonium Fuel Form (Puff) Facility at the Savannah River Plant. The PuFF Facility has been placed in a production readiness mode of operation pending funding of additional heat source programs.

  11. The 17 GHz active region number

    SciTech Connect

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Shibasaki, K.

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  12. Proton Form Factors Measurements in the Time-Like Region

    SciTech Connect

    Anulli, F.; /Frascati

    2007-10-22

    I present an overview of the measurement of the proton form factors in the time-like region. BABAR has recently measured with great accuracy the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} reaction from production threshold up to an energy of {approx} 4.5 GeV, finding evidence for a ratio of the electric to magnetic form factor greater than unity, contrary to expectation. In agreement with previous measurements, BABAR confirmed the steep rise of the magnetic form factor close to the p{bar p} mass threshold, suggesting the possible presence of an under-threshold N{bar N} vector state. These and other open questions related to the nucleon form factors both in the time-like and space-like region, wait for more data with different experimental techniques to be possibly solved.

  13. A kinematic study of the Lupus star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Bertout, C.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the southern star-forming region located in Lupus that constitutes one of the richest associations of T Tauri stars. Based on the convergent point (CP) method combined with a k-NN analysis we identify 109 pre-main sequence stars in this region that define the Lupus association of comoving stars, and derive individual distances for all group members.

  14. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  15. Algodystrophy: complex regional pain syndrome and incomplete forms

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Bugelli, Giulia; Celli, Fabio; Cazzella, Niki; Guido, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Summary The algodystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), is a painful disease characterized by erythema, edema, functional impairment, sensory and vasomotor disturbance. The diagnosis of CRPS is based solely on clinical signs and symptoms, and for exclusion compared to other forms of chronic pain. There is not a specific diagnostic procedure; careful clinical evaluation and additional test should lead to an accurate diagnosis. There are similar forms of chronic pain known as bone marrow edema syndrome, in which is absent the history of trauma or triggering events and the skin dystrophic changes and vasomotor alterations. These incomplete forms are self-limited, and surgical treatment is generally not needed. It is still controversial, if these forms represent a distinct self-limiting entity or an incomplete variant of CRPS. In painful unexplained conditions such as frozen shoulder, post-operative stiff shoulder or painful knee prosthesis, the algodystrophy, especially in its incomplete forms, could represent the cause. PMID:27252736

  16. Solar active region display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M.; Raben, V.; Weyland, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System (SARDS) is a client-server application that automatically collects a wide range of solar data and displays it in a format easy for users to assimilate and interpret. Users can rapidly identify active regions of interest or concern from color-coded indicators that visually summarize each region's size, magnetic configuration, recent growth history, and recent flare and CME production. The active region information can be overlaid onto solar maps, multiple solar images, and solar difference images in orthographic, Mercator or cylindrical equidistant projections. Near real-time graphs display the GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, flare events, and daily F10.7 value as a function of time; color-coded indicators show current trends in soft x-ray flux, flare temperature, daily F10.7 flux, and x-ray flare occurrence. Through a separate window up to 4 real-time or static graphs can simultaneously display values of KP, AP, daily F10.7 flux, GOES soft and hard x-ray flux, GOES >10 and >100 MeV proton flux, and Thule neutron monitor count rate. Climatologic displays use color-valued cells to show F10.7 and AP values as a function of Carrington/Bartel's rotation sequences - this format allows users to detect recurrent patterns in solar and geomagnetic activity as well as variations in activity levels over multiple solar cycles. Users can customize many of the display and graph features; all displays can be printed or copied to the system's clipboard for "pasting" into other applications. The system obtains and stores space weather data and images from sources such as the NOAA Space Environment Center, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, the joint ESA/NASA SOHO spacecraft, and the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, and can be extended to include other data series and image sources. Data and images retrieved from the system's database are converted to XML and transported from a central server using HTTP and SOAP protocols, allowing

  17. Astronomers Discover New Star-Forming Regions in Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Astronomers studying the Milky Way have discovered a large number of previously-unknown regions where massive stars are being formed. Their discovery provides important new information about the structure of our home Galaxy and promises to yield new clues about the chemical composition of the Galaxy. "We can clearly relate the locations of these star-forming sites to the overall structure of the Galaxy. Further studies will allow us to better understand the process of star formation and to compare the chemical composition of such sites at widely different distances from the Galaxy's center," said Thomas Bania, of Boston University. Bania worked with Loren Anderson of the Astrophysical Laboratory of Marseille in France, Dana Balser of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and Robert Rood of the University of Virginia. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Miami, Florida. The star-forming regions the astronomers sought, called H II regions, are sites where hydrogen atoms are ionized, or stripped of their electrons, by the intense radiation of the massive, young stars. To find these regions hidden from visible-light detection by the Milky Way's gas and dust, the researchers used infrared and radio telescopes. "We found our targets by using the results of infrared surveys done with NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and of surveys done with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope," Anderson said. "Objects that appear bright in both the Spitzer and VLA images we studied are good candidates for H II regions," he explained. The astronomers then used the NSF's giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, an extremely sensitive radio telescope. With the GBT, they were able to detect specific radio frequencies emitted by electrons as they recombined with protons to form hydrogen. This evidence of recombination confirmed that the regions contained ionized

  18. What makes active regions grow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weart, S.

    1972-01-01

    A study of magnetic flux growth or growth failure in over 100 active regions is shown to indicate that most growth is connected with the emergence of a large batch of flux in the shape of a new arch filament system (AFS). During the recent sunspot maximum, new AFSs appeared at a rate of nearly one per day over the entire sun. Evidence is presented for two proposed hypotheses, namely: (1) a twist in the flux tubes of new AFSs is a key factor in determining which new AFSs will grow; and (2) this twist is related to the well-known asymmetry of sunspot groups.

  19. Cometary nucleus and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  20. Silk Microgels Formed by Proteolytic Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sangram K.; Dash, Mamoni; Chiellini, Federica; Kaplan, David L.; Chiellini, Emo

    2013-01-01

    The proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin selectively cleaves the amorphous regions of silk fibroin protein (SFP) and allows the crystalline regions to self-assemble into silk microgels (SMG) at physiological temperature. These microgels consist of lamellar crystals in the micrometer scale, in contrast to the nanometer scaled crystals in native silkworm fibers. SDS-PAGE and zeta potential results demonstrated that α-chymotrypsin utilized only the nonamorphous domains or segments of the heavy chain of SFP to form negatively charged SMGs. The SMGs were characterized in terms of size, charge, structure, morphology, crystallinity, swelling kinetics, water content and thermal properties. The results suggest that the present technique of preparing SMGs by α-chymotrypsin is simple and efficient potential and that the prepared SMGS have useful features for studies related to biomaterials and pharmaceutical needs. This process is also an easy approach to obtain the amorphous peptide chains for further study. PMID:23756227

  1. Silk microgels formed by proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Chiellini, Federica; Kaplan, David L; Chiellini, Emo

    2013-09-01

    The proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin selectively cleaves the amorphous regions of silk fibroin protein (SFP) and allows the crystalline regions to self-assemble into silk microgels (SMGs) at physiological temperature. These microgels consist of lamellar crystals in the micrometer scale, in contrast to the nanometer-scaled crystals in native silkworm fibers. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and zeta potential results demonstrated that α-chymotrypsin utilized only the non-amorphous domains or segments of the heavy chain of SFP to form negatively charged SMGs. The SMGs were characterized in terms of size, charge, structure, morphology, crystallinity, swelling kinetics, water content and thermal properties. The results suggest that the present technique of preparing SMGs by α-chymotrypsin is simple and efficient, and that the prepared SMGs have useful features for studies related to biomaterial and pharmaceutical needs. This process is also an easy way to obtain the amorphous peptide chains for further study. PMID:23756227

  2. TRACE Observations of Active Region Births

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, C. J.; Shine, R. A.

    2000-05-01

    TRACE has recorded the births of a few bona-fide active regions, as well as many ephemeral regions and so-called X-ray bright points. The observations have usually been made serendipitously while studying a nearby, well formed active region. However, a couple of events have been recorded when deliberately looking for emerging flux in quiet portions of an active region belt. This poster will discuss some of the best observations to date, where the quality ranking of the observation is closely coupled to the observing mode TRACE was in and the availability of high resolution (temporal and/or spatial) MDI magnetograms. Included will be the birth of NOAA AR#8699 on 11 September 1999 at about 14 UT (N22E34), AR#8637 on 17 July 1999 at about 4 UT (N11W1), and AR#8885 on 21 February 2000 at about 6 UT (N11W7); these specifics being provided to encourage coordination with other observations. The temporal relationships between the first appearances of magnetic bipoles, EUV loops, chromospheric plage, pores, and sunspots will be discussed as will the growth rate and spatial relationships of these different features and any associated photospheric flows.

  3. VLBA Helps Build New Picture of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    New, high-precision distance measurements by the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope are providing a major advance for astronomers trying to understand how stars form. "A large improvement in measuring the distance to a young, still-forming star means a large improvement in measuring characteristics such as its mass and intrinsic brightness," said Laurent Loinard, of the National University of Mexico (UNAM). Loinard, Amy Mioduszewski of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, UNAM graduate student Rosa Torres and UNAM professor Luis Rodriguez presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Seattle, Washington. Parallax Diagram Trigonometric Parallax method determines distance to star by measuring its slight shift in apparent position as seen from opposite ends of Earth's orbit. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Image and Animation Files Parallax Diagram (above image, JPEG, 153K) Animation of apparant motion on sky of young star T Tauri S (MPEG, 891K) Still Frame from above animation (JPEG, 14K) B&W Plot of T Tauri S Parallax motion (JPEG, 51K) "Most of what we know about the processes of star formation has come from studying young stars in a few, relatively nearby regions," Loinard said. "However, estimates of the distance to these regions have been imprecise. That imprecision has limited the ability of real-world observations to improve theoretical models for star formation," he added. The new VLBA distance measurements are great improvements over earlier estimates. For example, earlier work placed a famous young stellar system in the constellation Taurus between 423 and 489 light-years from Earth. The new VLBA measurements narrow the range to 418-422 light-years. "Our observations brought the error in this measurement down from 66 light-years to four," Mioduszewski said. The new VLBA observations also refined the distance estimate to another star-forming region in the constellation Ophiuchus

  4. Dynamical evolution of star-forming regions - II. Basic kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard J.; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2016-04-01

    We follow the dynamical evolution of young star-forming regions with a wide range of initial conditions and examine how the radial velocity dispersion, σ, evolves over time. We compare this velocity dispersion to the theoretically expected value for the velocity dispersion if a region were in virial equilibrium, σvir and thus assess the virial state (σ/σvir) of these systems. We find that in regions that are initially subvirial, or in global virial equilibrium but subvirial on local scales, the system relaxes to virial equilibrium within several million years, or roughly 25-50 crossing times, according to the measured virial ratio. However, the measured velocity dispersion, σ, appears to be a bad diagnostic of the current virial state of these systems as it suggests that they become supervirial when compared to the velocity dispersion estimated from the virial mass, σvir. We suggest that this discrepancy is caused by the fact that the regions are never fully relaxed, and that the early non-equilibrium evolution is imprinted in the one-dimensional velocity dispersion at these early epochs. If measured early enough (<2 Myr in our simulations, or ˜20 crossing times), the velocity dispersion can be used to determine whether a region was highly supervirial at birth without the risk of degeneracy. We show that combining σ, or the ratio of σ to the interquartile range (IQR) dispersion, with measures of spatial structure, places stronger constraints on the dynamical history of a region than using the velocity dispersion in isolation.

  5. The Eagle Nebula: a spectral template for star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, Nicolas; Boulanger, Francois; Carey, Sean; Compiegne, Mathieu; Dwek, Eli; Habart, Emilie; Indebetouw, Remy; Montmerle, Thierry; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    IRAC and MIPS have revealed spectacular images of massive star forming regions in the Galaxy. These vivid illustrations of the interaction between the stars, through their winds and radiation, and their environment, made of gas and dust, still needs to be explained. The large scale picture of layered shells of gas components, is affected by the small scale interaction of stars with the clumpy medium that surrounds them. To understand spatial variations of physical conditions and dust properties on small scales, spectroscopic imaging observations are required on a nearby object. The iconic Eagle Nebula (M16) is one of the nearest and most observed star forming region of our Galaxy and as such, is a well suited template to obtain this missing data set. We thus propose a complete spectral map of the Eagle Nebula (M16) with the IRS/Long Low module (15-38 microns) and MIPS/SED mode (55-95 microns). Analysis of the dust emission, spectral features and continuum, and of the H2 and fine-structure gas lines within our models will provide us with constraints on the physical conditions (gas ionization state, pressure, radiation field) and dust properties (temperature, size distribution) at each position within the nebula. Only such a spatially and spectrally complete map will allow us to characterize small scale structure and dust evolution within the global context and understand the impact of small scale structure on the evolution of dusty star forming regions. This project takes advantage of the unique ability of IRS at obtaining sensitive spectral maps covering large areas.

  6. A STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF STAR-FORMING REGION AFGL 490

    SciTech Connect

    Masiunas, L. C.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Pipher, J. L.; Megeath, S. T.; Myers, P. C.; Kirk, H. M.; Fazio, G. G.; Allen, L. E.

    2012-06-20

    We present Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the star-forming region containing intermediate-mass young stellar object (YSO) AFGL 490. We supplement these data with near-IR Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry and with deep Simultaneous Quad Infrared Imaging Device observations off the central high-extinction region. We have more than doubled the known membership of this region to 57 Class I and 303 Class II YSOs via the combined 1-24 {mu}m photometric catalog derived from these data. We construct and analyze the minimum spanning tree of their projected positions, isolating one locally overdense cluster core containing 219 YSOs (60.8% of the region's members). We find this cluster core to be larger yet less dense than similarly analyzed clusters. Although the structure of this cluster core appears irregular, we demonstrate that the parsec-scale surface densities of both YSOs and gas are correlated with a power-law slope of 2.8, as found for other similarly analyzed nearby molecular clouds. We also explore the mass segregation implications of AFGL 490's offset from the center of its core, finding that it has no apparent preferential central position relative to the low-mass members.

  7. Abundances of hydrogen sulfide in star-forming regions.

    PubMed

    Minh, Y C; Ziurys, L M; Irvine, W M; McGonagle, D

    1991-01-01

    Interstellar hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and its isotopic variant H2 34S have been observed toward several star-forming regions via their 1(10)-1(01) transitions at 2 mm, using the FCRAO telescope. In sources where both isotopic species H2S and H2 34S were observed, column densities of approximately 10(16) cm-2 were measured. Column density lower limits of approximately 10(14) cm-2 for H2S were found for other sources, where only the main isotopic line was observed. The fractional abundances of H2S relative to molecular hydrogen appear to be enhanced by at least an order of magnitude relative to quiescent cloud values (approximately 10(-9)) for many of the observed sources. Such enhancement toward star-forming clouds suggests that some process involving elevated temperature aids in producing this species; this could be gas-phase reactions, grain-related processes, or both.

  8. The chemistry of planet-forming regions is not interstellar.

    PubMed

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Blevins, Sandra M

    2014-01-01

    Advances in infrared and submillimeter technology have allowed for detailed observations of the molecular content of the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks. In particular, disks around solar-type stars now have growing molecular inventories that can be directly compared with both prestellar chemistry and that inferred for the early solar nebula. The data directly address the old question of whether the chemistry of planet-forming matter is similar or different and unique relative to the chemistry of dense clouds and protostellar envelopes. The answer to this question may have profound consequences for the structure and composition of planetary systems. The practical challenge is that observations of emission lines from disks do not easily translate into chemical concentrations. Here, we present a two-dimensional radiative transfer model of RNO 90, a classical protoplanetary disk around a solar-mass star, and retrieve the concentrations of dominant molecular carriers of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen in the terrestrial region around 1 AU. We compare our results to the chemical inventory of dense clouds and protostellar envelopes, and argue that inner disk chemistry is, as expected, fundamentally different from prestellar chemistry. We find that the clearest discriminant may be the concentration of CO2, which is extremely low in disks, but one of the most abundant constituents of dense clouds and protostellar envelopes.

  9. Looking Closely at "Medusa": Star Forming Regions in NGC 4194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, D.; Eggers, D.; Nelson, C. H.; Kaiser, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    The "Medusa" (NGC 4194, Mrk 201) is a blue compact galaxy, with strong far infrared and radio emission. Ground-based observations exhibit a distorted image with a tidal tail and regions of strong star formation. A population of massive O and early B stars is evident from the IUE spectra HST survey of Seyfert and starburst galaxies notes NCG 4194 is an HII galaxy with lumpy HII regions and knots. The central starburst is apparently produced by a galaxy merger. As part of an investigation of star formation in interacting galaxies, we have obtained ultraviolet and visible images of the central regions of NGC 4194 with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on HST. Imaging was obtained in two ultraviolet (FUV-MAMA+F25QTZ, NUV-MAMA+F25CN182) and one visible (CCD+F28X50LP) band. Individual star forming knots (at HST resolution) have been identified. We present sized and luminosities for the individual knots, and the knot luminosity function. We compare our data to current starburst models to constrain stellar ages and populations. Knot characteristics as a function of location in the galaxy will also be discussed.

  10. Emission measure distribution for diffuse regions in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2014-11-01

    Our knowledge of the diffuse emission that encompasses active regions is very limited. In this paper we investigate two off-limb active regions, namely, AR 10939 and AR 10961, to probe the underlying heating mechanisms. For this purpose, we have used spectral observations from Hinode/EIS and employed the emission measure (EM) technique to obtain the thermal structure of these diffuse regions. Our results show that the characteristic EM distributions of the diffuse emission regions peak at log T = 6.25 and the coolward slopes are in the range 1.4-3.3. This suggests that both low- as well as high-frequency nanoflare heating events are at work. Our results provide additional constraints on the properties of these diffuse emission regions and their contribution to the background/foreground when active region cores are observed on-disk.

  11. VLBA Changes Picture of Famous Star-Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-10-01

    Using the supersharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), astronomers have made the most precise measurement ever of the distance to a famous star-forming region. The measurement -- to the heavily studied Orion Nebula -- changes scientists' understanding of the characteristics of the young stars in the region. Parallax Diagram Trigonometric Parallax method determines distance to star by measuring its slight shift in apparent position as seen from opposite ends of Earth's orbit. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Star Track Apparent track of star GMR A in the Orion Nebula Cluster, showing shift caused by Earth's orbital motion and star's movement in space. CREDIT: Sandstrom et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on Images for Larger Files "This measurement is four times more precise than previous distance estimates. Because our measurement reduces the distance to this region, it tells us that the stars there are less bright than thought before, and changes the estimates of their ages," said Geoff Bower, an astronomer at the University of California at Berkeley. Bower, along with Karin Sandstrom, J.E.G. Peek, Alberto Bolatto and Richard Plambeck, all of Berkeley, published their findings in the October 10 edition of the Astrophysical Journal. The scientists determined the distance to a star called GMR A, one of a cluster of stars in the Orion Nebula, by measuring the slight shift in the star's apparent position in the sky caused by the Earth's motion around the Sun. Observing the star when the Earth is on opposite sides of its annual orbit allows astronomers to measure the angle of this small shift and thus provides a direct trigonometric calculation of its distance. "By using this technique, called parallax, we get a direct measurement that does not depend on various assumptions that are required to use less-direct methods," Bower said. "Only a telescope with the remarkable ability to see fine detail that is provided by the VLBA is

  12. Axial Tilt Angles of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Robert F.

    1996-12-01

    Separate Mount Wilson plage and sunspot group data sets are analyzed in this review to illustrate several interesting aspects of active region axial tilt angles. (1) The distribution of tilt angles differs between plages and sunspot groups in the sense that plages have slightly higher tilt angles, on average, than do spot groups. (2) The distributions of average plage total magnetic flux, or sunspot group area, with tilt angle show a consistent effect: those groups with tilt angles nearest the average values are larger (or have a greater total flux) on average than those farther from the average values. Moreover, the average tilt angles on which these size or flux distributions are centered differ for the two types of objects, and represent closely the actual different average tilt angles for these two features. (3) The polarity separation distances of plages and sunspot groups show a clear relationship to average tilt angles. In the case of each feature, smaller polarity separations are correlated with smaller tilt angles. (4) The dynamics of regions also show a clear relationship with region tilt angles. The spot groups with tilt angles nearest the average value (or perhaps 0-deg tilt angle) have on average a faster rotation rate than those groups with extreme tilt angles. All of these tilt-angle characteristics may be assumed to be related to the physical forces that affect the magnetic flux loop that forms the region. These aspects are discussed in this brief review within the context of our current view of the formation of active region magnetic flux at the solar surface.

  13. Hydride Ions, HCO+ and Ionizing Irradiation in Star Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2016-06-01

    Hydrides are fundamental precursor molecules in cosmic chemistry and many hydride ions have become observable in high quality for the first time thanks to the Herschel Space Observatory. Ionized hydrides, such as CH+ and OH+ and also HCO+ affect the chemistry of molecules such as water. They also provide complementary information on irradiation by far UV (FUV) or X-rays and gas temperature.We explore hydrides of the most abundant heavier elements in an observational survey covering star forming regions with different mass and evolutionary state. Twelve YSOs were observed with HIFI on Herschel in 6 spectral settings providing fully velocity-resolved line profiles. The YSOs include objects of low (Class 0 and I), intermediate, and high mass, with luminosities ranging from 4 Ls to 2 105 Ls.The targeted lines of CH+, OH+, H2O+, and C+ are detected mostly in blue-shifted absorption. H3O+ and SH+ are detected in emission and only toward some high-mass objects. For the low-mass YSOs the column density ratios of CH+/OH+ can be reproduced by simple chemical models implying an FUV flux of 2 - 400 times the ISRF at the location of the molecules. In two high-mass objects, the UV flux is 20 - 200 times the ISRF derived from absorption lines, and 300 - 600 ISRF using emission lines. Upper limits for the X-ray luminosity can be derived from H3O+ observations for some low-mass objects.If the FUV flux required for low-mass objects originates at the central protostar, a substantial FUV luminosity, up to 1.5 Ls, is required. For high-mass regions, the FUV flux required to produce the observed molecular ratios is smaller than the unattenuated flux expected from the central object(s) at the Herschel beam radius. This is consistent with an FUV flux reduced by circumstellar extinction or by bloating of the protostar.The ion molecules are proposed to form in FUV irradiated cavity walls that are shocked by the disk wind. The shock region is turbulent, broadening the lines to some 1 - 12 km

  14. CME Productivity of Active Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Shen, C.; Ye, P.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, R.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two kinds of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although they are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process, the productivity of them could be quiet different for various ARs. Why is an AR productive? And why is a flare-rich AR CME-poor? To answer these questions, we compared the recent super flare-rich but CME-poor AR 12192, with other four ARs; two were productive in both flares and CMEs and the other two were inert to produce any M-class or intenser flares or CMEs. By investigating the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram, we find the three productive ARs have larger magnetic flux, current and free magnetic energy than the inert ARs. Furthermore, the two ARs productive in both flares and CMEs contain higher current helicity, concentrating along both sides of the flaring neutral lines, indicating the presence of a seed magnetic structure( that is highly sheared or twisted) of a CME; they also have higher decay index in the low corona, showing weak constraint. The results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have strong current system and sufficient free energy to power flares, and more importantly whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) if there is significant sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME and (2) if the constraint of the overlying arcades is weak enough. Moreover, some productive ARs may frequently produce more than one CME. How does this happen? We do a statistical investigation of waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs ( CME ssuccessive originating from the same ARs within short intervals) from super ARs in solar cycle 23 to answer this question. The waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hours, the first component peaks at 7 hours. The correlation analysis among CME waiting times

  15. Chemical Herschel Surveys of Star Forming Regions (chess)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emprechtinger, Martin

    2011-06-01

    CHESS is an unbiased line survey of low-, intermediate-, and high-mass star forming regions at different stages of their evolution. The eight sources in the CHESS program are observed with the HIFI instrument on board of the Herschel Space Telescope, which provides a high spectral resolution (R˜ 10^6) and covers a frequency range from 480 to 1910 GHz. The objective of CHESS is to study the chemical composition and physical conditions in star forming regions and their variation with mass and evolutionary stage. To date about 50% of the program have been completed. One of the eight objects in the CHESS program is the hot core NGC 6334 I. With an envelope mass of 200 M_⊙ and temperatures 100 K, NGC 6334 I is very line rich. In this object emission lines of more than 40 species have been identified, including first detections of H_2Cl^+ (Lis et al. 2010) and H_2O^+ (Ossenkopf et al. 2010). Furthermore, several lines of ortho and para water and ammonia have been detected, allowing to determine the ortho/para ratio of these crucial species. In addition many hydrides (HF, CH) and hydride ions (SH^+, OH^+, CH^+) have been found. In the low mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422, another source of our sample, several deuterated species, including the first detection of ND (Bacmann et al. 2010), were found. The data allowed also the first determination of the ortho/para ratio of D_2H^+ (>2.6) (Vastel et al. 2010). In this talk I will give a summary of the conducted observation and highlight the most important results.

  16. HUBBLE'S PANORAMIC PORTRAIT OF A VAST STAR-FORMING REGION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a panoramic portrait of a vast, sculpted landscape of gas and dust where thousands of stars are being born. This fertile star-forming region, called the 30 Doradus Nebula, has a sparkling stellar centerpiece: the most spectacular cluster of massive stars in our cosmic neighborhood of about 25 galaxies. The mosaic picture shows that ultraviolet radiation and high-speed material unleashed by the stars in the cluster, called R136 [the large blue blob left of center], are weaving a tapestry of creation and destruction, triggering the collapse of looming gas and dust clouds and forming pillar-like structures that are incubators for nascent stars. The photo offers an unprecedented, detailed view of the entire inner region of 30 Doradus, measuring 200 light-years wide by 150 light-years high. The nebula resides in the Large Magellanic Cloud (a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way), 170,000 light-years from Earth. Nebulas like 30 Doradus are the 'signposts' of recent star birth. High-energy ultraviolet radiation from the young, hot, massive stars in R136 causes the surrounding gaseous material to glow. Previous Hubble telescope observations showed that R136 contains several dozen of the most massive stars known, each about 100 times the mass of the Sun and about 10 times as hot. These stellar behemoths all formed at the same time about 2 million years ago. The stars in R136 are producing intense 'stellar winds' (streams of material traveling at several million miles an hour), which are wreaking havoc on the gas and dust in the surrounding neighborhood. The winds are pushing the gas away from the cluster and compressing the inner regions of the surrounding gas and dust clouds [the pinkish material]. The intense pressure is triggering the collapse of parts of the clouds, producing a new generation of star formation around the central cluster. The new stellar nursery is about 30 to 50 light-years from R136. Most of the stars in the

  17. Locating star-forming regions in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. E.; Eracleous, M.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Gronwall, C.; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R.; Sturm, Eckhard

    2014-02-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II]λ3727, Hβ, [O III]λ5007 and Paα images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically around the nucleus, powered primarily by star formation. We determine star-formation rates of the order of a few tens of M⊙ yr-1. The host galaxies of our target quasars have stellar masses of the order of 1011 M⊙ and specific star-formation rates on a par with those of M82 and luminous infrared galaxies. As such they fall at the upper envelope or just above the star-formation mass sequence in the specific star formation versus stellar mass diagram. We see a clear trend of increasing star-formation rate with quasar luminosity, reinforcing the link between the growth of the stellar mass of the host and the black hole mass found by other authors.

  18. Feature-oriented regional modeling and simulations (FORMS) for the western South Atlantic: Southeastern Brazil region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calado, L.; Gangopadhyay, A.; da Silveira, I. C. A.

    The multi-scale synoptic circulation system in the southeastern Brazil (SEBRA) region is presented using a feature-oriented approach. Prevalent synoptic circulation structures, or "features," are identified from previous observational studies. These features include the southward-flowing Brazil Current (BC), the eddies off Cabo São Tomé (CST - 22°S) and off Cabo Frio (CF - 23°S), and the upwelling region off CF and CST. Their synoptic water-mass ( T- S) structures are characterized and parameterized to develop temperature-salinity ( T- S) feature models. Following [Gangopadhyay, A., Robinson, A.R., Haley, P.J., Leslie, W.J., Lozano, C.J., Bisagni, J., Yu, Z., 2003. Feature-oriented regional modeling and simulation (forms) in the gulf of maine and georges bank. Cont. Shelf Res. 23 (3-4), 317-353] methodology, a synoptic initialization scheme for feature-oriented regional modeling and simulation (FORMS) of the circulation in this region is then developed. First, the temperature and salinity feature-model profiles are placed on a regional circulation template and objectively analyzed with available background climatology in the deep region. These initialization fields are then used for dynamical simulations via the Princeton Ocean Model (POM). A few first applications of this methodology are presented in this paper. These include the BC meandering, the BC-eddy interaction and the meander-eddy-upwelling system (MEUS) simulations. Preliminary validation results include realistic wave-growth and eddy formation and sustained upwelling. Our future plan includes the application of these feature models with satellite, in-situ data and advanced data-assimilation schemes for nowcasting and forecasting the SEBRA region.

  19. Star-forming region BBW 36 in puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudahgian, A. L.; May, J.

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies of the star formation region BBW 36 and associated molecular clouds are presented. The 12CO (1-0) observations, carried out with the 15-m SEST (Swedish-ESO) telescope (Cerro La Silla, Chile), revealed the existence of cloud a, connected with BBW 36 and of cloud b, having elongation in SE-NW direction. A red-shifted molecular outflow with velocity ˜+5 km/s (with respect to cloud a), having a direction parallel to the line of sight, was also observed. VLA observations showed the presence of a source VLA 2 at 3.6 cm with an elongation in the N-S direction. It is suggested that the VLA 2 source coincides with a dust disc (surrounding the object BBW 36). The star 3, which is one of the YSOs in the star-forming region BBW 36 and is connected with a bright comma-like nebula, can be the source of the molecular outflow. The star 3 has very high IR colors and is associated with an IRAS point source IRAS 07280-1829, which has IR colors, typical for an IRAS point source, connected with a water maser. On the 2MASS K image of BBW 36 we can see the existence of a bright nebula; a group of stars is embedded in that nebula, and among these stars there are stars with dust discs (or envelopes). On the 2MASS K image several spiral jets are also present, some of them with a condensation at the end.

  20. Testing Grain Surface Chemistry in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Jacqueline; Boogert, Adwin

    2008-03-01

    The key chemical reactions that produce the first generation ice mantles in dense molecular clouds are still poorly known. Within cold, dense clouds, species formed in the gas and on the grain surfaces will stick to the grains and form icy mantles. However, during star-formation, materials in the general cloud medium are subjected to numerous chemical and physical processes that are driven mostly by thermal and energetic radiation. The comparison between background stars and protostars is a proven excellent tool for this purpose. By comparing observed interstellar solid state abundances with models of grain surface chemistry it is possible to elucidate the efficiency and hence relevancy of a number of chemical reactions, in particular the CO_2 formation pathways. In part because of Spitzer, significant progress has been made towards understanding the various effects of these radiation processes on the ices around a large sample of high- and low-mass protostars. First results suggest that two different CO2 formation pathways play a role in these harsh environments. Though which reaction initially dominated the chemistry is unknown due to the numerous physical processes. Unfortunately, only a small sample of background field stars have been observed, most notably Taurus. In Taurus, only one reaction pathway appears to be efficient in quiescent regions, but this result is sample limited. We propose to take low resolution spectra from 5 to 22 microns along the line of sight toward 31 field stars behind the LDN 673 molecular cloud. Differences in near-IR ice chemistry have already been observed and we will use these mid-infrared data to provide more stringent constraints on chemical models of grain surface chemistry. With this sample it is possible to address fundamental questions in astrochemistry: what are the dominant grain surface chemistry pathways? What is the composition of the first generation ice mantles in molecular clouds?

  1. The Main Sequence of Explosive Solar Active Regions: Comparison of Emerging and Mature Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For mature active regions, an active region s magnetic flux content determines the maximum free energy the active region can have. Most Large flares and CMEs occur in active regions that are near their free-energy limit. Active-region flare power radiated in the GOES 1-8 band increases steeply as the free-energy limit is approached. We infer that the free-energy limit is set by the rate of release of an active region s free magnetic energy by flares, CMEs and coronal heating balancing the maximum rate the Sun can put free energy into the active region s magnetic field. This balance of maximum power results in explosive active regions residing in a "mainsequence" in active-region (flux content, free energy content) phase space, which sequence is analogous to the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) phase space.

  2. Combining regional expertise to form a bereavement support alliance.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Judy B; Kobler, Kathie; Roose, Rosmarie E; Meyer, Charlotte; Schmitz, Nancy; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Providing compassionate bereavement care for families experiencing perinatal loss is a standard of care in most healthcare organizations. In this article, we describe the development of The Alliance of Perinatal Bereavement Support Facilitators, begun over 25 years ago in Chicago by staff who identified the need to reach out to colleagues at other area institutions for advice and support in this work. This collaboration created a regional support network that has resulted in a long-lasting, active, sustainable organization of excellence focused on enhancing practice, education, and perinatal bereavement care. Alliance activities center around four main areas: education, networking/support, policy, and recognizing outstanding service to families. By continuing to draw upon the collective talent, wisdom, and expertise of its members, The Alliance still serves grieving families and provides mentoring for future interdisciplinary team members engaged in this work. The path taken to build this organization can be used by professionals in other specialties who are looking to create their own alliance infrastructure based on mutual benefit and interest.

  3. Combining regional expertise to form a bereavement support alliance.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Judy B; Kobler, Kathie; Roose, Rosmarie E; Meyer, Charlotte; Schmitz, Nancy; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Providing compassionate bereavement care for families experiencing perinatal loss is a standard of care in most healthcare organizations. In this article, we describe the development of The Alliance of Perinatal Bereavement Support Facilitators, begun over 25 years ago in Chicago by staff who identified the need to reach out to colleagues at other area institutions for advice and support in this work. This collaboration created a regional support network that has resulted in a long-lasting, active, sustainable organization of excellence focused on enhancing practice, education, and perinatal bereavement care. Alliance activities center around four main areas: education, networking/support, policy, and recognizing outstanding service to families. By continuing to draw upon the collective talent, wisdom, and expertise of its members, The Alliance still serves grieving families and provides mentoring for future interdisciplinary team members engaged in this work. The path taken to build this organization can be used by professionals in other specialties who are looking to create their own alliance infrastructure based on mutual benefit and interest. PMID:24759313

  4. 76 FR 42129 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form (Form DHS-7001), Online Ombudsman Form DHS-7001 AGENCY: Office of the Citizenship and Immigration Service... practices of USCIS to mitigate problems. This form is used by an applicant who is experiencing problems...

  5. From the H II Region to the Molecular Cloud: Determining Physical Conditions in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, N. P.

    2004-12-01

    Infrared missions such as Spitzer offer new insights into the chemical evolution and star formation history of the universe. Although objects such as starburst galaxies, which are among the most luminous objects in the universe, are the primary focus, OMC-1, a lower luminosity region with superb spatial resolution, serves as a benchmark to test the physics of newly formed O stars interacting with the surrounding molecular environment. The classical approach in determining conditions in the ionized, photodissociated, and molecular regions is to treat each problem separately. In actuality, however, this is a single continuous phenomenon, linked through the transport of gas and radiation. Here we self-consistently calculate the physical conditions and emission from the hot HII region to the cold, molecular gas as a continuous hydrostatic layer. The ion states of the first 30 elements, along with the abundances of 70 molecules, are determined with the temperature and electron density. The grain physics is treated self-consistently, with grain charge transfer, single photon heating, and PAH effects all included. Additionally, level populations of all the rotational/vibrational levels of the ground electronic state of molecular hydrogen are determined (see the dissertation talk of Gargi Shaw). As a benchmark, we consider the physical conditions through OMC-1 1' west of the Trapezium, where emission-line observations of the HII region and the PDR/molecular cloud all exist. Accurately interpreting this spectrum will give us confidence that we can apply our calculations to more luminous and distant starburst galaxies. We predict the sometimes significant contribution of the HII region to important PDR emission-line diagnostics. This has consequences for the interpretation of IR observations, the deduced values of n(H) and G0 in PDRs, and hence the overall conditions in star forming regions. All calculations were developed with the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, which is

  6. A Case of Filament - Active Region Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, C.; Dumitru, L.

    2010-09-01

    We analyze a huge filament observed between 5 and 19 September 2001. In its evolution it is linked to the active region 9612, observed between 7 and 16 September 2001. The filament has a strange morphology and dynamics: starting as two parallel components (A and B), it becomes a double sigmoid filament when a third component (C ) appears linking the other two. An unusual magnetic topology characterizes this evolution: the active region is located between the parallel components. When the third component becomes observable, it links these ones first below the active region. After a spectacular plasma movement registered in filament (A), this one becomes linked to (B) above the active region. In spite of these dramatically changes of the magnetic topology and filament -- active region switch, no CME is observed. Only a few flares occurring in AR9612 are registered and these ones can be seen in the dynamics of the filament as an expression of large scale magnetic reconnections.

  7. A nuclease-hypersensitive region forms de novo after chromosome replication.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M J; Varshavsky, A

    1987-10-01

    Regular nucleosome arrays in eucaryotic chromosomes are punctuated at specific locations, such as active promoters and replication origins, by apparently nucleosome-free sites, also called nuclease-hypersensitive, or exposed, regions. The -400-base pair-exposed region within simian virus 40 (SV40) chromosomes is present in approximately 20% of the chromosomes in lytically infected cells and encompasses the replication origin, transcriptional enhancer, and both late and early SV40 promoters. We report that nearly all SV40 chromosomes lacked the exposed region during replication and that newly formed chromosomes acquired the exposed region of the same degree as did bulk SV40 chromosomes within 1 h after replication. Furthermore, a much lower but significant level of exposure was detectable in late SV40 replication intermediates, indicating that formation of the exposed region could start within minutes after passage of the replication fork. PMID:2824998

  8. Further Characterizing the Planet Forming Region Around V1331 Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doppmann, Greg; Najita, J.; Carr, J.; Graham, J.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution L-band (3.0-3.9 μm) spectra of young stars with circumstellar disks provide a key window for probing the physical conditions and pre-biotic chemistry within the inner disk region where terrestrial-like planets are thought to form. Rich with transitions due to water, OH, and key organic compounds of biological interest, L-band spectra at high resolution (R > 18,000) are critical to elucidate the properties of each molecular component present. Well-suited for this purpose, our NIRSPEC/Keck observations of V1331 Cyg, an intermediate mass young stellar object (spectral type A8-G5), show strong OH and water emission at 1500K. At R=24,000, our spectra resolve individual lines in the crowded emission spectrum that is dominated by water, and enable us to also characterize the accompanying OH emission. By comparing the observed spectra with synthetic disk models we (1) probe the nature of the accretion mechanism in the inner disk from the temperature, column density, and line broadening of the water emission that is present, (2) examine the disk photochemistry from the abundance ratio of OH to water, and (3) employ the new HITEMP line list to make empirical improvements to the water line list and thereby detect or set detection limits on organic emission (e.g., C2H2, HCN, C2H6, H2CO, NH3, and CH4) that may underly the L-band water spectrum. Support for this research was provided in part by the NASA Origins of Solar Systems program NNH10A0061.

  9. Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions: What are the Most Massive Stars Formed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobulnicky, Chip; Vargas, Carlos; Kerton, Charles; Arvidsson, Kim

    2010-08-01

    High-mass star formation cannot be viewed as simply a scaled-up version of the paradigm for low-mass star formation. The high-mass regime (M> 10 Msun) appears to require significant differences in cloud fragmentation, accretion, radiation, turbulence, and overall molecular density compared to the low-mass regime. We have identified a sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs) hosting embedded clusters that straddle the boundary of these two regimes and can be used to understand the factors that govern the transition between these extremes. Most notable among these factors is the possibility of a critical cloud mass column density that appears to divide high-mass SFRs from IM SFRs. Yet, the very nature of IM SFRs and their stellar content are almost completely unknown, primarily because of the previous difficulty in identifying such objects. We propose HK band spectroscopy of the brightest stellar sources near nine IM SFRs to identify probable members, confirm the IM nature of the most massive stars, and characterize their evolutionary state. Three nights with FLAMINGOS on the 4 m (or equivalent IR spectrograph) will suffice to obtain classification spectra and several spectral diagnostics sensitive to accretion for at least 8-10 stars per object.

  10. Neural network with formed dynamics of activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dunin-Barkovskii, V.L.; Osovets, N.B.

    1995-03-01

    The problem of developing a neural network with a given pattern of the state sequence is considered. A neural network structure and an algorithm, of forming its bond matrix which lead to an approximate but robust solution of the problem are proposed and discussed. Limiting characteristics of the serviceability of the proposed structure are studied. Various methods of visualizing dynamic processes in a neural network are compared. Possible applications of the results obtained for interpretation of neurophysiological data and in neuroinformatics systems are discussed.

  11. Suppression of Active-Region CME Production by the Presence of Other Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Khazanov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    From the SOHO mission s data base of MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning solar cycle 23, we have obtained a set of 40,000 magnetograms of 1,300 active regions, tracking each active region across the 30 degree central solar disk. Each active region magnetogram is cropped from the full-disk magnetogram by an automated code. The cadence is 96 minutes. From each active-region magnetogram, we have measured two whole-active-region magnetic quantities: (1) the magnetic size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux), and (2) a gauge of the active region s free magnetic energy (part of the free energy is released in the production of a flare and/or CME eruption). From NOAA Flare/CME catalogs, we have obtained the event (Flare/CME/SEP event) production history of each active region. Using all these data, we find that for each type of eruptive event, an active region s expected rate of event production increases as a power law of our gauge of active-region free magnetic energy. We have also found that, among active regions having nearly the same free energy, the rate of the CME production is less when there are many other active regions on the disk than when there are few or none, but there is no significant discernible suppression of the rate of flare production. This indicates that the presence of other active regions somehow tends to inhibit an active region s flare-producing magnetic explosions from becoming CMEs, contrary to the expectation from the breakout model for the production of CMEs.

  12. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  13. Hinode Captures Images of Solar Active Region

    NASA Video Gallery

    In these images, Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) zoomed in on AR 11263 on August 4, 2011, five days before the active region produced the largest flare of this cycle, an X6.9. We show images...

  14. Molecular cloud/HII region interfaces in the star forming region NGC 6357.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, F.; Brand, J.; Felli, M.

    1997-04-01

    We have performed ^12^CO(1-0), ^12^CO(2-1), ^13^CO(1-0), ^13^CO(2-1), C^18^O(1-0), C^18^O(2-1), HCO^+^(1-0) and H^13^CO^+^(1-0) observations towards two selected areas in the star forming complex NGC 6357 with angular resolutions from 21" to 55". In particular, we have mapped the molecular gas around the two HII regions G353.1+0.6 and G353.2+0.9 in the ^12^CO(1-0) and ^13^CO(1-0) transitions with a resolution of ~43". This improves on the coarser ^12^CO(1-0) observations previously carried out by others. We have also studied the physical properties of gas along strips through the molecular cloud/HII region interfaces. For G353.1+0.6, the observations confirm that an ionization front is eroding a warm, dense molecular cloud located to the north of the optical nebula. The molecular gas appears fragmented on a scale size >0.5pc and not all the components are related to the HII region. There is evidence of a density increase near the front and indications of temperature gradients toward the exciting stars. This is further suggested by the presence of ^12^CO(1-0) self-absorption produced by a cooler external layer. The isotopic ratio X(^13^CO)/X(C^18^O) decreases from the inner part of the clouds towards the front, contrary to what is theoretically predicted and observed in many other regions. This may be due to excitation or optical depths effects. An evolutionary scenario is proposed where the exciting stars form at the edge of a molecular cloud. The morphology of G353.2+0.9 is rather different from what previously believed. Only a weak "bar" of molecular material was found to the south of the sharp ionization front observed optically and in the radio-continuum, and most of the molecular emission arises from regions behind or to the north of the HII region. This indicates that we are viewing a late stage "blister" configuration face-on. This region is fragmented on a scale size >0.5pc, and a warm, dense and compact molecular fragment coincides with the elephant trunk

  15. Software Displays Data on Active Regions of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golightly, Mike; Weyland, Mark; Raben, Vern

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Active Region Display System is a computer program that generates, in near real time, a graphical display of parameters indicative of the spatial and temporal variations of activity on the Sun. These parameters include histories and distributions of solar flares, active region growth, coronal mass ejections, size, and magnetic configuration. By presenting solar-activity data in graphical form, this program accelerates, facilitates, and partly automates what had previously been a time-consuming mental process of interpretation of solar-activity data presented in tabular and textual formats. Intended for original use in predicting space weather in order to minimize the exposure of astronauts to ionizing radiation, the program might also be useful on Earth for predicting solar-wind-induced ionospheric effects, electric currents, and potentials that could affect radio-communication systems, navigation systems, pipelines, and long electric-power lines. Raw data for the display are obtained automatically from the Space Environment Center (SEC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Other data must be obtained from the NOAA SEC by verbal communication and entered manually. The Solar Active Region Display System automatically accounts for the latitude dependence of the rate of rotation of the Sun, by use of a mathematical model that is corrected with NOAA SEC active-region position data once every 24 hours. The display includes the date, time, and an image of the Sun in H light overlaid with latitude and longitude coordinate lines, dots that mark locations of active regions identified by NOAA, identifying numbers assigned by NOAA to such regions, and solar-region visual summary (SRVS) indicators associated with some of the active regions. Each SRVS indicator is a small pie chart containing five equal sectors, each of which is color-coded to provide a semiquantitative indication of the degree of hazard posed by one aspect of the activity at

  16. 76 FR 61725 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Case Submission Form, Case Assistance Form; (Form DHS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Federal Register on July 18, 2011 at 76 FR 42129, for a 60-day public comment period. No comments were... other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. FOR FURTHER... to bring to the attention of the CIS Ombudsman (``trend''). For case problems, the CIS Ombudsman...

  17. NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IS MORE PREVALENT IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Popesso, P.; Genzel, R.; Saintonge, A.; Tacconi, L.; Wuyts, S. E-mail: lutz@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: popesso@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: amelie@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: swuyts@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-07-01

    We explore the question of whether low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially found in galaxies that are undergoing a transition from active star formation (SF) to quiescence. This notion has been suggested by studies of the UV-optical colors of AGN hosts, which find them to be common among galaxies in the so-called Green Valley, a region of galaxy color space believed to be composed mostly of galaxies undergoing SF quenching. Combining the deepest current X-ray and Herschel/PACS far-infrared (FIR) observations of the two Chandra Deep Fields with redshifts, stellar masses, and rest-frame photometry derived from the extensive and uniform multi-wavelength data in these fields, we compare the rest-frame U - V color distributions and star formation rate distributions of AGNs and carefully constructed samples of inactive control galaxies. The UV-to-optical colors of AGNs are consistent with equally massive inactive galaxies at redshifts out to z {approx} 2, but we show that such colors are poor tracers of SF. While the FIR distributions of both star-forming AGNs and star-forming inactive galaxies are statistically similar, we show that AGNs are preferentially found in star-forming host galaxies, or, in other words, AGNs are less likely to be found in weakly star-forming or quenched galaxies. We postulate that, among X-ray-selected AGNs of low and moderate accretion luminosities, the supply of cold gas primarily determines the accretion rate distribution of the nuclear black holes.

  18. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  19. A new star-forming region in Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magakian, T. Yu.; Movsessian, T. A.; Bally, J.

    2016-07-01

    A new southern star-formation region, located at an estimated distance of ˜1.5 kpc in the Lynds 1664 dark cloud in Canis Major, is described. Lynds 1664 contains several compact star clusters, small stellar groups and young stars associated with reflection nebulae. Narrow-band H α and [S II] images obtained with the 4-m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory reveal more than 20 new Herbig-Haro objects associated with several protostellar outflows.

  20. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.

    2012-12-10

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  1. Mapping Magnetic Fields in Star Forming Regions with BLASTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas B.; Gandilo, Natalie; Klein, J. R.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Korotkov, Andrei; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; nakamura, fumitaka; Barth Netterfield, Calvin; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Pereira Santos, Fábio; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil; Soler, Juan D.; Thomas, Nicholas; tucker, carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2016-01-01

    A key outstanding question in our understanding of star formation is whether magnetic fields provide support against the gravitational collapse of their parent molecular clouds and cores. Direct measurement of magnetic field strength is observationally challenging, however observations of polarized thermal emission from dust grains aligned with respect to the local cloud magnetic field can be used to map out the magnetic field orientation in molecular clouds. Statistical comparisons between these submillimeter polarization maps and three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetized star-forming clouds provide a promising method for constraining magnetic field strength. We present early results from a BLASTPol study of the nearby giant molecular cloud (GMC) Vela C, using data collected during a 2012 Antarctic flight. This sensitive balloon-borne polarimeter observed Vela C for 57 hours, yielding the most detailed submillimeter polarization map ever made of a GMC forming high mass stars. We find that most of the structure in p can be modeled by a power-law dependence on two quantities: the hydrogen column density and the local dispersion in magnetic field orientation. Our power-law model for p(N,S) provides new constraints for models of magnetized star-forming clouds and an important first step in the interpretation of the BLASTPol 2012 data set.

  2. Organized Subsurface Flows near Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, D. A.; Hindman, B. W.; Toomre, J.; Thompson, M. J.

    2004-04-01

    Local helioseismic techniques, such as ring analysis and time-distance helioseismology, have already shown that large-scale flows near the surface converge towards major active regions. Ring analysis has further demonstrated that at greater depths some active regions exhibit strong outflows. A critique leveled at the ring-analysis results is that the Regularized Least Squares (RLS) inversion kernels on which they are based have negative sidelobes near the surface. Such sidelobes could result in a surface inflow being misidentified as a diverging outflow at depth. In this paper we show that the Optimally Located Averages (OLA) inversion technique, which produces kernels without significant sidelobes, generates flows markedly similar to the RLS results. Active regions are universally zones of convergence near the surface, while large complexes evince strong outflows deeper down.

  3. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  4. Cosmic-Ray Injection from Star-Forming Regions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric; Profumo, Stefano; Linden, Tim

    2016-09-01

    At present, all physical models of diffuse Galactic γ-ray emission assume that the distribution of cosmic-ray sources traces the observed populations of either OB stars, pulsars, or supernova remnants. However, since H_{2}-rich regions host significant star formation and numerous supernova remnants, the morphology of observed H_{2} gas (as traced by CO line surveys) should also provide a physically motivated, high-resolution tracer for cosmic-ray injection. We assess the impact of utilizing H_{2} as a tracer for cosmic-ray injection on models of diffuse Galactic γ-ray emission. We employ state-of-the-art 3D particle diffusion and gas density models, along with a physical model for the star-formation rate based on global Schmidt laws. Allowing a fraction, f_{H_{2}}, of cosmic-ray sources to trace the observed H_{2} density, we find that a theoretically well-motivated value f_{H_{2}}∼0.20-0.25 (i) provides a significantly better global fit to the diffuse Galactic γ-ray sky and (ii) highly suppresses the intensity of the residual γ-ray emission from the Galactic center region. Specifically, in models utilizing our best global fit values of f_{H_{2}}∼0.20-0.25, the spectrum of the galactic center γ-ray excess is drastically affected, and the morphology of the excess becomes inconsistent with predictions for dark matter annihilation. PMID:27661675

  5. Cosmic-Ray Injection from Star-Forming Regions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric; Profumo, Stefano; Linden, Tim

    2016-09-01

    At present, all physical models of diffuse Galactic γ-ray emission assume that the distribution of cosmic-ray sources traces the observed populations of either OB stars, pulsars, or supernova remnants. However, since H_{2}-rich regions host significant star formation and numerous supernova remnants, the morphology of observed H_{2} gas (as traced by CO line surveys) should also provide a physically motivated, high-resolution tracer for cosmic-ray injection. We assess the impact of utilizing H_{2} as a tracer for cosmic-ray injection on models of diffuse Galactic γ-ray emission. We employ state-of-the-art 3D particle diffusion and gas density models, along with a physical model for the star-formation rate based on global Schmidt laws. Allowing a fraction, f_{H_{2}}, of cosmic-ray sources to trace the observed H_{2} density, we find that a theoretically well-motivated value f_{H_{2}}∼0.20-0.25 (i) provides a significantly better global fit to the diffuse Galactic γ-ray sky and (ii) highly suppresses the intensity of the residual γ-ray emission from the Galactic center region. Specifically, in models utilizing our best global fit values of f_{H_{2}}∼0.20-0.25, the spectrum of the galactic center γ-ray excess is drastically affected, and the morphology of the excess becomes inconsistent with predictions for dark matter annihilation.

  6. ON THE FORMATION OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Ake E-mail: aake@nbi.dk

    2012-07-01

    Magnetoconvection can produce an active region without an initial coherent flux tube. A simulation was performed where a uniform, untwisted, horizontal magnetic field of 1 kG strength was advected into the bottom of a computational domain 48 Mm wide by 20 Mm deep. The up and down convective motions produce a hierarchy of magnetic loops with a wide range of scales, with smaller loops riding 'piggy-back' in a serpentine fashion on larger loops. When a large loop approaches the surface, it produces a small active region with a compact leading spot and more diffuse following spots.

  7. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Mikić, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Archontis, V.; Linton, M. G.; Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Kliem, B.

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  8. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  9. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu fuel form activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL fuel form activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  10. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  11. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  12. Solar Eruptions Initiated in Sigmoidal Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    active regions that have been shown to possess high probability for eruption. They present a direct evidence of the existence of flux ropes in the corona prior to the impulsive phase of eruptions. In order to gain insight into their eruptive behavior and how they get destabilized we need to know their 3D magnetic field structure. First, we review some recent observations and modeling of sigmoidal active regions as the primary hosts of solar eruptions, which can also be used as useful laboratories for studying these phenomena. Then, we concentrate on the analysis of observations and highly data-constrained non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) models over the lifetime of several sigmoidal active regions, where we have captured their magnetic field structure around the times of major flares. We present the topology analysis of a couple of sigmoidal regions pointing us to the probable sites of reconnection. A scenario for eruption is put forward by this analysis. We demonstrate the use of this topology analysis to reconcile the observed eruption features with the standard flare model. Finally, we show a glimpse of how such a NLFFF model of an erupting region can be used to initiate a CME in a global MHD code in an unprecedented realistic manner. Such simulations can show the effects of solar transients on the near-Earth environment and solar system space weather.

  13. Asia Section. Regional Activities Division. Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Two papers on library and information activities in developing nations, particularly in India and other Asian countries, were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "IFLA in Asia: A Review of the Work of the Regional Section for Asia," Edward Lim Huck Tee (Malaysia) describes the low level of…

  14. Regional Intestinal Permeability in Dogs: Biopharmaceutical Aspects for Development of Oral Modified-Release Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, David; Roos, Carl; Johansson, Pernilla; Lundqvist, Anders; Tannergren, Christer; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Sjögren, Erik; Lennernäs, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The development of oral modified-release (MR) dosage forms requires an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) with a sufficiently high absorption rate in both the small and large intestine. Dogs are commonly used in preclinical evaluation of regional intestinal absorption and in the development of novel MR dosage forms. This study determined regional intestinal effective permeability (Peff) in dogs with the aim to improve regional Peff prediction in humans. Four model drugs, atenolol, enalaprilat, metoprolol, and ketoprofen, were intravenously and regionally dosed twice as a solution into the proximal small intestine (P-SI) and large intestine (LI) of three dogs with intestinal stomas. Based on plasma data from two separate study occasions for each dog, regional Peff values were calculated using a validated intestinal deconvolution method. The determined mean Peff values were 0.62, 0.14, 1.06, and 3.66 × 10(-4) cm/s in the P-SI, and 0.13, 0.02, 1.03, and 2.20 × 10(-4) cm/s in the LI, for atenolol, enalaprilat, metoprolol, and ketoprofen, respectively. The determined P-SI Peff values in dog were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.98) to the historically directly determined human jejunal Peff after a single-pass perfusion. The determined dog P-SI Peff values were also successfully implemented in GI-Sim to predict the risk for overestimation of LI absorption of low permeability drugs. We conclude that the dog intestinal stoma model is a useful preclinical tool for determination of regional intestinal permeability. Still, further studies are recommended to evaluate additional APIs, sources of variability, and formulation types, for more accurate determination of the dog model in the drug development process. PMID:27500599

  15. Magnetic helicity in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.; Hayashi, K.; Sun, X.; Schuck, P. W.

    2014-04-10

    Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study magnetic helicity injection into the corona in emerging active regions (ARs) and examine the hemispheric helicity rule. In every region studied, photospheric shearing motion contributes most of the helicity accumulated in the corona. In a sample of 28 emerging ARs, 17 follow the hemisphere rule (61% ± 18% at a 95% confidence interval). Magnetic helicity and twist in 25 ARs (89% ± 11%) have the same sign. The maximum magnetic twist, which depends on the size of an AR, is inferred in a sample of 23 emerging ARs with a bipolar magnetic field configuration.

  16. Supergranule Diffusion and Active Region Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2004-01-01

    Models of the Sun's magnetic dynamo include turbulent diffusion to parameterize the effects of convective motions on the evolution of the Sun's magnetic field. Supergranules are known to dominate the evolution of the surface magnetic field structure as evidenced by the structure of both the active and quiet magnetic network. However, estimates for the dif hivity attributed to su perymules differ by an order of magnitude from about 100 km sup2/s to more than 1000 km sup2/s. We examine this question of the e i v i t y using three merent approaches. 1) We study the decay of more than 30,000 active regions by determining the rate of change in the sunspot area of each active region from day-to-day. 2) We study the decay of a single isolated active region near the time of solar minimum by examining the magnetic field evolution over five solar rotations fiom SOHOMDI magnetograms obtained at 96-minute intervals. 3) We study the characteristics of supergranules that influence the estimates of their diffusive properties - flow speeds and lifetimes as functions of size - fiom SOHO/MDI Dopplergrams.

  17. Active region evolution in the chromosphere and transtition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shine, R. A.; Schrijver, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    Images in the C IV 1548 A and the Si II 1526 S lines taken with the ultraviolet spectrometer polarimeter (UVSP) instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite were combined into movies showing the evolution of active regions and the neighboring supergranulation over several days. The data sets generally consist of 240 by 240 arc second rasters with 3 arc second pixels taken one per orbit (about every 90 minutes). The images are projected on a latitude/longitude grid to remove the forshortening as the region rotates across the solar disk and further processed to remove jitter and gain variations. Movies were made with and without differential rotation. Although there are occasional missing orbits, these series do not suffer from the long nighttime gaps that occur in observations taken at a single groundbased observatory and are excellent for studying changes on time scales of several hours. The longest sequence processed to date runs from 20 Oct. 1980 to 25 Oct. 1980. This was taken during an SMM flare buildup study on AR 2744. Several shorter sequences taken in 1980 and 1984 will also be shown. The results will be presented on a video disk which can be interactively controlled to view the movies.

  18. Solar luminosity fluctuations and active region photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.A.; Herzog, A.D.; Lawrence, J.K.; Shelton, J.C.

    1984-07-15

    We present monochromatic observations, obtained with a 512 element diode array, of the irradiance fluctuations of the sunspots and faculae of an active region during its disk transit in 1982 August. Bolometric and stray light corrections are approximately equal in magnitude but opposite in sign, so they have not been applied. The maximum sunspot fluctuation, as a fraction of the quiet-Sun irradiance, is -800 parts per million (ppm). Faculae have a maximum irradiance fluctuation of about +200 ppm near the limbs. We find that the facular energy excess is more than 50% of the sunspot energy deficit, which is -5.8 x 10/sup 35/ ergs. These observations show that faculae are an important element in active region energy balance.

  19. Pu-238 fuel form activities, June 1-30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-18

    This monthly report for Pu-238 Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF Pu-238 Fuel Form Production Processes and SRL Pu-238 Fuel Form Research and Development. The program status, budget information, and milestone information are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structures (WBS) for this program is outlined. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  20. Active Tectonics And Modern Geodynamics Of Sub-Yerevan Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanesyan, M.

    2004-05-01

    The given work is dedicated to active tectonics and modern geodynamics of Sub-Yerevan region. This region is interesting as a one of regions with maximal seismic activity in Armenia. The high level of seismic risk of this region is conditioned by high level of seismic hazard, high density of the population, as well as presence of objects of special importance and industrial capacities. The modern structure of Sub-Yerevan region and the adjacent area, as well as the Caucasus entirely, has mosaic-block appearance, typical for collision zone of Arabian and Eurasian plates. Distinctively oriented active faults of various ranges and morphological types are distinguished. These faults, in their turn, form various-scale active blocks of the Earth's crust and their movement defines seismic activity of the region. The researches show, that all strong earthquakes in the region were caused by movements by newest and activated ancient faults. In order to reveal the character of Earth's crust active blocks movement, separation of high gradients of horizontal and vertical movements and definition of stress fields highest concentration regions by GPS observations, high-accuracy leveling and study of earthquake focal mechanisms a new seismotectonic model is developed, which represents a combination of tectonic structure, seismic data, newest and modern movements. On the basis of comparison and analysis of these data zones with potential maximal seismic hazard are separated. The zone of joint of Azat-Sevan active and Yerevan abysmal faults is the most active on the territory of Sub-Yerevan region. The directions relatively the Earth's crust movement in the zones of horizontal and vertical movement gradients lead to conclusion, that Aragats-Tsakhkunian and Gegam active blocks undergo clockwise rotation. This means, that additional concentration of stress must be observed in block corners, that is confirmed by location of strong earthquakes sources. Thus, on the North 1988 Spitak (M

  1. Form-Focused Discovery Activities in English Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogeyik, Muhlise Cosgun

    2011-01-01

    Form-focused discovery activities allow language learners to grasp various aspects of a target language by contributing implicit knowledge by using discovered explicit knowledge. Moreover, such activities can assist learners to perceive and discover the features of their language input. In foreign language teaching environments, they can be used…

  2. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  3. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  4. Solar irradiance variations due to active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, L.; Schatten, K.H.; Sofia, S.

    1982-05-15

    We have been able to reproduce the variations of the solar irradiance observed by ACRIM to an accuracy of better than +- 0.4 W m/sup -2/, assuming that during the 6 month observation period in 1980 the solar luminosity was constant. The improvement over previous attempts is primarily due to the inclusion of faculae. The reproduction scheme uses simple geometrical data on spot and facula areas, and conventional parameters for the respective fluxes and angular dependencies. The quality of reproduction is not very sensitive to most of the details of these parameters; nevertheless, there conventional parameters cannot be very different from their actual values in the solar atmosphere. It is interesting that the time average of the integrated excess emission (over directions) of the faculae cancels out the integrated deficit produced by the spots, within an accuracy of about 10%. If this behavior were maintained over longer periods of time, say, on the order of an activity cycle, active regions could be viewed as a kind of lighthouse where the energy deficit near the normal direction, associated with the spots, is primarily reemitted close to the tangential directions by the faculae. The currently available data suggest that energy ''storage'' associated with the redirection of flux near active regions on the Sun is comparable to the lifetime of the faculae.

  5. Two New SiO Maser Sources in High-Mass Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Se-Hyung; Yun, Youngjoo; Kim, Jaeheon; Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae; Choi, Minho

    2016-08-01

    Silicon monoxide (SiO) masers are rare in star-forming regions, with the exception of five known SiO maser sources. However, we detected two new SiO maser sources from infrared-loud clumps of the high-mass star-forming regions G19.61‑0.23 and G75.78+0.34. High angular resolution observations toward G19.61‑0.23 suggest that the deeply embedded young stellar object (YSO) of SMA1 is powering the SiO masers. In addition, the SiO v = 1, J = 1 \\to 0 line shows four spike features, while the v = 2 maser shows combined features of one spike and broad wing components, implying energetic activities of the YSO of SMA1 in the G19.61‑0.23 hot molecular core. The SiO v = 0, J = 2 \\to 1 emission shows bipolar outflows in the NE–SW direction with respect to the center of the SiO maser source. A high angular resolution map of the SiO v = 1, J = 2 \\to 1 maser in G75.78+0.34 shows that the SiO maser is associated with the CORE source at the earliest stage of high-mass star formation. Therefore, the newly detected SiO masers and their associated outflows will provide good probes for investigating this early high-mass star formation.

  6. Observations of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W. G.; Tang, Y. H.; Fang, C.; Xu, A. A.

    An active region filament was well observed on September 4, 2002 with THEMIS at the Teide observatory and SOHO/MDI. The full Stokes parameters of the filament were obtained in Hα and FeI 6302 Å lines. Using the data, we have studied the fine structure of the filament and obtained the parameters at the barb endpoints, including intensity, velocity and longitudinal magnetic field. Our results indicate: (a) the Doppler velocities are quiet different at barb endpoints; (b) the longitudinal magnetic fields at the barb endpoints are very weak; (c) there is a strong magnetic field structure under the filament spine.

  7. The complex high-mass star-forming region IRAS 15507-5359

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persi, P.; Tapia, M.; Roth, M.; Elia, D.; López-Vázquez, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    The far-infrared IRAS 15507-5359 source is known to be a medium-mass star-forming region associated with a compact H II region and a near-infrared embedded cluster. We present a survey of infrared-calibrated images ranging from 1.2 to 500 μm obtained with the Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Herschel space telescope with additional archive Spitzer data. We confirm the distance to the complex to be 5.0 kpc. Three Herschel far-infrared sources are found, I, II, III, identified with dense cores at different evolutionary stages. One (III) is a starless infrared dark cloud showing, near its edge, two infrared reflection nebulae (R1) and (R2) with dispersed young stellar populations, including a knot of shocked H2 line emission. Both show considerable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission. Core II has associated a radio H II region and a deeply embedded one-million-year-old cluster (Cl 1) that contains more than 45 young stellar objects, reddened by at least 20 visual magnitudes. About 20 per cent of them show considerable infrared excess emission. Core I appears void of a near-infrared population, and coincides with a long emission bar that resembles a photodissociation front. We determine the properties of the two most luminous Class I sources in the region by fitting models of young stars with accreting discs and envelopes to their 1-500 μm spectral energy distributions. This is another example of a medium-mass region with at least three well-defined active centres of star formation separated by about 1 pc and at different evolutionary stages.

  8. Pederson Current Dissipation In Emerging Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Pederson current dissipation in emerging active regions. Certain regions of the solar atmosphere, such as the photosphere and chromosphere, as well as prominences, contain a significant amount of neutral atoms, and a complete description of the plasma requires including the effects of partial ionization. In the chromosphere the dissipation of Pederson currents is important for the evolution of emerging magnetic fields. Due to the relatively high number density in the chromosphere, the ion-neutral collision time-scale is much smaller than timescales associated with flux emergence. Hence we use a single-fluid approach to model the partially ionized plasma. Looking at both the emergence of large-scale sub-surface structures, and the emergence and reconnection of undulatory fields, we investigate the effect of Pederson current dissipation on the state of the emerging field, on magnetic reconnection and on dissipative heating of the atmosphere. Specifically we examine the effect of motions across fieldlines in the partially ionized regions, and how this can increase the free energy supplied to the corona by flux emergence. We also look at reconnection associated with flux emergence in the partially ionized atmosphere, and how this can account for observed small-scale brightenings (Ellerman Bombs).

  9. HEROES Observations of a Quiescent Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Christe, S.; Gaskin, J.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) observations of solar flares reveal the signatures of energetic electrons, and HXR images with high dynamic range and high sensitivity can distinguish between where electrons are accelerated and where they stop. Even in the non-flaring corona, high-sensitivity HXR measurements may be able to detect the presence of electron acceleration. The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) balloon mission added the capability of solar observations to an existing astrophysics balloon payload, HERO, which used grazing-incidence optics for direct HXR imaging. HEROES measures HXR emission from ~20 to ~75 keV with an angular resolution of 33" HPD. HEROES launched on 2013 September 21 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, and had a successful one-day flight. We present the detailed analysis of the 7-hour observation of AR 11850, which sets new upper limits on the HXR emission from a quiescent active region, with corresponding constraints on the numbers of tens of keV energetic electrons present. Using the imaging capability of HEROES, HXR upper limits are also obtained for the quiet Sun surrounding the active region. We also discuss what can be achieved with new and improved HXR instrumentation on balloons.

  10. A CO LINE AND INFRARED CONTINUUM STUDY OF THE ACTIVE STAR-FORMING COMPLEX W51

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Miju; Lee, Youngung; Choi, Minho; Bieging, John H.; Kulesa, Craig A.; Peters, William L.

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of an extensive observational study of the active star-forming complex W51 that was observed in the J = 2 - 1 transition of the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO molecules over a 1.{sup 0}25 x 1.{sup 0}00 region with the University of Arizona Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. We use a statistical equilibrium code to estimate physical properties of the molecular gas. We compare the molecular cloud morphology with the distribution of infrared (IR) and radio continuum sources and find associations between molecular clouds and young stellar objects (YSOs) listed in Spitzer IR catalogs. The ratios of CO lines associated with H II regions are different from the ratios outside the active star-forming regions. We present evidence of star formation triggered by the expansion of the H II regions and by cloud-cloud collisions. We estimate that about 1% of the cloud mass is currently in YSOs.

  11. A CO Line and Infrared Continuum Study of the Active Star-forming Complex W51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Miju; Bieging, John H.; Kulesa, Craig A.; Lee, Youngung; Choi, Minho; Peters, William L.

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of an extensive observational study of the active star-forming complex W51 that was observed in the J = 2 - 1 transition of the 12CO and 13CO molecules over a 1fdg25 × 1fdg00 region with the University of Arizona Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. We use a statistical equilibrium code to estimate physical properties of the molecular gas. We compare the molecular cloud morphology with the distribution of infrared (IR) and radio continuum sources and find associations between molecular clouds and young stellar objects (YSOs) listed in Spitzer IR catalogs. The ratios of CO lines associated with H II regions are different from the ratios outside the active star-forming regions. We present evidence of star formation triggered by the expansion of the H II regions and by cloud-cloud collisions. We estimate that about 1% of the cloud mass is currently in YSOs.

  12. The Role of Grain Surface Reactions in the Chemistry of Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Roberge, W. G.

    1998-01-01

    The importance of reactions at the surfaces of dust grains has long been recognized to be one of the two main chemical processes that form molecules in cold, dark interstellar clouds where simple, saturated (fully-hydrogenated) molecules such as H2 water, methanol, H2CO, H2S, ammonia and CH4 are present in quantities far too high to be consistent with their extremely low gas phase formation rates. In cold dark regions of interstellar space, dust grains provide a substrate onto which gas-phase species can accrete and react. Grains provide a "third body" or a sink for the energy released in the exothermic reactions that form chemical bonds. In essence, the surfaces of dust grains open up alternative reaction pathways to form observed molecules whose abundances cannot be explained with gas-phase chemistry alone. This concept is taken one step further in this work: instead of merely acting as a substrate onto which radicals and molecules may physically adsorb, some grains may actively participate in the reaction itself, forming chemical bonds with the accreting species. Until recently, surface chemical reactions had not been thought to be important in warm circumstellar media because adspecies rapidly desorb from grains at very low temperatures; thus, the residence times of molecules and radicals on the surface of grains at all but the lowest temperatures are far too short to allow these reactions to occur. However, if the adspecies could adsorb more strongly, via a true chemical bond with surfaces of some dust grains, then grain surface reactions will play an important role in warm circumstellar regions as well. In this work, the surface-catalyzed reaction CO + 3 H2 yields CH4 + H2O is studied in the context that it may be very effective at converting the inorganic molecule CO into the simplest organic compound, methane. H2 and CO are the most abundant molecules in space, and the reaction converting them to methane, while kinetically inhibited in the gas phase under

  13. Class I methanol masers in low-mass star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskii, S. V.; Kurtz, S.; Bergman, P.

    2013-02-01

    Results of observations of Class I methanol masers in regions of low-mass star formation (MMIL) are summarized and analyzed. Four masers were detected at 44, 84, and 95 GHz towards "chemically active" bipolar outflows in the low-mass star-forming regions NGC1333 I4A, NGC 1333 I2A, HH 25, and L1157. Another maser was found at 36 GHz towards a similar outflow in NGC 2023. Thus, all the detected MMILs are associated with chemically active outflows. The brightness temperatures of the strongest 44-GHz maser spots in NGC 1333 I4A, HH 25, and L1157 exceed 2000 K, whereas the brightness temperature in NGC 1333 I2A is only 176 K, although a rotational-diagram analysis shows that this last source is also amaser. The flux densities of the newly detectedmasers are no higher than 18 Jy, and are much lower than those of strong masers in regions of high-mass star formation (MMIH). The MMIL luminosities match the maser luminosity-protostar luminosity relation established earlier for MMIHs. No MMIL variability was detected in 2004-2011. The radial velocities of the newly detected masers are close to the systemic velocities of the associated regions, except for NGC 2023, where the maser radial velocity is lower than the systemic velocity by approximately 3.5 km/s. Thus, the main MMILproperties are similar to those of MMIHs. MMILs are likely to be an extension of the MMIH population toward lower luminosities of both the masers and the associated young stellar objects. The results of VLA observations of MMILs can be explained using a turbulent-cloud model, which predicts that compact maser spots can arise in extended sources because the coherence lengths along some directions randomly appear to be longer than the mean coherence length in a turbulent velocity field. However, one must assume that the column density of methanol towardM1, the strongest maser in L1157, is appreciably higher than the mean column density of the clump B0a where the maser arises. The shape of the maser lines

  14. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ~65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of \

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: YSOs in 9 LMC star forming regions (Carlson+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, L. R.; Sewilo, M.; Meixner, M.; Romita, K. A.; Lawton, B.

    2012-04-01

    We introduce a new set of selection criteria for the identification of infrared bright young stellar object (YSO) candidates and apply them to nine HII regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), focusing particularly on lower mass candidates missed by most surveys. Data are from the Spitzer Space Telescope legacy program SAGE (Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution; Meixner et al. 2006, Cat. J/AJ/132/2268, see also II/305), combined with optical photometry from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS; Zaritsky et al. 1997AJ....114.1002Z) and near-infrared photometry from the InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF; Kato et al. 2007, Cat. II/288). We choose regions of diverse physical size, star formation rates (SFRs), and ages. We also cover a wide range of locations and surrounding environments in the LMC. These active star-forming regions are LHA 120-N 11, N 44, N 51, N 105, N 113, N 120, N 144, N 160, and N 206. Some have been well-studied (e.g., N11, N44, N160) in the past, while others (e.g., N51, N144) have received little attention. We identify 1045 YSO candidates, including 918 never before identified and 127 matching previous candidate lists. We characterize the evolutionary stage and physical properties of each candidate using the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitter of Robitaille et al. (2007ApJS..169..328R) and estimate mass functions and SFRs for each region. (4 data files).

  16. Identifying young stellar objects in nine Large Magellanic Cloud star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, L. R.; Sewiło, M.; Meixner, M.; Romita, K. A.; Lawton, B.

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a new set of selection criteria for the identification of infrared bright young stellar object (YSO) candidates and apply them to nine Hii regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), focusing particularly on lower mass candidates missed by most surveys. Data are from the Spitzer Space Telescope legacy program SAGE (Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution; Meixner et al. 2006, AJ, 132, 2268), combined with optical photometry from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS; Zaritsky et al. 1997, AJ, 114, 1002) and near-infrared photometry from the InfraRed Survey Facility (IRSF; Kato et al. 2007, PASJ, 59, 615). We choose regions of diverse physical size, star formation rates (SFRs), and ages. We also cover a wide range of locations and surrounding environments in the LMC. These active star-forming regions are LHA 120-N 11, N 44, N 51, N 105, N 113, N 120, N 144, N 160, and N 206. Some have been well-studied (e.g., N11, N44, N160) in the past, while others (e.g., N51, N144) have received little attention. We identify 1045 YSO candidates, including 918 never before identified and 127 matching previous candidate lists. We characterize the evolutionary stage and physical properties of each candidate using the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitter of Robitaille et al. (2007, ApJS, 169, 328) and estimate mass functions and SFRs for each region. Full Tables 1-3, 5 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/542/A66

  17. FIP bias in a sigmoidal active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in an anemone active region (AR) - coronal hole (CH) complex using an abundance map derived from Hinode/EIS spectra. The detailed, spatially resolved abundance map has a large field of view covering 359'' × 485''. Plasma with high FIP bias, or coronal abundances, is concentrated at the footpoints of the AR loops whereas the surrounding CH has a low FIP bias, ~1, i.e. photospheric abundances. A channel of low FIP bias is located along the AR's main polarity inversion line containing a filament where ongoing flux cancellation is observed, indicating a bald patch magnetic topology characteristic of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  18. Functional Specificity of the Visual Word Form Area: General Activation for Words and Symbols but Specific Network Activation for Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Karen; Fernandes, Myra; Schwindt, Graeme; O'Craven, Kathleen; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2008-01-01

    The functional specificity of the brain region known as the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA) was examined using fMRI. We explored whether this area serves a general role in processing symbolic stimuli, rather than being selective for the processing of words. Brain activity was measured during a visual 1-back task to English words, meaningful symbols…

  19. Three dimensional structures of solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Three dimensional structure of an active region is determined from observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 2, 6, and 20 cm. This region exhibits a single magnetic loop of length approx. 10 to the 10th power cm. The 2 cm radiation is mostly thermal bremsstrahlung and originates from the footpoints of the loop. The 6 and 20 cm radiation is dominated by the low harmonic gyroresonance radiation and originates from the upper portion of the legs or the top of the loop. The loop broadens toward the apex. The top of the loop is not found to be the hottest point, but two temperature maxima on either side of the loop apex are observed, which is consistent with the model proposed for long loops. From 2 and 6 cm observations it can be concluded that the electron density and temperature cannot be uniform in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the loop; the density should decrease away from the axis of the loop.

  20. Multiple Wavelength Observations of Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    The radio emission of quiescent active regions at 6 cm wavelength marks the legs of magnetic dipoles, and the emission at 20 cm wavelength delineates the radio wavelength counterpart of the coronal loops previously detected at X-ray wavelengths. At both wavelengths the temperatures have coronal values of a few million degrees. The polarization of the radio emission specifies the structure and strength of the coronal magnetic field (H ≈ 600 Gauss at heights h ≈ 4 x 109 cm above sunspot umbrae). At 6 cm and 20 cm wavelength the solar bursts have angular sizes between 5" and 30", brightness temperatures between 2 x 107 K and 2 x 108 K, and degrees of circular polarization between 10% and 90%. The location of the burst energy release is specified with second-of-arc accuracy. At radio wavelengths the bursts occur within the central regions of magnetic loops, while the flaring Ha kernels are located at the loop footpoints. Coronal loops exhibit enhanced radio emission (preburst heating) a few minutes before the release of burst energy. The radio polarization data indicate magnetic changes before and during solar bursts.

  1. 76 FR 22675 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Pacific Islands Region Permit Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... Islands Region Permit Family of Forms AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA...) Pacific Islands Region (PIR) manages the U.S. Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the...: Regular submission. Affected Public: Business or other for-profit organizations; individuals or...

  2. 76 FR 17839 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Permit Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ...--Permit Transfer, Notification Harvest Activity-- Aquaculture Live Rock, Request for Octocoral or... Form, South Atlantic Golden Crab Vessel Form, Colombian Treaty Vessel Form, Aquaculture Live Rock Site... minutes; Aquaculture Live Rock Site Evaluation Report, 45 minutes; Rock Shrimp Vessel Operator Permit...

  3. The role of energetic processing on solid-phase chemistry in star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, M. E.; Urso, R. G.; Kaňuchová, Z.; Scirè, C.; Accolla, M.; Baratta, G. A.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-05-01

    It is generally accepted that complex molecules observed in star forming regions are formed in the solid phase on icy grain mantles and are released to the gas-phase after desorption of icy mantles. Most of our knowledge on the physical and chemical properties of ices in star forming regions is based on the comparison between observations and laboratory experiments performed at low temperature (10-100 K). Here we present some recent laboratory experiments which show the formation of (complex) molecular species after ion bombardment of simple ices.

  4. Young open clusters in the Galactic star forming region NGC 6357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massi, F.; Giannetti, A.; Di Carlo, E.; Brand, J.; Beltrán, M. T.; Marconi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Context. NGC 6357 is an active star forming region with very young massive open clusters. These clusters contain some of the most massive stars in the Galaxy and strongly interact with nearby giant molecular clouds. Aims: We study the young stellar populations of the region and of the open cluster Pismis 24, focusing on their relationship with the nearby giant molecular clouds. We seek evidence of triggered star formation "propagating" from the clusters. Methods: We used new deep JHKs photometry, along with unpublished deep Spitzer/IRAC mid-infrared photometry, complemented with optical HST/WFPC2 high spatial resolution photometry and X-ray Chandra observations, to constrain age, initial mass function, and star formation modes in progress. We carefully examine and discuss all sources of bias (saturation, confusion, different sensitivities, extinction). Results: NGC 6357 hosts three large young stellar clusters, of which Pismis 24 is the most prominent. We found that Pismis 24 is a very young (~1-3 Myr) open cluster with a Salpeter-like initial mass function and a few thousand members. A comparison between optical and infrared photometry indicates that the fraction of members with a near-infrared excess (i.e., with a circumstellar disk) is in the range 0.3-0.6, consistent with its photometrically derived age. We also find that Pismis 24 is likely subdivided into a few different subclusters, one of which contains almost all the massive members. There are indications of current star formation triggered by these massive stars, but clear age trends could not be derived (although the fraction of stars with a near-infrared excess does increase towards the Hii region associated with the cluster). The gas out of which Pismis 24 formed must have been distributed in dense clumps within a cloud of less dense gas ~1 pc in radius. Conclusions: Our findings provide some new insight into how young stellar populations and massive stars emerge, and evolve in the first few Myr after

  5. 75 FR 51093 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-864, Form I-864A, Form I-864EZ, and Form I-864W...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... on May 12, 2010, at 75 FR 26782, allowing for a 60-day public comment period. USCIS received 2... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-864.... Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following information collection...

  6. 75 FR 26782 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-864, Form I-864A, Form I-864EZ, and Form I-864W...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-864... Exemption; OMB Control No. 1615-0075. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration...-864W; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  7. Photometric and spectroscopic studies of star-forming regions within Wolf-Rayet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, M. Chrisphin; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Sahu, D. K.; Sanwal, B. B.; Bisht, Shuchi

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the properties of star-forming regions within a sample of seven Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies. We analyse their morphologies, colours, star-formation rates (SFRs), metallicities and stellar populations, combining broad-band and narrow-band photometry with low-resolution optical spectroscopy. The UBVRI observations were made with the 2-m HCT (Himalayan Chandra Telescope) and 1-m ARIES telescope. The spectroscopic data were obtained using the Hanle Faint Object Spectrograph Camera (HFOSC) mounted on the 2-m HCT. The observed galaxies are NGC 1140, IRAS 07164+5301, NGC 3738, UM 311, NGC 6764, NGC 4861 and NGC 3003. The optical spectra were used to search for the faint WR features, to confirm that the ionization of the gas is caused by the massive stars, and to quantify the oxygen abundance of each galaxy using several independent empirical calibrations. We detected broad features originating in WR stars in NGC 1140 and 4861 and used them to derive the massive star populations. For these two galaxies we also derived the oxygen abundance using a direct estimation of the electron temperature of the ionized gas. The N/O ratio in NGC 4861 is ˜0.25-0.35 dex higher than expected, which may be a consequence of the chemical pollution by N-rich material released by WR stars. Using our Hα images we identified tens of star-forming regions within these galaxies, for which we derived the SFR. Our Hα-based SFR usually agrees with the SFR computed using the far-infrared and the radio-continuum flux. For all regions we found that the most recent star-formation event is 3-6 Myr old. We used the optical broad-band colours in combination with Starburst99 models to estimate the internal reddening and the age of the dominant underlying stellar population within all these regions. Knots in NGC 3738, 6764 and 3003 generally show the presence of an important old (400-1000 Myr) stellar population. However, the optical colours are not able to detect stars older than 20

  8. THE EVOLUTION OF DARK CANOPIES AROUND ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Robbrecht, E.; Muglach, K. E-mail: eva.robbrecht@oma.be

    2011-05-20

    As observed in spectral lines originating from the chromosphere, transition region, and low corona, active regions are surrounded by an extensive 'circumfacular' area which is darker than the quiet Sun. We examine the properties of these dark moat- or canopy-like areas using Fe IX 17.1 nm images and line-of-sight magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The 17.1 nm canopies consist of fibrils (horizontal fields containing extreme-ultraviolet-absorbing chromospheric material) clumped into featherlike structures. The dark fibrils initially form a quasiradial or vortical pattern as the low-lying field lines fanning out from the emerging active region connect to surrounding network and intranetwork elements of opposite polarity. The area occupied by the 17.1 nm fibrils expands as supergranular convection causes the active-region flux to spread into the background medium; the outer boundary of the dark canopy stabilizes where the diffusing flux encounters a unipolar region of opposite sign. The dark fibrils tend to accumulate in regions of weak longitudinal field and to become rooted in mixed-polarity flux. To explain the latter observation, we note that the low-lying fibrils are more likely to interact with small loops associated with weak, opposite-polarity flux elements in close proximity, than with high loops anchored inside strong unipolar network flux. As a result, the 17.1 nm fibrils gradually become concentrated around the large-scale polarity inversion lines (PILs), where most of the mixed-polarity flux is located. Systematic flux cancellation, assisted by rotational shearing, removes the field component transverse to the PIL and causes the fibrils to coalesce into long PIL-aligned filaments.

  9. Hinode Observations of an Eruption from a Sigmoidal Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, L. M.; Wallace, A. J.; Kliem, B.

    2012-08-01

    We analyse the evolution of a bipolar active region which produces an eruption during its decay phase. The soft X-ray arcade develops high shear over a time span of two days and transitions to sigmoidal shortly before the eruption. We propose that the continuous sigmoidal soft X-ray threads indicate that a flux rope has formed which is lying low in the solar atmosphere with a bald patch separatrix surface topology. The formation of the flux rope is driven by the photospheric evolution which is dominated by fragmentation of the main polarities, motion due to supergranular flows and cancellation at the polarity inversion line.

  10. Substrate-emitting semiconductor laser with a trapezoidal active region

    SciTech Connect

    Dikareva, N V; Nekorkin, S M; Karzanova, M V; Zvonkov, B N; Aleshkin, V Ya; Dubinov, A A; Afonenko, A A

    2014-04-28

    Semiconductor lasers with a narrow (∼2°) directional pattern in the planes both parallel and perpendicular to the p–n junction are fabricated. To achieve a low radiation divergence in the p–n junction plane, the active region in this plane was designed in the form of a trapezium. The narrow directional pattern in the plane perpendicular to the p–n junction was ensured by the use of a leaky mode, through which more than 90% of laser power was coupled out. (lasers)

  11. Emission Measure Distribution and Heating of Two Active Region Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode, we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions. Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emission measure distributions having an approximate power-law form EM/T(exp 2.4) from log T = 5.55 up to a peak at log T = 6.57. The observations are explained extremely well by a simple nanoflare model. However, in the absence of additional constraints, the observations could possibly also be explained by steady heating.

  12. Multiple forms of acid phosphatase activity in Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J P; Peters, S P; Glew, R H; Lee, R E; McCafferty, L R; Mercer, D W; Wenger, D A

    1978-07-01

    Although the primary genetic defect in all individuals with Gaucher's disease is a deficiency in glucocerebrosidase activity, the finding of marked elevations in splenic and serum acid phosphatase activity is almost as consistent a finding. Gaucher spleen and serum contain at least two forms of acid phosphatase that can be readily separated by chromatography on columns containing the cation exchange resin Sulphopropyl Sephadex. The major species of acid phosphatase (designated SP-I) contained in Triton X-100 (1% v/v) extracts of Gaucher spleen accounts for 65%--95% of the total activity and has the following properties: (1) it does not bind to the cation exchange column; (2) it exhibitis a pH optimum of 4.5--5.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride (15 mM), L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM), and beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The minor acid phosphatase activity (designated SP-II) present in extracts of Gaucher spleen has properties similar to those of the major species of acid phosphatase activity contained in serum from patients with Gaucher's disease: (1) it binds firmly to cation exchange columns (eluted by 0.5 M sodium chloride); (2) it exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0--6.0; (3) it is inhibited by sodium fluoride and sodium dithionite; and (4) it is resistant to inhibition by beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M) and L(+)-tartaric acid (20 mM). In addition, a second form of acid phosphatase that is tartrate resistant was found to be elevated in Gaucher serum. This form of serum acid phosphatase did not bind to Sulphopropyl Sephadex, was found to be significantly resistant to beta-mercaptoethanol (2.1 M), and was only partially inhibited by sodium dithionite (10 mM). The findings reported here indicate that at least three distinct forms of acid phosphatase activity are elevated in Gaucher's disease. Furthermore, the minor acid phosphatase activity contained in spleen homogenates has properties very similar to

  13. Armenia as a Regional Centre for Astronomy for Development activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A.

    2015-03-01

    The Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (BAO, Armenia, http://www.bao.am) are among the candidate IAU Regional Nodes for Astronomy for Development activities. It is one of the main astronomical centers of the former Soviet Union and the Middle East region. At present there are 48 qualified researchers at BAO, including six Doctors of Science and 30 PhDs. Five important observational instruments are installed at BAO, the larger ones being 2.6m Cassegrain (ZTA-2.6) and 1m Schmidt (the one that provided the famous Markarian survey). BAO is regarded as a national scientific-educational center, where a number of activities are being organized, such as: international conferences (4 IAU symposia and 1 IAU colloquium, JENAM-2007, etc.), small workshops and discussions, international summer schools (1987, 2006, 2008 and 2010), and Olympiads. BAO collaborates with scientists from many countries. The Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS, http://www.aras.am/) is an NGO founded in 2001; it has 93 members and it is rather active in the organization of educational, amateur, popular, promotional and other matters. The Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO, http://www.aras.am/Arvo/arvo.htm) is one of the 17 national VO projects forming the International Virtual Observatories Alliance (IVOA) and is the only VO project in the region serving also for educational purposes. A number of activities are planned, such as management, coordination and evaluation of the IAU programs in the area of development and education, establishment of the new IAU endowed lectureship program and organization of seminars and public lectures, coordination and initiation of fundraising activities for astronomy development, organization of regional scientific symposia, conferences and workshops, support to Galileo Teacher Training Program (GTTP), production/publication of educational and promotional materials, etc.

  14. The Life Cycle of Active Region Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Thompson, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a contemporary view of how solar active region magnetic fields are understood to be generated, transported and dispersed. Empirical trends of active region properties that guide model development are discussed. Physical principles considered important for active region evolution are introduced and advances in modeling are reviewed.

  15. NEAR-INFRARED CIRCULAR POLARIZATION SURVEY IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS: CORRELATIONS AND TRENDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Hough, James H.; Lucas, Phil W.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kandori, Ryo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2014-11-01

    We have conducted a systematic near-infrared circular polarization (CP) survey in star-forming regions, covering high-mass, intermediate-mass, and low-mass young stellar objects. All the observations were made using the SIRPOL imaging polarimeter on the Infrared Survey Facility 1.4 m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory. We present the polarization properties of 10 sub-regions in 6 star-forming regions. The polarization patterns, extents, and maximum degrees of linear and circular polarizations are used to determine the prevalence and origin of CP in the star-forming regions. Our results show that the CP pattern is quadrupolar in general, the CP regions are extensive, up to 0.65 pc, the CP degrees are high, up to 20%, and the CP degrees decrease systematically from high- to low-mass young stellar objects. The results are consistent with dichroic extinction mechanisms generating the high degrees of CP in star-forming regions.

  16. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2010-09-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

  17. Thrombomodulin Binding Selects the Catalytically Active Form of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Handley, Lindsey D; Treuheit, Nicholas A; Venkatesh, Varun J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Human α-thrombin is a serine protease with dual functions. Thrombin acts as a procoagulant, cleaving fibrinogen to make the fibrin clot, but when bound to thrombomodulin (TM), it acts as an anticoagulant, cleaving protein C. A minimal TM fragment consisting of the fourth, fifth, and most of the sixth EGF-like domain (TM456m) that has been prepared has much improved solubility, thrombin binding capacity, and anticoagulant activity versus those of previous TM456 constructs. In this work, we compare backbone amide exchange of human α-thrombin in three states: apo, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK)-bound, and TM456m-bound. Beyond causing a decreased level of amide exchange at their binding sites, TM and PPACK both cause a decreased level of amide exchange in other regions including the γ-loop and the adjacent N-terminus of the heavy chain. The decreased level of amide exchange in the N-terminus of the heavy chain is consistent with the historic model of activation of serine proteases, which involves insertion of this region into the β-barrel promoting the correct conformation of the catalytic residues. Contrary to crystal structures of thrombin, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results suggest that the conformation of apo-thrombin does not yet have the N-terminus of the heavy chain properly inserted for optimal catalytic activity, and that binding of TM allosterically promotes the catalytically active conformation. PMID:26468766

  18. Channel-Forming Activities in the Glycosomal Fraction from the Bloodstream Form of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Miinalainen, Ilkka J.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Michels, Paul A. M.; Antonenkov, Vasily D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycosomes are a specialized form of peroxisomes (microbodies) present in unicellular eukaryotes that belong to the Kinetoplastea order, such as Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, parasitic protists causing severe diseases of livestock and humans in subtropical and tropical countries. The organelles harbour most enzymes of the glycolytic pathway that is responsible for substrate-level ATP production in the cell. Glycolysis is essential for bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei and enzymes comprising this pathway have been validated as drug targets. Glycosomes are surrounded by a single membrane. How glycolytic metabolites are transported across the glycosomal membrane is unclear. Methods/Principal Findings We hypothesized that glycosomal membrane, similarly to membranes of yeast and mammalian peroxisomes, contains channel-forming proteins involved in the selective transfer of metabolites. To verify this prediction, we isolated a glycosomal fraction from bloodstream-form T.brucei and reconstituted solubilized membrane proteins into planar lipid bilayers. The electrophysiological characteristics of the channels were studied using multiple channel recording and single channel analysis. Three main channel-forming activities were detected with current amplitudes 70–80 pA, 20–25 pA, and 8–11 pA, respectively (holding potential +10 mV and 3.0 M KCl as an electrolyte). All channels were in fully open state in a range of voltages ±150 mV and showed no sub-conductance transitions. The channel with current amplitude 20–25 pA is anion-selective (PK+/PCl−∼0.31), while the other two types of channels are slightly selective for cations (PK+/PCl− ratios ∼1.15 and ∼1.27 for the high- and low-conductance channels, respectively). The anion-selective channel showed an intrinsic current rectification that may suggest a functional asymmetry of the channel's pore. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that the membrane of glycosomes apparently

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Parallaxes of high mass star forming regions (Reid+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Zheng, X. W.; Dame, T. M.; Xu, Y.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, B.; Sanna, A.; Sato, M.; Hachisuka, K.; Choi, Y. K.; Immer, K.; Moscadelli, L.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2016-04-01

    Table1 lists the parallaxes and proper motions of 103 regions of high-mass star formation measured with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) techniques, using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), the Japanese VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA; http://veraserver.mtk.nao.ac.jp) project, and the European VLBI Network (EVN). We have include three red supergiants (NML Cyg, S Per, VY CMa) as indicative of high-mass star forming regions. (2 data files).

  20. Magnetic field measurements in and above a limb active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Judge

    2013-07-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of a limb active region (NOAA 11302) obtained on September 22nd 2011 using the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Stokes profiles including lines of Si I 1028.7 nm and He I 1083 nm were obtained in three scans over a 45"x75" area. Simultaneous narrow band Ca II K and G-band intensity data were acquired with a cadence of 5s at the DST. The He I data show not only typical active region polarization signatures, but also signatures in plumes -- cool post flare loops -- which extend many Mm into the corona across the visible limb. The plumes have remarkably uniform brightness, and the plume plasma is significantly Doppler shifted as it drains from the corona. Using carefully constructed observing and calibration sequences and applying Principal Component Analysis to remove instrumental artifacts, we achieved a polarization sensitivity approaching 0.02%. With this sensitivity we attempt to diagnose the vector magnetic fields and plasma properties of chromospheric and cool coronal material in and above NOAA 11302. Inversions using various radiative transfer models in the HAZEL code are remarkably consistent with the idea that plume spectra are formed in a simple, slab-like geometry, but that the ``disk'' spectra are formed under more traditional models (Milne-Eddington). The inverted magnetic data of He I lines are compared with photospheric inversions of DST Si I and Fe I data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  1. Observations of Star-Forming Regions with the Midcourse Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Shipman, Russell F.; Price, Stephan D.; Mizuno, Donald R.; Kuchar, Thomas; Carey, Sean J.

    2003-09-01

    We have imaged seven nearby star-forming regions, the Rosette Nebula, the Orion Nebula, W3, the Pleiades, G300.2-16.8, S263, and G159.6-18.5, with the Spatial Infrared Imaging Telescope on the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite at 18" resolution at 8.3, 12.1, 14.7, and 21.3 μm. The large angular scale of the regions imaged (~7.2-50 deg2) makes these data unique in terms of the combination of size and resolution. In addition to the star-forming regions, two cirrus-free fields (MSXBG 160 and MSXBG 161) and a field near the south Galactic pole (MSXBG 239) were also imaged. Point sources have been extracted from each region, resulting in the identification over 500 new sources (i.e., no identified counterparts at other wavelengths), as well as over 1300 with prior identifications. The extended emission from the star-forming regions is described, and prominent structures are identified, particularly in W3 and Orion. The Rosette Nebula is discussed in detail. The bulk of the mid-infrared emission is consistent with that of photon-dominated regions, including the elephant trunk complex. The central clump, however, and a line of site toward the northern edge of the cavity show significantly redder colors than the rest of the Rosette complex.

  2. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  3. 13CO Survey of Northern Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Kerton, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a survey of 13CO with the OSO 20-m telescope toward 68 intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs) visible in the northern hemisphere. These regions have mostly been excluded from previous CO surveys and were selected from IRAS colors that specify cool dust and large PAH contribution. These regions are known to host stars up to, but not exceeding, about 8 solar masses. We detect 13CO in 57 of the 68 IM SFRs down to a typical RMS of ~50 mK. We present kinematic distances, minimum column densities, and minimum masses for these IM SFRs.

  4. Nucleophosmin contains amyloidogenic regions that are able to form toxic aggregates under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Concetta; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana; Cascella, Roberta; Cecchi, Cristina; Russo, Anna; Leone, Marilisa; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; Federici, Luca; Di Matteo, Adele; Chiti, Fabrizio; Vitagliano, Luigi; Marasco, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1 is a multifunctional protein involved in a variety of biologic processes and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human malignancies. To gain insight into the role of isolated fragments in NPM1 activities, we dissected the C-terminal domain (CTD) into its helical fragments. In this study, we observed the unexpected structural behavior of the peptide fragment corresponding to helix (H)2 (residues 264-277). This peptide has a strong tendency to form amyloidlike assemblies endowed with fibrillar morphology and β-sheet structure, under physiologic conditions, as shown by circular dichroism, thioflavin T, and Congo red binding assays; dynamic light scattering; and atomic force microscopy. The aggregates are also toxic to neuroblastoma cells, as determined using 3-(4;5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction and Ca(2+) influx assays. We also found that the extension of the H2 sequence beyond its N terminus, comprising the connecting loop with H1, delayed aggregation and its associated cytotoxicity, suggesting that contiguous regions of H2 have a protective role in preventing aggregation. Our findings and those in the literature suggest that the helical structures present in the CTD are important in preventing harmful aggregation. These findings could elucidate the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) caused by NPM1 mutants. Because the CTD is not properly folded in these mutants, we hypothesize that the aggregation propensity of this NPM1 region is involved in the pathogenesis of AML. Preliminary assays on NPM1-Cter-MutA, the most frequent AML-CTD mutation, revealed its significant propensity for aggregation. Thus, the aggregation phenomena should be seriously considered in studies aimed at unveiling the molecular mechanisms of this pathology.

  5. FORMATION OF CORONAL HOLES ON THE ASHES OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Karachik, Nina V.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Abramenko, Valentyna I. E-mail: apevtsov@nso.ed

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the formation of isolated non-polar coronal holes (CHs) on the remnants of decaying active regions (ARs) at the minimum/early ascending phase of sunspot activity. We follow the evolution of four bipolar ARs and measure several parameters of their magnetic fields including total flux, imbalance, and compactness. As regions decay, their leading and following polarities exhibit different dissipation rates: loose polarity tends to dissipate faster than compact polarity. As a consequence, we see a gradual increase in flux imbalance inside a dissipating bipolar region, and later a formation of a CH in place of more compact magnetic flux. Out of four cases studied in detail, two CHs had formed at the following polarity of the decaying bipolar AR, and two CHs had developed in place of the leading polarity field. All four CHs contain a significant fraction of magnetic field of their corresponding AR. Using potential field extrapolation, we show that the magnetic field lines of these CHs were closed on the polar CH at the North, which at the time of the events was in imbalance with the polar CH at the South. This topology suggests that the observed phenomenon may play an important role in transformation of toroidal magnetic field to poloidal field, which is a key step in transitioning from an old solar cycle to a new one. The timing of this observed transition may indicate the end of solar cycle 23 and the beginning of cycle 24.

  6. Active region upflows. II. Data driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.; Presmann, M.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Observations of many active regions show a slow systematic outflow/upflow from their edges lasting from hours to days. At present no physical explanation has been proven, while several suggestions have been put forward. Aims: This paper investigates one possible method for maintaining these upflows assuming, that convective motions drive the magnetic field to initiate them through magnetic reconnection. Methods: We use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data to provide an initial potential 3D magnetic field of the active region NOAA 11123 on 2010 November 13 where the characteristic upflow velocities are observed. A simple 1D hydrostatic atmospheric model covering the region from the photosphere to the corona is derived. Local correlation tracking of the magnetic features in the HMI data is used to derive a proxy for the time dependent velocity field. The time dependent evolution of the system is solved using a resistive 3D magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: The magnetic field contains several null points located well above the photosphere, with their fan planes dividing the magnetic field into independent open and closed flux domains. The stressing of the interfaces between the different flux domains is expected to provide locations where magnetic reconnection can take place and drive systematic flows. In this case, the region between the closed and open flux is identified as the region where observations find the systematic upflows. Conclusions: In the present experiment, the driving only initiates magneto-acoustic waves without driving any systematic upflows at any of the flux interfaces. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Auditory selective attention to speech modulates activity in the visual word form area.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, Yuliya N; Zevin, Jason D; Maurer, Urs; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2010-03-01

    Selective attention to speech versus nonspeech signals in complex auditory input could produce top-down modulation of cortical regions previously linked to perception of spoken, and even visual, words. To isolate such top-down attentional effects, we contrasted 2 equally challenging active listening tasks, performed on the same complex auditory stimuli (words overlaid with a series of 3 tones). Instructions required selectively attending to either the speech signals (in service of rhyme judgment) or the melodic signals (tone-triplet matching). Selective attention to speech, relative to attention to melody, was associated with blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) increases during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in left inferior frontal gyrus, temporal regions, and the visual word form area (VWFA). Further investigation of the activity in visual regions revealed overall deactivation relative to baseline rest for both attention conditions. Topographic analysis demonstrated that while attending to melody drove deactivation equivalently across all fusiform regions of interest examined, attending to speech produced a regionally specific modulation: deactivation of all fusiform regions, except the VWFA. Results indicate that selective attention to speech can topographically tune extrastriate cortex, leading to increased activity in VWFA relative to surrounding regions, in line with the well-established connectivity between areas related to spoken and visual word perception in skilled readers.

  8. Active region upflows. I. Multi-instrument observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanninathan, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Galsgaard, K.; Huang, Z.; Doyle, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    responsible for the formation of the upflow region. High cadence Hα observations are used to study the chromosphere at the footpoints of the upflow region. We find no significant jet-like (spicule/rapid blue excursion) activity to account for several hours/days of plasma upflow. The jet-like activity in this region is not continuous and blueward asymmetries are a bare minimum. Using an image enhancement technique for imaging and spectral data, we show that the coronal structures seen in the AIA 193 Å channel are comparable to the EIS Fe xii images, while images in the AIA 171 Å channel reveal additional loops that are a result of contribution from cooler emission to this channel. Conclusions: Our results suggest that at chromospheric heights there are no signatures that support the possible contribution of spicules to active region upflows. We suggest that magnetic flux diffusion is responsible for the formation of the coronal upflows. The existence of two velocity components possibly indicates the presence of two different flows, which are produced by two different physical mechanisms, e.g. magnetic reconnection and pressure-driven jets. Movies associated to Figs. A.1-A.3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  10. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Rebull, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  11. Looking for phase-space structures in star-forming regions: an MST-based methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Emilio J.; González, Marta

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for analysing the phase space of star-forming regions. In particular we are searching for clumpy structures in the 3D sub-space formed by two position coordinates and radial velocity. The aim of the method is the detection of kinematic segregated radial velocity groups, that is, radial velocity intervals whose associated stars are spatially concentrated. To this end we define a kinematic segregation index, tilde{Λ }(RV), based on the Minimum Spanning Tree graph algorithm, which is estimated for a set of radial velocity intervals in the region. When tilde{Λ }(RV) is significantly greater than 1 we consider that this bin represents a grouping in the phase space. We split a star-forming region into radial velocity bins and calculate the kinematic segregation index for each bin, and then we obtain the spectrum of kinematic groupings, which enables a quick visualization of the kinematic behaviour of the region under study. We carried out numerical models of different configurations in the sub-space of the phase space formed by the coordinates and the that various case studies illustrate. The analysis of the test cases demonstrates the potential of the new methodology for detecting different kind of groupings in phase space.

  12. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars.We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks.We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  13. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  14. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION W49

    SciTech Connect

    Saral, G.; Hora, J. L.; Willis, S. E.; Koenig, X. P.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Saygac, A. T.

    2015-11-01

    We present the initial results of our investigation of the star-forming complex W49, one of the youngest and most luminous massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We used Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) data to investigate massive star formation with the primary objective of locating a representative set of protostars and the clusters of young stars that are forming around them. We present our source catalog with the mosaics from the IRAC data. In this study we used a combination of IRAC, MIPS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) data to identify and classify the young stellar objects (YSOs). We identified 232 Class 0/I YSOs, 907 Class II YSOs, and 74 transition disk candidate objects using color–color and color–magnitude diagrams. In addition, to understand the evolution of star formation in W49, we analyzed the distribution of YSOs in the region to identify clusters using a minimal spanning tree method. The fraction of YSOs that belong to clusters with ≥7 members is found to be 52% for a cutoff distance of 96″, and the ratio of Class II/I objects is 2.1. We compared the W49 region to the G305 and G333 star-forming regions and concluded that W49 has the richest population, with seven subclusters of YSOs.

  15. 78 FR 10600 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region Logbook Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Region Logbook Family of Forms AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ACTION... mammals that are caught and discarded or have interacted with the vessel's fishing gear. A subset of these... other for-profit organizations; individuals or households. Estimated Number of Respondents:...

  16. B → πℓ+ℓ- form factors reexamined in the whole kinematically accessible region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuo-Hong; Si, Zong-Guo; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Nan

    2015-11-01

    We reexamine the B → πℓ+ℓ- (ℓ = e, μ, τ) form factors, f+B→π (q2), f0B→π (q2) and fTB→π (q2), in the entire region of the momentum transfer squared q2, by taking advantage of the complementarity between lattice QCD (LQCD) simulation and light cone sum rule approach (LCSR), and analyticity of the form factors. A LCSR calculation with a chiral current correlator, which could avoid pollution by twist-3 components, is performed at twist-2 next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy, to determinate the form factor shapes in the small and intermediate q2 region. Further, fitting simultaneously the LCSR results for these form factors and the related LQCD ones (available or based on a SUF (3) symmetry breaking ansatz) to a Bourrely-Caprini-Lellouch (BCL) parametrization, we get a global understanding of their q2 behaviors. Our findings turn out to be consistent with the recent study by Ali, Parkhomenko and Rusov, and the resulting observation for the vector form factor provides support for the existing LQCD as well as LCSR predictions extrapolated to the entire kinematically accessible region.

  17. Active curcumin nanoparticles formed from a volatile microemulsion template.

    PubMed

    Margulis, K; Srinivasan, S; Ware, M J; Summers, H D; Godin, B; Magdassi, S

    2014-01-01

    We report on biological performance of organic nanoparticles formed by a simple method based on rapid solvent removal from a volatile microemulsion. The particular focus of the study was on testing the suitability of the method for substances soluble in partially water-miscible organic solvents as well as on evaluating the therapeutic activity of the resultant nanoparticles. Curcumin was employed as a model for hydrophobic drug, and, as it is soluble in water-miscible organic solvents, it was successfully incorporated into a new cyclopentanone-water microemulsion system. During rapid solvent removal by spray-drying, the nanometric droplets of the microemulsion were converted into nanoparticles containing amorphous curcumin with the average size of 20.2±3.4 nm, having ζ potential of -36.2 ±1.8 mV. These nanoparticles were dispersible in water and retained the high loading of the active substance. The therapeutic activity of the resulting nanoparticles was demonstrated in a pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1. The effective concentration for reducing the metabolic activity was found to be 11.5 μM for nanoparticles compared with 19.5 μM for free curcumin. PMID:25485110

  18. X-ray and Infrared Surveys of Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Marc

    2005-07-01

    Since most stars in the Galaxy probably formed in giant molecular clouds, identifying nearly complete samples of low-mass stars in galactic star-forming regions is an important step in understanding the overall star-formation process. Recent X-ray, optical, and near-infrared studies of the galactic HII regions M8, M16, M17 and M20 have significantly increased the number of known cluster stars. By comparing their X-ray and infrared properties with stars in well-studied regions like the Orion Nebula Cluster, we can estimate distance, age and completeness. These studies will be used to assess the prevalence of triggered star-formation.

  19. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  20. Ultraviolet and Visible Analysis of Star-Forming Regions in Several Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zernow, Lea; Hunter, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    As some of the smallest and most numerous galaxies in the universe, dwarf irregular (dIm) galaxies give many opportunities for developing an understanding of the manner in which the universe operates. In particular, these galaxies offer challenges to standard models of star formation. The concentration of gas is sufficiently small that the standard models cannot account for the presence of stars in the galaxies. In order to examine this paradox, we used ultraviolet images obtained with the GALEX satellite and optical ground-based imaging to examine the properties of star-forming regions in three dIm galaxies: DDO 50, IC 1613, and WLM. We identified candidate young star-forming regions on near ultraviolet (NUV, 2270 Angstroms) images. We then measured the brightness of the regions in the NUV, far ultraviolet (FUV, 1520 Angstroms), and UBV images. Colors were compared to cluster evolutionary models to estimate ages of the regions, which enabled an estimate of the visual magnitude at a fiducial age of ten million years. We divided the galaxies into three broad annuli in order to compare properties of the star-forming regions as a function of radius. We discuss the properties of star-forming regions in the three galaxies in the context of current star formation models that predict star formation on the basis of large-scale gravitational instability and local-scale gas compression. LZ extends gratitude for funding from the National Science Foundation's Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program at Northern Arizona University through grant AST-0453611. DAH gratefully acknowledges funding for this research from the NASA GALEX program through grant NNX07AJ36G.

  1. A {sup 13}CO SURVEY OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kerton, Charles R.; Arvidsson, Kim

    2015-06-10

    We have conducted a {sup 13}CO survey of a sample of 128 infrared color-selected intermediate-mass star-forming region (IM SFR) candidates. We utilized the Onsala 20 m telescope to observe {sup 13}CO (1–0) toward 67 northern IM SFRs, used the 12 m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope to observe {sup 13}CO (2–1) toward 22 southern IM SFRs, and incorporated an additional 39 sources from the Boston University Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey which observed {sup 13}CO (1–0). We detect {sup 13}CO (1–0) in 58 of the 67 northern sources and {sup 13}CO (2–1) in 20 of the 22 southern sources. The mean molecular column densities and {sup 13}CO linewidths in the inner Galaxy are higher by factors of 3.4 and 1.5, respectively, than the outer Galaxy. We attribute this difference to molecular clouds in the inner Galaxy being more massive and hosting star forming regions with higher luminosities on average than the outer Galaxy. IM SFRs have mean a molecular column density of 7.89 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup −2}, a factor of 3.1 lower than that for a sample of high-mass regions, and have a mean {sup 13}CO linewidth of 1.84 km s{sup −1}, a factor of 1.5 lower than that for high-mass regions. We demonstrate a correlation between {sup 13}CO linewidth and infrared luminosity as well as between molecular column density and infrared luminosity for the entire sample of intermediate-mass and high-mass regions. IM SFRs appear to form in distinctly lower-density environments with mean linewidths and beam-averaged column densities a factor of several lower than high-mass star-forming regions.

  2. A 13CO Survey of Intermediate-mass Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kerton, Charles R.; Arvidsson, Kim

    2015-06-01

    We have conducted a 13CO survey of a sample of 128 infrared color-selected intermediate-mass star-forming region (IM SFR) candidates. We utilized the Onsala 20 m telescope to observe 13CO (1-0) toward 67 northern IM SFRs, used the 12 m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope to observe 13CO (2-1) toward 22 southern IM SFRs, and incorporated an additional 39 sources from the Boston University Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey which observed 13CO (1-0). We detect 13CO (1-0) in 58 of the 67 northern sources and 13CO (2-1) in 20 of the 22 southern sources. The mean molecular column densities and 13CO linewidths in the inner Galaxy are higher by factors of 3.4 and 1.5, respectively, than the outer Galaxy. We attribute this difference to molecular clouds in the inner Galaxy being more massive and hosting star forming regions with higher luminosities on average than the outer Galaxy. IM SFRs have mean a molecular column density of 7.89 × 1021 cm-2, a factor of 3.1 lower than that for a sample of high-mass regions, and have a mean 13CO linewidth of 1.84 km s-1, a factor of 1.5 lower than that for high-mass regions. We demonstrate a correlation between 13CO linewidth and infrared luminosity as well as between molecular column density and infrared luminosity for the entire sample of intermediate-mass and high-mass regions. IM SFRs appear to form in distinctly lower-density environments with mean linewidths and beam-averaged column densities a factor of several lower than high-mass star-forming regions.

  3. A Multi-Wavelength Survey of Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kerton, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Current research into Galactic star formation has focused on either massive star-forming regions or nearby low-mass regions. We present results from a survey of Galactic intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs). These regions were selected from IRAS colors that specify cool dust and large PAH contribution, suggesting that they produce stars up to but not exceeding about 8 solar masses. Using WISE data we have classified 984 candidate IM SFRs as star-like objects, galaxies, filamentary structures, or blobs/shells based on their mid-infrared morphologies. Focusing on the blobs/shells, we combined follow-up observations of deep near-infrared (NIR) imaging with optical and NIR spectroscopy to study the stellar content, confirming the intermediate-mass nature of these regions. We also gathered CO data from OSO and APEX to study the molecular content and dynamics of these regions. We compare these results to those of high-mass star formation in order to better understand their role in the star-formation paradigm.

  4. 13C Isotopic Fractionation of HC3N in Star-forming Regions: Low-mass Star-forming Region L1527 and High-mass Star-forming Region G28.28-0.36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Kotomi; Saito, Masao; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    We observed the J = 9–8 and 10–9 rotational lines of three 13C isotopologues of HC3N in L1527 and G28.28-0.36, with the 45 m radio telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, in order to constrain the main formation mechanisms of HC3N in each source. The abundance ratios of the three 13C isotopologues of HC3N are found to be 0.9 (±0.2) : 1.00 : 1.29 (±0.19) (1σ), and 1.0 (±0.2) : 1.00 : 1.47 (±0.17) (1σ), for [H13CCCN : HC13CCN : HCC13CN] in L1527 and G28.28-0.36, respectively. We recognize, from a similar 13C isotopic fractionation pattern, that the abundances of H13CCCN and HC13CCN are comparable, and HCC13CN is more abundant than the others. Based on the results, we discuss the main formation pathway of HC3N. The 13C isotopic fractionation pattern derived from our observations can be explained by the neutral-neutral reaction between C2H2 and CN in both the low-mass (L1527) and high-mass (G28.28-0.36) star-forming regions.

  5. Distribution of HNCO 505-404 in massive star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, J. Z.; Gu, Q. S.; Zheng, X. W.

    2013-07-01

    Aims: The goal of this paper is to study the spatial distribution of HNCO in massive star-forming region and to investigate both its spatial association with infrared sources and physical conditions in region of HNCO emission. Methods: We mapped nine massive star-forming regions in HNCO 505-404 with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope. The C18O maps of these sources were obtained simultaneously. Results: The HNCO emission shows compact distribution, with the emission peak centered on water masers. Nearly all the HNCO clumps show signs of embedded mid-infrared or far-infrared sources. The FWHM sizes of HNCO clumps are significantly smaller than C18O clumps but rather similar to HC3N clumps. We find a good correlation between the integrated intensities, linewidths, and LSR velocities of HNCO and HC3N emission, implying similar excitation mechanisms for these two species. As such, collisional excitation is likely to be the dominant excitation mechanism for HNCO 505 - 404 emission in galactic massive star-forming regions.

  6. Monitoring rice farming activities in the Mekong Delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. F.; Chen, C. R.; Chiang, S. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Khin, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    . The results in forms of spatialtemporal and quantitative information of rice sowing and harvesting activities were vital for crop management, and the methods are thus suggested for rice crop monitoring in the study region and could be transferable to other regions for crop monitoring.

  7. THE EXPANSION OF ACTIVE REGIONS INTO THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Huw; Jeska, Lauren; Leonard, Drew

    2013-06-01

    Advanced image processing of Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) C2 observations reveals the expansion of the active region closed field into the extended corona. The nested closed-loop systems are large, with an apparent latitudinal extent of 50 Degree-Sign , and expanding to heights of at least 12 R{sub Sun }. The expansion speeds are {approx}10 km s{sup -1} in the AIA/SDO field of view, below {approx}20 km s{sup -1} at 2.3 R{sub Sun }, and accelerate linearly to {approx}60 km s{sup -1} at 5 R{sub Sun }. They appear with a frequency of one every {approx}3 hr over a time period of around three days. They are not coronal mass ejections (CMEs) since their gradual expansion is continuous and steady. They are also faint, with an upper limit of 3% of the brightness of background streamers. Extreme ultraviolet images reveal continuous birth and expansion of hot, bright loops from a new active region at the base of the system. The LASCO images show that the loops span a radial fan-like system of streamers, suggesting that they are not propagating within the main coronal streamer structure. The expanding loops brighten at low heights a few hours prior to a CME eruption, and the expansion process is temporarily halted as the closed field system is swept away. Closed magnetic structures from some active regions are not isolated from the extended corona and solar wind, but can expand to large heights in the form of quiescent expanding loops.

  8. Artificial Syntactic Violations Activate Broca's Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersson, Karl Magnus; Forkstam, Christian; Ingvar, Martin

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated a group of participants on a grammaticality classification task after they had been exposed to well-formed consonant strings generated from an artificial regular grammar. We used an implicit acquisition paradigm in which the participants were exposed…

  9. Observations of Galactic star-forming regions with the Cosmic Background Imager at 31 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetroullas, C.; Dickinson, C.; Stamadianos, D.; Harper, S. E.; Cleary, K.; Jones, Michael E.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Taylor, Angela C.

    2015-10-01

    Studies of the diffuse Galactic radio emission are interesting both for better understanding the physical conditions in our Galaxy and for minimizing the contamination in cosmological measurements. Motivated by this, we present Cosmic Background Imager 31 GHz observations of the Galactic regions NGC 6357, NGC 6334, W51 and W40 at ˜4.5 arcmin resolution and conduct an investigation of the spectral emission process in the regions at 4.5 arcmin and 1° resolution. We find that most of the emission in the regions is due to optically thin free-free. For two sub-regions of NGC 6334 and for a sub-region of W51 though, at 4.5 arcmin resolution and at 31 GHz we detect less emission than expected from extrapolation of radio data at lower frequencies assuming a spectral index of -0.12 for optically thin free-free emission, at 3.3σ, 3.7σ and 6.5σ, respectively. We also detect excess emission in a sub-region of NCG 6334 at 6.4σ, after ruling out any possible contribution from ultra-compact H II regions. At 1° resolution, we detect a spinning dust component in the spectral energy distribution of W40 that accounts for 18 ± 7 per cent of the total flux density in the region at the peak frequency of 37 GHz. Comparison with 100 μm data indicates an average dust emissivity for the sub-regions of 0.5 ± 4.4 μK(MJy sr-1)-1. Finally, we translate the excess emission in the regions to an anomalous microwave emission (AME) emissivity relative to the optical depth at 250 μm. We find that this form of emissivity is independent of the AME significance and has a value somewhere in the order of 104 Jy.

  10. Detection of Water Vapor in the Terrestrial Planet Forming Region of a Transition Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyk, Colette; Lacy, John H.; Richter, Matthew J.; Zhang, Ke; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.

    2015-09-01

    We report a detection of water vapor in the protoplanetary disk around DoAr 44 with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph—a visitor instrument on the Gemini north telescope. The DoAr 44 disk consists of an optically thick inner ring and outer disk, separated by a dust-cleared 36 AU gap, and has therefore been termed “pre-transitional.” To date, this is the only disk with a large inner gap known to harbor detectable quantities of warm (T∼ 450 K) water vapor. In this work, we detect and spectrally resolve three mid-infrared pure rotational emission lines of water vapor from this source, and use the shapes of the emission lines to constrain the location of the water vapor. We find that the emission originates near 0.3 AU—the inner disk region. This characteristic region coincides with that inferred for both optically thick and thin thermal infrared dust emission, as well as rovibrational CO emission. The presence of water in the dust-depleted region implies substantial columns of hydrogen (\\gt {10}22 {{cm}}-2) as the water vapor would otherwise be destroyed by photodissociation. Combined with the dust modeling, this column implies a gas/small-dust ratio in the optically thin dusty region of ≳ 1000. These results demonstrate that DoAr 44 has maintained similar physical and chemical conditions to classical protoplanetary disks in its terrestrial-planet forming regions, in spite of having formed a large gap.

  11. Finding new strength in unity. Four Cincinnati-area Mercy hospitals form an integrated regional system.

    PubMed

    Hanser, J

    1997-01-01

    In early 1993 the leaders of the Sisters of Mercy in Cincinnati decided to form their four area hospitals into a new integrated regional system, The creation of this system--Mercy Regional Health System Greater Cincinnati--was made difficult by the fact that each of its four facilities had its own culture. Change, moreover, can be threatening to even the boldest. As a result of these factors, formation of the new system did not proceed as smoothly as we had planned. Things improved after we began to acquaint ourselves with the histories and cultures of the four hospitals. After that, we created a new regional leadership structure that enabled us to form administrators and employees into teams, breaking down the compartmentalization traditional in healthcare. We showed our employees that the system would open opportunities for them. We also created a new regional board of trustees to develop the system's strategic plan, manage its business infrastructure, and draw up its budget. We established a holistic health and wellness center to encourage focus on the connections between body, mind, and spirit. Through new corporate publications, newspaper advertisements, and lobby displays, we have explained our evolution both to our employees and the residents of the region. As a result, we are now in virtually all of greater Cincinnati's managed care plans.

  12. The comparison of physical properties derived from gas and dust in a massive star-forming region

    SciTech Connect

    Battersby, Cara; Bally, John; Ginsburg, Adam; Darling, Jeremy; Dunham, Miranda; Longmore, Steve

    2014-05-10

    We explore the relationship between gas and dust in a massive star-forming region by comparing the physical properties derived from each. We compare the temperatures and column densities in a massive star-forming Infrared Dark Cloud (G32.02+0.05), which shows a range of evolutionary states, from quiescent to active. The gas properties were derived using radiative transfer modeling of the (1,1), (2,2), and (4,4) transitions of NH{sub 3} on the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, while the dust temperatures and column densities were calculated using cirrus-subtracted, modified blackbody fits to Herschel data. We compare the derived column densities to calculate an NH{sub 3} abundance, χ{sub NH{sub 3}} = 4.6 × 10{sup –8}. In the coldest star-forming region, we find that the measured dust temperatures are lower than the measured gas temperatures (mean and standard deviations T {sub dust,} {sub avg} ∼ 11.6 ± 0.2 K versus T {sub gas,} {sub avg} ∼ 15.2 ± 1.5 K), which may indicate that the gas and dust are not well-coupled in the youngest regions (∼0.5 Myr) or that these observations probe a regime where the dust and/or gas temperature measurements are unreliable. Finally, we calculate millimeter fluxes based on the temperatures and column densities derived from NH{sub 3}, which suggest that millimeter dust continuum observations of massive star-forming regions, such as the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey or ATLASGAL, can probe hot cores, cold cores, and the dense gas lanes from which they form, and are generally not dominated by the hottest core.

  13. 76 FR 27077 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR, Extension of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and...; OMB Control No. 1615-0007. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration... collection: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public...

  14. 75 FR 16492 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-28, and Form G-28I, Revision of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-28, and... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has submitted the... sponsoring the collection: Form G-28, and Form G-28I. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)....

  15. Tracked Active Region Patches for MDI and HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, Michael; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Bobra, Monica

    2014-06-01

    We describe tracked active-region patch data products that have been developed for HMI (HMI Active Region Patches, or HARPs) and for MDI (MDI Tracked Active Region Patches, or MDI TARPs). Both data products consist of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions. The now-released HARP data product covers 2010-present (>2000 regions to date). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. The TARPs contain 6170 regions spanning 72000 images taken over 1996-2010, and will be availablein the MDI resident archive (RA).MDI TARPs are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that they are in. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Also, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a cross-calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HMI HARPs and the MDI TARPs. We show results demonstrating region correspondence, region boundary agreement, and agreement of flux metadata using the approximately 140 regions in the May 2010-October 2010 time period. We envision several uses for these data

  16. Rho-omega mixing and the pion form factor in the timelike region

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S.; OConnell, H.B.

    1998-03-01

    We determine the magnitude, phase, and s dependence of {rho}-{omega} {open_quotes}mixing{close_quotes} in the pion form factor in the timelike region through fits to e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} data. The associated systematic errors in these quantities, arising from the functional form used to fit the {rho} resonance, are small. The systematic errors in the {rho} mass and width, however, are larger than previously estimated. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Haislmaier, K. J.

    2013-10-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

  18. GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF SUBSURFACE SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jouve, L.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of a magnetic loop evolving in either a convectively stable or unstable rotating shell. The magnetic loop is introduced into the shell in such a way that it is buoyant only in a certain portion in longitude, thus creating an {Omega}-loop. Due to the action of magnetic buoyancy, the loop rises and develops asymmetries between its leading and following legs, creating emerging bipolar regions whose characteristics are similar to those of observed spots at the solar surface. In particular, we self-consistently reproduce the creation of tongues around the spot polarities, which can be strongly affected by convection. We further emphasize the presence of ring-shaped magnetic structures around our simulated emerging regions, which we call 'magnetic necklace' and which were seen in a number of observations without being reported as of today. We show that those necklaces are markers of vorticity generation at the periphery and below the rising magnetic loop. We also find that the asymmetry between the two legs of the loop is crucially dependent on the initial magnetic field strength. The tilt angle of the emerging regions is also studied in the stable and unstable cases and seems to be affected both by the convective motions and the presence of a differential rotation in the convective cases.

  19. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  20. Subsurface helicity of active regions 12192 and 10486

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, Rudolf; Tripathy, Sushant; Howe, Rachel; Hill, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The active region 10486 that produced the Halloween flares in 2003 initiated our interest in the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows associated with active regions. This lead to the realization that the helicity of subsurface flows is related to the flare activity of active regions. Eleven years later, a similarly enormous active region (12192) appeared on the solar surface. We plan to study the kinetic helicity of the subsurface flows associated with region 12192 and compare it to that of region 10486. For 10486, we have analyzed Dopplergrams obtained with the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) with a dense-pack ring-diagram analysis. For 12192, we have analyzed Dopplergrams from GONG and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We will present the latest results.

  1. A Fractal Dimension Survey of Active Region Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAteer, R. T. James; Gallagher, Peter; Ireland, Jack

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to quantifying the magnetic complexity of active regions using a fractal dimension measure is presented. This fully-automated approach uses full disc MDI magnetograms of active regions from a large data set (2742 days of the SoHO mission; 9342 active regions) to compare the calculated fractal dimension to both Mount Wilson classification and flare rate. The main Mount Wilson classes exhibit no distinct fractal dimension distribution, suggesting a self-similar nature of all active regions. Solar flare productivity exhibits an increase in both the frequency and GOES X-ray magnitude of flares from regions with higher fractal dimensions. Specifically a lower threshold fractal dimension of 1.2 and 1.25 exists as a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for an active region to produce M- and X-class flares respectively .

  2. Experimental study on interface region of two-dimensional Si layers by forming gas annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Yuhya; Kikuchi, Reika; Suzuki, Ayaka; Inoue, Ryohsuke; Yamanaka, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Miki; Nagamine, Yoshiki; Aoki, Takashi; Maeda, Tatsuro

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally studied the SiO2/Si and Si/buried oxide (BOX) interface regions of a two-dimensional (2D) Si layer, by forming gas annealing (FGA). A photoluminescence (PL) result measured at various lattice temperature, T L, values shows that the PL intensity I PL of the 2D-Si layer rapidly increases and then saturates with increasing FGA temperature, T A, and time, t A. I PL also increases with decreasing T L. A one-dimensional (1D) Schroedinger equation simulator indicates that some of the electrons in the 2D-Si layer generated by a PL excitation laser are quantum-mechanically transmitted into Si interface regions. Actually, we experimentally confirmed that the PL spectra of the 2D-Si layer can be fitted by the PL emission from two regions with different PL peak photon energy values, E PH, which consist of a typical 2D-Si and the interface regions of both the surface SiO2/Si and Si/BOX. Thus, this forming gas dependence is probably attributable to the improved lifetime τ of electrons in the surface interface region, because the Si surface is terminated by H atoms. Moreover, the E PH of the interface region is higher than that of the 2D-Si layer, because of the graded increased bandgap in the interface regions. However, the E PH of 2D-Si is independent of both T A and T L, and this T L independence does not agree with that of a 3D-Si layer. Consequently, we experimentally verified the larger impact of the Si interface on the performance of 2D-Si layer.

  3. Modeling the production of highly-complex molecules in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    Molecules of increasing complexity are being observed toward star-forming regions, including the recently detected iso-propyl cyanide, the first interstellar branched carbon-chain molecule. Modeling the formation of new complex organics requires new grain-surface production mechanisms, as well as gas-phase and grain-surface destruction processes. The method for constructing networks for new molecules is discussed, as well as the results of recent models of branched carbon-chain molecule chemistry. The formation of both simple and complex organics in cold regions is also discussed. New, exact kinetics models indicate that complex molecules may be formed efficiently at very low temperatures, if CO is abundant on the grain surfaces.

  4. PARALLAXES OF STAR-FORMING REGIONS IN THE OUTER SPIRAL ARM OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisuka, K.; Choi, Y. K.; Reid, M. J.; Dame, T. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Menten, K. M.; Sanna, A.

    2015-02-10

    We report parallaxes and proper motions of three water maser sources in high-mass star-forming regions in the Outer Spiral Arm of the Milky Way. The observations were conducted with the Very Long Baseline Array as part of Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy Survey and double the number of such measurements in the literature. The Outer Arm has a pitch angle of 14.°9 ± 2.°7 and a Galactocentric distance of 14.1 ± 0.6 kpc toward the Galactic anticenter. The average motion of these sources toward the Galactic center is 10.7 ± 2.1 km s{sup –1} and we see no sign of a significant fall in the rotation curve out to 15 kpc from the Galactic center. The three-dimensional locations of these star-forming regions are consistent with a Galactic warp of several hundred parsecs from the plane.

  5. The connection between galaxy environment and the luminosity function slopes of star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ˜65 000 star-forming regions (i.e. FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that α correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (ΣSFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity function in galaxies with low-number statistics nor the effects of blending due to distance can fully account for these trends. We hypothesize that the flatter slopes in high ΣSFR galaxies is due to higher gas densities and higher star formation efficiencies which result in proportionally greater numbers of bright star-forming regions. Finally, we create a composite luminosity function composed of star-forming regions from many galaxies and find a break in the luminosity function at brighter luminosities. However, we find that this break is an artefact of varying detection limits for galaxies at different distances.

  6. The Schmidt Law in Six Galactic Massive Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, S.; Guzman, A.; Marengo, M.; Smith, H. A.; Martínez-Galarza, J. R.; Allen, L.

    2015-08-01

    We present a census of young stars in five massive star-forming regions in the 4th Galactic quadrant, G305, G326-4, G326-6, G333 (RCW 106), and G351, and combine this census with an earlier census of young stars in NGC 6334. Each region was observed at J, H, and Ks with the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager and combined with deep observations taken with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope at the wavelengths 3.6 and 4.5 μm. We derived a five band point-source catalog containing >200,000 infrared sources in each region. We have identified a total of 2871 YSO candidates, 363 Class I YSOs, and 2508 Class II YSOs. We mapped the column density of each cloud using observations from Herschel between 160 and 500 μm and near-infrared extinction maps in order to determine the average gas surface density above AV > 2. We study the surface density of the YSOs and the star-formation rate as a function of the column density within each cloud and compare them to the results for nearby star-forming regions. We find a range in power-law indices across the clouds, with the dispersion in the local relations in an individual cloud much lower than the average over the six clouds. We find the average over the six clouds to be {{{Σ }}}{SFR}∼ {{{Σ }}}{gas}2.15+/- 0.41 and power-law exponents ranging from 1.77 to 2.86, similar to the values derived within nearby star-forming regions, including Taurus and Orion. The large dispersion in the power-law relations between individual Milky Way molecular clouds reinforces the idea that there is not a direct universal connection between Σgas and a cloud's observed star-formation rate.

  7. The First Detections of the Key Prebiotic Molecule PO in Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Cesaroni, R.

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element in biochemistry, in particular the P‑O bond, which is key in the formation of the backbone of deoxyribonucleic acid. So far, PO has only been detected toward the envelope of evolved stars, but never toward star-forming regions. We report the first detection of PO toward two massive star-forming regions, W51 e1/e2 and W3(OH), using data from the IRAM 30 m telescope. PN has also been detected toward the two regions. The abundance ratio PO/PN is 1.8 and 3 for W51 and W3(OH), respectively. Our chemical model indicates that the two molecules are chemically related and are formed via gas-phase ion–molecule and neutral–neutral reactions during cold collapse. The molecules freeze out onto grains at the end of the collapse and desorb during the warm-up phase once the temperature reaches ˜35 K. Similar abundances of the two species are expected during a period of ˜5 × 104 yr at the early stages of the warm-up phase, when the temperature is in the range 35–90 K. The observed molecular abundances of 10‑10 are predicted by the model if a relatively high initial abundance of 5 × 10‑9 of depleted phosphorus is assumed.

  8. The First Detections of the Key Prebiotic Molecule PO in Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Cesaroni, R.

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element in biochemistry, in particular the P-O bond, which is key in the formation of the backbone of deoxyribonucleic acid. So far, PO has only been detected toward the envelope of evolved stars, but never toward star-forming regions. We report the first detection of PO toward two massive star-forming regions, W51 e1/e2 and W3(OH), using data from the IRAM 30 m telescope. PN has also been detected toward the two regions. The abundance ratio PO/PN is 1.8 and 3 for W51 and W3(OH), respectively. Our chemical model indicates that the two molecules are chemically related and are formed via gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral-neutral reactions during cold collapse. The molecules freeze out onto grains at the end of the collapse and desorb during the warm-up phase once the temperature reaches ˜35 K. Similar abundances of the two species are expected during a period of ˜5 × 104 yr at the early stages of the warm-up phase, when the temperature is in the range 35-90 K. The observed molecular abundances of 10-10 are predicted by the model if a relatively high initial abundance of 5 × 10-9 of depleted phosphorus is assumed.

  9. Observations of HDO in the High-Mass Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulczak-Jastrzębska, M.

    2016-06-01

    I present observations of the ground state (10,1-00,0) rotational transition of HDO at 464.925 GHz toward several high-mass star forming regions carried out with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The spectra are modeled together with observations of higher-energy HDO transitions and submillimeter dust continuum fluxes present in the literature. Spherically symmetric radiative transfer model was used to derive the radial distribution of the HDO abundance in the target sources. The abundance profile is divided into an inner hot core region, with kinetic temperatures higher than 100 K, and a cold outer envelope. The derived HDO abundances relative to H2 are: (0.6-3.5)×10-8 and (0.1-25)×10-11 in the hot inner region and the cold outer envelope, respectively.

  10. The Stellar Content of Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael; Kobulnicky, H.; Alexander, M.; Vargas Alvarez, C.; Arvidsson, K.; Kerton, C.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to understand the factors that govern the transition from low- to high-mass star formation, we report near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of stars within a sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IMSFRs). Some IMSFRs appear to contain compact <1 pc embedded clusters at an early evolutionary stage similar to compact HII regions, but lacking the massive ionizing central star(s). The IMSFRs have photodissociation regions with diameters 1 pc powered by the equivalent of an early B star, but because all sources lack radio free-free emission, they must host a collection of less massive stars. These spectroscopic observations using FLAMINGOS on the Kitt Peak 4 m telescope, coupled with 2MASS and UKIDSS infrared imaging, identify which candidate IMSFRs host probable stellar clusters and address the nature of their most massive stellar constituents.

  11. Lipid droplets form from distinct regions of the cell in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DOE PAGES

    Meyers, Alex; del Rio, Zuania P.; Beaver, Rachael A.; Morris, Ryan M.; Weiskittel, Taylor M.; Alshibli, Amany K.; Mannik, Jaana; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Dalhaimer, Paul

    2016-04-29

    Eukaryotic cells store cholesterol/sterol esters (SEs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets, which form from the contiguous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. However, it is not known if droplets preferentially form from certain regions of the ER over others. Here, we used fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells where the nuclear and cortical/peripheral ER domains are distinguishable by light microscopy to show that SE-enriched lipid droplets form away from the nucleus at the cell tips, whereas TAG-enriched lipid droplets form around the nucleus. Sterols localize to the regions of the cells where droplets enriched in SEs are observed. TAG droplet formation aroundmore » the nucleus appears to be a strong function of diacylglycerol (DAG) homeostasis with Cpt1p, which coverts DAG into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine localized exclusively to the nuclear ER. Also, Dgk1p, which converts DAG into phosphatidic acid localized strongly to the nuclear ER over the cortical/peripheral ER. We also show that TAG more readily translocates from the ER to lipid droplets than do SEs. Lastly, the results augment the standard lipid droplet formation model, which has SEs and TAGs flowing into the same nascent lipid droplet regardless of its biogenesis point in the cell.« less

  12. Lipid Droplets Form from Distinct Regions of the Cell in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Alex; Del Rio, Zuania P; Beaver, Rachael A; Morris, Ryan M; Weiskittel, Taylor M; Alshibli, Amany K; Mannik, Jaana; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Dalhaimer, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells store cholesterol/sterol esters (SEs) and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in lipid droplets, which form from the contiguous endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. However, it is not known if droplets preferentially form from certain regions of the ER over others. Here, we used fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells where the nuclear and cortical/peripheral ER domains are distinguishable by light microscopy to show that SE-enriched lipid droplets form away from the nucleus at the cell tips, whereas TAG-enriched lipid droplets form around the nucleus. Sterols localize to the regions of the cells where droplets enriched in SEs are observed. TAG droplet formation around the nucleus appears to be a strong function of diacylglycerol (DAG) homeostasis with Cpt1p, which coverts DAG into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine localized exclusively to the nuclear ER. Also, Dgk1p, which converts DAG into phosphatidic acid localized strongly to the nuclear ER over the cortical/peripheral ER. We also show that TAG more readily translocates from the ER to lipid droplets than do SEs. The results augment the standard lipid droplet formation model, which has SEs and TAGs flowing into the same nascent lipid droplet regardless of its biogenesis point in the cell.

  13. The birth and evolution of solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaizauskas, V.

    1993-09-01

    The growth of solar active regions is a well-observed surface phenomenon with its origins concealed in the solar interior. We review the salient facts about the emergence of active regions and the consequences of their growth on the solar atmosphere. The most powerful flares, the ones which display a range of phenomena that still pose serious challenges for high-energy astrophysics, are associated with regions of high magnetic complexity. How does that degree of complexity arise when the vast majority of active regions are simple bipolar entities? In order to gain some insight into that problem, we compare the emergence of magnetic flux in ordinary regions with an instance when magnetic complexity is apparent from the very first appearance of a new region - clearly a subsurface prefabrication of complexity - and with others wherein a new region interacts with a pre-existing one to create the complexity in plain view.

  14. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Regional Activities. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on regional library activities which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Importance of Information Resources in National Development with Particular Reference to the Asian Scene" (Yogendra P. Dubey, India); (2) "Report of the Activities of the Regional Section for Asia…

  15. Automatic Tracking of Active Regions and Detection of Solar Flares in Solar EUV Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, C.; Aranda, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Solar catalogs are frequently handmade by experts using a manual approach or semi-automated approach. The appearance of new tools is very useful because the work is automated. Nowadays it is impossible to produce solar catalogs using these methods, because of the emergence of new spacecraft that provide a huge amount of information. In this article an automated system for detecting and tracking active regions and solar flares throughout their evolution using the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft is presented. The system is quite complex and consists of different phases: i) acquisition and preprocessing; ii) segmentation of regions of interest; iii) clustering of these regions to form candidate active regions which can become active regions; iv) tracking of active regions; v) detection of solar flares. This article describes all phases, but focuses on the phases of tracking and detection of active regions and solar flares. The system relies on consecutive solar images using a rotation law to track the active regions. Also, graphs of the evolution of a region and solar evolution are presented to detect solar flares. The procedure developed has been tested on 3500 full-disk solar images (corresponding to 35 days) taken from the spacecraft. More than 75 % of the active regions are tracked and more than 85 % of the solar flares are detected.

  16. Remote sensing application to regional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahrokhi, F.; Jones, N. L.; Sharber, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Two agencies within the State of Tennessee were identified whereby the transfer of aerospace technology, namely remote sensing, could be applied to their stated problem areas. Their stated problem areas are wetland and land classification and strip mining studies. In both studies, LANDSAT data was analyzed with the UTSI video-input analog/digital automatic analysis and classification facility. In the West Tennessee area three land-use classifications could be distinguished; cropland, wetland, and forest. In the East Tennessee study area, measurements were submitted to statistical tests which verified the significant differences due to natural terrain, stripped areas, various stages of reclamation, water, etc. Classifications for both studies were output in the form of maps of symbols and varying shades of gray.

  17. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    This monthly report summarizes production of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel forms for use in radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG's) in the Plutonium Fuel Form (PuFF) Facility at the Savannah River Plant.

  18. Neutral and ionized hydrides in star-forming regions. Observations with Herschel/HIFI.

    PubMed

    Benz, Arnold O; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Stäuber, Pascal; Wampfler, Susanne F

    2013-10-01

    The cosmic abundance of hydrides depends critically on high-energy UV, X-ray, and particle irradiation. Here we study hydrides in star-forming regions where irradiation by the young stellar object can be substantial, and density and temperature can be much enhanced over interstellar values. Lines of OH, CH, NH, and SH and their ions OH(+), CH(+), NH(+), SH(+), H2O(+), and H3O(+) were observed in star-forming regions by the HIFI spectrometer onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. Molecular column densities are derived from observed ground-state lines, models, or rotational diagrams. We report here on two prototypical high-mass regions, AFGL 2591 and W3 IRS5, and compare them to chemical calculations by making assumptions on the high-energy irradiation. A model assuming no ionizing protostellar emission is compared with (i) a model assuming strong protostellar X-ray emission and (ii) a two-dimensional (2D) model including emission in the far UV (FUV, 6-13.6 eV), irradiating the outflow walls that separate the outflowing gas and infalling envelope material. We confirm that the effect of FUV in two-dimensional models with enlarged irradiated surfaces is clearly noticeable. A molecule that is very sensitive to FUV irradiation is CH(+), enhanced in abundance by more than 5 orders of magnitude. The HIFI observations of CH(+) lines agree with the two-dimensional FUV model by Bruderer et al., which computes abundances, non-LTE excitation, and line radiative transfer.20 It is concluded that CH(+) is a good FUV tracer in star-forming regions. The effect of potential X-ray irradiation is not excluded but cannot be demonstrated by the present data.

  19. Different Evolutionary Stages in the Massive Star-forming Region W3 Main Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Beuther, Henrik; Zhang, Qizhou; Bik, Arjan; Rodón, Javier A.; Jiang, Zhibo; Fallscheer, Cassandra

    2012-08-01

    We observed three high-mass star-forming regions in the W3 high-mass star formation complex with the Submillimeter Array and IRAM 30 m telescope. These regions, i.e., W3 SMS1 (W3 IRS5), SMS2 (W3 IRS4) and SMS3, are in different evolutionary stages and are located within the same large-scale environment, which allows us to study rotation and outflows as well as chemical properties in an evolutionary sense. While we find multiple millimeter continuum sources toward all regions, these three subregions exhibit different dynamical and chemical properties, which indicate that they are in different evolutionary stages. Even within each subregion, massive cores of different ages are found, e.g., in SMS2, sub-sources from the most evolved ultracompact H II region to potential starless cores exist within 30,000 AU of each other. Outflows and rotational structures are found in SMS1 and SMS2. Evidence for interactions between the molecular cloud and the H II regions is found in the 13CO channel maps, which may indicate triggered star formation.

  20. Tectonic activity on Pluto after the Charon-forming impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy C.; Collins, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    The Pluto-Charon system, likely formed from an impact, has reached the endpoint of its tidal evolution. During its evolution into the dual-synchronous state, the equilibrium tidal figures of Pluto and Charon would have also evolved as angular momentum was transferred from Pluto's spin to Charon's orbit. The rate of tidal evolution is controlled by Pluto's interior physical and thermal state. We examine three interior models for Pluto: an undifferentiated rock/ice mixture, differentiated with ice above rock, and differentiated with an ocean. For the undifferentiated case without an ocean, the Pluto-Charon binary does not evolve to its current state unless its internal temperature Ti > 200K , which would likely lead to strong tidal heating, melting, and differentiation. Without an ocean, Pluto's interior temperature must be higher than 240 K for Charon to evolve on a time scale less than the age of the Solar System. Further tidal heating would likely create an ocean. If New Horizons finds evidence of ancient tidally-driven tectonic activity on either body, the most likely explanation is that Pluto had an internal ocean during Charon's orbital evolution.

  1. Modeling the water line emission from the high-mass star-forming region AFGL 2591

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelman, D. R.; van der Tak, F. F. S.

    2007-12-01

    Context: Observations of water lines are a sensitive probe of the geometry, dynamics and chemical structure of dense molecular gas. The launch of Herschel with on board HIFI and PACS allows to probe the behaviour of multiple water lines with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. Aims: We investigate the diagnostic value of specific water transitions in high-mass star-forming regions. As a test case, we apply our models to the AFGL 2591 region. Methods: A multi-zone escape probability method is used in two dimensions to calculate the radiative transfer. Similarities and differences of constant and jump abundance models are displayed, as well as when an outflow is incorporated. Results: In general, for models with a constant water abundance, the ground state lines, i.e., 110-101, 111-000, and 212-101, are predicted in absorption, all the others in emission. This behaviour changes for models with a water abundance jump profile in that the line profiles for jumps by a factor of ~10-100 are similar to the line shapes in the constant abundance models, whereas larger jumps lead to emission profiles. Asymmetric line profiles are found for models with a cavity outflow and depend on the inclination angle. Models with an outflow cavity are favoured to reproduce the SWAS observations of the 110-101 ground-state transition. PACS spectra will tell us about the geometry of these regions, both through the continuum and through the lines. Conclusions: It is found that the low-lying transitions of water are sensitive to outflow features, and represent the excitation conditions in the outer regions. High-lying transitions are more sensitive to the adopted density and temperature distribution which probe the inner excitation conditions. The Herschel mission will thus be very helpful to constrain the physical and chemical structure of high-mass star-forming regions such as AFGL 2591.

  2. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  3. The growth of the central region by acquisition of counterrotating gas in star-forming galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan-Mei; Shi, Yong; Tremonti, Christy A.; Bershady, Matt; Merrifield, Michael; Emsellem, Eric; Jin, Yi-Fei; Huang, Song; Fu, Hai; Wake, David A.; Bundy, Kevin; Stark, David; Lin, Lihwai; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Bergmann, Thaisa Storchi; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel; Bureau, Martin; Chisholm, John; Drory, Niv; Guo, Qi; Hao, Lei; Hu, Jian; Li, Cheng; Li, Ran; Lopes, Alexandre Roman; Pan, Kai-Ke; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wang, Lan; Westfall, Kyle; Yan, Ren-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies grow through both internal and external processes. In about 10% of nearby red galaxies with little star formation, gas and stars are counter-rotating, demonstrating the importance of external gas acquisition in these galaxies. However, systematic studies of such phenomena in blue, star-forming galaxies are rare, leaving uncertain the role of external gas acquisition in driving evolution of blue galaxies. Here, based on new measurements with integral field spectroscopy of a large representative galaxy sample, we find an appreciable fraction of counter-rotators among blue galaxies (9 out of 489 galaxies). The central regions of blue counter-rotators show younger stellar populations and more intense, ongoing star formation than their outer parts, indicating ongoing growth of the central regions. The result offers observational evidence that the acquisition of external gas in blue galaxies is possible; the interaction with pre-existing gas funnels the gas into nuclear regions (<1 kpc) to form new stars. PMID:27759033

  4. Probing the brown dwarf population of the Chamaeleon I star forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, F.; Neuhäuser, R.; Kaas, A. A.

    2000-07-01

    We present observations of a sample of 13 very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the central region of the Chamaeleon I star forming cloud. The observations include slitless spectroscopy around Hα to identify new members, low resolution long-slit visible and near-infrared spectroscopy, deep ROSAT PSPC X-ray observations, and ISOCAM mid-infrared observations. Our sample adds seven new objects to those discussed by Comerón, Rieke, and Neuhäuser (1999, A&A, 343, 477) and extends the range of spectral types up to M8. We study different narrow-band indices as a tool for detecting and classifying very late-type young stellar objects. As to K-band spectra, we find that the visible features are not appropriate to yield a spectral classification more accurate than a few subclasses at best beyond M6. None of our sources displays K-band excess emission, but four have excess at 6.7 mu m suggesting that, although circumstellar disks are common around young very low mass stars, their inner regions are in general not hot enough to radiate significantly in the K band. Mid-infrared emission loosely correlates with Hα emission: sources without mid-IR excesses are always weak Hα emitters, while mid-IR excess sources have a broad range of Hα equivalent widths. X-ray emission is detected for 7 objects with spectral type M6 or later, including one bona-fide brown dwarf and three objects near the border separating stars and brown dwarfs. X-ray to bolometric luminosity ratios are typical of low mass, fully convective stars. The non-detection of X-ray emission at comparable levels from more evolved brown dwarfs suggests that X-ray activity may be restricted to early stages of brown dwarf evolution. We discuss in detail the temperatures and luminosities of our objects based on their magnitudes and spectra, and use the derived values to estimate masses and ages according to two different sets of pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks. Both sets of models are in good agreement

  5. Multi-wavelength, Multi-scale Observations of Outflows in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunkett, Adele Laurie Dennis

    ratio of outflow energy to gravitational binding energy; further, if gas escapes from NGC 1333, then outflow energy and gravitational energy may become comparable within the next N ~ 0.5 Myr, possibly disrupting the cluster. Finally, we investigate the properties of a particular Class 0 molecular outflow in Serpens South, providing evidence for episodic outflow events and corresponding accretion at a very early stage. This remarkable outflow remains intact even within the active, central hub region of Serpens South.

  6. The Initial Mass Function in the Taurus Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, César; Luhman, K. L.; Hartmann, Lee; Stauffer, John R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    2002-11-01

    By combining a deep optical imaging (I,z') survey of 8 deg2 in the Taurus star-forming region with data from the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and follow-up spectroscopy, we have performed a search for low-mass Taurus members that is complete to 0.02 Msolar for reddenings of AV<~4. We report the discovery of nine new members with spectral types of M5.75-M9.5, corresponding to masses of 0.1-0.015 Msolar by recent evolutionary models. The new M9.5 member is the least massive brown dwarf found to date in the Taurus star-forming region. We derive an initial mass function (IMF) for the fields surveyed in this work and in our previous studies, which encompass 54% of the known Taurus membership. We compare the Taurus IMF with a similarly derived one for the Trapezium Cluster and to mass functions for the M35 and Pleiades open clusters. While the IMFs in all of these regions flatten near ~0.8 Msolar, the mass function in Taurus is more narrow and sharply peaked at this mass. Our survey indicates that Taurus has ~2 × fewer brown dwarfs at 0.02-0.08 Msolar than the Trapezium. We discuss the implications of these results for theories of the IMF, and suggest that the lower frequency of brown dwarfs in Taurus relative to the Trapezium may result from the low-density star-forming environment, leading to larger minimum Jeans masses. Based on observations obtained at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, Keck Observatory, Steward Observatory, and the MMT Observatory. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation.

  7. Tracing the PAH-YSO Relationship in Nine LMC Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Lynn R.; Galaxy Evolution), SAGE (Surveying the Agents of

    2013-01-01

    I present the discovery of over 1000 Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in nine diverse star-forming regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (Carlson et al. 2012 A&A 542, 66). These sources are color-selected in the infrared using SAGE Spitzer IRAC bands and MIPS 24μm, and their spectral energy distributions are fit as in Robitaille et al. (2007) to determine their approximate physical characteristics and evolutionary stages. I then look at the physical distribution of emission from polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in these regions by comparing IRAC fluxes as in Povich et al. (2007) and identifying YSOs with significant PAH emission. The clearest PAH tracer is 8μm/4.5μm, as the [8.0] encompasses the strong 7.7μm feature, while the [4.5] has no PAH contribution. The YSO and PAH distributions are compared.

  8. Deep VLA observations of nearby star forming regions I: Barnard 59 and Lupus 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzib, S. A.; Loinard, L.; Medina, S.-N. X.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Mioduszewski, A. J.; Torres, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Barnard 59 and Lupus 1 are two nearby star-forming regions visible from the southern hemisphere. In this manuscript, we present deep (σ˜15 μJy) radio observations (ν=6 GHz) of these regions, and report the detection of a total of 114 sources. Thirteen of these sources are associated with known young stellar objects, nine in Barnard 59 and four in Lupus 1. The properties of the radio emission (spectral index and, in some cases, polarization) suggest a thermal origin for most young stellar objects. Only for two sources (Sz 65 and Sz 67) are there indications for a possible non-thermal origin. The remaining radio detections do not have counterparts at other wavelengths, and the number of sources detected per unit solid angle is in agreement with extragalactic number counts, suggesting that they are extragalactic sources.

  9. A kinematic analysis of the Giant star-forming Region of N11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Flores, Sergio; Barbá, Rodolfo; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Rubio, Mónica; Bosch, Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    In this work we present high resolution spectroscopic data of the giant star-forming region of N11, obtained with the GIRAFFE instrument at the Very Large Telescope. By using this data set, we find that most of the Hα emission lines profiles in this complex can be fitted by a single Gaussian, however, multiple emission line profiles can be observed in the central region of N11. By adding all the spectra, we derive the integrated Hα profile of this complex, which displays a width (σ) of about 12 km s-1 (corrected by instrumental and thermal width). We find that a single Gaussian fit on the integrated Hα profile leaves remaining wings, which can be fitted by a secondary broad Gaussian component. In addition, we find high velocity features, which spatially correlate with soft diffuse X-ray emission.

  10. 76 FR 30738 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-845 and Form G-845 Supplement, Revision of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... the Federal Register on February 22, 2011, at 76 FR 9805, allowing for a 60-day public comment period... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-845 and Form G- 845 Supplement, Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request...

  11. The electromagnetic form factors of the Λ in the timelike region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2016-10-01

    The reaction e+e- → Λ bar Λ is investigated for energies close to the threshold. Specific emphasis is put on the role played by the interaction in the final Λ bar Λ system which is taken into account rigorously. For that interaction a variety of Λ bar Λ potential models is employed that have been constructed for the analysis of the reaction p bar p → Λ bar Λ in the past. The enhancement of the effective form factor for energies close to the Λ bar Λ threshold, seen in pertinent experiments, is reproduced. Predictions for the Λ electromagnetic form factors GM and GE in the timelike region and for spin-dependent observables such as spin-correlation parameters are presented.

  12. Trigonometric parallaxes of star forming regions in the Perseus spiral arm

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y. K.; Brunthaler, A.; Menten, K. M.; Hachisuka, K.; Reid, M. J.; Dame, T. M.; Xu, Y. E-mail: ykchoi@kasi.re.kr

    2014-08-01

    We report trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions of water masers for 12 massive star forming regions in the Perseus spiral arm of the Milky Way as part of the Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy (BeSSel) Survey. Combining our results with 14 parallax measurements in the literature, we estimate a pitch angle of 9.°9 ± 1.°5 for a section of the Perseus arm. The three-dimensional Galactic peculiar motions of these sources indicate that on average they are moving toward the Galactic center and slower than the Galactic rotation.

  13. Kinematic Distances of Pre-main Sequence Stars in the Lupus Star-Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.; Bertout, C.

    2014-06-01

    The problem of the determination of distances has always played a central role in astronomy. However, little recent progress has been made in the distance determination of faint young stellar objects such as pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. Many of the PMS stars were neither observed by the Hipparcos satellite due to their magnitude nor have any trigonometric parallax measured from the ground due to their distance. Here we investigate the kinematic properties of the Lupus moving group with the primary objective of deriving individual parallaxes for each group member of this star-forming region.

  14. Desert Pavement Process and Form: Modes and Scales of Landscape Stability and Instability in Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Stephen G.; McFadden, Leslie D.; McDonald, Eric V.; Eppes, Martha C.; Young, Michael H.; Wood, Yvonne A.

    2014-05-01

    Desert pavements are recognized in arid landscapes around the world, developing via diminution of constructional/depositional landform relief and creating a 1-2 stone thick armor over a "stone free" layer. Surface exposure dating demonstrates that clasts forming the desert pavements are maintained at the land surface over hundreds of thousands of years, as aeolian fines are deposited on the land surface, transported into the underlying parent material and incorporated into accretionary soil horizons (e.g., the stone free or vesicular [Av] horizon). This surface armor provides long-term stability over extensive regions of the landscape. Over shorter time periods and at the landform-element scale, dynamic surficial processes (i.e., weathering, runoff) continue to modify the pavement form. Clast size reduction in comparison to underlying parent material, along with armoring and packing of clasts in pavements contribute to their persistence, and studies of crack orientations in pavement clasts indicate physical weathering and diminution of particle size are driven by diurnal solar insolation. Over geologic time, cracks form and propagate from tensile stresses related to temporal and spatial gradients in temperature that evolve and rotate in alignment with the sun's rays. Observed multimodal nature of crack orientations appear related to seasonally varying, latitude-dependent temperature fields resulting from solar angle and weather conditions. Surface properties and their underlying soil profiles vary across pavement surfaces, forming a landscape mosaic and controlling surface hydrology, ecosystem function and the ultimate life-cycle of arid landscapes. In areas of well-developed pavements, surface infiltration and soluble salt concentrations indicate that saturated hydraulic conductivity of Av horizons decline on progressively older alluvial fan surfaces. Field observations and measurements from well-developed desert pavement surfaces landforms also yield

  15. An all-sky sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Alexander, Michael J.; Kerton, Charles R.; Arvidsson, Kim

    2014-04-01

    We present an all-sky sample of 984 candidate intermediate-mass Galactic star-forming regions that are color selected from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source Catalog and morphologically classify each object using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) images. Of the 984 candidates, 616 are probable star-forming regions (62.6%), 128 are filamentary structures (13.0%), 39 are point-like objects of unknown nature (4.0%), and 201 are galaxies (20.4%). We conduct a study of four of these regions, IRAS 00259+5625, IRAS 00420+5530, IRAS 01080+5717, and IRAS 05380+2020, at Galactic latitudes |b| > 5° using optical spectroscopy from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory, along with near-infrared photometry from the Two-Micron All Sky Survey, to investigate their stellar content. New optical spectra, color-magnitude diagrams, and color-color diagrams reveal their extinctions, spectrophotometric distances, and the presence of small stellar clusters containing 20-78 M {sub ☉} of stars. These low-mass diffuse star clusters contain ∼65-250 stars for a typical initial mass function, including one or more mid-B stars as their most massive constituents. Using infrared spectral energy distributions we identify young stellar objects near each region and assign probable masses and evolutionary stages to the protostars. The total infrared luminosity lies in the range 190-960 L {sub ☉}, consistent with the sum of the luminosities of the individually identified young stellar objects.

  16. A Survey of Large Molecules of Biological Interest toward Selected High Mass Star Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remijan, A.; Shiao, Y.-S.; Friedel, D. N.; Meier, D. S.; Snyder, L. E.

    2004-01-01

    We have surveyed three high mass Galactic star forming regions for interstellar methanol (CH3OH), formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), methyl formate (HCOOCH3), methyl cyanide (CH3CN), and ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) with the BIMA Array. From our observations, we have detected two new sources of interstellar HCOOH toward the hot core regions G19.61-0.23 and W75N. We have also made the first detections of CH3CH2CN and HCOOCH3 toward G19.61-0.23. The relative HCOOH/HCOOCH3 abundance ratio toward G19.61-0.23 is 0.18 which is comparable to the abundance ratios found by Liu and colleagues toward Sgr B2(N-LMH), Orion and W51(approximately 0.10). We have made the first detection of HCOOCH3 toward W75N. The relative HCOOH/HCOOCH3 abundance ratio toward W75N is 0.26 which is more than twice as large as the abundance ratios found by Liu and colleagues. Furthermore, the hot core regions around W75N show a chemical differentiation between the O and N cores similar to what is seen toward the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge and W3(OH) and W3(H2O). It is also apparent from our observations that the high mass star forming region G45.47+0.05 does not contain any compact hot molecular core and as a consequence its chemistry may be similar to cold dark clouds. Finally, the formation of CH3COOH appears to favor HMCs with well mixed N and O, despite the fact that CH3COOH does not contain a N atom. If proved to be true, this is an important constraint on CH3COOH formation and possibly other structurally similar biomolecules.

  17. Three acoustic forms of Allen's galagos (primates; Galagonidae) in the Central African region.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    This study identifies populations currently classified as Allen's galago (Galago alleni) at ten locations in Gabon, Cameroon and Bioko Island. Morphological diversity was evident both within and between populations. Attention to the loud calls revealed three distinct vocal profiles which are consistent within biogeographical regions. This work is based on the Recognition Concept of Species which refers to a Specific Mate Recognition System. Galagos rely less on visual signals than diurnal primates and recognise each other principally by means of auditory and olfactory signals. Galagos possess repertoires of loud calls relating to contact and alarm which are thought to be species-specific. Other studies of nocturnal prosimians (galagos, tarsiers) have demonstrated that the unique loud call repertoires are reliable indicators of species boundaries; whereas characters such as body size and pelage coloration are highly variable, even within populations. The vocal data in this study provide evidence of at least three acoustic forms of galago within the Allen's group which are predicted to represent three distinct species: the Allen's form on Bioko Island and south-west Cameroon, the Gabon form in southern Cameroon and northern Gabon and the Makandé form in Gabon south of the Ogooué river. Some populations may be vulnerable to extinction due to limited distributions and habitat destruction.

  18. Water in Star-forming Regions with Herschel (WISH): recent results and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2012-03-01

    Water is a key molecule in the physics and chemistry of star- and planet-forming regions. In the `Water in Star-forming Regions with Herschel' (WISH) Key Program, we have obtained a comprehensive set of water data toward a large sample of well-characterized protostars, covering a wide range of masses and luminosities --from the lowest to the highest mass protostars--, as well as evolutionary stages --from pre-stellar cores to disks. Lines of both ortho- and para-H_2O and their isotopologues, as well as chemically related hydrides, are observed with the HIFI and PACS instruments. The data elucidate the physical processes responsible for the warm gas, probe dynamical processes associated with forming stars and planets (outflow, infall, expansion), test basic chemical processes and reveal the chemical evolution of water and the oxygen-reservoir into planet-forming disks. In this brief talk a few recent WISH highlights will be presented, including determinations of the water abundance in each of the different physical components (inner and outer envelope, outflow) and constraints on the ortho/para ratio. Special attention will be given to trends found across the sample, especially the similarity in profiles from low to high-mass protostars and the evolution of the gas-phase water abundance from prestellar cores to disks. More details can be found at http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/WISH, whereas overviews are given in van Dishoeck et al. (2011, PASP 123, 138), Kristensen & van Dishoeck (2011, Astronomische Nachrichten 332, 475) and Bergin & van Dishoeck (2012, Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. A).

  19. Regional Observation of Seismic Activity in Baekdu Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Che, Il-Young; Shin, Jin-Soo; Chi, Heon-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Seismic unrest in Baekdu Mountain area between North Korea and Northeast China region has called attention to geological research community in Northeast Asia due to her historical and cultural importance. Seismic bulletin shows level of seismic activity in the area is higher than that of Jilin Province of Northeast China. Local volcanic observation shows a symptom of magmatic unrest in period between 2002 and 2006. Regional seismic data have been used to analyze seismic activity of the area. The seismic activity could be differentiated from other seismic phenomena in the region by the analysis.

  20. Active-region designs in quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zasavitskii, I I

    2012-10-31

    This paper analyses the development of active-region designs in quantum cascade lasers. Active-region designs have been demonstrated to date that employ various radiative transitions (vertical, diagonal, interminiband and interband). The lower laser level is depopulated through nonradiative transitions, such as one- or two-phonon (and even three-phonon) relaxation or bound state {yields} continuum transitions. Advances in active-region designs and energy diagram optimisation in the past few years have led to significant improvements in important characteristics of quantum cascade lasers, such as their output power, emission bandwidth, characteristic temperature and efficiency. (invited paper)

  1. The Essay: Theory and Pedagogy for an Active Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilker, Paul

    Calling for a radical reexamination of the traditional foundation of composition instruction--the thesis/support form, this book argues that the essay, with its informality, conversational tone, meditative mood, and integration of form and content, is better suited to developmental, epistemological, ideological, and feminist rhetorical…

  2. Sulphur abundance determinations in star-forming regions - I. Ionization correction factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dors, O. L.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Hägele, G. F.; Cardaci, M. V.; Krabbe, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we used a grid of photoionization models combined with stellar population synthesis models to derive reliable ionization correction factors (ICFs) for the sulphur in star-forming regions. These models cover a large range of nebular parameters and yielding ionic abundances in consonance with those derived through optical and infrared observational data of star-forming regions. From our theoretical ICFs, we suggested an α value of 3.27 ± 0.01 in the classical Stasińska formulae. We compared the total sulphur abundance in the gas phase of a large sample of objects by using our theoretical ICF and other approaches. In average, the differences between the determinations via the use of the different ICFs considered are similar to the uncertainties in the S/H estimations. Nevertheless, we noted that for some objects it could reach up to about 0.3 dex for the low-metallicity regime. Despite of the large scatter of the points, we found a trend of S/O ratio to decrease with the metallicity, independently of the ICF used to compute the sulphur total abundance.

  3. Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk.

    PubMed

    Eisner, J A

    2007-05-31

    Planetary systems (ours included) formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner-disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. Although the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star-forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-infrared interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-infrared emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-infrared interferometric observations that probe the gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to the dust, within one astronomical unit (1 au, the Sun-Earth distance) of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapour and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapour is probably produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets.

  4. The Nature of Transition Disks in Nearby Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieza, Lucas A.; Schreiber, M. R.; Romero, G. A.; Orellana, M.; Williams, J. P.; Merin, B.

    2011-01-01

    We present an update on our ongoing project to characterize a large sample of Spitzer selected transition disks located in several star-forming regions. Transition objects are pre-main-sequence stars with optically thin inner disks and optically thick outer disks. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain their inner opacity holes: planet formation, grain growth, photoevaporation, and tidal truncation in tight binaries. These mechanisms, all relevant to disk evolution in general, can be distinguished when disk masses, accretion rates, and multiplicity information are available. We have already completed our study of Ophiuchus objects, presenting the results from Adaptive Optics (AO) imaging, submillimeter photometry, and echelle spectroscopy observations. We are currently working on several other regions, including Taurus-Auriga, Perseus, Serpens, and Lupus. Our results show that transition disks are a very heterogeneous group of objects with a wide range of SED morphologies, disk masses ( < 0.5 to 40 Mjup), and accretion rates (<10E-11 to 10E-7 Msolar/yr). Since the properties of our transition disks point toward distinct processes driving the evolution of each disk, we have been able to identify very strong candidates for the following disk categories: circumbinary disks, grain-growth dominated disks, photoevaporating disks, debris disks, and (giant) planet-forming disks.

  5. Revealing spectacular, young and sequential star forming regions of the Trifid Nebula with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    2004-12-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of a young HII region, the Trifid Nebula (M20), reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, with recently formed massive protostars and numerous young stars illuminating the surrounding molecular clouds from which they formed and unveiling large scale filamentary dark clouds, which demonstrate a special evolutionary stage of HII regions. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Infrared emission is detected from the central O star complex, including the protoplanetary disks. Large populations of young stars including three dozen protostars (Classes I and 0) and over one hundred Class II pre-main sequence stars, are identified. The protostars are clustered along the filamentary dark lanes on western side of M20, which include the reflection nebula in the northern portion of the Trifid. Class II stars are distributed along the ionization front at the circular shape of HII regions. We suggest that the distribution of the protostars revealed by Spitzer is a result of sequential star formation triggered by the expansion of the young HII region of the Trifid Nebula along the filamentary dark clouds, where the massive stars tend to form in groups. The Spitzer images revealed clusters of protostars within the Class 0 objects, which were previously believed to be "starless" cores. These Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, now uncover the Class 0 protostars in infrared that are powering the SiO and CO outflows. Clusters of protostars are also detected from each of the continuum peaks TC3 and TC4, and some of these sources feature silicate absorption lines in their spectral energy distribution. The driving infrared source of a SiO outflow and submillimeter core TC1, near the exciting O star, is detected within a heated, infrared shell surrounding a dark, cold envelope. Lastly, the images also unveil three infrared sources lying along axis of the photoionized jet HH399 and

  6. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality

  7. A kinematic study and membership analysis of the Lupus star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Bertout, C.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: A precise determination of the distance to individual stars is required to reliably determine the fundamental parameters (mass and age) of young stellar objects. This paper is dedicated to investigating the kinematic properties of the Lupus moving group of young stars with the primary objective of deriving individual parallaxes for each group member. Methods: We identify those stars in the Lupus star-forming region that define the comoving association of young stars by utilizing our new and improved convergent point search method that allows us to derive the precise position of the convergent point of the comoving association from the stars' proper motions. We used published proper motion catalogs and searched the literature for radial velocities, which are needed to compute individual parallaxes. We supplemented the radial velocity data with new measurements from spectroscopic observations performed with the FEROS spectrograph mounted on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope at La Silla. Results: We identify a comoving group with 109 pre-main sequence stars and candidates that define the kinematic properties of the Lupus low-mass star-forming region. We derive individual parallaxes for stars with known radial velocity and tentative parallaxes for the remaining group members by assuming that all stars share the same space motion. The convergent point method, combined with the k-NN algorithm, makes it possible to distinguish the Lupus and Upper Centaurus Lupus stars from the adjacent Scorpius-Centaurus association. We find significant depth effects in this region and show that the classical T Tauri stars, located in the close vicinity of the Lupus molecular clouds, form a background population, while the weak-emission line T Tauri stars are dispersed not only in angular extent but also in depth. Conclusions: The newly derived individual parallaxes will be used in a forthcoming paper to refine the masses and ages of Lupus T Tauri stars, with the aim of better

  8. Structure and Form. Elementary Science Activity Series, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Frank F.

    This book is number 2 of a series of elementary science books that presents a wealth of ideas for science activities for the elementary school teacher. Each activity includes a standard set of information designed to help teachers determine the activity's appropriateness for their students, plan its implementation, and help children focus on a…

  9. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Nuruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p < 0.001)). Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP), containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons' active ageing level in Thailand. PMID:27375903

  10. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Nuruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p < 0.001)). Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP), containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons' active ageing level in Thailand.

  11. VERY LARGE ARRAY OH ZEEMAN OBSERVATIONS OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION S88B

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, A. P.; Eftimova, M.; Brogan, C. L.; Bourke, T. L.; Troland, T. H.

    2013-04-10

    We present observations of the Zeeman effect in OH thermal absorption main lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz taken with the Very Large Array toward the star-forming region S88B. The OH absorption profiles toward this source are complicated, and contain several blended components toward a number of positions. Almost all of the OH absorbing gas is located in the eastern parts of S88B, toward the compact continuum source S88B-2 and the eastern parts of the extended continuum source S88B-1. The ratio of 1665/1667 MHz OH line intensities indicates the gas is likely highly clumped, in agreement with other molecular emission line observations in the literature. S88-B appears to present a similar geometry to the well-known star-forming region M17, in that there is an edge-on eastward progression from ionized to molecular gas. The detected magnetic fields appear to mirror this eastward transition; we detected line-of-sight magnetic fields ranging from 90 to 400 {mu}G, with the lowest values of the field to the southwest of the S88B-1 continuum peak, and the highest values to its northeast. We used the detected fields to assess the importance of the magnetic field in S88B by a number of methods; we calculated the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressures, we calculated the critical field necessary to completely support the cloud against self-gravity and compared it to the observed field, and we calculated the ratio of mass to magnetic flux in terms of the critical value of this parameter. All these methods indicated that the magnetic field in S88B is dynamically significant, and should provide an important source of support against gravity. Moreover, the magnetic energy density is in approximate equipartition with the turbulent energy density, again pointing to the importance of the magnetic field in this region.

  12. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  13. Photospheric Magnetic Diffusion by Measuring Moments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Photospheric magnetic surface diffusion is an important constraint for the solar dynamo. The HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) program automatically identify all magnetic regions above a certain flux. In our study we measure the moments of ARs that are no longer actively emerging and can thereby give us good statistical constraints on photospheric diffusion. We also present the diffusion properties as a function of latitude, flux density, and single polarity (leading or following) within each HARP.

  14. Radio Coronal Magnetography of a Large Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Timothy S.; Gary, Dale E.; White, Stephen; Fleishman, Gregory; Chen, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative knowledge of coronal magnetic fields is fundamental to understanding energetic phenomena such as solar flares. Flares occur in solar active regions where strong, non-potential magnetic fields provide free energy. While constraints on the coronal magnetic field topology are readily available through high resolution SXR and EUV imaging of solar active regions, useful quantitative measurements of coronal magnetic fields have thus far been elusive. Recent progress has been made at infrared (IR) wavelengths in exploiting both the Zeeman and Hanle effects to infer the line-of-sight magnetic field strength or the orientation of the magnetic field vector in the plane of the sky above the solar limb. However, no measurements of coronal magnetic fields against the solar disk are possible using IR observations. Radio observations of gyroresonance emission from active regions offer the means of measuring coronal magnetic fields above the limb and on the solar disk. In particular, for plasma plasma conditions in the solar corona, active regions typically become optically thick to emission over a range of radio frequencies through gyroresonance absorption at a low harmonic of the electron gyrofrequency. The specific range of resonant frequencies depends on the range of coronal magnetic field strengths present in the active region.The Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array was used in November 2014 to image NOAA/USAF active region AR12209 over a continuous frequency range of 1-8 GHz, corresponding to a wavelength range of 3.75-30 cm. This frequency range is sensitive to coronal magnetic field strengths ranging from ~120-1400G. The active region was observed on four different dates - November 18, 20, 22, and 24 - during which the active region longitude ranged from -15 to +70 degrees, providing a wide range of aspect angles. In this paper we provide a preliminary description of the coronal magnetic field measurements derived from the radio observations.

  15. Carbon gas in SMC low-metallicity star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena-Torres, M. A.; Israel, F. P.; Okada, Y.; Güsten, R.; Stutzki, J.; Risacher, C.; Simon, R.; Zinnecker, H.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents [ CII ], [ CI ] and CO emission line maps of the star-forming regions N 66, N 25+N 26, and N 88 in the metal-poor Local Group dwarf galaxy SMC. The spatial and velocity structure of the large HII region N 66 reveals an expanding ring of shocked molecular gas centered on the exciting star cluster NGC 346, whereas a more distant dense molecular cloud is being eroded by UV radiation from the same cluster. In the N 25+N 26 and N 88 maps, diffuse [ CII ] emission at a relatively low surface brightness extends well beyond the compact boundaries of the bright emission associated with the HII regions. In all regions, the distribution of this bright [ CII ] emission and the less prominent [ CI ] emission closely follows the outline of the CO complexes, but the intensity of the [ CII ] and [ CI ] emission is generally anticorrelated, which can be understood by the action of photodissociation and photoionization processes. Notwithstanding the overall similarity of CO and [ CII ] maps, the intensity ratio of these lines varies significantly, mostly due to changes in CO brightness. [ CII ] emission line profiles are up to 50% wider in velocity than corresponding CO profiles. A radiative transfer analysis shows that the [ CII ] line is the dominant tracer of (CO-dark) molecular hydrogen in the SMC. CO emission traces only a minor fraction of the total amount of gas. The similarity of the spatial distribution and line profile shape, and the dominance of molecular gas associated with [ CII ] rather than CO emission imply that in the low-metallicity environment of the SMC the small amount of dense molecular gas traced by CO is embedded in the much more extended molecular gas traced only by [ CII ] emission. The contribution from neutral atomic and ionized hydrogen zones is negligible in the star-forming regions observed. The reduced datacubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via

  16. Bridging the gap: A Spitzer Census of Intermediate-Mass Star Forming Regions from Galactic Surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerton, Charles; Kobulnicky, Chip

    2008-03-01

    High-mass star formation (M>10 Msun) appears to proceed through different channels than low-mass star formation (M<2 Msun). The differences between these two regimes are thought to include not only the timescales and masses involved but also the initial conditions and operative physics within the parent molecular clouds. We propose an archival analysis of ~50 *intermediate-mass* star formation (SF) regions that straddle the boundary between these two regimes---regions forming stars up to 4-8 Msun. These, relatively unknown and unstudied IR sources are selected by their IRAS colors and lie within the Spitzer GLIMPSE+MIPSGAL legacy survey fields. Compared to their more famous high-mass SF cousins (e.g., the Westerhout 'W' HII objects), these regions are radio-quiet, relatively nearby, and structurally less complex. We will use complementary public-domain 13CO, 21-cm, and radio continuum Galactic surveys to 1) confirm the intermediate-mass SF nature of these objects, 2) compile a catalog and an atlas of mid-IR morphologies, 3) estimate distances, 4) calculate total luminosities and gas masses of affiliated molecular and atomic material, and 5) identify associated young stellar objects using IRAC+[24] colors. This work will provide a benchmark useful for contrasting the star formation process in both lower-mass and higher-mass SF environments.

  17. Periodic auroral forms and geomagnetic field oscillations in the 1400 MLT region

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A. ); Vo, H.; Venkatesan, D.; Cogger, L.L. ); Erlandson, R.E.; Zanetti, L.J.; Bythrow, P.F.; Anderson, B.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The UV images obtained with the Viking satellite often show bright features which resemble beads or pearls aligned in the east-west direction between noon and 1800 MLT. Viking acquired a series of 25 UV images during a 28-min period on July 29, 1986, which showed a distinct series of periodic bright features in this region. Magnetic field and hot plasma measurements obtained by Viking confirm that the UV emissions are colocated with the field line projection of an upward-flowing region 1 Birkeland current and precipitating energetic ({approximately}200 eV) electrons. The magnetic field and electric field measurements show transverse oscillations with a nearly constant period of about 3.5 min from 67{degree} invariant latitude equatorward up to the location of the large-scale Birkeland current system near 76{degree} invariant latitude. The electric field oscillations lead the magnetic field oscillations by about a quarter-period. The authors interpret the observed oscillations as standing Alfven waves driven at a frequency near the local resonance frequency by a large-scale wave in the boundary layer. They propose that the energy flux of the precipitating low-energy electrons in this afternoon region is modulated by this boundary wave and produces the periodic UV emission features. The results of this study support the view that large-scale oscillations of magnetospheric boundaries, possibly associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, can modulate currents, particles, and auroral forms.

  18. High angular resolution observations of star-forming regions with BETTII and SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Maxime; Rinehart, Stephen; Mundy, Lee G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Dhabal, Arnab; Fixsen, Dale J.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Stephen F.; Mentzell, Eric; Silverberg, Robert F.; Staguhn, Johannes; Veach, Todd; Cardiff BETTII Team

    2016-01-01

    High angular resolution observations in the far-infrared are important to understand the star formation process in embedded star clusters where extinction is large and stars form in close proximity. The material taking part in the star forming process is heated by the young stars and emits primarily in the far-IR; hence observations of the far-IR dust emission yields vital information about the gravitational potential, the mass and energy distribution, and core/star formation process. Previous observatories, such as Herschel, Spitzer and WISE lack the angular resolution required to study these dense star forming cores and are further limited by saturation in bright cores.The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is pioneering the path to sub-arcsecond resolution at far-IR wavelengths. This thesis talk discusses the instrumental challenges in building BETTII, as well as results from our SOFIA survey to illustrate the potential of higher-angular resolution observations. The 8m-long two element interferometer is being tested at NASA GSFC and is scheduled for first flight in fall 2016. BETTII will provide 0.5 to 1 arcsecond spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of 10 to 100 between 30 and 90 microns, where most of the dust continuum emission peaks in local star forming regions. It will achieve spatially-resolved spectroscopy of bright, dense cores with unprecedented high definition. This talk focuses on the main challenges and solutions associated with building BETTII: thermal stability, attitude/pointing control, and path length stabilization. In each of these areas we look at the trade-off between design, control, and knowledge in order to achieve the best-possible instrumental capability and sensitivity.As a first step towards resolving cluster cores, we surveyed 10 nearby star-forming clusters with SOFIA FORCAST at 11, 19, 31 and 37 microns. The FORCAST instrument has the highest angular resolution currently available in

  19. 76 FR 13699 - Reports, Forms and Recordkeeping Requirements Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ..., companies chartering ships from MARAD, and companies having Title XI guarantee obligations. Form(s): MA-172... TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Reports, Forms and Recordkeeping Requirements Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Maritime Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice and request for...

  20. DISK EVOLUTION IN THE THREE NEARBY STAR-FORMING REGIONS OF TAURUS, CHAMAELEON, AND OPHIUCHUS

    SciTech Connect

    Furlan, E.; Watson, Dan M.; McClure, M. K. E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.ed

    2009-10-01

    We analyze samples of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of T Tauri stars in the Ophiuchus, Taurus, and Chamaeleon I star-forming regions, whose median ages lie in the <1-2 Myr range. The median mid-infrared spectra of objects in these three regions are similar in shape, suggesting, on average, similar disk structures. When normalized to the same stellar luminosity, the medians follow each other closely, implying comparable mid-infrared excess emission from the circumstellar disks. We use the spectral index between 13 and 31 {mu}m and the equivalent width of the 10 {mu}m silicate emission feature to identify objects whose disk configuration departs from that of a continuous, optically thick accretion disk. Transitional disks, whose steep 13-31 {mu}m spectral slope and near-IR flux deficit reveal inner disk clearing, occur with about the same frequency of a few percent in all three regions. Objects with unusually large 10 {mu}m equivalent widths are more common (20%-30%); they could reveal the presence of disk gaps filled with optically thin dust. Based on their medians and fraction of evolved disks, T Tauri stars in Taurus and Chamaeleon I are very alike. Disk evolution sets in early, since already the youngest region, the Ophiuchus core (L1688), has more settled disks with larger grains. Our results indicate that protoplanetary disks show clear signs of dust evolution at an age of a few Myr, even as early as approx1 Myr, but age is not the only factor determining the degree of evolution during the first few million years of a disk's lifetime.

  1. A cytosolic activator of DNA replication is tyrosine phosphorylated in its active form.

    PubMed

    Fresa, K L; Autieri, M V; Coffman, F D; Georgoff, I; Cohen, S

    1993-04-01

    Cytosolic extracts from actively dividing lymphoid cells have been shown to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. An initiating factor in such extracts (activator of DNA replication; ADR) is a > 90-kDa aprotinin-binding protein whose activity is inhibitable not only by aprotinin, but also by several other protease inhibitors as well. Although cytosol from non-proliferating lymphocytes is devoid of ADR activity, we have shown that these preparations can be induced to express ADR activity by brief exposure to a membrane-enriched fraction of spontaneously proliferating MOLT-4 cells via a kinase-dependent mechanism. In the present study, we examine the role of tyrosine kinases in this process. Three inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (genistein, kaempferol, and quercetin) can inhibit the in vitro generation of ADR activity. In vitro generation of ADR activity is associated with the de novo phosphorylation of several proteins, many of which are detectable using anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies. ADR itself may be tyrosine phosphorylated in active form as immunoprecipitation using such monoclonal antibodies leads to the depletion of its activity. Moreover, immunoprecipitation results in the removal of several de novo tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, including species at approximately 122, 105, 93, 86, 79, and 65 kDa. A subset of de novo-phosphorylated proteins, migrating at approximately 105, 93, and 70 kDa, also bound to aprotinin, suggesting that at least one of these proteins may represent ADR itself. PMID:7683270

  2. Mechanistic insights into the first Lygus-active β-pore forming protein.

    PubMed

    Jerga, Agoston; Chen, Danqi; Zhang, Chunfen; Fu, Jinping; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Wang, Yanfei; Duff, Stephen M G; Howard, Jennifer E; Rydel, Timothy J; Evdokimov, Artem G; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Evans, Adam; Bolognesi, Renata; Park, Yoonseong; Haas, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-15

    The cotton pests Lygus hesperus and Lygus lineolaris can be controlled by expressing Cry51Aa2.834_16 in cotton. Insecticidal activity of pore-forming proteins is generally associated with damage to the midgut epithelium due to pores, and their biological specificity results from a set of key determinants including proteolytic activation and receptor binding. We conducted mechanistic studies to gain insight into how the first Lygus-active β-pore forming protein variant functions. Biophysical characterization revealed that the full-length Cry51Aa2.834_16 was a stable dimer in solution, and when exposed to Lygus saliva or to trypsin, the protein underwent proteolytic cleavage at the C-terminus of each of the subunits, resulting in dissociation of the dimer to two separate monomers. The monomer showed tight binding to a specific protein in Lygus brush border membranes, and also formed a membrane-associated oligomeric complex both in vitro and in vivo. Chemically cross-linking the β-hairpin to the Cry51Aa2.834_16 body rendered the protein inactive, but still competent to compete for binding sites with the native protein in vivo. Our study suggests that disassociation of the Cry51Aa2.834_16 dimer into monomeric units with unoccupied head-region and sterically unhindered β-hairpin is required for brush border membrane binding, oligomerization, and the subsequent steps leading to insect mortality. PMID:27001423

  3. Self-similar fragmentation regulated by magnetic fields in a region forming massive stars.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-bai; Yuen, Ka Ho; Otto, Frank; Leung, Po Kin; Sridharan, T K; Zhang, Qizhou; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Qiu, Keping

    2015-04-23

    Most molecular clouds are filamentary or elongated. For those forming low-mass stars (<8 solar masses), the competition between self-gravity and turbulent pressure along the dynamically dominant intercloud magnetic field (10 to 100 parsecs) shapes the clouds to be elongated either perpendicularly or parallel to the fields. A recent study also suggested that on the scales of 0.1 to 0.01 parsecs, such fields are dynamically important within cloud cores forming massive stars (>8 solar masses). But whether the core field morphologies are inherited from the intercloud medium or governed by cloud turbulence is unknown, as is the effect of magnetic fields on cloud fragmentation at scales of 10 to 0.1 parsecs. Here we report magnetic-field maps inferred from polarimetric observations of NGC 6334, a region forming massive stars, on the 100 to 0.01 parsec scale. NGC 6334 hosts young star-forming sites where fields are not severely affected by stellar feedback, and their directions do not change much over the entire scale range. This means that the fields are dynamically important. The ordered fields lead to a self-similar gas fragmentation: at all scales, there exist elongated gas structures nearly perpendicular to the fields. Many gas elongations have density peaks near the ends, which symmetrically pinch the fields. The field strength is proportional to the 0.4th power of the density, which is an indication of anisotropic gas contractions along the field. We conclude that magnetic fields have a crucial role in the fragmentation of NGC 6334.

  4. Chemical characterization of the early evolutionary phases of high-mass star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is a very complex process and up to date no comprehensive theory about it exists. This thesis studies the early stages of high-mass star-forming regions and employs astrochemistry as a tool to probe their different physical conditions. We split the evolutionary sequence into four observationally motivated stages that are based on a classification proposed in the literature. The sequence is characterized by an increase of the temperatures and densities that strongly influences the chemistry in the different stages. We observed a sample of 59 high-mass star-forming regions that cover the whole sequence and statistically characterized the chemical compositions of the different stages. We determined average column densities of 18 different molecular species and found generally increasing abundances with stage. We fitted them for each stage with a 1D model, such that the result of the best fit to the previous stage was used as new input for the following. This is a unique approach and allowed us to infer physical properties like the temperature and density structure and yielded a typical chemical lifetime for the high-mass star-formation process of 1e5 years. The 18 analyzed molecular species also included four deuterated molecules whose chemistry is particularly sensitive to thermal history and thus is a promising tool to infer chemical ages. We found decreasing trends of the D/H ratios with evolutionary stage for 3 of the 4 molecular species and that the D/H ratio depends more on the fraction of warm and cold gas than on the total amount of gas. That indicates different chemical pathways for the different molecules and confirms the potential use of deuterated species as chemical age indicators. In addition, we mapped a low-mass star forming region in order to study the cosmic ray ionization rate, which is an important parameter in chemical models. While in chemical models it is commonly fixed, we found that it ! strongly varies with

  5. Earth resources-regional transfer activity contracts review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensko, J., Jr.; Daniels, J. L.; Downs, S. W., Jr.; Jones, N. L.; Morton, R. R.; Paludan, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    A regional transfer activity contracts review held by the Earth Resources Office was summarized. Contracts in the earth resources field primarily directed toward applications of satellite data and technology in solution of state and regional problems were reviewed. A summary of the progress of each contract was given in order to share experiences of researchers across a seven state region. The region included Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina. Research in several earth science disciplines included forestry, limnology, water resources, land use, geology, and mathematical modeling. The use of computers for establishment of information retrieval systems was also emphasized.

  6. STYPu fuel form activities, March 1-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The SRP portion of this report summarizes production STYPuO2 fuel forms for use in radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG's) in the Plutonium Fuel Form (PuFF) Facility at the Savannah River Plant. The PuFF Facility began producing iridium-encapsulated, 62.5-watt STYPuO2 right circular cylinders for GPHS (General Purpose Heat Source) RTG's in June 1980; this program was completed in December 1983. The PuFF Facility has been placed in a production readiness mode of operation pending funding of additional heat source programs.

  7. A Proper-Motion Census of Star-Forming Regions in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam; Stauffer, John; Evans, Neal; Allers, Katelyn; Dunham, Michael; Lu, Jessica; Jaffe, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Over the past decade, Spitzer has revolutionized our understanding of the membership, mass functions, and disk populations of the star-forming regions in the solar neighborhood. However, the faintest members of these populations have remained elusive, particularly in highly-embedded regions of ongoing star formation. Mid-infrared color selection is not effective at distinguishing proto-brown dwarfs and disk-free young stars from dusty galaxies or reddened field stars, and optical/NIR spectroscopic confirmation remains too expensive. The most cost-effective method to identify this missing population is to confirm common proper motion with their host regions. The astrometric performance of IRAC has been considered insufficient for this task, but as we demonstrate, our new characterization of the IRAC optical distortion improves the astrometric noise floor from 0.1-0.2 arcsec to 0.01-0.02 arcsec at each epoch, corresponding to proper motion uncertainties as low as 2 mas/yr. We propose a Spitzer/IRAC Exploration Science program for 560 hours to conduct second-epoch imaging for a proper-motion search of six stellar populations: Ophiuchus, Lupus, Chamaeleon, Perseus, Taurus, and Corona Australis. We will observe dense mosaics that span the areas which were previously observed during the cryogenic mission. In combination with the existing first-epoch astrometry, we will measure proper motions with uncertainties of <=5 mas/yr for sources as faint as m_[3.6] = 17.5, reaching photospheric fluxes corresponding to 1-2 MJup at 1 Myr. Our census will reveal the shape and slope of the proto(sub)stellar luminosity function, identify free-floating counterparts of young giant planets, search for the dynamical signatures of star formation models, and study disk evolution/dispersal and planet formation around the youngest and lowest-mass primaries. In summary, our program will unveil the last unidentified members in the benchmark star-forming regions which have been studied so

  8. THE FORMATION AND MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OF ACTIVE-REGION FILAMENTS OBSERVED BY NVST, SDO, AND HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Xiang, Y. Y.; Kong, D. F.; Yang, L. H.; Pan, G. M.

    2015-08-15

    To better understand the properties of solar active-region filaments, we present a detailed study on the formation and magnetic structures of two active-region filaments in active region NOAA 11884 during a period of four days. It is found that the shearing motion of the opposite magnetic polarities and the rotation of the small sunspots with negative polarity play an important role in the formation of two active-region filaments. During the formation of these two active-region filaments, one foot of the filaments was rooted in a small sunspot with negative polarity. The small sunspot rotated not only around another small sunspot with negative polarity, but also around the center of its umbra. By analyzing the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation using the vector magnetic fields in the photosphere, twisted structures were found in the two active-region filaments prior to their eruptions. These results imply that the magnetic fields were dragged by the shearing motion between opposite magnetic polarities and became more horizontal. The sunspot rotation twisted the horizontal magnetic fields and finally formed the twisted active-region filaments.

  9. Tracking Active Region NOAA 12192 in Multiple Carrington Rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, Sushant C.; Hill, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Active region NOAA 12192 appeared on the visible solar disk on October 18, 2014 and grew rapidly into the largest such region since 1990. During its entire transit across the Earth facing side of the Sun, it produced a significant number of X- and M-class flares. The combination of front-side and helioseismic far-side images clearly indicated that it lived through several Carrington rotations. In this paper, using Dopplergrams from GONG and HMI, we present a study on mode parameters, viz. oscillation frequencies, amplitude, and sub-surface flows and investigate how these vary with the evolution of active region in multiple rotations. We also present a detailed comparison between NOAA 10486 (the biggest active region in cycle 23) and NOAA 12192, and discuss the similarities/differences between them.

  10. Spectacular Spitzer images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a young, massive-star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    2005-07-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, demonstrating its special evolutionary stage: recently-formed massive protostars and numerous young stars, including a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed and unveiling large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Multiple protostars, previously defined as Class 0 from dust continuum and molecular outflow observations, are revealed in the infrared within the cold dust continuum peaks TC3 and TC4. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each; the newly-discovered infrared protostar in TC2 is the driving source of the HH399 jet. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~150 young stellar objects (YSO) and classify them into different evolutionary stages, and also revealed a new class of YSO which are bright at 24μm but with spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8μm; we name these sources ``Hot excess'' YSO. Despite of expectation that Class 0 sources would be ``starless'' cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars; the mid-infrared emission cannot arise from the same location as the mm-wave emission, and instead must arise from a much smaller region with less intervening extinction to the central accretion. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive stars are located at the center of the cluster and are formed simultaneously with low-mass stars. The angular and mass distributions of protostars within the dust cores imply that these early protostars are

  11. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  12. Universities and Economic Development Activities: A UK Regional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decter, Moira; Cave, Frank; Rose, Mary; Peers, Gill; Fogg, Helen; Smith, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    A number of UK universities prioritize economic development or regeneration activities and for some of these universities such activities are the main focus of their knowledge transfer work. This study compares two regions of the UK--the North West and the South East of England--which have very different levels of economic performance.…

  13. New HH objects in star-forming regions: Parsec-scale outflows in GM 2 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikogossian, E. G.; Magakian, T. Yu.; Movsessian, T. A.

    2007-09-01

    We examine the star-forming region in a molecular cloud with the coordinates l = 33.30°, b = 0.25° at a distance of 1.7 kpc, in which the nebula GM 2 30 is embedded. Apart from the previously known Herbig—Haro object HH 172, several new HH objects have been found, comprising at least two HH flows. The internal structure of these objects is studied. The relationship between the line emission and kinematic data obtained through multi-pupil spectroscopy suggest the presence of bipolar outflow associated with the nebula GM 2 30 and HH 172/HH 721, which show mirror symmetry according to a number of characteristics. No optical source of this flow is observed, although the source of energy of the second flow may be a weak star associated with HH 723. The linear dimensions of the flows (more than one parsec) suggest that they are the giant outflows.

  14. The SONYC survey: Towards a complete census of brown dwarfs in star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzic, K.; Scholz, A.; Jayawardhana, R.; Geers, V. C.; Dawson, P.; Ray, T. P.; Tamura, M.

    2014-10-01

    Deep surveys of star forming regions are the backbone of observational studies on the origin of stars and planets: On one side, they provide large and homogeneous object samples required to study disks, accretion, and multiplicity. On the other side, such surveys determine the shape and the low-mass limit of the Initial Mass Function (IMF), which are fundamental constraints on star formation theory. SONYC, short for ``Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters", is an ongoing project to provide a census of the substellar population in nearby star forming regions. We have conducted deep optical and near-infrared photometry, combined with proper motions, and followed by extensive spectroscopic follow-up campaigns with Subaru and VLT, in which we have obtained more than 700 spectra of candidate objects in NGC1333, ρ Ophiuchi, Chamaeleon-I, Upper Sco, and Lupus-3. We have identified and characterized more than 60 new substellar objects, among them a handful of objects with masses close to, or below the Deuterium burning limit. Thanks to the SONYC survey and the efforts of other groups, the substellar IMF is now well characterized down to ˜ 5 - 10 M_{J}, and we find that the ratio of the number of stars with respect to brown dwarfs lies between 2 ad 6. Another important piece of information for the star formation theories is that, down to ˜ 5 M_J, the free-floating objects with planetary masses are 20-50 times less numerous than stars, so that their total contribution to the mass budget of the clusters can be neglected. In this contribution we will present the status of the SONYC survey, discuss its main results, and focus on the latest findings in NGC1333, Lupus-3 and Upper-Sco.

  15. Extremely Bright Submillimeter Galaxies beyond the Lupus-I Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Kawabe, R.; Shimajiri, Y.; Tsukagoshi, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Oasa, Y.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Saigo, K.; Tomida, K.; Yun, M. S.; Taniguchi, A.; Kohno, K.; Hatsukade, B.; Aretxaga, I.; Austermann, J. E.; Dickman, R.; Ezawa, H.; Goss, W. M.; Hayashi, M.; Hughes, D. H.; Hiramatsu, M.; Inutsuka, S.; Ogasawara, R.; Ohashi, N.; Oshima, T.; Scott, K. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    2015-08-01

    We report detections of two candidate distant submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), MM J154506.4-344318 and MM J154132.7-350320, which are discovered in the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm survey toward the Lupus-I star-forming region. The two objects have 1.1 mm flux densities of 43.9 and 27.1 mJy, and have Herschel/SPIRE counterparts as well. The Submillimeter Array counterpart to the former SMG is identified at 890 μm and 1.3 mm. Photometric redshift estimates using all available data from the mid-infrared to the radio suggest that the redshifts of the two SMGs are {z}{photo}≃ 4-5 and 3, respectively. Near-infrared objects are found very close to the SMGs and they are consistent with low-z ellipticals, suggesting that the high apparent luminosities can be attributed to gravitational magnification. The cumulative number counts at {S}1.1{mm}≥slant 25 mJy, combined with the other two 1.1 mm brightest sources, are {0.70}-0.34+0.56 deg-2, which is consistent with a model prediction that accounts for flux magnification due to strong gravitational lensing. Unexpectedly, a z\\gt 3 SMG and a Galactic dense starless core (e.g., a first hydrostatic core) could be similar in the mid-infrared to millimeter spectral energy distributions and spatial structures at least at ≳ 1\\prime\\prime . This indicates that it is necessary to distinguish the two possibilities by means of broadband photometry from the optical to centimeter and spectroscopy to determine the redshift, when a compact object is identified toward Galactic star-forming regions.

  16. Gold ore-forming fluids of the Tanami region, Northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernagh, Terrence P.; Wygralak, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    Fluid inclusion studies have been carried out on major gold deposits and prospects in the Tanami region to determine the compositions of the associated fluids and the processes responsible for gold mineralization. Pre-ore, milky quartz veins contain only two-phase aqueous inclusions with salinities ≤19 wt% NaCl eq. and homogenization temperatures that range from 110 to 410°C. In contrast, the ore-bearing veins typically contain low to moderate salinity (<14 wt% NaCl eq.), H2O + CO2 ± CH4 ± N2-bearing fluids. The CO2-bearing inclusions coexist with two-phase aqueous inclusions that exhibit a wider range of salinities (≤21 wt% NaCl eq.). Post-ore quartz and carbonate veins contain mainly two-phase aqueous inclusions, with a last generation of aqueous inclusions being very CaCl2-rich. Salinities range from 7 to 33 wt% NaCl eq. and homogenization temperatures vary from 62 to 312°C. Gold deposits in the Tanami region are hosted by carbonaceous or iron-rich sedimentary rocks and/or mafic rocks. They formed over a range of depths at temperatures from 200 to 430°C. The Groundrush deposit formed at the greatest temperatures and depths (260-430°C and ≤11 km), whereas deposits in the Tanami goldfield formed at the lowest temperatures (≥200°C) and at the shallowest depths (1.5-5.6 km). There is also evidence in the Tanami goldfield for late-stage isothermal mixing with higher salinity (≤21 wt% NaCl eq.) fluids at temperatures between 100 and 200°C. Other deposits (e.g., The Granites, Callie, and Coyote) formed at intermediate depths and at temperatures ranging from 240 to 360°C. All ore fluids contained CO2 ± N2 ± CH4, with the more deeply formed deposits being enriched in CH4 and higher level deposits being enriched in CO2. Fluids from deposits hosted mainly by sedimentary rocks generally contained appreciable quantities of N2. The one exception is the Tanami goldfield, where the quartz veins were dominated by aqueous inclusions with rare CO2-bearing

  17. H{sub 2}D{sup +} IN THE HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION CYGNUS X

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, T.; Lis, D. C.; Caselli, P.; Kauffmann, J.; Zhang, Q.; Thompson, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    H{sub 2}D{sup +} is a primary ion that dominates the gas-phase chemistry of cold dense gas. Therefore, it is hailed as a unique tool in probing the earliest, prestellar phase of star formation. Observationally, its abundance and distribution is, however, just beginning to be understood in low-mass prestellar and cluster-forming cores. In high-mass star-forming regions, H{sub 2}D{sup +} has been detected only in two cores, and its spatial distribution remains unknown. Here, we present the first map of the ortho-H{sub 2}D{sup +} J{sub k{sup +},k{sup -}} = 1{sub 1,0} {yields} 1{sub 1,1} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 4-3 transition in the DR21 filament of Cygnus X with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, and N{sub 2}D{sup +} 3-2 and dust continuum with the Submillimeter Array. We have discovered five very extended ({<=}34, 000 AU diameter) weak structures in H{sub 2}D{sup +} in the vicinity of, but distinctly offset from, embedded protostars. More surprisingly, the H{sub 2}D{sup +} peak is not associated with either a dust continuum or N{sub 2}D{sup +} peak. We have therefore uncovered extended massive cold dense gas that was undetected with previous molecular line and dust continuum surveys of the region. This work also shows that our picture of the structure of cores is too simplistic for cluster-forming cores and needs to be refined: neither dust continuum with existing capabilities nor emission in tracers like N{sub 2}D{sup +} can provide a complete census of the total prestellar gas in such regions. Sensitive H{sub 2}D{sup +} mapping of the entire DR21 filament is likely to discover more of such cold quiescent gas reservoirs in an otherwise active high-mass star-forming region.

  18. Molecular emission in dense massive clumps from the star-forming regions S231-S235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeyschikov, D. A.; Kirsanova, M. S.; Tsivilev, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the study of the star-forming regions S231-S235 in radio lines of molecules of the interstellar medium—carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), in maser lines—methanol (CH3OH) and water vapor (H2O). The regions S231-S235 belong to the giant molecular cloudG174+2.5. The goal of this paper is to search for new sources of emission toward molecular clumps and to estimate their physical parameters from CO and NH3 molecular lines. We obtained new detections ofNH3 andHC3Nlines in the sources WB89673 and WB89 668 which indicates the presence of high-density gas. From the CO line, we derived sizes, column densities, and masses of molecular clumps. From the NH3 line, we derived gas kinetic temperatures and number densities in molecular clumps. We determined that kinetic temperatures and number densities of molecular gas are within the limits 16-30 K and 2.8-7.2 × 103 cm-3 respectively. The shock-tracing line of CH3OH molecule at a frequency of 36.2 GHz was detected in WB89 673 for the first time.

  19. THE MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS OMNIBUS X-RAY CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Kuhn, Michael A.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Povich, Matthew S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the Massive Star-forming Regions (MSFRs) Omnibus X-ray Catalog (MOXC), a compendium of X-ray point sources from Chandra/ACIS observations of a selection of MSFRs across the Galaxy, plus 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. MOXC consists of 20,623 X-ray point sources from 12 MSFRs with distances ranging from 1.7 kpc to 50 kpc. Additionally, we show the morphology of the unresolved X-ray emission that remains after the cataloged X-ray point sources are excised from the ACIS data, in the context of Spitzer and WISE observations that trace the bubbles, ionization fronts, and photon-dominated regions that characterize MSFRs. In previous work, we have found that this unresolved X-ray emission is dominated by hot plasma from massive star wind shocks. This diffuse X-ray emission is found in every MOXC MSFR, clearly demonstrating that massive star feedback (and the several-million-degree plasmas that it generates) is an integral component of MSFR physics.

  20. Ground-based Observations of Water Vapor in Planet-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyk, Colette; Zhang, K.; Pontoppidan, K.; Blake, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy has shown that protoplanetary disks around low-mass young stars are generally blanketed in the mid-IR with strong molecular emission lines. Observations of these emission lines are allowing us, for the first time, to investigate disk chemistry in planet-forming regions, and to test our understanding of planet formation processes, such as the condensation sequence. However, at the spectral resolution of the IRS, the emission lines are unresolved and blended, making their interpretation difficult, even in the context of sophisticated radiative transfer disk modeling. In addition, with Spitzer alone, we are primarily sensitive to the few-AU region of protoplanetary disks, but do not get a complete picture of the water chemistry throughout the disk. Therefore, we have been pursuing a campaign of ground-based observing of water vapor in protoplanetary disks, utilizing a range of high-resolution spectrographs probing near- through mid-infrared wavelengths. I will present an update on our ground-based observing program and discuss implications for disk chemistry and planet formation.

  1. Nitric oxide in star-forming regions: further evidence for interstellar N-O bonds.

    PubMed

    Ziurys, L M; McGonagle, D; Minh, Y; Irvine, W M

    1991-06-01

    Nitric oxide has been newly detected towards several star-forming clouds, including Orion-KL, Sgr B2(N), W33A, W51M, and DR21(OH) via its J = 3/2 --> 1/2 transitions near 150 GHz, using the FCRAO 14 m telescope. Both lambda-doubling components of NO were observed towards all sources. Column densities derived for nitric oxide in these clouds are N approximately 10(15)-10(16) cm-2, corresponding to fractional abundances of f approximately 0.5-1.0 x 10(-8), relative to H2. Towards Orion-KL, the NO line profile suggests that the species arises primarily from hot, dense gas. Nitric oxide may arise from warm material toward the other clouds as well. Nitric oxide in star-forming regions could be synthesized by high-temperature reactions, although the observed abundances do not disagree with values predicted from low-temperature, ion-molecule chemistry by more than one order of magnitude. The abundance of NO, unlike other simple interstellar nitrogen compounds, does appear to be reproduced by chemical models, at least to a good approximation. Regardless of the nature of formation of NO, it appears to be a common constituent of warm, dense molecular clouds. N-O bonds may therefore be more prevalent than previously thought.

  2. Trigonometric parallaxes to star-forming regions within 4 kpc of the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, A.; Menten, K. M.; Zhang, B.; Sato, M.; Brunthaler, A.; Immer, K.; Reid, M. J.; Dame, T. M.; Moscadelli, L.

    2014-02-01

    We report four trigonometric parallaxes for high-mass star-forming regions within 4 kpc of the Galactic center. These measurements were made with the Very Long Baseline Array as part of the BeSSeL Survey. By associating these sources kinematically with large-scale features in CO and H I longitude-velocity diagrams, we begin to outline some major features of the inner Milky Way: the Connecting arm, the near and far 3 kpc arms, and the Norma arm. The Connecting arm in the first Galactic quadrant lies closer to the Galactic center than the far 3 kpc arm and is offset by the long-bar's major axis near its leading edge, supporting the presence of an inner Lindblad resonance. Assuming the 3 kpc arms are a continuous physical structure, the relative Galactocentric distance of its near and far sides suggests highly elliptical streamlines of gas around the bar(s) and a bar corotation radius, r {sub CR} ≳ 3.6 kpc. At a Galactic longitude near 10° and a heliocentric distance of about 5 kpc, the near 3 kpc arm and the Norma arm intersect on a face-on view of our Galaxy, while passing at different Galactic latitudes. We provide an accurate distance measurement to the W 31 star-forming complex of 4.95{sub −0.43}{sup +0.51} kpc from the Sun, which associates it with a bright CO feature belonging to the near 3 kpc arm.

  3. Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of the NGC 2071 Star-Forming Region with SIRPOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Hashimoto, Jun; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Nakajima, Yasushi; Sato, Shuji; Nagashima, Chie; Kurita, Mikio; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nagayama, Takahiro; Hough, James H.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Chrysostomou, Antonio

    2007-06-01

    We conducted deep JHKs imaging polarimetry of a ˜ 8' × 8' area of the NGC 2071 star-forming region. Our polarization data revealed various infrared reflection nebulae (IRNe) associated with the central IR young star cluster NGC 2071IR and identified their illuminating sources. There are at least 4 IRNe in NGC 2071IR, and several additional IRNe were identified around nearby young stars in the same field-of-view. Each illuminating source coincides with a known near-IR source, except for IRS 3, which is only a part of IRN 2 and is illuminated by the radio source 1c. Aperture polarimetry of each cluster source was used to detect unresolved circumstellar disk/outflow systems. Aperture polarimetry of the other point-like sources within the field was conducted in this region for the first time. The magnetic field structures (from ˜ 1 pc down to ˜ 0.1 pc) were derived using both aperture polarimetry of the point-like sources and imaging polarimetry of the shocked H2 emission that is seen as the dominant knotty nebulae in the Ks band image; both are of dichroic origin and the derived field directions are consistent with each other. The magnetic field direction projected on the sky is also consistent with that inferred from the 850μm thermal continuum emission polarimetry of the central 0.2 pc region, but is running roughly perpendicular (˜ 75°) to the direction of the large-scale outflow. We argue that the field strength is too weak to align the outflow in the large-scale field direction via magnetic braking.

  4. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH SURVEY OF YOUNG STARS IN THE CHAMAELEON I STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Manoj, P.; Kim, K. H.; Watson, Dan M.; Forrest, W. J.; Bohac, C.; Arnold, L. A.; Furlan, E.; McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Luhman, K. L.; Espaillat, C.; Najita, J. R.; D'Alessio, P.; Adame, L.; Sargent, B. A.; Green, J. D.

    2011-03-15

    We present 5-36 {mu}m mid-infrared spectra of 82 young stars in the {approx}2 Myr old Chamaeleon I star-forming region, obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). We have classified these objects into various evolutionary classes based on their spectral energy distributions and the spectral features seen in the IRS spectra. We have analyzed the mid-IR spectra of Class II objects in Chamaeleon I in detail, in order to study the vertical and radial structure of the protoplanetary disks surrounding these stars. We find evidence for substantial dust settling in most protoplanetary disks in Chamaeleon I. We have identified several disks with altered radial structures in Chamaeleon I, among them transitional disk candidates which have holes or gaps in their disks. Analysis of the silicate emission features in the IRS spectra of Class II objects in Cha I shows that the dust grains in these disks have undergone significant processing (grain growth and crystallization). However, disks with radial holes/gaps appear to have relatively unprocessed grains. We further find the crystalline dust content in the inner ({approx}<1-2 AU) and the intermediate ({approx}<10 AU) regions of the protoplanetary disks to be tightly correlated. We also investigate the effects of accretion and stellar multiplicity on the disk structure and dust properties. Finally, we compare the observed properties of protoplanetary disks in Cha I with those in slightly younger Taurus and Ophiuchus regions and discuss the effects of disk evolution in the first 1-2 Myr.

  5. B- AND A-TYPE STARS IN THE TAURUS-AURIGA STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-07-10

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), {tau} Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  6. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star-Forming Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), t Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  7. Narrow-band Imaging of Massive Star-Forming Regions: Tracing Outflows and the Rate of Star-Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kendall; Willis, Sarah; Hora, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Narrowband images targeting ionized hydrogen (Brackett gamma, 2.17 microns) and molecular hydrogen (2.12 microns) were obtained for six massive star-forming regions within the Milky Way, NGC 6334, G305, G3333, G3264, G3266, and G351. These regions are within 1-4 kpc from our solar system. The narrowband flux in Brackett gamma was used as a star-formation tracer to calculate a star-formation rate for each region. This is compared with other star-formation rates found using other methods such as the count of young stars and YSOs, and rates calculated from using other tracers (e.g. 70 micron monochromatic luminosity). The molecular hydrogen narrowband images were manually searched to locate outflows from young stars. Once these outflows are identified, it may help to get a better survey of the young stellar population. A better understanding of the stellar population distribution can lead to more accurate star-formation rates to compare to those calculated from star-formation tracers. We found the regions NGC 6334 and G3266 to have the highest levels of ongoing star formation activity as indicated by the number of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs) detected. There are a total of 279 cataloged MHOs in 181 categorized systems for the six regions. There are a total of 150 identified potential driving sources.This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  8. AN INFRARED/X-RAY SURVEY FOR NEW MEMBERS OF THE TAURUS STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Luhman, K. L.; Allen, P. R.; Mamajek, E. E.; Cruz, K. L.

    2009-09-20

    We present the results of a search for new members of the Taurus star-forming region using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the XMM-Newton Observatory. We have obtained optical and near-infrared spectra of 44 sources that exhibit red Spitzer colors that are indicative of stars with circumstellar disks and 51 candidate young stars that were identified by Scelsi and coworkers using XMM-Newton. We also performed spectroscopy on four possible companions to members of Taurus that were reported by Kraus and Hillenbrand. Through these spectra, we have demonstrated the youth and membership of 41 sources, 10 of which were independently confirmed as young stars by Scelsi and coworkers. Five of the new Taurus members are likely to be brown dwarfs based on their late spectral types (>M6). One of the brown dwarfs has a spectral type of L0, making it the first known L-type member of Taurus and the least massive known member of the region (M {approx} 4-7 M{sub Jup}). Another brown dwarf exhibits a flat infrared spectral energy distribution, which indicates that it could be in the protostellar class I stage (star+disk+envelope). Upon inspection of archival images from various observatories, we find that one of the new young stars has a large edge-on disk (r = 2.''5 = 350 AU). The scattered light from this disk has undergone significant variability on a timescale of days in optical images from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Using the updated census of Taurus, we have measured the initial mass function for the fields observed by XMM-Newton. The resulting mass function is similar to previous ones that we have reported for Taurus, showing a surplus of stars at spectral types of K7-M1 (0.6-0.8 M{sub sun}) relative to other nearby star-forming regions, such as IC 348, Chamaeleon I, and the Orion Nebula Cluster.

  9. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  10. Temperature dependence of emission measure in solar X-ray plasmas. I - Nonflaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Previous determinations of the form of the emission-measure distribution function for solar active regions are examined. It is found that two analyses in particular are affected by low quality of either observational or atomic data. An alternative method of analysis is discussed.

  11. An Unbiased Census of Weak Herbig-Haro Flows in the R Corona Australis Star Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, Lynnae C.; Roberge, A.; Weinberger, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    Bipolar outflows are produced by protostars as they draw gas from surrounding accretion disks. As these outflows collide with the interstellar medium, bow shocks are produced, giving rise to Herbig-Haro knots. A Herbig-Haro flow is a sign that active accretion is occurring in a protostellar system. In an effort to constrain the time available for giant planet formation in gas- rich disks, we seek to find weak Herbig-Haro flows by sensitively mapping the entire R Corona Australis star forming region. Between ≤ 1 and 6 Myrs old (Neuhäuser et al. 2000), and located approximately 129±11pc away (Casey et al. 1998), the R Corona Australis region is home to approximately 50 young stars (Neuhäuser et al. 2000). We have imaged this region in the near-IR using a narrow band H2 S(1) filter that isolates emission from the ν=1, J=3 level of H2 at 2.12 μm. We will present preliminary results of this analysis.

  12. THE BLAST VIEW OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION IN AQUILA (l = 45{sup 0}, b = 0{sup 0})

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    We have carried out the first general submillimeter analysis of the field toward GRSMC 45.46+0.05, a massive star-forming region in Aquila. The deconvolved 6 deg{sup 2} (3{sup 0} x 2{sup 0}) maps provided by BLAST in 2005 at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m were used to perform a preliminary characterization of the clump population previously investigated in the infrared, radio, and molecular maps. Interferometric CORNISH data at 4.8 GHz have also been used to characterize the Ultracompact H II regions (UCHIIRs) within the main clumps. By means of the BLAST maps, we have produced an initial census of the submillimeter structures that will be observed by Herschel, several of which are known Infrared Dark Clouds. Our spectral energy distributions of the main clumps in the field, located at {approx}7 kpc, reveal an active population with temperatures of T{approx} 35-40 K and masses of {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub sun} for a dust emissivity index {beta} = 1.5. The clump evolutionary stages range from evolved sources, with extended H II regions and prominent IR stellar population, to massive young stellar objects, prior to the formation of an UCHIIR. The CORNISH data have revealed the details of the stellar content and structure of the UCHIIRs. In most cases, the ionizing stars corresponding to the brightest radio detections are capable of accounting for the clump bolometric luminosity, in most cases powered by embedded OB stellar clusters.

  13. Star and jet multiplicity in the high-mass star forming region IRAS 05137+3919

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Massi, F.; Arcidiacono, C.; Beltrán, M. T.; Persi, P.; Tapia, M.; Molinari, S.; Testi, L.; Busoni, L.; Riccardi, A.; Boutsia, K.; Bisogni, S.; McCarthy, D.; Kulesa, C.

    2015-09-01

    Context. We present a study of the complex high-mass star forming region IRAS 05137+3919 (also known as Mol8), where multiple jets and a rich stellar cluster have been described in previous works. Aims: Our goal is to determine the number of jets and shed light on their origin, and thus determine the nature of the young stars powering these jets. We also wish to analyse the stellar clusters by resolving the brightest group of stars. Methods: The star forming region was observed in various tracers and the results were complemented with ancillary archival data. The new data represent a substantial improvement over previous studies both in resolution and frequency coverage. In particular, adaptive optics provides us with an angular resolution of 80 mas in the near IR, while new mid- and far-IR data allow us to sample the peak of the spectral energy distribution and thus reliably estimate the bolometric luminosity. Results: Thanks to the near-IR continuum and millimetre line data we can determine the structure and velocity field of the bipolar jets and outflows in this star forming region. We also find that the stars are grouped into three clusters and the jets originate in the richest of these, whose luminosity is ~ 2.4 × 104L⊙. Interestingly, our high-resolution near-IR images allow us to resolve one of the two brightest stars (A and B) of the cluster into a double source (A1+A2). Conclusions: We confirm that there are two jets and establish that they are powered by B-type stars belonging to cluster C1. On this basis and on morphological and kinematical arguments, we conclude that the less extended jet is almost perpendicular to the line of sight and that it originates in the brightest star of the cluster, while the more extended one appears to be associated with the more extincted, double source A1+A2. We propose that this is not a binary system, but a small bipolar reflection nebula at the root of the large-scale jet, outlining a still undetected circumstellar

  14. Chromophore structure of the physiologically active form (Pfr) of phytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Rüdiger, W.; Thümmler, F.; Cmiel, E.; Schneider, S.

    1983-01-01

    Chromopeptides were prepared by proteolytic digestion of phytochrome (far-red absorbing form, Pfr) and of phycocyanin. The phycocyanobilin peptide, the chromophore of which is Z,Z,Z-configurated, was modified to the Z,Z,E isomeric chromophore. It has been demonstrated earlier that the Pfr chromopeptide and the Z,Z,E-configurated phycocyanin chromopeptide behave similarly with regard to spectral and chromatographic properties and reactivity. We present evidence here, obtained by high-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy, that both the modified phycocyanobilin chromophore and the phytochrome chromophore obtained directly from Pfr are 15E-configurated. PMID:16593380

  15. Forming a Learning Culture to Promote Fracture Prevention Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjalmarson, Helene V.; Strandmark, Margaretha

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore interprofessional experiences of incorporating fracture prevention activities in clinical practice inspired by an empowerment approach. Design/methodology/approach: Data collection consisted primarily of focus groups interviews, systematized and analyzed by the grounded theory method. The study took…

  16. Characterizing Warm Molecular Hydrogen in Active Star-Forming Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Naseem

    2014-10-01

    Herschel observations of nearby star-forming galaxies have determined that the warm component of the molecular gas traced by the high-J CO lines dominates the luminosity (~90% of the total CO luminosity) and hence the energetics of the molecular ISM. At the temperatures (T = 300 - 2000 K) and densities (n_H < 1E6 per cubic cm) typically found in our survey, H2 emission is the dominant gas coolant, much more important than CO. A fundamental assumption of all analyses of CO emission has been that CO emission traces H2 over the entire range of physical conditions in the observed sources. However, a direct observational comparison of spatial distributions and kinematics of CO and H2 has never been made for the warm molecular gas. We propose to observe the warm H2, in S(1) and S(2) transitions, with the SOFIA-EXES instrument in a diverse sample of star-forming systems: NGC 253 (starburst nucleus), NGC 6240 (luminous infrared galaxy), NGC 1068 (Seyfert-2), and SgrB2(M)/(N) (Galactic hot cores). The primary goal is to compare these measurements with the warm CO (J = 6-5 transition) observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to investigate differences in the kinematics and spatial distributions (for the extended targets) of the two molecules and thereby confirm whether CO is a reliable tracer of H2 in the warm gas.

  17. TARPs: Tracked Active Region Patches from SoHO/MDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Bobra, M.

    2013-12-01

    We describe progress toward creating a retrospective MDI data product consisting of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions, abbreviated TARPs (Tracked Active Region Patches). The TARPs are being developed as a backward-looking extension (covering approximately 3500 regions spanning 1996-2010) to the HARP (HMI Active Region Patch) data product that has already been released for HMI (2010-present). Like the HARPs, the MDI TARP data set is designed to be a catalog of active regions (ARs), indexed by a region ID number, analogous to a NOAA AR number, and time. TARPs from MDI are computed based on the 96-minute synoptic magnetograms and pseudo-continuum intensitygrams. As with the related HARP data product, the approximate threshold for significance is 100G. Use of both image types together allows faculae and sunspots to be separated out as sub-classes of activity, in addition to identifying the overall active region that the faculae/sunspots are part of. After being identified in single images, the magnetically-active patches are grouped and tracked from image to image. Merges among growing active regions, as well as faint active regions hovering at the threshold of detection, are handled automatically. Regions are tracked from their inception until they decay within view, or transit off the visible disk. The final data product is indexed by a nominal AR number and time. For each active region and for each time, a bitmap image is stored containing the precise outline of the active region. Additionaly, metadata such as areas and integrated fluxes are stored for each AR and for each time. Because there is a calibration between the HMI and MDI magnetograms (Liu, Hoeksema et al. 2012), it is straightforward to use the same classification and tracking rules for the HARPs (from HMI) and the MDI TARPs. We anticipate that this will allow a consistent catalog spanning both instruments. We envision several uses for the TARP data product, which will be

  18. The structure and early evolution of massive star forming regions. Substructure in the infrared dark cloud SDC13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, C.; Fuller, G. A.; Peretto, N.; Zhang, Q.; Traficante, A.; Avison, A.; Jimenez-Serra, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Investigations into the substructure of massive star forming regions are essential for understanding the observed relationships between core mass distributions and mass distributions in stellar clusters, differentiating between proposed mechanisms of massive star formation. Aims: We study the substructure in the two largest fragments (i.e. cores) MM1 and MM2, in the infrared dark cloud complex SDC13. As MM1 appears to be in a later stage of evolution than MM2, comparing their substructure provides an insight in to the early evolution of massive clumps. Methods: We report the results of high resolution SMA dust continuum observations towards MM1 and MM2. Combining these data with Herschel observations, we carry out RADMC-3D radiative transfer modelling to characterise the observed substructure. Results: SMA continuum data indicates 4 sub-fragments in the SDC13 region. The nature of the second brightest sub-fragment (B) is uncertain as it does not appear as prominent at the lower MAMBO resolution or at radio wavelengths. Statistical analysis indicates that it is unlikely to be a background source, an AGB star, or the free-free emission of a HII region. It is plausible that B is a runaway object ejected from MM1. MM1, which is actively forming stars, consists of two sub-fragments A and C. This is confirmed by 70 μmHerschel data. While MM1 and MM2 appear quite similar in previous low resolution observations, at high resolution, the sub-fragment at the centre of MM2 (D) is much fainter than sub-fragment at the centre of MM1 (A). RADMC-3D models of MM1 and MM2 are able to reproduce these results, modelling MM2 with a steeper density profile and higher mass than is required for MM1. The relatively steep density profile of MM2 depends on a significant temperature decrease in its centre, justified by the lack of star formation in MM2. A final stellar population for MM1 was extrapolated, indicating a star formation efficiency typical of regions of core and cluster

  19. 76 FR 31972 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-508 and Form I-508F, Extension of a Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-508 and... and Immigration Services (USCIS), will be submitting the following information collection request for... Immigration Services. (4) Affected public who will be asked or required to respond, as well as a...

  20. Footpoint Separation and Evershed Flow of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Jones, E. H.

    2012-05-01

    The bipolar nature of active regions and sunspot groups within the Sun’s photosphere is generally attributed to the emergence of magnetic flux tubes that originate from shear and turbulent pumping at the base of the Sun’s convection zone. There is debate, however, as to exactly how well-connected active regions are to solar interior. A connection to the solar interior during the ascent of a flux tube through the convection zone is a requirement within numerical models designed to describe the observed characteristics of active regions, e.g. Joy’s law tilt and latitude emergence, however, these models also predict post-emergence behavior of sunspots that is not supported observationally (Schussler and Rempel, 1995; Fan, 2009; Toth and Gerlei, 2003). It has been suggested (Rubio et al., 2008; Schussler and Rempel, 1995) that a bipolar magnetic region might lose its connection quickly upon emergence. Using data from SDO/HMI, we examine the footpoint separation and the Evershed flow of a number of active regions over time to detect the disconnection process of a sunspot from its magnetic roots.

  1. SMA Observations of the Massive Star-forming Regions NGC 6334 I & I(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Todd R.; Beuther, Henrik; Megeath, Tom; Menten, Karl; Thorwirth, Sven; Zhang, Qizhou

    We present high-resolution observations of the massive star-formation regions NGC 6334 I and I(N) in the 230 GHz band. Data were obtained during Spring 2004 and 2005 in the compact and extended configurations of the Submillimeter Array (SMA), a joint venture of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Academica Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Various pieces of evidence, including a molecular line survey by Thorwirth et al. (2003), have suggested that these two fields exist in different evolutionary stages, with field I(N) being younger. Our new observations will help to explore this hypothesis. We have detected and imaged a number of molecular lines that trace the outflow activity and dense gas in both fields. In field I, we have begun to resolve the strong dust continuum emission into multiple sources. In a separate work, these new sources were found to coincide with strong thermal centimeter lines of ammonia and methanol (Beuther et al. 2005).

  2. The molecular composition of the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks across the luminosity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Catherine; Nomura, Hideko; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-10-01

    Context. Near- to mid-infrared observations of molecular emission from protoplanetary disks show that the inner regions are rich in small organic volatiles (e.g., C2H2 and HCN). Trends in the data suggest that disks around cooler stars (Teff ≈ 3000 K) are potentially (i) more carbon-rich; and (ii) more molecule-rich than their hotter counterparts (Teff ≳ 4000 K). Aims: We explore the chemical composition of the planet-forming region (<10 AU) of protoplanetary disks around stars over a range of spectral types (from M dwarf to Herbig Ae) and compare with the observed trends. Methods: Self-consistent models of the physical structure of a protoplanetary disk around stars of different spectral types are coupled with a comprehensive gas-grain chemical network to map the molecular abundances in the planet-forming zone. The effects of (i) N2 self shielding; (ii) X-ray-induced chemistry; and (iii) initial abundances, are investigated. The chemical composition in the "observable" atmosphere is compared with that in the disk midplane where the bulk of the planet-building reservoir resides. Results: M dwarf disk atmospheres are relatively more molecule rich than those for T Tauri or Herbig Ae disks. The weak far-UV flux helps retain this complexity which is enhanced by X-ray-induced ion-molecule chemistry. N2 self shielding has only a small effect in the disk molecular layer and does not explain the higher C2H2/HCN ratios observed towards cooler stars. The models underproduce the OH/H2O column density ratios constrained in Herbig Ae disks, despite reproducing (within an order of magnitude) the absolute value for OH: the inclusion of self shielding for H2O photodissociation only increases this discrepancy. One possible explanation is the adopted disk structure. Alternatively, the "hot" H2O (T ≳ 300 K) chemistry may be more complex than assumed. The results for the atmosphere are independent of the assumed initial abundances; however, the composition of the disk midplane

  3. Multiple forms of endopeptidase activity from jojoba seeds.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M J; Storey, R D

    1990-01-01

    The cotyledons of 27 day post-germination jojoba seedlings (Simmondsia chinensis) contained five distinct endopeptidase activities separable by DEAE Bio-Gel and CM-cellulose ion exchange chromatography. The endopeptidases were purified 108- to 266-fold and their individuality was confirmed by activity-specific assays in native acrylamide gels along with differences in their Mr and catalytic properties. The five endopeptidases, which showed activity on model substrates and protein, were named EP Ia, EP Ib, EP II, EP III and EP IV. EP Ia was a serine proteinase with a pH optimum of ca 8 and Mr of 58,000. EP Ib, II and III were discrete cysteine proteinases showing pH optima of ca 6.8, 6.0 and 5.4 and Mr of 41,000, 47,000 and 35,000 respectively. EP IV was an aspartic acid proteinase with a ca pH optimum of 3.5 and Mr of 33,000.

  4. VLBA Determination of the Distance to Nearby Star-forming Regions. VII. Monoceros R2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Loinard, Laurent; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Torres, Rosa M.; Deller, Adam

    2016-08-01

    We present a series of 16 Very Long Baseline Array high angular resolution observations of a cluster of suspected low-mass young stars in the Monoceros R2 region. Four compact and highly variable radio sources are detected; three of them in only one epoch, the fourth one a total of seven times. This latter source is seen in the direction of the previously known UC H ii region VLA 1, and has radio properties that resemble those of magnetically active stars; we shall call it VLA 1⋆. We model its displacement on the celestial sphere as a combination of proper motion and trigonometric parallax. The fit obtained using a uniform proper motion yields a parallax ϖ = 1.10 ± 0.18 mas, but with a fairly high post-fit dispersion. If acceleration terms (probably due to an undetected companion) are included, the quality of the fit improves dramatically, and the best estimate of the parallax becomes ϖ = 1.12 ± 0.05 mas. The magnitude of the fitted acceleration suggests an orbital period of the order of a decade. The measured parallax corresponds to a distance d = {893}-40+44 {pc} , in very good agreement with previous, indirect determinations.

  5. THz quantum cascade lasers with wafer bonded active regions.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, M; Deutsch, C; Benz, A; Cole, G D; Detz, H; Andrews, A M; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G; Unterrainer, K

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate terahertz quantum-cascade lasers with a 30 μm thick double-metal waveguide, which are fabricated by stacking two 15 μm thick active regions using a wafer bonding process. By increasing the active region thickness more optical power is generated inside the cavity, the waveguide losses are decreased and the far-field is improved due to a larger facet aperture. In this way the output power is increased by significantly more than a factor of 2 without reducing the maximum operating temperature and without increasing the threshold current.

  6. Kink Waves in an Active Region Dynamic Fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietarila, A.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Hirzberger, J.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-10-01

    We present high spatial and temporal resolution Ca II 8542 Å observations of a kink wave in an on-disk chromospheric active region fibril. The properties of the wave are similar to those observed in off-limb spicules. From the observed phase and period of the wave we determine a lower limit for the field strength in the chromospheric active region fibril located at the edge of a sunspot to be a few hundred gauss. We find indications that the event was triggered by a small-scale reconnection event higher up in the atmosphere.

  7. The Disk Population of the Chamaeleon I Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Allen, L. E.; Allen, P. R.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Hartmann, L.; Mamajek, E. E.; Megeath, S. T.; Myers, P. C.; Fazio, G. G.

    2008-03-01

    We present a census of circumstellar disks in the Chamaeleon I star-forming region. Using the Infrared Array Camera and the Multiband Imaging Photometer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have obtained images of Chamaeleon I at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 μm. To search for new disk-bearing members of the cluster, we have performed spectroscopy on objects that have red colors in these data. Through this work, we have discovered four new members of Chamaeleon I with spectral types of M4, M6, M7.5, and L0. The first three objects are highly embedded (AJ ~ 5) and reside near known protostars, indicating that they may be among the youngest low-mass sources in the cluster (τ < 1 Myr ). The L0 source is the coolest known member of Chamaeleon I. Its luminosity implies a mass of 0.004-0.01 M⊙, making it the least massive brown dwarf for which a circumstellar disk has been reliably detected. To characterize the disk population in Chamaeleon I, we have classified the infrared spectral energy distributions of the 203 known members that are encompassed by the Spitzer images. Through these classifications, we find that the disk fraction in Chamaeleon I is roughly constant at ~50% from 0.01 to 0.3 M⊙. These data are similar to the disk fraction of IC 348, which is a denser cluster at the same age as Chamaeleon I. However, the disk fraction at Mgtrsim 1 M⊙ is significantly higher in Chamaeleon I than in IC 348 (65% vs. 20%), indicating longer disk lifetimes in Chamaeleon I for this mass range. Thus, low-density star-forming regions like Chamaeleon I may offer more time for planet formation around solar-type stars than denser clusters. Based on observations performed with the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Gemini Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Gemini Observatory is operated by AURA under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the NSF (United States), the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council

  8. A search for companions to brown dwarfs in the Taurus and Chamaeleon star-forming regions

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, K. O.; Luhman, K. L.; Konopacky, Q. M.; McLeod, K. K.; Apai, D.; Pascucci, I.; Ghez, A. M.; Robberto, M.

    2014-06-10

    We have used WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain images of 47 members of the Taurus and Chamaeleon I star-forming regions that have spectral types of M6-L0 (M ∼ 0.01-0.1 M {sub ☉}). An additional late-type member of Taurus, FU Tau (M7.25+M9.25), was also observed with adaptive optics at Keck Observatory. In these images, we have identified promising candidate companions to 2MASS J04414489+2301513 (ρ = 0.''105/15 AU), 2MASS J04221332+1934392 (ρ = 0.''05/7 AU), and ISO 217 (ρ = 0.''03/5 AU). We reported the first candidate in a previous study, showing that it has a similar proper motion as the primary in images from WFPC2 and Gemini adaptive optics. We have collected an additional epoch of data with Gemini that further supports that result. By combining our survey with previous high-resolution imaging in Taurus, Chamaeleon I, and Upper Sco (τ ∼ 10 Myr), we measure binary fractions of 14/93 = 0.15{sub −0.03}{sup +0.05} for M4-M6 (M ∼ 0.1-0.3 M {sub ☉}) and 4/108 = 0.04{sub −0.01}{sup +0.03} for >M6 (M ≲ 0.1 M {sub ☉}) at separations of >10 AU. Given the youth and low density of these regions, the lower binary fraction at later types is probably primordial rather than due to dynamical interactions among association members. The widest low-mass binaries (>100 AU) also appear to be more common in Taurus and Chamaeleon I than in the field, which suggests that the widest low-mass binaries are disrupted by dynamical interactions at >10 Myr, or that field brown dwarfs have been born predominantly in denser clusters where wide systems are disrupted or inhibited from forming.

  9. TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS. VI. GALACTIC STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS, AND NONCIRCULAR MOTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, M. J.; Sato, M.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Xu, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Zheng, X. W.; Zhang, B.; Moscadelli, L.; Honma, M.; Hirota, T.; Hachisuka, K.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2009-07-20

    We are using the Very Long Baseline Array and the Japanese VLBI Exploration of Radio Astronomy project to measure trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions of masers found in high-mass star-forming regions across the Milky Way. Early results from 18 sources locate several spiral arms. The Perseus spiral arm has a pitch angle of 16 deg. {+-} 3 deg., which favors four rather than two spiral arms for the Galaxy. Combining positions, distances, proper motions, and radial velocities yields complete three-dimensional kinematic information. We find that star-forming regions on average are orbiting the Galaxy {approx}15 km s{sup -1} slower than expected for circular orbits. By fitting the measurements to a model of the Galaxy, we estimate the distance to the Galactic center R {sub 0} = 8.4 {+-} 0.6 kpc and a circular rotation speed {theta}{sub 0} = 254 {+-} 16 km s{sup -1}. The ratio {theta}{sub 0}/R {sub 0} can be determined to higher accuracy than either parameter individually, and we find it to be 30.3 {+-} 0.9 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}, in good agreement with the angular rotation rate determined from the proper motion of Sgr A*. The data favor a rotation curve for the Galaxy that is nearly flat or slightly rising with Galactocentric distance. Kinematic distances are generally too large, sometimes by factors greater than 2; they can be brought into better agreement with the trigonometric parallaxes by increasing {theta}{sub 0}/R {sub 0} from the IAU recommended value of 25.9 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1} to a value near 30 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}. We offer a 'revised' prescription for calculating kinematic distances and their uncertainties, as well as a new approach for defining Galactic coordinates. Finally, our estimates of {theta}{sub 0} and {theta}{sub 0}/R{sub 0}, when coupled with direct estimates of R {sub 0}, provide evidence that the rotation curve of the Milky Way is similar to that of the Andromeda galaxy, suggesting that the dark matter halos of these two

  10. OT1_cvastel_2: Deuterated water chemistry towards high-mass star-forming regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastel, C.

    2010-07-01

    Observations of the HDO molecules are an important complement for studies of water, since they give strong constraints on the formation processes: grain surfaces versus gas-phase chemistry through energetic process as shocks. HIFI observations of multiple transitions of HDO in SgrB2(M) combined with ground-based observations allowed for the first time the determination of its abundance throughout the envelope. In the framework of the PRISMAS Key Program, a large sample of high-mass star-forming regions have been observed with the detection of many species in their line of sight. The HDO (111-000) fundamental transition has also been detected in absorption at the velocity of the hot core towards the 2 sources that have been observed so far, probably tracing the colder envelope in its surrounding. We propose to observe higher energy level HDO transitions towards a sample of three compact HII regions that will be targeted by the PRISMAS Key Program (G34.3+0.1, W33A, W49N) in order to perform a full modeling from the hot core through the envelope using a spherical Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, RATRAN, which takes into account radiative pumping by continuum emission from dust. We will use for an optimum accuracy of the modeling the HDO and D2O collision rates with H2, recently computed within our group, that are not available in the public so far. This study will hopefully give strong constrains on the formation processes of water, combining the proposed observations with published or soon to be published high resolution H2O observations with HIFI towards the same sources.

  11. Water in massive star-forming regions: HIFI observations of W3 IRS5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarría, L.; Herpin, F.; Jacq, T.; Braine, J.; Bontemps, S.; Baudry, A.; Marseille, M.; van der Tak, F.; Pietropaoli, B.; Wyrowski, F.; Shipman, R.; Frieswijk, W.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Cernicharo, J.; Bachiller, R.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A. O.; Bergin, E.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G. A.; Bruderer, S.; Caselli, P.; Codella, C.; Daniel, F.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Doty, S. D.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Graauw, Th.; Hartogh, P.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Kristensen, L. E.; Larsson, B.; Lis, D.; Liseau, R.; McCoey, C.; Melnick, G.; Nisini, B.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J. C.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Santiago-García, J.; Saraceno, P.; Stutzki, J.; Szczerba, R.; Tafalla, M.; Tielens, A.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.; Willem, J.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2010-10-01

    We present Herschel observations of the water molecule in the massive star-forming region W3 IRS5. The o-H_217O 110-101, p-H_218O 111-000, p-H2O 202-111, p-H2O 111-000, o-H2O 221-212, and o-H2O 212-101 lines, covering a frequency range from 552 up to 1669 GHz, have been detected at high spectral resolution with HIFI. The water lines in W3 IRS5 show well-defined high-velocity wings that indicate a clear contribution by outflows. Moreover, the systematically blue-shifted absorption in the H2O lines suggests expansion, presumably driven by the outflow. No infall signatures are detected. The p-H2O 111-000 and o-H2O 212-101 lines show absorption from the cold material (T ~ 10 K) in which the high-mass protostellar envelope is embedded. One-dimensional radiative transfer models are used to estimate water abundances and to further study the kinematics of the region. We show that the emission in the rare isotopologues comes directly from the inner parts of the envelope (T ≳ 100 K) where water ices in the dust mantles evaporate and the gas-phase abundance increases. The resulting jump in the water abundance (with a constant inner abundance of 10-4) is needed to reproduce the o-H_217O 110-101 and p-H_218O 111-000 spectra in our models. We estimate water abundances of 10-8 to 10-9 in the outer parts of the envelope (T ≲ 100 K). The possibility of two protostellar objects contributing to the emission is discussed. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. Spectacular Spitzer Images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a Young, Massive-Star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; Reach, William T.; Lefloch, Bertrand; Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2006-06-01

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, highlighting the nebula's special evolutionary stage. The images feature recently formed massive protostars and numerous young stellar objects, and a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed, and unveil large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. Multiple protostars are detected in the infrared, within the cold dust cores of TC3 and TC4, which were previously defined as Class 0. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~160 young stellar objects (YSOs) and classify them into different evolutionary stages. The diagram also revealed a unique group of YSOs that are bright at 24 μm but have the spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8 μm. Despite expectation that Class 0 sources would be ``starless'' cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars. The mid-infrared emission of the protostars can be fit by two temperatures of 150 and 400 K; the hot core region is probably optically thin in the mid-infrared regime, and the size of hot core is much smaller than that of the cold envelope. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive star in the TC3 cluster is located at the center of the cluster and at the bottom of the gravitational potential well.

  13. An x-ray study of massive star forming regions with CHANDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2007-08-01

    Massive stars are characterized by powerful stellar winds, strong ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and consequently devastating supernovae explosions, which have a profound influence on their natal clouds and galaxy evolution. However, the formation and evolution of massive stars themselves and how their low-mass siblings are affected in the wind-swept and UV-radiation-dominated environment are not well understood. Much of the stellar populations inside of the massive star forming regions (MSFRs) are poorly studied in the optical and IR wavelengths because of observational challenges caused by large distance, high extinction, and heavy contamination from unrelated sources. Although it has long been recognized that X-rays open a new window to sample the young stellar populations residing in the MSFRs, the low angular resolution of previous generation X-ray telescopes has limited the outcome from such studies. The sensitive high spatial resolution X-ray observations enabled by the Chandra X- ray Observatory and the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) have significantly improved our ability to study the X-ray-emitting populations in the MSFRs in the last few years. In this thesis, I analyzed seven high spatial resolution Chandra /ACIS images of two massive star forming complexes, namely the NGC 6357 region hosting the 1 Myr old Pismis 24 cluster (Chapter 3) and the Rosette Complex including the 2 Myr old NGC 2244 cluster immersed in the Rosette Nebula (Chapter 4), embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC; Chapter 5), and a triggered cluster NGC 2237 (Chapter 6). The X-ray sampled stars were studied in great details. The unique power of X-ray selection of young stellar cluster members yielded new knowledge in the stellar populations, the cluster structures, and the star formation histories. The census of cluster members is greatly improved in each region. A large fraction of the X-ray detections have optical or near-infrared (NIR) stellar counterparts

  14. Active Curved Polymers Form Vortex Patterns on Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Jonas; Huber, Lorenz; Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2016-04-01

    Recent in vitro experiments with FtsZ polymers show self-organization into different dynamic patterns, including structures reminiscent of the bacterial Z ring. We model FtsZ polymers as active particles moving along chiral, circular paths by Brownian dynamics simulations and a Boltzmann approach. Our two conceptually different methods point to a generic phase behavior. At intermediate particle densities, we find self-organization into vortex structures including closed rings. Moreover, we show that the dynamics at the onset of pattern formation is described by a generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  15. Active Curved Polymers Form Vortex Patterns on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Denk, Jonas; Huber, Lorenz; Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2016-04-29

    Recent in vitro experiments with FtsZ polymers show self-organization into different dynamic patterns, including structures reminiscent of the bacterial Z ring. We model FtsZ polymers as active particles moving along chiral, circular paths by Brownian dynamics simulations and a Boltzmann approach. Our two conceptually different methods point to a generic phase behavior. At intermediate particle densities, we find self-organization into vortex structures including closed rings. Moreover, we show that the dynamics at the onset of pattern formation is described by a generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. PMID:27176542

  16. Active Curved Polymers Form Vortex Patterns on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Denk, Jonas; Huber, Lorenz; Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2016-04-29

    Recent in vitro experiments with FtsZ polymers show self-organization into different dynamic patterns, including structures reminiscent of the bacterial Z ring. We model FtsZ polymers as active particles moving along chiral, circular paths by Brownian dynamics simulations and a Boltzmann approach. Our two conceptually different methods point to a generic phase behavior. At intermediate particle densities, we find self-organization into vortex structures including closed rings. Moreover, we show that the dynamics at the onset of pattern formation is described by a generalized complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  17. Spectacular Spitzer images of the Trifid Nebula: Protostars in a young, massive-star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Reach, W. T.; Lefloch, B.; Fazio, G.

    Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Trifid Nebula (M20; see Figure 1) reveal its spectacular appearance in infrared light, demonstrating its special evolutionary stage: recently-formed massive protostars and numerous young stars, including a single O star that illuminates the surrounding molecular cloud from which it formed and unveiling large-scale, filamentary dark clouds. The hot dust grains show contrasting infrared colors in shells, arcs, bow-shocks and dark cores. Multiple protostars, previously defined as Class 0 from dust continuum and molecular outflow observations, are revealed in the infrared within the cold dust continuum peaks TC3 and TC4. The cold dust continuum cores of TC1 and TC2 contain only one protostar each; the newly-discovered infrared protostar in TC2 is the driving source of the HH399 jet. The Spitzer color-color diagram allowed us to identify ~150 young stellar objects (YSO) and classify them into different evolutionary stages, and also revealed a new class of YSO which are bright at 24μm but with spectral energy distribution peaking at 5-8μm; we name these sources "Hot excess" YSO. Despite of expectation that Class 0 sources would be "starless" cores, the Spitzer images, with unprecedented sensitivity, uncover mid-infrared emission from these Class 0 protostars. The mid-infrared detections of Class 0 protostars show that the emission escapes the dense, cold envelope of young protostars; the mid-infrared emission cannot arise from the same location as the mm-wave emission, and instead must arise from a much smaller region with less intervening extinction to the central accretion. The presence of multiple protostars within the cold cores of Class 0 objects implies that clustering occurs at this early stage of star formation. The most massive stars are located at the center of the cluster and are formed simultaneously with low-mass stars. The angular and mass distributions of protostars within the dust cores imply that these early

  18. Trigonometric parallaxes of high mass star forming regions: the structure and kinematics of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, M. J.; Dame, T. M.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, B.; Sanna, A.; Sato, M.; Choi, Y. K.; Immer, K.; Zheng, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Hachisuka, K.; Moscadelli, L.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Bartkiewicz, A.

    2014-03-10

    Over 100 trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions for masers associated with young, high-mass stars have been measured with the Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy Survey, a Very Long Baseline Array key science project, the European VLBI Network, and the Japanese VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry project. These measurements provide strong evidence for the existence of spiral arms in the Milky Way, accurately locating many arm segments and yielding spiral pitch angles ranging from about 7° to 20°. The widths of spiral arms increase with distance from the Galactic center. Fitting axially symmetric models of the Milky Way with the three-dimensional position and velocity information and conservative priors for the solar and average source peculiar motions, we estimate the distance to the Galactic center, R {sub 0}, to be 8.34 ± 0.16 kpc, a circular rotation speed at the Sun, Θ{sub 0}, to be 240 ± 8 km s{sup –1}, and a rotation curve that is nearly flat (i.e., a slope of –0.2 ± 0.4 km s{sup –1} kpc{sup –1}) between Galactocentric radii of ≈5 and 16 kpc. Assuming a 'universal' spiral galaxy form for the rotation curve, we estimate the thin disk scale length to be 2.44 ± 0.16 kpc. With this large data set, the parameters R {sub 0} and Θ{sub 0} are no longer highly correlated and are relatively insensitive to different forms of the rotation curve. If one adopts a theoretically motivated prior that high-mass star forming regions are in nearly circular Galactic orbits, we estimate a global solar motion component in the direction of Galactic rotation, V {sub ☉} = 14.6 ± 5.0 km s{sup –1}. While Θ{sub 0} and V {sub ☉} are significantly correlated, the sum of these parameters is well constrained, Θ{sub 0} + V {sub ☉} = 255.2 ± 5.1 km s{sup –1}, as is the angular speed of the Sun in its orbit about the Galactic center, (Θ{sub 0} + V {sub ☉})/R {sub 0} = 30.57 ± 0.43 km s{sup –1} kpc{sup –1}. These parameters improve the accuracy of

  19. 77 FR 15787 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-131, Revision of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No. 1615-0059. The..., USCIS will be evaluating whether to revise the Form N-644. Should USCIS decide to revise Form N-644...

  4. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR-FORMING REGION N206

    SciTech Connect

    Romita, Krista Alexandra; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Carlson, Lynn Redding; Whitney, B.; Babler, B.; Meade, M.; Indebetouw, R.; Hora, J. L. E-mail: carlson@stsci.ed E-mail: brian@sal.wisc.ed E-mail: jhora@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-09-20

    We present analysis of the energetic star-forming region Henize 206 (N206) located near the southern edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on photometric data from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE-LMC; IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m and MIPS 24 {mu}m), Infrared Survey Facility near-infrared survey (J, H, K{sub s}), and the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey (MCPS UBVI) covering a wavelength range of 0.36-24 {mu}m. Young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified based upon their location in infrared color-magnitude space and classified by the shapes of their spectral energy distributions in comparison with a pre-computed grid of YSO models. We identify 116 YSO candidates: 102 are well characterized by the YSO models, predominately Stage I, and 14 may be multiple sources or young sources with transition disks. Careful examination of the individual sources and their surrounding environment allows us to identify a factor of {approx}14.5 more YSO candidates than have already been identified. The total mass of these well-fit YSO candidates is {approx}520 M{sub sun}. We calculate a current star formation rate of 0.27 x 10{sup -1} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. The distribution of YSO candidates appears to follow shells of neutral material in the interstellar medium.

  5. Phosphorus-bearing molecules in solar-type star forming regions: First PO detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, Bertrand; Vastel, C.; Viti, S.; Jimenez-Serra, I.; Codella, C.; Podio, L.; Ceccarelli, C.; Mendoza, E.; Lepine, J. R. D.; Bachiller, R.

    2016-08-01

    As part of the Large Program ASAI (Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM), we have used the IRAM 30m telescope to lead a systematic search for the emission of rotational transitions of P-bearing species between 80 and 350 GHz towards L1157-B1, a shock position in the solar-type star forming region L1157. We report the detection of several transitions of PN and, for the first time, of prebiotic molecule PO. None of these species are detected towards the driving protostar of the outflow L1157-mm. Analysis of the line profiles shows that PN arises from the outflow cavity, where SiO, a strong shock tracer, is produced. Radiative transfer analysis yields an abundance of 2.5 × 10-9 and 0.9 × 10-9 for PO and PN, respectively. These results imply a strong depletion (≈100) of Phosphorus in the quiescent cloud gas. Shock modelling shows that atomic N plays a major role in the chemistry of PO and PN. The relative abundance of PO and PN brings constraints both on the duration of the pre-shock phase, which has to be ˜ 106 yr, and on the shock parameters. The maximum temperature in the shock has to be larger than 4000 K, which implies a shock velocity of 40 km s-1.

  6. Phosphorus-bearing molecules in solar-type star-forming regions: first PO detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, Bertrand; Vastel, C.; Viti, S.; Jimenez-Serra, I.; Codella, C.; Podio, L.; Ceccarelli, C.; Mendoza, E.; Lepine, J. R. D.; Bachiller, R.

    2016-11-01

    As part of the Large Program Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM, we have used the IRAM 30 m telescope to lead a systematic search for the emission of rotational transitions of P-bearing species between 80 and 350 GHz towards L1157-B1, a shock position in the solar-type star-forming region L1157. We report the detection of several transitions of PN and, for the first time, of pre-biotic molecule PO. None of these species are detected towards the driving protostar of the outflow L1157-mm. Analysis of the line profiles shows that PN arises from the outflow cavity, where SiO, a strong shock tracer, is produced. Radiative transfer analysis yields an abundance of 2.5 × 10-9 and 0.9 × 10-9 for PO and PN, respectively. These results imply a strong depletion (≈100) of phosphorus in the quiescent cloud gas. Shock modelling shows that atomic N plays a major role in the chemistry of PO and PN. The relative abundance of PO and PN brings constraints both on the duration of the pre-shock phase, which has to be ˜106 yr, and on the shock parameters. The maximum temperature in the shock has to be larger than 4000 K, which implies a shock velocity of 40 km s-1.

  7. Following the Water: the Evolution of Ice-forming Regions in the Early Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2006-01-01

    The abundances of water-vapor and water-ice during the first ten million years of the protoplanetary solar nebula are simulated using a new condensation/sublimation model. This study builds on a "snow line" model reported in ApJ 627 L153 (2005); it uses a simple phenomenological model where water vapor molecules evolve from solar atomic abundance and eventually condenses to ice at colder points in the nebula once the water-vapor partial pressure exceeds a value determined by the phase diagram for water. The synthesis of water vapor from elementary species is modeled with a chemical network consisting of about 400 species and 4000 reactions. The evolution of the icy zone (and its relative abundance of solid ice) is traced from a limited region in the early hotter disk to its final state at the time when the gas is expelled and a planetary system begins to form. Possible effects of this dynamic motion on disk chemistry and organic molecule formation are also described.

  8. Extreme infrared variables from UKIDSS - I. A concentration in star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Peña, C.; Lucas, P. W.; Froebrich, D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Goldstein, J.; Drew, J. E.; Adamson, A.; Davis, C. J.; Barentsen, G.; Wright, N. J.

    2014-04-01

    We present initial results of the first panoramic search for high-amplitude near-infrared variability in the Galactic plane. We analyse the widely separated two-epoch K-band photometry in the fifth and seventh data releases of the UKIDSS Galactic plane survey. We find 45 stars with ΔK > 1 mag, including two previously known OH/IR stars and a Nova. Even though the mid-plane is not yet included in the data set, we find the majority (66 per cent) of our sample to be within known star-forming regions (SFRs), with two large concentrations in the Serpens OB2 association (11 stars) and the Cygnus-X complex (12 stars). Sources in SFRs show spectral energy distributions that support classification as young stellar objects (YSOs). This indicates that YSOs dominate the Galactic population of high-amplitude infrared variable stars at low luminosities and therefore likely dominate the total high-amplitude population. Spectroscopic follow up of the DR5 sample shows at least four stars with clear characteristics of eruptive pre-main-sequence variables, two of which are deeply embedded. Our results support the recent concept of eruptive variability comprising a continuum of outburst events with different time-scales and luminosities, but triggered by a similar physical mechanism involving unsteady accretion. Also, we find what appears to be one of the most variable classical Be stars.

  9. Trigonometric parallaxes of star forming regions in the Scutum spiral arm

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, M.; Wu, Y. W.; Immer, K.; Zhang, B.; Sanna, A.; Brunthaler, A.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Dame, T. M.

    2014-10-01

    We report measurements of trigonometric parallaxes for six high-mass star-forming regions in the Scutum spiral arm of the Milky Way as part of the BeSSeL Survey. Combining our measurements with 10 previous measurements from the BeSSeL Survey yields a total sample of 16 sources in the Scutum arm with trigonometric parallaxes in the Galactic longitude range from 5° to 32°. Assuming a logarithmic spiral model, we estimate a pitch angle of 19.°8 ± 3.°1 for the Scutum arm, which is larger than pitch angles reported for other spiral arms. The high pitch angle of the arm may be due to the arm's proximity to the Galactic bar. The Scutum arm sources show an average peculiar motion of 4 km s{sup –1} slower than the Galactic rotation and 8 km s{sup –1} toward the Galactic center. While the direction of this non-circular motion has the same sign as determined for sources in other spiral arms, the motion toward the Galactic center is greater for the Scutum arm sources.

  10. YSOVAR: Mid-infrared variability in the star-forming region Lynds 1688

    SciTech Connect

    Günther, H. M.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hora, J. L.; Cody, A. M.; Covey, K. R.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Plavchan, P.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Bayo, A.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Meng, H. Y. A.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Parks, J. R.; Song, Inseok

    2014-12-01

    The emission from young stellar objects (YSOs) in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) is dominated by the inner rim of their circumstellar disks. We present IR data from the Young Stellar Object VARiability (YSOVAR) survey of ∼800 objects in the direction of the Lynds 1688 (L1688) star-forming region over four visibility windows spanning 1.6 yr using the Spitzer Space Telescope in its warm mission phase. Among all light curves, 57 sources are cluster members identified based on their spectral energy distribution and X-ray emission. Almost all cluster members show significant variability. The amplitude of the variability is larger in more embedded YSOs. Ten out of 57 cluster members have periodic variations in the light curves with periods typically between three and seven days, but even for those sources, significant variability in addition to the periodic signal can be seen. No period is stable over 1.6 yr. Nonperiodic light curves often still show a preferred timescale of variability that is longer for more embedded sources. About half of all sources exhibit redder colors in a fainter state. This is compatible with time-variable absorption toward the YSO. The other half becomes bluer when fainter. These colors can only be explained with significant changes in the structure of the inner disk. No relation between mid-IR variability and stellar effective temperature or X-ray spectrum is found.

  11. The HIFI spectral survey of massive star-forming region AFGL 2591

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmierczak, Maja; van der Tak, Floris; Helmich, Frank; Chvarria, Luis; Wang, Kuo-Song; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2013-07-01

    AFGL 2591 is a massive protostellar object with a bipolar outflow. It has been widely studied before since it is a relatively isolated and nearby star-forming region. Here we present an overview of the Herschel/HIFI spectral survey, as a part of CHESS Key Project. The survey covers a frequency range from 480 up to 1240 GHz as well as some particular lines from 1267 to 1901 GHz. From the spectral survey a total of 32 species were identified. The data analysis is divided into various families of molecules, eg. CO and its isotopologues, nitrogen-bearing molecules, sulfur-bearing species, organic molecules. We will discuss different types of observed molecules and their physical parameters. The radial abundance profiles of some molecules will be presented to learn about the chemical processes leading to their formation and destruction. One of the studied molecule is ammonia, which is concentrated in the inner part of the protostellar envelope (when T > 100K i.e. where water ice evaporates), with the abundance of 3x10e-7.

  12. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nasol, D.

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  13. Identification of biotransformation products of citalopram formed in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Beretsou, Vasiliki G; Psoma, Aikaterini K; Gago-Ferrero, Pablo; Aalizadeh, Reza; Fenner, Kathrin; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2016-10-15

    Citalopram (CTR) is a worldwide highly consumed antidepressant which has demonstrated incomplete removal by conventional wastewater treatment. Despite its global ubiquitous presence in different environmental compartments, little is known about its behaviour and transformation processes during wastewater treatment. The present study aims to expand the knowledge on fate and transformation of CTR during the biological treatment process. For this purpose, batch reactors were set up to assess biotic, abiotic and sorption losses of this compound. One of the main objectives of the study was the identification of the formed transformation products (TPs) by applying suspect and non-target strategies based on liquid chromatography quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS). The complementary use of reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) for the identification of polar TPs, and the application of in-house developed quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) prediction models, in addition to the comprehensive evaluation of the obtained MS/MS spectra, provided valuable information to support identification. In total, fourteen TPs were detected and thirteen of them were tentatively identified. Four compounds were confirmed (N-desmethylCTR, CTR amide, CTR carboxylic acid and 3-oxo-CTR) through the purchase of the corresponding reference standard. Probable structures based on diagnostic evidence were proposed for the additional nine TPs. Eleven TPs are reported for the first time. A transformation pathway for the biotransformation of CTR was proposed. The presence of the identified TPs was assessed in real wastewater samples through retrospective analysis, resulting in the detection of five compounds. Finally, the potential ecotoxicological risk posed by CTR and its TPs to different trophic levels of aquatic organisms was evaluated by means of risk quotients. PMID:27459150

  14. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. METHODS By using data from the Health section of 2008’s Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. RESULTS A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. CONCLUSIONS Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making PMID:27355465

  15. A multi-wavelength study of pre-main sequence stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, E. W.; Stelzer, B.; Neuhäuser, R.; Hillwig, T. C.; Durisen, R. H.; Menten, K. M.; Greimel, R.; Barwig, H.; Englhauser, J.; Robb, R. M.

    2000-05-01

    Although many lowmass pre-main sequence stars are strong X-ray sources, the origin of the X-ray emission is not well known. Since these objects are variable at all frequencies, simultaneous observations in X-rays and in other wavelengths are able to constrain the properties of the X-ray emitting regions. In this paper, we report quasi-simultaneous observations in X-rays, the optical, and the radio regime for classical and weak-line T Tauri stars from the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. We find that all detected T Tauri stars show significant night-to-night variations of the X-ray emission. For three of the stars, FM Tau and CW Tau, both classical T Tauri stars, and V773 Tau, a weak-line T Tauri star, the variations are especially large. From observations taken simultaneously, we also find that there is some correspondence between the strength of Hα and the X-ray brightness in V773 Tau. The lack of a strong correlation leads us to conclude that the X-ray emission of V773 Tau is not a superposition of flares. However, we suggest that a weak correlation occurs because chromospherically active regions and regions of strong X-ray emission are generally related. V773 Tau was detected at 8.46 GHz as a weakly circularly polarised but highly variable source. We also find that the X-ray emission and the equivalent width of Hα remained unchanged, while large variations of the flux density in the radio regime were observed. This clearly indicates that the emitting regions are different. Using optical spectroscopy we detected a flare in Hα and event which showed a flare-like light-curve of the continuum brightness in FM Tau. However, ROSAT did not observe the field at the times of these flares. Nevertheless, an interesting X-ray event was observed in V773 Tau, during which the flux increased for about 8 hours and then decreased back to the same level in 5 hours. We interpret this as a long-duration event similar to those seen on the sun and other active stars. In the

  16. IFLA General Conference, 1989. Division of Regional Activities. Section on Regional Activities--Africa; Section on Regional Activities--Asia and Oceania; Section on Regional Activities--Latin America and the Caribbean. Booklet 80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    There are five papers in this collection from the Division of Regional Activities: (1) "Communication and Information in Contemporary African Society" (Bimpe Aboyade), which discusses how libraries can make themselves relevant to other institutions concerned with information transfer; (2) "Libraries and Rural Development: Village Reading Rooms in…

  17. Inferred flows of electric currents in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Y. J.; Hong, Q. F.; Hagyard, M. J.; Deloach, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to identify sources of major current systems in active regions and their channels of flow are explored. Measured photospheric vector magnetic fields together with high resolution white light and H-alpha photographs provide the data base to derive the current systems in the photosphere and chromosphere of a solar active region. Simple mathematical constructions of active region fields and currents are used to interpret these data under the assumptions that the fields in the lower atmosphere (below 200 km) may not be force free but those in the chromosphere and higher are. The results obtained for the complex active region AR 2372 are: (1) Spots exhibiting significant spiral structure in the penumbral filaments were the source of vertical currents at the photospheric surface; (2) Magnetic neutral lines where the transverse magnetic field was strongly sheared were channels along which a strong current system flowed; (3) The inferred current systems produced a neutral sheet and oppositely-flowing currents in the area of the magnetic delta configuration that was the site of flaring.

  18. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Regional Activities. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Six of the seven papers in this collection focus on regional library activities in Africa, Asia and Oceania, and Latin America and the Caribbean: (1) "Libraries and Information Services in a Changing World: The Challenges African Information Services Face at the End of the 1980s" (Dejen Abate, Ethiopia); (2) "The Computer and Knowledge Information…

  19. Urban, Rural, and Regional Variations in Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sarah Levin; Kirkner, Gregory J.; Mayo, Kelly; Matthews, Charles E.; Durstine, J. Larry; Hebert, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: There is some speculation about geographic differences in physical activity (PA) levels. We examined the prevalence of physical inactivity (PIA) and whether US citizens met the recommended levels of PA across the United States. In addition, the association between PIA/PA and degree of urbanization in the 4 main US regions (Northeast,…

  20. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression.

    PubMed

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-05-03

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients.

  1. A solar cycle timing predictor - The latitude of active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1990-01-01

    A 'Spoerer butterfly' method is used to examine solar cycle 22. It is shown from the latitude of active regions that the cycle can now be expected to peak near November 1989 + or - 8 months, basically near the latter half of 1989.

  2. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  3. Early life stress affects limited regional brain activity in depression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lian; Wang, Jingjie; Meng, Ben; Yong, Na; Yang, Xiangying; Huang, Qingling; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Lingling; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Zhu; Li, Yongmei; Lv, Fajin; Hu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) can alter brain function and increases the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) in later life. This study investigated whether ELS contributes to differences in regional brain activity between MDD patients and healthy controls (HC), as measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF)/fractional (f)ALFF. Eighteen first-episode, treatment-naïve MDD patients and HC were assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We compared ALFF/fALFF between MDD patients and HC, with or without controlling for ELS, and determined whether ELS level was correlated with regional brain activity in each group. After regressing out ELS, we found that ALFF increased in bilateral amygdala and left orbital/cerebellum, while fALFF decreased in left inferior temporal and right middle frontal gyri in MDD patients relative to controls. ELS positively correlated with regional activity in the left cerebellum in MDD and in the right post-central/inferior temporal/superior frontal cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral cerebellum in HC. Our findings indicate that there is only very limited region showing correlation between ELS and brain activity in MDD, while diverse areas in HC, suggesting ELS has few impacts on MDD patients. PMID:27138376

  4. Isolation of a biologically active soluble form of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Sendai virus.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Laver, W G; Murti, K G; Portner, A

    1988-01-01

    As a first step in establishing the three-dimensional structure of the Sendai virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), we have isolated and characterized a potentially crystallizable form of the molecule. The sequence of HN, a surface glycoprotein, predicts a protein with an uncharged hydrophobic region near the amino terminus which is responsible for anchorage in the viral envelope. To avoid rosette formation (aggregation), which would preclude crystallization, this hydrophobic tail was removed from a membrane-free form of HN by proteolytic digestion. This digestion resulted in a single product with a molecular weight of about 10,000 less than native HN. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of cleaved HN (C-HN) indicated a single cleavage site at amino acid residue 131, resulting in a product consisting of the carboxyl-terminal 444 amino acids of HN. Functional analyses revealed that C-HN retained full neuraminidase activity and was able to bind erythrocytes, indicating that the N-terminal 131 residues were not necessary for these biological activities. Furthermore, this cleavage product retained the antigenic structure of intact HN, since monoclonal antibodies still bound to C-HN in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western (immuno-) blot analysis. Viewed by electron microscopy, the dimeric and tetrameric forms of intact HN form rosettes while C-HN maintains the oligomeric structure but no longer aggregates. Furthermore, the electron micrographs revealed a C-HN tetramer strikingly similar to the influenza virus neuraminidase in both size and gross structural features. Images PMID:2846877

  5. Evolution of two Flaring Active Regions With CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    We study the coronal magnetic field structure of two active regions, one during solar activity minimum (June 2007) and another one during a more active time (January 2004). The temporal evolution was explored with the help of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations of SOLIS/VSM and NAOJ/SFT photospheric vector magnetograms. We study the active region NOAA 10960 observed on 2007 June 7 with three SOLIS/VSM snapshots taken during a small C1.0 flare of time cadence 10 minutes and six snapshots during a quiet period. The total magnetic energy in the active region was approximately 3 × 1025 J. Before the flare the free magnetic energy was about 5~% of the potential field energy. A part of this excess energy was released during the flare, producing almost a potential configuration at the beginning of the quiet period. The return to an almost potential structure can be assigned to a CME as recorded by the SoHO/LASCO instrument on 2007 June 07 around 10 minutes after the flare peaked, so that whatever magnetic helicity was bodily removed from the structure. This was compared with active region 10540 observed on 2004 January 18 -- 21, which was analyzed with the help of vector magnetograph data from the Solar Flare Telescope in Japan of time cadence of about 1 day. The free energy was Efree≈ 66~% of the total energy which was sufficiently high to power a M6.1 flare on January 20, which was associated with a CME 20 minutes later. The activity of AR 10540 was significantly higher than for AR 10960, as was the total magnetic energy. Furthermore, we found the common feature that magnetic energy accumulates before the flare/CME and a significant part of the excess energy is released during the eruption.

  6. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R.; Rogers, Troy D.; Stutts, M. Jackson; Randell, Scott H.; Grubb, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na+ transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface. PMID:22814399

  7. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Akihiro; Wong, Pooi-Fong; Hojo, Hironobu; Hasegawa, Makoto; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Llanes, Rafael; Kubo, Yoshinao; Senba, Masachika; Ichinose, Yoshio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

  8. Optogenetic activation of presynaptic inputs in lateral amygdala forms associative fear memory.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Nakajima, Ryuichi; Kim, Hyung-Su; Jeong, Yire; Augustine, George J; Han, Jin-Hee

    2014-11-01

    In Pavlovian fear conditioning, the lateral amygdala (LA) has been highlighted as a key brain site for association between sensory cues and aversive stimuli. However, learning-related changes are also found in upstream sensory regions such as thalamus and cortex. To isolate the essential neural circuit components for fear memory association, we tested whether direct activation of presynaptic sensory inputs in LA, without the participation of upstream activity, is sufficient to form fear memory in mice. Photostimulation of axonal projections from the two main auditory brain regions, the medial geniculate nucleus of the thalamus and the secondary auditory cortex, was paired with aversive footshock. Twenty-four hours later the same photostimulation induced robust conditioned freezing and this fear memory formation was disrupted when glutamatergic synaptic transmission was locally blocked in the LA. Therefore, our results prove for the first time that synapses between sensory input areas and the LA, previously implicated as a crucial brain site for fear memory formation, actually are sufficient to serve as a conditioned stimulus. Our results strongly support the idea that the LA may be sufficient to encode and store associations between neutral cue and aversive stimuli during natural fear conditioning as a critical part of a broad fear memory engram.

  9. HARPs: Tracked Active Region Patch Data Product from SDO/HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turmon, M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Sun, X.; Bobra, M.

    2012-12-01

    We describe an HMI data product consisting of tracked magnetic features on the scale of solar active regions, abbreviated HARPs (HMI Active Region Patches). The HARP data series has been helpful for subsetting individual active regions, for development of near-real-time (NRT) space weather indices for individual active regions, and for defining closed magnetic structures for computationally-intensive algorithms like vector field disambiguation. The data series builds upon the 720s cadence activity masks, which identify large-scale instantaneously-observed magnetic features. Using these masks as a starting point, large spatially-coherent structures are identified using convolution with a longitudinally-extended kernel on a spherical domain. The resulting set of identified regions is then tracked from image to image. The metric for inter-image association is area of overlap between the best current estimate of AR location, as predicted by temporally extrapolating each currently tracked object, and the set of instantaneously-observed magnetic structures. Once completed tracks have been extracted, they are made into a standardized HARP data series by finding the smallest constant-angular-velocity box, of constant width in latitude and longitude, that encompasses all appearances of the active region. This data product is currently available, in definitive and near-real-time forms, with accompanying region-strength, location, and NOAA-AR metadata, on HMI's Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) data portal.; HARP outlines for three days (2001 February 14, 15, and 16, 00:00 TAI, flipped N-S, selected from the 12-minute cadence original data product). HARPs are shown in the same color (some colors repeated) with a thin white box surrounding each HARP. HARPs are tracked and associated from image to image. HARPs, such as the yellow one in the images above, need not be connected regions. Merges and splits, such as the light blue region, are accounted for automatically.

  10. Active sonar, beaked whales and European regional policy.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Sarah J; Evans, Peter G H; Notarbartolo-di-Sciara, Giuseppe; Frisch, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    Various reviews, resolutions and guidance from international and regional fora have been produced in recent years that acknowledge the significance of marine noise and its potential impacts on cetaceans. Within Europe, ACCOBAMS and ASCOBANS have shown increasing attention to the issue. The literature highlights concerns surrounding the negative impacts of active sonar on beaked whales in particular, where concerns primarily relate to the use of mid-frequency active sonar (1-10kHz), as used particularly in military exercises. The authors review the efforts that European regional policies have undertaken to acknowledge and manage possible negative impacts of active sonar and how these might assist the transition from scientific research to policy implementation, including effective management and mitigation measures at a national level.

  11. RADIO JETS AND DISKS IN THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION NGC2071IR

    SciTech Connect

    Trinidad, M. A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rodriguez, L. F.

    2009-11-20

    We report the results of simultaneous radio continuum and water maser observations toward the NGC 2071IR star-forming region, carried out with the VLA in its A configuration. We detect continuum emission toward the infrared sources IRS 1 and IRS 3 at 1.3 and 3.6 cm. In addition, a new continuum source, VLA 1, is also detected at both wavelengths, which is located between IRS 1 and IRS 3. IRS 1 breaks up into three continuum peaks (IRS 1E, 1C, and 1W), aligned in the east-west direction (P.A. = 100{sup 0}). IRS 1 is the central source, while the sources E and W seem to be condensations ejected by IRS 1. In the same way, IRS 3 is also forming a triple system (IRS 3N, 3C and 3S), which is elongated in the northeast-southwest direction and the condensations, IRS 3N and IRS 3S, are symmetrically located along the major axis. Based on the morphology and the continuum emission, we suggest that both IRS 1 and IRS 3 are radio jets, which have ejected condensations into the interstellar medium. Moreover, IRS 1 and IRS 3 seem to be the driving sources of the large-scale outflows observed in H{sub 2} and CO, respectively. In addition, we also detected water emission toward the systems IRS 1, IRS 3, and the new source VLA 1. Based on the spatial-kinematic distribution of the water masers, we find evidence that the water masers are tracing part of circumstellar disks around IRS 1C and IRS 3C. Moreover, we estimate that the sources IRS 1C and IRS 3C have central masses of approx5 and approx1 M {sub sun}, respectively. We conclude that the radio continuum and water maser emission are tracing disk-YSO-outflow systems toward IRS 1 and IRS 3, which are low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects, respectively.

  12. Patterns of Activity Revealed by a Time Lag Analysis of a Model Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Stephen; Viall, Nicholeen

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of average frequencies. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine an extrapolated magnetic skeleton with hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes to create a model active region, and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is to recover some typical properties and patterns of activity observed in active regions. Our key findings are: 1. Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. 2. Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. 3. All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line-of-sight passes through coronal loop foot-points. 4. There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a time scale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies operates across active regions. 5. Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  13. Mechanism of formation of a dipole magnetic field in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasyan, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    A model of the formation of large-scale magnetic fields of dipole configuration in the central regions (r ≈ 100 pc) of active galaxies is studied. It is assumed that these regions contain a rapidly rotating, highly ionized gas (Ω ≈ 5·10-15 sec, Ne ≈ 103 cm-3). Ionized matter escapes from the center of the region with a velocity of several hundred km/sec and is entrained by the rotation of the surrounding medium. Biermann's "battery" effect [L. Biermann, Z. Naturforsch., 5a, 65 (1950)] operates under such conditions, and circular electric currents are formed in the medium, which amplify the dipole magnetic fields. During the active phase of a galaxy, about 108 years, the magnetic field strength at the boundary of this region may reach 10-4 10-3 G.

  14. SUB-STELLAR COMPANIONS AND STELLAR MULTIPLICITY IN THE TAURUS STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Daemgen, Sebastian; Bonavita, Mariangela; Jayawardhana, Ray; Lafrenière, David; Janson, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We present results from a large, high-spatial-resolution near-infrared imaging search for stellar and sub-stellar companions in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. The sample covers 64 stars with masses between those of the most massive Taurus members at ∼3 M {sub ☉} and low-mass stars at ∼0.2 M {sub ☉}. We detected 74 companion candidates, 34 of these reported for the first time. Twenty-five companions are likely physically bound, partly confirmed by follow-up observations. Four candidate companions are likely unrelated field stars. Assuming physical association with their host star, estimated companion masses are as low as ∼2 M {sub Jup}. The inferred multiplicity frequency within our sensitivity limits between ∼10-1500 AU is 26.3{sub −4.9}{sup +6.6}%. Applying a completeness correction, 62% ± 14% of all Taurus stars between 0.7 and 1.4 M {sub ☉} appear to be multiple. Higher order multiples were found in 1.8{sub −1.5}{sup +4.2}% of the cases, in agreement with previous observations of the field. We estimate a sub-stellar companion frequency of ∼3.5%-8.8% within our sensitivity limits from the discovery of two likely bound and three other tentative very low-mass companions. This frequency appears to be in agreement with what is expected from the tail of the stellar companion mass ratio distribution, suggesting that stellar and brown dwarf companions share the same dominant formation mechanism. Further, we find evidence for possible evolution of binary parameters between two identified sub-populations in Taurus with ages of ∼2 Myr and ∼20 Myr, respectively.

  15. MULTIPLICITY, DISKS, AND JETS IN THE NGC 2071 STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Osorio, Mayra; Anglada, Guillem; Gomez, Jose F.; D'Alessio, Paola; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Torrelles, Jose M.

    2012-02-10

    We present centimeter (cm) and millimeter (mm) observations of the NGC 2071 star-forming region performed with the Very Large Array (VLA) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detected counterparts at 3.6 cm and 3 mm for the previously known sources IRS 1, IRS 2, IRS 3, and VLA 1. All these sources show spectral energy distributions (SEDs) dominated by free-free thermal emission at cm wavelengths and thermal dust emission at mm wavelengths, suggesting that all of them are associated with young stellar objects (YSOs). IRS 1 shows a complex morphology at 3.6 cm, with changes in the direction of its elongation. We discuss two possible explanations to this morphology: the result of changes in the direction of a jet due to interactions with a dense ambient medium, or that we are actually observing the superposition of two jets arising from two components of a binary system. Higher angular resolution observations at 1.3 cm support the second possibility, since a double source is inferred at this wavelength. IRS 3 shows a clear jet-like morphology at 3.6 cm. Over a timespan of four years, we observed changes in the morphology of this source that we interpret as due to ejection of ionized material in a jet. The emission at 3 mm of IRS 3 is angularly resolved, with a deconvolved size (FWHM) of {approx}120 AU, and seems to be tracing a dusty circumstellar disk perpendicular to the radio jet. An irradiated accretion disk model around an intermediate-mass YSO can account for the observed SED and spatial intensity profile at 3 mm, supporting this interpretation.

  16. The Physical Environment of the Massive Star-forming Region W42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Luna, A.; Ojha, D. K.; Anandarao, B. G.; Mallick, K. K.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2015-10-01

    We present an analysis of multi-wavelength observations from various data sets and Galactic plane surveys to study the star-formation process in the W42 complex. A bipolar appearance of the W42 complex is evident due to the ionizing feedback from the O5-O6 type star in a medium that is highly inhomogeneous. The Very Large Telescope/NACO adaptive-optics K and L‧ images (resolutions ˜0.″2-0.″1) resolved this ionizing source into multiple point-like sources below ˜5000 AU scale. The position angle ˜15° of the W42 molecular cloud is consistent with the H-band starlight mean polarization angle, which in turn is close to the Galactic magnetic field, suggesting the influence of the Galactic field on the evolution of the W42 molecular cloud. Herschel sub-millimeter data analysis reveals three clumps located along the waist axis of the bipolar nebula, with the peak column densities of ˜(3-5) × 1022 cm-2 corresponding to visual extinctions of AV ˜ 32-53.5 mag. The Herschel temperature map traces a temperature gradient in W42, revealing regions of 20 K, 25 K, and 30-36 K. Herschel maps reveal embedded filaments (length ˜1-3 pc) that appear to be radially pointed to the denser clump associated with the O5-O6 star, forming a hub-filament system. A total of 512 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) are identified in the complex, ˜40% of which are present in clusters distributed mainly within the molecular cloud, including the Herschel filaments. Our data sets suggest that the YSO clusters, including the massive stars, are located at the junction of the filaments, similar to those seen in the Rosette Molecular Cloud.

  17. DIVERGENT HORIZONTAL SUB-SURFACE FLOWS WITHIN ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S. C.; Hill, F. E-mail: stripathy@nso.edu

    2015-07-20

    We measure the horizontal subsurface flow in a fast emerging active region (AR; NOAA 11158) using the ring-diagram technique and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager high spatial resolution Dopplergrams. This AR had a complex magnetic structure and displayed significant changes in morphology during its disk passage. Over a period of six days from 2011 February 11 to 16, the temporal variation in the magnitude of the total velocity is found to follow the trend of magnetic field strength. We further analyze regions of individual magnetic polarity within AR 11158 and find that the horizontal velocity components in these sub-regions have significant variation with time and depth. The leading and trailing polarity regions move faster than the mixed-polarity region. Furthermore, both zonal and meridional components have opposite signs for trailing and leading polarity regions at all depths showing divergent flows within the AR. We also find a sharp decrease in the magnitude of total horizontal velocity in deeper layers around major flares. It is suggested that the re-organization of magnetic fields during flares, combined with the sunspot rotation, decreases the magnitude of horizontal flows or that the flow kinetic energy has been converted into the energy released by flares. After the decline in flare activity and sunspot rotation, the flows tend to follow the pattern of magnetic activity. We also observe less variation in the velocity components near the surface but these tend to increase with depth, further demonstrating that the deeper layers are more affected by the topology of ARs.

  18. Fine thermal structure of a coronal active region.

    PubMed

    Reale, Fabio; Parenti, Susanna; Reeves, Kathy K; Weber, Mark; Bobra, Monica G; Barbera, Marco; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro; Peres, Giovanni; Golub, Leon

    2007-12-01

    The determination of the fine thermal structure of the solar corona is fundamental to constraining the coronal heating mechanisms. The Hinode X-ray Telescope collected images of the solar corona in different passbands, thus providing temperature diagnostics through energy ratios. By combining different filters to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio, we observed a coronal active region in five filters, revealing a highly thermally structured corona: very fine structures in the core of the region and on a larger scale further away. We observed continuous thermal distribution along the coronal loops, as well as entangled structures, and variations of thermal structuring along the line of sight.

  19. Prevention of Liver Fibrosis by Triple Helix-Forming Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Targeted to the Promoter Region of Type I Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from −141 to −165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5′ end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules. PMID:20818932

  20. Investigation of OH and H2O masers in the star-forming region G 188.946+0.886

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashimbaeva, N. T.; Colom, P.; Lekht, E. E.; Pashchenko, M. I.; Rudnitskii, G. M.; Tolmachev, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of our observations of the maser radio emission source G188.946+0.886 in hydroxyl (OH) molecular lines with the radio telescope of the Nançay Observatory (France) and in the H2O line at λ = 1.35 cm with the RT-22 radio telescope at the Pushchino Observatory (Russia). An emission feature in the 1720-MHz satellite line of the OH ground state has been detected for the first time. The radial velocity of the feature, V LSR = 3.6 km s-1, has a "blue" shift relative to the range of emission velocities in the main 1665- and 1667-MHz OH lines, which is 8-11 km s-1. This suggests a probable connection of the observed feature in the 1720-MHz line with the "blue" wing of the bipolar outflow observed in this region in the CO line. We have estimated the magnetic field strength for three features (0.90 and 0.8 mG for 1665 MHz and 0.25 mG for 1720 MHz) from the Zeeman splitting in the 1665- and 1720-MHz lines. No emission and (or) absorption has been detected in the other 1612-MHz satellite OH line. Three cycles of H2O maser activity have been revealed. The variability is quasi-periodic in pattern. There is a general tendency for the maser activity to decrease. Some clusters of H2O maser spots can form organized structures, for example, chains and other forms.

  1. Determining heating timescales in solar active region cores from AIA/SDO Fe XVIII images

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the frequency of transient brightenings in the core of solar active regions as observed in the Fe XVIII line component of AIA/SDO 94 Å filter images. The Fe XVIII emission is isolated using an empirical correction to remove the contribution of 'warm' emission to this channel. Comparing with simultaneous observations from EIS/Hinode, we find that the variability observed in Fe XVIII is strongly correlated with the emission from lines formed at similar temperatures. We examine the evolution of loops in the cores of active regions at various stages of evolution. Using a newly developed event detection algorithm, we characterize the distribution of event frequency, duration, and magnitude in these active regions. These distributions are similar for regions of similar age and show a consistent pattern as the regions age. This suggests that these characteristics are important constraints for models of solar active regions. We find that the typical frequency of the intensity fluctuations is about 1400 s for any given line of sight, i.e., about two to three events per hour. Using the EBTEL 0D hydrodynamic model, however, we show that this only sets a lower limit on the heating frequency along that line of sight.

  2. Structure and polarization of active region microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Alissandrakis, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Active region radio emission observations made at 6.16 cm wavelength during May 20-27, 1980, are the bases of maps of total intensity and circular polarization presented for the three regions whose Hale numbers are 16850, 16863, and 16864. A detailed comparison is made between these maps and on- and off-band H-alpha pictures and magnetograms. The neutral lines with which the strongest sources were associated have their two opposite polarities close to each other, implying a high magnetic field gradient, and are also associated with arch filament systems. A detailed analysis is undertaken of observations of the circular polarization sense inversion in region 16863. The large scale structure of the magnetic field can be approximated by a dipole with its axis inclined by 11 deg with respect to the photosphere, and with a dipole moment of about 2 x 10 to the 31 power cgs units.

  3. IPS observations of heliospheric density structures associated with active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.; Altrock, R.; Woan, G.; Slater, G.

    1996-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements of the 'disturbance factor' g, obtained with the Cambridge (UK) array can be used to explore the heliospheric density structure. We have used these data to construct synoptic (Carrington) maps, representing the large-scale enhancements of the g-factor in the inner heliosphere. These maps emphasize the stable corotating, rather than the transient heliospheric density enhancements. We have compared these maps with Carrington maps of Fe XIV observations National Solar Observatory ((NSO), Sacramento Peak) and maps based on Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) X-ray observations. Our results indicate that the regions of enhanced g tend to map to active regions rather than the current sheet. The implication is that act ve regions are the dominant source of the small-scale (approximately equal 200 km) density variations present in the quiet solar wind.

  4. Diagnostics of Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fludra, Andrzej; Hornsey, Christopher; Nakariakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    We aim to develop a diagnostic method for the coronal heating mechanism in active region loops. Observational constraints on coronal heating models have been sought using measurements in the X-ray and EUV wavelengths. Statistical analysis, using EUV emission from many active regions, was done by Fludra and Ireland (2008) who studied power-law relationships between active region integrated magnetic flux and emission line intensities. A subsequent study by Fludra and Warren (2010) for the first time compared fully resolved images in an EUV spectral line of OV 63.0 nm with the photospheric magnetic field, leading to the identification of a dominant, ubiquitous variable component of the transition region EUV emission and a discovery of a steady basal heating, and deriving the dependence of the basal heating rate on the photospheric magnetic flux density. In this study, we compare models of single coronal loops with EUV observations. We assess to what degree observations of individual coronal loops made in the EUV range are capable of providing constraints on the heating mechanism. We model the coronal magnetic field in an active region using an NLFF extrapolation code applied to a photospheric vector magnetogram from SDO/HMI and select several loops that match an SDO/AIA 171 image of the same active region. We then model the plasma in these loops using a 1D hydrostatic code capable of applying an arbitrary heating rate as a function of magnetic field strength along the loop. From the plasma parameters derived from this model, we calculate the EUV emission along the loop in AIA 171 and 335 bands, and in pure spectral lines of Fe IX 17.1 nm and Fe XVI 33.5 nm. We use different spatial distributions of the heating function: concentrated near the loop top, uniform and concentrated near the footpoints, and investigate their effect on the modelled EUV intensities. We find a diagnostics based on the dependence of the total loop intensity on the shape of the heating function

  5. Electron acceleration and radiation in evolving complex active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, A.; Gontikakis, C.; Vilmer, N.; Vlahos, L.

    2004-07-01

    We present a model for the acceleration and radiation of solar energetic particles (electrons) in evolving complex active regions. The spatio - temporal evolution of active regions is calculated using a cellular automaton model, based on self-organized criticality. The acceleration of electrons is due to the presence of randomly placed, localized electric fields produced by the energy release process, simulated by the cellular automaton model. We calculate the resulting kinetic energy distributions of the particles and their emitted X-ray radiation spectra using the thick target approximation, and we perform a parametric study with respect to number of electric fields present and thermal temperature of the injected distribution. Finally, comparing our results with the existing observations, we find that they are in a good agreement with the observed X-ray spectra in the energy range 100-1000 keV.

  6. Evidence of active region imprints on the solar wind structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    A common descriptive framework for discussing the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere uses the global magnetic field as a reference: low density, high velocity solar wind emanates from open magnetic fields, with high density, low speed solar wind flowing outward near the current sheet. In this picture, active regions, underlying closed magnetic field structures in the streamer belt, leave little or no imprint on the solar wind. We present evidence from interplanetary scintillation measurements of the 'disturbance factor' g that active regions play a role in modulating the solar wind and possibly contribute to the solar wind mass output. Hence we find that the traditional view of the solar wind, though useful in understanding many features of solar wind structure, is oversimplified and possibly neglects important aspects of solar wind dynamics

  7. Electric currents and coronal heating in NOAA active region 6952

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, T. R.; Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Wulser, J. -P.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tsuneta, S.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal relationship between coronal structures observed with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft and the vertical electric current density derived from photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the Stokes Polarimeter at the Mees Solar Observatory. We focus on a single active region: AR 6952 which we observed on 7 days during 1991 December. For 11 independent maps of the vertical electric current density co-aligned with non-flaring X-ray images, we search for a morphological relationship between sites of high vertical current density in the photosphere and enhanced X-ray emission in the overlying corona. We find no compelling spatial or temporal correlation between the sites of vertical current and the bright X-ray structures in this active region.

  8. Identification of furin pro-region determinants involved in folding and activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Lyne; Charest, Gabriel; Longpré, Jean-Michel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The pro-region of the subtilisin-like convertase furin acts early in the biosynthetic pathway as an intramolecular chaperone to enable proper folding of the zymogen, and later on as an inhibitor to constrain the activity of the enzyme until it reaches the trans -Golgi network. To identify residues that are important for pro-region function, we initially identified amino acids that are conserved among the pro-regions of various mammalian convertases. Site-directed mutagenesis of 17 selected amino acids within the 89-residue pro-region and biosynthetic labelling revealed that I60A-furin and H66A-furin were rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner, while W34A-furin and F67A-furin did not show any autocatalytic activation. Intriguingly, the latter mutants proteolytically cleaved pro-von Willebrand factor precursor to the mature polypeptide, suggesting that the mutations permitted proper folding, but did not allow the pro-region to exercise its role in inhibiting the enzyme. Homology modelling of furin's pro-region revealed that residues Ile-60 and His-66 might be crucial in forming the binding interface with the catalytic domain, while residues Trp-34 and Phe-67 might be involved in maintaining a hydrophobic core within the pro-region itself. These results provide structural insights into the dual role of furin's pro-region. PMID:14741044

  9. 76 FR 66944 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-914; Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  18. Composition and topology of activity cliff clusters formed by bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    The assessment of activity cliffs has thus far mostly focused on compound pairs, although the majority of activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple active compounds and cliffs. However, the composition of coordinated activity cliff configurations and their topologies are unknown. Therefore, we have identified all activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and analyzed them in network representations where activity cliff configurations occur as clusters. The composition, topology, frequency of occurrence, and target distribution of activity cliff clusters have been determined. A limited number of large cliff clusters with unique topologies were identified that were centers of activity cliff formation. These clusters originated from a small number of target sets. However, most clusters were of small to moderate size. Three basic topologies were sufficient to describe recurrent activity cliff cluster motifs/topologies. For example, frequently occurring clusters with star topology determined the scale-free character of the global activity cliff network and represented a characteristic activity cliff configuration. Large clusters with complex topology were often found to contain different combinations of basic topologies. Our study provides a first view of activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and of the recurrent topologies of activity cliff clusters. Activity cliff clusters of defined topology can be selected, and from compounds forming the clusters, SAR information can be obtained. The SAR information of activity cliff clusters sharing a/one specific activity and topology can be compared.

  19. Simulation of Active-Region-Scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; van der Holst, B.

    2015-12-01

    Shear flows long observed in solar active regions are now understood to be a consequence of the Lorentz force that develops from a complex interaction between magnetic fields and the thermal pressure of the Sun's gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The shearing motions transport magnetic flux and energy from the submerged portion of the field to the corona providing the necessary energy for flares, filament eruptions and CMEs. To further examine this shearing process, we simulate flux emergence on the scale of active regions with a large-scale model of the near surface convection zone constructed on an adaptive spherical grid. This model is designed to simulate flux emerging on the scale of active regions from a depth of 30 Mm. Here, we show results of a twisted flux rope emerging through the hierarchy of granular convection, and examine the flow patterns that arise as the flux approaches the photosphere. We show how these organized flows driven by the Lorentz force cause the coronal field evolve to a highly non-potential configuration capable of driving solar eruptions such as CMEs and flares.

  20. Evidence for coronal turbulence in a quiescent active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.; Strong, Keith T.

    1986-01-01

    The first evidence for nonthermal broadening of X-ray lines in a quiescent active region was based on a single observation of a limb active region by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) on the SMM satellite, reported by Acton et al. (1981). With the renewal of SMM operations, the FCS has been used to further investigate this phenomenon. On April 28, 1984 a map of Mg XI resonance line profiles was made for a bright area in NOAA Active Region 4474 during a nonflaring period. The narrowest line profiles are consistent with the nominal instrumental width plus a thermal width equivalent to about 3 million K, the temperature derived from line ratios of O VIII, Ne IX, and Mg XI. The broadest line profiles are consistent with the instrumental width plus a thermal width equivalent to about 7 million K, but a substantial amount of plasma at this temperature would result in much greater flux in the FCS higher-temperature channels than was seen. If the excess width is attributed solely to plasma turbulence, the corresponding velocity would be about 40 + or - 10 km/s.

  1. A theoretical approach to spot active regions in antimicrobial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Much effort goes into identifying new antimicrobial compounds able to evade the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics. One strategy relies on antimicrobial peptides, either derived from fragments released by proteolytic cleavage of proteins or designed from known antimicrobial protein regions. Results To identify these antimicrobial determinants, we developed a theoretical approach that predicts antimicrobial proteins from their amino acid sequence in addition to determining their antimicrobial regions. A bactericidal propensity index has been calculated for each amino acid, using the experimental data reported from a high-throughput screening assay as reference. Scanning profiles were performed for protein sequences and potentially active stretches were identified by the best selected threshold parameters. The method was corroborated against positive and negative datasets. This successful approach means that we can spot active sequences previously reported in the literature from experimental data for most of the antimicrobial proteins examined. Conclusion The method presented can correctly identify antimicrobial proteins with an accuracy of 85% and a sensitivity of 90%. The method can also predict their key active regions, making this a tool for the design of new antimicrobial drugs. PMID:19906288

  2. The Intermediate-line Region in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, T. P.; Różańska, A.; Czerny, B.; Hryniewicz, K.; Ferland, G. J.

    2016-11-01

    We show that the recently observed suppression of the gap between the broad-line region (BLR) and the narrow-line region (NLR) in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can be fully explained by an increase of the gas density in the emitting region. Our model predicts the formation of the intermediate-line region (ILR) that is observed in some Seyfert galaxies by the detection of emission lines with intermediate-velocity FWHM ∼ 700–1200 km s‑1. These lines are believed to be originating from an ILR located somewhere between the BLR and NLR. As was previously proved, the apparent gap is assumed to be caused by the presence of dust beyond the sublimation radius. Our computations with the use of the cloudy photoionization code show that the differences in the shape of the spectral energy distribution from the central region of AGNs do not diminish the apparent gap in the line emission in those objects. A strong discontinuity in the line emission versus radius exists for all lines at the dust sublimation radius. However, increasing the gas density to ∼{10}11.5 cm‑3 at the sublimation radius provides the continuous line emission versus radius and fully explains the recently observed lack of apparent gap in some AGNs. We show that such a high density is consistent with the density of upper layers of an accretion disk atmosphere. Therefore, the upper layers of the disk atmosphere can give rise to the formation of observed emission-line clouds.

  3. A Multi-line Study of Atomic Carbon and Carbon Monoxide in the Galactic Star- forming Region W3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, H.; Kramer, C.; Mookerjea, B.; Jeyakumar, S.; Stutzki, J.

    We present results from simultaneous observations of the fine structure line emissions of neutral carbon (C I) at 492 and 809 GHz from selected Galactic star forming regions. These observations include the first results using the the newly installed SMART (SubmilliMeter Array Receiver at Two wavelengths) on KOSMA. The regions observed were selected in order to cover a range of strengths of the incident UV radiation from the exciting star/stars and also densities of the interstellar medium. Extended maps of C I emission from massive star forming regions including W3, S106 and Orion BN/KL have been observed. Simultaneous observation of the two C I lines ensures better relative calibration. The results from these observations will be combined with observed intensities of low-J and mid-J CO and C+ lines and analyzed using radiation transfer based models for Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs).

  4. Matrix metallopeptidase 2 activity in tendon regions: effects of mechanical loading exercise associated to anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Marqueti, Rita C; Prestes, Jonato; Paschoal, Milena; Ramos, Oscar H P; Perez, Sérgio E A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; Selistre-de-Araujo, Heloisa S

    2008-12-01

    Matrix metallopeptidases (MMPs) are responsible for degradation of the extracellular matrix components and tissue remodeling. To achieve a better understanding of AAS effects in rat tendon, MMP-2 activity in the proximal and distal regions of the calcanear tendon (CT) and proximal, intermediate and distal region of superficial (SFT) and deep flexor tendons (DFT) after mechanical load exercise associated with AAS was investigated. Animals were grouped into four groups: sedentary animals (S); sedentary animals with ASS supplementation (S + A); trained animals (T) and trained animals with AAS supplementation (T + A). Analysis of MMP activity in tendon extracts was done by gelatin zymography. Both proximal and distal regions of the calcanear tendon showed the lowest MMP-2 concentration and the highest proportion in MMP-2 active form. The intermediate region of the SFT differed (P < 0.01) from the proximal and distal regions with higher % of active MMP-2 in the sedentary group. The proportion of active MMP-2 decreased in the proximal region of the CT. AAS treatment strongly decreased both MMP-2 concentration and active form in the three regions of the SFT and on the proximal region of the CT, but not on the DFT. The differences in the response to exercise and AAS treatment are a result of distinct metabolism and recruitment of these tendon regions in the exercise program employed in this study.

  5. Regional differences in muscle activation during hamstrings exercise.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Contreras, Bret; Tiryaki-Sonmez, Gul; Wilson, Jacob M; Kolber, Morey J; Peterson, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that regional activation within a muscle may lead to greater site-specific muscular adaptations in the activated portion of the muscle. Because the hamstrings are a biarticular muscle, it can be theorized that single-joint exercises where movement originates at the hip vs. the knee will result in differential activation of the muscle complex. The purpose of the present study was to assess electromyographic activity in the proximal and distal aspects of the medial and lateral hamstrings during performance of the stiff-legged deadlift (SLDL), a hip-dominant exercise, and the lying leg curl (LLC), a knee-dominant exercise. Ten young, resistance-trained men were recruited from a university population to participate in the study. Employing a within-subject design, participants performed the SLDL and LLC to muscular failure using a load equating to their 8 repetition maximum for each exercise. The order of performance of exercises was counterbalanced between participants so that approximately half of the subjects performed SLDL first and the other half performed LLC first. Surface electromyography was used to record mean normalized muscle activity of the upper lateral hamstrings, lower lateral hamstrings, upper medial hamstrings, and lower medial hamstrings. Results showed that the LLC elicited significantly greater normalized mean activation of the lower lateral and lower medial hamstrings compared with the SLDL (p ≤ 0.05). These findings support the notion that the hamstrings can be regionally targeted through exercise selection. Further investigations are required to determine whether differences in activation lead to greater muscular adaptations in the muscle complex. PMID:24978835

  6. Opposite effects of visual and auditory word-likeness on activity in the visual word form area

    PubMed Central

    Ludersdorfer, Philipp; Schurz, Matthias; Richlan, Fabio; Kronbichler, Martin; Wimmer, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    The present fMRI study investigated the effects of word-likeness of visual and auditory stimuli on activity along the ventral visual stream. In the context of a one-back task, we presented visual and auditory words, pseudowords, and artificial stimuli (i.e., false-fonts and reversed-speech, respectively). Main findings were regionally specific effects of word-likeness on activation in a left ventral occipitotemporal region corresponding to the classic localization of the Visual Word Form Area (VWFA). Specifically, we found an inverse word-likeness effect for the visual stimuli in the form of decreased activation for words compared to pseudowords which, in turn, elicited decreased activation compared to the artificial stimuli. For the auditory stimuli, we found positive word-likeness effects as both words and pseudowords elicited more activation than the artificial stimuli. This resulted from a marked deactivation in response to the artificial stimuli and no such deactivation for words and pseudowords. We suggest that the opposite effects of visual and auditory word-likeness on VWFA activation can be explained by assuming the involvement of visual orthographic memory representations. For the visual stimuli, these representations reduce the coding effort as a function of word-likeness. This results in highest activation to the artificial stimuli and least activation to words for which corresponding representations exist. The positive auditory word-likeness effects may result from activation of orthographic information associated with the auditory words and pseudowords. The view that the VWFA has a primarily visual function is supported by our findings of high activation to the visual artificial stimuli (which have no phonological or semantic associations) and deactivation to the auditory artificial stimuli. According to the phenomenon of cross-modal sensory suppression such deactivations during demanding auditory processing are expected in visual regions. PMID

  7. The length of a lantibiotic hinge region has profound influence on antimicrobial activity and host specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; van Heel, Auke J; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized (methyl)lanthionine containing peptides which can efficiently inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. As lantibiotics kill bacteria efficiently and resistance to them is difficult to be obtained, they have the potential to be used in many applications, e.g., in pharmaceutical industry or food industry. Nisin can inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to lipid II and by making pores in their membrane. The C-terminal part of nisin is known to play an important role during translocation over the membrane and forming pore complexes. However, as the thickness of bacterial membranes varies between different species and environmental conditions, this property could have an influence on the pore forming activity of nisin. To investigate this, the so-called "hinge region" of nisin (residues NMK) was engineered to vary from one to six amino acid residues and specific activity against different indicators was compared. Antimicrobial activity in liquid culture assays showed that wild type nisin is most active, while truncation of the hinge region dramatically reduced the activity of the peptide. However, one or two amino acids extensions showed only slightly reduced activity against most indicator strains. Notably, some variants (+2, +1, -1, -2) exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than nisin in agar well diffusion assays against Lactococcus lactis MG1363, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis VE14089, Bacillus sporothermodurans IC4 and Bacillus cereus 4153 at certain temperatures.

  8. On the Periodicity of Energy Release in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldvarg, T. B.; Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Solov'Ev, A. A.

    2005-06-01

    We investigate the periodic regimes of energy release on the Sun, namely, the recurrence of solar flares in active regions using the Solar Geophysical Data Journal on Hα flares from 1979 until 1981, which corresponds to the maximum of solar cycle 21. We obtained the following series of periods in the manifestation of flare activity bymeans of a correlation periodogram analysis, a self-similarity function, and a wavelet analysis: ˜1, 2, 3 h as well as ˜0.4, 1, 2, 5 days. We suggest a diffusive model for the quasi-periodic transfer of toroidal magnetic fields from under the photosphere to interpret the retrieved sequence of periods in the enhancement of flare activity. We estimated the typical spatial scales of the magnetic field variations in the solar convection zone: ˜17 000 km.

  9. Lower solar chromosphere-corona transition region. II - Wave pressure effects for a specific form of the heating function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, D. Tod; Holzer, Thomas E.; Macgregor, Keith B.

    1990-01-01

    Lower transition region models with a balance between mechanical heating and radiative losses are expanded to include wave pressure effects. The models are used to study the simple damping length form of the heating function. The results are compared to the results obtained by Woods et al. (1990) for solutions in the lower transition region. The results suggest that a mixture of fast-mode and slow-mode waves may provide the appropriate heating mechanism in the lower transition region, with the decline in effective vertical wave speed caused by the refraction and eventual total reflection of the fast-mode wave resulting from the decreasing atmospheric density.

  10. The temperature structure and pressure balance of magnetic loops in active regions. [in solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.

    1975-01-01

    EUV observations show many active region loops in lines formed at temperatures between 10,000 and 2,000,000 K. The brightest loops are associated with flux tubes leading to the umbrae of sunspots. It is shown that the high visibility of certain loops in transition region lines is due principally to a sharp radial decrease of temperature to chromospheric values toward the loop axis. The plasma density of these cool loops is not significantly greater than in the hot gas immediately surrounding it. Consequently, the internal gas pressure of the cool material is clearly lower. The hot material immediately surrounding the cool loops is generally denser than the external corona by a factor 3-4. When the active region is examined in coronal lines, this hot high pressure plasma shows up as loops that are generally parallel to the cool loops but significantly displaced laterally.

  11. A regional reconstruction of debris-flow activity in the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procter, Emily; Bollschweiler, Michelle; Stoffel, Markus; Neumann, Mathias

    2011-09-01

    Dendrogeomorphic dating of historical debris-flow events is a highly valuable tool for improving historical records in the field of natural hazard management. Previous dendrogeomorphic investigations generally have focused on case studies of single torrents; however, regional investigations may offer a more accurate reconstruction of regional patterns of activity and therefore may have an advantage over individual cases. The aim of the study is to provide a regional reconstruction of debris-flow events for a site in the Northern Calcareous Alps of western Austria (Gamperdonatal, Vorarlberg) and to document spatial and temporal morphological changes in individual and neighboring torrents. Analysis of 442 trees (268 Pinus mugo ssp. uncinata, 164 Picea abies, and 10 Abies alba) allowed identification of 579 growth disturbances corresponding to 63 debris-flow events since A.D. 1839. The majority of growth disturbances were in the form of growth suppression or release (76%) owing to the nature of both the deposited material and the process characteristics. Regional patterns of event frequency indicated a paucity of activity in the early to mid-twentieth century and increased activity since A.D. 1948, whereby large events were followed by subsequent years of continued activity of smaller magnitude. Patterns of frequency could be attributed primarily to spatiotemporal changes in channel morphology, but may also be reflective of changes in transport conditions within the valley. This study provides the first regional investigation in the Austrian Alps and contributes to the documentation of tree responses to geomorphic disturbances in calcareous material.

  12. PEERING INTO THE GIANT-PLANET-FORMING REGION OF THE TW HYDRAE DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Valerie A.; Kastner, Joel H.; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A.; Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-20

    We present Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) adaptive optics near-infrared images of the giant-planet-forming regions of the protoplanetary disk orbiting the nearby (D = 54 pc), pre-main-sequence (classical T Tauri) star TW Hydrae. The GPI images, which were obtained in coronagraphic/polarimetric mode, exploit starlight scattered off small dust grains to elucidate the surface density structure of the TW Hya disk from ∼80 AU to within ∼10 AU of the star at ∼1.5 AU resolution. The GPI polarized intensity images unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in the radial surface brightness distribution of the inner disk. The gap is centered near ∼23 AU, with a width of ∼5 AU and a depth of ∼50%. In the context of recent simulations of giant-planet formation in gaseous, dusty disks orbiting pre-main-sequence stars, these results indicate that at least one young planet with a mass ∼0.2 M{sub J} could be present in the TW Hya disk at an orbital semimajor axis similar to that of Uranus. If this (proto)planet is actively accreting gas from the disk, it may be readily detectable by GPI or a similarly sensitive, high-resolution infrared imaging system.

  13. THE HIGH-VELOCITY MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN MASSIVE CLUSTER-FORMING REGION G10.6-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: pho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t

    2010-12-20

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the {sup 12}CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity {sup 12}CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, {approx}10{sup 5} years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 10{sup 47} erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  14. Peering into the Giant-planet-forming Region of the TW Hydrae Disk with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapson, Valerie A.; Kastner, Joel H.; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A.; Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-01

    We present Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) adaptive optics near-infrared images of the giant-planet-forming regions of the protoplanetary disk orbiting the nearby (D = 54 pc), pre-main-sequence (classical T Tauri) star TW Hydrae. The GPI images, which were obtained in coronagraphic/polarimetric mode, exploit starlight scattered off small dust grains to elucidate the surface density structure of the TW Hya disk from ∼80 AU to within ∼10 AU of the star at ∼1.5 AU resolution. The GPI polarized intensity images unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in the radial surface brightness distribution of the inner disk. The gap is centered near ∼23 AU, with a width of ∼5 AU and a depth of ∼50%. In the context of recent simulations of giant-planet formation in gaseous, dusty disks orbiting pre-main-sequence stars, these results indicate that at least one young planet with a mass ∼0.2 MJ could be present in the TW Hya disk at an orbital semimajor axis similar to that of Uranus. If this (proto)planet is actively accreting gas from the disk, it may be readily detectable by GPI or a similarly sensitive, high-resolution infrared imaging system.

  15. The High-velocity Molecular Outflows in Massive Cluster-forming Region G10.6-0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou

    2010-12-01

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the 12CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity 12CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH3OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, ~105 years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 1047 erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  16. Helioseismology of pre-emerging active regions. III. Statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.

    2014-05-01

    The subsurface properties of active regions (ARs) prior to their appearance at the solar surface may shed light on the process of AR formation. Helioseismic holography has been applied to samples taken from two populations of regions on the Sun (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, that were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Paper I. Paper II showed that there are statistically significant signatures in the average helioseismic properties that precede the formation of an AR. This paper describes a more detailed analysis of the samples of pre-emergence regions and regions without emergence based on discriminant analysis. The property that is best able to distinguish the populations is found to be the surface magnetic field, even a day before the emergence time. However, after accounting for the correlations between the surface field and the quantities derived from helioseismology, there is still evidence of a helioseismic precursor to AR emergence that is present for at least a day prior to emergence, although the analysis presented cannot definitively determine the subsurface properties prior to emergence due to the small sample sizes.

  17. The Role of Biofilms in the Sedimentology of Actively Forming Gypsum Deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Marilyn B.; Des Marais, David J.; Turk, Kendra A.; Parenteau, Mary N.; Jahnke, Linda L.; Kubo, Michael D. Y.

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of

  18. The role of biofilms in the sedimentology of actively forming gypsum deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marilyn B; Des Marais, David J; Turk, Kendra A; Parenteau, Mary N; Jahnke, Linda L; Kubo, Michael D Y

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of

  19. The role of biofilms in the sedimentology of actively forming gypsum deposits at Guerrero Negro, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marilyn B; Des Marais, David J; Turk, Kendra A; Parenteau, Mary N; Jahnke, Linda L; Kubo, Michael D Y

    2009-11-01

    Actively forming gypsum deposits at the Guerrero Negro sabkha and saltern system provided habitats for stratified, pigmented microbial communities that exhibited significant morphological and phylogenetic diversity. These deposits ranged from meter-thick gypsum crusts forming in saltern seawater concentration ponds to columnar microbial mats with internally crystallized gypsum granules developing in natural anchialine pools. Gypsum-depositing environments were categorized as forming precipitation surfaces, biofilm-supported surfaces, and clastic surfaces. Each surface type was described in terms of depositional environment, microbial diversity, mineralogy, and sedimentary fabrics. Precipitation surfaces developed in high-salinity subaqueous environments where rates of precipitation outpaced the accumulation of clastic, organic, and/or biofilm layers. These surfaces hosted endolithic biofilms comprised predominantly of oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes. Biofilm-supported deposits developed in lower-salinity subaqueous environments where light and low water-column turbulence supported dense benthic microbial communities comprised mainly of oxygenic phototrophs. In these settings, gypsum granules precipitated in the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix as individual granules exhibiting distinctive morphologies. Clastic surfaces developed in sabkha mudflats that included gypsum, carbonate, and siliclastic particles with thin gypsum/biofilm components. Clastic surfaces were influenced by subsurface brine sheets and capillary evaporation and precipitated subsedimentary gypsum discs in deeper regions. Biofilms appeared to influence both chemical and physical sedimentary processes in the various subaqueous and subaerially exposed environments studied. Biofilm interaction with chemical sedimentary processes included dissolution and granularization of precipitation surfaces, formation of

  20. Active tectonics and earthquake potential of the Myanmar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Sieh, Kerry; Tun, Soe Thura; Lai, Kuang-Yin; Myint, Than

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes geomorphologic evidence for the principal neotectonic features of Myanmar and its immediate surroundings. We combine this evidence with published structural, geodetic, and seismic data to present an overview of the active tectonic architecture of the region and its seismic potential. Three tectonic systems accommodate oblique collision of the Indian plate with Southeast Asia and extrusion of Asian territory around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalayan mountain range. Subduction and collision associated with the Sunda megathrust beneath and within the Indoburman range and Naga Hills accommodate most of the shortening across the transpressional plate boundary. The Sagaing fault system is the predominant locus of dextral motion associated with the northward translation of India. Left-lateral faults of the northern Shan Plateau, northern Laos, Thailand, and southern China facilitate extrusion of rocks around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalaya. All of these systems have produced major earthquakes within recorded history and continue to present major seismic hazards in the region.

  1. Time Dependence of Joy's Law for Emerging Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Zhang, J.; Liu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Joy's law governs the tilt of Active Regions (ARs) with respect to their absolute heliographic latitude. Together with Hale's law of hemispheric polarity, it is essential in constraining solar dynamo models. However, previous studies on Joy's law show only a weak positive trend between AR tilt angles and latitudes. In this study, we are focusing on the time dependence of Joy's law, for the cases of emerging ARs of Solar Cycle 24. We selected 40 ARs that emerge on the East hemisphere, effectively maximizing the observing time for each AR. Then, by converting the helioprojective maps into heliographic, we determine the geometrical as well as the magnetic-flux-weighted centroids for each emergence case. That way we are able to track the temporal evolution of their physical properties, including locations, fluxes of positive and negative polarities, as well as the tilt angles of these regions in a continuous manner until emergence stops and the ARs assume their final state.

  2. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Active Region NOAA 7154

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Nitta, N. V.; Frank. Z. A.; Dame, L.; Suematsu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report on observations of a solar active region in May 1992 by the Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment (SPDE) in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite (producing soft X-ray images) and ground-based observatories (producing photospheric magnetograms and various filtergrams including those at the CN 3883 A line). The main focus is a study of the physical conditions of hot (T is approximately greater than 3 MK) coronal loops at their foot-points. The coronal part of the loops is fuzzy but what appear to be their footpoints in the transition region down to the photosphere are compact. Despite the morphological similarities, the footpoint emission at 10(exp 5) K is not quantitatively correlated with that at approximately 300 km above the tau (sub 5000) = 1 level, suggesting that the heat transport and therefore magnetic field topology in the intermediate layer is complicated. High resolution imaging observations with continuous temperature coverage are crucially needed.

  3. Influence of the Cardiac Myosin Hinge Region on Contractile Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Sarkis S.; Krueger, John W.; Sellers, James R.; Cuda, Giovanni; Caulfield, James B.; Norton, Paul; Slayter, Henry S.

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the antihinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  4. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  5. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s‑1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s‑1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s‑1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  6. Ancient Tectonic and Volcanic Activity in the Tharsis Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, S. C.; Kronberg, P.; Hauber, E.; Grott, M.; Steinberger, B.; Torsvik, T. H.; Neukum, G.

    The two topographically dominating volcanic provinces on Mars are the Tharsis and the Elysium regions, situated close to the equator on the dichotomy boundary between the heavily cratered (older) highlands and the northern lowlands (about 100 degrees apart). The regions are characterized by volcanoes whose morphologies are analogous to volcanic landforms on Earth, and the huge volcanoes in the Tharsis region (Olympus Mons and Tharsis Montes) are prime examples resembling many characteristics of Hawaiian shield volcanoes. The main difference between the Martian and terrestrial volcanoes are their size and the length of the flows, possibly due to higher eruption rates, the "stationary" character of the source (no plate tectonics) and the lower gravity. The Tharsis plateau is the topographically most prominent region on Mars, and associated with an areoid high. On Earth, large geoid highs are related to longlived heterogeneities near the core-mantle boundary that are sources for large igneous provinces. The Tharsis' volcanic vent structures were active at least episodically over the past 4 billion years (based on crater count statistics), which indicates long-lived volcanic and magmatic activity. Two major groups of tectonic features are related to the Tharsis bulge: a concentric set of wrinkle ridges indicating compression radial to Tharsis,and several sets of extensional structures that radiate outward from different centers within Tharsis, indicating tension circumferential to Tharsis. No landforms imply ancient plate tectonics. Here, we present surface ages associated with volcanic and tectonic landforms with a special focus on the ancient magma-tectonic environment (see Grott et al. 2006, this volume). We will examine the long-lived volcanism and tectonic surface expressions and discuss whether Mars volcanism could represent deep mantle plumes.

  7. High Spatial Resolution Fe XII Observations of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-08-01

    We use UV spectral observations of active regions with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the properties of the coronal Fe xii 1349.4 Å emission at unprecedented high spatial resolution (˜0.33″). We find that by using appropriate observational strategies (i.e., long exposures, lossless compression), Fe xii emission can be studied with IRIS at high spatial and spectral resolution, at least for high-density plasma (e.g., post-flare loops and active region moss). We find that upper transition region (TR; moss) Fe xii emission shows very small average Doppler redshifts ({v}{{D}} ˜ 3 km s-1) as well as modest non-thermal velocities (with an average of ˜24 km s-1 and the peak of the distribution at ˜15 km s-1). The observed distribution of Doppler shifts appears to be compatible with advanced three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations in which impulsive heating is concentrated at the TR footpoints of a hot corona. While the non-thermal broadening of Fe xii 1349.4 Å peaks at similar values as lower resolution simultaneous Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) measurements of Fe xii 195 Å, IRIS observations show a previously undetected tail of increased non-thermal broadening that might be suggestive of the presence of subarcsecond heating events. We find that IRIS and EIS non-thermal line broadening measurements are affected by instrumental effects that can only be removed through careful analysis. Our results also reveal an unexplained discrepancy between observed 195.1/1349.4 Å Fe xii intensity ratios and those predicted by the CHIANTI atomic database.

  8. From snakes to region-based active contours defined by region-dependent parameters.

    PubMed

    Jehan-Besson, Stéphanie; Gastaud, Muriel; Precioso, Frédéric; Barlaud, Michel; Aubert, Gilles; Debreuve, Eric

    2004-01-10

    Image and sequence segmentation of a the segmentation task are discussed from the point of view of optimizing the segmentation criterion. Such a segmentation criterion involves so-called (boundary and region) descriptors, which, in general, may depend on their respective boundaries or regions. This dependency must be taken into account when one is computing the criterion derivative with respect to the unknown object domain (defined by its boundary). If this dependency not considered, some correctional terms may be omitted. Computing the derivative of the segmentation criterion with a dynamic scheme is described. The scheme is general enough to provide a framework for a wide variety of applications in segmentation. It also provides a theoretical meaning to the philosophy of active contours.

  9. The coronal and transition region temperature structure of a solar active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, R. H.; Pye, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Using measurements of EUV and X-ray spectral lines, the differential emission measure vs electron temperature from the transition region to the corona of an active region (electron temperature between 100,000 and 5,000,000 K) is derived. The total emission measure and radiative losses are of the order 3 x 10 to the 48th/cu cm and 4 x 10 to the 26th ergs/sec, respectively. The emission measure at electron temperatures greater than approximately 1,000,000 K (i.e. that mainly responsible for the X-ray emission) is about 75% of the total. The use of the Mg x line at 625 A as an indicator of coronal electron density is also examined. A set of theoretical energy balance models of coronal loops in which the loop divergence is a variable parameter is presented and compared with the observations.

  10. Feeding patterns of molestus and pipiens forms of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in a region of high hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two biological forms of the mosquito Culex pipiens s.s., denoted pipiens and molestus, display behavioural differences that may affect their role as vectors of arboviruses. In this study, the feeding patterns of molestus and pipiens forms were investigated in Comporta (Portugal), where high levels of inter-form admixture have been recorded. Methods Indoor and outdoor mosquito collections were performed in the summer of 2010. Collected Cx. pipiens s.l. females were molecularly identified to species and form by PCR and genotyped for six microsatellites. The source of the blood meal in post-fed females was determined by ELISA and mitochondrial DNA sequencing. Results The distribution of the forms differed according to the collection method. The molestus form was present only in indoor collections, whereas pipiens and admixed individuals were sampled both indoors and outdoors. In both forms, over 90% of blood meals were made on avian hosts. These included blood meals taken from Passeriformes (Passer domesticus and Turdus merula) by females caught resting inside domestic shelters. Conclusion Genetic structure and blood meal analyses suggest the presence of a bird biting molestus population in the study area. Both forms were found to rest indoors, mainly in avian shelters, but at least a proportion of females of the pipiens form may bite outdoors in sylvan habitats and then search for anthropogenic resting sites to complete their gonotrophic cycle. This behaviour may potentiate the accidental transmission of arboviruses to humans in the region. PMID:23578139

  11. TESTING 24 {mu}m AND INFRARED LUMINOSITY AS STAR FORMATION TRACERS FOR GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J. II

    2013-03-10

    We have tested some relations for star formation rates used in extragalactic studies for regions within the Galaxy. In nearby molecular clouds, where the initial mass function is not fully sampled, the dust emission at 24 {mu}m greatly underestimates star formation rates (by a factor of 100 on average) when compared to star formation rates determined from counting young stellar objects. The total infrared emission does no better. In contrast, the total far-infrared method agrees within a factor of two on average with star formation rates based on radio continuum emission for massive, dense clumps that are forming enough massive stars to have L{sub TIR} exceed 10{sup 4.5} L{sub Sun }. The total infrared and 24 {mu}m also agree well with each other for both nearby, low-mass star-forming regions and the massive, dense clump regions.

  12. Implications of Special Regions to Conducting Human Activities on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, J. D.; Barlow, N. G.; Beaty, D. W.; Jones, M. A.; Hipkin, V.

    2014-12-01

    A MEPAG Science Analysis Group (SAG) has undertaken an analysis of Special Regions (SR) on Mars—regions where indigenous martian life could exist or where Earth microbes, if introduced, could survive and reproduce. The SR-SAG has considered the impact of SR on future human activities on the martian surface. Human exploration requires access to in-situ resources, some of which may be found in SR. Water and oxygen for ISRU are found in the atmosphere, surface/near-surface ice, hydrated minerals, and perchlorates. Water ice is most abundant at latitudes poleward of ~60 degrees, but polar darkness, cold temperatures, and CO2 degassing present hazards to human operations in these regions. Accessible water is more limited toward the equator, though temperature and solar energy conditions become more favorable. The possible presence of liquid water in Recurring Slope Lineae and active gullies leads to their treatment as SR. Fuel for surface operations and propellants for crew ascent could be manufactured from the martian atmosphere and surface materials, but dust in the atmosphere may clog ISRU equipment and perchlorate is toxic to humans. Power may be produced from solar or nuclear energy. Reliance on solar energy limits operations to the equatorial zone where easily accessible ice resources are limited. Nuclear power allows surface operations at a range of latitudes, but waste heat could convert some non-SR into SR. Radiation shielding is necessary for long-term human operations on Mars and could be obtained by deposition of regolith or by water storage in tanks or as ice around habitats, or the use of underground habitats. SR-SAG recognizes that it will be impossible for all human-associated processes and operations to be conducted within entirely closed systems. Protocols need to be established so (1) human missions to Mars will not contaminate SR nor be contaminated by materials from them, and (2) human activities on Mars will avoid converting areas into SR.

  13. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  14. Cytolytic and antibacterial activity of synthetic peptides derived from amoebapore, the pore-forming peptide of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Leippe, M; Andrä, J; Müller-Eberhard, H J

    1994-01-01

    The pore-forming peptide amoebapore is considered part of the cytolytic armament of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica. Amoebapore is composed of 77 amino acid residues arranged in four alpha-helical domains. For structure-function analysis, synthetic peptides were constructed corresponding to these four domains: H1 (residues 1-22), H2 (25-39), H3 (40-64), and H4 (67-77). The peptides H1 and H3, representing two highly amphipathic alpha-helical regions of amoebapore, possessed pore-forming activity. Peptide H3 displayed cytolytic and antibacterial functions similar to those of natural amoebapore. The most potent antibacterial activity and the broadest activity spectrum were expressed by H1-Mel, a hybrid molecule composed of the N-terminal alpha-helix of amoebapore and the C-terminal hexapeptide of melittin from the venom of Apis mellifera. Images PMID:8146160

  15. ON THE STRENGTH OF THE HEMISPHERIC RULE AND THE ORIGIN OF ACTIVE-REGION HELICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Vector magnetograph and morphological observations have shown that the solar magnetic field tends to have negative (positive) helicity in the northern (southern) hemisphere, although only ∼60%-70% of active regions appear to obey this 'hemispheric rule'. In contrast, at least ∼80% of quiescent filaments and filament channels that form during the decay of active regions follow the rule. We attribute this discrepancy to the difficulty in determining the helicity sign of newly emerged active regions, which are dominated by their current-free component; as the transverse field is canceled at the polarity inversion lines, however, the axial component becomes dominant there, allowing a more reliable determination of the original active-region chirality. We thus deduce that the hemispheric rule is far stronger than generally assumed, and cannot be explained by stochastic processes. Earlier studies have shown that the twist associated with the axial tilt of active regions is too small to account for the observed helicity; here, both tilt and twist are induced by the Coriolis force acting on the diverging flow in the emerging flux tube. However, in addition to this east-west expansion about the apex of the loop, each of its legs must expand continually in cross section during its rise through the convection zone, thereby acquiring a further twist through the Coriolis force. Since this transverse pressure effect is not limited by drag or tension forces, the final twist depends mainly on the rise time, and may be large enough to explain the observed active-region helicity.

  16. Chromospheric Evolution and the Flare Activity of Super-Active Region NOAA 6555

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PrasadC, Debi; Ambastha, Ashok; Srivastava, Nandita; Tripathy, Sushanta C.; Hagyard, Mona J.

    1997-01-01

    Super-active region NOAA 6555 was highly flare productive during the period March 21st - 27th, 1991 of its disk passage. We have studied its chromospheric activity using high spatial resolution H alpha filtergrams taken at Udaipur along with MSFC vector magnetograms. A possible relationship of flare productivity and the variation in shear has been explored. Flares were generally seen in those subareas of the active region which possessed closed magnetic field configuration, whereas only minor flares and/or surges occurred in subareas showing open magnetic field configuration. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed surges are also discussed.

  17. SOI/MDI studies of active region seismology and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Ted D.; Title, Alan; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Scherrer, Phil; Zweibel, Ellen

    1995-01-01

    The solar oscillations investigation (SOI) will study solar active regions using both helioseismic and conventional observation techniques. The Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) can perform Doppler continuum and line depth imagery and can produce longitudinal magnetograms, showing either the full disk or a high resolution field of view. A dynamics program of continuous full disk Doppler observations for two months per year, campaign programs of eight hours of continuous observation per day, and a synoptic magnetic program of about 15 full disk magnetograms per day, are planned. The scientific plans, measurements and observation programs, are described.

  18. The distribution of maximum temperatures of coronal active region loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teske, R. G.; Mayfield, E. B.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with the integrated emission measure distributions of solar active regions, the distribution of the maximum temperature parameter which characterizes individual plasma loops is determined. The observed emission measure distributions were determined by combining EUV and X-ray data from two separate experiments on ATM/Skylab. The present work sets some limits on such an approach. It is found that the distribution of maximum temperature has approximately the same shape as the integrated emission measure distributions, a result which is expected since most of the loop emission measure is near their maximum temperatures.

  19. Similarity of urinary risk factors among stone-forming patients in five regions of the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, J. A.; Hill, K. D.; Pak, C. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Study Objective: To compare urinary biochemical risk factors among stone-forming patients in the Southeast (SE) or "stone belt" versus four other regions of the United States. Design: Prospective biochemical survey for regional comparisons. Setting: Referral-based nephrolithiasis clinics, urologists, nephrologists, and family practitioners. Patients: Consecutive sample of 3473 stone-forming patients who submitted 24-hour urine collections for biochemical analyses of stone-forming risk factors. Interventions: None. Subjects taking medication known to interfere with stone-forming risk factors were deleted from the final data compilation. Measurements and Main Results: Overall, the mean values for each urinary parameter spanned a narrow range without significant difference between the five regions. Among "metabolic" factors, 40% in the SE had hypercalciuria (> 6.25 mmol/d), compared to 35%-43% in other regions, and hyperuricosuria (> 4.2 mmol/d) was found in 16% in the SE versus 17%-19% elsewhere. Among "environmental" factors, low urine volume ( < 2 L/d) was found in 77% patients in the SE compared to 69%-78% elsewhere, and high sodium was encountered in 27% in the SE versus 24%-29% elsewhere. No differences were noted in occurrence of other abnormal risk factors: hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia, low pH, high sulfate, high phosphorus, or low magnesium. Conclusions: Despite expected regional differences in nutritional and environmental influences, the results of this study showed a striking similarity in urinary biochemical risk factor profiles of stone-formers in all five regions of the United States.

  20. Hyperon elastic electromagnetic form factors in the space-like momentum region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios; Fischer, Christian S.

    2016-02-01

    We present a calculation of the electric and magnetic form factors of ground-state octet and decuplet baryons including strange quarks. We work with a combination of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the quark propagator and covariant Bethe-Salpeter equations describing baryons as bound states of three (non-perturbative) quarks. Our form factors for the octet baryons are in good agreement with corresponding lattice data at finite Q2; deviations in some isospin channels for the magnetic moments can be explained by missing meson cloud effects. At larger Q2 our quark core calculation has predictive power for both, the octet and decuplet baryons.

  1. Formation and survival of water vapor in the terrestrial planet-forming region.

    PubMed

    Bethell, Thomas; Bergin, Edwin

    2009-12-18

    Recent astronomical observations have revealed what may prove to be the ubiquity of water vapor during the early stages of planet formation. We present here a simple mechanism showing how water vapor forms in situ and is capable of shielding itself from molecule-destroying stellar radiation. The absorption of this radiation by water can control the thermodynamics of the terrestrial planet-forming zone. Similar to Earth's ozone layer, which shelters the chemistry of life, the water layer protects other water molecules and allows for a rich organic chemistry. The total abundance of water vapor in the natal habitable zone is equal to that of several thousand oceans.

  2. 77 FR 47370 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Logbook Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... objectives is to collect data from users of the resource. Thus, as regional Fishery Management Councils... and Management Act, the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary) has the responsibility for the conservation and management of marine fishery resources. Much of this responsibility has been delegated to...

  3. Oscillations of solar activity - the main climate-forming factor in millennium scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorozov, S. V.; Budovy, V. I.; Medvedev, V. A.

    Here is advanced and substantiated the hypothesis of existence of the physical mechanism, by means of which alteration of solar activity leads to change of the "greenhouse effect". This hypothetical mechanism can be the following one. The increase of solar activity leads to considerable magnification of ultra-violet radiation in a solar spectrum and to increase of ion concentration in the upper stratums of an atmosphere (including upper troposphere). Accordingly, the rise of condensation kernels concentration (of water vapour) occurs, and, as a result, the transparency decrease of an atmosphere concerning infrared radiation of the Earth takes place. For checkout of the hypothesis the simplified physical-statistical model of energy-balance of atmosphere and hydrosphere is constructed. The modelling of the global temperatures and the temperature in the different regions of the North hemisphere was made. The effective coefficients of the model take into account, in particular, the features of ocean and atmosphere circulation. They were determined with use of step-by-step procedure of correction based on a Monte-Carlo method, under condition of achievement of the greatest correspondence between simulated and actual values of global temperature. The constructed model allows to explain (without attraction of the anthropogenous factor) modern global warming, and also known data about temperature oscillations during second millennium. The comparative analysis of model results with independently reconstructed regional temperatures, including Central England (1000-1659 years), China (1000-1990 years), Gulf of Alaska and Pacific Northwest (1752-1983 years), shows their good enough correspondence which allows to assume, that the solar activity oscillations really can be the main climate-forming factor in millennium scale. Moreover, there had been detected the close correlation between the rate of increase of CO2 concentration and the simulated temperature of the upper layer of

  4. c-Myc quadruplex-forming sequence Pu-27 induces extensive damage in both telomeric and nontelomeric regions of DNA.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ashraful; Thomas, Shelia D; Murty, Vundavalli V; Sedoris, Kara J; Miller, Donald M

    2014-03-21

    Quadruplex-forming DNA sequences are present throughout the eukaryotic genome, including in telomeric DNA. We have shown that the c-Myc promoter quadruplex-forming sequence Pu-27 selectively kills transformed cells (Sedoris, K. C., Thomas, S. D., Clarkson, C. R., Muench, D., Islam, A., Singh, R., and Miller, D. M. (2012) Genomic c-Myc quadruplex DNA selectively kills leukemia. Mol. Cancer Ther. 11, 66-76). In this study, we show that Pu-27 induces profound DNA damage, resulting in striking chromosomal abnormalities in the form of chromatid or chromosomal breaks, radial formation, and telomeric DNA loss, which induces γ-H2AX in U937 cells. Pu-27 down-regulates telomeric shelterin proteins, DNA damage response mediators (RAD17 and RAD50), double-stranded break repair molecule 53BP1, G2 checkpoint regulators (CHK1 and CHK2), and anti-apoptosis gene survivin. Interestingly, there are no changes of DNA repair molecules H2AX, BRCA1, and the telomere maintenance gene, hTERT. ΔB-U937, where U937 cells stably transfected with deleted basic domain of TRF2 is partially sensitive to Pu-27 but exhibits no changes in expression of shelterin proteins. However, there is an up-regulation of CHK1, CHK2, H2AX, BRCA1, and survivin. Telomere dysfunction-induced foci assay revealed co-association of TRF1with γ-H2AX in ATM deficient cells, which are differentially sensitive to Pu-27 than ATM proficient cells. Alt (alternating lengthening of telomere) cells are relatively resistant to Pu-27, but there are no significant changes of telomerase activity in both Alt and non-Alt cells. Lastly, we show that this Pu-27-mediated sensitivity is p53-independent. The data therefore support two conclusions. First, Pu-27 induces DNA damage within both telomeric and nontelomeric regions of the genome. Second, Pu-27-mediated telomeric damage is due, at least in part, to compromise of the telomeric shelterin protein complex.

  5. Peptides of the Constant Region of Antibodies Display Fungicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C.; Pinto, Marcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  6. 77 FR 67792 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Northeast Region Permit Family of Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... electronic vessel monitoring system (VMS) to declare their intent to fish before starting a particular trip... signed paper form sent in the mail. VMS Requirements Vessels with VMS requirements are required to... electronic VMS units on board the vessel. VMS power down exemption requests are submitted by signed...

  7. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. II - NOAA active region 5747 (1989 October)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leka, K. D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Mcclymont, A. N.; De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Fan, Yuhong; Tang, F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes October 1989 observations in NOAA Active Region 5747 of the morphology of energetic electron precipitation and high-pressure coronal flare plasmas of three flares and their relation to the vector magnetic field and vertical electric currents. The H-alpha spectroheliograms were coaligned with the vector magnetograms using continuum images of sunspots, enabling positional accuracy of a few arcsec. It was found that, during the gradual phase, the regions of the H-alpha flare that show the effects of enhanced pressure in the overlying corona often encompass extrema of the vertical current density, consistent with earlier work showing a close relationship between H-alpha emission and line-of-sight currents. The data are also consistent with the overall morphology and evolution described by erupting-filament models such as those of Kopp and Pneuman (1976) and Sturrock (1989).

  8. Active Region Magnetic Structure Observed in the Photosphere and Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leka, K. D.; Metcalf, Thomas R.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic flux above sunspots and plage in NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Active Region 8299 has been measured in the photosphere and the chromosphere. We investigate the vertical magnetic structure above the umbrae, penumbrae and plage regions using quantitative statistical comparisons of the photospheric and chromospheric vector magnetic flux data. The results include: (1) a decrease in flux with height, (2) the direct detection of the superpenumbral canopy in the chromosphere, (3) values for dB/dz which are consistent with earlier investigations when derived from a straight difference between the two datasets but quite low when derived from the delta x B = 0 condition, (4) a monolithic structure in the umbra which extends well into the upper chromosphere with a very complex and varied structure in the penumbra and plage, as evidenced by (5) a uniform magnetic scale height in the umbrae with an abrupt jump to widely varying scale heights in the penumbral and plage regions. Further, we find (6) evidence for a very large (delta z approximately equals 3Mm) height difference between the atmospheric layers sampled in the two magnetograms, almost a factor of three larger than that implied by atmospheric models. We additionally test the apropriateness of using photospheric magnetic flux as a boundary for field-line extrapolations, and find a better agreement with observed coronal structure when the chromospheric flux is used as a boundary.

  9. Plasma Beta Above a Solar Active Region: Rethinking the Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model of the plasma beta above an active region and discuss its consequences in terms of coronal magnetic field modeling. The beta-plasma model is representative and derived from a collection of sources. The resulting beta variation with height is used to emphasize the assumption that the magnetic pressure dominates over the plasma pressure must be carefully considered depending on what part of the solar atmosphere is being considered. This paper points out (1) that the paradigm that the coronal magnetic field can be constructed from a force-free magnetic field must be used in the correct context, since the forcefree region is sandwiched between two regions which have beta greater than 1, (2) that the chromospheric MgIICIV magnetic measurements occur near the beta-minimum, and (3) that, moving from the photosphere upwards, beta can return to 1 at relatively low coronal heights, e.g. R approximately 1.2R(sub)s.

  10. Magnetic helicity and free energy in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraitis, K.; Georgoulis, M.; Tziotziou, K.; Archontis, V.

    2013-09-01

    We study the evolution of the non-potential free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in solar active regions (ARs). For this we use a time-series of a three-dimensional, synthetic AR produced by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations. As a first step, we calculate the potential magnetic field that has the same normal components with the MHD field along all boundaries of the AR, by solving Laplace's equation. The free magnetic energy of the AR is then easily derived. From the two fields, MHD and potential one, we calculate the corresponding vector potentials with a recently proposed integration method. The knowledge of both fields and their respective vector potentials throughout the AR, allows us to estimate the relative magnetic helicity budget of the AR. Following this procedure for each snapshot of the AR, we reconstruct the evolution of free energy and helicity in the AR. Our method reproduces, for a synthetic AR, the energy/helicity relations known to hold in real active regions.

  11. Multi-Wavelength Study of Active Region Loop Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.

    2006-11-01

    Observations have revealed the existence of weak transient disturbances in extended coronal loop systems. These propagating disturbances (PDs) originate from small scale brightenings at the footpoints of the loops and propagate upward along the loops. In all cases observed, the projected propagation speed is close to, but below the expected sound speed in the loops. This suggests that the PDs could be interpreted as slow mode MHD waves. Interpreting the oscillation in terms of different wave modes and/or plasma motions always depend on the line of sight as we observe in the limb or on the center of the disk. The JOP 165 campaign will address some of these questions. MDI and TRACE photospheric and UV imaging of TRACE and SPIRIT have been acquired simultaneously with high temporal and spatial coverage along with the spectroscopic data from CDS. EIT was operated in the shutter-less mode to achieve high Cadence. Some of the off- limb active region dynamics and oscillations observed during this JOP campaign will be focused in this presentation. Plasma condensations and temporal variations in active region loops will be also addressed.

  12. Active Region Filaments Might Harbor Weak Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Baso, C. J.; Martínez González, M. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent spectropolarimetric observations of active region filaments have revealed polarization profiles with signatures typical of the strong field Zeeman regime. The conspicuous absence in those observations of scattering polarization and Hanle effect signatures was then pointed out by some authors. This was interpreted as either a signature of mixed “turbulent” field components or as a result of optical thickness. In this article, we present a natural scenario to explain these Zeeman-only spectropolarimetric observations of active region (AR) filaments. We propose a two-component model, one on top of the other. Both components have horizontal fields, with the azimuth difference between them being close to 90°. The component that lies lower in the atmosphere is permeated by a strong field of the order of 600 G, while the upper component has much weaker fields, of the order of 10 G. The ensuing scattering polarization signatures of the individual components have opposite signs, so its combination along the line of sight reduces—and even can cancel out—the Hanle signatures, giving rise to an apparent Zeeman-only profile. This model is also applicable to other chromospheric structures seen in absorption above ARs.

  13. 75 FR 16895 - Reports, Forms and Record Keeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB...

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  18. Star forming regions towards Gum 31: distribution of the molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazzano, M. M.; Cappa, C. E.; Vasquez, J.; Rubio, M.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the distribution of the molecular gas associated with IRAS and 2MASS sources, young stellar objects linked to the Hii region Gum31. We based our studies on observations obtained with the APEX telescope, located in the north of Chile. We used observations of different CO isotopologues, CS(7-6) and HCO(4-3) lines. The sources are located on the edge of the Gum31 Hii region, whose shock front substantially affects the morphology of their molecular environs. The observations revealed that in the surroundings of the sources there is molecular gas associated with the nebula, which is shown by the CO(3-2) emission, with small high density clumps detected in CO(3-2).

  19. SPITZER IRAC COLOR DIAGNOSTICS FOR EXTENDED EMISSION IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ybarra, Jason E.; Tapia, Mauricio; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    2014-10-20

    The infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope are an invaluable tool for identifying physical processes in star formation. In this study, we calculate the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color space of UV fluorescent H{sub 2} and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in photodissociation regions (PDRs) using the Cloudy code with PAH opacities from Draine and Li. We create a set of color diagnostics that can be applied to study the structure of PDRs and to distinguish between FUV-excited and shock-excited H{sub 2} emission. To test this method, we apply these diagnostics to Spitzer IRAC data of NGC 2316. Our analysis of the structure of the PDR is consistent with previous studies of the region. In addition to UV excited emission, we identify shocked gas that may be part of an outflow originating from the cluster.

  20. Photospheric electric current and transition region brightness within an active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, A. C.; Hagyard, M. J.; Rabin, D.; Moore, R. L.; Smith, B. J., Jr.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1984-01-01

    Distributions of vertical electrical current density J(z) calculated from vector measurements of the photospheric magnetic field are compared with ultraviolet spectroheliograms to investigate whether resistive heating is an important source of enhanced emission in the transition region. The photospheric magnetic fields in Active Region 2372 were measured on April 6 and 7, 1980 with the Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph; ultraviolet wavelength spectroheliograms (L-alpha and N V 1239 A) were obtained with the UV Spectrometer and Polarimeter experiment aboard the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Spatial registration of the J(z) (5 arcsec resolution) and UV (3 arcsec resolution) maps indicates that the maximum current density is cospatial with a minor but persistent UV enhancement, but there is little detected current associated with other nearby bright areas. It is concluded that, although resistive heating may be important in the transition region, the currents responsible for the heating are largely unresolved in the present measurements and have no simple correlation with the residual current measured on 5-arcsec scales.

  1. First results from a NIR survey of High Mass Star Forming Regions on the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuernberger, Dieter; Bronfman, Leonardo

    In spite of the lower formation rate and shorter evolutionary time scale of high mass stars (M > 8 M_{\\odot}) in comparison to low mass stars (M < 3 M_{\\odot}) there is no doubt that young OB stars have a more severe impact on their parental environment. On the one hand they are associated both with high energetic winds and massive molecular outflows, on the other hand they emit a large amount of Lyman-Continuum photons, which ionize the circumstellar material resulting in the formation of ultracompact H ii regions (UCHIIs). Here we present first results from a JHK^{'} survey of 42 regions of high mass star formation, showing FIR colour characteristics of UCHIIs (Wood & Churchwell 1989) and strong emission in the CS(2--1) rotational transition (Bronfman etal.\\ 1996). As all regions are mapped at mm wavelengths we are able to study the interplay between the young (deeply embedded) high mass stars and their ambient medium of gas and dust. Furthermore, we investigate the multiplicity of the sources as well as the spatial shape and spectral (NIR) characteristic of the UCHIIs.

  2. Molecular gas in the star-forming region IRAS 08589-4714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldaño, Hugo P.; Vásquez, J.; Cappa, C. E.; Gómez, M.; Duronea, N.; Rubio, M.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: We present an analysis of the region IRAS 08589-4714 with the aim of characterizing the molecular environment. Methods: We observed the 12CO(3 -2), 13CO(3 -2), C18O(3 -2), HCO+(3 -2), and HCN(3 -2) molecular lines in a region of 150''× 150'', centered on the IRAS source, to analyze the distribution and characteristics of the molecular gas linked to the IRAS source. Results: The molecular gas distribution reveals a molecular clump that is coincident with IRAS 08589-4714 and with a dust clump detected at 1.2 mm. The molecular clump is 0.45 pc in radius and its mass and H2 volume density are 310 M⊙ and 1.2 × 104 cm-3, respectively. Two overdensities were identified within the clump in HCN(3-2) and HCO+(3-2) lines. A comparison of the LTE and virial masses suggests that the clump is collapsing in regions that harbor young stellar objects. An analysis of the molecular lines suggests that they are driving molecular outflows. Final reduced APEX data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A115

  3. THE FRACTAL DIMENSION OF STAR-FORMING REGIONS AT DIFFERENT SPATIAL SCALES IN M33

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Nestor; Alfaro, Emilio J.; Anez, Neyda; Odekon, Mary Crone

    2010-09-01

    We study the distribution of stars, H II regions, molecular gas, and individual giant molecular clouds in M33 over a wide range of spatial scales. The clustering strength of these components is systematically estimated through the fractal dimension. We find scale-free behavior at small spatial scales and a transition to a larger correlation dimension (consistent with a nearly uniform distribution) at larger scales. The transition region lies in the range {approx}500-1000 pc. This transition defines a characteristic size that separates the regime of small-scale turbulent motion from that of large-scale galactic dynamics. At small spatial scales, bright young stars and molecular gas are distributed with nearly the same three-dimensional fractal dimension (D {sub f,3D} {approx}< 1.9), whereas fainter stars and H II regions exhibit higher values, D {sub f,3D} {approx_equal} 2.2-2.5. Our results indicate that the interstellar medium in M33 is on average more fragmented and irregular than in the Milky Way.

  4. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both C-terminal truncated form and full length form of Pleiotrophin failed to activate vertebrate ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)?

    PubMed

    Mathivet, Thomas; Mazot, Pierre; Vigny, Marc

    2007-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase essentially and transiently expressed during development in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. ALK expression persists at a lower level in the adult brain. Thus, it might play an important role in both the normal development and function of the nervous system. The nature of the cognate ligand of this receptor in vertebrates is still a matter of debate. Pleiotrophin and midkine have been proposed as ligands of ALK but several independent studies do not confirm this hypothesis. Interestingly, a recent study proposed that a C-terminal truncated form of Pleiotrophin (Pleiotrophin.15) and not the full length form (Pleiotrophin.18) promotes glioblastoma proliferation in an ALK-dependent fashion. These data were obviously a strong basis to conciliate the conflicting results so far reported in the literature. In the present study, we first purified to homogeneity the two forms of Pleiotrophin secreted by HEK 293 cells. In contrast to agonist monoclonal antibodies, both Pleiotrophin.15 and Pleiotrophin.18 failed to activate ALK in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells expressing this receptor. Thus, for our point of view, ALK is still an orphan receptor in vertebrates.

  5. 78 FR 19726 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Visa Waiver Program Carrier Agreement (CBP Form I-775)

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  7. Tunable growth of nanodendritic silver by galvanic-cell mechanism on formed activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Lai, Yijian; Zhao, Binyuan; Hu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Di; Hu, Keao

    2010-06-01

    Well-defined silver dendritic nanostructures have been prepared in large quantities in an ambient environment using formed activated carbon (FAC) only. A reasonable mechanism (step 1: reduction by surface reductive groups; step 2: growing in the form of a galvanic cell) is suggested.

  8. 77 FR 21104 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-694, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

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  9. 75 FR 29780 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-612, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

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  10. 76 FR 11808 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-590, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

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    2010-05-27

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  16. 75 FR 76745 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-601, Extension of a Currently Approved...

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    2010-12-09

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  17. 76 FR 16800 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-601, Revision of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

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  18. 76 FR 71056 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-566, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

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  19. 75 FR 41215 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-821, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

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  20. 75 FR 37821 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-751, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

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  1. 76 FR 45845 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-777, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... published in the Federal Register on May 19, 2011, at 76 FR 28800, allowing for a 60-day public comment...: Primary: Individuals or Households. Form I- 777 is used by applicants applying for a Northern Marina... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form...

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-907, Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-day notice of information collection under review: Form I- 907, Request for Premium Processing Service; OMB Control No....

  3. 75 FR 11898 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-612, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-612, Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review: Form I- 612, Application for Waiver of the Foreign Residence...

  4. 75 FR 74071 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-601, Revision of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-601, Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review: Form I- 601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility;...

  5. 76 FR 66946 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-539, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

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  6. 75 FR 57049 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-777, Application for Replacement of Northern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-777, Application for Replacement of Northern Mariana Card ACTION: Correction to 30-day notice of Information Collection Under Review: Form I-777, Application for Replacement of Northern Mariana Card; OMB Control...

  7. 76 FR 52961 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300; Revision of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-300.... The Department Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting... collection: Form N-300; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will...

  8. 76 FR 70747 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-90; Revision of a Currently Approved Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-90... Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the...: Form I-90; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). (4) Affected public who will be asked...

  9. 76 FR 9805 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-845 and Supplement; Revision of a Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

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  10. 76 FR 48874 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... the Federal Register on March 17, 2011, at 76 FR 28444, allowing for a 60- day public comment period... SECURITY Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form G-884... Collection Under Review: Form G- 884, Request for the Return of Original Document(s). The Department...

  11. 76 FR 39415 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644, Extension of a Currently Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... was previously published in the Federal Register on April 19, 2011, at 76 FR 21913, allowing for a 60... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644... Information Collection Under Review: Form N- 644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship; OMB Control No....

  12. 75 FR 70278 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600, Extension of a Currently Approved...

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  13. 76 FR 45844 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-426, Extension of a Currently Approved...

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  14. 77 FR 128 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-600, Revision of a Currently Approved...

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  15. 75 FR 41216 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644, Extension of a Currently Approved...

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  16. 75 FR 43535 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form N-644, Revision of a Currently Approved...

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  17. 78 FR 73875 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68)

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  18. 75 FR 70016 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-290B, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-290B, Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection under Review: Form I- 290B,...

  19. 77 FR 17085 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form I-612; Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  20. 76 FR 43336 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  1. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  2. The N-terminal, polybasic region is critical for prion protein neuroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    Turnbaugh, Jessie A; Westergard, Laura; Unterberger, Ursula; Biasini, Emiliano; Harris, David A

    2011-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the normal form of the prion protein, PrP(C), exerts a neuroprotective activity against cellular stress or toxicity. One of the clearest examples of such activity is the ability of wild-type PrP(C) to suppress the spontaneous neurodegenerative phenotype of transgenic mice expressing a deleted form of PrP (Δ32-134, called F35). To define domains of PrP involved in its neuroprotective activity, we have analyzed the ability of several deletion mutants of PrP (Δ23-31, Δ23-111, and Δ23-134) to rescue the phenotype of Tg(F35) mice. Surprisingly, all of these mutants displayed greatly diminished rescue activity, although Δ23-31 PrP partially suppressed neuronal loss when expressed at very high levels. Our results pinpoint the N-terminal, polybasic domain as a critical determinant of PrP(C) neuroprotective activity, and suggest that identification of molecules interacting with this region will provide important clues regarding the normal function of the protein. Small molecule ligands targeting this region may also represent useful therapeutic agents for treatment of prion diseases.

  3. Active Geodesics: Region-based Active Contour Segmentation with a Global Edge-based Constraint.

    PubMed

    Appia, Vikram; Yezzi, Anthony

    2011-11-01

    We present an active geodesic contour model in which we constrain the evolving active contour to be a geodesic with respect to a weighted edge-based energy through its entire evolution rather than just at its final state (as in the traditional geodesic active contour models). Since the contour is always a geodesic throughout the evolution, we automatically get local optimality with respect to an edge fitting criterion. This enables us to construct a purely region-based energy minimization model without having to devise arbitrary weights in the combination of our energy function to balance edge-based terms with the region-based terms. We show that this novel approach of combining edge information as the geodesic constraint in optimizing a purely region-based energy yields a new class of active contours which exhibit both local and global behaviors that are naturally responsive to intuitive types of user interaction. We also show the relationship of this new class of globally constrained active contours with traditional minimal path methods, which seek global minimizers of purely edge-based energies without incorporating region-based criteria. Finally, we present some numerical examples to illustrate the benefits of this approach over traditional active contour models.

  4. Different epitope structures select distinct mutant forms of an antibody variable region for expression during the immune response

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Antibody variable (V) regions that initially differ from one another by only single amino acid residues at VH-D and D-JH segment junctions (termed canonical V regions) can be elicited in strain A/J mice by three different haptens. Among such V regions an amino acid substitution due to somatic mutation is recurrently observed at VH CDR2 position 58, regardless of which of these haptens is used for immunization. This substitution confers upon a canonical V region a generic increase in affinity for all the haptens. Conversely, the type of amino acid substitution at VH position 59 resulting from somatic mutation that is recurrently observed among such V regions changes with the eliciting hapten, in a manner that correlates directly with the cognate affinity increases (or decreases) for hapten conferred by the observed substitutions. This small subregion of VH CDR2 therefore plays a major role in determining both affinity and specificity for antigen. The data confirm that affinity for antigen is of pivotal importance in determining the degree of selection of different mutant forms of a V region. Moreover, during an immune response a sufficiently diverse mutant repertoire can be generated from a single canonical V region to allow adaptation to increase affinity for three different epitopes. PMID:1705280

  5. Uncovering the monster stars in W49: the most luminous star-forming region in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shiwei; Bik, Arjan; Henning, Thomas; Pasquali, Anna; Brandner, Wolfgang; Stolte, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    As a part of the LOBSTAR project (Luci OBservations of STARburst regions), which aims at understanding the stellar content of some of the most massive star-forming regions, we present our result on the high-mass stellar content of W49. K-band spectra of the candidate massive stars from VLT/ISAAC and LBT/LUCI provide us with reliable spectral types of dozens of massive stars in this HII region.The first results show that this region hosts several of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Two most brightest stars, one in the core of the central cluster and one in W49 South, were identified as very massive stars (M > 100 M⊙). Their K-band spectra exhibit strong stellar wind features, and they are classified as O2-3.5If* supergiant stars. After comparison to the Geneva evolutionary models, the mass range of W49nr1 was estimated to be between 100 M⊙ and 180 M⊙. Additionally we find 12 O stars with spectral types between O7V and O3V and masses from 25 M⊙ to 125 M⊙, respectively.These results allow us to derive the fundamental parameters of the cluster (mass, age) as well as the total energy output in the form of ionising photons. This will enable us to study the feedback effects of this extreme star forming region in great detail. To our surprise, two young stellar objects with infrared excess feature showing CO emission lines in their spectra are identified. This suggests that circumstellar disks can survive even in this extreme environment. Finally the spatial distribution of the massive stars is analysed to discuss the star formation history and identify potential runaway stars. The extreme properties of this region makes it a good template for more extreme star formation outside our galaxy.

  6. Characteristics, location and origin of flare activity in a complex active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.; Gary, G. A.; Hagyard, M. J.; Hernandez, A. M.; Rovira, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    The observational characteristics of series of multiple-loop flares from a complex active region are summarized. The location of the highest observed photospheric magnetic shear is found to be the commonly observed site of flare onset, but not, in many cases, the magnetic region where the largest time-integrated energy release is observed. The observations thus reveal a consistent pattern of energy-release processes related to the magnetic-field topology.

  7. Effect of chemical form of selenium on tissue glutathione peroxidase activity in developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Strength, Ralph; Johnson, Janet; White, Marguerite T.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that the stage of development of rats may affect the availability of various forms of selenium for the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) in the rat was experimentally investigated. One experiment evaluated the availability of selenium as selenite or selenomethionine for GSPHx activity during three developmental states in rats: fetus and 7-day old and 14-day old nursing pups. In all tissues studied, GSHPx activity was highest in the 14-day-old pups whose dams were in the selenomethionine group. Rat pups given intraperitoneal selenite had higher liver and kidney GSHPx activity than pups given the same amount of selenium as intraperitoneal selenomethionine. In a second experiment, all dams were fed the same basal diet and pups were weaned to diets containing one of two levels of selenium and one of three forms of selenium (selenite, selenomethionine, or selenocystine). The results also supported the hypothesis these dietary forms of selenium are differentially available for GSHPx activity.

  8. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  9. Near-Infrared Variability Among YSOs in the Star Forming Region Cygnus OB7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Thomas; Wolk, S. J.; Aspin, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of near-infrared time-series photometry in J, H, and K bands for about 100 epochs of a 1 deg x 1 deg region of the Lynds 1003/1004 dark cloud in the Cygnus OB7 region. From the 7 bands of near and mid-infrared photometry we identify 92 candidate disk bearing young stellar objects (YSOs). Of these, 27 are clearly Class I or earlier. Using the Wide-Field imaging CAMera (WFCAM) on the United Kingdom InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT), we were able to obtain photometry over three observing seasons, with photometric uncertainty better than 0.05 mag down to J=17. We study in detail the light curves and color trajectories of 50 of these sources in the monitored field. We investigate the variability and periodicity of the YSOs and find the data are consistent with all YSOs being variable in these wavelengths on time scales of a few years. We divide the variability into four observational classes: 1) stars with periodic variability stable over long timescales, 2) variables which exhibit short-lived periodicity, 3) long-term eruptive variables, and 4) stochastic variables. Some YSO variability defies simple classification. We can explain much of the observed variability as being due to dynamic and rotational changes in the disk, including an asymmetric or changing blocking fraction, changes to the inner disk hole size as well as the accretion rate.

  10. Far-infrared observations of a star-forming region in the Corona Australis dark cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz-Gonzalez, I.; Mcbreen, B.; Fazio, G. G.

    1984-01-01

    A high-resolution far-IR (40-250-micron) survey of a 0.9-sq-deg section of the core region of the Corona Australis dark cloud (containing very young stellar objects such as T Tauri stars, Herbig Ae and Be stars, Herbig-Haro objects, and compact H II regions) is presented. Two extended far-IR sources were found, one associated with the Herbig emission-line star R CrA and the other with the irregular emission-line variable star TY CrA. The two sources have substantially more far-IR radiation than could be expected from a blackbody extrapolation of their near-IR fluxes. The total luminosities of these sources are 145 and 58 solar luminosity, respectively, implying that the embedded objects are of intermediate or low mass. The infrared observations of the sources associated with R CrA and TY CrA are consistent with models of the evolution of protostellar envelopes of intermediate mass. However, the TY CrA source appears to have passed the evolutionary stage of expelling most of the hot dust near the central source, yielding an age of about 1 Myr.

  11. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  12. Cellulase occurs in multiple active forms in ripe avocado fruit mesocarp.

    PubMed

    Kanellis, A K; Kalaitzis, P

    1992-02-01

    The existence of multiple forms of avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) cellulase in crude protein extracts of ripe avocado fruit is reported. Cellulase was separated into at least 11 multiple forms by native isoelectric focusing in the pH range between 4 and 7 and visualized by both activity staining using Congo red and immunostaining. The enzyme components were acidic proteins with isoelectric points in the range of pH 5.10 to 6.80, the predominant forms having isoelectric points of 5.60, 5.80, 5.95, and 6.20. All 11 forms were immunologically related with molecular masses of 54 kilodaltons.

  13. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies associate with transcriptionally active genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jayson; Shiels, Carol; Sasieni, Peter; Wu, Pei Jun; Islam, Suhail A.; Freemont, Paul S.; Sheer, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is aggregated into nuclear bodies that are associated with diverse nuclear processes. Here, we report that the distance between a locus and its nearest PML body correlates with the transcriptional activity and gene density around the locus. Genes on the active X chromosome are more significantly associated with PML bodies than their silenced homologues on the inactive X chromosome. We also found that a histone-encoding gene cluster, which is transcribed only in S-phase, is more strongly associated with PML bodies in S-phase than in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, visualization of specific RNA transcripts for several genes showed that PML bodies were not themselves sites of transcription for these genes. Furthermore, knock-down of PML bodies by RNA interference did not preferentially change the expression of genes closely associated with PML bodies. We propose that PML bodies form in nuclear compartments of high transcriptional activity, but they do not directly regulate transcription of genes in these compartments. PMID:14970191

  14. Education Technologies in Addressing the Problem of Forming the Socially Active Individual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popova, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the analysis of technological support of the educational process in solving the problem of forming the socially active individual. The authors studied the value of the category "social activity" and analyzed educational technologies that have an impact on its formation. The obtained results gave the possibility…

  15. Morphology and optical properties of aluminum oxide formed into oxalic electrolyte with addition surface active agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarkin, B.; Stsiapanau, A.; Zhilinski, V.; Chernik, A.; Bezborodov, V.; Kozak, G.; Danilovich, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the results of investigations of porous films of alumina, formed into oxalic electrolyte with addition surface active agents, in particular, ordering structure, roughness of a surface, the optical transparency of the electrolyte concentration and surface active agents. Also discusses the features of the formation of porous films of temperature and IR radiation.

  16. Comparing Two Forms of Concept Map Critique Activities to Facilitate Knowledge Integration Processes in Evolution Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendimann, Beat A.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2016-01-01

    Concept map activities often lack a subsequent revision step that facilitates knowledge integration. This study compares two collaborative critique activities using a Knowledge Integration Map (KIM), a form of concept map. Four classes of high school biology students (n?=?81) using an online inquiry-based learning unit on evolution were assigned…

  17. The regulatory region of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, A; Lund, L R; Sartorio, R; Lania, A; Andreasen, P A; Danø, K; Blasi, F

    1988-01-01

    The human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has been isolated and its promoter region characterized. PAI-1 regulation by glucocorticoids, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and the phorbol ester PMA is shown to be exerted at the promoter level. A fragment spanning 805 nucleotides of the 5' flanking and 72 of the 5' untranslated region contain information enough to promote transcription and to respond to glucocorticoids when fused to a reporter gene and transfected into human fibrosarcoma cells. A moderately repetitive DNA sequence, containing a TATA box, a GRE consensus, a Z-DNA forming sequence and two imperfect direct repeats at the extremities, is present a few nucleotides 5' of the human PAI-1 gene transcription start site, raising the possibility that this gene could have been activated by DNA insertion during evolution. Images PMID:3130610

  18. Comparison of Solar Active Region Complexity Andgeomagnetic Activity from 1996 TO 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanskanen, E. I.; Nikbakhsh, S.; Perez-Suarez, D.; Hackman, T.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the influence of magnetic complexity of solar Active Regions (ARs)on geomagnetic activity from 1996 to 2014. Sunspots are visual indicators of ARswhere the solar magnetic field is disturbed. We have used International, American,Space Environment Service Center (SESC) and Space Weather Prediction Center(SWPC) sunspot numbers to examine ARs. Major manifestations of solar magneticactivity, such as flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), are associated withARs. For this study we chose the Mount Wilson scheme. It classifies ARs in terms oftheir magnetic topology from the least complex (?) to the most complex one ( ?).Several cases have been found where the more complex structures produce strongerflares and CMEs than the less complex ones. We have a list of identified substormsavailable with different phases and their durations. This will be compared to ourmagnetic complexity data to analyse the effects of active region magnetic complexityto the magnetic activity on the vicinity of the Earth.

  19. Anion permeation in calcium-activated chloride channels formed by TMEM16A from Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J P; López-Rodríguez, A; Espino-Saldaña, A E; Huanosta-Gutiérrez, A; Miledi, R; Martínez-Torres, A

    2014-09-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) formed by anoctamin1/TMEM16A subunits are ubiquitously expressed, and these channels are known to prevent polyspermy in amphibian oocytes. Here, we describe a TMEM16A clone isolated from Xenopus tropicalis oocytes (xtTMEM16A) and how the anion permeation properties are modified in single-site mutants of the ion pore. The anion permeability sequence was SCN(-) > I(-) > Br(-) > Cl(-) > gluconate (relative permeabilities 5.6:3.0:2.1:1:0.2, respectively). Dose-response curves indicated that the voltage-dependent half-maximal concentration for Ca(2+) activation (K d of the Hill equation at +100 mV) was 120 nM in normal external Cl(-), whereas it was displaced leftward to 75 nM Ca(2+), when I(-) replaced Cl(-). The I(-):Cl(-) mole fraction (MF) of the external solution was varied in order to gain insight into the permeation mechanism of the pore. No anomaly in MF behavior was observed for conductance, but it was observed for current reversal potential, which deviated from the prediction of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation. Mutations of positively charged amino acids in the pore, R646 and R761, to glutamate resulted in reduction of the relative permeability to I(-). Data from the wild type and mutants could be well fitted by a three-barrier, two-site permeation model. This suggests a multi-ion pore with at least two binding sites for anions, with R646 mole fraction closer to the extracellular membrane surface--being important for the stability of both sites--and R761--located deeper within the membrane--mainly affecting the innermost binding site. Considerations of xtTMEM16A putative pore region topology are discussed in the light of two alternative topological models of the protein. PMID:24352628

  20. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.