Science.gov

Sample records for active remote sensors

  1. Active structural acoustic control using the remote sensor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is an effective method of reducing the sound radiation from vibrating structures. In order to implement ASAC systems using only structural actuators and sensors, it is necessary to employ a model of the sound radiation from the structure. Such models have been presented in the literature for simple structures, such as baffled rectangular plates, and methods of determining the radiation modes of more complex practical structures using experimental data have also been explored. A similar problem arises in the context of active noise control, where cancellation of a disturbance is required at positions in space where it is not possible to locate a physical error microphone. In this case the signals at the cancellation points can be estimated from the outputs of remotely located measurement sensors using the “remote microphone method”. This remote microphone method is extended here to the ASAC problem, in which the pressures at a number of microphone locations must be estimated from measurements on the structure of the radiating system. The control and estimation strategies are described and the performance is assessed for a typical structural radiation problem.

  2. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris; Larson, David

    1997-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  3. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  4. remote sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Unold, Georg; Junker, Astrid; Altmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    High-throughput (HT) plant phenotyping systems enable the quantitative analysis of a variety of plant features in a fully automated fashion. The comprehensive phenomics infrastructure at IPK comprises three LemnaTec conveyor belt-based (plant-to-sensor) systems for the simultaneous analysis of large numbers of individual plants of different sizes. For monitoring of environmental conditions within the plant growth area and soil conditions in individual pots, highly modular and flexible remote sensing devices are required. We present the architecture of a wireless sensor network implemented in the HT plant phenotyping systems at IPK in the frame of the German Plant Phenotyping Network (DPPN). This system comprises 350 soil monitoring modules, each measuring water content, water matrix potential, temperature and electric conductivity. Furthermore small and large sensor platforms enable the continuous monitoring of environmental parameters such as incident photosynthetic active radiation, total radiation balance, relative humidity and CO2 concentration and more. Finally we present an introduction into data management and maintenance."

  5. Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground-Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. D.; Feltz, W. F.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote sensors as well as traditional in situ radiosonde measurements. Remote sensing technologies include an automated Raman lidar and an automated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), which are able to retrieve water vapor profiles operationally through the lower troposphere throughout the diurnal cycle. Comparisons of these two water vapor remote sensing methods to each other and to radiosondes over an 8-month period are presented and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and limitations of each method. Additionally, the AERI is able to retrieve profiles of temperature while the Raman lidar is able to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles operationally. These data, coupled with hourly wind profiles from a 915-MHz wind profiler, provide complete specification of the state of the atmosphere in noncloudy skies. Several case studies illustrate the utility of these high temporal resolution measurements in the characterization of mesoscale features within a 3-day time period in which passage of a dryline, warm air advection, and cold front occurred.

  6. Path-averaged atmospheric CO2 measurement using a 1.57 μm active remote sensor compared with multi-positioned in situ sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaizawa, Daisuke; Kawakami, Shuji; Nakajima, Masakatsu; Sawa, Yosuke; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Kameyama, Syumpei; Imaki, Masaharu; Hirano, Yoshihito; Ueno, Shinichi

    2009-08-01

    The Green-house gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) was launched to determine the continental CO2 inventories. Its sensor is based on a passive remote sensing technique developed to achieve less than 1% relative accuracy for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Meanwhile, a laser remote sensor with the differential absorption spectrometry has been developed for a candidate of a future space-based mission to observe the atmospheric CO2 or other trace gases. A prototype of the newly developed active remote sensor has been performed to demonstrate a properly validated performance for ground-based and airborne systems. This study shows the results of the in-house and field measurements. The in-house measurement demonstrated the linearity with the correlation coefficient of over 0.99 between the instrumental response and the known CO2 density in the cell. The diurnal variation obtained from our system is consistent (correlation coefficient of 0.95) with that of multi-positioned in situ sensors, indicates the spatial responsibility of the atmospheric CO2 obtained from our remote sensor with two ~3-km observation paths.

  7. FIRRE Remote Sensor Station (RSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshanks, J. R.; Wickstrand, E. L.; Kramer, T. A.; Laird, R. T.; Barngrover, C. M.; Gardner, C. W.

    2006-05-01

    The Family of Integrated Rapid Response Equipment (FIRRE) is an advanced technology demonstration program intended to develop a family of affordable, scalable, modular, and logistically supportable unmanned systems to meet urgent operational force protection needs and requirements worldwide. The near-term goal is to provide the best available unmanned ground systems to the warfighter in Iraq and Afghanistan. The overarching long-term goal is to develop a fully-integrated, layered force protection system of systems for our forward deployed forces that is networked with the future force C4ISR systems architecture. The intent of the FIRRE program is to reduce manpower requirements, enhance force protection capabilities, and reduce casualties through the use of unmanned systems. FIRRE is sponsored by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, Acquisitions, Technology and Logistics (OUSD AT&L), and is managed by the Product Manager, Force Protection Systems (PM-FPS). The Remote Sensor Station (RSS) provides FIRRE with the ability to remote (or extend the range of) manned/unmanned sensors. The RSS consists of three primary components: (1) an actively cooled and hermetically sealed (NEMA-4X) electronics enclosure, (2) a 22' telescoping tower, (3) and the PM-MEP 531A 2KW GENSET. The current configuration supports a Digital Imaging Infrared (DII) DI-5000 thermal imaging system/visual imaging system (TIS/VIS), a Syracuse Research Corporation (SRC) PPS-5D ground surveillance radar (GSR), an AN/PRS-9 (BAIS) unmanned ground sensor (UGS) receiver, an Intuicom Military Navigator II (MILNAVII) data link radio, and a DTC Communications Palladium 12000 audio/video (A/V) radio. The electronics box is insulated with a radiant barrier and fitted with a EIC Solutions 1500 BTU solid state thermoelectric cooler (TEC) capable of maintaining a safe operating temperature in extreme conditions (<120° Fahrenheit).

  8. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  9. Remotely deployable aerial inspection using tactile sensors

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C. N.; Cao, J.; Pierce, S. G.; Dobie, G.; Summan, R.; Sullivan, J. C.; Pipe, A. G.

    2014-02-18

    For structural monitoring applications, the use of remotely deployable Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) inspection platforms offer many advantages, including improved accessibility, greater safety and reduced cost, when compared to traditional manual inspection techniques. The use of such platforms, previously reported by researchers at the University Strathclyde facilitates the potential for rapid scanning of large areas and volumes in hazardous locations. A common problem for both manual and remote deployment approaches lies in the intrinsic stand-off and surface coupling issues of typical NDE probes. The associated complications of these requirements are obviously significantly exacerbated when considering aerial based remote inspection and deployment, resulting in simple visual techniques being the preferred sensor payload. Researchers at Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed biomimetic tactile sensors modelled on the facial whiskers (vibrissae) of animals such as rats and mice, with the latest sensors actively sweeping their tips across the surface in a back and forth motion. The current work reports on the design and performance of an aerial inspection platform and the suitability of tactile whisking sensors to aerial based surface monitoring applications.

  10. Comparison of Surface and Column Variations of CO2 Over Urban Areas for Future Active Remote CO2 Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Yang, Melissa; Kooi, Susan; Browell, Edward

    2015-01-01

    High resolution in-situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaign, to investigate the ability of space-based observations to accurately assess near surface conditions related to air quality. This campaign includes, Washington DC/Baltimore, MD (July 2011), San Joaquin Valley, CA (January - February 2013), Houston, TX (September 2013), and Denver, CO (July-August 2014). Each of these campaigns consisted of missed approaches and approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 within the lower troposphere (surface to about 5 km). In this study, surface (0 - 1 km) and column-averaged (0 - 3.5 km) CO2 mixing ratio values from the vertical soundings in the four geographically different urban areas are used to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of CO2 within the different urban atmospheric emission environments. Tracers such as CO, CH2O, NOx, and NMHCs are used to identify the source of CO2 variations in the urban sites. Additionally, we apply nominal CO2 column weighting functions for potential future active remote CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57-microns and 2.05-microns measurement regions to convert the in situ CO2 vertical mixing ratio profiles to variations in CO2 column optical depths, which is what the active remote sensors actually measure. Using statistics calculated from the optical depths at each urban site measured during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and for each nominal weighting function, we investigate the natural variability of CO2 columns in the lower troposphere; relate the CO2 column variability to the urban surface emissions; and show the measurement requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) in the continental U.S. urban areas.

  11. Remote Attitude Measurement Sensor (RAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. W.

    1989-01-01

    Remote attitude measurement sensor (RAMS) offers a low-cost, low-risk, proven design concept that is based on mature, demonstrated space sensor technology. The electronic design concepts and interpolation algorithms were tested and proven in space hardware like th Retroreflector Field Tracker and various star trackers. The RAMS concept is versatile and has broad applicability to both ground testing and spacecraft needs. It is ideal for use as a precision laboratory sensor for structural dynamics testing. It requires very little set-up or preparation time and the output data is immediately usable without integration or extensive analysis efforts. For on-orbit use, RAMS rivals any other type of dynamic structural sensor (accelerometer, lidar, photogrammetric techniques, etc.) for overall performance, reliability, suitability, and cost. Widespread acceptance and extensive usage of RAMS will occur only after some interested agency, such as OAST, adopts the RAMS concept and provides the funding support necessary for further development and implementation of RAMS for a specific program.

  12. Remote environmental sensor array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Geoffrey G.

    This thesis examines the creation of an environmental monitoring system for inhospitable environments. It has been named The Remote Environmental Sensor Array System or RESA System for short. This thesis covers the development of RESA from its inception, to the design and modeling of the hardware and software required to make it functional. Finally, the actual manufacture, and laboratory testing of the finished RESA product is discussed and documented. The RESA System is designed as a cost-effective way to bring sensors and video systems to the underwater environment. It contains as water quality probe with sensors such as dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, specific conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential and chlorophyll a. In addition, an omni-directional hydrophone is included to detect underwater acoustic signals. It has a colour, high-definition and a low-light, black and white camera system, which it turn are coupled to a laser scaling system. Both high-intensity discharge and halogen lighting system are included to illuminate the video images. The video and laser scaling systems are manoeuvred using pan and tilt units controlled from an underwater computer box. Finally, a sediment profile imager is included to enable profile images of sediment layers to be acquired. A control and manipulation system to control the instruments and move the data across networks is integrated into the underwater system while a power distribution node provides the correct voltages to power the instruments. Laboratory testing was completed to ensure that the different instruments associated with the RESA performed as designed. This included physical testing of the motorized instruments, calibration of the instruments, benchmark performance testing and system failure exercises.

  13. Remote query pressure measurement using magnetoelastic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Stoyanov, P. G.; Kouzoudis, D.; Ong, K. G.

    1999-12-01

    Two magnetostriction-based methods for measuring atmospheric pressure are presented. Each technique correlates changes in pressure with the characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic magnetostrictive thick-film sensor. In each case the sensor is monitored remotely, using an adjacently located pickup coil, without the use of physical connections to the sensor.

  14. Remote sensor support requirements for planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddell, J. B.; Wheeler, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    The study approach, methods, results, and conclusions of remote sensor support requirements for planetary missions are summarized. Major efforts were made to (1) establish the scientific and engineering knowledge and observation requirements for planetary exploration in the 1975 to 1985 period; (2) define the state of the art and expected development of instrument systems appropriate for sensing planetary environments; (3) establish scaling laws relating performance and support requirements of candidate remote sensor systems; (4) establish fundamental remote sensor system capabilities, limitations, and support requirements during encounter and other dynamical conditions for specific missions; and (5) construct families of candidate remote sensors compatible with selected missions. It was recommended that these data be integrated with earlier results to enhance utility, and that more restrictions be placed on the system.

  15. Magnetoelastic sensors for remote query environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Ong, K. G.; Loiselle, K.; Stoyanov, P. G.; Kouzoudis, D.; Liu, Y.; Tong, C.; Tefiku, F.

    1999-10-01

    Magnetoelastic thin film sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of surface acoustic wave sensors, with the characteristic resonant frequency of the magnetoelastic sensor changing in response to different environmental parameters. We report on the application of magnetoelastic sensors for remote query measurement of pressure, temperature, liquid viscosity and, in combination with a glucose-responding mass-changing polymer, glucose concentrations. The advantage of using magnetoelastic sensors is that no direct physical connections, such as wires or cables, are required to obtain sensor information allowing the sensor to be monitored from inside sealed containers. Furthermore since it is the frequency response of the sensor that is monitored, rather than the amplitude, the relative orientation of the sensor with respect to the query field is unimportant.

  16. Wearable Sensors for Remote Health Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Sumit; Mondal, Tapas; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-01-12

    Life expectancy in most countries has been increasing continually over the several few decades thanks to significant improvements in medicine, public health, as well as personal and environmental hygiene. However, increased life expectancy combined with falling birth rates are expected to engender a large aging demographic in the near future that would impose significant  burdens on the socio-economic structure of these countries. Therefore, it is essential to develop cost-effective, easy-to-use systems for the sake of elderly healthcare and well-being. Remote health monitoring, based on non-invasive and wearable sensors, actuators and modern communication and information technologies offers an efficient and cost-effective solution that allows the elderly to continue to live in their comfortable home environment instead of expensive healthcare facilities. These systems will also allow healthcare personnel to monitor important physiological signs of their patients in real time, assess health conditions and provide feedback from distant facilities. In this paper, we have presented and compared several low-cost and non-invasive health and activity monitoring systems that were reported in recent years. A survey on textile-based sensors that can potentially be used in wearable systems is also presented. Finally, compatibility of several communication technologies as well as future perspectives and research challenges in remote monitoring systems will be discussed.

  17. Wearable Sensors for Remote Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sumit; Mondal, Tapas; Deen, M. Jamal

    2017-01-01

    Life expectancy in most countries has been increasing continually over the several few decades thanks to significant improvements in medicine, public health, as well as personal and environmental hygiene. However, increased life expectancy combined with falling birth rates are expected to engender a large aging demographic in the near future that would impose significant  burdens on the socio-economic structure of these countries. Therefore, it is essential to develop cost-effective, easy-to-use systems for the sake of elderly healthcare and well-being. Remote health monitoring, based on non-invasive and wearable sensors, actuators and modern communication and information technologies offers an efficient and cost-effective solution that allows the elderly to continue to live in their comfortable home environment instead of expensive healthcare facilities. These systems will also allow healthcare personnel to monitor important physiological signs of their patients in real time, assess health conditions and provide feedback from distant facilities. In this paper, we have presented and compared several low-cost and non-invasive health and activity monitoring systems that were reported in recent years. A survey on textile-based sensors that can potentially be used in wearable systems is also presented. Finally, compatibility of several communication technologies as well as future perspectives and research challenges in remote monitoring systems will be discussed. PMID:28085085

  18. Objective Determination of Cloud Heights and Radar Reflectivities Using a Combination of Active Remote Sensors at the ARM CART Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Mace, Gerald G.; Moran, Kenneth P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Miller, Mark A.; Martner, Brooks E.

    2000-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is deploying sensitive, millimeter-wave cloud radars at its Cloud and Radiation Test Bed (CART) sites in Oklahoma, Alaska, and the tropical western Pacific Ocean. The radars complement optical devices, including a Belfort or Vaisala laser ceilometer and a micropulse lidar, in providing a comprehensive source of information on the vertical distribution of hydrometeors overhead at the sites. An algorithm is described that combines data from these active remote sensors to produce an objective determination of hydrometeor height distributions and estimates of their radar reflectivities, vertical velocities, and Doppler spectral widths, which are optimized for accuracy. These data provide fundamental information for retrieving cloud microphysical properties and assessing the radiative effects of clouds on climate. The algorithm is applied to nine months of data from the CART site in Oklahoma for initial evaluation. Much of the algorithm's calculations deal with merging and optimizing data from the radar's four sequential operating modes, which have differing advantages and limitations, including problems resulting from range sidelobes, range aliasing, and coherent averaging. Two of the modes use advanced phase-coded pulse compression techniques to yield approximately 10 and 15 dB more sensitivity than is available from the two conventional pulse modes. Comparison of cloud-base heights from the Belfort ceilometer and the micropulse lidar confirms small biases found in earlier studies, but recent information about the ceilometer brings the agreement to within 20-30 m. Merged data of the radar's modes were found to miss approximately 5.9% of the clouds detected by the laser systems. Using data from only the radar's two less-sensitive conventional pulse modes would increase the missed detections to 22%-34%. A significant remaining problem is that the radar's lower-altitude data are often

  19. Remote optical gas sensor integrated in glass by coherence modulation and active phase readout using an integrated LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elflein, Wilhelm; Porte, Henri; Benech, Pierre; Schanen-Duport, Isabelle

    1998-08-01

    We describe in this paper a sensor system dedicated to the measurement of concentration of organic gases. This system is based on the sue of coherence modulation and allows a remote interferometric measurement. Two different integrated optics technologies are required in a complementary way. Integrated optics in glass is used to realize the sensor itself, whereas lithium niobate technology is used for the demodulation process which performs an active phase read- out. The sensor uses a polymer material whose refractive index varies with the gas concentration, and thus modifies the characteristics of the evanescent part of the wave propagating in the glass waveguide. Experimentally, a sensitivity of 0.8rad/Vol percent is obtained with the vapor of ethanol, and 0.2rad/vol percent for butane.

  20. Remote Sensing and Quantization of Analog Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.

    2011-01-01

    This method enables sensing and quantization of analog strain gauges. By manufacturing a piezoelectric sensor stack in parallel (physical) with a piezoelectric actuator stack, the capacitance of the sensor stack varies in exact proportion to the exertion applied by the actuator stack. This, in turn, varies the output frequency of the local sensor oscillator. The output, F(sub out), is fed to a phase detector, which is driven by a stable reference, F(sub ref). The output of the phase detector is a square waveform, D(sub out), whose duty cycle, t(sub W), varies in exact proportion according to whether F(sub out) is higher or lower than F(sub ref). In this design, should F(sub out) be precisely equal to F(sub ref), then the waveform has an exact 50/50 duty cycle. The waveform, D(sub out), is of generally very low frequency suitable for safe transmission over long distances without corruption. The active portion of the waveform, t(sub W), gates a remotely located counter, which is driven by a stable oscillator (source) of such frequency as to give sufficient digitization of t(sub W) to the resolution required by the application. The advantage to this scheme is that it negates the most-common, present method of sending either very low level signals (viz. direct output from the sensors) across great distances (anything over one-half meter) or the need to transmit widely varying higher frequencies over significant distances thereby eliminating interference [both in terms of beat frequency generation and in-situ EMI (electromagnetic interference)] caused by ineffective shielding. It also results in a significant reduction in shielding mass.

  1. Multi-instrument remote sensor characterization study

    SciTech Connect

    Riese, C.; Best, L.; McLaughlin, S.; Eaton, F.; Hines, J.; Peterman, R.

    1996-12-31

    During April 1995, the US Environmental Protection Agency, in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sponsored a Ground-Based Remote Sensor Characterization Study at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) near Erie, Colorado. The BAO is a 300-meter instrumented tower used as a ground-truth profile device for calibrating tower mounted in-situ or ground-based remote sensors. The following remote sensors were evaluated: 915 MHZ Boundary Layer Radar Profiler; Phased Array Sodar; Fixed-Beam Sodar; and 2.7 GHz FM-CW Backscatter Radar Profiler. This paper examines the excellent agreement among these various instruments and the BAO tower using traditional comparative graphic plots and tables. Data were collected at the BAO site continuously over a one-month period. The variety of synoptic weather features and diurnal inversion cycles during the month made the comparisons particularly useful for objective data comparison analyses. The relationship between the remote sensor data and current issues of air pollution meteorology such as tropospheric ozone management strategies is also examined.

  2. Guidelines for spaceborne microwave remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litman, V.; Nicholas, J.

    1982-01-01

    A handbook was developed to provide information and support to the spaceborne remote sensing and frequency management communities: to guide sensor developers in the choice of frequencies; to advise regulators on sensor technology needs and sharing potential; to present sharing analysis models and, through example, methods for determining sensor sharing feasibility; to introduce developers to the regulatory process; to create awareness of proper assignment procedures; to present sensor allocations; and to provide guidelines on the use and limitations of allocated bands. Controlling physical factors and user requirements and the regulatory environment are discussed. Sensor frequency allocation achievable performance and usefulness are reviewed. Procedures for national and international registration, the use of non-allocated bands and steps for obtaining new frequency allocations, and procedures for reporting interference are also discussed.

  3. A wireless acoustic emission sensor remotely powered by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, F.; Huang, H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, wireless sensing of acoustic emission (AE) signals using a battery-free sensor node remotely powered by light is presented. The wireless sensor consists of a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for AE signal acquisition and a wireless transponder that performs signal conditioning, frequency conversion, and wireless transmission. For signal conditioning, a voltage follower that consumes less than 2 mW was introduced to buffer the high impedance of the PWAS from the low impedance of the wireless transponder. A photocell-based energy harvester with a stable voltage output was developed to power the voltage follower so that the wireless AE sensor can operate without an external power source. The principle of operation of the battery-free wireless AE sensor node and the sensor interrogation system is described, followed by a detailed description of the hardware implementation. The voltage follower and the wireless channel were characterized by ultrasound pitch-catch and pencil lead break experiments.

  4. Optical fiber networks for remote fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered.

  5. Optical Fiber Networks for Remote Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  6. Remote fire detection using MMW radiometric sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnik, Lev S.; Manasson, Vladimir A.; Chapman, Robert E.; Mino, Robert M.; Kiseliov, Vladimir

    1998-08-01

    Lack of reliable fire warning and detection systems for urban/wildland interface, large area industrial facilities and transportation systems result each year in a loss of millions of dollars worth of property; it also endangers lives. Typical optical fire detection sensor do not work well under frequency encountered adverse atmospheric conditions and, in addition, are incapable of covering sizable areas. WaveBand has recently developed hardware to study the feasibility of fire detection using a millimeter wave (MMW) scanning radiometer. It has proven the advantages of remote fire detection even under adverse weather conditions and through fire-generated smoke, better immunity to false alarms than optical sensors, and larger area of coverage. Despite using a wavelength that is much longer than that of visible light, the MMW sensor can accurate pinpoint the location of a developing fire.

  7. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Studies on global climate change show that the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) on the Earth's radiation balance and climate, also known as indirect aerosol effects, are the most uncertain among all the effects involving the atmospheric constituents and processes (Stocker et al., IPCC, 2013). Droplet activation is the most important and challenging process in the understanding of ACI. It represents the direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds and it is probably the largest source of uncertainty in estimating indirect aerosol effects. An accurate estimation of aerosol-clouds microphysical and optical properties in proximity and within the cloud boundaries represents a good frame for the study of droplet activation. This can be obtained by using ground-based profiling remote sensing techniques. In this work, a methodology for the experimental investigation of droplet activation, based on ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidar and Doppler radar technique, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin liquid water clouds, which are low or midlevel super-cooled clouds characterized by a liquid water path (LWP) lower than about 100 gm-2(Turner et al., 2007). These clouds are often optically thin, which means that ground-based Raman lidar allows the detection of the cloud top and of the cloud structure above. Broken clouds are primarily inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure using ground based remote sensing. Observations are performed simultaneously with multi-wavelength Raman lidars, a cloud Doppler radar and a microwave radiometer at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory: www.ciao.imaa.cnr.it), in Potenza, Southern Italy (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l.). A statistical study of the variability of optical properties and humidity in the transition from cloudy regions to cloud-free regions surrounding the clouds leads to the identification of threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the

  8. Development of a remote vital signs sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, M.D.; Pacheco, M.S.; Rivas, R.R.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes the work at Sandia National Laboratories to develop sensors that remotely detect unique life-form characteristics, such as breathing patterns or heartbeat patterns. This paper will address the Technical Support Working Group`s (TSWG) objective: to develop a remote vital signs detector which can be used to assess someone`s malevolent intent. The basic concept of operations for the projects, system development issues, and the preliminary results for a radar device currently in-house and the implications for implementation are described. A survey that identified the in-house technology currently being evaluated is reviewed, as well as ideas for other potential technologies to explore. A radar unit for breathing and heartbeat detection is being tested, and the applicability of infrared technology is being explored. The desire for rapid prototyping is driving the need for off-the-shelf technology. As a conclusion, current status and future directions of the effort are reviewed.

  9. Use of active and passive ground based remote sensors to explore cloud droplet modifications in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw Thet

    We explore the potential aerosol impact on cloud optical properties which is a strong modifier of climate forcing. Previous studies have shown that increased aerosol loading can affect the cloud optical properties such as cloud optical depth and cloud droplet effective radius in rural areas, particularly at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Southern Great Plain site. In this study, we attempt to observe and quantify aerosol-cloud interaction over New York City, using a combination of passive and active radiometric sensors. In particular, we look for signatures of the Twomey indirect effect which states that the droplet size of water phase clouds will decrease with increasing aerosols. We find that under certain conditions, a strong signature is found between the cloud drop effective radius and extinction and this effect is in part due to vertical wind uptake. In demonstrating the Aerosol Cloud Interaction, we use multiple approaches. For example, we derive the integrated liquid water path using both a multiband neural network and dual channel approach and show general agreement between two methods while the DC approach seems more robust. We also find that these measurements are difficult and sensitive to the position of the aerosols relative to the cloud base. As a corollary, we explore whether near surface aerosol loading can effecting the cloud by using particulate matter (PM2.5) and find that the effects are too variable to be given any statistical weight. Finally, we explore the potential of modifying our approach to remove the noisy and difficult measurement of Raman LIDAR derived extinction with calibrated LIDAR backscatter. The results seem to show a general improvement in correlation and offer the possibility of increasing the number of cases observed.

  10. Surface and Column Variations of CO2 using Weighting Functions for Future Active Remote CO2 sensors and Data from DISCOVER-AQ Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M. M.; Choi, Y.; Kooi, S. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    Fast response (1 Hz) and high precision (< 0.1 ppmv) in situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaign, to investigate the ability of space-based observations to accurately assess near surface conditions related to air quality. The campaign spanned 4 years and took place over four geographically different locations. These included, Washington DC/Baltimore, MD (July 2011), San Joaquin Valley, CA (January - February 2013), Houston, TX (September 2013), and Denver, CO (July-August 2014). With the objective of obtaining better CO2 column calculations, each of these campaigns consisted of missed approaches and approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 (from the surface to about 5 km). In this study, surface and column-averaged CO2 mixing ratio values from the vertical soundings in the four different urban areas are used to examine the temporal and spatial variability of CO2 within the lower troposphere. Tracers such as CO, CH2O, NOx, and NMHCs will be used to identify the source of variations observed in these urban sites. Additionally, we apply nominal CO2 column weighting functions for potential future active remote CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57-mm and 2.05-mm measurement regions to convert the in situ CO2 vertical mixing ratio profiles to variations in CO2 column optical depths, which is what the active remote sensors actually measure. Using statistics calculated from the optical depths at each urban site measured during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and for each nominal weighting function, we compare the natural variability of CO2 columns in the lower troposphere; relate the CO2 column variability to surface emissions; and show the measurement requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) in the continental U.S. urban areas.

  11. ROAN Remote radio meteor detection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesanu, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Only few meteor enthusiasts across the world today, approaches systematically the radio meteor detection technique, one of the reasons being the difficulty to build and install proper permanent antennas, especially when low-VHF frequency opportunity transmitters are used as illuminators. Other reasons were in the past the relatively high cost of the entire system, receivers and computers, and not ultimately the high power consumption of the system in a 24/7 operation, when using regular personal computers. The situation changed in the recent years with the advent of the low cost software defined radio SDR receivers and low consumption/cost single board computers SBC. A commercial off-the-shelf hardware based remote radio meteor detection sensor is presented.

  12. Application of remote sensor data to geologic analysis of the Bonanza test site Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Compiler); Butler, R. W.; Fisher, J. C.; Huntley, D.; Hulstrom, R. L.; Knepper, D. H., Jr.; Muhm, J. R.; Sawatzky, D. L.; Worman, K. E.; Wychgram, D.

    1973-01-01

    Research activities on geologic remote sensing applications for Colorado are summarized. Projects include: regional and detailed geologic mapping, surficial and engineering geology, fracture studies, uranium exploration, hydrology, and data reduction and enhancement. The acquisition of remote sensor data is also discussed.

  13. Analysis of interference to remote passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Douglas; Tillotson, Tom

    1986-01-01

    The final acts of the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) were analyzed to determine potential interference to remote passive microwave sensors. Using interferer populations determined from the U.S. Government and FCC Master File Lists and assuming uniform geographical distribution of interferers, the level of interference from shared services and active services in adjacent and subharmonic bands was calculated for each of the 22 passive sensing bands. In addition, due to the theoretically large antennas required for passive sensing, an analysis was performed to determine if smaller antennas, i.e., relaxed resolution requirements, would have an effect on interference and to what extent.

  14. Software and Equipment for Remote Testing of Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Brezovec, Barbara; Matko, Vojko

    2007-01-01

    An improved approach for remote testing of elements and systems is presented in this article. To ensure high reliability of products, tests must be done in the production phase to detect possible errors in working mode. Because environmental testing involves long-term processes the possibility of remote observation and remote controlling of tests is very useful solution. The concept is to connect the testing chamber with a personal computer, create a reliable driver and control it remotely over the local network or Internet from other client. It is designed for performing tests on wide area of sensors and sensor based systems.

  15. Simulating optoelectronic systems for remote sensing with SENSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Anko

    2003-04-01

    The consistent end-to-end simulation of airborne and spaceborne remote sensing systems is an important task and sometimes the only way for the adaptation and optimization of a sensor and its observation conditions, the choice and test of algorithms for data processing, error estimation and the evaluation of the capabilities of the whole sensor system. The presented software simulator SENSOR (Software ENvironment for the Simulation of Optical Remote sensing systems) includes a full model of the sensor hardware, the observed scene, and the atmosphere in between. It allows the simulation of a wide range of optoelectronic systems for remote sensing. The simulator consists of three parts. The first part describes the geometrical relations between scene, sun, and the remote sensing system using a ray tracing algorithm. The second part of the simulation environment considers the radiometry. It calculates the at-sensor radiance using a pre-calculated multidimensional lookup-table taking the atmospheric influence on the radiation into account. Part three consists of an optical and an electronic sensor model for the generation of digital images. Using SENSOR for an optimization requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the end-to-end-simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR are discussed, and examples of its use are given. The verification of SENSOR is demonstrated.

  16. Evaluation of satellites and remote sensors for atmospheric pollution measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, J.; Eldridge, R.; Friedman, E.; Keitz, E.

    1976-01-01

    An approach to the development of a prioritized list of scientific goals in atmospheric research is provided. The results of the analysis are used to estimate the contribution of various spacecraft/remote sensor combinations for each of several important constituents of the stratosphere. The evaluation of the combinations includes both single-instrument and multiple-instrument payloads. Attention was turned to the physical and chemical features of the atmosphere as well as the performance capability of a number of atmospheric remote sensors. In addition, various orbit considerations were reviewed along with detailed information on stratospheric aerosols and the impact of spacecraft environment on the operation of the sensors.

  17. Comparison of NDVI fields obtained from different remote sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano Rodriguez, Juan; Alonso, Carmelo; Tarquis, Ana Maria; Benito, Rosa Maria; Hernandez Díaz-Ambrona, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Satellite image data have become an important source of information for monitoring vegetation and mapping land cover at several scales. Beside this, the distribution and phenology of vegetation is largely associated with climate, terrain characteristics and human activity. Various vegetation indices have been developed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of vegetation using remote spectral measurements. In particular, sensors with spectral bands in the red (RED) and near-infrared (NIR) lend themselves well to vegetation monitoring and based on them [(NIR - RED) / (NIR + RED)] Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been widespread used. Given that the characteristics of spectral bands in RED and NIR vary distinctly from sensor to sensor, NDVI values based on data from different instruments will not be directly comparable. The spatial resolution also varies significantly between sensors, as well as within a given scene in the case of wide-angle and oblique sensors. As a result, NDVI values will vary according to combinations of the heterogeneity and scale of terrestrial surfaces and pixel footprint sizes. Therefore, the question arises as to the impact of differences in spectral and spatial resolutions on vegetation indices like the NDVI and their interpretation as a drought index. During 2012 three locations (at Salamanca, Granada and Córdoba) were selected and a periodic pasture monitoring and botanic composition were achieved. Daily precipitation, temperature and monthly soil water content were measurement as well as fresh and dry pasture weight. At the same time, remote sensing images were capture by DEIMOS-1 and MODIS of the chosen places. DEIMOS-1 is based on the concept Microsat-100 from Surrey. It is conceived for obtaining Earth images with a good enough resolution to study the terrestrial vegetation cover (20x20 m), although with a great range of visual field (600 km) in order to obtain those images with high temporal resolution and at a

  18. Remote Environmental Monitoring With a Wireless Sensor Network System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizito, F.; Hopmans, J. W.; Bales, R.; Tuli, A.; Kamai, T.

    2007-12-01

    Wireless sensors have the potential to reveal dynamic environmental variables in remote landscapes at reduced long-term costs and offer a promising approach to revolutionize environmental monitoring. Better management of surface water in remote landscapes warrants close monitoring of moisture and temperature variability. This work describes field data demonstrating the functionality of a deployed wireless network system, consisting of various soil moisture sensors. Soil water potential sensors with an imbedded thermistor were deployed in a remote meadow along a topographic gradient with dense tree canopies in Wolverton Meadows in Sequoia National Park. The sensors responded to moisture and temperature variations and the wireless system met the goal of providing informative data on dynamic responses of soil moisture to rainfall and snowmelt. The deployed sensor system functioned well during harsh winter conditions at 7000 feet, requiring low power. The study highlights measurement accuracy limitations and presents an alternative, robust wireless Zigbee sensor network, using Crossbow motes. We demonstrate that deployment, implementation and long-term field monitoring in remote and challenging environments is possible with current technologies.

  19. Atmospheric transformation of multispectral remote sensor data. [Great Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The effects of earth's atmosphere were accounted for, and a simple algorithm, based upon a radiative transfer model, was developed to determine the radiance at earth's surface free of atmospheric effects. Acutal multispectral remote sensor data for Lake Erie and associated optical thickness data were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the atmospheric transformation algorithm. The basic transformation was general in nature and could be applied to the large scale processing of multispectral aircraft or satellite remote sensor data.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman fiberoptic sensors for remote monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, D.L.; Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-09-01

    A new sensor design for remote surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements has been developed for environmental applications. The design features the modification of an optical fiber using layers of alumina microparticles and silver coatings for inducing the SERS effect at the sensing probe. A single fiber carries both the laser excitation and the SERS signal radiation, keeping optical parameters at the remote tip simple and consistent. The small tip size achievable with this configuration also demonstrates potential of this new design as a microsensor for in-situ measurement in microenvironments. Details of sensor tip fabrication and optical system design are described. SERS spectra of aqueous environmental samples acquired in-situ using the SERS sensor are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the SERS sensor.

  1. Interactive display/graphics systems for remote sensor data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, W. G.; Loe, D. L.; Wilson, E. L.; Whitley, S. L.; Sachen, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    A color-television display system and interactive graphics equipment on-line to an IBM 360/44 computer are used to develop a variety of interactive displays which aid in analyzing remote sensor data. These interactive displays are used to: (1) analyze data from a multispectral scanner; (2) develop automatic pattern recognition systems based on multispectral scanner measurements; and (3) analyze data from non-imaging sensors such as the infrared radiometer and microwave scatterometer.

  2. Thermal remote sensing: theory, sensors, and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Applications of thermal infrared remote sensing for Earth science research are both varied and wide in scope. They range from understanding thermal energy responses that drive land-atmosphere energy exchanges in the hydrologic cycle, to measurement of dielectric surface properties for snow, ice, an...

  3. Novel remote sensor systems: design, prototyping, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayastha, V.; Gibbons, S.; Lamb, J. E.; Giedd, R. E.

    2014-06-01

    We have designed and tested a prototype TRL4 radio-frequency (RF) sensing platform containing a transceiver that interrogates a passive carbon nanotube (CNT)-based sensor platform. The transceiver can be interfaced to a server technology such as a Bluetooth® or Wi-Fi device for further connectivity. The novelty of a very-low-frequency (VLF) implementation in the transceiver design will ultimately enable deep penetration into the ground or metal structures to communicate with buried sensing platforms. The sensor platform generally consists of printed electronic devices made of CNTs on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and Kapton® substrates. This novel remote sensing system can be integrated with both passive and active sensing platforms. It offers unique characteristics suitable for a variety of sensing applications. The proposed sensing platforms can take on different form factors and the RF output of the sensing platforms could be modulated by humidity, temperature, pressure, strain, or vibration signals. Resonant structures were designed and constructed to operate in the very-high-frequency (VHF) and VLF ranges. In this presentation, we will report results of our continued effort to develop a commercially viable transceiver capable of interrogating the conformally mounted sensing platforms made from CNTs or silver-based nanomaterials on polyimide substrates over a broad range of frequencies. The overall performance of the sensing system with different sensing elements and at different frequency ranges will be discussed.

  4. Security applications of a remote electric-field sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prance, Robert J.; Harland, Christopher J.; Prance, Helen

    2008-10-01

    A new generation of electric field sensors developed at the University of Sussex is enabling an alternative to contact voltage and non-contact magnetic field measurements. We have demonstrated the capability of this technology in a number of areas including ECG through clothing, remote off-body ECG, through wall movement sensing and electric field imaging. Clearly, there are many applications for a generic sensor technology with this capability, including long term vital sign monitoring. The non-invasive nature of the measurement also makes these sensors ideal for man/machine and human/robot interfacing. In addition, there are obvious security and biometric possibilities since we can obtain physiological data remotely, without the knowledge of the subject. This is a clear advantage if such systems are to be used for evaluating the psychological state of a subject. In this paper we report the results obtained with a new version of the sensor which is capable of acquiring electrophysiological signals remotely in an open unshielded laboratory. We believe that this technology opens up a new area of remote biometrics which could have considerable implications for security applications. We have also demonstrated the ability of EPS to function in closely-packed one and two dimensional arrays for real-time imaging.

  5. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-08-01

    The authors discussed the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  6. A wireless, remote query magnetoelastic CO2 sensor.

    PubMed

    Cai, Q Y; Cammers-Goodwin, A; Grimes, C A

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents a wireless, passive, remote query CO2 sensor comprising a ribbon-like magnetoelastic thick-film coated with a mass-changing CO2 responsive polymer synthesized from acrylamide and isooctylacrylate. In response to a magnetic field impulse, the magnetostrictive magnetoelastic sensor vibrates at a characteristic resonant frequency that is inversely dependent upon the mass of the attached CO2 responsive polymer. The mechanical vibrations of the magnetostrictive sensor launch magnetic flux, which can be detected remotely using a pickup coil. By monitoring the resonant frequency of the passive sensor, the atmospheric CO2 concentration can be determined without the need for physical connections to the sensor or specific alignment requirements. The effect of humidity and the CO2 responsive copolymer composition on the measurement sensitivity are reported. Greatest sensitivity is achieved with a polymer comprising a 1:1 mole ratio of acrylamide to isooctyl acrylate. A 0.7% change in atmospheric CO2 concentration can be detected for a 20 microns thick polymer coated sensor.

  7. Preliminary data for the 20 May 1974, simultaneous evaluation of remote sensors experiment. [water pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Batten, C. E.; Bowker, D. E.; Bressette, W. E.; Grew, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Several remote sensors were simultaneously used to collect data over the tidal James River from Hopewell to Norfolk, Virginia. Sensors evaluated included the Multichannel-Ocean Color Sensor, multispectral scanners, and multispectral photography. Ground truth measurements and remotely sensed data are given. Preliminary analysis indicates that suspended sediment and concentrated industrial effluent are observable from all sensors.

  8. Role of passive remote sensors. Sensor System Panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Capabilities of present passive systems are described and the development of passive remote sensing systems for the more abundant tropospheric trace species is recommended. The combination of nadir-viewing spectrometers and solar occultation for tropospheric measurement of those gases having large stratospheric burdens is discussed. Development of a nadir-viewing instrument capable of obtaining continuous spectra in narrower bands is recommended. Gas filter radiometers for species specific measurements and development of a spectral survey instrument are discussed. Further development of aerosol retrieval algorithms, including polarization techniques, for obtaining aerosol thickness and size distributions is advised. Recommendations of specific investigations to be pursued are presented.

  9. Sensor motion control and mobile platforms for aquatic remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    2006-09-01

    Modern remote sensing systems used in repetitive environmental monitoring and surveillance applications are used on various platforms. These platforms can be categorized as stationary (fixed) or moving platforms. The sensing systems monitor the ambient environment which also may have inherent motion, such as the water surface with water waves. This is particularly the case for airborne or ship borne sensing of aquatic environments and is true for ground based walking or crawling systems. The time sequential comparison and spatial registration of sensor images, particularly "hyperspectral imagery" requires pixel to pixel registration for science based change and target (or medium) detection applications. These applications require sensor motion control combined with platform motion control. If the pixel sizes are small - on the order of 1 meter to less than 1 mm, then "nano-positioning accuracy" may be necessary for various aspects of the camera or surveillance sensor system, and/or related sensors used to control the moving platform. In this paper and presentation, an overview of converging technologies to sensor motion control and nano-positioning is discussed. The paper and presentation will demonstrate that the technologies converging on this aspect of remote sensing monitoring systems will require professionals with a combination of skills that are not readily available in today's workforce nor taught in educational programs today - especially at the undergraduate level. Thus there is a need to consider new avenues for educating professionals necessary to engineer and apply these converging technologies to important social environmental monitoring and surveillance needs.

  10. Interactive display/graphics systems for remote sensor data analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, W. G.; Loe, D. L.; Wilson, E. L.; Whitley, S. L.; Sachen, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Using a color-television display system and interactive graphics equipment on-line to an IBM 360/44 computer, investigators at the Manned Spacecraft Center have developed a variety of interactive displays which aid in analyzing remote sensor data. This paper describes how such interactive displays are used to: (1) analyze data from a multispectral scanner, (2) develop automatic pattern recognition systems based on multispectral scanner measurements, and (3) analyze data from nonimaging sensors such as the infrared radiometer and microwave scatterometer.

  11. Interpolating for the location of remote sensor data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puccinelli, E. F.; Kornfield, J.

    1981-01-01

    An interpolation algorithm is presented as a practical alternative to common interpolation and approximation methods when applied to the problem of determining the location of remote sensor data. This algorithm is based upon knowledge of the geometry of the problem and is shown to be inherently more accurate than common interpolation schemes which may be applied to all types of data. A practical location problem is used to demonstrate its accuracy and computational cost.

  12. Remote sensing: Physical principles, sensors and products, and the LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Steffen, C. A.; Lorenzzetti, J. A.; Stech, J. L.; Desouza, R. C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques of data acquisition by remote sensing are introduced in this teaching aid. The properties of the elements involved (radiant energy, topograph, atmospheric attenuation, surfaces, and sensors) are covered. Radiometers, photography, scanners, and radar are described as well as their products. Aspects of the LANDSAT system examined include the characteristics of the satellite and its orbit, the multispectral band scanner, and the return beam vidicon. Pixels (picture elements), pattern registration, and the characteristics, reception, and processing of LANDSAT imagery are also considered.

  13. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way.

  14. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  15. Regional Drought Monitoring Based on Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Jinyoung; Im, Jungho; Park, Seonyoung

    2014-05-01

    Drought originates from the deficit of precipitation and impacts environment including agriculture and hydrological resources as it persists. The assessment and monitoring of drought has traditionally been performed using a variety of drought indices based on meteorological data, and recently the use of remote sensing data is gaining much attention due to its vast spatial coverage and cost-effectiveness. Drought information has been successfully derived from remotely sensed data related to some biophysical and meteorological variables and drought monitoring is advancing with the development of remote sensing-based indices such as the Vegetation Condition Index (VCI), Vegetation Health Index (VHI), and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) to name a few. The Scaled Drought Condition Index (SDCI) has also been proposed to be used for humid regions proving the performance of multi-sensor data for agricultural drought monitoring. In this study, remote sensing-based hydro-meteorological variables related to drought including precipitation, temperature, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture were examined and the SDCI was improved by providing multiple blends of the multi-sensor indices for different types of drought. Multiple indices were examined together since the coupling and feedback between variables are intertwined and it is not appropriate to investigate only limited variables to monitor each type of drought. The purpose of this study is to verify the significance of each variable to monitor each type of drought and to examine the combination of multi-sensor indices for more accurate and timely drought monitoring. The weights for the blends of multiple indicators were obtained from the importance of variables calculated by non-linear optimization using a Machine Learning technique called Random Forest. The case study was performed in the Republic of Korea, which has four distinct seasons over the course of the year and contains complex topography with a variety

  16. Captain, sensors report ...: Correction of Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing data acquired by airborne and satellite Systems have many impressive virtues for ecology and other sciences. They are synoptic. They are extremely cheap per data point. They cover large areas. They are not subjective. They detect features that are of clear and obvious interest for many uses. But, they also yield totally irreproducible measurements. Sensors that operate in the visible, near infrared and thermal portions of the spectrum are sensitive to a host of phenomena that are usually of little interest to the average user. Fully recognizing the power and sophistication of the algorithms currently available to users of remote sensing, the authors as long time developers (20+ years) of such algorithms, demonstrate that a host of other signals are convolved with the typical data set, and that many of these signals are very commonly not even recognized, and that these signals are often larger than the signal from the putative target. These derive from both geometric and radiometric sources as well as fundamental flaws in sensor engineering. Until such extraneous factors can be controlled or eliminated the utility of the data is greatly restricted. Finally, the authors lay out a design elements for a rational sensor and methods of deconvolving the complexity of the real world data using such a sensor.

  17. BIOME: An Ecosystem Remote Sensor Based on Imaging Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, David L.; Hammer, Philip; Smith, William H.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Until recent times, optical remote sensing of ecosystem properties from space has been limited to broad band multispectral scanners such as Landsat and AVHRR. While these sensor data can be used to derive important information about ecosystem parameters, they are very limited for measuring key biogeochemical cycling parameters such as the chemical content of plant canopies. Such parameters, for example the lignin and nitrogen contents, are potentially amenable to measurements by very high spectral resolution instruments using a spectroscopic approach. Airborne sensors based on grating imaging spectrometers gave the first promise of such potential but the recent decision not to deploy the space version has left the community without many alternatives. In the past few years, advancements in high performance deep well digital sensor arrays coupled with a patented design for a two-beam interferometer has produced an entirely new design for acquiring imaging spectroscopic data at the signal to noise levels necessary for quantitatively estimating chemical composition (1000:1 at 2 microns). This design has been assembled as a laboratory instrument and the principles demonstrated for acquiring remote scenes. An airborne instrument is in production and spaceborne sensors being proposed. The instrument is extremely promising because of its low cost, lower power requirements, very low weight, simplicity (no moving parts), and high performance. For these reasons, we have called it the first instrument optimized for ecosystem studies as part of a Biological Imaging and Observation Mission to Earth (BIOME).

  18. Miniature Wireless BioSensor for Remote Endoscopic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Brown, Keith; Issadore, David; Westervelt, Robert; Thompson, Chris; Obstein, Keith; Laine, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We have built a miniature wireless biosensor with fluorescence detection capability that explores the miniaturization limit for a self-powered sensor device assembled from the latest off-the-shelf technology. The device is intended as a remote medical sensor to be inserted endoscopically and remainin a patient's gastrointestinal tract for a period of weeks, recording and transmitting data as necessary. A sensing network may be formed by using multiple such devices within the patient, routing information to an external receiver that communicates through existing mobilephone networks to relay data remotely. By using a monolithic IC chip with integrated processor, memory, and 2.4 GHz radio,combined with a photonic sensor and miniature battery, we have developed a fully functional computing device in a form factorcompliantwith insertion through the narrowest endoscopic channels (less than 3mm x 3mm x 20mm). We envision similar devices with various types of sensors to be used in many different areas of the human body.

  19. Remote Automatic Material On-Line Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, Erik

    2005-12-20

    Low cost NMR sensor for measuring moisture content of forest products. The Department of Energy (DOE) Industries of the Future (IOF) program seeks development and implementation of technologies that make industry more efficient--in particular, more energy-efficient. Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM), a wholly-owned subsidiary of GE Security, received an award under the program to investigate roles for low-cost Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technology in furtherance of these goals. Most NMR systems are designed for high-resolution spectroscopy applications. These systems use intense magnetic fields produced by superconducting magnets that drive price and operating cost to levels beyond industry tolerance. At low magnetic fields, achievable at low cost, one loses the ability to obtain spectroscopic information. However, measuring the time constants associated with the NMR signal, called NMR relaxometry, gives indications of chemical and physical states of interest to process control and optimization. It was the purpose of this effort to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of using such low-field, low-cost NMR to monitor parameters enabling greater process efficiencies. The primary target industry identified in the Cooperative Development Agreement was the wood industry, where the moisture content of wood is a key process parameter from the time the cut tree enters a mill until the time it is delivered as pieces of lumber. Extracting the moisture is energy consuming, and improvements in drying efficiency stand to reduce costs and emissions substantially. QM designed and developed a new, low-cost NMR instrument suitable for inspecting lumber up to 3 inches by 12 inches in cross section, and other materials of similar size. Low cost is achieved via an inexpensive, permanent magnet and low-cost NMR spectrometer electronics. Laboratory testing demonstrated that the NMR system is capable of accurate ({+-} 0.5%) measurements of the moisture content of wood for

  20. Brazil's remote sensing activities in the Eighties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raupp, M. A.; Pereiradacunha, R.; Novaes, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the remote sensing activities in Brazil have been conducted by the Institute for Space Research (INPE). This report describes briefly INPE's activities in remote sensing in the last years. INPE has been engaged in research (e.g., radiance studies), development (e.g., CCD-scanners, image processing devices) and applications (e.g., crop survey, land use, mineral resources, etc.) of remote sensing. INPE is also responsible for the operation (data reception and processing) of the LANDSATs and meteorological satellites. Data acquisition activities include the development of CCD-Camera to be deployed on board the space shuttle and the construction of a remote sensing satellite.

  1. Characterizing the wake vortex signature for an active line of sight remote sensor. M.S. Thesis Technical Report No. 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heil, Robert Milton

    1994-01-01

    A recurring phenomenon, described as a wake vortex, develops as an aircraft approaches the runway to land. As the aircraft moves along the runway, each of the wing tips generates a spiraling and expanding cone of air. During the lifetime of this turbulent event, conditions exist over the runway which can be hazardous to following aircraft, particularly when a small aircraft is following a large aircraft. Left to themselves, these twin vortex patterns will converge toward each other near the center of the runway, harmlessly dissipating through interaction with each other or by contact with the ground. Unfortunately, the time necessary to disperse the vortex is often not predictable, and at busy airports can severely impact terminal area productivity. Rudimentary methods of avoidance are in place. Generally, time delays between landing aircraft are based on what is required to protect a small aircraft. Existing ambient wind conditions can complicate the situation. Reliable detection and tracking of a wake vortex hazard is a major technical problem which can significantly impact runway productivity. Landing minimums could be determined on the basis of the actual hazard rather than imposed on the basis of a worst case scenario. This work focuses on using a windfield description of a wake vortex to generate line-of-sight Doppler velocity truth data appropriate to an arbitrarily located active sensor such as a high resolution radar or lidar. The goal is to isolate a range Doppler signature of the vortex phenomenon that can be used to improve detection. Results are presented based on use of a simplified model of a wake vortex pattern. However, it is important to note that the method of analysis can easily be applied to any vortex model used to generate a windfield snapshot. Results involving several scan strategies are shown for a point sensor with a range resolution of 1 to 4 meters. Vortex signatures presented appear to offer potential for detection and tracking.

  2. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of August 1, 1984...active and passive microwave remote sensing , (2) used the strong fluctuation theory and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to calculate the brightness

  3. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and ...

  4. Remote sensing and human health: new sensors and new opportunities.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, L. R.; Lobitz, B. M.; Wood, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    Since the launch of Landsat-1 28 years ago, remotely sensed data have been used to map features on the earth's surface. An increasing number of health studies have used remotely sensed data for monitoring, surveillance, or risk mapping, particularly of vector-borne diseases. Nearly all studies used data from Landsat, the French Système Pour l'Observation de la Terre, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. New sensor systems are in orbit, or soon to be launched, whose data may prove useful for characterizing and monitoring the spatial and temporal patterns of infectious diseases. Increased computing power and spatial modeling capabilities of geographic information systems could extend the use of remote sensing beyond the research community into operational disease surveillance and control. This article illustrates how remotely sensed data have been used in health applications and assesses earth-observing satellites that could detect and map environmental variables related to the distribution of vector-borne and other diseases. PMID:10827111

  5. Remote sensing and human health: new sensors and new opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, L. R.; Lobitz, B. M.; Wood, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    Since the launch of Landsat-1 28 years ago, remotely sensed data have been used to map features on the earth's surface. An increasing number of health studies have used remotely sensed data for monitoring, surveillance, or risk mapping, particularly of vector-borne diseases. Nearly all studies used data from Landsat, the French Systeme Pour l'Observation de la Terre, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. New sensor systems are in orbit, or soon to be launched, whose data may prove useful for characterizing and monitoring the spatial and temporal patterns of infectious diseases. Increased computing power and spatial modeling capabilities of geographic information systems could extend the use of remote sensing beyond the research community into operational disease surveillance and control. This article illustrates how remotely sensed data have been used in health applications and assesses earth-observing satellites that could detect and map environmental variables related to the distribution of vector-borne and other diseases.

  6. Using an Active Sensor to Estimate Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Dry Matter Yield and Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing in the form of active sensors could be used to estimate forage biomass on spatial and temporal scales. The objective of this study is to use canopy reflectance measurements from an active remote sensor to compare different vegetation indices as a means of estimating final dry matter y...

  7. Application of remote sensors in coastal zone observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillat, J. M.; Elachi, C.; Brown, W. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A review of processes taking place along coastlines and their biological consideration led to the determination of the elements which are required in the study of coastal structures and which are needed for better utilization of the resources from the oceans. The processes considered include waves, currents, and their influence on the erosion of coastal structures. Biological considerations include coastal fisheries, estuaries, and tidal marshes. Various remote sensors were analyzed for the information which they can provide and sites were proposed where a general ocean-observation plan could be tested.

  8. Optimal feedback control of a bioreactor with a remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niranjan, S. C.; San, K. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sensors used to monitor bioreactor conditions directly often perform poorly in the face of adverse nonphysiological conditions. One way to circumvent this is to use a remote sensor block. However, such a configuration usually causes a significant time lag between measurements and the actual state values. Here, the problem of implementing feedback control strategies for such systems, described by nonlinear equations, is addressed. The problem is posed as an optimal control problem with a linear quadratic performance index. The linear control law so obtained is used to implement feedback. A global linearization technique as well as an expansion using Taylor series is used to linearize the nonlinear system, and the feedback is subsequently implemented.

  9. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    This is a report on the progress that has been made in the study of active and passive remote sensing of ice during the period of February 1, 1984...the emissivities as functions of viewing angles and polarizations. They are used to interpret the passive microwave remote sensing data from

  10. Educational activities of remote sensing archaeology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Agapiou, Athos; Lysandrou, Vasilki; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Cuca, Branka; Nisantzi, Argyro; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Krauss, Thomas; Cerra, Daniele; Gessner, Ursula; Schreier, Gunter

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing science is increasingly being used to support archaeological and cultural heritage research in various ways. Satellite sensors either passive or active are currently used in a systematic basis to detect buried archaeological remains and to systematic monitor tangible heritage. In addition, airborne and low altitude systems are being used for documentation purposes. Ground surveys using remote sensing tools such as spectroradiometers and ground penetrating radars can detect variations of vegetation and soil respectively, which are linked to the presence of underground archaeological features. Education activities and training of remote sensing archaeology to young people is characterized of highly importance. Specific remote sensing tools relevant for archaeological research can be developed including web tools, small libraries, interactive learning games etc. These tools can be then combined and aligned with archaeology and cultural heritage. This can be achieved by presenting historical and pre-historical records, excavated sites or even artifacts under a "remote sensing" approach. Using such non-form educational approach, the students can be involved, ask, read, and seek to learn more about remote sensing and of course to learn about history. The paper aims to present a modern didactical concept and some examples of practical implementation of remote sensing archaeology in secondary schools in Cyprus. The idea was built upon an ongoing project (ATHENA) focused on the sue of remote sensing for archaeological research in Cyprus. Through H2020 ATHENA project, the Remote Sensing Science and Geo-Environment Research Laboratory at the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT), with the support of the National Research Council of Italy (CNR) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) aims to enhance its performance in all these new technologies.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Carbon Dioxide using Structure Functions in Urban Areas: Insights for Future Active Remote CO2 Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Yang, M. M.; Kooi, S. A.; Browell, E. V.; DiGangi, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution in-situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaigns during July 2011 over Washington DC/Baltimore, MD; January - February 2013 over the San Joaquin Valley, CA; September 2013 over Houston, TX; and July-August 2014 over Denver, CO. Each of these campaigns have approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 within the lower troposphere (surface to about 5 km) at 6-8 different sites in each of the urban area. In this study, we used structure function analysis, which are a useful way to quantify spatial and temporal variability, by displaying differences with average observations, to evaluate the variability of CO2 in the 0-2 km range (representative of the planetary boundary layer). These results can then be used to provide guidance in the development of science requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission to measure near-surface CO2 variability in different urban areas. We compare the observed in-situ CO2 variability with the variability of the CO2 column-averaged optical depths in the 0-1 km and 0-3.5 km altitude ranges in the four geographically different urban areas, using vertical weighting functions for potential future ASCENDS lidar CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57 and 2.05 μm measurement regions. In addition to determining the natural variability of CO2 near the surface and in the column, radiocarbon and anthropogenic pollution tracers are used to examine the variation of emission sources among these urban sites.

  12. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Carbon Dioxide Using Structure Functions in Urban Areas: Insights for Future Active Remote CO2 Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Yang, Melissa; Kooi, Susan A.; Browell, Edward V.; DiGangi, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    High resolution in-situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaigns during July 2011 over Washington DC/Baltimore, MD; January-February 2013 over the San Joaquin Valley, CA; September 2013 over Houston, TX; and July-August 2014 over Denver, CO. Each of these campaigns have approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 within the lower troposphere (surface to about 5 kilometers) at 6-8 different sites in each of the urban areas. In this study, we used structure function analysis, which is a useful way to quantify spatial and temporal variability, by displaying differences with average observations, to evaluate the variability of CO2 in the 0-2 kilometers range (representative of the planetary boundary layer). These results can then be used to provide guidance in the development of science requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission to measure near-surface CO2 variability in different urban areas. We also compare the observed in-situ CO2 variability with the variability of the CO2 column-averaged optical depths in the 0-1 kilometer and 0-3.5 kilometers altitude ranges in the four geographically different urban areas, using vertical weighting functions for potential future ASCENDS lidar CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57 and 2.05 millimeter measurement regions. In addition to determining the natural variability of CO2 near the surface and in the column, radiocarbon method using continuous CO2 and CO measurements are used to examine the variation of emission quantification between anthropogenic and biogenic sources in the DC/Maryland urban site.

  13. Modified Michelson fiber-optic interferometer: A remote low-coherence distributed strain sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Libo

    2003-01-01

    A simple modified Michelson fiber-optic low-coherence interferometric quasi-distributed sensing system permitting absolute length measurement in remote reflective sensor array is proposed. The sensor reflective signals characteristics have been analyzed and the relationship between light signal intensities and sensors number was given for multiplexing potential evaluation. The proposed sensing scheme will be useful for the remote measurement of strain. An important application could be deformation sensing in smart structures. Experimentally, a three sensors array has been demonstrated.

  14. Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-26

    92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice NO0014-89-J-l 107 6. AUTHOR(S) 425f023-08 Prof. J.A. Kong 7... REMOTE SENSING OF ICE Sponsored by: Department of the Navy Office of Naval Research Contract number: N00014-89-J-1107 Research Organization: Center for...J. A. Kong Period covered: October 1, 1988 - November 30, 1992 St ACTIVE AND PASSIVE REMOTE SENSING OF ICE FINAL REPORT This annual report covers

  15. Frequency Based Volcanic Activity Detection through Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing has proved to offer a useful and relatively inexpensive method for monitoring large areas where field work is logistically unrealistic, and potentially dangerous. Current sensors are able to detect the majority of explosive volcanic activity; those that tend to effect and represent larger scale changes in the volcanic systems, eventually relating to ash producing periods of extended eruptive activity, and effusive activity. As new spaceborne sensors are developed, the ability to detect activity improves so that a system to gauge the frequency of volcanic activity can be used as a useful monitoring tool. Four volcanoes were chosen for development and testing of a method to monitor explosive activity: Stromboli (Italy); Shishaldin and Cleveland (Alaska, USA); and Karymsky (Kamchatka, Russia). Each volcano studied had similar but unique signatures of pre-cursory and eruptive activity. This study has shown that this monitoring tool could be applied to a wide range of volcanoes and still produce useful and robust data. Our method deals specifically with the detection of small scale explosive activity. The method described here could be useful in an operational setting, especially at remote volcanoes that have the potential to impact populations, infrastructure, and the aviation community. A number of important factors will affect the validity of application of this method. They are: (1) the availability of a continuous and continually populated dataset; (2) appropriate and reasonable sensor resolutions; (3) a recorded history of the volcano's previous activity; and, if available, (4) some ground-based monitoring system. We aim to develop the method further to be able to capture and evaluate the frequency of other volcanic processes such as lava flows, phreatomagmatic eruptions and dome growth and collapse. The work shown here has served to illustrate the capability of this method and monitoring tool for use at remote, un-instrumented volcanoes.

  16. Bluetooth-based sensor networks for remotely monitoring the physiological signals of a patient.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Xiao, Hannan

    2009-11-01

    Integrating intelligent medical microsensors into a wireless communication network makes it possible to remotely collect physiological signals of a patient, release the patient from being tethered to monitoring medical instrumentations, and facilitate the patient's early hospital discharge. This can further improve life quality by providing continuous observation without the need of disrupting the patient's normal life, thus reducing the risk of infection significantly, and decreasing the cost of the hospital and the patient. This paper discusses the implementation issues, and describes the overall system architecture of our developed Bluetooth sensor network for patient monitoring and the corresponding heart activity sensors. It also presents our approach to developing the intelligent physiological sensor nodes involving integration of Bluetooth radio technology, hardware and software organization, and our solutions for onboard signal processing.

  17. Indicators of international remote sensing activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The extent of worldwide remote sensing activities, including the use of satellite and high/medium altitude aircraft data was studied. Data were obtained from numerous individuals and organizations with international remote sensing responsibilities. Indicators were selected to evaluate the nature and scope of remote sensing activities in each country. These indicators ranged from attendance at remote sensing workshops and training courses to the establishment of earth resources satellite ground stations and plans for the launch of earth resources satellites. Results indicate that this technology constitutes a rapidly increasing component of environmental, land use, and natural resources investigations in many countries, and most of these countries rely on the LANDSAT satellites for a major portion of their data.

  18. Remote Respiration Monitoring Using Ultra-wideband Microwave Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashikatsuragi, Kenji; Nakahata, Youichiro; Matsunami, Isamu; Kajiwara, Akihiro

    Impulse based ultra-wideband radio has lately attracted considerable attention as medical monitoring sensor since it is expected to measure bio-signals of a patient on a bed such as respiration rate and heartbeat with a remote non-contact approach. It is also friendly to the environment including the human body due to the very low electromagnetic energy emission. Using conventional ranging scheme, however, high speed A/D device should be required in order to detect the small respiratory displacement. This paper suggests a respiratory monitoring scheme where the respiration rate is measured by observing the variation of the path strength from the patient. Therefore, it does not require high speed A/D. It also makes possible to design the simultaneous monitoring of multiple patients in hospital beds, for example. In this paper the measurements were conducted for various scenarios and the feasibility is discussed.

  19. A theoretical/experimental program to develop active optical pollution sensors: Quantitative remote Raman lidar measurements of pollutants from stationary sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poultney, S. K.; Brumfield, M. L.; Siviter, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Typical pollutant gas concentrations at the stack exits of stationary sources can be estimated to be about 500 ppm under the present emission standards. Raman lidar has a number of advantages which makes it a valuable tool for remote measurements of these stack emissions. Tests of the Langley Research Center Raman lidar at a calibration tank indicate that night measurements of SO2 concentrations and stack opacity are possible. Accuracies of 10 percent are shown to be achievable from a distance of 300 m within 30 min integration times for 500 ppm SO2 at the stack exits. All possible interferences were examined quantitatively (except for the fluorescence of aerosols in actual stack emissions) and found to have negligible effect on the measurements. An early test at an instrumented stack is strongly recommended.

  20. Particle fallout/activity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Ihlefeld M. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Rose, Kenneth A., III (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A particle fallout/activity sensor measures relative amounts of dust or other particles which collect on a mirror in an area to be monitored. The sensor includes a sensor module and a data acquisition module, both of which can be operated independently of one another or in combination with one another. The sensor module includes a housing containing the mirror, an LED assembly for illuminating the mirror and an optical detector assembly for detecting light scattered off of the mirror by dust or other particles collected thereon. A microprocessor controls operation of the sensor module's components and displays results of a measurement on an LCD display mounted on the housing. A push button switch is also mounted on the housing which permits manual initiation of a measurement. The housing is constructed of light absorbing material, such as black delrin, which minimizes detection of light by the optical detector assembly other than that scattered by dust or particles on the mirror. The data acquisition module can be connected to the sensor module and includes its own microprocessor, a timekeeper and other digital circuitry for causing the sensor module to make a measurement periodically and send the measurement data to the data acquisition module for display and storage in memory for later retrieval and transfer to a separate computer. The time tagged measurement data can also be used to determine the relative level of activity in the monitored area since this level is directly related to the amount of dust or particle fallout in the area.

  1. Remote management for multipoint sensing systems using hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors.

    PubMed

    Goh, Lee See; Anoda, Yuji; Kazuhiro, Watanabe; Shinomiya, Norihiko

    2013-12-27

    This paper describes the design and experimental verification of a multipoint sensing system with hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors and its remote management using an internet-standard protocol. The study proposes two different types of design and conducts experiments to verify those systems' feasibility. In order to manage the sensing systems remotely, the management method uses a standard operation and maintenance protocol for internet: the Simple Network Management Protocol is proposed. The purpose of this study is to construct a multipoint sensing system remote management tool by which the system can also determine the status and the identity of fiber optic sensors. The constructed sensing systems are verified and the results have demonstrated that the first proposed system can distinguish the responses from different hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely. The second proposed system shows that data communications are performed successfully while identifying the status of hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely.

  2. Application of remote sensor data to geologic analysis of the Bonanza test site, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Compiler)

    1972-01-01

    A variety of remote sensor data has aided geologic mapping in central Colorado. This report summarizes the application of sensor data to both regional and local geologic mapping and presents some conclusions on the practical use of remote sensing for solving geologic mapping problems. It is emphasized that this study was not conducted primarily to test or evaluate remote sensing systems or data, but, rather, to apply sensor data as an accessory tool for geologic mapping. The remote sensor data used were acquired by the NASA Earth Observations Aircraft Program. Conclusions reached on the utility of the various sensor data and interpretation techniques for geologic mapping were by-products of attempts to use them.

  3. Intercomparison of Land Surface Remote Sensing Products From Various Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobron, N.; Pinty, B.; Mélin, F.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M.; Widlowski, J.

    2003-12-01

    The biophysical activities on land surfaces are documented from spectral measurements made in space. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products able to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. The outline of the methodology will be summarized and the preliminary results of an inter-comparison exercise conducted with SeaWiFS, MERIS(ENVISAT), MISR(Terra) and MODIS(Terra) products will be presented.

  4. Remote sensing of environmental impact of land use activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, C. K.

    1977-01-01

    The capability to monitor land cover, associated in the past with aerial film cameras and radar systems, was discussed in regard to aircraft and spacecraft multispectral scanning sensors. A proposed thematic mapper with greater spectral and spatial resolutions for the fourth LANDSAT is expected to usher in new environmental monitoring capability. In addition, continuing improvements in image classification by supervised and unsupervised computer techniques are being operationally verified for discriminating environmental impacts of human activities on the land. The benefits of employing remote sensing for this discrimination was shown to far outweigh the incremental costs of converting to an aircraft-satellite multistage system.

  5. Active Collaborative Learning through Remote Tutoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehret, Austin U.; Elliot, Lisa B.; MacDonald, Jonathan H. C.

    2017-01-01

    An exploratory case study approach was used to describe remote tutoring in biochemistry and general chemistry with students who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). Data collected for analysis were based on the observations of the participant tutor. The research questions guiding this study included (1) How is active learning accomplished in…

  6. Remote Sensing Simulation Activities for Earthlings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krockover, Gerald H.; Odden, Thomas D.

    1977-01-01

    Suggested are activities using a Polaroid camera to illustrate the capabilities of remote sensing. Reading materials from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are suggested. Methods for (1) finding a camera's focal length, (2) calculating ground dimension photograph simulation, and (3) limiting size using film resolution are…

  7. SENSOR++: Simulation of Remote Sensing Systems from Visible to Thermal Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproth, C.; Schlüßler, E.; Scherbaum, P.; Börner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During the development process of a remote sensing system, the optimization and the verification of the sensor system are important tasks. To support these tasks, the simulation of the sensor and its output is valuable. This enables the developers to test algorithms, estimate errors, and evaluate the capabilities of the whole sensor system before the final remote sensing system is available and produces real data. The presented simulation concept, SENSOR++, consists of three parts. The first part is the geometric simulation which calculates where the sensor looks at by using a ray tracing algorithm. This also determines whether the observed part of the scene is shadowed or not. The second part describes the radiometry and results in the spectral at-sensor radiance from the visible spectrum to the thermal infrared according to the simulated sensor type. In the case of earth remote sensing, it also includes a model of the radiative transfer through the atmosphere. The final part uses the at-sensor radiance to generate digital images by using an optical and an electronic sensor model. Using SENSOR++ for an optimization requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR++ are discussed, and first examples of its use are given, for example a camera simulation for a moon lander. Finally, the verification of SENSOR++ is demonstrated.

  8. A remote compact sensor for the real-time monitoring of human heartbeat and respiration rate.

    PubMed

    Jung Han Choi; Dong Kyun Kim

    2009-06-01

    A remote compact sensor system for the detection of human vital signs (heartbeat and respiration rate) is presented. The frequency band of 24 GHz is employed for remote sensing. For the compact size, the developed sensor uses a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave with a single antenna. The sensor system is composed of radio-frequency circuits, a signal conditioning block, a data-acquisition unit, and a signal-processing part. The peak detection of the power spectral density with a tracking algorithm is utilized for the real-time detection of human vital signs. The measurement result is compared with the commercial fingertip sensor. The comparison result shows excellent agreement.

  9. Cardiac Care Assistance using Self Configured Sensor Network—a Remote Patient Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma Dhulipala, V. R.; Kanagachidambaresan, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    Pervasive health care systems are used to monitor patients remotely without disturbing the normal day-to-day activities in real-time. Wearable physiological sensors required to monitor various significant ecological parameters of the patients are connected to Body Central Unit (BCU). Body Sensor Network (BSN) updates data in real-time and are designed to transmit alerts against abnormalities which enables quick response by medical units in case of an emergency. BSN helps monitoring patient without any need for attention to the subject. BSN helps in reducing the stress and strain caused by hospital environment. In this paper, mathematical models for heartbeat signal, electro cardio graph (ECG) signal and pulse rate are introduced. These signals are compared and their RMS difference-fast Fourier transforms (PRD-FFT) are processed. In the context of cardiac arrest, alert messages of these parameters and first aid for post-surgical operations has been suggested.

  10. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  11. Hand tremor and activity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigsberg, E.

    1975-01-01

    System detects hand tremor and activity and transmitting signals over distance of at least 3 meters to receiver system. Designed for use in studies of effect of fatigue on individual's judgement or reaction time, sensor is installed within mounting of finger-ring; no external wiring or power source is needed.

  12. Active spectral sensor evaluation under varying conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination characteristics critically affect sensor response. Active sensors are of benefit in minimizing uncontrolled illumination effe...

  13. Remote Sensing of the Arctic Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, W. F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines remote sensing of the arctic seas by discussing: (1) passive microwave sensors; (2) active microwave sensors; (3) other types of sensors; (4) the future deployment of sensors; (5) data buoys; and (6) future endeavors. (JN)

  14. A tunable MWIR laser remote sensor for chemical vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Thomas L.; Noblett, Patricia M.; Otting, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force vision for Global Virtual Presence suggests a need for active remote sensing systems that provide both global coverage and the ability to detect multiple gaseous chemical species at low concentration from a significant standoff distance. The system will need to have acceptable weight, volume, and power characteristics, as well as a long operating lifetime for integration with various surveillance platforms. Laser based remote sensing systems utilizing the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique are promising for long range chemical sensing applications. Recent advancements in pulsed, diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and in tunable optical parametric oscillators (OPO) make broadly tunable laser transmitters possible for the DIAL system. Also the characteristic narrow spectral bandwidth of these laser devices provides high measurement sensitivity and spectral selectivity with the potential to avoid interfering species. Rocketdyne has built and tested a tunable, midwave infrared (MWIR) DIAL system using DPSSL/OPO technology. The key to the system is a novel tuning and line narrowing technology developed for the OPO. The tuning system can quickly adjust to the desired wavelength and precisely locate a narrow spectral feature of interest. Once the spectral feature is located, a rapid dither tuning technique is employed. The laser pulses are tuned ``on'' and ``off'' the spectral resonance of a molecule with precise and repeatable performance as required to make the DIAL measurement. To date, the breadboard system has been tested by measuring methane, ethane, and sulfur dioxide in a calibrated gas cell at a range of 60 meters.

  15. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  16. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  17. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  18. Sensor web enables rapid response to volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Chien, Steve; Wright, Robert; Miklius, Asta; Kyle, Philip R.; Welsh, Matt; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Tran, Daniel; Schaffer, Steven R.; Sherwood, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Rapid response to the onset of volcanic activity allows for the early assessment of hazard and risk [Tilling, 1989]. Data from remote volcanoes and volcanoes in countries with poor communication infrastructure can only be obtained via remote sensing [Harris et al., 2000]. By linking notifications of activity from ground-based and spacebased systems, these volcanoes can be monitored when they erupt.Over the last 18 months, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has implemented a Volcano Sensor Web (VSW) in which data from ground-based and space-based sensors that detect current volcanic activity are used to automatically trigger the NASA Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft to make highspatial-resolution observations of these volcanoes.

  19. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) for Surveillance and Remote Sensor Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) will be developed for tracking individuals, locating terrorist threats, and delivering remote sensors, for surveillance and chemical/biological agent detection. The tasks are: (1) Develop robust MAV platform capable of carrying sensor payload. (2) Develop fully autonomous capabilities for delivery of sensors to remote and distant locations. The current capabilities and accomplishments are: (1) Operational electric (inaudible) 6-inch MAVs with novel flexible wing, providing superior aerodynamic efficiency and control. (2) Vision-based flight stability and control (from on-board cameras).

  20. Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing of Forest Dynamics in Central Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, K. J.; Sun, G.; Kharuk, V. I.; Howl, J.

    2011-01-01

    The forested regions of Siberia, Russia are vast and contain about a quarter of the world's forests that have not experienced harvesting. However, many Siberian forests are facing twin pressures of rapidly changing climate and increasing timber harvest activity. Monitoring the dynamics and mapping the structural parameters of the forest is important for understanding the causes and consequences of changes observed in these areas. Because of the inaccessibility and large extent of this forest, remote sensing data can play an important role for observing forest state and change. In Central Siberia, multi-sensor remote sensing data have been used to monitor forest disturbances and to map above-ground biomass from the Sayan Mountains in the south to the taiga-tundra boundaries in the north. Radar images from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C)/XSAR mission were used for forest biomass estimation in the Sayan Mountains. Radar images from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1), European Remote Sensing Satellite-1 (ERS-1) and Canada's RADARSAT-1, and data from ETM+ on-board Landsat-7 were used to characterize forest disturbances from logging, fire, and insect damage in Boguchany and Priangare areas.

  1. Comparison of fractal dimensions based on segmented NDVI fields obtained from different remote sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, C.; Benito, R. M.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite image data have become an important source of information for monitoring vegetation and mapping land cover at several scales. Beside this, the distribution and phenology of vegetation is largely associated with climate, terrain characteristics and human activity. Various vegetation indices have been developed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of vegetation using remote spectral measurements. In particular, sensors with spectral bands in the red (RED) and near-infrared (NIR) lend themselves well to vegetation monitoring and based on them [(NIR - RED) / (NIR + RED)] Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been widespread used. Given that the characteristics of spectral bands in RED and NIR vary distinctly from sensor to sensor, NDVI values based on data from different instruments will not be directly comparable. The spatial resolution also varies significantly between sensors, as well as within a given scene in the case of wide-angle and oblique sensors. As a result, NDVI values will vary according to combinations of the heterogeneity and scale of terrestrial surfaces and pixel footprint sizes. Therefore, the question arises as to the impact of differences in spectral and spatial resolutions on vegetation indices like the NDVI. The aim of this study is to establish a comparison between two different sensors in their NDVI values at different spatial resolutions. Scaling analysis and modeling techniques are increasingly understood to be the result of nonlinear dynamic mechanisms repeating scale after scale from large to small scales leading to non-classical resolution dependencies. In the remote sensing framework the main characteristic of sensors images is the high local variability in their values. This variability is a consequence of the increase in spatial and radiometric resolution that implies an increase in complexity that it is necessary to characterize. Fractal and multifractal techniques has been proven to be useful to extract

  2. SENSOR: a tool for the simulation of hyperspectral remote sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Anko; Wiest, Lorenz; Keller, Peter; Reulke, Ralf; Richter, Rolf; Schaepman, Michael; Schläpfer, Daniel

    The consistent end-to-end simulation of airborne and spaceborne earth remote sensing systems is an important task, and sometimes the only way for the adaptation and optimisation of a sensor and its observation conditions, the choice and test of algorithms for data processing, error estimation and the evaluation of the capabilities of the whole sensor system. The presented software simulator SENSOR (Software Environment for the Simulation of Optical Remote sensing systems) includes a full model of the sensor hardware, the observed scene, and the atmosphere in between. The simulator consists of three parts. The first part describes the geometrical relations between scene, sun, and the remote sensing system using a ray-tracing algorithm. The second part of the simulation environment considers the radiometry. It calculates the at-sensor radiance using a pre-calculated multidimensional lookup-table taking the atmospheric influence on the radiation into account. The third part consists of an optical and an electronic sensor model for the generation of digital images. Using SENSOR for an optimisation requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the end-to-end-simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR are discussed, and first examples of its use are given. The verification of SENSOR is demonstrated. This work is closely related to the Airborne PRISM Experiment (APEX), an airborne imaging spectrometer funded by the European Space Agency.

  3. Development of Novel, Simple, Multianalyte Sensors for Remote Environmental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, Sanford A.

    2000-06-01

    We will develop simple, inexpensive new chemical sensing materials which can be used as visual color test strips to sensitively and selectively report on the concentration and identity of environmental pollutants such as cations of Pb, U, Pu, Sr, Hg, Cs, Co as well as other species. We will develop inexpensive chemical test strips which can be immersed in water to determine these analytes in the field. We will also develop arrays of these chemical sensing materials which will be attached to fiber optic bundles to be used as rugged multichannel optrodes to simultaneously monitor numerous analytes remotely in hostile environments. These sensing materials are based on the intelligent polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) technology we recently developed. This sensing motif utilizes a mesoscopically periodic array of colloidal particles polymerized into an acrylamide hydrogel. This array Bragg diffracts light in the visible spectral region due to the periodic array of colloidal particles. This material also contains chelating agents for the analytes of interest. When an analyte binds, its charge is immobilized within the acrylamide hydrogel. The resulting Donnan potential causes an osmotic pressure which swells the array proportional to the concentration of analyte bound. The diffracted wavelength shifts and the color changes. The change in the wavelength diffracted reports on the identity and concentration of the target analyte. Our successful development of these simple, inexpensive highly sensitive chemical sensing optrodes, which are easily coupled to simple optical instrumentation, could revolutionize environmental monitoring. In addition, we will develop highly rugged versions, which can be attached to core penetrometers and which can be used to determine analytes in buried core samples. Research Progress and Implications This report summarizes work after 21 months of a three year project. We have developed a new method to crosslink our PCCA sensing

  4. Active Targets For Capacitive Proximity Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power active targets devised for use with improved capacitive proximity sensors described in "Capacitive Proximity Sensor Has Longer Range" (GSC-13377), and "Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields" (GSC-13475). Active targets are short-distance electrostatic beacons; they generate known alternating electro-static fields used for alignment and/or to measure distances.

  5. Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network for Real Time Remote Monitoring of Sand Dynamics on Coastal Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzebon, Alessandro; Bove, Carmine; Cappelli, Irene; Alquini, Fernanda; Bertoni, Duccio; Sarti, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the architecture of a heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) to be deployed on coastal sand dunes is described, the aim of which is to provide real time measurements of physical parameters to better define the sediment transport in connection with Aeolian processes. The WSN integrates different typologies of sensors and is provided with both local and remote connection. In particular, three different typologies of sensors are integrated in the network: a multilayer anemometric station, a sensor developed ad-hoc to measure the sand dune level and a sand collector capable of measuring the weight of trapped sand and its quantity. Each sensor node is made up at least of a ZigBee radio module that is able to transmit the data collected by the sensor at a distance of about 100 meters. While the sand level sensor and the sand collector are provided only with this transmission module, the anemometric station also integrates a microprocessor board in charge of data processing. A Gateway node provided with a GSM connection for remote data transmission and a Zigbee radio module for Local Area communication has also been developed. This node is in charge of collecting all the data packets sent by the Sensor Nodes and transmit them to a remote server through GPRS connection. A Web server has been set up to collect these packets and store them in a database. The proposed WSN can provide both a static and a dynamic framework of sand transport processes acting on coastal dunes.

  6. Mapping Palm Swamp Wetland Ecosystems in the Peruvian Amazon: a Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podest, E.; McDonald, K. C.; Schroeder, R.; Pinto, N.; Zimmerman, R.; Horna, V.

    2012-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems are prevalent in the Amazon basin, especially in northern Peru. Of specific interest are palm swamp wetlands because they are characterized by constant surface inundation and moderate seasonal water level variation. This combination of constantly saturated soils and warm temperatures year-round can lead to considerable methane release to the atmosphere. Because of the widespread occurrence and expected sensitivity of these ecosystems to climate change, it is critical to develop methods to quantify their spatial extent and inundation state in order to assess their carbon dynamics. Spatio-temporal information on palm swamps is difficult to gather because of their remoteness and difficult accessibility. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing is an effective tool for characterizing these ecosystems since it is sensitive to surface water and vegetation structure and allows monitoring large inaccessible areas on a temporal basis regardless of atmospheric conditions or solar illumination. We developed a remote sensing methodology using multi-sensor remote sensing data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM, and Landsat to derive maps at 100 meter resolution of palm swamp extent and inundation based on ground data collections; and combined active and passive microwave data from AMSR-E and QuikSCAT to derive inundation extent at 25 kilometer resolution on a weekly basis. We then compared information content and accuracy of the coarse resolution products relative to the high-resolution datasets. The synergistic combination of high and low resolution datasets allowed for characterization of palm swamps and assessment of their flooding status. This work has been undertaken partly within the framework of the JAXA ALOS Kyoto & Carbon Initiative. PALSAR data have been provided by JAXA. Portions of this work were carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  7. The potential for synthesizing multi-sensor remote sensing data for global volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtney, M.; Pritchard, M. E.; Carn, S. A.; McCormick, B.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Jay, J.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanoes exhibit variable eruption frequencies and styles, from near-continuous eruptions of effusive lavas to more intermittent, explosive eruptions. The monitoring frequency necessary to capture precursory signals at any volcano remains uncertain, as some warnings allot hours for evacuation. Likewise, no precursory signal appears deterministic for each volcano. Volcanic activity manifests in a variety of ways (i.e. tremor, deformation), thus requiring multiple monitoring mechanisms (i.e. geodetic, geochemical, geothermal). We are developing databases to compare relationships among remotely sensed volcanic unrest signals and eruptions. Satellite remote sensing utilizes frequent temporal measurements (daily to bi-weekly), an essential component of worldwide volcano monitoring. Remote sensing methods are also capable of detecting diverse precursory signals such as ground deformation from satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar—InSAR— (multiple space agencies), degassing from satellite spectroscopy (i.e. OMI SO2 from NASA), and hot spots from thermal infrared (i.e. MODIS from NASA). We present preliminary results from seven SAR satellites and two thermal infrared satellites for 24 volcanoes with prominent SO2 emissions. We find near-continuous emissions at Ibu (Indonesia) since 2008 corresponded with hotspots and 10 cm of subsidence, with degassing and comparable subsidence observed at Pagan (Marianas). A newcomer to volcano monitoring, remote sensing data are only beginning to be utilized on a global scale, let alone as a synthesized dataset for monitoring developing eruptions. We foresee a searchable tool for rapidly accessing basic volcanic unrest characteristics for different types of volcanoes and whether or not they resulted in eruption. By including data from multiple satellite sensors in our database we hope to develop quantitative assessments for calculating the likelihood of eruption from individual events.

  8. A new type of remote sensors which allow directly forming certain statistical estimates of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlaskin, Boris; Guk, Elena; Karpenko, Andrey

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to the problems of statistical and structural pattern recognition, a signal processing and image analysis techniques has been considered. These problems are extremely important for tasks being solved by airborne and space borne remote sensing systems. Development of new remote sensors for image and signal processing is inherently connected with a possibility of statistical processing of images. Fundamentally new optoelectronic sensors "Multiscan" have been suggested in the present paper. Such sensors make it possible to form directly certain statistical estimates, which describe completely enough the different types of images. The sensors under discussion perform the Lebesgue-Stieltjes signal integration rather than the Cauchy-Riemann one. That permits to create integral functionals for determining statistical features of images. The use of the integral functionals for image processing provides a good agreement of obtained statistical estimates with required image information features. The Multiscan remote sensors allows to create a set of integral moments of an input image right up to high-order integral moments, to form a quantile representation of an input image, which provides a count number limited texture, to form a median, which provides a localisation of a low-contrast horizon line in fog, localisation of water flow boundary etc. This work presents both the description of the design concept of the new remote sensor and mathematical apparatus providing the possibility to create input image statistical features and integral functionals.

  9. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOEpatents

    Josten, Nicholas E.; Svoboda, John M.

    1999-01-01

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency.

  10. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOEpatents

    Josten, N.E.; Svoboda, J.M.

    1999-05-25

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency. 13 figs.

  11. Remote sensing space science enabled by the multiple instrument distributed aperture sensor (MIDAS) concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Joseph T.; Duncan, Alan; Stubbs, David; Sigler, Robert D.; Kendrick, Richard L.; Smith, Eric H.; Mason, James E.; Delory, Gregory; Lipps, Jere H.; Manga, Michael; Graham, James R.; de Pater, Imke; Reiboldt, Sarah; Bierhaus, Edward; Dalton, James B.; Fienup, James R.; Yu, Jeffrey W.

    2004-11-01

    The science capabilities and features of an innovative and revolutionary approach to remote sensing imaging systems aimed at increasing the return on future planetary science missions many fold are described. Our concept, called Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS), provides a large-aperture, wide-field, diffraction-limited telescope at a fraction of the cost, mass and volume of conventional space telescopes, by integrating advanced optical imaging interferometer technologies into a multi-functional remote sensing science payload. MIDAS acts as a single front-end actively controlled telescope array for use on common missions, reducing the cost, resources, complexity, and risks of developing a set of back-end science instruments (SIs) tailored to each specific mission. By interfacing to multiple science instruments, MIDAS enables either sequential or concurrent SI operations in all functional modes. Passive imaging modes enable remote sensing at diffraction-limited resolution sequentially by each SI, as well as at somewhat lower resolution by multiple SIs acting concurrently on the image, such as in different wavebands. MIDAS inherently provides nanometer-resolution hyperspectral passive imaging without the need for any moving parts in the SI's. Our optical design features high-resolution imaging for long dwell times at high altitudes, <1m GSD from the 5000km extent of spiral orbits, thereby enabling regional remote sensing of dynamic planet surface processes, as well as ultra-high resolution of 2cm GSD from a 100km science orbit that enable orbital searches for signs of life processes on the planet surface. In its active remote sensing modes, using an integrated solid-state laser source, MIDAS enables LIDAR, vibrometry, surface illumination, ablation, laser spectroscopy and optical laser communications. The powerful combination of MIDAS passive and active modes, each with sequential or concurrent SI operations, increases potential science return

  12. Remote monitoring of soldier safety through body posture identification using wearable sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Quwaider, Muhannad

    2008-04-01

    The physical safety and well being of the soldiers in a battlefield is the highest priority of Incident Commanders. Currently, the ability to track and monitor soldiers rely on visual and verbal communication which can be somewhat limited in scenarios where the soldiers are deployed inside buildings and enclosed areas that are out of visual range of the commanders. Also, the need for being stealth can often prevent a battling soldier to send verbal clues to a commander about his or her physical well being. Sensor technologies can remotely provide various data about the soldiers including physiological monitoring and personal alert safety system functionality. This paper presents a networked sensing solution in which a body area wireless network of multi-modal sensors can monitor the body movement and other physiological parameters for statistical identification of a soldier's body posture, which can then be indicative of the physical conditions and safety alerts of the soldier in question. The specific concept is to leverage on-body proximity sensing and a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based mechanism that can be applied for stochastic identification of human body postures using a wearable sensor network. The key idea is to collect relative proximity information between wireless sensors that are strategically placed over a subject's body to monitor the relative movements of the body segments, and then to process that using HMM in order to identify the subject's body postures. The key novelty of this approach is a departure from the traditional accelerometry based approaches in which the individual body segment movements, rather than their relative proximity, is used for activity monitoring and posture detection. Through experiments with body mounted sensors we demonstrate that while the accelerometry based approaches can be used for differentiating activity intensive postures such as walking and running, they are not very effective for identification and

  13. ‘Baseline-offset’ scheme for a methane remote sensor based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wuwen; Sun, Liqun; Yi, Luying; Zhang, Enyao

    2016-08-01

    A new scheme for methane remote sensing is presented. Unlike a standard published remote sensor based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), a reference cell is inserted into the measuring optical path. This scheme inherits the merits of WMS and can achieve high signal-to-noise ratio especially in a low concentration environment. Experimental results show that the presented remote sensor can detect ambient methane with a detection limit of 5 ppm m (parts per million · meter) at a distance of 10 m and 16 ppm m for 20 m. A methane leak test shows the sensor can detect a methane leak of 15 ml min-1 within a range up to 37 m.

  14. Respirable particulate monitoring with remote sensors. (Public health ecology: Air pollution)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring atmospheric aerosols in the respirable range from air or space platforms was studied. Secondary reflectance targets were located in the industrial area and near Galveston Bay. Multichannel remote sensor data were utilized to calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient and thus determine the aerosol size distribution. Houston Texas air sampling network high volume data were utilized to generate computer isopleth maps of suspended particulates and to establish the mass loading of the atmosphere. In addition, a five channel nephelometer and a multistage particulate air sampler were used to collect data. The extinction coefficient determined from remote sensor data proved more representative of wide areal phenomena than that calculated from on site measurements. It was also demonstrated that a significant reduction in the standard deviation of the extinction coefficient could be achieved by reducing the bandwidths used in remote sensor.

  15. Application of Remote Power-by-Light Switching in a Simplified BOTDA Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups. PMID:24351644

  16. Capacity Model and Constraints Analysis for Integrated Remote Wireless Sensor and Satellite Network in Emergency Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Feihong; Xie, Zhidong; Bian, Dongming

    2015-11-17

    This article investigates the capacity problem of an integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network (IWSSN) in emergency scenarios. We formulate a general model to evaluate the remote sensor and satellite network capacity. Compared to most existing works for ground networks, the proposed model is time varying and space oriented. To capture the characteristics of a practical network, we sift through major capacity-impacting constraints and analyze the influence of these constraints. Specifically, we combine the geometric satellite orbit model and satellite tool kit (STK) engineering software to quantify the trends of the capacity constraints. Our objective in analyzing these trends is to provide insights and design guidelines for optimizing the integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network schedules. Simulation results validate the theoretical analysis of capacity trends and show the optimization opportunities of the IWSSN.

  17. Application of remote power-by-light switching in a simplified BOTDA sensor network.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Mikel; Ullan, Angel; Zornoza, Ander; Loayssa, Alayn; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2013-12-17

    We propose and demonstrate the use of spatial multiplexing as a means to reduce the costs of distributed sensing networks. We propose a new scheme in which remote power-by-light switching is deployed to scan multiple branches of a distributed sensing network based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. A proof-of-concept system is assembled with two 5-km sensor fiber branches that are alternatively monitored using a fast remotely controlled and optically powered optical switch. The multiplexed distributed sensor fibers were located 10 km away from the interrogation unit and a Raman pump is used to remotely power the switch. Furthermore, the deployed BOTDA unit uses an alternative configuration that can lead to simplified setups.

  18. Capacity Model and Constraints Analysis for Integrated Remote Wireless Sensor and Satellite Network in Emergency Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Feihong; Xie, Zhidong; Bian, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the capacity problem of an integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network (IWSSN) in emergency scenarios. We formulate a general model to evaluate the remote sensor and satellite network capacity. Compared to most existing works for ground networks, the proposed model is time varying and space oriented. To capture the characteristics of a practical network, we sift through major capacity-impacting constraints and analyze the influence of these constraints. Specifically, we combine the geometric satellite orbit model and satellite tool kit (STK) engineering software to quantify the trends of the capacity constraints. Our objective in analyzing these trends is to provide insights and design guidelines for optimizing the integrated remote wireless sensor and satellite network schedules. Simulation results validate the theoretical analysis of capacity trends and show the optimization opportunities of the IWSSN. PMID:26593919

  19. Remotely activated protein-producing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Avi; Goldberg, Michael S; Kastrup, Christian; Wang, Yingxia; Jiang, Shan; Joseph, Brian J; Levins, Christopher G; Kannan, Sneha T; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-13

    The development of responsive nanomaterials, nanoscale systems that actively respond to stimuli, is one general goal of nanotechnology. Here we develop nanoparticles that can be controllably triggered to synthesize proteins. The nanoparticles consist of lipid vesicles filled with the cellular machinery responsible for transcription and translation, including amino acids, ribosomes, and DNA caged with a photolabile protecting group. These particles served as nanofactories capable of producing proteins including green fluorescent protein (GFP) and enzymatically active luciferase. In vitro and in vivo, protein synthesis was spatially and temporally controllable, and could be initiated by irradiating micrometer-scale regions on the time scale of milliseconds. The ability to control protein synthesis inside nanomaterials may enable new strategies to facilitate the study of orthogonal proteins in a confined environment and for remotely activated drug delivery.

  20. Laser Remote Sensing at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is developing active remote sensors to monitor the health of Planet Earth and for exploration of other planets. Development and deployment of these remote sensors can have a huge economic impact. Lasers for these active remote sensors span the spectral range from the ultraviolet to the mid infrared spectral regions. Development activities range from quantum mechanical modeling and prediction of new laser materials to the design, development, and demonstration be deployed in the field.

  1. Remote Sensing Sensors and Applications in Environmental Resources Mapping and Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Weng, Qihao; S.Thenkabail, Prasad; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2007-01-01

    The history of remote sensing and development of different sensors for environmental and natural resources mapping and data acquisition is reviewed and reported. Application examples in urban studies, hydrological modeling such as land-cover and floodplain mapping, fractional vegetation cover and impervious surface area mapping, surface energy flux and micro-topography correlation studies is discussed. The review also discusses the use of remotely sensed-based rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for estimating crop water requirement satisfaction index and hence provides early warning information for growers. The review is not an exhaustive application of the remote sensing techniques rather a summary of some important applications in environmental studies and modeling.

  2. Remote sensing sensors and applications in environmental resources mapping and modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Weng, Qihao; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2007-01-01

    The history of remote sensing and development of different sensors for environmental and natural resources mapping and data acquisition is reviewed and reported. Application examples in urban studies, hydrological modeling such as land-cover and floodplain mapping, fractional vegetation cover and impervious surface area mapping, surface energy flux and micro-topography correlation studies is discussed. The review also discusses the use of remotely sensed-based rainfall and potential evapotranspiration for estimating crop water requirement satisfaction index and hence provides early warning information for growers. The review is not an exhaustive application of the remote sensing techniques rather a summary of some important applications in environmental studies and modeling.

  3. Design and implementation of a wireless sensor network-based remote water-level monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuhong; Cheng, Xiao; Gong, Peng; Yan, Ke

    2011-01-01

    The proposed remote water-level monitoring system (RWMS) consists of a field sensor module, a base station module, a data center module and a WEB releasing module. It has advantages in real time and synchronized remote control, expandability, and anti-jamming capabilities. The RWMS can realize real-time remote monitoring, providing early warning of events and protection of the safety of monitoring personnel under certain dangerous circumstances. This system has been successfully applied in Poyanghu Lake. The cost of the whole system is approximately 1,500 yuan (RMB).

  4. Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters . Pt. 1; Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation; [Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, G.; DaSilva, A. M.; Norris, P. M.; Platnick, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating synthetic sensor radiances from variable output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint, the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probability density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The simulated sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies.We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products). We focus on clouds because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  5. Development of Novel, Simple Multianalyte Sensors for Remote Environmental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Sanford A. Asher

    2003-02-18

    Advancement of our polymerized crystalline colloidal array chemical sensing technology. They have dramatically advanced their polymerized crystalline colloidal array chemical sensing technology. They fabricated nonselective sensors for determining pH and ionic strength. They also developed selective sensors for glucose and organophosphorus mimics of nerve gas agents. They developed a trace sensor for cations in water which utilized a novel crosslinking sensing motif. In all of these cases they have been able to theoretically model their sensor response by extending hydrogel volume phase transition theory. They also developed transient sampling methods to allow their ion sensing methods to operate at high ionic strengths. They also developed a novel optrode to provide for simple sampling.

  6. Mobile Phones Coupled with Remote Sensors for Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    applications can be created to utilize the sensor data to better convey information to the user . The controlled testing we conducted yielded good...as a real -time information system. The user being able to adjust the sensitivity of the sensor “on the fly” would also be a useful capability. 50...Postgraduate School, 2010. [13] Boettcher P. and Shaw G. “Energy-Constrained Collaborative Processing for Target Detection, Tracking , and Geolocation

  7. Passive and Self-Powered Autonomous Sensors for Remote Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sardini, Emilio; Serpelloni, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous sensors play a very important role in the environmental, structural, and medical fields. The use of this kind of systems can be expanded for several applications, for example in implantable devices inside the human body where it is impossible to use wires. Furthermore, they enable measurements in harsh or hermetic environments, such as under extreme heat, cold, humidity or corrosive conditions. The use of batteries as a power supply for these devices represents one solution, but the size, and sometimes the cost and unwanted maintenance burdens of replacement are important drawbacks. In this paper passive and self-powered autonomous sensors for harsh or hermetical environments without batteries are discussed. Their general architectures are presented. Sensing strategies, communication techniques and power management are analyzed. Then, general building blocks of an autonomous sensor are presented and the design guidelines that such a system must follow are given. Furthermore, this paper reports different proposed applications of autonomous sensors applied in harsh or hermetic environments: two examples of passive autonomous sensors that use telemetric communication are proposed, the first one for humidity measurements and the second for high temperatures. Other examples of self-powered autonomous sensors that use a power harvesting system from electromagnetic fields are proposed for temperature measurements and for airflow speeds. PMID:22399949

  8. Mountainous Ecosystem Sensor Array (MESA): a mesh sensor network for climate change research in remote mountainous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. W.; Neal, D.; Frome, D.; Kavanagh, K.; Davis, A.; Gessler, P. E.; Hess, H.; Holden, Z. A.; Link, T. E.; Newingham, B. A.; Smith, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Developing sensor networks robust enough to perform unattended in the world's remote regions is critical since these regions serve as important benchmarks that lack anthropogenic influence. Paradoxically, the factors that make these remote, natural sites challenging for sensor networking are often what make them indispensable for climate change research. The MESA (Mountainous Ecosystem Sensor Array) project has faced these challenges and developed a wireless mesh sensor network across a 660 m topoclimatic gradient in a wilderness area in central Idaho. This sensor array uses advances in sensing, networking, and power supply technologies to provide near real-time synchronized data covering a suite of biophysical parameters used in ecosystem process models. The 76 sensors in the network monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, humidity, air and soil temperature, soil water content, precipitation, incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation, snow depth, wind speed and direction, and leaf wetness at synchronized time intervals ranging from two minutes to two hours and spatial scales from a few meters to two kilometers. We present our novel methods of placing sensors and network nodes above, below, and throughout the forest canopy without using meteorological towers. In addition, we explain our decision to use different forms of power (wind and solar) and the equipment we use to control and integrate power harvesting. Further, we describe our use of the network to sense and quantify its own power use. Using examples of environmental data from the project, we discuss how these data may be used to increase our understanding of the effects of climate change on ecosystem processes in mountainous environments. MESA sensor locations across a 700 m topoclimatic gradient at the University of Idaho Taylor Wilderness Research Station.

  9. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Corbiere, Franck; Belliot, Pierre; Estribeau, Magali

    2004-11-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding space applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this paper will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments and performances of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process will be presented in the corresponding section.

  10. Introduction to the Special Session on Thermal Remote Sensing Data for Earth Science Research: The Critical Need for Continued Data Collection and Development of Future Thermal Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale a.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Martha; Hook, Simon

    2006-01-01

    There is a rich and long history of thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data for multidisciplinary Earth science research. The continuity of TIR data collection, however, is now in jeopardy given there are no planned future Earth observing TIR remote sensing satellite systems with moderately high spatial resolutions to replace those currently in orbit on NASA's Terra suite of sensors. This session will convene researchers who have actively worked in the field of TIR remote sensing to present results that elucidate the importance of thermal remote sensing to the wider Earth science research community. Additionally, this session will also exist as a forum for presenting concepts and ideas for new thermal sensing systems with high spatial resolutions for future Earth science satellite missions, as opposed to planned systems such as the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer (VIIRS) suite of sensors on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) that will collect TIR data at very coarse iairesolutions.

  11. Multi-Sensor Registration of Earth Remotely Sensed Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Cole-Rhodes, Arlene; Eastman, Roger; Johnson, Kisha; Morisette, Jeffrey; Netanyahu, Nathan S.; Stone, Harold S.; Zavorin, Ilya; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Assuming that approximate registration is given within a few pixels by a systematic correction system, we develop automatic image registration methods for multi-sensor data with the goal of achieving sub-pixel accuracy. Automatic image registration is usually defined by three steps; feature extraction, feature matching, and data resampling or fusion. Our previous work focused on image correlation methods based on the use of different features. In this paper, we study different feature matching techniques and present five algorithms where the features are either original gray levels or wavelet-like features, and the feature matching is based on gradient descent optimization, statistical robust matching, and mutual information. These algorithms are tested and compared on several multi-sensor datasets covering one of the EOS Core Sites, the Konza Prairie in Kansas, from four different sensors: IKONOS (4m), Landsat-7/ETM+ (30m), MODIS (500m), and SeaWIFS (1000m).

  12. National activities in remote sensing: a Canadian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Bruce

    A brief review of the federal government's role in developing remote sensing activities in Canada over the years is given. The struggle to map a large country, together with an interest in space, brought about the Canadian remote sensing program. In particular, the paper focuses on the role of Energy, Mines and Resources Canada in coordinating research activities by all levels of government in remote sensing, thus fostering the growth of the remote sensing industry in Canada. An overview is given of the expanding remote sensing market. In addition, the paper looks at the present applications of remote sensing to agriculture, forestry and the study of ice caps and fresh water, for example, as well as its use in assessing and preventing environmental disasters. The paper concludes by stressing the importance of remote sensing in meeting the "Challenge of the 90's"—making sustainable development a way of life.

  13. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specified surface of the body. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes: (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature.

  14. A simulation of remote sensor systems and data processing algorithms for spectral feature classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, R. F.; Aherron, R. M.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in multispectral remote sensing was designed to evaluate the performance of sensor systems and data processing algorithms for spectral feature classification. Accuracy in distinguishing between categories of surfaces or between specific types is developed as a means to compare sensor systems and data processing algorithms. The model allows studies to be made of the effects of variability of the atmosphere and of surface reflectance, as well as the effects of channel selection and sensor noise. Examples of these effects are shown.

  15. Wageningen UR Unmanned Aerial Remote Sensing Facility - Overview of activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomeus, Harm; Keesstra, Saskia; Kooistra, Lammert; Suomalainen, Juha; Mucher, Sander; Kramer, Henk; Franke, Jappe

    2016-04-01

    To support environmental management there is an increasing need for timely, accurate and detailed information on our land. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are increasingly used to monitor agricultural crop development, habitat quality or urban heat efficiency. An important reason is that UAS technology is maturing quickly while the flexible capabilities of UAS fill a gap between satellite based and ground based geo-sensing systems. In 2012, different groups within Wageningen University and Research Centre have established an Unmanned Airborne Remote Sensing Facility. The objective of this facility is threefold: a) To develop innovation in the field of remote sensing science by providing a platform for dedicated and high-quality experiments; b) To support high quality UAS services by providing calibration facilities and disseminating processing procedures to the UAS user community; and c) To promote and test the use of UAS in a broad range of application fields like habitat monitoring, precision agriculture and land degradation assessment. The facility is hosted by the Laboratory of Geo-Information Science and Remote Sensing (GRS) and the Department of Soil Physics and Land Management (SLM) of Wageningen University together with the team Earth Informatics (EI) of Alterra. The added value of the Unmanned Aerial Remote Sensing Facility is that compared to for example satellite based remote sensing more dedicated science experiments can be prepared. This includes for example higher frequent observations in time (e.g., diurnal observations), observations of an object under different observation angles for characterization of BRDF and flexibility in use of camera's and sensors types. In this way, laboratory type of set ups can be tested in a field situation and effects of up-scaling can be tested. In the last years we developed and implemented different camera systems (e.g. a hyperspectral pushbroom system, and multispectral frame cameras) which we operated in projects all

  16. Engineering a laser remote sensor for atmospheric pressure and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Korb, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A system for the remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is described. Resonant lines in the 7600 Angstrom oxygen A band region are used and an organic dye laser beam is tuned to measure line absorption changes with temperature or pressure. A reference beam outside this band is also transmitted for calibration. Using lidar techniques, profiling of these parameters with altitude can be accomplished.

  17. Frequency requirements for active earth observation sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The foundation and rationale for the selection of microwave frequencies for active remote sensing usage and for subsequent use in determination of sharing criteria and allocation strategies for the WARC-79 are presented.

  18. Inductive Coupling Method for Remote Powering of Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-03

    expensive wiring harnesses . [0005] The wiring harnesses can add significant weight to the vessel and each power connection from the harness to a...sensor requires a penetration through the hull. The wiring harnesses and penetrations can add significantly to the costs of the vessel. Additionally, each

  19. REMOTE DETECTION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION USING FLUIDIZED SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Narasi Sridhar; Garth Tormoen; Ashok Sabata

    2005-10-31

    Pipelines present a unique challenge to monitoring because of the great geographical distances they cover, their burial depth, their age, and the need to keep the product flowing without much interruption. Most other engineering structures that require monitoring do not pose such combined challenges. In this regard, a pipeline system can be considered analogous to the blood vessels in the human body. The human body has an extensive ''pipeline'' through which blood and other fluids are transported. The brain can generally sense damage to the system at any location and alert the body to provide temporary repair, unless the damage is severe. This is accomplished through a vast network of fixed and floating sensors combined with a vast and extremely complex communication/decision making system. The project described in this report mimics the distributed sensor system of our body, albeit in a much more rudimentary fashion. Internal corrosion is an important factor in pipeline integrity management. At present, the methods to assess internal corrosion in pipelines all have certain limitations. In-line inspection tools are costly and cannot be used in all pipelines. Because there is a significant time interval between inspections, any impact due to upsets in pipeline operations can be missed. Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) is a procedure that can be used to identify locations of possible internal corrosion. However, the uncertainties in the procedure require excavation and location of damage using more detailed inspection tools. Non-intrusive monitoring techniques can be used to monitor internal corrosion, but these tools also require pipeline excavation and are limited in the spatial extent of corrosion they can examine. Therefore, a floating sensor system that can deposit at locations of water accumulation and communicate the corrosion information to an external location is needed. To accomplish this, the project is divided into four main tasks related to

  20. A magnetostatic-coupling based remote query sensor for environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Stoyanov, P. G.; Liu, Y.; Tong, C.; Ong, K. G.; Loiselle, K.; Shaw, M.; Doherty, S. A.; Seitz, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of in situ, remotely monitored magnetism-based sensor is presented that is comprised of an array of magnetically soft, magnetostatically-coupled ferromagnetic thin-film elements or particles combined with a chemically responsive material that swells or shrinks in response to the analyte of interest. As the chemically responsive material changes size the distance between the ferromagnetic elements changes, altering the inter-element magnetostatic coupling. This in turn changes the coercive force of the sensor, the amplitude of the voltage spikes detected in nearby pick-up coils upon magnetization reversal and the number of higher-order harmonics generated by the flux reversal. Since the sensor is monitored through changes in magnetic flux, no physical connections such as wires or cables are needed to obtain sensor information, nor is line of sight alignment required as with laser telemetry; the sensors can be detected from within sealed, opaque or thin metallic enclosures.

  1. A remote sensor for detecting methane based on palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Li, Guomin

    2013-07-10

    The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID), and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs) are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI) and the comparative analog identifier (∆AID). Results validate the sensor's ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ∆AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  2. Development of Ecogenomic Sensors for Remote Detection of Marine Microbes, Their Genes and Gene Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholin, C.; Preston, C.; Harris, A.; Birch, J.; Marin, R.; Jensen, S.; Roman, B.; Everlove, C.; Makarewicz, A.; Riot, V.; Hadley, D.; Benett, W.; Dzenitis, J.

    2008-12-01

    An internet search using the phrase "ecogenomic sensor" will return numerous references that speak broadly to the idea of detecting molecular markers indicative of specific organisms, genes or other biomarkers within an environmental context. However, a strict and unified definition of "ecogenomic sensor" is lacking and the phrase may be used for laboratory-based tools and techniques as well as semi or fully autonomous systems that can be deployed outside of laboratory. We are exploring development of an ecogenomic sensor from the perspective of a field-portable device applied towards oceanographic research and water quality monitoring. The device is known as the Environmental Sample Processor, or ESP. The ESP employs wet chemistry molecular analytical techniques to autonomously assess the presence and abundance of specific organisms, their genes and/or metabolites in near real-time. Current detection chemistries rely on low- density DNA probe and protein arrays. This presentation will emphasize results from 2007-8 field trials when the ESP was moored in Monterey Bay, CA, as well as current engineering activities for improving analytical capacity of the instrument. Changes in microbial community structure at the rRNA level were observed remotely in accordance with changing chemical and physical oceanographic conditions. Current developments include incorporation of a reusable solid phase extraction column for purifying nucleic acids and a 4-channel real-time PCR module. Users can configure this system to support a variety of PCR master mixes, primer/probe combinations and control templates. An update on progress towards fielding a PCR- enabled ESP will be given along with an outline of plans for its use in coastal and oligotrophic oceanic regimes.

  3. REMOTE, a Wireless Sensor Network Based System to Monitor Rowing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Llosa, Jordi; Vilajosana, Ignasi; Vilajosana, Xavier; Navarro, Nacho; Suriñach, Emma; Marquès, Joan Manuel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we take a hard look at the performance of REMOTE, a sensor network based application that provides a detailed picture of a boat movement, individual rower performance, or his/her performance compared with other crew members. The application analyzes data gathered with a WSN strategically deployed over a boat to obtain information on the boat and oar movements. Functionalities of REMOTE are compared to those of RowX [1] outdoor instrument, a commercial wired sensor instrument designed for similar purposes. This study demonstrates that with smart geometrical configuration of the sensors, rotation and translation of the oars and boat can be obtained. Three different tests are performed: laboratory calibration allows us to become familiar with the accelerometer readings and validate the theory, ergometer tests which help us to set the acquisition parameters, and on boat tests shows the application potential of this technologies in sports. PMID:22423204

  4. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  5. Human factors in remote control engineering development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.M.; Hamel, W.R.; Draper, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    Human factors engineering, which is an integral part of the advanced remote control development activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is described. First, work at the Remote Systems Development Facility (RSDF) has shown that operators can perform a wide variety of tasks, some of which were not specifically designed for remote systems, with a dextrous electronic force-reflecting servomanipulator and good television remote viewing capabilities. Second, the data collected during mock-up remote maintenance experiments at the RSDF have been analyzed to provide guidelines for the design of human interfaces with an integrated advanced remote maintenance system currently under development. Guidelines have been provided for task allocation between operators, remote viewing systems, and operator controls. 6 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  6. GIS Integration for Quantitatively Determining the Capabilities of Five Remote Sensors for Resource Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascucci, R. F.; Smith, A.

    1982-01-01

    To assist the U.S. Geological Survey in carrying out a Congressional mandate to investigate the use of side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for resources exploration, a research program was conducted to define the contribution of SLAR imagery to structural geologic mapping and to compare this with contributions from other remote sensing systems. Imagery from two SLAR systems and from three other remote sensing systems was interpreted, and the resulting information was digitized, quantified and intercompared using a computer-assisted geographic information system (GIS). The study area covers approximately 10,000 square miles within the Naval Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, and is situated between the foothills of the Brooks Range and the North Slope. The principal objectives were: (1) to establish quantitatively, the total information contribution of each of the five remote sensing systems to the mapping of structural geology; (2) to determine the amount of information detected in common when the sensors are used in combination; and (3) to determine the amount of unique, incremental information detected by each sensor when used in combination with others. The remote sensor imagery that was investigated included real-aperture and synthetic-aperture radar imagery, standard and digitally enhanced LANDSAT MSS imagery, and aerial photos.

  7. Spacecraft technology. [development of satellites and remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Developments in spacecraft technology are discussed with emphasis on the Explorer satellite program. The subjects considered include the following: (1) nutational behavior of the Explorer-45 satellite, (2) panoramic sensor development, (3) onboard camera signal processor for Explorer satellites, and (4) microcircuit development. Information on the zero gravity testing of heat pipes is included. Procedures for cleaning heat treated aluminum heat pipes are explained. The development of a five-year magnetic tape, an accurate incremental angular encoder, and a blood freezing apparatus for leukemia research are also discussed.

  8. Portable remote laser sensor for methane leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Hinkley, E. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A portable laser system for remote detection of methane gas leaks and concentrations is disclosed. The system transmitter includes first and second lasers, tuned respectively to a wavelength coincident with a strong absorption line of methane and a reference wavelength which is weakly absorbed by methane gas. The system receiver includes a spherical mirror for collecting the reflected laser radiation and focusing the collected radiation through a narrowband optical filter onto an optial detector. The filter is tuned to the wavelength of the two lasers, and rejects background noise. The output of the optical detector is processed by a lock-in detector synchronized to the chopper, and which measures the difference between the first wavelength signal and the reference wavelength signal.

  9. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  10. Magnetically remote-controlled optical sensor spheres for monitoring oxygen or pH.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Günter; Koren, Klaus; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic sensor macrospheres (MagSeMacs), i.e., stainless steel spheres coated with optical chemical sensors, are presented as an alternative to existing optical sensor patches and fiber-optical dip-probes. Such spheres can either be reversibly attached to the tip of an optical fiber (dip-probe) or trapped inside a vessel for read-out through the side wall. Moving the magnetic separator at the exterior enables measurements at varying positions with a single sensor. Moreover, the sensor's replacement is rapid and contactless. We measured dissolved oxygen or pH in stirred liquids, rotating flasks, and 24-well plates with a SensorDish-reader device for parallel cell culture monitoring. In these applications, MagSeMacs proved to be advantageous over conventional sensor patches and magnetic optical sensor particles because of their magnetism, spherical shape, reflectance, and size. These properties resulted in strong but reversible fixation, magnetic remote-controllability, short response times, high signal intensities, and simplified handling.

  11. An Optical Fibre Depth (Pressure) Sensor for Remote Operated Vehicles in Underwater Applications.

    PubMed

    Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Omerdic, Edin; Capocci, Romano; Lewis, Elfed; Newe, Thomas; Leen, Gabriel; Toal, Daniel; Dooly, Gerard

    2017-02-19

    A miniature sensor for accurate measurement of pressure (depth) with temperature compensation in the ocean environment is described. The sensor is based on an optical fibre Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) combined with a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG). The EFPI provides pressure measurements while the Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) provides temperature measurements. The sensor is mechanically robust, corrosion-resistant and suitable for use in underwater applications. The combined pressure and temperature sensor system was mounted on-board a mini remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) in order to monitor the pressure changes at various depths. The reflected optical spectrum from the sensor was monitored online and a pressure or temperature change caused a corresponding observable shift in the received optical spectrum. The sensor exhibited excellent stability when measured over a 2 h period underwater and its performance is compared with a commercially available reference sensor also mounted on the ROV. The measurements illustrates that the EFPI/FBG sensor is more accurate for depth measurements (depth of ~0.020 m).

  12. An Optical Fibre Depth (Pressure) Sensor for Remote Operated Vehicles in Underwater Applications

    PubMed Central

    Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Omerdic, Edin; Capocci, Romano; Lewis, Elfed; Newe, Thomas; Leen, Gabriel; Toal, Daniel; Dooly, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    A miniature sensor for accurate measurement of pressure (depth) with temperature compensation in the ocean environment is described. The sensor is based on an optical fibre Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) combined with a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG). The EFPI provides pressure measurements while the Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) provides temperature measurements. The sensor is mechanically robust, corrosion-resistant and suitable for use in underwater applications. The combined pressure and temperature sensor system was mounted on-board a mini remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) in order to monitor the pressure changes at various depths. The reflected optical spectrum from the sensor was monitored online and a pressure or temperature change caused a corresponding observable shift in the received optical spectrum. The sensor exhibited excellent stability when measured over a 2 h period underwater and its performance is compared with a commercially available reference sensor also mounted on the ROV. The measurements illustrates that the EFPI/FBG sensor is more accurate for depth measurements (depth of ~0.020 m). PMID:28218727

  13. Dynamics of plankton populations in upwelling areas. [by remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szekielda, K.

    1974-01-01

    Recent investigations of the upwelling area along the NW Coast of Africa which include studies with satellites are discussed. The detection of patchiness in temperature and plankton distribution in the upwelling area is of special interest because they can be investigated from space synoptically with repeated coverage. The recent satellite missions provide recordings in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum (EMR) as well as in the visible part. The information from those two parts of the EMR is useful for establishing the sea surface temperature and plankton distribution in upwelling areas. The temperature distribution as observed with infrared sensors and the patchiness in plankton patterns are discussed as observed with the most recent satellites, namely the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) and NOAA-2.

  14. Remote Raman Sensor System for Testing of Rocks and Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Ismail, Syed; Sanford, Stephen P.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    2007-01-01

    Recent and future explorations of Mars and lunar surfaces through rovers and landers have spawned great interest in developing an instrument that can perform in-situ analysis of minerals on planetary surfaces. Several research groups have anticipated that for such analysis, Raman spectroscopy is the best suited technique because it can unambiguously provide the composition and structure of a material. A remote pulsed Raman spectroscopy system for analyzing minerals was demonstrated at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the University of Hawaii. This system utilizes a 532 nm pulsed laser as an excitation wavelength, and a telescope with a 4-inch aperture for collecting backscattered radiation. A spectrograph equipped with a super notch filter for attenuating Rayleigh scattering is used to analyze the scattered signal. To form the Raman spectrum, the spectrograph utilizes a holographic transmission grating that simultaneously disperses two spectral tracks on the detector for increased spectral range. The spectrum is recorded on an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera system, which provides high gain to allow detection of inherently weak Stokes lines. To evaluate the performance of the system, Raman standards such as calcite and naphthalene are analyzed. Several sets of rock and gemstone samples obtained from Ward s Natural Science are tested using the Raman spectroscopy system. In addition, Raman spectra of combustible substances such acetone and isopropanol are also obtained. Results obtained from those samples and combustible substances are presented.

  15. Development of Novel, Simple, Multianalyte Sensors For Remote Environmental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, Sanfor A.

    1999-06-01

    We will develop simple, inexpensive new chemical sensing materials which can be used as visual color test strips to sensitively and selectively report on the concentration and identity of environmental pollutants such as cations of Pb, U, Pu, Sr, Hg, Cs, Co as well as other species. We will develop inexpensive chemical test strips which can be immersed in water to determine these analytes in the field. We will also develop arrays of these chemical sensing materials which will be attached to fiber optic bundles to be used as rugged multichannel optrodes to simultaneously monitor numerous analytes remotely in hostile environments. These sensing materials are based on the intelligent polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) technology we recently developed. This sensing motif utilizes a mesoscopically periodic array of colloidal particles polymerized into an acrylamide hydrogel. This array Bragg diffracts light in the visible spectral region due to the periodic array of colloidal particles. This material also contains chelating agents for the analytes of interest. When an analyte binds, its charge is immobilized within the acrylamide hydrogel. The resulting Donnan potential causes an osmotic pressure which swells the array proportional to the concentration of analyte bound. The diffracted wavelength shifts and the color changes. The change in the wavelength diffracted reports on the identity and concentration of the target analyte.

  16. Monitoring Animal Behaviour and Environmental Interactions Using Wireless Sensor Networks, GPS Collars and Satellite Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Handcock, Rebecca N.; Swain, Dave L.; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; Patison, Kym P.; Wark, Tim; Valencia, Philip; Corke, Peter; O'Neill, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Remote monitoring of animal behaviour in the environment can assist in managing both the animal and its environmental impact. GPS collars which record animal locations with high temporal frequency allow researchers to monitor both animal behaviour and interactions with the environment. These ground-based sensors can be combined with remotely-sensed satellite images to understand animal-landscape interactions. The key to combining these technologies is communication methods such as wireless sensor networks (WSNs). We explore this concept using a case-study from an extensive cattle enterprise in northern Australia and demonstrate the potential for combining GPS collars and satellite images in a WSN to monitor behavioural preferences and social behaviour of cattle. PMID:22412327

  17. A manual for inexpensive methods of analyzing and utilizing remote sensor data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elifrits, C. D.; Barr, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Instructions are provided for inexpensive methods of using remote sensor data to assist in the completion of the need to observe the earth's surface. When possible, relative costs were included. Equipment need for analysis of remote sensor data is described, and methods of use of these equipment items are included, as well as advantages and disadvantages of the use of individual items. Interpretation and analysis of stereo photos and the interpretation of typical patterns such as tone and texture, landcover, drainage, and erosional form are described. Similar treatment is given to monoscopic image interpretation, including LANDSAT MSS data. Enhancement techniques are detailed with respect to their application and simple techniques of creating an enhanced data item. Techniques described include additive and subtractive (Diazo processes) color techniques and enlargement of photos or images. Applications of these processes, including mappings of land resources, engineering soils, geology, water resources, environmental conditions, and crops and/or vegetation, are outlined.

  18. Wearable dry sensors with bluetooth connection for use in remote patient monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Gaetano; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario; Jin, Craig; McEwan, Alistair; van Schaik, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Cost reduction has become the primary theme of healthcare reforms globally. More providers are moving towards remote patient monitoring, which reduces the length of hospital stays and frees up their physicians and nurses for acute cases and helps them to tackle staff shortages. Physiological sensors are commonly used in many human specialties e.g. electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes, for monitoring heart signals, and electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes, for sensing the electrical activity of the brain, are the most well-known applications. Consequently there is a substantial unmet need for physiological sensors that can be simply and easily applied by the patient or primary carer, are comfortable to wear, can accurately sense parameters over long periods of time and can be connected to data recording systems using Bluetooth technology. We have developed a small, battery powered, user customizable portable monitor. This prototype is capable of recording three-axial body acceleration, skin temperature, and has up to four bio analogical front ends. Moreover, it is also able of continuous wireless transmission to any Bluetooth device including a PDA or a cellular phone. The bio-front end can use long-lasting dry electrodes or novel textile electrodes that can be embedded in clothes. The device can be powered by a standard mobile phone which has a Ni-MH 3.6 V battery, to sustain more than seven days continuous functioning when using the Bluetooth Sniff mode to reduce TX power. In this paper, we present some of the evaluation experiments of our wearable personal monitor device with a focus on ECG applications.

  19. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate.

  20. A Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Approach for Railway Corridor Ground Hazard Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kromer, Ryan; Hutchinson, Jean; Lato, Matt; Gauthier, Dave; Edwards, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing and monitoring ground hazard processes is a difficult endeavor along mountainous transportation corridors. This is primarily due to the quantity of hazard sites, complex topography, limited and sometimes hazardous access to sites, and obstructed views. The current hazard assessment approach for Canadian railways partly relies on the ability of inspection employees to assess hazard from track level, which isn't practical in complex slope environments. Various remote sensing sensors, implemented on numerous platforms have the potential to be used in these environments. They are frequently found to be complementary in their use, however, an optimum combination of these approaches has not yet been found for an operational rail setting. In this study, we investigate various cases where remote sensing technologies have been used to characterize and monitor ground hazards along railway corridors across the Canadian network, in order to better understand failure mechanisms, identify hazard source zones and to provide early warning. Since early 2012, a series of high resolution gigapixel images, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Aerial laser scanning (ALS), ground based photogrammetry, oblique aerial photogrammetry (from helicopter and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms), have been collected at ground hazard sites throughout the Canadian rail network. On a network level scale, comparison of sequential ALS scanning data has been found to be an ideal methodology for observing large-scale change and prioritizing high hazard sites for more detailed monitoring with terrestrial methods. The combination of TLS and high resolution gigapixel imagery at various temporal scales has allowed for a detailed characterization of the hazard level posed by the slopes, the identification of the main failure modes, an analysis of hazard activity, and the observation failure precursors such as deformation, rockfall and tension crack opening. At sites not feasible for ground

  1. Predicting eruptions from precursory activity using remote sensing data hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Ramsey, M. S.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-07-01

    Many volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to an eruption. This activity may or may not be detected depending on the available monitoring technology. In certain cases, precursors such as thermal output can be interpreted to make forecasts about the time and magnitude of the impending eruption. Kamchatka (Russia) provides an ideal natural laboratory to study a wide variety of eruption styles and precursory activity prior to an eruption. At Bezymianny volcano for example, a clear increase in thermal activity commonly occurs before an eruption, which has allowed predictions to be made months ahead of time. Conversely, the eruption of Tolbachik volcano in 2012 produced no discernable thermal precursors before the large scale effusive eruption. However, most volcanoes fall between the extremes of consistently behaved and completely undetectable, which is the case with neighboring Kliuchevskoi volcano. This study tests the effectiveness of using thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to track volcanic thermal precursors using data from both the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors. It focuses on three large eruptions that produced different levels and durations of effusive and explosive behavior at Kliuchevskoi. Before each of these eruptions, TIR spaceborne sensors detected thermal anomalies (i.e., pixels with brightness temperatures > 2 °C above the background temperature). High-temporal, low-spatial resolution (i.e., ~ hours and 1 km) AVHRR data are ideal for detecting large thermal events occurring over shorter time scales, such as the hot material ejected following strombolian eruptions. In contrast, high-spatial, low-temporal resolution (i.e., days to weeks and 90 m) ASTER data enables the detection of much lower thermal activity; however, activity with a shorter duration will commonly be missed. ASTER and AVHRR data are combined to track low

  2. Application of remote sensor data to geologic analysis of the Bonanza test site, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Hayden Pass (Orient mine area) includes 60 sq miles of the northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains and San Luis Valley in south-central Colorado. Based on interpretation of the remote sensor data, a geologic map was prepared and compared with a second geologic map, prepared from interpretation of both remote sensor data and field data. Comparison of the two maps gives an indication of the usefulness and reliability of the remote sensor data. The relative utility of color and color infrared photography was tested. The photography was used successfully to locate 75% of all faults in a portion of the geologically complex Bonanza volcanic center and to map and correctly identify 93% of all quaternary deposits and 62% of all areas of tertiary volcanic outcrop. Using a filter wheel photometer, more than 8,600 measurements of band reflectance of several sedimentary rocks were performed. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) the typical spectral reflectance curve shows a gradual increase with increasing wavelength; (2) the average band reflectance is about 0.20; and (3) within a formation, the minimum natural variation is about 0.04, or about 20% of the mean band reflectance.

  3. Test-bed for the remote health monitoring system for bridge structures using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Hyung; Park, Ki-Tae; Joo, Bong-Chul; Hwang, Yoon-Koog

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on test-bed for the long-term health monitoring system for bridge structures employing fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, which is remotely accessible via the web, to provide real-time quantitative information on a bridge's response to live loading and environmental changes, and fast prediction of the structure's integrity. The sensors are attached on several locations of the structure and connected to a data acquisition system permanently installed onsite. The system can be accessed through remote communication using an optical cable network, through which the evaluation of the bridge behavior under live loading can be allowed at place far away from the field. Live structural data are transmitted continuously to the server computer at the central office. The server computer is connected securely to the internet, where data can be retrieved, processed and stored for the remote web-based health monitoring. Test-bed revealed that the remote health monitoring technology will enable practical, cost-effective, and reliable condition assessment and maintenance of bridge structures.

  4. Gold Nanoshell-Mediated Remote Myotube Activation.

    PubMed

    Marino, Attilio; Arai, Satoshi; Hou, Yanyan; Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; Cappello, Valentina; Mazzolai, Barbara; Chang, Young-Tae; Mattoli, Virgilio; Suzuki, Madoka; Ciofani, Gianni

    2017-03-28

    Mild heat stimulation of muscle cells within the physiological range represents an intriguing approach for the modulation of their functions. In this work, photothermal conversion was exploited to remotely stimulate striated muscle cells by using gold nanoshells (NSs) in combination with near-infrared (NIR) radiation. Temperature increments of approximately 5 °C were recorded by using an intracellular fluorescent molecular thermometer and were demonstrated to efficiently induce myotube contraction. The mechanism at the base of this phenomenon was thoroughly investigated and was observed to be a Ca(2+)-independent event directly involving actin-myosin interactions. Finally, chronic remote photothermal stimulations significantly increased the mRNA transcription of genes encoding heat shock proteins and sirtuin 1, a protein which in turn can induce mitochondrial biogenesis. Overall, we provide evidence that remote NIR + NS muscle excitation represents an effective wireless stimulation technique with great potential in the fields of muscle tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and bionics.

  5. Wireless structural health monitoring for critical members of civil infrastructures using piezoelectric active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Yun, Chung-Bang; Inman, Daniel J.; Park, Gyuhae

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents several challenging issues on wireless structural health monitoring techniques for critical members of civil infrastructures using piezoelectric active sensors. The basic concept of the techniques is to monitor remotely the structural integrity by observing the impedance variations at the piezoelectric active sensors distributed to critical members of a host structure. An active sensing node incorporating on-board microprocessor and radio frequency telemetry is introduced in a sense of tailoring wireless sensing technology to the impedance method. A data compression algorithm using principal component analysis is embedded into the on-board chip of the active sensing node. The data compression algorithm would promote efficiency in terms of both power management and noise elimination of the active sensor node. Finally, a piezoelectric sensor self-diagnosis issue is touched introducing a new impedance model equation that incorporates the effects of sensor and bonding defects.

  6. Distinctive Order Based Self-Similarity descriptor for multi-sensor remote sensing image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Amin; Ebadi, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    Robust, well-distributed and accurate feature matching in multi-sensor remote sensing image is a difficult task duo to significant geometric and illumination differences. In this paper, a robust and effective image matching approach is presented for multi-sensor remote sensing images. The proposed approach consists of three main steps. In the first step, UR-SIFT (Uniform robust scale invariant feature transform) algorithm is applied for uniform and dense local feature extraction. In the second step, a novel descriptor namely Distinctive Order Based Self Similarity descriptor, DOBSS descriptor, is computed for each extracted feature. Finally, a cross matching process followed by a consistency check in the projective transformation model is performed for feature correspondence and mismatch elimination. The proposed method was successfully applied for matching various multi-sensor satellite images as: ETM+, SPOT 4, SPOT 5, ASTER, IRS, SPOT 6, QuickBird, GeoEye and Worldview sensors, and the results demonstrate its robustness and capability compared to common image matching techniques such as SIFT, PIIFD, GLOH, LIOP and LSS.

  7. A remote quantitative Fugl-Meyer assessment framework for stroke patients based on wearable sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Xiong, Daxi; Guo, Liquan; Wang, Jiping

    2016-05-01

    To extend the use of wearable sensor networks for stroke patients training and assessment in non-clinical settings, this paper proposes a novel remote quantitative Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) framework, in which two accelerometer and seven flex sensors were used to monitoring the movement function of upper limb, wrist and fingers. The extreme learning machine based ensemble regression model was established to map the sensor data to clinical FMA scores while the RRelief algorithm was applied to find the optimal features subset. Considering the FMA scale is time-consuming and complicated, seven training exercises were designed to replace the upper limb related 33 items in FMA scale. 24 stroke inpatients participated in the experiments in clinical settings and 5 of them were involved in the experiments in home settings after they left the hospital. Both the experimental results in clinical and home settings showed that the proposed quantitative FMA model can precisely predict the FMA scores based on wearable sensor data, the coefficient of determination can reach as high as 0.917. It also indicated that the proposed framework can provide a potential approach to the remote quantitative rehabilitation training and evaluation.

  8. Remote interrogation of WDM fiber-optic intensity sensors deploying delay lines in the virtual domain.

    PubMed

    Montero, David Sánchez; Vázquez, Carmen

    2013-05-07

    In this work a radio-frequency self-referencing WDM intensity-based fiber-optic sensor operating in reflective configuration and using virtual instrumentation is presented. The use of virtual delay lines at the reception stage, along with novel flexible self-referencing techniques, and using a single frequency, avoids all-optical or electrical-based delay lines approaches. This solution preserves the self-referencing and performance characteristics of the proposed WDM-based optical sensing topology, and leads to a more compact solution with higher flexibility for the multiple interrogation of remote sensing points in a sensor network. Results are presented for a displacement sensor demonstrating the concept feasibility.

  9. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    PubMed

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  10. Optical Passive Sensor Calibration for Satellite Remote Sensing and the Legacy of NOAA and NIST Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Rice, Joseph; Johnson, B. Carol; Shirley, Eric; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the cooperative efforts of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to improve the calibration of operational satellite sensors for remote sensing of the Earth’s land, atmosphere and oceans. It gives a chronological perspective of the NOAA satellite program and the interactions between the two agencies’ scientists to address pre-launch calibration and issues of sensor performance on orbit. The drive to improve accuracy of measurements has had a new impetus in recent years because of the need for improved weather prediction and climate monitoring. The highlights of this cooperation and strategies to achieve SI-traceability and improve accuracy for optical satellite sensor data are summarized1. PMID:26601030

  11. Optical Passive Sensor Calibration for Satellite Remote Sensing and the Legacy of NOAA and NIST Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Rice, Joseph; Johnson, B Carol; Shirley, Eric; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the cooperative efforts of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to improve the calibration of operational satellite sensors for remote sensing of the Earth's land, atmosphere and oceans. It gives a chronological perspective of the NOAA satellite program and the interactions between the two agencies' scientists to address pre-launch calibration and issues of sensor performance on orbit. The drive to improve accuracy of measurements has had a new impetus in recent years because of the need for improved weather prediction and climate monitoring. The highlights of this cooperation and strategies to achieve SI-traceability and improve accuracy for optical satellite sensor data are summarized.

  12. Nanoparticle-mediated remote control of enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Leslie D; Ali, Nur; Wei, Yinan; Hilt, J Zach; Daunert, Sylvia

    2012-10-23

    Nanomaterials have found numerous applications as tunable, remotely controlled platforms for drug delivery, hyperthermia cancer treatment, and various other biomedical applications. The basis for the interest lies in their unique properties achieved at the nanoscale that can be accessed via remote stimuli. These properties could then be exploited to simultaneously activate secondary systems that are not remotely actuatable. In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles are encapsulated in a bisacrylamide cross-linked polyacrylamide hydrogel network along with a model dehalogenase enzyme, L-2-HAD(ST). This thermophilic enzyme is activated at elevated temperatures and has been shown to have optimal activity at 70 °C. By exposing the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles to a remote stimulus, an alternating magnetic field (AMF), enhanced system heating can be achieved, thus remotely activating the enzyme. The internal heating of the nanocomposite hydrogel network in the AMF results in a 2-fold increase in enzymatic activity as compared to the same hydrogel heated externally in a water bath, suggesting that the internal heating of the nanoparticles is more efficient than the diffusion-limited heating of the water bath. This system may prove useful for remote actuation of biomedical and environmentally relevant enzymes and find applications in a variety of fields.

  13. A generalised random encounter model for estimating animal density with remote sensor data.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tim C D; Moorcroft, Elizabeth A; Freeman, Robin; Rowcliffe, J Marcus; Jones, Kate E

    2015-05-01

    Wildlife monitoring technology is advancing rapidly and the use of remote sensors such as camera traps and acoustic detectors is becoming common in both the terrestrial and marine environments. Current methods to estimate abundance or density require individual recognition of animals or knowing the distance of the animal from the sensor, which is often difficult. A method without these requirements, the random encounter model (REM), has been successfully applied to estimate animal densities from count data generated from camera traps. However, count data from acoustic detectors do not fit the assumptions of the REM due to the directionality of animal signals.We developed a generalised REM (gREM), to estimate absolute animal density from count data from both camera traps and acoustic detectors. We derived the gREM for different combinations of sensor detection widths and animal signal widths (a measure of directionality). We tested the accuracy and precision of this model using simulations of different combinations of sensor detection widths and animal signal widths, number of captures and models of animal movement.We find that the gREM produces accurate estimates of absolute animal density for all combinations of sensor detection widths and animal signal widths. However, larger sensor detection and animal signal widths were found to be more precise. While the model is accurate for all capture efforts tested, the precision of the estimate increases with the number of captures. We found no effect of different animal movement models on the accuracy and precision of the gREM.We conclude that the gREM provides an effective method to estimate absolute animal densities from remote sensor count data over a range of sensor and animal signal widths. The gREM is applicable for count data obtained in both marine and terrestrial environments, visually or acoustically (e.g. big cats, sharks, birds, echolocating bats and cetaceans). As sensors such as camera traps and acoustic

  14. Fully switchable multi-wavelength fiber laser based interrogator system for remote and versatile fiber optic sensors multiplexing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo Acha, M.; DeMiguel-Soto, V.; Ortigosa, A.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2014-05-01

    A novel interrogation system for multiple fiber optic sensor technologies and based on a fully-switchable multiwavelength fiber laser (MWFL) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The MWFL can generate any wavelength combination with a minimum emission line distance up to 50 GHz fitting the ITU grid specifications. On the other hand, as proof of concept sensor network, two different networks were multiplexed by using a remote powered by light fiber optic switch. They are based on two different sensor technologies. One of them based on PCF intensity sensors and multiplexed by using an 8 port WDM and the other one based on wavelength temperature/strain FBG sensors.

  15. Secure Authentication for Remote Patient Monitoring with Wireless Medical Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Hayajneh, Thaier; Mohd, Bassam J; Imran, Muhammad; Almashaqbeh, Ghada; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2016-03-24

    There is broad consensus that remote health monitoring will benefit all stakeholders in the healthcare system and that it has the potential to save billions of dollars. Among the major concerns that are preventing the patients from widely adopting this technology are data privacy and security. Wireless Medical Sensor Networks (MSNs) are the building blocks for remote health monitoring systems. This paper helps to identify the most challenging security issues in the existing authentication protocols for remote patient monitoring and presents a lightweight public-key-based authentication protocol for MSNs. In MSNs, the nodes are classified into sensors that report measurements about the human body and actuators that receive commands from the medical staff and perform actions. Authenticating these commands is a critical security issue, as any alteration may lead to serious consequences. The proposed protocol is based on the Rabin authentication algorithm, which is modified in this paper to improve its signature signing process, making it suitable for delay-sensitive MSN applications. To prove the efficiency of the Rabin algorithm, we implemented the algorithm with different hardware settings using Tmote Sky motes and also programmed the algorithm on an FPGA to evaluate its design and performance. Furthermore, the proposed protocol is implemented and tested using the MIRACL (Multiprecision Integer and Rational Arithmetic C/C++) library. The results show that secure, direct, instant and authenticated commands can be delivered from the medical staff to the MSN nodes.

  16. Secure Authentication for Remote Patient Monitoring with Wireless Medical Sensor Networks †

    PubMed Central

    Hayajneh, Thaier; Mohd, Bassam J; Imran, Muhammad; Almashaqbeh, Ghada; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2016-01-01

    There is broad consensus that remote health monitoring will benefit all stakeholders in the healthcare system and that it has the potential to save billions of dollars. Among the major concerns that are preventing the patients from widely adopting this technology are data privacy and security. Wireless Medical Sensor Networks (MSNs) are the building blocks for remote health monitoring systems. This paper helps to identify the most challenging security issues in the existing authentication protocols for remote patient monitoring and presents a lightweight public-key-based authentication protocol for MSNs. In MSNs, the nodes are classified into sensors that report measurements about the human body and actuators that receive commands from the medical staff and perform actions. Authenticating these commands is a critical security issue, as any alteration may lead to serious consequences. The proposed protocol is based on the Rabin authentication algorithm, which is modified in this paper to improve its signature signing process, making it suitable for delay-sensitive MSN applications. To prove the efficiency of the Rabin algorithm, we implemented the algorithm with different hardware settings using Tmote Sky motes and also programmed the algorithm on an FPGA to evaluate its design and performance. Furthermore, the proposed protocol is implemented and tested using the MIRACL (Multiprecision Integer and Rational Arithmetic C/C++) library. The results show that secure, direct, instant and authenticated commands can be delivered from the medical staff to the MSN nodes. PMID:27023540

  17. A land use and land cover classification system for use with remote sensor data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, James R.; Hardy, Ernest E.; Roach, John T.; Witmer, Richard E.

    1976-01-01

    The framework of a national land use and land cover classification system is presented for use with remote sensor data. The classification system has been developed to meet the needs of Federal and State agencies for an up-to-date overview of land use and land cover throughout the country on a basis that is uniform in categorization at the more generalized first and second levels and that will be receptive to data from satellite and aircraft remote sensors. The proposed system uses the features of existing widely used classification systems that are amenable to data derived from remote sensing sources. It is intentionally left open-ended so that Federal, regional, State, and local agencies can have flexibility in developing more detailed land use classifications at the third and fourth levels in order to meet their particular needs and at the same time remain compatible with each other and the national system. Revision of the land use classification system as presented in U.S. Geological Survey Circular 671 was undertaken in order to incorporate the results of extensive testing and review of the categorization and definitions.

  18. VALIDATION AND VERIFICATION OF CMST-CP REMOTE SURVEILLANCE SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    In its original form, this project was intended to utilize the capabilities of the Analytical Laboratory at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) to carry out validation and verification of data obtained in the field for purposes of characterization, monitoring, and sensing in relation to closure and post-closure of various sites throughout the DOE complex. To do this, technologies were to be identified that had already been deployed and had produced field data. The role of the FIU-HCET Analytical Laboratory was considered first as part of a round robin team with other laboratories or, alternatively, to act as an objective third-party laboratory in evaluating validation data by others. Shortly after the onset of the project, FIU-HCET determined that specific deployed technologies were not readily identifiable. Thus, the direction of the project was changed to one in which the FKJ-HCET Analytical Laboratory would investigate DOE needs that require validation. These needs were examined primarily on the Internet, as listed by each specific site. In addition, needs having validation implications for regulatory agencies, such as the EPA, were also investigated. Furthermore, contact was made with laboratories with which the FIU-HCET Analytical Laboratory could act in a round robin or third-party capacity. Included in this report are potentially deployable technologies that would lend themselves to validation and verification of field data. FIU-HCET intends to monitor the deployment of these technologies with a view toward carrying out the validation activities originally proposed.

  19. A Remote Sensor for Detecting Methane Based on Palladium-Decorated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Li, Guomin

    2013-01-01

    The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID), and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 μm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs) are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI) and the comparative analog identifier (ΔAID). Results validate the sensor's ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ΔAID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm. PMID:23845931

  20. Application of remote sensors in mapping rice area and forecasting its production: a review.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Mostafa K; Hassan, Quazi K; Chowdhury, Ehsan H

    2015-01-05

    Rice is one of the staple foods for more than three billion people worldwide. Rice paddies accounted for approximately 11.5% of the World's arable land area during 2012. Rice provided ~19% of the global dietary energy in recent times and its annual average consumption per capita was ~65 kg during 2010-2011. Therefore, rice area mapping and forecasting its production is important for food security, where demands often exceed production due to an ever increasing population. Timely and accurate estimation of rice areas and forecasting its production can provide invaluable information for governments, planners, and decision makers in formulating policies in regard to import/export in the event of shortfall and/or surplus. The aim of this paper was to review the applicability of the remote sensing-based imagery for rice area mapping and forecasting its production. Recent advances on the resolutions (i.e., spectral, spatial, radiometric, and temporal) and availability of remote sensing imagery have allowed us timely collection of information on the growth and development stages of the rice crop. For elaborative understanding of the application of remote sensing sensors, following issues were described: the rice area mapping and forecasting its production using optical and microwave imagery, synergy between remote sensing-based methods and other developments, and their implications as an operational one. The overview of the studies to date indicated that remote sensing-based methods using optical and microwave imagery found to be encouraging. However, there were having some limitations, such as: (i) optical remote sensing imagery had relatively low spatial resolution led to inaccurate estimation of rice areas; and (ii) radar imagery would suffer from speckles, which potentially would degrade the quality of the images; and also the brightness of the backscatters were sensitive to the interacting surface. In addition, most of the methods used in forecasting rice yield were

  1. Monitoring of bacteria growth using a wireless, remote query resonant-circuit sensor: application to environmental sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, K. G.; Wang, J.; Singh, R. S.; Bachas, L. G.; Grimes, C. A.; Daunert, S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A new technique is presented for in-vivo remote query measurement of the complex permittivity spectra of a biological culture solution. A sensor comprised of a printed inductor-capacitor resonant-circuit is placed within the culture solution of interest, with the impedance spectrum of the sensor measured using a remotely located loop antenna; the complex permittivity spectra of the culture is calculated from the measured impedance spectrum. The remote query nature of the sensor platform enables, for example, the in-vivo real-time monitoring of bacteria or yeast growth from within sealed opaque containers. The wireless monitoring technique does not require a specific alignment between sensor and antenna. Results are presented for studies conducted on laboratory strains of Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli JM109, Pseudomonas putida and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  2. Research on application of photoelectric rotary encoder in space optical remote sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Qi, Shao-fan; Wang, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Zhan-dong

    2016-11-01

    For space optical remote sensor, especially wide swath detecting sensor, the focusing control system for the focal plane should be well designed to obtain the best image quality. The crucial part of this system is the measuring instrument. For previous implements, the potentiometer, which is essentially a voltage divider, is usually introduced to conduct the position in feedback closed-loop control process system. However, the performances of both electro-mechanical and digital potentiometers is limited in accuracy, temperature coefficients, and scale range. To have a better performance of focal plane moving detection, this article presents a new measuring implement with photoelectric rotary encoder, which consists of the photoelectric conversion system and the signal process system. In this novel focusing control system, the photoelectric conversion system is fixed on main axis, which can transform the angle information into a certain analog signal. Through the signal process system, after analog-to-digital converting and data format processing of the certain analog signal, the focusing control system can receive the digital precision angle position which can be used to deduct the current moving position of the focal plane. For utilization of space optical remote sensor in aerospace areas, the reliability design of photoelectric rotary encoder system should be considered with highest priority. As mentioned above, this photoelectric digital precision angle measurement device is well designed for this real-time control and dynamic measurement system, because its characters of high resolution, high accuracy, long endurance, and easy to maintain.

  3. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  4. In situ ozone data for evaluation of the laser absorption spectrometer ozone remote sensor: 1979 southeastern Virginia urban plume study summer field program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone data from the 1979 Southeastern Virginia Urban Study (SEV-UPS) field program are presented. The SEV-UPS was conducted for evaluation of an ozone remote sensor, the Laser Absorption Spectrometer. During the measurement program, remote-sensor evaluation was in two areas; (1) determination of the remote sensor's accuracy, repeatability, and operational characteristics, and (2) demonstration of the application of remotely sensed ozone data in air-quality studies. Data from six experiments designed to provide in situ ozone data for evaluation of the sensor in area 1, above, are presented. Experiments consisted of overflights of a test area with the remote sensor aircraft while in situ measurements with a second aircraft and selected surface stations provided correlative ozone data within the viewing area of the remote sensor.

  5. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1992-04-30

    This research project designed to investigate how atmospheric remote sensing technology can best be applied to the characterization of the cloudy atmosphere. Our research program addresses basic atmospheric remote sensing questions, but at the same time is clearly directed toward providing information crucial to the ARM (Atmospheric Remote Sensing) program and for application to the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART). The instrumentation that is being brought into play includes a variety of art-of-the-art sensors. Available at NOAA WPL are polarization Doppler K{sub a}-band (0.86 mm) and X-band (3.2 cm) radars, a C0{sub 2}(10.6 {mu}m) Doppler lidar with sequential ' polarization measurement capabilities, a three-channel (20.6, 31.65 and 90 GHz) microwave radiometer, and variety of visible and infrared radiometers. Instrumentation at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) includes a polarization ruby (0.643 {mu}m) lidar, a narrow-beam (0.14{degree}) mid-infrared (9.5--11.5 {mu}m) radiometer coaligned with the lidar, several other radiometers in the visible and infrared spectral regions, and an advanced two-color (1.06 and 0.532 {mu}m), four-channel Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) and all-sky video imaging system that have only recently been developed under the ARM IDP.

  6. Optical Communication System for Remote Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Ground Sensors Exhibiting Collective Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Comprehensive management of the battle-space has created new requirements in information management, communication, and interoperability as they effect surveillance and situational awareness. The objective of this proposal is to expand intelligent controls theory to produce a uniquely powerful implementation of distributed ground-based measurement incorporating both local collective behavior, and interoperative global optimization for sensor fusion and mission oversight. By using a layered hierarchal control architecture to orchestrate adaptive reconfiguration of autonomous robotic agents, we can improve overall robustness and functionality in dynamic tactical environments without information bottlenecks. In this concept, each sensor is equipped with a miniaturized optical reflectance modulator which is interactively monitored as a remote transponder using a covert laser communication protocol from a remote mothership or operative. Robot data-sharing at the ground level can be leveraged with global evaluation criteria, including terrain overlays and remote imaging data. Information sharing and distributed intelli- gence opens up a new class of remote-sensing applications in which small single-function autono- mous observers at the local level can collectively optimize and measure large scale ground-level signals. AS the need for coverage and the number of agents grows to improve spatial resolution, cooperative behavior orchestrated by a global situational awareness umbrella will be an essential ingredient to offset increasing bandwidth requirements within the net. A system of the type described in this proposal will be capable of sensitively detecting, tracking, and mapping spatial distributions of measurement signatures which are non-stationary or obscured by clutter and inter- fering obstacles by virtue of adaptive reconfiguration. This methodology could be used, for example, to field an adaptive ground-penetrating radar for detection of underground structures in

  7. Study Of Remote Sensor Spectral Responses And Data Processing Algorithms For Feature Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, F. O.; Davis, R. E.; Fales, C. L.; Ardiuni, R. F.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-10-01

    A computational model of the deterministic and stochastic processes involved in remote sensing is used to study and compare the performance of sensor spectral responses and data processing algorithms for classifying spectral features. The simulated spectral responses include those of the U.S. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the French Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre (SPOT). The simulated data processing algorithms include the computationally simple boundary approximation method (BAM) to discriminate between general target categories such as vegetation, bare land, water, snow, and clouds, and the maximum likelihood (MLH) and mean-square distance (MSD) classifications to discriminate between specific targets such as various crop types.

  8. Spline function approximation techniques for image geometric distortion representation. [for registration of multitemporal remote sensor imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuta, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    Least squares approximation techniques were developed for use in computer aided correction of spatial image distortions for registration of multitemporal remote sensor imagery. Polynomials were first used to define image distortion over the entire two dimensional image space. Spline functions were then investigated to determine if the combination of lower order polynomials could approximate a higher order distortion with less computational difficulty. Algorithms for generating approximating functions were developed and applied to the description of image distortion in aircraft multispectral scanner imagery. Other applications of the techniques were suggested for earth resources data processing areas other than geometric distortion representation.

  9. Analyses of the lunar surface with advanced remote sensors: Expectations for the 1990's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, Carle M.

    1991-01-01

    Today's advanced sensor capabilities provide unprecedented opportunities for exploration that mesh well with the science requirements for a sophisticated integration of several types of remotely acquired information. Science priorities for the 1990's include an evaluation of the global composition and structure of the primordial lunar crust in order to model its origin and evolution, using the Moon as a natural laboratory to study the impact process and time-cumulative events at 1 AU, and, ultimately, constraining the origin of the Moon and its relation to Earth.

  10. Remote sensing of debris-covered glaciers: Change detection and analysis using multiple sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y.; Huh, K.; Mark, B. G.; La Frenierre, J.; Gulley, J. D.; Park, K.

    2013-12-01

    Debris-cover can insulate glaciers and hinder surface melting, but also challenges accurate assessment of change detection and subsequent risk evaluation of outburst floods from moraine-dammed supra-glacial lakes that endanger downstream inhabitants. These events have been predicted to increase frequency along with the coverage of debris as warming accelerates. Enhanced monitoring capability from optical air and space-borne sensors has improved the detection of changes in surface-derived characteristics such as areal and volumetric fluctuations as well as glacier velocity over debris-covered glaciers, improving the accuracy of geometric and temporal resolutions in hydrological analysis. In this study we present case studies from Nepal, Peru and Ecuador focusing on: 1) time series of debris-coverage and moraine-dammed lakes; and 2) the relationship of remotely sensed observable quantities from different sensors such as aerial photographs, ASTER, Landsat imagery and Airborne/Terrestrial Laser Scanner.

  11. Monitoring of atmospheric aerosol emissions using a remotely piloted air vehicle (RPV)-Borne Sensor Suite

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a small sensor system, the micro-atmospheric measurement system ({mu}-AMS), to monitor and track aerosol emissions. The system was developed to fly aboard a remotely piloted air vehicle, or other mobile platform, to provide real-time particle measurements in effluent plumes and to collect particles for chemical analysis. The {mu}-AMS instrument measures atmospheric parameters including particle mass concentration and size distribution, temperature, humidity, and airspeed, altitude and position (by GPS receiver) each second. The sensor data are stored onboard and are also down linked to a ground station in real time. The {mu}-AMS is battery powered, small (8 in. dia x 36 in.), and lightweight (15 pounds). Aerosol concentrations and size distributions from above ground explosive tests, airbone urban pollution, and traffic-produced particulates are presented.

  12. Global Coverage Measurement Planning Strategies for Mobile Robots Equipped with a Remote Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Muhammad Asif; Trincavelli, Marco; Cirillo, Marcello; Schaffernicht, Erik; Lilienthal, Achim J.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of gas detection is relevant to many real-world applications, such as leak detection in industrial settings and landfill monitoring. In this paper, we address the problem of gas detection in large areas with a mobile robotic platform equipped with a remote gas sensor. We propose an algorithm that leverages a novel method based on convex relaxation for quickly solving sensor placement problems, and for generating an efficient exploration plan for the robot. To demonstrate the applicability of our method to real-world environments, we performed a large number of experimental trials, both on randomly generated maps and on the map of a real environment. Our approach proves to be highly efficient in terms of computational requirements and to provide nearly-optimal solutions. PMID:25803707

  13. Global coverage measurement planning strategies for mobile robots equipped with a remote gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Arain, Muhammad Asif; Trincavelli, Marco; Cirillo, Marcello; Schaffernicht, Erik; Lilienthal, Achim J

    2015-03-20

    The problem of gas detection is relevant to many real-world applications, such as leak detection in industrial settings and landfill monitoring. In this paper, we address the problem of gas detection in large areas with a mobile robotic platform equipped with a remote gas sensor. We propose an algorithm that leverages a novel method based on convex relaxation for quickly solving sensor placement problems, and for generating an efficient exploration plan for the robot. To demonstrate the applicability of our method to real-world environments, we performed a large number of experimental trials, both on randomly generated maps and on the map of a real environment. Our approach proves to be highly efficient in terms of computational requirements and to provide nearly-optimal solutions.

  14. Monitoring activities of daily living based on wearable wireless body sensor network.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, E; Augustyniak, P; Markiewicz, M; Prusak, D

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances in microprocessor chip technology, wireless communication, and biomedical engineering it is possible to develop miniaturized ubiquitous health monitoring devices that are capable of recording physiological and movement signals during daily life activities. The aim of the research is to implement and test the prototype of health monitoring system. The system consists of the body central unit with Bluetooth module and wearable sensors: the custom-designed ECG sensor, the temperature sensor, the skin humidity sensor and accelerometers placed on the human body or integrated with clothes and a network gateway to forward data to a remote medical server. The system includes custom-designed transmission protocol and remote web-based graphical user interface for remote real time data analysis. Experimental results for a group of humans who performed various activities (eg. working, running, etc.) showed maximum 5% absolute error compared to certified medical devices. The results are promising and indicate that developed wireless wearable monitoring system faces challenges of multi-sensor human health monitoring during performing daily activities and opens new opportunities in developing novel healthcare services.

  15. Remote sensing application to regional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahrokhi, F.; Jones, N. L.; Sharber, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    Two agencies within the State of Tennessee were identified whereby the transfer of aerospace technology, namely remote sensing, could be applied to their stated problem areas. Their stated problem areas are wetland and land classification and strip mining studies. In both studies, LANDSAT data was analyzed with the UTSI video-input analog/digital automatic analysis and classification facility. In the West Tennessee area three land-use classifications could be distinguished; cropland, wetland, and forest. In the East Tennessee study area, measurements were submitted to statistical tests which verified the significant differences due to natural terrain, stripped areas, various stages of reclamation, water, etc. Classifications for both studies were output in the form of maps of symbols and varying shades of gray.

  16. Remote query measurement of pressure, fluid-flow velocity, and humidity using magnetoelastic thick-film sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Kouzoudis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Free-standing magnetoelastic thick-film sensors have a characteristic resonant frequency that can be determined by monitoring the magnetic flux emitted from the sensor in response to a time varying magnetic field. This property allows the sensors to be monitored remotely without the use of direct physical connections, such as wires, enabling measurement of environmental parameters from within sealed, opaque containers. In this work, we report on application of magnetoelastic sensors to measurement of atmospheric pressure, fluid-flow velocity, temperature, and mass load. Mass loading effects are demonstrated by fabrication of a remote query humidity sensor, made by coating the magnetoelastic thick film with a thin layer of solgel deposited Al2O3 that reversibly changes mass in response to humidity. c2000 Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. A Large-Scale Remote Wireless Data Acquisition Network for Environmental Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. F.; Natvig, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past nine years we have constructed a large-scale wireless telemetry network that connects remote environmental research experiments and wildlife monitoring webcams to the Internet. This network, which connects back to the University of New Mexico Sevilleta Field Station, is distributed across several thousand square kilometers in central New Mexico, providing real-time automated data acquisition from nearly fifty dataloggers and thousands of sensors located at meteorological stations, global change experiments, and eddy covariance flux towers. This is one of the largest remote environmental wireless data acquisition networks in the world. While the majority of sites connected to this network are within the boundaries of the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, the network includes several sites outside the Refuge, with the most distant link being nearly one hundred kilometers from the Sevilleta Field Station. An ancillary network in the Valles Caldera National Preserve in northern New Mexico exists to provide remote connectivity to additional environmental research experiments. Hundreds of person hours and thousands of vehicle miles are saved each year by eliminating regular visits to download data at these remote sites. Additionally, this network allows for prompt detection of equipment and power failures, reducing data loss. The use of Wi-Fi devices has permitted tremendous flexibility in the overall network design while keeping costs low. Moreover, such devices have allowed wireless links averaging more than ten kilometers and in several instances, exceeding thirty kilometers. Here, we describe the basic elements of this remote wireless data acquisition network, including network design, equipment choices, power options, and datalogger interfaces.

  18. Remote detection of nitroaromatic explosives in soil using distributed sensor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, Robert J.; Hance, Bradley G.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Johnson, Mark S.; Hargis, Philip J., Jr.

    2001-10-01

    Environmental fate and transport studies of explosives in soil indicate that 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and similar products such as dinitrotoluene (DNT) are major contributors to the trace chemical signature emanating from buried landmines. Chemical analysis methods are under development that have great potential to detect mines, or to rapidly classify electromagnetically detected anomalies as mines vs. 'mine-like objects'. However, these chemical methods are currently confined to point sensors. In contrast, we have developed a method that can remotely determine the presence of nitroaromatic explosives in surface soil. This method utilizes a novel distributed granular sensor approach in combination with uv-visible fluorescence LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology. We have produced prototype sensor particles that combine sample preconcentration, explosives sensing, signal amplification, and optical signal output functions. These particles can be sprayed onto soil areas that are suspected of explosives contamination. By design, the fluorescence emission spectrum of the distributed particles is strongly affected by absorption of nitroaromatic explosives from the surrounding environment. Using ~1mg/cm2 coverage of the sensor particles on natural soil, we have observed significant spectral changes due to TNT concentrations in the ppm range (mg TNT/kg soil) on 2-inch diameter targets at a standoff distance of 0.5 km.

  19. A high-performance miniaturized time division multiplexed sensor system for remote structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Glynn D.; Everall, Lorna A.; Sugden, Kate; Bennion, Ian

    2004-09-01

    We report for the first time the design, implementation and commercial application of a hand-held optical time division multiplexed, distributed fibre Bragg grating sensor system. A unique combination of state-of-the art electronic and optical components enables system miniaturization whilst maintaining exceptional performance. Supporting more than 100 low-cost sensors per channel, the battery-powered system operates remotely via a wireless GSM link, making it ideal for real-time structural health monitoring in harsh environments. Driven by highly configurable timing electronics, an off-the-shelf telecommunications semiconductor optical amplifier performs combined amplification and gating. This novel optical configuration boasts a spatial resolution of less than 20cm and an optical signal to noise ratio of better than 30dB, yet utilizes sensors with reflectivity of only a few percent and does not require RF speed signal processing devices. This paper highlights the performance and cost advantages of a system that utilizes TDM-style mass manufactured commodity FBGs. Created in continual lengths, these sensors reduce stock inventory, eradicate application-specific array design and simplify system installation and expansion. System analysis from commercial installations in oil exploration, wind energy and vibration measurement will be presented, with results showing kilohertz interrogation speed and microstrain resolution.

  20. Evaluation of SMART sensor displays for multidimensional precision control of Space Shuttle remote manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Brown, J. W.; Lewis, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    An enhanced proximity sensor and display system was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and tested on the full scale Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The sensor system, integrated with a four-claw end effector, measures range error up to 6 inches, and pitch and yaw alignment errors within + or 15 deg., and displays error data on both graphic and numeric displays. The errors are referenced to the end effector control axes through appropriate data processing by a dedicated microcomputer acting on the sensor data in real time. Both display boxes contain a green lamp which indicates whether the combination of range, pitch and yaw errors will assure a successful grapple. More than 200 test runs were completed in early 1980 by three operators at JSC for grasping static and capturing slowly moving targets. The tests have indicated that the use of graphic/numeric displays of proximity sensor information improves precision control of grasp/capture range by more than a factor of two for both static and dynamic grapple conditions.

  1. A multi-sensor remote sensing approach for measuring primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, Catherine

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed to develop a multi-sensor remote sensing method for computing marine primary productivity from space, based on the capability to measure the primary ocean variables which regulate photosynthesis. The three variables and the sensors which measure them are: (1) downwelling photosynthetically available irradiance, measured by the VISSR sensor on the GOES satellite, (2) sea-surface temperature from AVHRR on NOAA series satellites, and (3) chlorophyll-like pigment concentration from the Nimbus-7/CZCS sensor. These and other measured variables would be combined within empirical or analytical models to compute primary productivity. With this proposed capability of mapping primary productivity on a regional scale, we could begin realizing a more precise and accurate global assessment of its magnitude and variability. Applications would include supplementation and expansion on the horizontal scale of ship-acquired biological data, which is more accurate and which supplies the vertical components of the field, monitoring oceanic response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, correlation with observed sedimentation patterns and processes, and fisheries management.

  2. Characteristics of active spectral sensor for plant sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination conditions critically affect sensor response. Active spectral sensors minimize the illumination effects by producing their ...

  3. Active-edge planar radiation sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, C.J.; Segal, J.D.; Westbrook, E.; Parker, Sherwood; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Watts, S.; Morse, J.

    2007-01-01

    Many systems in medicine, biology, high-energy physics, and astrophysics require large area radiation sensors. In most of these applications, minimizing the amount of dead area or dead material is crucial. We have developed a new type of silicon radiation sensor in which the device is active to within a few microns of the mechanical edge. Their perimeter is made by a plasma etcher rather than a diamond saw. Their edges can be defined and also passivated by growing, in an intermediate step, a field oxide on the side surfaces. In this paper, the basic architecture and results from a synchrotron beam test are presented. PMID:18185839

  4. Retrieving Leaf Area Index (LAI) Using Remote Sensing: Theories, Methods and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guang; Moskal, L. Monika

    2009-01-01

    The ability to accurately and rapidly acquire leaf area index (LAI) is an indispensable component of process-based ecological research facilitating the understanding of gas-vegetation exchange phenomenon at an array of spatial scales from the leaf to the landscape. However, LAI is difficult to directly acquire for large spatial extents due to its time consuming and work intensive nature. Such efforts have been significantly improved by the emergence of optical and active remote sensing techniques. This paper reviews the definitions and theories of LAI measurement with respect to direct and indirect methods. Then, the methodologies for LAI retrieval with regard to the characteristics of a range of remotely sensed datasets are discussed. Remote sensing indirect methods are subdivided into two categories of passive and active remote sensing, which are further categorized as terrestrial, aerial and satellite-born platforms. Due to a wide variety in spatial resolution of remotely sensed data and the requirements of ecological modeling, the scaling issue of LAI is discussed and special consideration is given to extrapolation of measurement to landscape and regional levels. PMID:22574042

  5. Retrieving Leaf Area Index (LAI) Using Remote Sensing: Theories, Methods and Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guang; Moskal, L Monika

    2009-01-01

    The ability to accurately and rapidly acquire leaf area index (LAI) is an indispensable component of process-based ecological research facilitating the understanding of gas-vegetation exchange phenomenon at an array of spatial scales from the leaf to the landscape. However, LAI is difficult to directly acquire for large spatial extents due to its time consuming and work intensive nature. Such efforts have been significantly improved by the emergence of optical and active remote sensing techniques. This paper reviews the definitions and theories of LAI measurement with respect to direct and indirect methods. Then, the methodologies for LAI retrieval with regard to the characteristics of a range of remotely sensed datasets are discussed. Remote sensing indirect methods are subdivided into two categories of passive and active remote sensing, which are further categorized as terrestrial, aerial and satellite-born platforms. Due to a wide variety in spatial resolution of remotely sensed data and the requirements of ecological modeling, the scaling issue of LAI is discussed and special consideration is given to extrapolation of measurement to landscape and regional levels.

  6. Validation of mercury tip-switch and accelerometer activity sensors for identifying resting and active behavior in bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasmine Ware,; Rode, Karyn D.; Pagano, Anthony M.; Bromaghin, Jeffrey; Charles T Robbins,; Joy Erlenbach,; Shannon Jensen,; Amy Cutting,; Nicole Nicassio-Hiskey,; Amy Hash,; Owen, Megan A.; Heiko Jansen,

    2015-01-01

    Activity sensors are often included in wildlife transmitters and can provide information on the behavior and activity patterns of animals remotely. However, interpreting activity-sensor data relative to animal behavior can be difficult if animals cannot be continuously observed. In this study, we examined the performance of a mercury tip-switch and a tri-axial accelerometer housed in collars to determine whether sensor data can be accurately classified as resting and active behaviors and whether data are comparable for the 2 sensor types. Five captive bears (3 polar [Ursus maritimus] and 2 brown [U. arctos horribilis]) were fitted with a collar specially designed to internally house the sensors. The bears’ behaviors were recorded, classified, and then compared with sensor readings. A separate tri-axial accelerometer that sampled continuously at a higher frequency and provided raw acceleration values from 3 axes was also mounted on the collar to compare with the lower resolution sensors. Both accelerometers more accurately identified resting and active behaviors at time intervals ranging from 1 minute to 1 hour (≥91.1% accuracy) compared with the mercury tip-switch (range = 75.5–86.3%). However, mercury tip-switch accuracy improved when sampled at longer intervals (e.g., 30–60 min). Data from the lower resolution accelerometer, but not the mercury tip-switch, accurately predicted the percentage of time spent resting during an hour. Although the number of bears available for this study was small, our results suggest that these activity sensors can remotely identify resting versus active behaviors across most time intervals. We recommend that investigators consider both study objectives and the variation in accuracy of classifying resting and active behaviors reported here when determining sampling interval.

  7. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  8. A Real-Time Health Monitoring System for Remote Cardiac Patients Using Smartphone and Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kakria, Priyanka; Tripathi, N. K.; Kitipawang, Peerapong

    2015-01-01

    Online telemedicine systems are useful due to the possibility of timely and efficient healthcare services. These systems are based on advanced wireless and wearable sensor technologies. The rapid growth in technology has remarkably enhanced the scope of remote health monitoring systems. In this paper, a real-time heart monitoring system is developed considering the cost, ease of application, accuracy, and data security. The system is conceptualized to provide an interface between the doctor and the patients for two-way communication. The main purpose of this study is to facilitate the remote cardiac patients in getting latest healthcare services which might not be possible otherwise due to low doctor-to-patient ratio. The developed monitoring system is then evaluated for 40 individuals (aged between 18 and 66 years) using wearable sensors while holding an Android device (i.e., smartphone under supervision of the experts). The performance analysis shows that the proposed system is reliable and helpful due to high speed. The analyses showed that the proposed system is convenient and reliable and ensures data security at low cost. In addition, the developed system is equipped to generate warning messages to the doctor and patient under critical circumstances. PMID:26788055

  9. The detection and mapping of oil on a marshy area by a remote luminescent sensor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarlane, C.; Watson, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing can be a cost-effective method for monitoring pollutants in large areas such as occur in oil spills. An opportunity to test a particular method arose when a well ruptured and for 23 days spewed a 90-meter fountain of oil into the air, dispersing the oil over a wide area. The method tested was an airborne luminescence detector with a Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (FLD) which was flown over the affected area 41 days after the well was capped to obtain a map or the deposition pattern. To calibrate the system, samples of Spartina (wire grass) and Phragmites (common reed) were collected from the contaminated area and the oil residues were eluted in cyclohexane and quantitatively analyzed in a fluorescence photometer. Good correlation was observed between the remote sensor (FLD) and the laboratory analysis. Isopleths defining the deposition pattern of oil were drawn from the remote sensing information. A discussion will be presented on the feasibility of using this instrument for similar contamination incidents for cleanup and damage assessment.

  10. A MGy radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link for nuclear reactor monitoring and remote handling

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeeck, Jens; Cao, Ying; Van Uffelen, Marco; Mont Casellas, Laura; Damiani, Carlo; Morales, Emilio Ruiz; Santana, Roberto Ranz; De Cock, Wouter; Vermeeren, Ludo; Steyaert, Michiel; Leroux, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Decommissioning, dismantling and remote handling applications in nuclear facilities all require robotic solutions that are able to survive in radiation environments. Recently raised safety, radiation hardness and cost efficiency demands from both the nuclear regulatory and the society impose severe challenges in traditional methods. For example, in case of the dismantling of the Fukushima sites, solutions that survive accumulated doses higher than 1 MGy are mandatory. To allow remote operation of these tools in nuclear environments, electronics were used to be shielded with several centimeters of lead or even completely banned in these solutions. However, shielding electronics always leads to bulky and heavy solutions, which reduces the flexibility of robotic tools. It also requires longer repair time and produces extra waste further in a dismantling or decommissioning cycle. In addition, often in current reactor designs, due to size restrictions and the need to inspect very tight areas there are limitations to the use of shielding. A MGy radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link developed by MAGyICS provides a solution to build a flexible, easy removable and small I and C module with MGy radiation tolerance without any shielding. Hereby it removes all these pains to implement electronics in robotic tools. The demonstrated solution in this poster is developed for ITER Remote Handling equipments operating in high radiation environments (>1 MGy) in and around the Tokamak. In order to obtain adequately accurate instrumentation and control information, as well as to ease the umbilical management, there is a need of front-end electronics that will have to be located close to those actuators and sensors on the remote handling tool. In particular, for diverter remote handling, it is estimated that these components will face gamma radiation up to 300 Gy/h (in-vessel) and a total dose of 1 MGy. The radiation-hardened sensor instrumentation link presented here, consists

  11. Monitoring soil moisture patterns in alpine meadows using ground sensor networks and remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Giacomo; Brenner, Johannes; Notarnicola, Claudia; Greifeneder, Felix; Nicolini, Irene; Della Chiesa, Stefano; Niedrist, Georg; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture content (SMC) is a key factor for numerous processes, including runoff generation, groundwater recharge, evapotranspiration, soil respiration, and biological productivity. Understanding the controls on the spatial and temporal variability of SMC in mountain catchments is an essential step towards improving quantitative predictions of catchment hydrological processes and related ecosystem services. The interacting influences of precipitation, soil properties, vegetation, and topography on SMC and the influence of SMC patterns on runoff generation processes have been extensively investigated (Vereecken et al., 2014). However, in mountain areas, obtaining reliable SMC estimations is still challenging, because of the high variability in topography, soil and vegetation properties. In the last few years, there has been an increasing interest in the estimation of surface SMC at local scales. On the one hand, low cost wireless sensor networks provide high-resolution SMC time series. On the other hand, active remote sensing microwave techniques, such as Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs), show promising results (Bertoldi et al. 2014). As these data provide continuous coverage of large spatial extents with high spatial resolution (10-20 m), they are particularly in demand for mountain areas. However, there are still limitations related to the fact that the SAR signal can penetrate only a few centimeters in the soil. Moreover, the signal is strongly influenced by vegetation, surface roughness and topography. In this contribution, we analyse the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface and root-zone SMC (2.5 - 5 - 25 cm depth) of alpine meadows and pastures in the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Area Mazia Valley (South Tyrol - Italy) with different techniques: (I) a network of 18 stations; (II) field campaigns with mobile ground sensors; (III) 20-m resolution RADARSAT2 SAR images; (IV) numerical simulations using the GEOtop hydrological model (Rigon et al

  12. Application of Remote Sensors in Mapping Rice Area and Forecasting Its Production: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh, Mostafa K.; Hassan, Quazi K.; Chowdhury, Ehsan H.

    2015-01-01

    Rice is one of the staple foods for more than three billion people worldwide. Rice paddies accounted for approximately 11.5% of the World's arable land area during 2012. Rice provided ∼19% of the global dietary energy in recent times and its annual average consumption per capita was ∼65 kg during 2010–2011. Therefore, rice area mapping and forecasting its production is important for food security, where demands often exceed production due to an ever increasing population. Timely and accurate estimation of rice areas and forecasting its production can provide invaluable information for governments, planners, and decision makers in formulating policies in regard to import/export in the event of shortfall and/or surplus. The aim of this paper was to review the applicability of the remote sensing-based imagery for rice area mapping and forecasting its production. Recent advances on the resolutions (i.e., spectral, spatial, radiometric, and temporal) and availability of remote sensing imagery have allowed us timely collection of information on the growth and development stages of the rice crop. For elaborative understanding of the application of remote sensing sensors, following issues were described: the rice area mapping and forecasting its production using optical and microwave imagery, synergy between remote sensing-based methods and other developments, and their implications as an operational one. The overview of the studies to date indicated that remote sensing-based methods using optical and microwave imagery found to be encouraging. However, there were having some limitations, such as: (i) optical remote sensing imagery had relatively low spatial resolution led to inaccurate estimation of rice areas; and (ii) radar imagery would suffer from speckles, which potentially would degrade the quality of the images; and also the brightness of the backscatters were sensitive to the interacting surface. In addition, most of the methods used in forecasting rice yield

  13. The Exploitation of Data from Remote and Human Sensors for Environment Monitoring in the SMAT Project

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Rosa; Roglia, Elena; Bottino, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we outline the functionalities of a system that integrates and controls a fleet of Unmanned Aircraft Vehicles (UAVs). UAVs have a set of payload sensors employed for territorial surveillance, whose outputs are stored in the system and analysed by the data exploitation functions at different levels. In particular, we detail the second level data exploitation function whose aim is to improve the sensors data interpretation in the post-mission activities. It is concerned with the mosaicking of the aerial images and the cartography enrichment by human sensors—the social media users. We also describe the software architecture for the development of a mash-up (the integration of information and functionalities coming from the Web) and the possibility of using human sensors in the monitoring of the territory, a field in which, traditionally, the involved sensors were only the hardware ones. PMID:23247415

  14. Active microwave remote sensing of oceans, chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A rationale is developed for the use of active microwave sensing in future aerospace applications programs for the remote sensing of the world's oceans, lakes, and polar regions. Summaries pertaining to applications, local phenomena, and large-scale phenomena are given along with a discussion of orbital errors.

  15. Tagless remote refractometric sensor based on WGMs in quantum dot-embedded microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2008-02-01

    Optical resonances in microspheres have recently been applied to biosensing applications. The resonances, known as Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) result from the total internal reflection of the light propagating inside the high index spherical surface within a lower index medium. The evanescent field of the WGM, which extends beyond the microsphere surface, is sensitive to the changes in the local refractive index in the surrounding medium. The high Q factor associated with WGMs enables a highly sensitive sensor element. Here we present a refractometric sensor with high sensitivity based on quantum dot (QD) embedded polystyrene microspheres. Ultrashort laser pulses are used to induce two photon excited luminescence from the QDs inside the microspheres. By optimizing the detection area of the microsphere, an enhanced resonance signal to background ratio can be achieved. Theoretical calculations of the resonance peak shifts are compared with the experimental data. Refractometric sensing based on WGMs is a technique that does not require analyte labeling. In this work, QDs are used as a local, broadband light source within the microspheres to enable remote excitation of the resonant modes. The sensor has great potential in many biosensing applications.

  16. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Attal, Ferhat; Mohammed, Samer; Dedabrishvili, Mariam; Chamroukhi, Faicel; Oukhellou, Latifa; Amirat, Yacine

    2015-12-11

    This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle). Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors' placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), and Random Forest (RF) as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM), are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject.

  17. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  18. Magnetoelastic sensors in combination with nanometer-scale honeycombed thin film ceramic TiO2 for remote query measurement of humidity.

    PubMed

    Grimes, C A; Kouzoudis, D; Dickey, E C; Qian, D; Anderson, M A; Shahidain, R; Lindsey, M; Green, L

    2000-05-01

    Ribbonlike magnetoelastic sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of an acoustic bell; in response to an externally applied magnetic field impulse the sensors emit magnetic flux with a characteristic resonant frequency. The magnetic flux can be detected external to the test area using a pick-up coil, enabling query remote monitoring of the sensor. The characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic sensor changes in response to mass loads. [L.D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1986). p. 100].Therefore, remote query chemical sensors can be fabricated by combining the magnetoelastic sensors with a mass changing, chemically responsive layer. In this work magnetoelastic sensors are coated with humidity-sensitive thin films of ceramic, nanodimensionally porous TiO2 to make remote query humidity sensors.

  19. Magnetoelastic sensors in combination with nanometer-scale honeycombed thin film ceramic TiO2 for remote query measurement of humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, C. A.; Kouzoudis, D.; Dickey, E. C.; Qian, D.; Anderson, M. A.; Shahidain, R.; Lindsey, M.; Green, L.

    2000-01-01

    Ribbonlike magnetoelastic sensors can be considered the magnetic analog of an acoustic bell; in response to an externally applied magnetic field impulse the sensors emit magnetic flux with a characteristic resonant frequency. The magnetic flux can be detected external to the test area using a pick-up coil, enabling query remote monitoring of the sensor. The characteristic resonant frequency of a magnetoelastic sensor changes in response to mass loads. [L.D. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Theory of Elasticity, 3rd ed. (Pergamon, New York, 1986). p. 100].Therefore, remote query chemical sensors can be fabricated by combining the magnetoelastic sensors with a mass changing, chemically responsive layer. In this work magnetoelastic sensors are coated with humidity-sensitive thin films of ceramic, nanodimensionally porous TiO2 to make remote query humidity sensors. c2000 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described, and the results for both linear and nonlinear performance analysis of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  1. Active vibration damping of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of providing active damping augmentation of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) following normal payload-handling operations is investigated. The approach used in the analysis is described and the results from both linear and nonlinear performance analyses of candidate laws are presented, demonstrating that significant improvement in the RMS dynamic response can be achieved through active control using measured RMS tip acceleration data for feedback.

  2. Development of a Three Dimensional Wireless Sensor Network for Terrain-Climate Research in Remote Mountainous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, K.; Davis, A.; Gessler, P.; Hess, H.; Holden, Z.; Link, T. E.; Newingham, B. A.; Smith, A. M.; Robinson, P.

    2011-12-01

    Developing sensor networks that are robust enough to perform in the world's remote regions is critical since these regions serve as important benchmarks compared to human-dominated areas. Paradoxically, the factors that make these remote, natural sites challenging for sensor networking are often what make them indispensable for climate change research. We aim to overcome these challenges by developing a three-dimensional sensor network arrayed across a topoclimatic gradient (1100-1800 meters) in a wilderness area in central Idaho. Development of this sensor array builds upon advances in sensing, networking, and power supply technologies coupled with experiences of the multidisciplinary investigators in conducting research in remote mountainous locations. The proposed gradient monitoring network will provide near real-time data from a three-dimensional (3-D) array of sensors measuring biophysical parameters used in ecosystem process models. The network will monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, humidity, air and soil temperature, soil water content, precipitation, incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation, snow depth, wind speed and direction, tree stem growth and leaf wetness at time intervals ranging from seconds to days. The long-term goal of this project is to realize a transformative integration of smart sensor networks adaptively communicating data in real-time to ultimately achieve a 3-D visualization of ecosystem processes within remote mountainous regions. Process models will be the interface between the visualization platforms and the sensor network. This will allow us to better predict how non-human dominated terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems function and respond to climate dynamics. Access to the data will be ensured as part of the Northwest Knowledge Network being developed at the University of Idaho, through ongoing Idaho NSF-funded cyber infrastructure initiatives, and existing data management systems funded by NSF, such as

  3. Discrimination techniques employing both reflective and thermal multispectral signals. [for remote sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Crane, R. B.; Richardson, W.

    1973-01-01

    Recent improvements in remote sensor technology carry implications for data processing. Multispectral line scanners now exist that can collect data simultaneously and in registration in multiple channels at both reflective and thermal (emissive) wavelengths. Progress in dealing with two resultant recognition processing problems is discussed: (1) More channels mean higher processing costs; to combat these costs, a new and faster procedure for selecting subsets of channels has been developed. (2) Differences between thermal and reflective characteristics influence recognition processing; to illustrate the magnitude of these differences, some explanatory calculations are presented. Also introduced, is a different way to process multispectral scanner data, namely, radiation balance mapping and related procedures. Techniques and potentials are discussed and examples presented.

  4. First measurements of the Twomey indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, Graham; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Veron, Dana E.; Previdi, Michael

    2003-03-01

    We demonstrate first measurements of the aerosol indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors at a continental US site. The response of nonprecipitating, ice-free clouds to changes in aerosol loading is quantified in terms of a relative change in cloud-drop effective radius for a relative change in aerosol extinction under conditions of equivalent cloud liquid water path. This is done in a single column of air at a temporal resolution of 20 s (spatial resolution of ~100 m). Cloud-drop effective radius is derived from a cloud radar and microwave radiometer. Aerosol extinction is measured below cloud base by a Raman lidar. Results suggest that aerosols associated with maritime or northerly air trajectories tend to have a stronger effect on clouds than aerosols associated with northwesterly trajectories that also have local influence. There is good correlation (0.67) between the cloud response and a measure of cloud turbulence.

  5. Earth Resources: A continuing bibliography with indexes, issue 2. [remote sensors and data acquisition techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Reports, articles, and other documents announced between April and June 1974 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR), and International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA) are cited. Documents related to the identification and evaluation by means of sensors in spacecraft and aircraft of vegetation, minerals, and other natural resources, and the techniques and potentialities of surveying and keeping up-to-date inventories of such riches are included along with studies of such natural phenomena as earthquakes, volcanoes, ocean currents, and magnetic fields; and such cultural phenomena as cities, transportation networks, and irrigation systems. The components and use of remote sensing and geophysical instrumentation, their subsystems, observational procedures, signature and analyses and interpretive techniques for gathering data are, described. All reports generated under NASA's Earth Resources Survey Program for the time period covered are included.

  6. Implementation of multichannel sensors for remote biomedical measurements in a microsystems format.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Erik A; Wang, Lei; Cui, Li; Tang, Tong Boon; Ahmadian, Mansour; Astaras, Alexander; Reid, Stuart W J; Yam, Philippa S; Murray, Alan F; Flynn, Brian W; Beaumont, Steve P; Cumming, David R S; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2004-03-01

    A novel microelectronic "pill" has been developed for in situ studies of the gastro-intestinal tract, combining microsensors and integrated circuits with system-level integration technology. The measurement parameters include real-time remote recording of temperature, pH, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen. The unit comprises an outer biocompatible capsule encasing four microsensors, a control chip, a discrete component radio transmitter, and two silver oxide cells (the latter providing an operating time of 40 h at the rated power consumption of 12.1 mW). The sensors were fabricated on two separate silicon chips located at the front end of the capsule. The robust nature of the pill makes it adaptable for use in a variety of environments related to biomedical and industrial applications.

  7. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Wiemann, Dora K.; Choi, Junoh; Howell, Stephen W.

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  8. Remote detection of human electroencephalograms using ultrahigh input impedance electric potential sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland, C. J.; Clark, T. D.; Prance, R. J.

    2002-10-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate the use of very high performance, ultrahigh impedance, electric potential probes in the detection of electrical activity in the brain. We show that these sensors, requiring no electrical or physical contact with the body, can be used to monitor the human electroencephalogram (EEG) revealing, as examples, the α and β rhythms and the α blocking phenomenon. We suggest that the advantages offered by these sensors compared with the currently used contact (Ag/AgCl) electrodes may act to stimulate new developments in multichannel EEG monitoring and in real-time electrical imaging of the brain.

  9. Improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source for system-level testing of remote optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance. Keywords: Calibration, radiometry, remote sensing, source.

  10. A real-time heart rate analysis for a remote millimeter wave I-Q sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, S.; Liao, S.; Elmer, T.; Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.

    2011-06-01

    This paper analyzes heart rate (HR) information from physiological tracings collected with a remote millimeter wave (mmW) I-Q sensor for biometric monitoring applications. A parameter optimization method based on the nonlinear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used. The mmW sensor works at 94 GHz and can detect the vital signs of a human subject from a few to tens of meters away. The reflected mmW signal is typically affected by respiration, body movement, background noise, and electronic system noise. Processing of the mmW radar signal is, thus, necessary to obtain the true HR. The down-converted received signal in this case consists of both the real part (I-branch) and the imaginary part (Q-branch), which can be considered as the cosine and sine of the received phase of the HR signal. Instead of fitting the converted phase angle signal, the method directly fits the real and imaginary parts of the HR signal, which circumvents the need for phase unwrapping. This is particularly useful when the SNR is low. Also, the method identifies both beat-to-beat HR and individual heartbeat magnitude, which is valuable for some medical diagnosis applications. The mean HR here is compared to that obtained using the discrete Fourier transform.

  11. Monitoring drought using multi-sensor remote sensing data in cropland of Gansu Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Linglin; Shan, Jie; Xiang, Daxiang

    2014-03-01

    Various drought monitoring models have been developed from different perspectives, as drought is impacted by various factors (precipitation, evaporation, runoff) and usually reflected in various aspects (vegetation condition, temperature). Cloud not only plays an important role in the earth's energy balance and climate change, but also directly impacts the regional precipitation and evaporation. As a result, the change of cloud cover and cloud type can be used to monitor drought. This paper proposes a new drought composite index, the Drought Composite Index (DCI), for drought monitoring based on multi-sensor remote sensing data in cropland of Gansu Province. This index combines the cloud classification data (CLS) from FY satellite and Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) which was calculated using the maximum and minimum NDVI values for the same time period from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Pearson correlation was performed to correlate NDVI, VCI, CLS and DCI values to precipitation data and soil moisture (SM) data collected from 20 meteorological stations during the growing season of 2011 and 2012. Better agreement was observed between DCI and precipitation as compared with that between NDVI/VCI and precipitation, especially the one-month precipitation, and there is an obvious time lag in the response of vegetation to precipitation. In addition, the results indicated that DCI well reflected precipitation fluctuations in the study area promising a possibility for early drought awareness necessary and near real-time drought monitoring.

  12. A more acceptable endoluminal implantation for remotely monitoring ingestible sensors anchored to the stomach wall.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Izumi, Shintaro; Yoshimoto, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Several types of implant devices have been proposed and introduced into healthcare and telemedicine systems for monitoring physiological parameters, sometimes for very long periods of time. To our disappointment, most of the devices are implanted invasively and by surgery. We often have to surgically remove such devices after they have finished their mission or before the battery becomes worn out. Wearable devices have the possibility to become new modalities for monitoring vital parameters less-invasively. However, for round-the-clock monitoring of data from sensors over long periods of time, it would be better to put them inside the body to avoid causing inconvenience to patients in their daily lives. This study tested a less invasive endoluminal approach and innovative tools (developed during our research into therapeutic capsule endoscopy) for remotely anchoring ingestible sensors to the stomach wall. Preliminary investigations are also described about wireless communication (NFC, ZigBee, and Bluetooth) for low power consumption and inductive extracorporeal power feeding wirelessly to the circuits in a phantom lined with swine gastric mucosa. Electrocardiogram and pH were monitored and those parameters were successfully transmitted by wireless communication ICs to the Internet via a portable device.

  13. Implementation of the remote measuring system for addiction patients in rehabilitation applying vital sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Myung-Jae; Lee, Ki-Young; Kwon, Young-Man

    2014-01-01

    Recently, with the rapid development of related ubiquitous industries, ubiquitous-Zone (u-Zone) development is being promoted to build a ubiquitous environment within a specific area. From a health care system perspective, in particular, u-Zone is expected to contribute to reducing cost and effort to manage patients’ condition such as in-patients, addiction patients and mental patients. In contrast, the current health care system only targets specific persons or continues to expand the internal system of hospitals. As addiction patients are on the rise in terms of drug addiction, including alcohol and narcotics, behavioural addiction attributable to the exposure to games, gambling, Internet and mobile communications and shopping is also becoming a problem. That is why it is difficult to collect data for the daily addiction status, which causes difficulties in systematic management and accurate diagnosis. Therefore, this paper suggests a remote measuring system to collect continuous condition data, which monitors the addiction patients via the vital sign measuring sensor within u-Zone. That is, the system collects their condition information from the sensors measuring heart rate, body temperature and acceleration, based on which the specialists determine the patient's emotional state. These data are expected to become the basis of diagnosing and managing addiction patients. PMID:26019608

  14. Review of remote-sensor potential for wind-energy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hooke, W.H.

    1981-03-01

    This report evaluates a number of remote-sensing systems such as radars, lidars, and acoustic echo sounders which are potential alternatives to the cup- and propeller anemometers routinely used in wind energy siting. The high costs and demanding operational requirements of these sensors currently preclude their use in the early stages of a multi-phase wind energy siting strategy such as that recently articulated by Hiester and Pennell (1981). Instead, these systems can be used most effectively in the lattermost stages of the siting process - what Hiester and Pennell (1981) refer to as the site development phase, necessary only for the siting of large wind-energy conversion systems (WECS) or WECS clusters. Even for this particular application only four techniques appear to be operational now; that is, if used properly, these techniques should provide the data sets currently considered adequate for wind-energy siting purposes. They are, in rough order of increasing expense and operating demands: optical transverse wind sensors; acoustic Doppler sounders; time-of-flight and continuous wave (CW) Doppler lidar; and frequency-modulated, continuous wave (FM-CW) Doppler radar.

  15. An investigation for the development of an integrated optical data preprocessor. [preprocessing remote sensor outputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verber, C. M.; Kenan, R. P.; Hartman, N. F.; Chapman, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory model of a 16 channel integrated optical data preprocessor was fabricated and tested in response to a need for a device to evaluate the outputs of a set of remote sensors. It does this by accepting the outputs of these sensors, in parallel, as the components of a multidimensional vector descriptive of the data and comparing this vector to one or more reference vectors which are used to classify the data set. The comparison is performed by taking the difference between the signal and reference vectors. The preprocessor is wholly integrated upon the surface of a LiNbO3 single crystal with the exceptions of the source and the detector. He-Ne laser light is coupled in and out of the waveguide by prism couplers. The integrated optical circuit consists of a titanium infused waveguide pattern, electrode structures and grating beam splitters. The waveguide and electrode patterns, by virtue of their complexity, make the vector subtraction device the most complex integrated optical structure fabricated to date.

  16. Digital imaging and remote sensing image generator (DIRSIG) as applied to NVESD sensor performance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly E.; Choi, Hee-sue S.; Kaur, Balvinder; Olson, Jeffrey T.; Hill, Clayton F.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2016-05-01

    The US Army's Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (referred to as NVESD) is developing a virtual detection, recognition, and identification (DRI) testing methodology using simulated imagery as a means of augmenting the field testing component of sensor performance evaluation, which is expensive, resource intensive, time consuming, and limited to the available target(s) and existing atmospheric visibility and environmental conditions at the time of testing. Existing simulation capabilities such as the Digital Imaging Remote Sensing Image Generator (DIRSIG) and NVESD's Integrated Performance Model Image Generator (NVIPM-IG) can be combined with existing detection algorithms to reduce cost/time, minimize testing risk, and allow virtual/simulated testing using full spectral and thermal object signatures, as well as those collected in the field. NVESD has developed an end-to-end capability to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Simple detection algorithms have been used on the degraded images generated by NVIPM-IG to determine the relative performance of the algorithms on both DIRSIG-simulated and collected images. Evaluating the degree to which the algorithm performance agrees between simulated versus field collected imagery is the first step in validating the simulated imagery procedure.

  17. Implementation of the remote measuring system for addiction patients in rehabilitation applying vital sensor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Myung-Jae; Lee, Ki-Young; Kwon, Young-Man

    2014-11-14

    Recently, with the rapid development of related ubiquitous industries, ubiquitous-Zone (u-Zone) development is being promoted to build a ubiquitous environment within a specific area. From a health care system perspective, in particular, u-Zone is expected to contribute to reducing cost and effort to manage patients' condition such as in-patients, addiction patients and mental patients. In contrast, the current health care system only targets specific persons or continues to expand the internal system of hospitals. As addiction patients are on the rise in terms of drug addiction, including alcohol and narcotics, behavioural addiction attributable to the exposure to games, gambling, Internet and mobile communications and shopping is also becoming a problem. That is why it is difficult to collect data for the daily addiction status, which causes difficulties in systematic management and accurate diagnosis. Therefore, this paper suggests a remote measuring system to collect continuous condition data, which monitors the addiction patients via the vital sign measuring sensor within u-Zone. That is, the system collects their condition information from the sensors measuring heart rate, body temperature and acceleration, based on which the specialists determine the patient's emotional state. These data are expected to become the basis of diagnosing and managing addiction patients.

  18. Telemanipulation - a special activity in remotely controlled operations

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.W. ); Andre, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    Work to be done in areas hostile to humans needs special and careful preparation. If short-term entry is possible, groups of men can be trained to do the necessary work. If not, special devices have to be designed, built, and tested on mockups before the real work can be executed. Based on experience gained from maintenance in car production and test programs for a reprocessing facility, it was decided to train a special group of men to do remotely controlled work in hostile areas without endangering them and to use their personal experience as the basis for future work. This is the old-fashioned way of all professions. Some needs to be able to do that remotely controlled work with normally existing operational means and combinations of them like cranes, mechanical and electromechanical master slave manipulators (MMSMs and EMSMs), saws, files, hammer, tig-welding equipment, etc., in air as well as underwater. This paper discusses use of a remote operator manipulator (ROM), remote operator welder (ROW), a test of underwater work, and the repair of two activated jets pumps of a boiling water reactor BWR with a fueling machine, reactor crane, EMSM, and conventional tools.

  19. A low power on-chip class-E power amplifier for remotely powered implantable sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ture, Kerim; Kilinc, Enver G.; Dehollain, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a low power fully integrated class-E power amplifier and its integration with remotely powered sensor system. The class-E power amplifier is suitable solution for low-power applications due to its high power efficiency. However, the required high inductance values which make the on-chip integration of the power amplifier difficult. The designed power amplifier is fully integrated in the remotely powered sensor system and fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS process. The power is transferred to the implantable sensor system at 13.56 MHz by using an inductively coupled remote powering link. The induced AC voltage on the implant coil is converted into a DC voltage by a passive full-wave rectifier. A voltage regulator is used to suppress the ripples and create a clean and stable 1.8 V supply voltage for the sensor and communication blocks. The data collected from the sensors is transmitted by on-off keying modulated low-power transmitter at 1.2 GHz frequency. The transmitter is composed of a LC tank oscillator and a fully on-chip class-E power amplifier. An additional output network is used for the power amplifier which makes the integration of the power amplifier fully on-chip. The integrated power amplifier with 0.2 V supply voltage has a drain efficiency of 31.5% at -10 dBm output power for 50 Ω load. The measurement results verify the functionality of the power amplifier and the remotely powered implantable sensor system. The data communication is also verified by using a commercial 50 Ω chip antenna and has 600 kbps data rate at 1 m communication distance.

  20. Enabling Remote Activity: Using mobile technology for remote participation in geoscience fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah; Collins, Trevor; Gaved, Mark; Bartlett, Jessica; Valentine, Chris; McCann, Lewis

    2010-05-01

    Field-based activities are regarded as essential to the development of a range of professional and personal skills within the geosciences. Students enjoy field activities, preferring these to learning with simulations (Spicer and Stratford 2001), and these improve deeper learning and understanding (Kern and Carpenter, 1984; Elkins and Elkins, 2007). However, some students find it difficult to access these field-based learning opportunities. Field sites may be remote and often require travel across uneven, challenging or potentially dangerous terrain. Mobility-impaired students are particularly limited in their opportunities to participate in field-based learning activities and, as higher education institutions have a responsibility to provide inclusive opportunities for students (UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, UK Special Education Needs and Disability Rights Act 2001), the need for inclusive fieldwork learning is being increasingly recognised. The Enabling Remote Activity (ERA) project has been investigating how mobile communications technologies might allow field learning experiences to be brought to students who would otherwise find it difficult to participate, and also to enhance activities for all participants. It uses a rapidly deployable, battery-powered wireless network to transmit video, audio, and high resolution still images to connect participants at an accessible location with participants in the field. Crucially, the system uses a transient wireless network, allowing multiple locations to be explored during a field visit, and for plans to be changed dynamically if required. Central to the concept is the requirement for independent investigative learning: students are enabled to participate actively in the learning experience and to direct the investigations, as opposed to being simply remote viewers of the experience. Two ways of using the ERA system have been investigated: remote access and collaborative groupwork. In 2006 and 2008 remote

  1. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Attal, Ferhat; Mohammed, Samer; Dedabrishvili, Mariam; Chamroukhi, Faicel; Oukhellou, Latifa; Amirat, Yacine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle). Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors’ placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), and Random Forest (RF) as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM), are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject. PMID:26690450

  2. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  3. A Novel High Sensitivity Sensor for Remote Field Eddy Current Non-Destructive Testing Based on Orthogonal Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojie; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Zhanbin; Jia, Yueling

    2014-01-01

    Remote field eddy current is an effective non-destructive testing method for ferromagnetic tubular structures. In view of conventional sensors' disadvantages such as low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sensitivity to axial cracks, a novel high sensitivity sensor based on orthogonal magnetic field excitation is proposed. Firstly, through a three-dimensional finite element simulation, the remote field effect under orthogonal magnetic field excitation is determined, and an appropriate configuration which can generate an orthogonal magnetic field for a tubular structure is developed. Secondly, optimized selection of key parameters such as frequency, exciting currents and shielding modes is analyzed in detail, and different types of pick-up coils, including a new self-differential mode pick-up coil, are designed and analyzed. Lastly, the proposed sensor is verified experimentally by various types of defects manufactured on a section of a ferromagnetic tube. Experimental results show that the proposed novel sensor can largely improve the sensitivity of defect detection, especially for axial crack whose depth is less than 40% wall thickness, which are very difficult to detect and identify by conventional sensors. Another noteworthy advantage of the proposed sensor is that it has almost equal sensitivity to various types of defects, when a self-differential mode pick-up coil is adopted. PMID:25615738

  4. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-06-03

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  5. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  6. Measuring thermal budgets of active volcanoes by satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L.; Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thematic Mapper measurements of the total radiant energy flux Q at Lascar volcano in north Chile for December 1984 are reported. The results are consistent with the earlier suggestion that a lava lake is the source of a reported thermal budget anomaly, and with values for 1985-1986 that are much lower, suggesting that fumarolic activity was then a more likely heat source. The results show that satellite remote sensing may be used to monitor the activity of a volcano quantitatively, in a way not possible by conventional ground studies, and may provide a method for predicting eruptions.

  7. Viewing marine bacteria, their activity and response to environmental drivers from orbit: satellite remote sensing of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D Jay; Ford, Tim E; Colwell, Rita R; Baker-Austin, Craig; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Subramaniam, Ajit; Capone, Douglas G

    2014-04-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing of marine microorganisms has become a useful tool in predicting human health risks associated with these microscopic targets. Early applications were focused on harmful algal blooms, but more recently methods have been developed to interrogate the ocean for bacteria. As satellite-based sensors have become more sophisticated and our ability to interpret information derived from these sensors has advanced, we have progressed from merely making fascinating pictures from space to developing process models with predictive capability. Our understanding of the role of marine microorganisms in primary production and global elemental cycles has been vastly improved as has our ability to use the combination of remote sensing data and models to provide early warning systems for disease outbreaks. This manuscript will discuss current approaches to monitoring cyanobacteria and vibrios, their activity and response to environmental drivers, and will also suggest future directions.

  8. Detection, Identification, Location, and Remote Sensing using SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, we will consider the problem of simultaneous detection, identification, location estimation, and remote sensing for multiple objects. In particular, we will describe the design and testing of a wireless system capable of simultaneously detecting the presence of multiple objects, identifying each object, and acquiring both a low-resolution estimate of location and a high-resolution estimate of temperature for each object based on wireless interrogation of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor tags affixed to each object. The system is being studied for application on the lunar surface as well as for terrestrial remote sensing applications such as pre-launch monitoring and testing of spacecraft on the launch pad and monitoring of test facilities. The system utilizes a digitally beam-formed planar receiving antenna array to extend range and provide direction-of-arrival information coupled with an approximate maximum-likelihood signal processing algorithm to provide near-optimal estimation of both range and temperature. The system is capable of forming a large number of beams within the field of view and resolving the information from several tags within each beam. The combination of both spatial and waveform discrimination provides the capability to track and monitor telemetry from a large number of objects appearing simultaneously within the field of view of the receiving array. In the presentation, we will summarize the system design and illustrate several aspects of the operational characteristics and signal structure. We will examine the theoretical performance characteristics of the system and compare the theoretical results with results obtained from experiments in both controlled laboratory environments and in the field.

  9. Novel Networked Remote Laboratory Architecture for Open Connectivity Based on PLC-OPC-LabVIEW-EJS Integration. Application in Remote Fuzzy Control and Sensors Data Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    González, Isaías; Calderón, Antonio José; Mejías, Andrés; Andújar, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the design and implementation of a network for integrating Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), the Object-Linking and Embedding for Process Control protocol (OPC) and the open-source Easy Java Simulations (EJS) package is presented. A LabVIEW interface and the Java-Internet-LabVIEW (JIL) server complete the scheme for data exchange. This configuration allows the user to remotely interact with the PLC. Such integration can be considered a novelty in scientific literature for remote control and sensor data acquisition of industrial plants. An experimental application devoted to remote laboratories is developed to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of the proposed approach. The experiment to be conducted is the parameterization and supervision of a fuzzy controller of a DC servomotor. The graphical user interface has been developed with EJS and the fuzzy control is carried out by our own PLC. In fact, the distinctive features of the proposed novel network application are the integration of the OPC protocol to share information with the PLC and the application under control. The user can perform the tuning of the controller parameters online and observe in real time the effect on the servomotor behavior. The target group is engineering remote users, specifically in control- and automation-related tasks. The proposed architecture system is described and experimental results are presented. PMID:27809229

  10. Novel Networked Remote Laboratory Architecture for Open Connectivity Based on PLC-OPC-LabVIEW-EJS Integration. Application in Remote Fuzzy Control and Sensors Data Acquisition.

    PubMed

    González, Isaías; Calderón, Antonio José; Mejías, Andrés; Andújar, José Manuel

    2016-10-31

    In this paper the design and implementation of a network for integrating Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), the Object-Linking and Embedding for Process Control protocol (OPC) and the open-source Easy Java Simulations (EJS) package is presented. A LabVIEW interface and the Java-Internet-LabVIEW (JIL) server complete the scheme for data exchange. This configuration allows the user to remotely interact with the PLC. Such integration can be considered a novelty in scientific literature for remote control and sensor data acquisition of industrial plants. An experimental application devoted to remote laboratories is developed to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of the proposed approach. The experiment to be conducted is the parameterization and supervision of a fuzzy controller of a DC servomotor. The graphical user interface has been developed with EJS and the fuzzy control is carried out by our own PLC. In fact, the distinctive features of the proposed novel network application are the integration of the OPC protocol to share information with the PLC and the application under control. The user can perform the tuning of the controller parameters online and observe in real time the effect on the servomotor behavior. The target group is engineering remote users, specifically in control- and automation-related tasks. The proposed architecture system is described and experimental results are presented.

  11. Integrating passive and active remote sensing methods to assess and map soil salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Chudnovsky Chudnovsky, Alexandra

    2013-04-01

    Irrigated lands in Israel are subjected to salinization processes, mostly as a result of using low-quality irrigation water. The Jezre'el Valley in northern Israel is an example of this phenomenon and thus it was selected to carry out this study. This area is characterized by increasing soil salinity over the years, followed by an increase in soil SAR (Sodium Adsorption Ration), which leads to a significant deterioration of the soil structure and a reduced infiltration rate. The traditional methods of mapping, by soil sampling (sampling, laboratory checks, and mapping) are time-consuming and do not provide near real-time information. An alternative method is suggested herein using active and passive remote sensing methods: (1) an hyperspectral data from the ground ASD field spectrometer and from the air, by AISA air-born sensor (2) EFDM- Frequency Domain Electro-Magnetic, and (3) GPR- ground penetration radar. The constructed PLS model was applied on the hyperspectral images, producing an EC thematic map of the surface. In addition, a sub-surface salinity map was generated by applying the surface - sub-surface correlation on the surface EC thematic map. The generated maps were found to be in good agreement with maps based on chemical data. The results indicated that traditional methods are correlated with the remote sensing ones and that merging the three remote sensing methodologies may yield a better picture than each of them alone. In addition, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of applied in this study methods. It can be concluded that it is possible to account for soil salinity based on active and passive remote sensing means.

  12. Delineation of geological problems for use in urban planning. [in Alabama using remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T. H.; Bloss, P.; Fambrough, R.; Stow, S. H.; Hooks, W. G.; Freehafer, D.; Sutley, D.

    1976-01-01

    Activities of the University of Alabama in support of state and local planning commissions are reported. Demonstrations were given of the various types of remotely sensed images available from U-2, Skylab, and LANDSAT; and their uses and limitations were discussed. Techniques to be used in determining flood prone areas were provided for environmental studies. A rapid, inexpensive method for study was developed by which imagery is copied on 35 mm film and projected on existing topographic maps for measuring delta volume and growth.

  13. Improvements in Virtual Sensors: Using Spatial Information to Estimate Remote Sensing Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Srivastava, Ashok N.; Stroeve, Julienne

    2005-01-01

    Various instruments are used to create images of the Earth and other objects in the universe in a diverse set of wavelength bands with the aim of understanding natural phenomena. Sometimes these instruments are built in a phased approach, with additional measurement capabilities added in later phases. In other cases, technology may mature to the point that the instrument offers new measurement capabilities that were not planned in the original design of the instrument. In still other cases, high resolution spectral measurements may be too costly to perform on a large sample and therefore lower resolution spectral instruments are used to take the majority of measurements. Many applied science questions that are relevant to the earth science remote sensing community require analysis of enormous amounts of data that were generated by instruments with disparate measurement capabilities. In past work [1], we addressed this problem using Virtual Sensors: a method that uses models trained on spectrally rich (high spectral resolution) data to "fill in" unmeasured spectral channels in spectrally poor (low spectral resolution) data. We demonstrated this method by using models trained on the high spectral resolution Terra MODIS instrument to estimate what the equivalent of the MODIS 1.6 micron channel would be for the NOAA AVHRR2 instrument. The scientific motivation for the simulation of the 1.6 micron channel is to improve the ability of the AVHRR2 sensor to detect clouds over snow and ice. This work contains preliminary experiments demonstrating that the use of spatial information can improve our ability to estimate these spectra.

  14. Vineyard zonal management for grape quality assessment by combining airborne remote sensed imagery and soil sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, I.; Martínez De Toda, F.; Martínez-Casasnovas, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Vineyard variability within the fields is well known by grape growers, producing different plant responses and fruit characteristics. Many technologies have been developed in last recent decades in order to assess this spatial variability, including remote sensing and soil sensors. In this paper we study the possibility of creating a stable classification system that better provides useful information for the grower, especially in terms of grape batch quality sorting. The work was carried out during 4 years in a rain-fed Tempranillo vineyard located in Rioja (Spain). NDVI was extracted from airborne imagery, and soil conductivity (EC) data was acquired by an EM38 sensor. Fifty-four vines were sampled at véraison for vegetative parameters and before harvest for yield and grape analysis. An Isocluster unsupervised classification in two classes was performed in 5 different ways, combining NDVI maps individually, collectively and combined with EC. The target vines were assigned in different zones depending on the clustering combination. Analysis of variance was performed in order to verify the ability of the combinations to provide the most accurate information. All combinations showed a similar behaviour concerning vegetative parameters. Yield parameters classify better by the EC-based clustering, whilst maturity grape parameters seemed to give more accuracy by combining all NDVIs and EC. Quality grape parameters (anthocyanins and phenolics), presented similar results for all combinations except for the NDVI map of the individual year, where the results were poorer. This results reveal that stable parameters (EC or/and NDVI all-together) clustering outcomes in better information for a vineyard zonal management strategy.

  15. Improving Oil Palm Classification in the Peruvian Amazon by Combining Active and Passive Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Velez, V. H.; DeFries, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Oil palm expansion has led to clearing of extensive forest areas in the tropics. However quantitative assessments of the magnitude of oil palm expansion to deforestation have been challenging due in large part to the limitations presented by conventional optical data sets for discriminating plantations from forests and other tree cover vegetations. Recently available information from active remote sensors has opened the possibility of using these data sources to overcome these limitations. The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the accuracy of oil palm classification when using ALOS/PALSAR active satellite data in conjunction with Landsat information, compared to the use of Landsat data only. The analysis takes place in a focused region around the city of Pucallpa in the Ucayali province of the Peruvian Amazon for the year 2010. Oil palm plantations were separated in five categories consisting of four age classes (0-3, 3-5, 5-10 and > 10 yrs) and an additional class accounting for degraded plantations older than 15 yr. Other land covers were water bodies, unvegetated land, short and tall grass, fallow, secondary vegetation, and forest. Classifications were performed using random forests. Training points for calibration and validation consisted of 411 polygons measured in areas representative of the land covers of interest and totaled 6,367 ha. Overall classification accuracy increased from 89.9% using only Landsat data sets to 94.3% using both Landast and ALOS/PALSAR. Both user's and producer's accuracy increased in all classes when using both data sets except for producer's accuracy in short grass which decreased by 1%. The largest increase in user's accuracy was obtained in oil palm plantations older than 10 years from 62 to 80% while producer's accuracy improved the most in plantations in age class 3-5 from 63 to 80%. Results demonstrate the suitability of data from ALOS/PALSAR and other active remote sensors to improve classification of oil palm

  16. Propagation Limitations in Remote Sensing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Multi-sensors and systems in remote sensing ; Radar sensing systems over land; Remote sensing techniques in oceanography; Influence of...propagation media and background; Infrared techniques in remote sensing ; Photography in remote sensing ; Analytical studies in remote sensing .

  17. Remote sensor application studies report, July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969: Remote sensing reconnaissance, Mill creek area, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Offield, T.W.; Watson, Kenneth; Cannon, P.J.; Watson, R.D.

    1970-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Remote Sensor Application Studies program, infrared images and several kinds of photographs were obtained on reconnaissance flights over two areas in the Arbuckle Mountains near Mill Creek, Oklahoma. These data were used in a preliminary investigation (1) to determine the diagnostic reflection and emission characteristics of various rock types, and (2) io evaluate the perturbing influence of atmospheric conditions, surface coatings, rock texture, and topography on the observed reflected and emitted energy in the thermal infrared (8-14μ) part of the spectrum

  18. Detection, Identification, Location, and Remote Sensing Using SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Richard J.; Kennedy, Timothy F.; Williams, Robert M.; Fink, Patrick W.; Ngo, Phong H.

    2009-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Systems Branch (EV4) of the Avionic Systems Division at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX is studying the utility of surface acoustic wave (SAW) radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags for multiple wireless applications including detection, identification, tracking, and remote sensing of objects on the lunar surface, monitoring of environmental test facilities, structural shape and health monitoring, and nondestructive test and evaluation of assets. For all of these applications, it is anticipated that the system utilized to interrogate the SAW RFID tags may need to operate at fairly long range and in the presence of considerable multipath and multiple-access interference. Towards that end, EV4 is developing a prototype SAW RFID wireless interrogation system for use in such environments called the Passive Adaptive RFID Sensor Equipment (PARSED) system. The system utilizes a digitally beam-formed planar receiving antenna array to extend range and provide direction-of-arrival information coupled with an approximate maximum-likelihood signal processing algorithm to provide near-optimal estimation of both range and temperature. The system is capable of forming a large number of beams within the field of view and resolving the information from several tags within each beam. The combination of both spatial and waveform discrimination provides the capability to track and monitor telemetry from a large number of objects appearing simultaneously within the field of view of the receiving array. In this paper, we will consider the application of the PARSEQ system to the problem of simultaneous detection, identification, localization, and temperature estimation for multiple objects. We will summarize the overall design of the PARSEQ system and present a detailed description of the design and performance of the signal detection and estimation algorithms incorporated in the system. The system is currently configured only to measure temperature

  19. Remote assessment of cultural heritage environments with wireless sensor array networks.

    PubMed

    Agbota, Henoc; Mitchell, John E; Odlyha, Marianne; Strlič, Matija

    2014-05-19

    The logistics and cost of environmental monitoring can represent challenges for heritage managers, partly because of the sheer number of environmental parameters to consider. There is a need for a system, capable of monitoring the holistic impact of the environment on cultural materials while remaining relatively easy to use and providing remote access. This paper describes a dosimetric system based on piezoelectric quartz crystal technology. The prototype sensing module consists of an array of piezoelectric quartz crystals (PQC) coated with different metals (Fe, Cu, Ni and Sn) and includes a temperature and relative humidity sensor. The communication module involves an 802.15.4 low-power radio and a GPRS gateway which allows real time visualisation of the measurements online. An energy management protocol ensures that the system consumes very low power between measurements. The paper also describes the results and experiences from two heritage field deployments, at Apsley House in London, UK, and at the Royal Palaces of Abomey in Benin. Evaluation of PQC measurements, temperature, relative humidity and the rate of successful transmission over the communication systems are also reported.

  20. Virtual Sensors: Using Data Mining Techniques to Efficiently Estimate Remote Sensing Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Ashok N.; Oza, Nikunj; Stroeve, Julienne

    2004-01-01

    Various instruments are used to create images of the Earth and other objects in the universe in a diverse set of wavelength bands with the aim of understanding natural phenomena. These instruments are sometimes built in a phased approach, with some measurement capabilities being added in later phases. In other cases, there may not be a planned increase in measurement capability, but technology may mature to the point that it offers new measurement capabilities that were not available before. In still other cases, detailed spectral measurements may be too costly to perform on a large sample. Thus, lower resolution instruments with lower associated cost may be used to take the majority of measurements. Higher resolution instruments, with a higher associated cost may be used to take only a small fraction of the measurements in a given area. Many applied science questions that are relevant to the remote sensing community need to be addressed by analyzing enormous amounts of data that were generated from instruments with disparate measurement capability. This paper addresses this problem by demonstrating methods to produce high accuracy estimates of spectra with an associated measure of uncertainty from data that is perhaps nonlinearly correlated with the spectra. In particular, we demonstrate multi-layer perceptrons (MLPs), Support Vector Machines (SVMs) with Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernels, and SVMs with Mixture Density Mercer Kernels (MDMK). We call this type of an estimator a Virtual Sensor because it predicts, with a measure of uncertainty, unmeasured spectral phenomena.

  1. Remote fiber optic sensor for gaseous and liquid environments, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrabba, Michael M.; Rauh, R. D.; Spencer, K. M.; Edmonds, R. B.

    1992-09-01

    The goal of this program was to develop techniques and instrumentation for the implementation of Raman spectroscopy as a chemical sensor for both gas and liquid phase samples. Surface enhanced Raman techniques have been employed for low level detection. Novel SERS substrates have been demonstrated which enable complexation and preconcentration of gas phase species, a new development since SERS had previously been associated only with the liquid phase. The substrates were demonstrated for Raman sensing of hydrazine, ethanol, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), and other vapor species. In order to conduct remote sensing using Raman, a fiber optic probe, was developed. The probe permits the excitation and collection of Raman spectra over greater than 50 m of optical fiber without interference from scattering originating within the fibers themselves, previously a serious problem with this approach. Spectral analysis has been conducted with small spectrographs, some of them palm-sized. Special Raman filters based on holographic optical elements were developed for this purpose, removing all vestiges of the primary Raman excitation light before introducing the scattered Raman light into the spectrograph. Several spectrograph configurations were examined, including a novel Echelle design which enables better than 1 cm-1 spectral resolution in a compact package (e.g., approximately 10(exp 3) cu cm, including CCD detector).

  2. Design and performance of the halogen occultation experiment (HALOE) remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, R. L.; Mauldin, L. E., III; Russell, J. M., III

    1986-01-01

    HALOE is an optical remote sensor that measures extinction of solar radiation caused by the earth's atmosphere in eight channels, ranging in wavelength from 2.5 to 10.1 microns. These measurements, which occur twice each satellite orbit during solar occultation, are inverted to yield vertical distributions of middle atmosphere ozone (O3), water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and methane. A channel located in the 2.7 region is used to infer the tangent point pressure by measuring carbon dioxide absorption. The HALOE instrument consists of a two-axis gimbal system, telescope, spectral discrimination optics and a 12-bit data system. The gimbal system tracks the solar radiometric centroid in the azimuthal plane and tracks the solar limb in the elevation plane, placing the instrument's instantaneous field-of-view 4 arcmin down from the solar top edge. The instrument gathers data for tangent altitudes ranging from 150 km to the earth's horizon. Prior to an orbital sunset and after an orbital sunrise, HALOE automatically performs calibration sequences to enhance data interpretation. The instrument is presently being tested at the NASA Langley Research Center in preparation for launch on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite near the end of this decade. This paper describes the instrumenmt design, operation, and functional performance.

  3. Remote Assessment of Cultural Heritage Environments with Wireless Sensor Array Networks

    PubMed Central

    Agbota, Henoc; Mitchell John, E.; Odlyha, Marianne; Strlič, Matija

    2014-01-01

    The logistics and cost of environmental monitoring can represent challenges for heritage managers, partly because of the sheer number of environmental parameters to consider. There is a need for a system, capable of monitoring the holistic impact of the environment on cultural materials while remaining relatively easy to use and providing remote access. This paper describes a dosimetric system based on piezoelectric quartz crystal technology. The prototype sensing module consists of an array of piezoelectric quartz crystals (PQC) coated with different metals (Fe, Cu, Ni and Sn) and includes a temperature and relative humidity sensor. The communication module involves an 802.15.4 low-power radio and a GPRS gateway which allows real time visualisation of the measurements online. An energy management protocol ensures that the system consumes very low power between measurements. The paper also describes the results and experiences from two heritage field deployments, at Apsley House in London, UK, and at the Royal Palaces of Abomey in Benin. Evaluation of PQC measurements, temperature, relative humidity and the rate of successful transmission over the communication systems are also reported. PMID:24854056

  4. Active microwave remote sensing of earth/land, chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Geoscience applications of active microwave remote sensing systems are examined. Major application areas for the system include: (1) exploration of petroleum, mineral, and ground water resources, (2) mapping surface and structural features, (3) terrain analysis, both morphometric and genetic, (4) application in civil works, and (5) application in the areas of earthquake prediction and crustal movements. Although the success of radar surveys has not been widely publicized, they have been used as a prime reconnaissance data base for mineral exploration and land-use evaluation in areas where photography cannot be obtained.

  5. Remote Sensing and Remote Control Activities in Europe and America: Part 2--Remote Sensing Ground Stations in Europe,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Development tasks and products of remote sensing ground stations in Europe are represented by the In-Sec Corporation and the Schlumberger Industries Corporation. The article presents the main products of these two corporations.

  6. Integrating remote sensing data from multiple optical sensors for ecological and crop condition monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological and crop condition monitoring requires high temporal and spatial resolution remote sensing data. Due to technical limitations and budget constraints, remote sensing instruments trade spatial resolution for swath width. As a result, it is difficult to acquire remotely sensed data with both...

  7. Smart Multi-Level Tool for Remote Patient Monitoring Based on a Wireless Sensor Network and Mobile Augmented Reality

    PubMed Central

    González, Fernando Cornelio Jimènez; Villegas, Osslan Osiris Vergara; Ramírez, Dulce Esperanza Torres; Sánchez, Vianey Guadalupe Cruz; Domínguez, Humberto Ochoa

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovations in the field of disease prevention and maintenance of patient health have enabled the evolution of fields such as monitoring systems. One of the main advances is the development of real-time monitors that use intelligent and wireless communication technology. In this paper, a system is presented for the remote monitoring of the body temperature and heart rate of a patient by means of a wireless sensor network (WSN) and mobile augmented reality (MAR). The combination of a WSN and MAR provides a novel alternative to remotely measure body temperature and heart rate in real time during patient care. The system is composed of (1) hardware such as Arduino microcontrollers (in the patient nodes), personal computers (for the nurse server), smartphones (for the mobile nurse monitor and the virtual patient file) and sensors (to measure body temperature and heart rate), (2) a network layer using WiFly technology, and (3) software such as LabView, Android SDK, and DroidAR. The results obtained from tests show that the system can perform effectively within a range of 20 m and requires ten minutes to stabilize the temperature sensor to detect hyperthermia, hypothermia or normal body temperature conditions. Additionally, the heart rate sensor can detect conditions of tachycardia and bradycardia. PMID:25230306

  8. Smart multi-level tool for remote patient monitoring based on a wireless sensor network and mobile augmented reality.

    PubMed

    González, Fernando Cornelio Jiménez; Villegas, Osslan Osiris Vergara; Ramírez, Dulce Esperanza Torres; Sánchez, Vianey Guadalupe Cruz; Domínguez, Humberto Ochoa

    2014-09-16

    Technological innovations in the field of disease prevention and maintenance of patient health have enabled the evolution of fields such as monitoring systems. One of the main advances is the development of real-time monitors that use intelligent and wireless communication technology. In this paper, a system is presented for the remote monitoring of the body temperature and heart rate of a patient by means of a wireless sensor network (WSN) and mobile augmented reality (MAR). The combination of a WSN and MAR provides a novel alternative to remotely measure body temperature and heart rate in real time during patient care. The system is composed of (1) hardware such as Arduino microcontrollers (in the patient nodes), personal computers (for the nurse server), smartphones (for the mobile nurse monitor and the virtual patient file) and sensors (to measure body temperature and heart rate), (2) a network layer using WiFly technology, and (3) software such as LabView, Android SDK, and DroidAR. The results obtained from tests show that the system can perform effectively within a range of 20 m and requires ten minutes to stabilize the temperature sensor to detect hyperthermia, hypothermia or normal body temperature conditions. Additionally, the heart rate sensor can detect conditions of tachycardia and bradycardia.

  9. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Simple Floating Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Nakamura, Junichi; Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel image sensor integrated circuit features simple floating-gate structure, with metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as active circuit element in each pixel. Provides flexibility of readout modes, no kTC noise, and relatively simple structure suitable for high-density arrays. Features desirable for "smart sensor" applications.

  10. Confronting Passive and Active Sensors with Non-Gaussian Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo.; Garcia-Gago, Jesús.; Gomez-Lahoz, Javier.; González-Aguilera, Diego.

    2014-01-01

    This paper has two motivations: firstly, to compare the Digital Surface Models (DSM) derived by passive (digital camera) and by active (terrestrial laser scanner) remote sensing systems when applied to specific architectural objects, and secondly, to test how well the Gaussian classic statistics, with its Least Squares principle, adapts to data sets where asymmetrical gross errors may appear and whether this approach should be changed for a non-parametric one. The field of geomatic technology automation is immersed in a high demanding competition in which any innovation by one of the contenders immediately challenges the opponents to propose a better improvement. Nowadays, we seem to be witnessing an improvement of terrestrial photogrammetry and its integration with computer vision to overcome the performance limitations of laser scanning methods. Through this contribution some of the issues of this “technological race” are examined from the point of view of photogrammetry. A new software is introduced and an experimental test is designed, performed and assessed to try to cast some light on this thrilling match. For the case considered in this study, the results show good agreement between both sensors, despite considerable asymmetry. This asymmetry suggests that the standard Normal parameters are not adequate to assess this type of data, especially when accuracy is of importance. In this case, standard deviation fails to provide a good estimation of the results, whereas the results obtained for the Median Absolute Deviation and for the Biweight Midvariance are more appropriate measures. PMID:25196104

  11. Recognition of human activities with wearable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weihua; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao; Li, Xinke

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach for recognizing human activities with wearable sensors is investigated in this article. The key techniques of this approach include the generalized discriminant analysis (GDA) and the relevance vector machines (RVM). The feature vectors extracted from the measured signal are processed by GDA, with its dimension remarkably reduced from 350 to 12 while fully maintaining the most discriminative information. The reduced feature vectors are then classified by the RVM technique according to an extended multiclass model, which shows good convergence characteristic. Experimental results on the Wearable Action Recognition Dataset demonstrate that our approach achieves an encouraging recognition rate of 99.2%, true positive rate of 99.18% and false positive rate of 0.07%. Although in most cases, the support vector machines model has more than 70 support vectors, the number of relevance vectors related to different activities is always not more than 4, which implies a great simplicity in the classifier structure. Our approach is expected to have potential in real-time applications or solving problems with large-scale datasets, due to its perfect recognition performance, strong ability in feature reduction, and simple classifier structure.

  12. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1993-11-01

    In support of the initial phase of the Instrument Development Program (IDP) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, the authors have researched the means by which multiple remote sensing techniques could be best applied to characterizing the cloudy atmosphere. This research has directly supported the short-term goal of aiding in the selection of the most appropriate instrumentation for ARM Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, but also has more long-term consequences for the application of remote sensing for measuring cloud properties of crucial concern to general circulation and climate models. To accomplish the goals they have (1) developed a mobile, state-of-the-art, scanning polarization diversity lidar (PDL) to test a variety of techniques for cloud remote sensing, including simultaneous dual-wavelength and dual-polarization, and high-speed variable field-of-view operations; (2) successfully participated in field projects using the PDL along with other remote sensors and instrumented aircraft to obtain detailed datasets for the testing of instrument techniques; (3) in collaboration with researchers at the NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory, used numerical cloud modeling and empirical studies to develop and refine remote sensing approaches for cloud property retrieval.

  13. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Eitel, Jan U. H.; Keefe, Robert F.; Long, Dan S.; Davis, Anthony S.; Vierling, Lee A.

    2010-01-01

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and do not require spectral reference readings. Besides measuring red (590–670 nm) and near-infrared (>760 nm) reflectance AGORS devices have recently become available that also measure red-edge (730 nm) reflectance. We tested the hypothesis that the additional availability of red-edge reflectance information would improve AGORS of plant stress induced chlorophyll breakdown in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Our results showed that the availability of red-edge reflectance information improved AGORS estimates of stress induced variation in chlorophyll concentration (r2 > 0.73, RMSE < 1.69) when compared to those without (r2 = 0.57, RMSE = 2.11). PMID:22319275

  14. A Method for Monitoring the Heat Flux from an Urban District with a Single Infrared Remote Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Aurélien; Mestayer, Patrice G.

    2014-07-01

    The proposed methodology relies on the modelling capabilities of the thermo-radiative model Suc(olene) to simulate the heat and radiation energy exchanges between an actual urban district and the atmosphere. It is based on the comparison of the simulated upward infrared and sensible heat flux diurnal cycles that may be measured by elevated sensors above the three-dimensional scene, as a function of sensor position: the heat flux is a function of an equivalent surface temperature given by the infrared sensor and an equivalent heat transfer coefficient deduced from Suc(olene) simulations with the actual geometry. The method is tested against measurements obtained in the city centre of Toulouse, France during an experimental campaign in 2004-2005. To improve the computation of the heat exchanges between air and building surfaces a new algorithm is first implemented, based on an empirical model of the wind distribution within street canyons. This improvement is assessed by a direct comparison of the simulated brightness surface temperatures of the Toulouse city centre to measurements obtained with an airborne infrared sensor. The optimization of the infrared remote sensor position is finally analyzed as a function of its height above the mean roof level: it allows evaluation of the heat flux from an urban district when the three different classes of surfaces (roofs, walls, grounds) have similar contributions to the infrared flux towards the sensor, and to the heat flux into the atmosphere.

  15. Energy-aware activity classification using wearable sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bo; Montoye, Alexander; Moore, Rebecca; Pfeiffer, Karin; Biswas, Subir

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents implementation details, system characterization, and the performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity analysis. Specific machine learning mechanisms are implemented for recognizing a target set of activities with both out-of-body and on-body processing arrangements. Impacts of energy consumption by the on-body sensors are analyzed in terms of activity detection accuracy for out-of-body processing. Impacts of limited processing abilities for the on-body scenario are also characterized in terms of detection accuracy, by varying the background processing load in the sensor units. Impacts of varying number of sensors in terms of activity classification accuracy are also evaluated. Through a rigorous systems study, it is shown that an efficient human activity analytics system can be designed and operated even under energy and processing constraints of tiny on-body wearable sensors.

  16. Energy-aware Activity Classification using Wearable Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bo; Montoye, Alexander; Moore, Rebecca; Pfeiffer, Karin; Biswas, Subir

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents implementation details, system characterization, and the performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity analysis. Specific machine learning mechanisms are implemented for recognizing a target set of activities with both out-of-body and on-body processing arrangements. Impacts of energy consumption by the on-body sensors are analyzed in terms of activity detection accuracy for out-of-body processing. Impacts of limited processing abilities for the on-body scenario are also characterized in terms of detection accuracy, by varying the background processing load in the sensor units. Impacts of varying number of sensors in terms of activity classification accuracy are also evaluated. Through a rigorous systems study, it is shown that an efficient human activity analytics system can be designed and operated even under energy and processing constraints of tiny on-body wearable sensors. PMID:25075266

  17. U.S. Geological Survey land remote sensing activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Doyle G.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Department of the Interior (DOI) were among the earliest to recognize the potential applications of satellite land remote sensing for management of the country's land and water resources…not only as a user but also as a program participant responsible for final data processing, product generation, and data distribution. With guidance from Dr. William T. Pecora, who was the Survey's Director at that time and later Under Secretary of Interior, the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Program was established in 1966 as a focal point for these activities within the Department. Dr. Pecora was among the few who could envision a role for the Survey and the Department as active participants in programs yet to come--like the Landsat, Magsat, Seasat and, most recently, Shuttle Imaging Radar programs.

  18. The NASA Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR): A New Sensor for Earth Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR) is a versatile new airborne imaging radiometer recently developed by NASA. The AESMIR design is unique in that it performs dual-polarized imaging at all standard passive microwave frequency bands (6-89 GHz) using only one sensor headscanner package, providing an efficient solution for Earth remote sensing applications (snow, soil moisture/land parameters, precipitation, ocean winds, sea surface temperature, water vapor, sea ice, etc.). The microwave radiometers themselves will incorporate state-of-the-art receivers, with particular attention given to instrument calibration for the best possible accuracy and sensitivity. The single-package design of AESMIR makes it compatible with high-altitude aircraft platforms such as the NASA ER-2s. The arbitrary 2-axis gimbal can perform conical and cross-track scanning, as well as fixed-beam staring. This compatibility with high-altitude platforms coupled with the flexible scanning configuration, opens up previously unavailable science opportunities for convection/precip/cloud science and co-flying with complementary instruments, as well as providing wider swath coverage for all science applications. By designing AESMIR to be compatible with these high-altitude platforms, we are also compatible with the NASA P-3, the NASA DC-8, C-130s and ground-based deployments. Thus AESMIR can provide low-, mid-, and high- altitude microwave imaging. Parallel filter banks allow AESMIR to simultaneously simulate the exact passbands of multiple satellite radiometers: SSM/I, TMI, AMSR, Windsat, SSMI/S, and the upcoming GPM/GMI and NPOESS/CMIS instruments --a unique capability among aircraft radiometers. An L-band option is also under development, again using the same scanner. With this option, simultaneous imaging from 1.4 to 89 GHz will be feasible. And, all receivers except the sounding channels will be configured for 4-Stokes polarimetric operation using high-speed digital

  19. A triboelectric motion sensor in wearable body sensor network for human activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Hui Huang; Xian Li; Ye Sun

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study is to design a novel triboelectric motion sensor in wearable body sensor network for human activity recognition. Physical activity recognition is widely used in well-being management, medical diagnosis and rehabilitation. Other than traditional accelerometers, we design a novel wearable sensor system based on triboelectrification. The triboelectric motion sensor can be easily attached to human body and collect motion signals caused by physical activities. The experiments are conducted to collect five common activity data: sitting and standing, walking, climbing upstairs, downstairs, and running. The k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) clustering algorithm is adopted to recognize these activities and validate the feasibility of this new approach. The results show that our system can perform physical activity recognition with a successful rate over 80% for walking, sitting and standing. The triboelectric structure can also be used as an energy harvester for motion harvesting due to its high output voltage in random low-frequency motion.

  20. Crosstalk effect and its mitigation in thermal emissive bands of remote sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Madhavan, S.; Wang, M.

    2016-09-01

    It has been found that there is severe electronic noise in the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) bands 27-30 which corresponds to wavelengths ranging between 6.7 μm to 9.73 μm. The cause for the issue has been identified to be crosstalk, which is significantly amplified since 2010 due to severe degradation in the electronic circuitry. The crosstalk effect causes unexpected discontinuity/change in the calibration coefficients and induces strong striping artifacts in the earth view (EV) images. Also it is noticed, that there are large long-term drifts in the EV brightness temperature (BT) in these bands. An algorithm using a linear approximation derived from on-orbit lunar observations has been developed to correct the crosstalk effect for them. It was demonstrated that the crosstalk correction can remarkably minimize the discontinuity/change in the calibration coefficients, substantially reduce the striping in the EV images, and significantly remove the long-term drift in the EV BT in all these bands. In this paper, we present the recent progresses in the crosstalk effect analysis and its mitigation. In addition, we will show that besides these four bands, the TEBs in other satellite remote sensors also have significant crosstalk contaminations. Further, it will be demonstrated that the crosstalk correction algorithm we developed can be successfully applied to all the contaminated TEBs to significantly reduce the crosstalk effects and substantially improve both the image quality and the radiometric accuracy of Level-1B (L1B) products for the bands.

  1. The effect of the three non-collinear chips on the imaging of infrared remote sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaofan; Jin, Libing

    2016-10-01

    With the development of high-resolution imaging infrared remote satellites, high resolution imaging and wide swath width are required. Now one effective way to get a wide imaging swath is to increase the length of infrared chip linear array. Restricted by the number of sensor elements on each chip, field butting of the multiple chips is often adopted to obtain a wide of the field of view (FOV). However, since each infrared chip is actually an array in physical structure, and there is also an outer cover for each chip, it is really impossible to place the multiple infrared chips directly as a straight line on the focal plane, and three non-collinear arranging style is adopted instead. Due to the control stability of the drift angle, a non-collinear arrangement of the three chips on the focal plane, the undulation of the ground elevation and so on, the sub-image separately captured by each infrared chip cannot directly from as an integrated image scene. In this paper, the image mode of the three non-collinear Infrared chips is proposed. What is more, some key factors that affect the imaging quality of the three non-collinear infrared chips are discussed in detail, including the control of the drift angle, the placement of the three infrared chips on the focal plane, the terrain undulation and so on. The scales of the effect caused by those factors are calculated in the paper. In order to test and verify the methods given in the paper, flight mission of sun synchronism circle orbit is taken as an example for simulation. Some practical conclusions are arrived at. When the drift angle is out of control, it can bring the effect of the drift angle on the overlapping degree about pixel number, and relative distortion variation tendency was given based on altitude difference.

  2. Actively controlled multiple-sensor system for feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Michael J.; Silberberg, Teresa M.

    1991-08-01

    Typical vision systems which attempt to extract features from a visual image of the world for the purposes of object recognition and navigation are limited by the use of a single sensor and no active sensor control capability. To overcome limitations and deficiencies of rigid single sensor systems, more and more researchers are investigating actively controlled, multisensor systems. To address these problems, we have developed a self-calibrating system which uses active multiple sensor control to extract features of moving objects. A key problem in such systems is registering the images, that is, finding correspondences between images from cameras of differing focal lengths, lens characteristics, and positions and orientations. The authors first propose a technique which uses correlation of edge magnitudes for continuously calibrating pan and tilt angles of several different cameras relative to a single camera with a wide angle field of view, which encompasses the views of every other sensor. A simulation of a world of planar surfaces, visual sensors, and a robot platform used to test active control for feature extraction is then described. Motion in the field of view of at least one sensor is used to center the moving object for several sensors, which then extract object features such as color, boundary, and velocity from the appropriate sensors. Results are presented from real cameras and from the simulated world.

  3. Realistic Instrumentation Platform for Active and Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Gebru, Alem; Jayaweera, Hiran; Svanberg, Sune

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of a novel versatile optical platform for active and passive remote sensing of environmental parameters. Applications include assessment of vegetation status and water quality. The system is also adapted for ecological studies, such as identification of flying insects including agricultural pests. The system is based on two mid-size amateur astronomy telescopes, continuous-wave diode lasers at different wavelengths ranging from violet to the near infrared, and detector facilities including quadrant photodiodes, two-dimensional and line scan charge-coupled device cameras, and a compact digital spectrometer. Application examples include remote Ramanlaser-induced fluorescence monitoring of water quality at 120 m distance, and insect identification at kilometer ranges using the recorded wing beat frequency and its spectrum of overtones. Because of the low cost this developmental platform is very suitable for advanced research projects in developing countries and has, in fact, been multiplied during hands-on workshops and is now being used by a number of groups at African universities.

  4. Measuring physical activity with sensors: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dias, André; Fisterer, Bernhard; Lamla, Gregor; Kuhn, Klaus; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Horsch, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Long term wearing of motion and heart rate sensors are essential aspects for longitudinal studies on physical activity measurement studies. We conducted a qualitative study with seven subjects in a total of 13 test sessions to identify usability and handling problems associated with Stayhealth RT3, Actigraph GT1M and Polar RS800 sensors. We found that battery life limitation is the most recurrent technical problem and long term wear of heart rate sensors produces discomfort and skin irritation.

  5. NASA's Future Active Remote Sensing Missing for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Jonathan B.

    2000-01-01

    Since the beginning of space remote sensing of the earth, there has been a natural progression widening the range of electromagnetic radiation used to sense the earth, and slowly, steadily increasing the spatial, spectral, and radiometric resolution of the measurements. There has also been a somewhat slower trend toward active measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum, motivated in part by increased resolution, but also by the ability to make new measurements. Active microwave instruments have been used to measure ocean topography, to study the land surface. and to study rainfall from space. Future NASA active microwave missions may add detail to the topographical studies, sense soil moisture, and better characterize the cryosphere. Only recently have active optical instruments been flown in space by NASA; however, there are currently several missions in development which will sense the earth with lasers and many more conceptual active optical missions which address the priorities of NASA's earth science program. Missions are under development to investigate the structure of the terrestrial vegetation canopy, to characterize the earth's ice caps, and to study clouds and aerosols. Future NASA missions may measure tropospheric vector winds and make vastly improved measurements of the chemical components of the earth's atmosphere.

  6. A field evaluation of remote sensor measurements of wind, temperature, and moisture for ARM integrated sounding system research

    SciTech Connect

    Martner, B.E.; Westwater, E.R.; Strauch, R.G.

    1993-10-01

    Remote sensing systems were operated in Colorado in February and March 1991 to obtain detailed profiles of the kinematic and thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere for the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research program. The instruments included wind profilers, Radio Acoustic Sounding Systems (PASS), microwave and infrared radiometers, an infrared spectrometer, ceilometers, radiosondes, surface meteorological stations, and other equipment. A mesoscale data assimilation model will be used to combine the data into dynamically consistent four-dimensional fields as part of an integrated data assimilation sounding system. This report evaluates the performance of the NOAA remote sensors used in the 1991 field data collection. These included five different wind profilers, each equipped with RASS capability for temperature profiling, and microwave radiometers for measurements of pathintegrated water vapor and liquid water content. The design and initial testing of a Fourier-transform InfraRed Sounder (FIRS) for humidity profiling is also described. The ranges of height coverage and measurement accuracies for each wind profiler/RASS are examined. Specific recommendations for optimizing the design and configuration of similar instruments are made for the ARM cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, based on results of the 1991 field work and earlier tests. Examples of routine processed data products are presented for three intensive operating period studies to further illustrate the remote sensors` capabilities.

  7. Active self-testing noise measurement sensors for large-scale environmental sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-12-13

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  8. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10. PMID:24351634

  9. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1992-04-30

    This research project designed to investigate how atmospheric remote sensing technology can best be applied to the characterization of the cloudy atmosphere. Our research program addresses basic atmospheric remote sensing questions, but at the same time is clearly directed toward providing information crucial to the ARM (Atmospheric Remote Sensing) program and for application to the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART). The instrumentation that is being brought into play includes a variety of art-of-the-art sensors. Available at NOAA WPL are polarization Doppler K{sub a}-band (0.86 mm) and X-band (3.2 cm) radars, a C0{sub 2}(10.6 {mu}m) Doppler lidar with sequential ` polarization measurement capabilities, a three-channel (20.6, 31.65 and 90 GHz) microwave radiometer, and variety of visible and infrared radiometers. Instrumentation at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) includes a polarization ruby (0.643 {mu}m) lidar, a narrow-beam (0.14{degree}) mid-infrared (9.5--11.5 {mu}m) radiometer coaligned with the lidar, several other radiometers in the visible and infrared spectral regions, and an advanced two-color (1.06 and 0.532 {mu}m), four-channel Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) and all-sky video imaging system that have only recently been developed under the ARM IDP.

  10. The ASPRS Remote Sensing Industry Forecast: Phase II & III - Digital Sensor Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondello, Charles

    2007-01-01

    In August 1999, ASPRS and NASA's (then) Commercial Remote Sensing Program (CRSP) entered into a 5-year Space Act Agreement (SAA), combining resources and expertise to: (a) Baseline the Remote Sensing Industry (RSI) based on GEIA Model; (b) Develop a 10-Year RSI market forecast and attendant processes; and (c) Provide improved information for decision makers.

  11. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  12. A simulation of air pollution model parameter estimation using data from a ground-based LIDAR remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, J. F.; Suttles, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    One way to obtain estimates of the unknown parameters in a pollution dispersion model is to compare the model predictions with remotely sensed air quality data. A ground-based LIDAR sensor provides relative pollution concentration measurements as a function of space and time. The measured sensor data are compared with the dispersion model output through a numerical estimation procedure to yield parameter estimates which best fit the data. This overall process is tested in a computer simulation to study the effects of various measurement strategies. Such a simulation is useful prior to a field measurement exercise to maximize the information content in the collected data. Parametric studies of simulated data matched to a Gaussian plume dispersion model indicate the trade offs available between estimation accuracy and data acquisition strategy.

  13. All you ever wanted to know about remote sensing. [terminology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooneyhan, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    A brief review of remote sensing state-of-the-art is presented. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of remote sensing terminology. Passive and active sensors and sensor platforms from the spacecraft program to the ground truth program are described.

  14. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  15. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  16. Pulse-Driven Magnetoimpedance Sensor Detection of Cardiac Magnetic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology. PMID:22022453

  17. Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at Microwave Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    This report summarizes research activities and results obtained under grant N000l4-99-1-0627 "Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at...Measurements were completed during April 1999 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts.

  18. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  19. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  20. Active contour segmentation for hyperspectral oil spill remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-ping; Chang, Ming; An, Ju-bai; Huang, Jian; Lin, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Oil spills could occur in many conditions, which results in pollution of the natural resources, marine environment and economic health of the area. Whenever we need to identify oil spill, confirm the location or get the shape and acreage of oil spill, we have to get the edge information of oil slick images firstly. Hyperspectral remote sensing imaging is now widely used to detect oil spill. Active Contour Models (ACMs) is a widely used image segmentation method that utilizes the geometric information of objects within images. Region based models are less sensitive to noise and give good performance for images with weak edges or without edges. One of the popular Region based ACMs, active contours without edges Models, is implemented by Chan-Vese. The model has the property of global segmentation to segment all the objects within an image irrespective of the initial contour. In this paper, we propose an improved CV model, which can perform well in the oil spill hyper-spectral image segmentation. The energy function embeds spectral and spatial information, introduces the vector edge stopping function, and constructs a novel length term. Results of the improved model on airborne hyperspectral oil spill images show that it improves the ability of distinguishing between oil spills and sea water, as well as the capability of noise reduction.

  1. Generation and remote delivery of plasma activated species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Paul; Mahony, Charles; Kelsey, Colin; Rutherford, David; Mariotti, Davide; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Diver, Declan

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interactions with microdroplets offer new opportunities to deliver active chemical agents and nanoparticles to remote substrates downstream with many potential applications from cancer theranostics and wound healing in biomedicine, gentle food decontamination and seed germination in plasma agriculture to catalyst production and photonic structures fabrication, among others. We demonstrate plasma-liquid based pristine nanomaterials synthesis in flight and subsequent delivery up to 120mm from the atmospheric pressure plasma source. Monosized and non-aggregating metal nanoparticles are formed in the rf plasma in less than 100us, representing an increase in precursor reduction rate that is many (>4) orders of magnitude faster than that observed with standard colloidal chemistry or via high energy radiolytic techniques. Also the collection and purification limitations of the latter are avoided. Plasma activated liquid including OH radicals and H2O2 are transported over 120mm and have demonstrated high efficacy bacterial decontamination. These results will be compared with charge species and radical transport from the rf plasma without microdroplets. Reaction models based on high solvated surface electron concentrations will be presented. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  2. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  3. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  4. Remote Monitoring of Post-eruption Volcano Environment Based-On Wireless Sensor Network (WSN): The Mount Sinabung Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soeharwinto; Sinulingga, Emerson; Siregar, Baihaqi

    2017-01-01

    An accurate information can be useful for authorities to make good policies for preventive and mitigation after volcano eruption disaster. Monitoring of environmental parameters of post-eruption volcano provides an important information for authorities. Such monitoring system can be develop using the Wireless Network Sensor technology. Many application has been developed using the Wireless Sensor Network technology, such as floods early warning system, sun radiation mapping, and watershed monitoring. This paper describes the implementation of a remote environment monitoring system of mount Sinabung post-eruption. The system monitor three environmental parameters: soil condition, water quality and air quality (outdoor). Motes equipped with proper sensors, as components of the monitoring system placed in sample locations. The measured value from the sensors periodically sends to data server using 3G/GPRS communication module. The data can be downloaded by the user for further analysis.The measurement and data analysis results generally indicate that the environmental parameters in the range of normal/standard condition. The sample locations are safe for living and suitable for cultivation, but awareness is strictly required due to the uncertainty of Sinabung status.

  5. Ultra-fast coherent optical system for active remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Shubhashish; Becker, Don; Joshi, Abhay; Howard, Roy

    2008-04-01

    Active optical remote sensing has numerous applications including battlefield target recognition and tracking, atmospheric monitoring, structural monitoring, collision avoidance systems, and terrestrial mapping. The maximum propagation distance in LIDAR sensors is limited by the signal attenuation. Sensor range could be improved by increasing the transmitted pulse energy, at the expense of reduced resolution and information bandwidth. Coherent detection can operate at low optical power levels without sacrificing sensor bandwidth. Utilizing a high power LO laser to increase the receiver gain, coherent systems provide shot noise-limited gain thereby increasing the sensing range. To fully exploit high LO powers without incurring performance penalties due to the RIN of the LO, high power handling balanced photodiodes are used. The coherent system has superior dynamic range, bandwidth, and noise performance than small-signal APD-based systems. Coherent detection is a linear process that is sensitive to the amplitude, phase and polarization of the received signal. Therefore, Doppler shifts and vibration signatures can be easily recovered. RF adaptive filtering following photodetection enables channel equalization, atmospheric turbulence compensation, and efficient background light filtering. We demonstrate a coherent optical transmission system using 15mA high power handling balanced photodetectors. This system has an IF linewidth <1Hz, employing a proprietary phase locked loop design. Data is presented for 100ps pulsed transmission. We have demonstrated amplitude and phase modulated 10Gb/s communication links with sensitivities of 132 and 72 photons per bit respectively. Investigations into system performance in the presence of laboratory induced atmospheric turbulence are shown.

  6. Technical Survey and Evaluation of Underwater Sensors and Remotely Operated Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    and sensor technologies. "* An evaluation of how well each vehicle system would be able to meet operational and environmental requirements for sensor...delivery. "" An evaluation af how well each sensor would be able to meet the overall inspection requirements. "* The development of a conceptual...of damaged areas as well as crew efficiency and safety. 8 Precipitation (heavy snowfall, rain, or hail) contributes to low visibility, operator error

  7. Wireless remotely readable microaccelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Hareesh; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    1997-06-01

    The integration of MEMS, SAW devices and required microelectronics is presented in this paper. This unique combination of technologies results in a novel sensor that can be remotely sensed by a microwave system with the advantage of no power requirements or very low power requirements. Such a device is readily compatible with existing antenna technologies as the SAW device operates at 1 GHz. The microaccelerometer presented is simple in construction and easy to manufacture with existing silicon micromachining technology. Depending on the application certain design parameters can be modified to achieve the desired sensitivity. Similar modifications in the microelectronics can also be envisioned. A fabrication method to produce such a device is also presented. The relatively small size of the sensor makes it an ideal conformal sensor. The accelerometer finds application as air bag deployment sensors, vibration sensors for noise control, deflection and strain sensors, inertial and dimensional positioning systems, ABS/traction control, smart suspension, active roll stabilization and four wheel steering.

  8. A study of the potential of remote sensors in urban transportation planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietschier, D.; Modlin, D. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The potential uses of remotely sensed data as applied to the transportation planning process are presented. By utilizing the remote sensing technology developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in the various space programs, it is hoped that both the expense and errors inherent in the conventional data collection techniques can be avoided. Additional bonuses derived from the use of remotely sensed data are those of the permanent record nature of the data and the traffic engineering data simultaneously made available. The major mathematical modeling phases and the role remotely sensed data might play in replacing conventionally collected data are discussed. Typical surveys undertaken in the overall planning process determine the nature and extent of travel desires, land uses, transportation facilities and socio-economic characteristics. Except for the socio-economic data, data collected in the other surveys mentioned can be taken from photographs in sufficient detail to be useful in the modeling procedures.

  9. Multisensor of Remotely Sensed Data for Characterizing Seismotectonic Activities in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Bakar, Rabieahtul; Azahari Razak, Khamarrul; Anuar Jamaludin, Tajul; Tongkul, Felix; Mohamad, Zakaria; Ramli, Zamri; Abd Manap, Mohamad; Rahman, Muhammad Zulkarnain Abdul

    2015-04-01

    develop the exchangeable and transferable rule-set with optimal parameterization for such aforementioned tasks. A geomorphometric-based remotely sensed approach is used to understand the tectonic geomorphology in processes affecting the environment at different spatial scales. As a result of this study, questions related to cascading natural disasters, e.g. landslides can be quantitatively answered. Development and applications of seismically induced landslide hazard and risk zonation at different scales are conceptually presented and critically discussed. So far, quantification evaluation of uncertainties associated to spatial seismic hazard and risks prediction remains very challenging to understand and it is an interest of on-going research. In the near-future, it is crucial to address the changes of climate and land-use-land-cover in relation to temporal and spatial pattern of seismically induced landslides. It is also important to assess, model and incorporate the changes due to natural disasters into a sustainable risk management. As a conclusion, the characteristics, development and function of tectonic movement, as one of the components for geomorphological process-response system is crucial for a regional seismic study. With newly emerging multi-sensor of remotely sensed data coupled with the satellite positioning system promises a better mapping and monitoring tool for seismotectonic activities in such a way that it can be used to map, monitor, and model related seismically induced processes for a comprehensive hazard and associated risk assessment.

  10. Training Classifiers with Shadow Features for Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Simon; Song, Wei; Cho, Kyungeun; Wong, Raymond; Wong, Kelvin K. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel training/testing process for building/using a classification model based on human activity recognition (HAR) is proposed. Traditionally, HAR has been accomplished by a classifier that learns the activities of a person by training with skeletal data obtained from a motion sensor, such as Microsoft Kinect. These skeletal data are the spatial coordinates (x, y, z) of different parts of the human body. The numeric information forms time series, temporal records of movement sequences that can be used for training a classifier. In addition to the spatial features that describe current positions in the skeletal data, new features called ‘shadow features’ are used to improve the supervised learning efficacy of the classifier. Shadow features are inferred from the dynamics of body movements, and thereby modelling the underlying momentum of the performed activities. They provide extra dimensions of information for characterising activities in the classification process, and thereby significantly improve the classification accuracy. Two cases of HAR are tested using a classification model trained with shadow features: one is by using wearable sensor and the other is by a Kinect-based remote sensor. Our experiments can demonstrate the advantages of the new method, which will have an impact on human activity detection research. PMID:28264470

  11. Operation of remote mobile sensors for security of drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Perelman, By Lina; Ostfeld, Avi

    2013-09-01

    The deployment of fixed online water quality sensors in water distribution systems has been recognized as one of the key components of contamination warning systems for securing public health. This study proposes to explore how the inclusion of mobile sensors for inline monitoring of various water quality parameters (e.g., residual chlorine, pH) can enhance water distribution system security. Mobile sensors equipped with sampling, sensing, data acquisition, wireless transmission and power generation systems are being designed, fabricated, and tested, and prototypes are expected to be released in the very near future. This study initiates the development of a theoretical framework for modeling mobile sensor movement in water distribution systems and integrating the sensory data collected from stationary and non-stationary sensor nodes to increase system security. The methodology is applied and demonstrated on two benchmark networks. Performance of different sensor network designs are compared for fixed and combined fixed and mobile sensor networks. Results indicate that complementing online sensor networks with inline monitoring can increase detection likelihood and decrease mean time to detection.

  12. Wireless Sensor Node for Autonomous Monitoring and Alerts in Remote Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor); Panangadan, Anand V. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method, apparatus, system, and computer program products provides personal alert and tracking capabilities using one or more nodes. Each node includes radio transceiver chips operating at different frequency ranges, a power amplifier, sensors, a display, and embedded software. The chips enable the node to operate as either a mobile sensor node or a relay base station node while providing a long distance relay link between nodes. The power amplifier enables a line-of-sight communication between the one or more nodes. The sensors provide a GPS signal, temperature, and accelerometer information (used to trigger an alert condition). The embedded software captures and processes the sensor information, provides a multi-hop packet routing protocol to relay the sensor information to and receive alert information from a command center, and to display the alert information on the display.

  13. Laser-activated remote phosphor conversion with ceramic phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Tchoul, Maxim; Mehl, Oliver; Sorg, Jörg; Zheng, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Direct laser activation of a remote phosphor, or LARP, is a highly effective approach for producing very high luminance solid-state light sources. Such sources have much smaller étendue than LEDs of similar power, thereby greatly increasing system luminous fluxes in projection and display applications. While several commercial products now employ LARP technology, most current configurations employ phosphor powders in a silicone matrix deposited on rotating wheels. These provide a low excitation duty cycle that helps limit quenching and thermal overload. These systems already operate close to maximum achievable pump powers and intensities. To further increase power scaling and eliminate mechanical parts to achieve smaller footprints, OSRAM has been developing static LARP systems based on high-thermal conductivity monolithic ceramic phosphors. OSRAM has recently introduced a static LARP product using ceramic phosphor for endoscopy and also demonstrated a LARP concept for automotive forward lighting1. We first discuss the basic LARP concept with ceramic phosphors, showing how their improved thermal conductivity can achieve both high luminous fluxes and luminance in a static configuration. Secondly, we show the importance of scattering and low optical losses to achieving high overall efficiency and light extraction. This is shown through experimental results and radiation transport calculations. Finally, we discuss some of the fundamental factors which limit the ultimate luminance achievable with ceramic converted LARP, including optical pumping effects and thermal quenching.

  14. Validation of Remote Sensing Retrieval Products using Data from a Wireless Sensor-Based Online Monitoring in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuhong; Cheng, Xiao; Yang, Rongjin; Liu, Qiang; Qiu, Yubao; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli; Zhao, Long

    2016-11-17

    Of the modern technologies in polar-region monitoring, the remote sensing technology that can instantaneously form large-scale images has become much more important in helping acquire parameters such as the freezing and melting of ice as well as the surface temperature, which can be used in the research of global climate change, Antarctic ice sheet responses, and cap formation and evolution. However, the acquirement of those parameters is impacted remarkably by the climate and satellite transit time which makes it almost impossible to have timely and continuous observation data. In this research, a wireless sensor-based online monitoring platform (WSOOP) for the extreme polar environment is applied to obtain a long-term series of data which is site-specific and continuous in time. Those data are compared and validated with the data from a weather station at Zhongshan Station Antarctica and the result shows an obvious correlation. Then those data are used to validate the remote sensing products of the freezing and melting of ice and the surface temperature and the result also indicated a similar correlation. The experiment in Antarctica has proven that WSOOP is an effective system to validate remotely sensed data in the polar region.

  15. Validation of Remote Sensing Retrieval Products using Data from a Wireless Sensor-Based Online Monitoring in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuhong; Cheng, Xiao; Yang, Rongjin; Liu, Qiang; Qiu, Yubao; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli; Zhao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Of the modern technologies in polar-region monitoring, the remote sensing technology that can instantaneously form large-scale images has become much more important in helping acquire parameters such as the freezing and melting of ice as well as the surface temperature, which can be used in the research of global climate change, Antarctic ice sheet responses, and cap formation and evolution. However, the acquirement of those parameters is impacted remarkably by the climate and satellite transit time which makes it almost impossible to have timely and continuous observation data. In this research, a wireless sensor-based online monitoring platform (WSOOP) for the extreme polar environment is applied to obtain a long-term series of data which is site-specific and continuous in time. Those data are compared and validated with the data from a weather station at Zhongshan Station Antarctica and the result shows an obvious correlation. Then those data are used to validate the remote sensing products of the freezing and melting of ice and the surface temperature and the result also indicated a similar correlation. The experiment in Antarctica has proven that WSOOP is an effective system to validate remotely sensed data in the polar region. PMID:27869668

  16. Developing sensor activity relationships for the JPL electronic nose sensors using molecular modeling and QSAR techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Jewell, A. D.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    We report a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) study using Genetic Function Approximations (GFA) to describe the polymer-carbon composite sensor activities in the JPL Electronic Nose, when exposed to chemical vapors at parts-per-million concentration levels.

  17. EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

    2005-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

  18. [Remote sensing of chlorophyll fluorescence at airborne level based on unmanned airship platform and hyperspectral sensor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Qi; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Ni, Zhuo-Ya; Wang, Ran; Wang, Qing-Shan

    2013-11-01

    The solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) has a close relationship with photosynthetic and is considered as a probe of plant photosynthetic activity. In this study, an airborne fluorescence detecting system was constructed by using a hyperspectral imager on board an unmanned airship. Both Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (FLD) and 3FLD used to extract ChlF require the incident solar irradiance, which is always difficult to receive at airborne level. Alternative FLD (aFLD) can overcome the problem by selecting non-fluorescent emitter in the image. However, aFLD is based on the assumption that reflectance is identical around the Fraunhofer line, which is not realistic. A new method, a3FLD, is proposed, which assumes that reflectance varies linearly with the wavelength around Fraunhofer line. The result of simulated data shows that ChlF retrieval error of a3FLD is significantly lower than that of aFLD when vegetation reflectance varies near the Fraunhofer line. The results of hyperspectral remote sensing data with the airborne fluorescence detecting system show that the relative values of retrieved ChlF of 5 kinds of plants extracted by both aFLD and a3FLD are consistent with vegetation growth stage and the ground-level ChlF. The ChlF values of aFLD are about 15% greater than a3FLD. In addition, using aFLD, some non-fluorescent objects have considerable ChlF value, while a3FLD can effectively overcome the problem.

  19. Predictive Analysis of Landslide Activity Using Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuzon, N.; Regan, J.; Slesnick, C.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides are historically one of the most damaging geohazard phenomena in terms of death tolls and socio-economic losses. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes of landslides and how environmental phenomena affect their frequency and severity is of critical importance. Of specific importance for mitigating future damage is increasing our understanding of how climate change will affect landslide severity, occurrence rates, and damage. We are developing data driven models aimed at predicting landslide activity. The models learn multi-dimensional weather and geophysical patterns associated with historical landslides and estimate location-dependent probabilities for landslides under current or future weather and geophysical conditions. Our approach uses machine learning algorithms capable of determining non-linear associations between dependent variables and landslide occurrence without requiring detailed knowledge of geomorphology. Our primary goal in year one of the project is to evaluate the predictive capabilities of data mining models in application to landslide activity, and to analyze if the approach will discover previously unknown variables and/or relationships important to landslide occurrence, frequency or severity. The models include remote sensing and ground-based data, including weather, landcover, slope, elevation and drainage information as well as urbanization data. The historical landslide dataset we used to build our preliminary models was compiled from City of Seattle landslide files, United States Geological Survey reports, newspaper articles, and a verified subset of the Seattle Landslide Database that consists of all reported landslides within Seattle, WA, between 1948 and 1999. Most of the landslides analyzed to-date are shallow. Using statistical analysis and unsupervised clustering methods we have thus far identified subsets of weather conditions that lead to a significantly higher landslide probability, and have developed

  20. Annotating smart environment sensor data for activity learning.

    PubMed

    Szewcyzk, S; Dwan, K; Minor, B; Swedlove, B; Cook, D

    2009-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track the activities that people perform at home. Machine learning techniques can perform this task, but the software algorithms rely upon large amounts of sample data that is correctly labeled with the corresponding activity. Labeling, or annotating, sensor data with the corresponding activity can be time consuming, may require input from the smart home resident, and is often inaccurate. Therefore, in this paper we investigate four alternative mechanisms for annotating sensor data with a corresponding activity label. We evaluate the alternative methods along the dimensions of annotation time, resident burden, and accuracy using sensor data collected in a real smart apartment.

  1. Identification of sewage leaks by active remote-sensing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly; Basson, Uri

    2016-04-01

    The increasing length of sewage pipelines, and concomitant risk of leaks due to urban and industrial growth and development is exposing the surrounding land to contamination risk and environmental harm. It is therefore important to locate such leaks in a timely manner, to minimize the damage. Advances in active remote sensing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Frequency Domain Electromagnetic (FDEM) technologies was used to identify leaking potentially responsible for pollution and to identify minor spills before they cause widespread damage. This study focused on the development of these electromagnetic methods to replace conventional acoustic methods for the identification of leaks along sewage pipes. Electromagnetic methods provide an additional advantage in that they allow mapping of the fluid-transport system in the subsurface. Leak-detection systems using GPR and FDEM are not limited to large amounts of water, but enable detecting leaks of tens of liters per hour, because they can locate increases in environmental moisture content of only a few percentage along the pipes. The importance and uniqueness of this research lies in the development of practical tools to provide a snapshot and monitoring of the spatial changes in soil moisture content up to depths of about 3-4 m, in open and paved areas, at relatively low cost, in real time or close to real time. Spatial measurements performed using GPR and FDEM systems allow monitoring many tens of thousands of measurement points per hectare, thus providing a picture of the spatial situation along pipelines and the surrounding. The main purpose of this study was to develop a method for detecting sewage leaks using the above-proposed geophysical methods, since their contaminants can severely affect public health. We focused on identifying, locating and characterizing such leaks in sewage pipes in residential and industrial areas.

  2. Flood mapping by combining the strengths of optical and Sentinel active radar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsemius, H. C.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Westerhoff, R.; Huizinga, J.; Villars, N.; Bishop, C.

    2012-04-01

    Flood mapping with remote sensing plays an important role in large scale disaster management procedures. For this purpose, the Dartmouth Flood Observatory (DFO) gained experience since 1993 with the production of flood maps from optical satellite imagery and has currently established, together with NASA collaborators, a fully automated, global, near real-time service. Another consortium is also presently working on an automated, near real-time, global flood mapping procedure called the 'Global Flood Observatory' (GFO), which will make use of high resolution Sentinel data. The procedure is currently tested on Envisat active radar (ASAR) imagery. Both the DFO and GFO projects provide open data output of their data and maps. The optical and radar approaches to flood mapping each have advantages and suffer from shortcomings. Optical remote sensing via the U.S. MODIS and VIIRS sensors is constrained by cloud cover but can attain a high revisit frequency (>2 /day), whereas the Envisat ASAR is not affected by cloud cover, but uses a lower revisit frequency (generally once/3 days, depending on the location). In this contribution, we demonstrate the combination of both approaches into one flood mapping result. This results in improved flood mapping in a case study over the Chao Phraya basin (Bangkok surroundings) during the recent October-November 2011 extreme flooding. The combined map shows that during overpass, ASAR reveals flooded regions over cloud-obscured areas, which clearly follow elevated features in the landscape such as roads, embankments and railways. Meanwhile, the high frequency of delivery of the optical information ensures timely information. Also, the quite different water classification methods used for the optical and ASAR data sources show good agreement and have been successfully merged into one GIS data product. This can also be automatically generated and disseminated on a global basis.

  3. Using a simple apparatus to measure direct and diffuse photosynthetically active radiation at remote locations.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Michael J; Kucharik, Christopher J; Norman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  4. Coastal and Estuarine Waters: Light Behavior. Coastal and Estuarine Waters: Optical Sensors and Remote Sensing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes the use of remote sensing techniques and technology to monitor coastal and estuarine waters. These waters are rich in mineral particles stirred up from the seabed by tides and waves and dissolved organic matter transported by rivers. The majority of the li...

  5. Scaling-up camera traps: monitoring the planet's biodiversity with networks of remote sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steenweg, Robin; Hebblewhite, Mark; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge A.; Fisher, Jason T.; Burton, Cole; Townsend, Susan E.; Carbone, Chris; Rowcliffe, J. Marcus; Whittington, Jesse; Brodie, Jedediah; Royle, Andy; Switalski, Adam; Clevenger, Anthony P.; Heim, Nicole; Rich, Lindsey N.

    2017-01-01

    Countries committed to implementing the Convention on Biological Diversity's 2011–2020 strategic plan need effective tools to monitor global trends in biodiversity. Remote cameras are a rapidly growing technology that has great potential to transform global monitoring for terrestrial biodiversity and can be an important contributor to the call for measuring Essential Biodiversity Variables. Recent advances in camera technology and methods enable researchers to estimate changes in abundance and distribution for entire communities of animals and to identify global drivers of biodiversity trends. We suggest that interconnected networks of remote cameras will soon monitor biodiversity at a global scale, help answer pressing ecological questions, and guide conservation policy. This global network will require greater collaboration among remote-camera studies and citizen scientists, including standardized metadata, shared protocols, and security measures to protect records about sensitive species. With modest investment in infrastructure, and continued innovation, synthesis, and collaboration, we envision a global network of remote cameras that not only provides real-time biodiversity data but also serves to connect people with nature.

  6. Remote sensing of plant trait responses to field-based plant-soil feedback using UAV-based optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meij, Bob; Kooistra, Lammert; Suomalainen, Juha; Barel, Janna M.; De Deyn, Gerlinde B.

    2017-02-01

    Plant responses to biotic and abiotic legacies left in soil by preceding plants is known as plant-soil feedback (PSF). PSF is an important mechanism to explain plant community dynamics and plant performance in natural and agricultural systems. However, most PSF studies are short-term and small-scale due to practical constraints for field-scale quantification of PSF effects, yet field experiments are warranted to assess actual PSF effects under less controlled conditions. Here we used unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-based optical sensors to test whether PSF effects on plant traits can be quantified remotely. We established a randomized agro-ecological field experiment in which six different cover crop species and species combinations from three different plant families (Poaceae, Fabaceae, Brassicaceae) were grown. The feedback effects on plant traits were tested in oat (Avena sativa) by quantifying the cover crop legacy effects on key plant traits: height, fresh biomass, nitrogen content, and leaf chlorophyll content. Prior to destructive sampling, hyperspectral data were acquired and used for calibration and independent validation of regression models to retrieve plant traits from optical data. Subsequently, for each trait the model with highest precision and accuracy was selected. We used the hyperspectral analyses to predict the directly measured plant height (RMSE = 5.12 cm, R2 = 0.79), chlorophyll content (RMSE = 0.11 g m-2, R2 = 0.80), N-content (RMSE = 1.94 g m-2, R2 = 0.68), and fresh biomass (RMSE = 0.72 kg m-2, R2 = 0.56). Overall the PSF effects of the different cover crop treatments based on the remote sensing data matched the results based on in situ measurements. The average oat canopy was tallest and its leaf chlorophyll content highest in response to legacy of Vicia sativa monocultures (100 cm, 0.95 g m-2, respectively) and in mixture with Raphanus sativus (100 cm, 1.09 g m-2, respectively), while the lowest values (76 cm, 0.41 g m-2, respectively

  7. Active Sensing System with In Situ Adjustable Sensor Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Nurzaman, Surya G.; Culha, Utku; Brodbeck, Luzius; Wang, Liyu; Iida, Fumiya

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread use of sensors in engineering systems like robots and automation systems, the common paradigm is to have fixed sensor morphology tailored to fulfill a specific application. On the other hand, robotic systems are expected to operate in ever more uncertain environments. In order to cope with the challenge, it is worthy of note that biological systems show the importance of suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability to handle different kinds of sensing tasks with particular requirements. Methodology This paper presents a robotics active sensing system which is able to adjust its sensor morphology in situ in order to sense different physical quantities with desirable sensing characteristics. The approach taken is to use thermoplastic adhesive material, i.e. Hot Melt Adhesive (HMA). It will be shown that the thermoplastic and thermoadhesive nature of HMA enables the system to repeatedly fabricate, attach and detach mechanical structures with a variety of shape and size to the robot end effector for sensing purposes. Via active sensing capability, the robotic system utilizes the structure to physically probe an unknown target object with suitable motion and transduce the arising physical stimuli into information usable by a camera as its only built-in sensor. Conclusions/Significance The efficacy of the proposed system is verified based on two results. Firstly, it is confirmed that suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability enables the system to sense different physical quantities, i.e. softness and temperature, with desirable sensing characteristics. Secondly, given tasks of discriminating two visually indistinguishable objects with respect to softness and temperature, it is confirmed that the proposed robotic system is able to autonomously accomplish them. The way the results motivate new research directions which focus on in situ adjustment of sensor morphology will also be discussed. PMID:24416094

  8. U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LAND REMOTE SENSING ACTIVITIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Doyle G.

    1983-01-01

    USGS uses all types of remotely sensed data, in combination with other sources of data, to support geologic analyses, hydrologic assessments, land cover mapping, image mapping, and applications research. Survey scientists use all types of remotely sensed data with ground verifications and digital topographic and cartographic data. A considerable amount of research is being done by Survey scientists on developing automated geographic information systems that can handle a wide variety of digital data. The Survey is also investigating the use of microprocessor computer systems for accessing, displaying, and analyzing digital data.

  9. [Active crop canopy sensor-based nitrogen diagnosis for potato].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Li, Fei; Qin, Yong-Lin; Fan, Ming-Shou

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, two potato experiments involving different N rates in 2011 were conducted in Wuchuan County and Linxi County, Inner Mongolia. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was collected by an active GreenSeeker crop canopy sensor to estimate N status of potato. The results show that the NDVI readings were poorly correlated with N nutrient indicators of potato at vegetative Growth stage due to the influence of soil background. With the advance of growth stages, NDVI values were exponentially related to plant N uptake (R2 = 0.665) before tuber bulking stage and were linearly related to plant N concentration (R2 = 0.699) when plant fully covered soil. In conclusion, GreenSeeker active crop sensor is a promising tool to estimate N status for potato plants. The findings from this study may be useful for developing N recommendation method based on active crop canopy sensor.

  10. Virtual Mission Operations of Remote Sensors With Rapid Access To and From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, Dave; Walke, Jon; Dikeman, Larry; Sage, Steven; Miller, Eric; Northam, James; Jackson, Chris; Taylor, John; Lynch, Scott; Heberle, Jay

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes network-centric operations, where a virtual mission operations center autonomously receives sensor triggers, and schedules space and ground assets using Internet-based technologies and service-oriented architectures. For proof-of-concept purposes, sensor triggers are received from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) to determine targets for space-based sensors. The Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) Disaster Monitoring Constellation satellite, the United Kingdom Disaster Monitoring Constellation (UK-DMC), is used as the space-based sensor. The UK-DMC s availability is determined via machine-to-machine communications using SSTL s mission planning system. Access to/from the UK-DMC for tasking and sensor data is via SSTL s and Universal Space Network s (USN) ground assets. The availability and scheduling of USN s assets can also be performed autonomously via machine-to-machine communications. All communication, both on the ground and between ground and space, uses open Internet standards.

  11. A Lightweight Hierarchical Activity Recognition Framework Using Smartphone Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Manhyung; Bang, Jae Hun; Nugent, Chris; McClean, Sally; Lee, Sungyoung

    2014-01-01

    Activity recognition for the purposes of recognizing a user's intentions using multimodal sensors is becoming a widely researched topic largely based on the prevalence of the smartphone. Previous studies have reported the difficulty in recognizing life-logs by only using a smartphone due to the challenges with activity modeling and real-time recognition. In addition, recognizing life-logs is difficult due to the absence of an established framework which enables the use of different sources of sensor data. In this paper, we propose a smartphone-based Hierarchical Activity Recognition Framework which extends the Naïve Bayes approach for the processing of activity modeling and real-time activity recognition. The proposed algorithm demonstrates higher accuracy than the Naïve Bayes approach and also enables the recognition of a user's activities within a mobile environment. The proposed algorithm has the ability to classify fifteen activities with an average classification accuracy of 92.96%. PMID:25184486

  12. A fluorescence LIDAR sensor for hyper-spectral time-resolved remote sensing and mapping.

    PubMed

    Palombi, Lorenzo; Alderighi, Daniele; Cecchi, Giovanna; Raimondi, Valentina; Toci, Guido; Lognoli, David

    2013-06-17

    In this work we present a LIDAR sensor devised for the acquisition of time resolved laser induced fluorescence spectra. The gating time for the acquisition of the fluorescence spectra can be sequentially delayed in order to achieve fluorescence data that are resolved both in the spectral and temporal domains. The sensor can provide sub-nanometric spectral resolution and nanosecond time resolution. The sensor has also imaging capabilities by means of a computer-controlled motorized steering mirror featuring a biaxial angular scanning with 200 μradiant angular resolution. The measurement can be repeated for each point of a geometric grid in order to collect a hyper-spectral time-resolved map of an extended target.

  13. Future European and Japanese remote-sensing sensors and programs; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 1, 2, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, P.N.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to the METEOSAT second-generation program, the ESA earth observation polar platform program, a new satellite for a climatology study in the tropics, a medium-resolution imaging spectrometer, a Michelson interferometer for passive atmosphere sounding, an optical mapping instrument, an optical sensor system for Japanese earth resources satellite 1, a synthetic aperture radar of JERS-1, an ocean color and temperature scanner for Advanced Earth-Observing Satellite (ADEOS), an interferometric monitor for greenhouse gasses for ADEOS. Attention is also given to Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for EOS-A, short-wave infrared subsystem design status of ASTER, ASTER calibration concept, Japanese polar orbit platform program, and airborne and spaceborne thermal multispectral remote sensing.

  14. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  15. Activities of the Remote Sensing Information Sciences Research Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Botkin, D.; Peuquet, D.; Smith, T.; Star, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Topics on the analysis and processing of remotely sensed data in the areas of vegetation analysis and modelling, georeferenced information systems, machine assisted information extraction from image data, and artificial intelligence are investigated. Discussions on support field data and specific applications of the proposed technologies are also included.

  16. Remote sensing research activities related to academic institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, V. I.

    1980-01-01

    The role of research in the educational setting is discussed. Curriculum developments for integrating teaching and research are described. Remote sensing technology is used as an example of bridging the gap between research and application. Recommendations are presented for strengthing research groups.

  17. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Active and Passive Microwave Ocean Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    of both analytical and efficient numerical methods for electromagnetics and hydrodynamics. New insights regarding these phenomena can then be applied to improve microwave active and passive remote sensing of the ocean surface.

  18. Active-Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Martian Permafrost and Subsurface Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raizer, V.; Linkin, V. M.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Smythe, W. D.; Zoubkov, B.; Babkin, F.

    2000-01-01

    The investigation of permafrost formation global distribution and their appearance in h less than or equal 1 m thick subsurface layer would be investigated successfully by employment of active-passive microwave remote sensing techniques.

  19. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  20. Performance evaluation of a Wireless Body Area sensor network for remote patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Khan, Jamil Y; Yuce, Mehmet R; Karami, Farbood

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, interests in the application of Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) have grown considerably. A WBAN can be used to develop a patient monitoring system which offers flexibility and mobility to patients. Use of a WBAN will also allow the flexibility of setting up a remote monitoring system via either the internet or an intranet. For such medical systems it is very important that a WBAN can collect and transmit data reliably, and in a timely manner to the monitoring entity. In this paper we examine the performance of an IEEE802.15.4/Zigbee MAC based WBAN operating in different patient monitoring environment. We study the performance of a remote patient monitoring system using an OPNET based simulation model.

  1. Personalized Technologies in Chronic Gastrointestinal Disorders: Self-monitoring and Remote Sensor Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad Safwan; Atreja, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    With increased access to high-speed Internet and smartphone devices, patients have started to use mobile applications (apps) for various health needs. These mobile apps are now increasingly used in integration with telemedicine and wearables to support fitness, health education, symptom tracking, and collaborative disease management and care coordination. More recently, evidence (especially around remote patient monitoring) has started to build in some chronic diseases, and some of the digital health technologies have received approval from the Food and Drug Administration. With the changing healthcare landscape and push for value-based care, adoption of these digital health initiatives among providers is bound to increase. Although so far there is a dearth of published evidence about effectiveness of these apps in gastroenterology care, there are ongoing trials to determine whether remote patient monitoring can lead to improvement in process metrics or outcome metrics for patients with chronic gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27189911

  2. Airborne remote sensors applied to engineering geology and civil works design investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelnett, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    The usefulness of various airborne remote sensing systems in the detection and identification of regional and specific geologic structural features that may affect the design and location of engineering structures on major civil works projects is evaluated. The Butler Valley Dam and Blue Lake Project in northern California was selected as a demonstration site. Findings derived from the interpretation of various kinds of imagery used are given.

  3. The Physics of Imaging with Remote Sensors : Photon State Space & Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.

    2012-01-01

    Standard (mono-pixel/steady-source) retrieval methodology is reaching its fundamental limit with access to multi-angle/multi-spectral photo- polarimetry. Next... Two emerging new classes of retrieval algorithm worth nurturing: multi-pixel time-domain Wave-radiometry transition regimes, and more... Cross-fertilization with bio-medical imaging. Physics-based remote sensing: - What is "photon state space?" - What is "radiative transfer?" - Is "the end" in sight? Two wide-open frontiers! center dot Examples (with variations.

  4. Interpretation of air pollution data as measured by an airborne remote sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; Young, G. R.; Green, R. N.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation described is a continuation of the work reported by Smith et al. (1974) in which a single source was studied. In the current study, multiple sources of known location are considered. The study is concerned with the strength of each source and the resulting pollution concentration field. The characteristics of the remotely sensed data are discussed along with the parameter estimation procedure, the estimation of pollution parameters, and a numerical example.

  5. Comparison of chlorophyll a concentration detected by remote sensors and other chlorophyll indices in inhomogeneous turbid waters.

    PubMed

    Sokoletsky, Leonid G; Yacobi, Yosef Z

    2011-10-20

    A new analytical approach for retrieval of the vertically weighted chlorophyll a concentration (Chl(rs)) detected by remote sensors is presented. Model calculations were carried out for the turbid waters of Lake Kinneret, Israel, and showed that Chl(rs) may be replaced by the average chlorophyll a concentration (Chl(p)) within the upper "penetration layer" 0-Z(p). The study also showed a high correlation between Chl(rs) and Chl concentration averaged in the other depth layers, namely, the 0-1 m layer, the euphotic layer (0-Z(e)), and the production layer (0-Z(pr)). Our findings are closely related to models developed for the world ocean, with the exception of periods when the dinoflagellate Peridinium gatunense blooms in the lake. We showed the effect of the pattern of vertical Chl distributions within the penetration layer on the difference between Chl(rs) and other Chl indices was conspicuous when the Chl maximum was in the uppermost 0- m layer of the water column. We assume that the presented approaches are instrumental for further development of optimal, locally adapted algorithms for remote sensing of Chl in any type of natural waters.

  6. Fiber Optic-Fluorescence Sensors for Remote Detection of Chemical Species in Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    from the viewing volume by diffusive/convective mass transport processes and replaced by uncomplexed indicator from the reservoir. Because the flow...Morin as Fluorescence sensor for Determination of Aluminum(III) ." Anal. Chem., 1983, 55, 667-670. (10) Urbano , E., H. Offenbacher, and O.S. Wolfbeis

  7. ERTS-B (Earth Resources Technology Satellite). [spacecraft design remote sensor description, and technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Mission plans and objectives of the ERTS 2 Satellite are presented. ERTS 2 follow-on investigations in various scientific disciplines including agriculture, meteorology, land-use, geology, water resources, oceanography, and environment are discussed. Spacecraft design and its sensors are described along with the Delta launch vehicle and launch operations. Applications identified from ERTS 1 investigations are summarized.

  8. Sensor Node for Remote Monitoring of Waterborne Disease-Causing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyukwang; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A sensor node for sampling water and checking for the presence of harmful bacteria such as E. coli in water sources was developed in this research. A chromogenic enzyme substrate assay method was used to easily detect coliform bacteria by monitoring the color change of the sampled water mixed with a reagent. Live webcam image streaming to the web browser of the end user with a Wi-Fi connected sensor node shows the water color changes in real time. The liquid can be manipulated on the web-based user interface, and also can be observed by webcam feeds. Image streaming and web console servers run on an embedded processor with an expansion board. The UART channel of the expansion board is connected to an external Arduino board and a motor driver to control self-priming water pumps to sample the water, mix the reagent, and remove the water sample after the test is completed. The sensor node can repeat water testing until the test reagent is depleted. The authors anticipate that the use of the sensor node developed in this research can decrease the cost and required labor for testing samples in a factory environment and checking the water quality of local water sources in developing countries. PMID:25951340

  9. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C.; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V.; Serrano, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature. PMID:26393604

  10. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V; Serrano, Juan J

    2015-09-18

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature.

  11. Fusion of smartphone motion sensors for physical activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2014-06-10

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting role) and an accelerometer (in a lead role) has been used with the aim to improve the recognition performance. How and when are various motion sensors, which are available on a smartphone, best used for better recognition performance, either individually or in combination? This is yet to be explored. In order to investigate this question, in this paper, we explore how these various motion sensors behave in different situations in the activity recognition process. For this purpose, we designed a data collection experiment where ten participants performed seven different activities carrying smart phones at different positions. Based on the analysis of this data set, we show that these sensors, except the magnetometer, are each capable of taking the lead roles individually, depending on the type of activity being recognized, the body position, the used data features and the classification method employed (personalized or generalized). We also show that their combination only improves the overall recognition performance when their individual performances are not very high, so that there is room for performance improvement. We have made our data set and our data collection application publicly available, thereby making our experiments reproducible.

  12. Fusion of Smartphone Motion Sensors for Physical Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2014-01-01

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting role) and an accelerometer (in a lead role) has been used with the aim to improve the recognition performance. How and when are various motion sensors, which are available on a smartphone, best used for better recognition performance, either individually or in combination? This is yet to be explored. In order to investigate this question, in this paper, we explore how these various motion sensors behave in different situations in the activity recognition process. For this purpose, we designed a data collection experiment where ten participants performed seven different activities carrying smart phones at different positions. Based on the analysis of this data set, we show that these sensors, except the magnetometer, are each capable of taking the lead roles individually, depending on the type of activity being recognized, the body position, the used data features and the classification method employed (personalized or generalized). We also show that their combination only improves the overall recognition performance when their individual performances are not very high, so that there is room for performance improvement. We have made our data set and our data collection application publicly available, thereby making our experiments reproducible. PMID:24919015

  13. Remote detection of riverine traffic using an ad hoc wireless sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athan, Stephan P.

    2005-05-01

    Trafficking of illegal drugs on riverine and inland waterways continues to proliferate in South America. While there has been a successful joint effort to cut off overland and air trafficking routes, there exists a vast river network and Amazon region consisting of over 13,000 water miles that remains difficult to adequately monitor, increasing the likelihood of narcotics moving along this extensive river system. Hence, an effort is underway to provide remote unattended riverine detection in lieu of manned or attended detection measures.

  14. Basic forest cover mapping using digitized remote sensor data and automated data processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggeshall, M. E.; Hoffer, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Remote sensing equipment and automatic data processing techniques were employed as aids in the institution of improved forest resource management methods. On the basis of automatically calculated statistics derived from manually selected training samples, the feature selection processor of LARSYS selected, upon consideration of various groups of the four available spectral regions, a series of channel combinations whose automatic classification performances (for six cover types, including both deciduous and coniferous forest) were tested, analyzed, and further compared with automatic classification results obtained from digitized color infrared photography.

  15. Application of remote sensor data to geologic analysis of the Bonanza Test Site Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Compiler)

    1973-01-01

    A geologic map of the Bonanza Test Site is nearing completion. Using published large scale geologic maps from various sources, the geology of the area is being compiled on a base scaled at 1:250,000. Sources of previously published geologic mapping include: (1) USGS Bulletins; (2) professional papers and geologic quadrangle maps; (3) Bureau of Mines reports; (4) Colorado School of Mines quarterlies; and (5) Rocky Mountain Association of Geologist Guidebooks. This compilation will be used to evaluate ERTS, Skylab, and remote sensing underflight data.

  16. Remote diffuse reflectance spectroscopy sensor for tissue engineering monitoring based on blind signal separation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Mateos, Pedro; Crespo-Garcia, Sergio; Ruiz-Llata, Marta; Lopez-Fernandez, José Ramón; Jorcano, José Luis; Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Acedo, Pablo

    2014-09-01

    In this study the first results on evaluation and assessment of grafted bioengineered skin substitutes using an optical Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) system with a remote optical probe are shown. The proposed system is able to detect early vascularization of skin substitutes expressing the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) protein compared to normal grafts, even though devitalized skin is used to protect the grafts. Given the particularities of the biological problem, data analysis is performed using two Blind Signal Separation (BSS) methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). These preliminary results are the first step towards point-of-care diagnostics for skin implants early assessment.

  17. New Airborne Sensors and Platforms for Solving Specific Tasks in Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, G.

    2012-07-01

    A huge number of small and medium sized sensors entered the market. Today's mid format sensors reach 80 MPix and allow to run projects of medium size, comparable with the first big format digital cameras about 6 years ago. New high quality lenses and new developments in the integration prepared the market for photogrammetric work. Companies as Phase One or Hasselblad and producers or integrators as Trimble, Optec, and others utilized these cameras for professional image production. In combination with small camera stabilizers they can be used also in small aircraft and make the equipment small and easy transportable e.g. for rapid assessment purposes. The combination of different camera sensors enables multi or hyper-spectral installations e.g. useful for agricultural or environmental projects. Arrays of oblique viewing cameras are in the market as well, in many cases these are small and medium format sensors combined as rotating or shifting devices or just as a fixed setup. Beside the proper camera installation and integration, also the software that controls the hardware and guides the pilot has to solve much more tasks than a normal FMS did in the past. Small and relatively cheap Laser Scanners (e.g. Riegl) are in the market and a proper combination with MS Cameras and an integrated planning and navigation is a challenge that has been solved by different softwares. Turnkey solutions are available e.g. for monitoring power line corridors where taking images is just a part of the job. Integration of thermal camera systems with laser scanner and video capturing must be combined with specific information of the objects stored in a database and linked when approaching the navigation point.

  18. Implementation of Remote Corrosion-Monitoring Sensor for Mission-Essential Structures at Okinawa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    modem was briefly considered, but there was a ques- tion of how easy it would be to interact with the local Japanese cell phone service providers... interdigitated steel ‘fingers’ (F), and the yellow-brown areas being the exposed top surface of the ad- hesive/polyimide support polymer (P). The width of...comprised of interdigitated steel fin- gers on top of a polyimide support film. Starting with the untested but electrically shorted, sensor (No. 3

  19. Application of remote sensor data to geologic analysis of the Bonanza test site Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    Selected samples of anomalous surface features commonly associated with the various types of uranium deposits are presented and recommendations for sensor applications are given. The features studied include: epigenetic uranium ore roll type; precambrian basal conglomerate type; vein-type uranium deposits; pipe-structure or diatreme deposits; evaporitic uranium deposits. The hydrogeology of the Mosquito Range and the San Luis Valley is also examined.

  20. Preliminary investigation of a sealed, remotely activated silver-zinc battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheat, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Methods necessary to provide a remotely activated, silver zinc battery capable of an extended activated stand while in a sealed condition were investigated. These requirements were to be accomplished in a battery package demonstrating an energy density of at least 35 watt hours per pound. Several methods of gas suppression were considered in view of the primary nature of this unit and utilized the electroplated dendritic zinc electrode. Amalgamation of the electrode provided the greatest suppression of gas at the zinc electrode. The approach to extending the activated stand capability of the remotely activated battery was through evaluation of three basic methods of remote, multi-cell activation; 1) the electrolyte manifold, 2) the gas manifold and 3) the individual cell. All three methods of activation can be incorporated into units which will meet the minimum energy density requirement.

  1. Remote electrocardiograph monitoring using a novel adhesive strip sensor: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Charles J; Ladewig, Dorothy J; Somers, Virend K; Bennet, Kevin E; Burrichter, Scott; Scott, Christopher G; Olson, Lyle J; Friedman, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    The increase in health care costs is not sustainable and has heightened the need for innovative low cost effective strategies for delivering patient care. Remote monitoring holds great promise for preventing or shortening duration of hospitalization even while improving quality of care. We therefore conducted a proof of concept study to examine the quality of electrocardiograph (ECG) recordings obtained remotely and to test its potential utility in detecting harmful rhythms such as atrial fibrillation. We tested a novel adhesive strip ECG monitor and assessed the ECG quality in ambulatory individuals. 2630 ECG strips were analyzed and classified as: Sinus, atrial fibrillation (AF), indeterminate, or other. Four readers independently rated ECG quality: 0: Noise; 1: QRS complexes seen, but P-wave indeterminate; 2: QRS complexes seen, P-waves seen but poor quality; and 3: Clean QRS complexes and P-waves. The combined average rating was: Noise 12%; R-R, no P-wave 10%; R-R, no PR interval 18%; and R-R with PR interval 60% (if Sinus). If minimum diagnostic quality was a score of 1, 88% of strips were diagnostic. There was moderate to high agreement regarding quality (weighted Kappa statistic values; 0.58 to 0.76) and high level of agreement regarding ECG diagnosis (ICC = 0.93). A highly variable RR interval (HRV ≥ 7) predicted AF (AUC = 0.87). The monitor acquires and transmits diagnostic high quality ECG data and permits characterization of AF. PMID:27847556

  2. Integration of active and passive sensors for obstacle avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Sridhar, Banavar

    1989-01-01

    The automatic obstacle-avoidance guidance problem is studied under the operational constraints imposed by the rotorcraft nap-of-the-earth (NOE) environment. The problem is discussed for two different circumstances. The first assumes that a full range map is available, irrespective of the type of sensor being used. Two approaches are proposed to extend a two-dimensional obstacle-avoidance concept presented by Cheng (1988). The situation where only a sparse range map is available from a passive sensor is also treated. An integrated approach that augments the passive sensor with an active one is discussed, along with the problem of data fusion and how it is affected by the characteristics of NOE flight.

  3. Trichomes as sensors: detecting activity on the leaf surface.

    PubMed

    Tooker, John F; Peiffer, Michelle; Luthe, Dawn S; Felton, Gary W

    2010-01-01

    The dramatic movements of some carnivorous plants species are triggered by sensory structures derived from trichomes. While unusual plant species such as the Venus fly trap and sundews may be expected to have elaborate sensors to capture their insect prey, more modest plant species might not be expected to have similar sensory capabilities. Our recent work, however, has revealed that glandular trichomes on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) appear to have a function similar to trigger hairs of carnivorous species, acting as "early warning" sensors. Using a combination of behavioral, molecular, and biochemical techniques, we determined that caterpillars, moths and mechanical disruption upregulate signaling molecules and defensive genes found in glandular trichomes. Importantly, we discovered that plants whose trichomes have been broken respond more vigorously when their defenses were induced. Taken together, our results suggest that glandular trichomes can act as sensors that detect activity on the leaf surface, and ready plants for herbivore attack.

  4. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  5. Monitoring Brain Activity with Protein Voltage and Calcium Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Storace, Douglas A.; Braubach, Oliver R.; Jin, Lei; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Sung, Uhna

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the roles of different cell types in the behaviors generated by neural circuits requires protein indicators that report neural activity with high spatio-temporal resolution. Genetically encoded fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors, which optically report the electrical activity in distinct cell populations, are, in principle, ideal candidates. Here we demonstrate that the FP voltage sensor ArcLight reports odor-evoked electrical activity in the in vivo mammalian olfactory bulb in single trials using both wide-field and 2-photon imaging. ArcLight resolved fast odorant-responses in individual glomeruli, and distributed odorant responses across a population of glomeruli. Comparisons between ArcLight and the protein calcium sensors GCaMP3 and GCaMP6f revealed that ArcLight had faster temporal kinetics that more clearly distinguished activity elicited by individual odorant inspirations. In contrast, the signals from both GCaMPs were a saturating integral of activity that returned relatively slowly to the baseline. ArcLight enables optical electrophysiology of mammalian neuronal population activity in vivo. PMID:25970202

  6. Active pixel sensor array with electronic shuttering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An active pixel cell includes electronic shuttering capability. The cell can be shuttered to prevent additional charge accumulation. One mode transfers the current charge to a storage node that is blocked against accumulation of optical radiation. The charge is sampled from a floating node. Since the charge is stored, the node can be sampled at the beginning and the end of every cycle. Another aspect allows charge to spill out of the well whenever the charge amount gets higher than some amount, thereby providing anti blooming.

  7. Bi-Fi: an embedded sensor/system architecture for REMOTE biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Farshchi, Shahin; Pesterev, Aleksey; Nuyujukian, Paul H; Mody, Istvan; Judy, Jack W

    2007-11-01

    Wireless-enabled processor modules intended for communicating low-frequency phenomena (i.e., temperature, humidity, and ambient light) have been enabled to acquire and transmit multiple biological signals in real time, which has been achieved by using computationally efficient data acquisition, filtering, and compression algorithms, and interfacing the modules with biological interface hardware. The sensor modules can acquire and transmit raw biological signals at a rate of 32 kb/s, which is near the hardware limit of the modules. Furthermore, onboard signal processing enables one channel, sampled at a rate of 4000 samples/s at 12-bit resolution, to be compressed via adaptive differential-pulse-code modulation (ADPCM) and transmitted in real time. In addition, the sensors can be configured to filter and transmit individual time-referenced "spike" waveforms, or to transmit the spike height and width for alleviating network traffic and increasing battery life. The system is capable of acquiring eight channels of analog signals as well as data via an asynchronous serial connection. A back-end server archives the biological data received via networked gateway sensors, and hosts them to a client application that enables users to browse recorded data. The system also acquires, filters, and transmits oxygen saturation and pulse rate via a commercial-off-the-shelf interface board. The system architecture can be configured for performing real-time nonobtrusive biological monitoring of humans or rodents. This paper demonstrates that low-power, computational, and bandwidth-constrained wireless-enabled platforms can indeed be leveraged for wireless biosignal monitoring.

  8. Fiber-remote reflectance spectroscopy with an optimized diffuse reflectance sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, R.D.; Grim, K.P.; Dewey, G.; Brubaker, M.L.

    1995-12-31

    A diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system is described which can operate in a contact and non-contact mode on powders, slurries and other diffusely scattering materials. Diffuse reflectance spectra are presented for a number of samples including common household materials. A comparison is made of the probe with a Bio-Rad diffuse reflectance accessory. Second derivative spectra are shown of a calibration mixture of polymer additives. The use of the diffuse reflectance system for non-destructive tablet hardness measurements is discussed. Sensor multiplexing for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, is reviewed.

  9. Fiber-remote reflectance spectroscopy with an optimized diffuse reflectance sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driver, Richard D.; Grim, Kirk P.; Dewey, G.; Brubaker, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    A diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system is described which can operate in a contact and non- contact mode on powders, slurries and other diffusely scattering materials. Diffuse reflectance spectra are presented for a number of samples including common household materials. A comparison is made of the probe with a Bio-Rad diffuse reflectance accessory. Second derivative spectra are shown of a calibration mixture of polymer additives. The use of the diffuse reflectance system for non-destructive tablet hardness measurements is discussed. Sensor multiplexing for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is reviewed.

  10. Radiation effects on optical components of a laser radar sensor designed for remote metrology in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Grann, E.B.; Slotwinski, A.

    1997-09-01

    A frequency modulated laser radar is being developed for in-vessel metrology and viewing of plasma-facing surfaces. Some optical components of this sensor must withstand intense gamma radiation (3 {times} 10{sup 6} rad/h) during operation. The authors have tested the effect of radiation on a silica core polarization maintaining optical fiber and on TeO{sub 2} crystals at doses up to {approximately} 10{sup 9} rad. Additional tests are planned for evaluating the performance of a complete acousto-optic (AO) scanning device. The progress made in these tests is also described.

  11. Beach erosion control study at Pass Christian. [using remote sensors and satellite observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The methods of measuring the existence of erosion and the effects of sand stabilization control systems are described. The mechanics of sand movement, the nature of sand erosion, and the use of satellite data to measure these factors and their surrogates are discussed using the locational and control aspects of aeolian and litoral erosion zones along the sand beach of the Mississippi coast. The aeolian erosion is highlighted due to the redeposition of the sand which causes high cleanup costs, property damage, and safety and health hazards. The areas of differential erosion and the patterns of beach sand movement are illustrated and the use of remote sensing methods to identify the areas of erosion are evaluated.

  12. The analytical design of spectral measurements for multispectral remote sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiersma, D. J.; Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In order to choose a design which will be optimal for the largest class of remote sensing problems, a method was developed which attempted to represent the spectral response function from a scene as accurately as possible. The performance of the overall recognition system was studied relative to the accuracy of the spectral representation. The spectral representation was only one of a set of five interrelated parameter categories which also included the spatial representation parameter, the signal to noise ratio, ancillary data, and information classes. The spectral response functions observed from a stratum were modeled as a stochastic process with a Gaussian probability measure. The criterion for spectral representation was defined by the minimum expected mean-square error.

  13. REMOTE SENSING AND GIS FOR WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In identifying and characterizing wetland and adjacent features, the use of remote sensor and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technologies has been valuable. Remote sensors such as photographs and computer-sensor generated images can illustrate conditions of hydrology, exten...

  14. Relation of NDVI obtained from different remote sensing at different space and resolutions sensors in Spanish Dehesas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano Rodríguez, Juan; Tarquis, Ana M.; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Díaz-Ambrona, Carlos G. H.

    2015-04-01

    Satellite data are an important source of information and serve as monitoring crops on large scales. There are several indexes, but the most used for monitoring vegetation is NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), calculated from the spectral bands of red (RED) and near infrared (NIR), obtaining the value according to relationship: [(NIR - RED) / (NIR + RED)]. During the years 2010-2013 monthly monitoring was conducted in three areas of Spain (Salamanca, Caceres and Cordoba). Pasture plots were selected and satellite images of two different sensors, DEIMOS-1 and MODIS were obtained. DEIMOS-1 is based on the concept Microsat-100 from Surrey. It is designed for imaging the Earth with a resolution good enough to study terrestrial vegetation cover (20x20 m), although with a wide range of visual field (600 km) to get those images with high temporal resolution. By contrast, MODIS images present a much lower spatial resolution (500x500 m). Indices obtained from both sensors to the same area and date are compared and the results show r2 = 0.56; r2 = 0.65 and r2 = 0.90 for the areas of Salamanca, Cáceres and Cordoba respectively. According to the results obtained show that the NDVI obtained by MODIS is slightly larger than that obtained by the sensor for DEIMOS for same time and area. References J.A. Escribano, C.G.H. Diaz-Ambrona, L. Recuero, M. Huesca, V. Cicuendez, A. Palacios-Orueta y A.M. Tarquis. Aplicacion de Indices de Vegetacion para evaluar la falta de produccion de pastos y montaneras en dehesas. I Congreso Iberico de la Dehesa y el Montado. 6-7 Noviembre, 2013, Badajoz. J.A. Escribano Rodriguez, A.M. Tarquis, C.G. Hernandez Diaz-Ambrona. Pasture Drought Insurance Based on NDVI and SAVI. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 14, EGU2012-13945, 2012. EGU General Assembly 2012. Juan Escribano Rodriguez, Carmelo Alonso, Ana Maria Tarquis, Rosa Maria Benito, Carlos Hernandez Diaz-Ambrona. Comparison of NDVI fields obtained from different remote sensors

  15. Optimal Atmospheric Correction for Above-Ground Forest Biomass Estimation with the ETM+ Remote Sensor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu Cong; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Jungbin; Choi, Sung-Uk; Hong, Suk-Young; Heo, Joon

    2015-07-31

    The reflectance of the Earth's surface is significantly influenced by atmospheric conditions such as water vapor content and aerosols. Particularly, the absorption and scattering effects become stronger when the target features are non-bright objects, such as in aqueous or vegetated areas. For any remote-sensing approach, atmospheric correction is thus required to minimize those effects and to convert digital number (DN) values to surface reflectance. The main aim of this study was to test the three most popular atmospheric correction models, namely (1) Dark Object Subtraction (DOS); (2) Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) and (3) the Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) and compare them with Top of Atmospheric (TOA) reflectance. By using the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) algorithm, a series of experiments were conducted for above-ground forest biomass (AGB) estimations of the Gongju and Sejong region of South Korea, in order to check the effectiveness of atmospheric correction methods for Landsat ETM+. Overall, in the forest biomass estimation, the 6S model showed the bestRMSE's, followed by FLAASH, DOS and TOA. In addition, a significant improvement of RMSE by 6S was found with images when the study site had higher total water vapor and temperature levels. Moreover, we also tested the sensitivity of the atmospheric correction methods to each of the Landsat ETM+ bands. The results confirmed that 6S dominates the other methods, especially in the infrared wavelengths covering the pivotal bands for forest applications. Finally, we suggest that the 6S model, integrating water vapor and aerosol optical depth derived from MODIS products, is better suited for AGB estimation based on optical remote-sensing data, especially when using satellite images acquired in the summer during full canopy development.

  16. An infrared remote sensor with high integration and multi-spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lisha; Liu, Zhaojun; Ma, Wenpo; Tang, Shaofan; Hu, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Along with the further application of optical remote sensing, it becomes main trend to realize high spatial resolution, high time resolution, high spectrum resolution and high irradiance sensitivity simultaneously. We present a new satellite-based imaging system that will provide images with these high performances. The structure of the system is compact with small size and light weight. The IR imager, a new generation of high resolution optical remote sensing, is universally acknowledged as the most effective approach to surveil dynamic changes in the environment on the earth. Pushbroom imaging fashion with high efficiency and long-array focal plane detector with passive cooling are adopted to realize area imaging relevant to the flight direction of satellite. The instrument is a dual-optical-path system with long-wave infrared (LWIR) and mid-short-wave infrared (MW-SWIR) bands - which has 4 narrow spectrum bands respectively. An IR dichroic beam-splitter is use to divide wideband incident infrared into LWIR and MW-SWIR. Then two pieces of joint filters, which are integrated in front of detectors and then enveloped by IR Dewars, are used to divide the LWIR and MWIR into 4 spectral bands separately. The focal plane arrays (FPA) are fixed on the optical imaging plane of the lens. The LWIR and MW-SWIR FPA are cooled around 80K or even below. For cooled FPA, optical system must provide a real, accessible exit pupil coupled with a fast f/number refractive component in a Dewar and very close to the FPA. Compared to traditional infrared instruments, high spatial resolution and spectrum resolution can be obtained simultaneously within mass, volume and performance constraints.

  17. Optimal Atmospheric Correction for Above-Ground Forest Biomass Estimation with the ETM+ Remote Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu Cong; Jung, Jaehoon; Lee, Jungbin; Choi, Sung-Uk; Hong, Suk-Young; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The reflectance of the Earth’s surface is significantly influenced by atmospheric conditions such as water vapor content and aerosols. Particularly, the absorption and scattering effects become stronger when the target features are non-bright objects, such as in aqueous or vegetated areas. For any remote-sensing approach, atmospheric correction is thus required to minimize those effects and to convert digital number (DN) values to surface reflectance. The main aim of this study was to test the three most popular atmospheric correction models, namely (1) Dark Object Subtraction (DOS); (2) Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH) and (3) the Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) and compare them with Top of Atmospheric (TOA) reflectance. By using the k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) algorithm, a series of experiments were conducted for above-ground forest biomass (AGB) estimations of the Gongju and Sejong region of South Korea, in order to check the effectiveness of atmospheric correction methods for Landsat ETM+. Overall, in the forest biomass estimation, the 6S model showed the bestRMSE’s, followed by FLAASH, DOS and TOA. In addition, a significant improvement of RMSE by 6S was found with images when the study site had higher total water vapor and temperature levels. Moreover, we also tested the sensitivity of the atmospheric correction methods to each of the Landsat ETM+ bands. The results confirmed that 6S dominates the other methods, especially in the infrared wavelengths covering the pivotal bands for forest applications. Finally, we suggest that the 6S model, integrating water vapor and aerosol optical depth derived from MODIS products, is better suited for AGB estimation based on optical remote-sensing data, especially when using satellite images acquired in the summer during full canopy development. PMID:26263996

  18. Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  19. Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-02

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis.

  20. Steel bridge fatigue crack detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Ziehl, Paul; Ozevin, Didem; Pollock, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are well known for its dual capabilities in structural health monitoring, acting as either actuators or sensors. Due to the variety of deterioration sources and locations of bridge defects, there is currently no single method that can detect and address the potential sources globally. In our research, our use of the PWAS based sensing has the novelty of implementing both passive (as acoustic emission) and active (as ultrasonic transducers) sensing with a single PWAS network. The combined schematic is using acoustic emission to detect the presence of fatigue cracks in steel bridges in their early stage since methods such as ultrasonics are unable to quantify the initial condition of crack growth since most of the fatigue life for these details is consumed while the fatigue crack is too small to be detected. Hence, combing acoustic emission with ultrasonic active sensing will strengthen the damage detection process. The integration of passive acoustic emission detection with active sensing will be a technological leap forward from the current practice of periodic and subjective visual inspection, and bridge management based primarily on history of past performance. In this study, extensive laboratory investigation is performed supported by theoretical modeling analysis. A demonstration system will be presented to show how piezoelectric wafer active sensor is used for acoustic emission. Specimens representing complex structures are tested. The results will also be compared with traditional acoustic emission transducers to identify the application barriers.

  1. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-01

    We consider the task of deterministically entangling two remote qubits using joint measurement and feedback, but no directly entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Finally, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  2. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; Sarovar, Mohan; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can be modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.

  3. Deterministic generation of remote entanglement with active quantum feedback

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, Leigh; Motzoi, Felix; Li, Hanhan; ...

    2015-12-10

    We develop and study protocols for deterministic remote entanglement generation using quantum feedback, without relying on an entangling Hamiltonian. In order to formulate the most effective experimentally feasible protocol, we introduce the notion of average-sense locally optimal feedback protocols, which do not require real-time quantum state estimation, a difficult component of real-time quantum feedback control. We use this notion of optimality to construct two protocols that can deterministically create maximal entanglement: a semiclassical feedback protocol for low-efficiency measurements and a quantum feedback protocol for high-efficiency measurements. The latter reduces to direct feedback in the continuous-time limit, whose dynamics can bemore » modeled by a Wiseman-Milburn feedback master equation, which yields an analytic solution in the limit of unit measurement efficiency. Our formalism can smoothly interpolate between continuous-time and discrete-time descriptions of feedback dynamics and we exploit this feature to derive a superior hybrid protocol for arbitrary nonunit measurement efficiency that switches between quantum and semiclassical protocols. Lastly, we show using simulations incorporating experimental imperfections that deterministic entanglement of remote superconducting qubits may be achieved with current technology using the continuous-time feedback protocol alone.« less

  4. A FPGA Embedded Web Server for Remote Monitoring and Control of Smart Sensors Networks

    PubMed Central

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Pérez, Fernando; Hernández, David; García, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a web server using an embedded Altera NIOS II IP core, a general purpose and configurable RISC processor which is embedded in a Cyclone FPGA. The processor uses the μCLinux operating system to support a Boa web server of dynamic pages using Common Gateway Interface (CGI). The FPGA is configured to act like the master node of a network, and also to control and monitor a network of smart sensors or instruments. In order to develop a totally functional system, the FPGA also includes an implementation of the time-triggered protocol (TTP/A). Thus, the implemented master node has two interfaces, the webserver that acts as an Internet interface and the other to control the network. This protocol is widely used to connecting smart sensors and actuators and microsystems in embedded real-time systems in different application domains, e.g., industrial, automotive, domotic, etc., although this protocol can be easily replaced by any other because of the inherent characteristics of the FPGA-based technology. PMID:24379047

  5. A FPGA embedded web server for remote monitoring and control of smart sensors networks.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Pérez, Fernando; Hernández, David; García, Enrique

    2013-12-27

    This article describes the implementation of a web server using an embedded Altera NIOS II IP core, a general purpose and configurable RISC processor which is embedded in a Cyclone FPGA. The processor uses the μCLinux operating system to support a Boa web server of dynamic pages using Common Gateway Interface (CGI). The FPGA is configured to act like the master node of a network, and also to control and monitor a network of smart sensors or instruments. In order to develop a totally functional system, the FPGA also includes an implementation of the time-triggered protocol (TTP/A). Thus, the implemented master node has two interfaces, the webserver that acts as an Internet interface and the other to control the network. This protocol is widely used to connecting smart sensors and actuators and microsystems in embedded real-time systems in different application domains, e.g., industrial, automotive, domotic, etc., although this protocol can be easily replaced by any other because of the inherent characteristics of the FPGA-based technology.

  6. Active Control of Noise Using Actuator/Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Winder, Patrice; Kirby, George

    1996-01-01

    Current research in smart structures is directed toward the integration of many actuators and sensors into a material. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using this instrumentation for active noise control from a vibrating structures. Current technology for reducing radiated sound is limited by the instrumentation for the control system. These control systems employ relatively small numbers of sensors and actuators. Hence, these control systems must rely on a model of the structure to estimate and control the global vibrations that contribute to the far field pressure. For complex, realistic structures the development of such a model is a formidable task. The model is a limiting factor in the continuing development of structural acoustics. In this paper we propose to increase the number of actuators and sensors of a smart material to offset the complexity of the model used for control design. The sensor arrays will be used to directly sense the shape of the structure rather than using a model of the structures to indirectly sense the shape of the structure. The actuator array is used to apply distributed forces to the structure, rather than using the structure itself as a load path. A control system for the active cancellation of sound is derived from standard control system methodologies.

  7. A Synchronized Sensor Array for Remote Monitoring of Avian and Bat Interactions with Offshore Renewable Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Suryan, Robert; Albertani, Roberto; Polagye, Brian

    2016-07-15

    Wind energy production in the U.S. is projected to increase to 35% of our nation’s energy by 2050. This substantial increase in the U.S. is only a portion of the global wind industry growth, as many countries strive to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A major environmental concern and potential market barrier for expansion of wind energy is bird and bat mortality from impacts with turbine blades, towers, and nacelles. Carcass surveys are the standard protocol for quantifying mortality at onshore sites. This method is imperfect, however, due to survey frequency at remote sites, removal of carcasses by scavengers between surveys, searcher efficiency, and other biases as well as delays of days to weeks or more in obtaining information on collision events. Furthermore, carcass surveys are not feasible at offshore wind energy sites. Near-real-time detection and quantification of interaction rates is possible at both onshore and offshore wind facilities using an onboard, integrated sensor package with data transmitted to central processing centers. We developed and experimentally tested an array of sensors that continuously monitors for interactions (including impacts) of birds and bats with wind turbines. The synchronized array includes three sensor nodes: (1) vibration (accelerometers and contact microphones), (2) optical (visual and infrared spectrum cameras), and (3) bioacoustics (acoustic and ultrasonic microphones). Accelerometers and contact acoustic microphones are placed at the root of each blade to detect impact vibrations and sound waves propagating through the structure. On-board data processing algorithms using wavelet analysis detect impact signals exceeding background vibration. Stereo-visual and infrared cameras were placed on the nacelle to allow target tracking, distance, and size calculations. On-board image processing and target detection algorithms identify moving targets within the camera field of view. Bioacoustic recorders monitor vocalizations

  8. Fluorescence-based remote irradiation sensor in liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltner, R.; Bykov, D. S.; Xie, S.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report an irradiation sensor based on a fluorescent "flying particle" that is optically trapped and propelled inside the core of a water-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. When the moving particle passes through an irradiated region, its emitted fluorescence is captured by guided modes of the fiber core and so can be monitored using a filtered photodiode placed at the fiber end. The particle speed and position can be precisely monitored using in-fiber Doppler velocimetry, allowing the irradiation profile to be measured to a spatial resolution of ˜10 μm. The spectral response can be readily adjusted by appropriate choice of particle material. Using dye-doped polystyrene particles, we demonstrate detection of green (532 nm) and ultraviolet (340 nm) light.

  9. Remote Sensing of Chlorophyll Fluorescence by the Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Morgan, F., II; Demajistre, R.; Cook, B. D.; Corp, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the amount of fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or Fraunhofer lines in the reflected solar spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is designed and constructed specifically for airborne and groundbased ChlF measurements using the line fill-in ChlF measurement technique. In this paper, we will present the design of this triple etalon Fabry-Perot imaging instrument and the results of its vegetation fluorescence measurements obtained from the ground in the laboratory and from a NASA Langley King Air during our 2014 airborne campaign over vegetated targets in North Carolina and Virginia.

  10. Fluorescence-Based Sensor for Monitoring Activation of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.

    2012-01-01

    This sensor unit is designed to determine the level of activation of lunar dust or simulant particles using a fluorescent technique. Activation of the surface of a lunar soil sample (for instance, through grinding) should produce a freshly fractured surface. When these reactive surfaces interact with oxygen and water, they produce hydroxyl radicals. These radicals will react with a terephthalate diluted in the aqueous medium to form 2-hydroxyterephthalate. The fluorescence produced by 2-hydroxyterephthalate provides qualitative proof of the activation of the sample. Using a calibration curve produced by synthesized 2-hydroxyterephthalate, the amount of hydroxyl radicals produced as a function of sample concentration can also be determined.

  11. Light-Activated Ion Channels for Remote Control of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, James J.; Kramer, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Light-activated ion channels provide a new opportunity to precisely and remotely control neuronal activity for experimental applications in neurobiology. In the past few years, several strategies have arisen that allow light to control ion channels and therefore neuronal function. Light-based triggers for ion channel control include caged compounds, which release active neurotransmitters when photolyzed with light, and natural photoreceptive proteins, which can be expressed exogenously in neurons. More recently, a third type of light trigger has been introduced: a photoisomerizable tethered ligand that directly controls ion channel activity in a light-dependent manner. Beyond the experimental applications for light-gated ion channels, there may be clinical applications in which these light-sensitive ion channels could prove advantageous over traditional methods. Electrodes for neural stimulation to control disease symptoms are invasive and often difficult to reposition between cells in tissue. Stimulation by chemical agents is difficult to constrain to individual cells and has limited temporal accuracy in tissue due to diffusional limitations. In contrast, ion channels that can be directly activated with light allow control with unparalleled spatial and temporal precision. The goal of this chapter is to describe light-regulated ion channels and how they have been tailored to control different aspects of neural activity, and how to use these channels to manipulate and better understand development, function, and plasticity of neurons and neural circuits. PMID:19195553

  12. FTIR remote sensor measurements of air pollutants in the petrochemical industrial park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rong T.; Chang, Shih-Yi; Chung, Y. W.; Tzou, H. C.; Tso, Tai-Ly

    1995-09-01

    As FT-IR remote sensing techniques become more accessible, there are increasing interests to apply this open-path measurement method to detect and measure airborne pollutants. Thus a research for VOCs emission pollutants in the petrochemical industry park is conducted. In this study, we focused on the identification of the gaseous pollutants as well as the location of the VOCs pollutants from different factories. Measurement is sampled at every half hour period to obtain the time series plots of observed gas concentration for the gaseous pollutants. Besides the inherent components in ambient air such as carbon monoxide, methane, and ozone, the results of the measurement indicate that the major pollutants detected in this industrial park include vinyl chloride, chloroform, hydrogen chloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,3-butadiene, ethylene, propylene, n-hexane, acetic acid, methyl acetate and ammonia. Some of these toxic pollutants are carcinogens and also the chloride related compounds are potentially a threat to the depletion of ozone. All of these measurements indicate that the pattern of the pollutants for each location is significantly different from each other pattern. In addition, the concentrations and the presence of absence of pollutants were dramatically affected by wind directions. Under this case, suspicious polluting plants are successfully being identified by examining the pattern of compounds, pollutant's concentration time series, metrology, and manufacturing process.

  13. Synthetic vision to augment sensor-based vision for remotely piloted vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadema, Jochum; Koeners, Joris; Theunissen, Erik

    2006-05-01

    In the past fifteen years, several research programs have demonstrated potential advantages of synthetic vision technology for manned aviation. More recently, some research programs have focused on integrating synthetic vision technology into control stations for remotely controlled aircraft. The contribution of synthetic vision can be divided into two categories. The depiction of the environment and all relevant constraints contributes to the pilot's situation awareness, while the depiction of the planned path and its constraints allows the pilot to control or monitor the aircraft with high precision. This paper starts with an overview of the potential opportunities provided by synthetic vision technology. A distinction is made between the presentation domain and the function domain. In the presentation domain, the benefits are obtained from making the invisible visible. In the function domain, benefits are obtained from the possibility to integrate data from the synthetic vision system into other functions. The paper continues with a number of examples of situation awareness support concepts which have been explored in the current research. After this, the potential contribution of synthetic vision technology to the manual control task is discussed and it is indicated how these potential advantages will be explored in the next research phase.

  14. An optical fiber sensor for remote pH sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Lili

    2012-03-01

    A fiber-optical probe for pH sensing and real-time imaging is successfully fabricated by connecting a polymer imaging fiber and a gradient index (GRIN) lens rod which was modified with a sensing film. By employing an improved metallographic microscope, an optical system is designed to cooperate with the probe. This novel technique has high-quality imaging capabilities for observing remote samples while measuring pH. The linear range of the probe is pH 1.2-3.5. This technique overcomes the difficulty that high-quality images cannot be obtained when directly using conventional imaging bundles for pH sensing and imaging. As preliminary applications, the corrosion behavior of an iron screw and the reaction process of rust were investigated in buffer solutions of pH 2.0 and 2.9, respectively. The experiment demonstrated that the pH values of the analytes' surface were higher than that of buffer solutions due to the chemical reaction. It provides great potential for applications in optical multifunctional detection, especially in chemical sensing and biosensing.

  15. The promise of wearable activity sensors to define patient recovery.

    PubMed

    Appelboom, Geoff; Yang, Annie H; Christophe, Brandon R; Bruce, Eliza M; Slomian, Justine; Bruyère, Olivier; Bruce, Samuel S; Zacharia, Brad E; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Connolly, E Sander

    2014-07-01

    The recent emergence of mobile health--the use of mobile telecommunication and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, services, and research--has inspired a patient-centric approach to monitor health metrics. Sensors embedded in wearable devices are utilized to acquire greater self-knowledge by tracking basic parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature as well as data related to exercise, diet, and psychological state. To that end, recent studies on utilizing wireless fitness activity trackers to monitor and promote functional recovery in patients suggest that collecting up-to-date performance data could help patients regain functional independence and help hospitals determine the appropriate length of stay for a patient. This manuscript examines existing functional assessment scales, discusses the use of activity tracking sensors in evaluating functional independence, and explores the growing application of wireless technology in measuring and promoting functional recovery.

  16. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  17. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  18. A parallelogram-based compliant remote-center-of-motion stage for active parallel alignment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin

    2014-09-01

    Parallel alignment stage with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) is of key importance in precision out-of-plane aligning since it can eliminate the harmful lateral displacement generated at the output platform. This paper presents the development of a parallelogram-based compliant RCM stage for active parallel alignment. Different from conventional parallelogram-based RCM mechanism, the proposed stage is designed with compliant mechanisms, which endows the stage with many attractive merits when used in precision micro-/nanomanipulations. A symmetric double-parallelogram mechanism (SDPM) based on flexure hinges is developed as the rotary guiding component to realize desired RCM function. Due to the geometrical constraint of the SDPM, the operating space of the stage can be easily adjusted by bending the input links without loss of rotational precision. The stage is driven by a piezoelectric actuator and its output motion is measured by non-contact displacement sensors. Based on pseudo-rigid-body simplification method, the analytical models predicting kinematics, statics, and dynamics of the RCM stage have been established. Besides, the dimensional optimization is conducted in order to maximize the first resonance frequency of the stage. After that, finite element analysis is conducted to validate the established models and the prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. The experimental results show that the developed RCM stage has a rotational range of 1.45 mrad while the maximum center shift of the RCM point is as low as 1 μm, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  19. In situ correlative measurements for the ultraviolet differential absorption lidar and the high spectral resolution lidar air quality remote sensors: 1980 PEPE/NEROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Beck, S. M.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In situ correlative measurements were obtained with a NASA aircraft in support of two NASA airborne remote sensors participating in the Environmental Protection Agency's 1980persistent elevated pollution episode (PEPE) and Northeast regional oxidant study (NEROS) field program in order to provide data for evaluating the capability of two remote sensors for measuring mixing layer height, and ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS program. The in situ aircraft was instrumented to measure temperature, dewpoint temperature, ozone concentrations, and light scattering coefficient. In situ measurements for ten correlative missions are given and discussed. Each data set is presented in graphical and tabular format aircraft flight plans are included.

  20. Remote maintenance design activities and research and development accomplishments for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations. The remote operations consist of removing and replacing such components as first wall armor protection tiles, radio-frequency (rf) heating modules, and diagnostic modules. The major pieces of equipment being developed for maintenance activities internal to the vacuum vessel include an articulated boom manipulator (ABM), an inspection manipulator, and special tooling. For activities external to the vessel, the equipment includes a bridge-mounted manipulator system, decontamination equipment, hot cell equipment, and solid radiation-waste (rad-waste) handling and packaging equipment. The CIT Project is completing the conceptual design phase; research and development (R and D) activities, which include demonstrations of remote maintenance operations on full-size partial mock-ups are under way. 5 figs.

  1. Assessement of Land Biophysical Activity Over Multiple Years From a Sensor Independent Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadine, G.; Bernard, P.; Frederic, M.; Malcolm, T.; Michel, V. M.; Alan, B.; Thomas, L.; Jean-Luc, W.

    2004-12-01

    In the context of scientific research concerning global change issues, remote sensing products have been demonstrated to be essential tools to monitor the characteristics of both land surfaces and their temporal evolution. The biophysical activities on land surfaces are documented from spectral measurements made in space. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products able to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. This paper will present inter-comparison procedure and results from the exercise conducted with SeaWiFS and MERIS (ENVISAT) global product. A study of European land surfaces response against 2003 drought will be illustrated.

  2. Wearability Assessment of a Wearable System for Parkinson's Disease Remote Monitoring Based on a Body Area Network of Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Cancela, Jorge; Pastorino, Matteo; Tzallas, Alexandros T.; Tsipouras, Markos G.; Rigas, Giorgios; Arredondo, Maria T.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.

    2014-01-01

    Wearable technologies for health monitoring have become a reality in the last few years. So far, most research studies have focused on assessments of the technical performance of these systems, as well as the validation of the clinical outcomes. Nevertheless, the success in the acceptance of these solutions depends not only on the technical and clinical effectiveness, but on the final user acceptance. In this work the compliance of a telehealth system for the remote monitoring of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients is presented with testing in 32 PD patients. This system, called PERFORM, is based on a Body Area Network (BAN) of sensors which has already been validated both from the technical and clinical point for view. Diverse methodologies (REBA, Borg and CRS scales in combination with a body map) are employed to study the comfort, biomechanical and physiological effects of the system. The test results allow us to conclude that the acceptance of this system is satisfactory with all the levels of effect on each component scoring in the lowest ranges. This study also provided useful insights and guidelines to lead to redesign of the system to improve patient compliance. PMID:25230307

  3. Energy-Efficient Transmissions for Remote Wireless Sensor Networks: An Integrated HAP/Satellite Architecture for Emergency Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Dong, Feihong; Li, Hongjun; Gong, Xiangwu; Liu, Quan; Wang, Jingchao

    2015-09-03

    A typical application scenario of remote wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is identified as an emergency scenario. One of the greatest design challenges for communications in emergency scenarios is energy-efficient transmission, due to scarce electrical energy in large-scale natural and man-made disasters. Integrated high altitude platform (HAP)/satellite networks are expected to optimally meet emergency communication requirements. In this paper, a novel integrated HAP/satellite (IHS) architecture is proposed, and three segments of the architecture are investigated in detail. The concept of link-state advertisement (LSA) is designed in a slow flat Rician fading channel. The LSA is received and processed by the terminal to estimate the link state information, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption at the terminal end. Furthermore, the transmission power requirements of the HAPs and terminals are derived using the gradient descent and differential equation methods. The energy consumption is modeled at both the source and system level. An innovative and adaptive algorithm is given for the energy-efficient path selection. The simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive algorithm. It is shown that the proposed adaptive algorithm can significantly improve energy efficiency when combined with the LSA and the energy consumption estimation.

  4. Energy-Efficient Transmissions for Remote Wireless Sensor Networks: An Integrated HAP/Satellite Architecture for Emergency Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feihong; Li, Hongjun; Gong, Xiangwu; Liu, Quan; Wang, Jingchao

    2015-01-01

    A typical application scenario of remote wireless sensor networks (WSNs) is identified as an emergency scenario. One of the greatest design challenges for communications in emergency scenarios is energy-efficient transmission, due to scarce electrical energy in large-scale natural and man-made disasters. Integrated high altitude platform (HAP)/satellite networks are expected to optimally meet emergency communication requirements. In this paper, a novel integrated HAP/satellite (IHS) architecture is proposed, and three segments of the architecture are investigated in detail. The concept of link-state advertisement (LSA) is designed in a slow flat Rician fading channel. The LSA is received and processed by the terminal to estimate the link state information, which can significantly reduce the energy consumption at the terminal end. Furthermore, the transmission power requirements of the HAPs and terminals are derived using the gradient descent and differential equation methods. The energy consumption is modeled at both the source and system level. An innovative and adaptive algorithm is given for the energy-efficient path selection. The simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive algorithm. It is shown that the proposed adaptive algorithm can significantly improve energy efficiency when combined with the LSA and the energy consumption estimation. PMID:26404292

  5. Satellite Remote Sensing of Global Vegetation Phenology: Comparison of Optical-Infrared and Microwave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. O.; Kimball, J. S.; Jones, L. A.; McDonald, K. C.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite optical-infrared remote sensing has long been used to monitor vegetation phenology at continental to global scales. Models incorporating the optical-infrared vegetation indices (VI), EVI and NDVI, have been applied to measure phenological events including growing season start, peak, end and duration. These indices are sensitive to signal degradation from reduced solar illumination, clouds, smoke and other atmospheric effects reducing temporal fidelity and accuracy of observations. However, satellite microwave remote sensing at lower frequencies (≤ 10 GHz) is largely insensitive to solar illumination and atmospheric effects. The AMSR-E radiometer offers multifrequency microwave observations at moderate (~25-60 km) spatial scales with near-daily global sampling. We recently developed an algorithm for global retrieval of vegetation optical depth (VOD), which is sensitive to phenological changes in canopy biomass and water content. We examined phenology signals using three approaches. First, linear correlations between six years (2003-2008) of MODIS VI, AMSR-E VOD, and a bioclimatic phenology model were derived globally. Second, correlations were summarized by land cover type and spatially contiguous regions to assess regional patterns in the results. Finally, we compared MODIS VI and AMSR-E VOD series with the bioclimatic phenology model and tower eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements across a network of Ameriflux sites representing the major global biomes. Our results show reduced VI-VOD correspondence over cloudy regions, including tropical forests, due to VI related signal degradation. VOD phenology sensitivity coincided with seasonal changes in meteorological conditions, vegetation greenness, ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem CO2 exchange. Correlation means by land cover (pixels≥80% homogeneous) ranged from 0.66 (NDVI; Savannas; 97% of pixels p<0.01) to -0.07 (EVI; Evergreen Broadleaf; 70% of pixels p>0.10). The majority of insignificant

  6. Mapping crop distribution in administrative districts of southwest Germany using multi-sensor remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Christopher; Goessl, Achim; Lex, Sylvia; Metz, Annekatrin; Esch, Thomas; Konrad, Christoph; Goettlicher, Gerold; Dech, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    In the face of global change, concepts for sustainable land management are increasingly requested, among others to cope with the rapidly increasing energy demand. High resolution land use classifications can contribute spatially explicit information suitable for land use planning. In this study, the coverage of cereal crops was derived for two regions in Baden-Wuerttemberg and Rhineland-Palatinate - Germany, as well as in the Alsace - France, by classifying multitemporal and multi-scale remote sensing data. The presented methodology shall be used as basic input for high resolution bio-energy potential calculations. Segmentation of pan-merged 15 m Landsat 7 ETM+ data and pre-classification with CORINE data was applied to derive homogenous objects assumed to approximate the field boundaries of agricultural areas. Seven acquisitions of moderate resolution IRS-P6 AWiFS data (60 m) recorded during the vegetation period of 2007 were used for the subsequent classification of the objects. Multiple classification and regression trees (random forest) were selected as classification algorithm due to their ability to consider non-linear distributions of class values in the feature space. Training and validation was based on a subset of 1724 samplings of the official European land use survey LUCAS (Land Use/ Cover Area Frame Statistical Survey). Altogether, the object based approach resulted in an overall accuracy of 74 %. The use of 15 m Landsat for mapping field objects were identified to be one major obstacle caused by the characteristically small agricultural units in Southwest Germany. Improvements were also achieved by correcting the LUCAS samples for location errors.

  7. Ground-based imaging remote sensing of ice clouds: uncertainties caused by sensor, method and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, Tobias; Hausmann, Petra; Ewald, Florian; Bugliaro, Luca; Emde, Claudia; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    In this study a method is introduced for the retrieval of optical thickness and effective particle size of ice clouds over a wide range of optical thickness from ground-based transmitted radiance measurements. Low optical thickness of cirrus clouds and their complex microphysics present a challenge for cloud remote sensing. In transmittance, the relationship between optical depth and radiance is ambiguous. To resolve this ambiguity the retrieval utilizes the spectral slope of radiance between 485 and 560 nm in addition to the commonly employed combination of a visible and a short-wave infrared wavelength.An extensive test of retrieval sensitivity was conducted using synthetic test spectra in which all parameters introducing uncertainty into the retrieval were varied systematically: ice crystal habit and aerosol properties, instrument noise, calibration uncertainty and the interpolation in the lookup table required by the retrieval process. The most important source of errors identified are uncertainties due to habit assumption: Averaged over all test spectra, systematic biases in the effective radius retrieval of several micrometre can arise. The statistical uncertainties of any individual retrieval can easily exceed 10 µm. Optical thickness biases are mostly below 1, while statistical uncertainties are in the range of 1 to 2.5.For demonstration and comparison to satellite data the retrieval is applied to observations by the Munich hyperspectral imager specMACS (spectrometer of the Munich Aerosol and Cloud Scanner) at the Schneefernerhaus observatory (2650 m a.s.l.) during the ACRIDICON-Zugspitze campaign in September and October 2012. Results are compared to MODIS and SEVIRI satellite-based cirrus retrievals (ACRIDICON - Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Convective Cloud Systems; MODIS - Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer; SEVIRI - Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager). Considering the identified

  8. Spatial estimation of sub-hour Global Horizontal Irradiance based on official observations and remote sensors.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Corea, Federico-Vladimir; Manso-Callejo, Miguel-Angel; Moreno-Regidor, María-Pilar; Velasco-Gómez, Jesús

    2014-04-11

    This study was motivated by the need to improve densification of Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) observations, increasing the number of surface weather stations that observe it, using sensors with a sub-hour periodicity and examining the methods of spatial GHI estimation (by interpolation) with that periodicity in other locations. The aim of the present research project is to analyze the goodness of 15-minute GHI spatial estimations for five methods in the territory of Spain (three geo-statistical interpolation methods, one deterministic method and the HelioSat2 method, which is based on satellite images). The research concludes that, when the work area has adequate station density, the best method for estimating GHI every 15 min is Regression Kriging interpolation using GHI estimated from satellite images as one of the input variables. On the contrary, when station density is low, the best method is estimating GHI directly from satellite images. A comparison between the GHI observed by volunteer stations and the estimation model applied concludes that 67% of the volunteer stations analyzed present values within the margin of error (average of ±2 standard deviations).

  9. Spatial Estimation of Sub-Hour Global Horizontal Irradiance Based on Official Observations and Remote Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Corea, Federico-Vladimir; Manso-Callejo, Miguel-Angel; Moreno-Regidor, María-Pilar; Velasco-Gómez, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    This study was motivated by the need to improve densification of Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) observations, increasing the number of surface weather stations that observe it, using sensors with a sub-hour periodicity and examining the methods of spatial GHI estimation (by interpolation) with that periodicity in other locations. The aim of the present research project is to analyze the goodness of 15-minute GHI spatial estimations for five methods in the territory of Spain (three geo-statistical interpolation methods, one deterministic method and the HelioSat2 method, which is based on satellite images). The research concludes that, when the work area has adequate station density, the best method for estimating GHI every 15 min is Regression Kriging interpolation using GHI estimated from satellite images as one of the input variables. On the contrary, when station density is low, the best method is estimating GHI directly from satellite images. A comparison between the GHI observed by volunteer stations and the estimation model applied concludes that 67% of the volunteer stations analyzed present values within the margin of error (average of ±2 standard deviations). PMID:24732102

  10. A land use classification scheme for use with remote sensor data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1972-01-01

    The needs of Federal agencies for a broad overview of national land use patterns, trends, and environmental impacts, with data inputs from both conventional sources and some of the more exotic sensors in high altitude aircraft and satellite platforms led to the formation in early 1971 of an Inter-Agency Steering Committee on Land Use Information and Classification. The work of this Committee, composed of representatives from the Geological Survey of the U.S. Department of the Interior, the Earth Observations Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, as well as the Association of American Geographers and the International Geographical Union, has been supported by NASA and the EROS Program of the Interior Department and coordinated by the USGS Geographic Applications Program. The Chairman of the Inter-Agency Committee was Dr. Arch C. Gerlach, Chief Geographer of the Geological Survey until his death in May 1972. Shortly before Dr. Gerlach's death, Dr. James R. Anderson was appointed Acting Chairman of the Committee.

  11. Motion Sensor Use for Physical Activity Data: Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Margaret; Grey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity continues to be a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and only one half of adults in the United States meet physical activity (PA) goals. PA data are often collected for surveillance or for measuring change after an intervention. One of the challenges in PA research is quantifying exactly how much and what type of PA is taking place—especially because self-report instruments have inconsistent validity. Objective The purpose is to review the elements to consider when collecting PA data via motion sensors, including the difference between PA and exercise; type of data to collect; choosing the device; length of time to monitor PA; instructions to the participants; and interpretation of the data. Methods The current literature on motion sensor research was reviewed and synthesized to summarize relevant considerations when using a motion sensor to collect PA data. Results Exercise is a division of PA that is structured, planned, and repetitive. Pedometer data includes steps taken, and calculated distance and energy expenditure. Accelerometer data includes activity counts and intensity. The device chosen depends on desired data, cost, validity, and ease of use. Reactivity to the device may influence the duration of data collection. Instructions to participants may vary depending on purpose of the study. Experts suggest pedometer data be reported as steps—since that is the direct output—and distance traveled and energy expenditure are estimated values. Accelerometer count data may be analyzed to provide information on time spent in moderate or vigorous activity. Discussion Thoughtful decision making about PA data collection using motion sensor devices is needed to advance nursing science. PMID:26126065

  12. Active remote detection of radioactivity based on electromagnetic signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Hafizi, B.; Milchberg, H.; Nusinovich, G.; Zigler, A.

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents a new concept for the remote detection of radioactive materials. The concept is based on the detection of electromagnetic signatures in the vicinity of radioactive material and can enable stand-off detection at distances greater than 100 m. Radioactive materials emit gamma rays, which ionize the surrounding air. The ionized electrons rapidly attach to oxygen molecules forming O{sub 2}{sup −} ions. The density of O{sub 2}{sup −} around radioactive material can be several orders of magnitude greater than background levels. The elevated population of O{sub 2}{sup −} extends several meters around the radioactive material. Electrons are easily photo-detached from O{sub 2}{sup −} ions by laser radiation. The photo-detached electrons, in the presence of laser radiation, initiate avalanche ionization which results in a rapid increase in electron density. The rise in electron density induces a frequency modulation on a probe beam, which becomes a direct spectral signature for the presence of radioactive material.

  13. Implementation study of wearable sensors for activity recognition systems

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemian, Mona

    2015-01-01

    This Letter investigates and reports on a number of activity recognition methods for a wearable sensor system. The authors apply three methods for data transmission, namely ‘stream-based’, ‘feature-based’ and ‘threshold-based’ scenarios to study the accuracy against energy efficiency of transmission and processing power that affects the mote's battery lifetime. They also report on the impact of variation of sampling frequency and data transmission rate on energy consumption of motes for each method. This study leads us to propose a cross-layer optimisation of an activity recognition system for provisioning acceptable levels of accuracy and energy efficiency. PMID:26609413

  14. Recognition of Human Activities Using Continuous Autoencoders with Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lukun

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an approach for recognizing human activities with wearable sensors. The continuous autoencoder (CAE) as a novel stochastic neural network model is proposed which improves the ability of model continuous data. CAE adds Gaussian random units into the improved sigmoid activation function to extract the features of nonlinear data. In order to shorten the training time, we propose a new fast stochastic gradient descent (FSGD) algorithm to update the gradients of CAE. The reconstruction of a swiss-roll dataset experiment demonstrates that the CAE can fit continuous data better than the basic autoencoder, and the training time can be reduced by an FSGD algorithm. In the experiment of human activities’ recognition, time and frequency domain feature extract (TFFE) method is raised to extract features from the original sensors’ data. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) method is applied to feature reduction. It can be noticed that the dimension of each data segment is reduced from 5625 to 42. The feature vectors extracted from original signals are used for the input of deep belief network (DBN), which is composed of multiple CAEs. The training results show that the correct differentiation rate of 99.3% has been achieved. Some contrast experiments like different sensors combinations, sensor units at different positions, and training time with different epochs are designed to validate our approach. PMID:26861319

  15. Using an Active Pixel Sensor In A Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, HansGeorg; Wieman, Howard H.; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2004-04-22

    Research has shown that Active Pixel CMOS sensors can detect charged particles. We have been studying whether this process can be used in a collider environment. In particular, we studied the effect of radiation with 55 MeV protons. These results show that a fluence of about 2 x 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2} reduces the signal by a factor of two while the noise increases by 25%. A measurement 6 months after exposure shows that the silicon lattice naturally repairs itself. Heating the silicon to 100 C reduced the shot noise and increased the collected charge. CMOS sensors have a reduced signal to noise ratio per pixel because charge diffuses to neighboring pixels. We have constructed a photogate to see if this structure can collect more charge per pixel. Results show that a photogate does collect charge in fewer pixels, but it takes about 15 ms to collect all of the electrons produced by a pulse of light.

  16. Interactive Change Detection Using High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Active Learning with Gaussian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Hui; Yu, Huai; Huang, Pingping; Yang, Wen

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  17. Estimating the direct aerosol radiative effect over China using multi-sensor satellite remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, Anu-Maija; Arola, Antti; Kolmonen, Pekka; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    The quantification of aerosol radiative effects is complex and large uncertainties still exist, mainly due to the high spatial and temporal variation of the aerosol concentration and mass as well as their relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere. In this work a multi-sensor satellite based approach is studied for defining the direct short wave aerosol radiative effect (ADRE) over China. ADRE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is defined as the difference between the net solar flux with (F) and without (F0) aerosols. The negative values of ADRE correspond to increased outgoing radiation and planetary cooling, whereas positive values correspond to decreased outgoing radiation at TOA and increased atmospheric warming. To derive instantaneous ADRE from the satellite observations, the challenge is to estimate the value for F0. In this work F0 is derived using the colocated observations of CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radian Energy System) short wave broad band TOA-flux and MODIS (Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol optical depth (AOD). Assuming that aerosol type does not change systematically within a 0.5 deg. grid cell over a month, a linear relationship is established between the TOA-flux and AOD when AOD < 2.0. Using the linear fit an estimate for F0 can be obtained and F is the monthly mean of CERES observations. However, there are several other parameters affecting the observed TOA flux than the aerosol loading and aerosol type, such as solar zenith angle, water vapour, land surface albedo and Earth-Sun distance. Changes in these parameters within a grid cell over a month inflect the correlation. To minimize the effect of zenith angle, water vapour, and Earth-Sun distance the CERES fluxes are normalized before the linear fitting using reference fluxes calculated with a radiative transfer code (Libradtran). The normalization, especially to a fixed zenith angle increases the correlation between TOA flux and AOD significantly. For a comparison theF0 is

  18. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall...

  19. Multi-sensor cloud and aerosol retrieval simulator and remote sensing from model parameters - Part 2: Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wind, Galina; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.

    2016-07-01

    The Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator (MCRS) produces a "simulated radiance" product from any high-resolution general circulation model with interactive aerosol as if a specific sensor such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were viewing a combination of the atmospheric column and land-ocean surface at a specific location. Previously the MCRS code only included contributions from atmosphere and clouds in its radiance calculations and did not incorporate properties of aerosols. In this paper we added a new aerosol properties module to the MCRS code that allows users to insert a mixture of up to 15 different aerosol species in any of 36 vertical layers.This new MCRS code is now known as MCARS (Multi-sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator). Inclusion of an aerosol module into MCARS not only allows for extensive, tightly controlled testing of various aspects of satellite operational cloud and aerosol properties retrieval algorithms, but also provides a platform for comparing cloud and aerosol models against satellite measurements. This kind of two-way platform can improve the efficacy of model parameterizations of measured satellite radiances, allowing the assessment of model skill consistently with the retrieval algorithm. The MCARS code provides dynamic controls for appearance of cloud and aerosol layers. Thereby detailed quantitative studies of the impacts of various atmospheric components can be controlled.In this paper we illustrate the operation of MCARS by deriving simulated radiances from various data field output by the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model. The model aerosol fields are prepared for translation to simulated radiance using the same model subgrid variability parameterizations as are used for cloud and atmospheric properties profiles, namely the ICA technique. After MCARS computes modeled sensor radiances equivalent to their observed counterparts, these radiances are presented as input to

  20. Multi-Sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters . Part 2; Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; Da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator (MCRS) produces a simulated radiance product from any high-resolution general circulation model with interactive aerosol as if a specific sensor such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were viewing a combination of the atmospheric column and land ocean surface at a specific location. Previously the MCRS code only included contributions from atmosphere and clouds in its radiance calculations and did not incorporate properties of aerosols. In this paper we added a new aerosol properties module to the MCRS code that allows users to insert a mixture of up to 15 different aerosol species in any of 36 vertical layers. This new MCRS code is now known as MCARS (Multi-sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator). Inclusion of an aerosol module into MCARS not only allows for extensive, tightly controlled testing of various aspects of satellite operational cloud and aerosol properties retrieval algorithms, but also provides a platform for comparing cloud and aerosol models against satellite measurements. This kind of two-way platform can improve the efficacy of model parameterizations of measured satellite radiances, allowing the assessment of model skill consistently with the retrieval algorithm. The MCARS code provides dynamic controls for appearance of cloud and aerosol layers. Thereby detailed quantitative studies of the impacts of various atmospheric components can be controlled. In this paper we illustrate the operation of MCARS by deriving simulated radiances from various data field output by the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model. The model aerosol fields are prepared for translation to simulated radiance using the same model sub grid variability parameterizations as are used for cloud and atmospheric properties profiles, namely the ICA technique. After MCARS computes modeled sensor radiances equivalent to their observed counterparts, these radiances are presented as input to

  1. Remote sensing of Alaskan boreal forest fires at the pixel and sub-pixel level: multi-sensor approaches and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waigl, C.; Stuefer, M.; Prakash, A.

    2013-12-01

    Wildfire is the main disturbance regime of the boreal forest ecosystem, a region acutely sensitive to climate change. Large fires impact the carbon cycle, permafrost, and air quality on a regional and even hemispheric scale. Because of their significance as a hazard to human health and economic activity, monitoring wildfires is relevant not only to science but also to government agencies. The goal of this study is to develop pathways towards a near real-time assessment of fire characteristics in the boreal zones of Alaska based on satellite remote sensing data. We map the location of active burn areas and derive fire parameters such as fire temperature, intensity, stage (smoldering or flaming), emission injection points, carbon consumed, and energy released. For monitoring wildfires in the sub-arctic region, we benefit from the high temporal resolution of data (as high as 8 images a day) from MODIS on the Aqua and Terra platforms and VIIRS on NPP/Suomi, downlinked and processed to level 1 by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. To transcend the low spatial resolution of these sensors, a sub-pixel analysis is carried out. By applying techniques from Bayesian inverse modeling to Dozier's two-component approach, uncertainties and sensitivity of the retrieved fire temperatures and fractional pixel areas to background temperature and atmospheric factors are assessed. A set of test cases - large fires from the 2004 to 2013 fire seasons complemented by a selection of smaller burns at the lower end of the MODIS detection threshold - is used to evaluate the methodology. While the VIIRS principal fire detection band M13 (centered at 4.05 μm, similar to MODIS bands 21 and 22 at 3.959 μm) does not usually saturate for Alaskan wildfire areas, the thermal IR band M15 (10.763 μm, comparable to MODIS band 31 at 11.03 μm) indeed saturates for a percentage, though not all, of the fire pixels of intense burns. As this limits the

  2. Polymer optical fiber grating as water activity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Webb, David J.

    2014-05-01

    Controlling the water content within a product has long been required in the chemical processing, agriculture, food storage, paper manufacturing, semiconductor, pharmaceutical and fuel industries. The limitations of water content measurement as an indicator of safety and quality are attributed to differences in the strength with which water associates with other components in the product. Water activity indicates how tightly water is "bound," structurally or chemically, in products. Water absorption introduces changes in the volume and refractive index of poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA. Therefore for a grating made in PMMA based optical fiber, its wavelength is an indicator of water absorption and PMMA thus can be used as a water activity sensor. In this work we have investigated the performance of a PMMA based optical fiber grating as a water activity sensor in sugar solution, saline solution and Jet A-1 aviation fuel. Samples of sugar solution with sugar concentration from 0 to 8%, saline solution with concentration from 0 to 22%, and dried (10ppm), ambient (39ppm) and wet (68ppm) aviation fuels were used in experiments. The corresponding water activities are measured as 1.0 to 0.99 for sugar solution, 1.0 to 0.86 for saline solution, and 0.15, 0.57 and 1.0 for the aviation fuel samples. The water content in the measured samples ranges from 100% (pure water) to 10 ppm (dried aviation fuel). The PMMA based optical fiber grating exhibits good sensitivity and consistent response, and Bragg wavelength shifts as large as 3.4 nm when the sensor is transferred from dry fuel to wet fuel.

  3. Successful Mars remote sensors, MO THEMIS and MER Mini-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Steven; Christensen, Phil

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes results of the calibration of the miniature thermal emission spectrometer (Mini-TES) and the thermal emission imaging system (THEMIS) built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) under contract to Arizona State University (ASU). This paper also serves as an update to an earlier paper (Silverman et al., 2003) for mission description and instrument designs (Schueler et al., 2003). A major goal of the Mars exploration program is to help determine whether life ever existed on Mars via detailed in situ studies and surface sample return. It is essential to identify landing sites with the highest probability of containing samples indicative of early pre-biotic or biotic environments. Of particular interest are aqueous and/or hydrothermal environments in which life could have existed, or regions of current near-surface water or heat sources [Exobiology_Working_Group, 1995, An Exobiological Strategy for Mars Exploration, NASA Headquarters]. The search requires detailed geologic mapping and accurate interpretations of site composition and history in a global context. THEMIS and Mini-TES were designed to do this and builds upon a wealth of data from previous experiments. Previous experiments include the Mariner 6/7 Mars infrared radiometer (MIR) and infrared spectrometer [G.C. Pimentel, P.B. Forney, K.C. Herr, Evidence about hydrate and solid water in the martian surface from the 1969 Mariner infrared spectrometer, Journal of Geophysical Research 79(11) (1974) 1623 1634], the Mariner 9 infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) [B. Conrath, R. Curran, R. Hanel, V. Kunde, W. Maguire, J. Pearl, J. Pirraglia, J. Walker, Atmospheric and surface properties of Mars obtained by infrared spectroscopy on Mariner 9, Journal of Geophysical Research 78 (1973) 4267 4278], the Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) [H.H. Kieffer, T.Z. Martin, A.R. Peterfreund, B.M. Jakosky, E.D. Miner, F.D. Palluconi, Thermal and albedo mapping of Mars during the Viking

  4. Novel Use of a Remote Laboratory for Active Learning in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramírez, Darinka; Ramírez, María Soledad; Marrero, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to describe a novel teaching mode that allows for direct instructor-student and student-student discussions of material balance concepts by means of active learning. The instructor explains the concepts during class time while using a remotely controlled laboratory system that is projected on a screen with real-time access to the…

  5. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  6. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.; McMillin, Summer

    2013-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Space Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode-based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU.

  7. Development of Active Catheter,Active Guide Wire and Micro Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Y.; Mineta, T.; Totsu, K.; Makishi, W.; Esashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Active catheters and active guide wires which move like a snake have been developed for catheter-based minimally invasive diagnosis and therapy. Communication and control IC chips in the active catheter reduce the number of lead wires for control. The active catheter can be not only bent but also torsioned and extended. An ultra minature fiber-optic pressure sensor; a forward-looking ultrasonic probe and a magnetic position and orientation sensor have been developed for catheters and guide wires. These moving mechanisms and several sensors which are fitted near the tip of the catheter and the guide wire will provide detailed information near the tip and enable delicate and effective catheter intervention. PMID:20663389

  8. A New Quantum Sensor for Measuring Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Thomas, T.; Heinicke, D.; Peterson, R.; Morgan, P.; McDermitt, D. K.; Burba, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    A quantum sensor measures photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, in μmol of photons m-2 s-1) in the 400 nm to 700 nm waveband. Plants utilize this radiation to drive photosynthesis, though individual plant responses to incident radiation may vary within this range. The new quantum sensor (model LI-190R, LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE), with an optical filter and silicon photodiode detector housed in a cosine-corrected head, is designed to provide a better response to incident radiation across the 400-700 nm range. The new design is expected to significantly improve spectral response due to uniformity across the PAR waveband, but particularly in the wavebands from 520 nm to 600 nm and 665 nm to 680 nm, and sharp cutoffs in the regions below and above the PAR waveband. Special care was taken to make sure that PAR sensor would not substantially respond to incident radiation above the 700 nm threshold because this can lead to errors when performing measurements in environments with a large proportion of near-infrared radiation, such as canopy understory. The physical housing of the sensor is designed to be weather-resistant, to effectively shed precipitation, provide protection at high temperature and high humidity conditions, and has a cosine-corrected response to 82° zenith angle. The latter is particularly important when measuring incident radiation at low elevation angles, diffuse light, or low light conditions. This presentation describes the principles of the new design, and shows the performance results from field experiments and laboratory tests.

  9. Remote Sensing of Almond and Walnut Tree Canopy Temperatures Using an Inexpensive Infrared Sensor on a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Kellen Ethan

    Improving water use efficiency in agriculture will become increasingly important in the face of decreasing water resources and a growing population. Increasing water use efficiency, or water productivity, has been shown to greatly reduce irrigation water usage in many orchard crops with little to no impact on yield. In some specialty crops, improving water productivity can even lead to a higher value crop. Current irrigation practices depend largely on uniform applications of water over large fields with varying degrees of heterogeneity. As a result, much of the field receives more water than it needs. A system to monitor the needs of each plant or smaller groups of plants within the field would be helpful in distributing irrigation water according to each plant or group of plants' needs. Such a system would help conserve water resources. Stomatal conductance is a good indicator of plant water-based stress, as it is the main response a plant has to limit transpiration-related water losses. The difference between leaf temperature and air temperature, when adjusted for environmental conditions, can give a good indication of stomatal conductance. Recent efforts at UC Davis have employed a handheld sensor suite to measure leaf temperature and other environmental variables like wind speed, air temperature, and humidity in almond and walnut trees. Though effective, this method requires walking or driving through the orchard and measuring several leaves on a given tree, so it is impractical for large-scale monitoring. Satellite and aircraft can measure canopy temperatures remotely, but these applications typically do not have the spatial resolution for precise monitoring or the temporal resolution necessary for irrigation decisions, and they are too expensive and impractical for smaller-scale farms. A smaller unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) could employ the same methods as satellite and larger aircraft-based systems, but relatively inexpensively and at a scale catered to

  10. Integrating Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing and In-situ Measurements for Africa Drought Monitoring and Food Security Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, X.; Qu, J. J.; Motha, R. P.; Stefanski, R.; Malherbe, J.

    2014-12-01

    Drought is one of the most complicated natural hazards, and causes serious environmental, economic and social consequences. Agricultural production systems, which are highly susceptible to weather and climate extremes, are often the first and most vulnerable sector to be affected by drought events. In Africa, crop yield potential and grazing quality are already nearing their limit of temperature sensitivity, and, rapid population growth and frequent drought episodes pose serious complications for food security. It is critical to promote sustainable agriculture development in Africa under conditions of climate extremes. Soil moisture is one of the most important indicators for agriculture drought, and is a fundamentally critical parameter for decision support in crop management, including planting, water use efficiency and irrigation. While very significant technological advances have been introduced for remote sensing of surface soil moisture from space, in-situ measurements are still critical for calibration and validation of soil moisture estimation algorithms. For operational applications, synergistic collaboration is needed to integrate measurements from different sensors at different spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation, a collaborative effort is demonstrated for drought monitoring in Africa, supported and coordinated by WMO, including surface soil moisture and crop status monitoring. In-situ measurements of soil moisture, precipitation and temperature at selected sites are provided by local partners in Africa. Measurements from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are integrated with in-situ observations to derive surface soil moisture at high spatial resolution. Crop status is estimated through temporal analysis of current and historical MODIS measurements. Integrated analysis of soil moisture data and crop status provides both in-depth understanding of drought conditions and

  11. Integrating Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing and In-situ Measurements for Africa Drought Monitoring and Food Security Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, X.; Qu, J. J.; Motha, R. P.; Stefanski, R.; Malherbe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is one of the most complicated natural hazards, and causes serious environmental, economic and social consequences. Agricultural production systems, which are highly susceptible to weather and climate extremes, are often the first and most vulnerable sector to be affected by drought events. In Africa, crop yield potential and grazing quality are already nearing their limit of temperature sensitivity, and, rapid population growth and frequent drought episodes pose serious complications for food security. It is critical to promote sustainable agriculture development in Africa under conditions of climate extremes. Soil moisture is one of the most important indicators for agriculture drought, and is a fundamentally critical parameter for decision support in crop management, including planting, water use efficiency and irrigation. While very significant technological advances have been introduced for remote sensing of surface soil moisture from space, in-situ measurements are still critical for calibration and validation of soil moisture estimation algorithms. For operational applications, synergistic collaboration is needed to integrate measurements from different sensors at different spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation, a collaborative effort is demonstrated for drought monitoring in Africa, supported and coordinated by WMO, including surface soil moisture and crop status monitoring. In-situ measurements of soil moisture, precipitation and temperature at selected sites are provided by local partners in Africa. Measurements from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are integrated with in-situ observations to derive surface soil moisture at high spatial resolution. Crop status is estimated through temporal analysis of current and historical MODIS measurements. Integrated analysis of soil moisture data and crop status provides both in-depth understanding of drought conditions and

  12. Enabling Remote Access to Fieldwork: Gaining Insight into the Pedagogic Effectiveness of "Direct" and "Remote" Field Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Alison; Collins, Trevor; Maskall, John; Lea, John; Lunt, Paul; Davies, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study considers the pedagogical effectiveness of remote access to fieldwork locations. Forty-one students from across the GEES disciplines (geography, earth and environmental sciences) undertook a fieldwork exercise, supported by two lecturers. Twenty students accessed the field site directly and the remainder accessed the site remotely using…

  13. Optical and Radar Satellite Remote Sensing for Large Area Analysis of Landslide Activity in Southern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessner, S.; Behling, R.; Teshebaeva, K. O.; Motagh, M.; Wetzel, H. U.

    2014-12-01

    The presented work has been investigating the potential of optical and radar satellite remote sensing for the spatio-temporal analysis of landslide activity at a regional scale along the eastern rim of the Fergana Basin representing the area of highest landslide activity in Kyrgyzstan. For this purpose a multi-temporal satellite remote sensing database has been established for a 12.000 km2 study area in Southern Kyrgyzstan containing a multitude of optical data acquired during the last 28 years as well as TerraSAR-X and ALOS-PALSAR acquired since 2007. The optical data have been mainly used for creating a multi-temporal inventory of backdated landslide activity. For this purpose an automated approach for object-oriented multi-temporal landslide detection has been developed which is based on the analysis of temporal NDVI-trajectories complemented by relief information to separate landslide-related surface changes from other land cover changes. Applying the approach to the whole study area using temporal high resolution RapidEye time series data has resulted in the automated detection of 612 landslide objects covering a total area of approx. 7.3 km². Currently, the approach is extended to the whole multi-sensor time-series database for systematic analysis of longer-term landslide occurrence at a regional scale. Radar remote sensing has been focussing on SAR Interferometry (InSAR) to detect landslide related surface deformation. InSAR data were processed by repeat-pass interferometry using the DORIS and SARScape software. To better assess ground deformation related to individual landslide objects, InSAR time-series analysis has been applied using the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) method. Analysis of the results in combination with optical data and DEM information has revealed that most of the derived deformations are caused by slow movements in areas of already existing landslides indicating the reactivation of older slope failures. This way, InSAR analysis can

  14. Linking tree size distribution to active remote sensing parameters: consequences for observation strategies and impacts on biomass retrieval (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, N.; Simard, M.; Behrman, K. D.; Keitt, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation 3D structure measurements from active remote sensing (i.e. lidar and radar) are usually averaged and reported at the regional level. However, environmental gradients and disturbance can structure vegetation patterns at multiple scales. Thus, a critical challenge in designing global observation strategies is to obtain confidence intervals on vegetation parameters as a function of biome, sensor, and resolution of observation. We present strategies to gain knowledge on forest spatial heterogeneity that can be translated into confidence intervals for above ground biomass and canopy height measurements. We use data from two airborne systems: the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) and the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) acquired over sites in the US (NH and ME), Canada (Quebec) and Costa Rica. We first describe two parameters (alpha and beta) that summarize tree size distribution for individual patches, thereby capturing forest successional stage. In this scenario, the uncertainty in predicting above ground biomass stems from: (1) the ability to estimate alpha and beta with the lidar/radar signals, and (2) the error in deriving above ground biomass from tree size distribution statistics. The processes of competition and self-thinning create skewed tree size distributions where smaller individuals are common and large individuals are rare. Using a global dataset of spaceborne lidar points from the sensor ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite), we show the importance of sampling extreme values when using spatially sparse data. This raises the need to obtain expectations for the second-order properties of forest stands. To this end, we employed wavelet transforms to quantify variation in lidar-derived canopy height metrics across >20 Km transects and asked whether environmental gradients such as elevation can constrain the spatial autocorrelation among large trees.

  15. Remote Bridge Deflection Measurement Using an Advanced Video Deflectometer and Actively Illuminated LED Targets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Long; Pan, Bing

    2016-08-23

    An advanced video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets is proposed for remote, real-time measurement of bridge deflection. The system configuration, fundamental principles, and measuring procedures of the video deflectometer are first described. To address the challenge of remote and accurate deflection measurement of large engineering structures without being affected by ambient light, the novel idea of active imaging, which combines high-brightness monochromatic LED targets with coupled bandpass filter imaging, is introduced. Then, to examine the measurement accuracy of the proposed advanced video deflectometer in outdoor environments, vertical motions of an LED target with precisely-controlled translations were measured and compared with prescribed values. Finally, by tracking six LED targets mounted on the bridge, the developed video deflectometer was applied for field, remote, and multipoint deflection measurement of the Wuhan Yangtze River Bridge, one of the most prestigious and most publicized constructions in China, during its routine safety evaluation tests. Since the proposed video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets offers prominent merits of remote, contactless, real-time, and multipoint deflection measurement with strong robustness against ambient light changes, it has great potential in the routine safety evaluation of various bridges and other large-scale engineering structures.

  16. Remote Bridge Deflection Measurement Using an Advanced Video Deflectometer and Actively Illuminated LED Targets

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Long; Pan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    An advanced video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets is proposed for remote, real-time measurement of bridge deflection. The system configuration, fundamental principles, and measuring procedures of the video deflectometer are first described. To address the challenge of remote and accurate deflection measurement of large engineering structures without being affected by ambient light, the novel idea of active imaging, which combines high-brightness monochromatic LED targets with coupled bandpass filter imaging, is introduced. Then, to examine the measurement accuracy of the proposed advanced video deflectometer in outdoor environments, vertical motions of an LED target with precisely-controlled translations were measured and compared with prescribed values. Finally, by tracking six LED targets mounted on the bridge, the developed video deflectometer was applied for field, remote, and multipoint deflection measurement of the Wuhan Yangtze River Bridge, one of the most prestigious and most publicized constructions in China, during its routine safety evaluation tests. Since the proposed video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets offers prominent merits of remote, contactless, real-time, and multipoint deflection measurement with strong robustness against ambient light changes, it has great potential in the routine safety evaluation of various bridges and other large-scale engineering structures. PMID:27563901

  17. A 868MHz-based wireless sensor network for ground truthing of soil moisture for a hyperspectral remote sensing campaign - design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näthe, Paul; Becker, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture and plant available water are important environmental parameters that affect plant growth and crop yield. Hence, they are significant parameters for vegetation monitoring and precision agriculture. However, validation through ground-based soil moisture measurements is necessary for accessing soil moisture, plant canopy temperature, soil temperature and soil roughness with airborne hyperspectral imaging systems in a corresponding hyperspectral imaging campaign as a part of the INTERREG IV A-Project SMART INSPECTORS. At this point, commercially available sensors for matric potential, plant available water and volumetric water content are utilized for automated measurements with smart sensor nodes which are developed on the basis of open-source 868MHz radio modules, featuring a full-scale microcontroller unit that allows an autarkic operation of the sensor nodes on batteries in the field. The generated data from each of these sensor nodes is transferred wirelessly with an open-source protocol to a central node, the so-called "gateway". This gateway collects, interprets and buffers the sensor readings and, eventually, pushes the data-time series onto a server-based database. The entire data processing chain from the sensor reading to the final storage of data-time series on a server is realized with open-source hardware and software in such a way that the recorded data can be accessed from anywhere through the internet. It will be presented how this open-source based wireless sensor network is developed and specified for the application of ground truthing. In addition, the system's perspectives and potentials with respect to usability and applicability for vegetation monitoring and precision agriculture shall be pointed out. Regarding the corresponding hyperspectral imaging campaign, results from ground measurements will be discussed in terms of their contributing aspects to the remote sensing system. Finally, the significance of the wireless sensor

  18. Optimal Sensor Placement in Active Multistatic Sonar Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    monitored in order to protect them from hostile underwater assets. We consider discrete “ cookie cutter” sensors as well as various diffuse sensor models. By... cookie cutter sensor model, we are able to exclude even more suboptimal solutions by determining range-of-the-day, source and receiver circles. To...protect them from hostile underwater assets. We consider discrete “ cookie cutter” sensors as well as various diffuse sensor models. By showing that the

  19. Multi-sensor control for 6-axis active vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Douglas Gary

    The goal of this research is to look at the two different parts of the challenge of active vibration isolation. First is the hardware that will be used to accomplish the task and improve performance. The cubic hexapod, or Stewart platform, has become a popular solution to the problem because of its ability to provide 6-axis vibration isolation with a relatively simple configuration. A number of these hexapods have been constructed at different research facilities around the country to address different missions, each with their own approach. Hood Technology Corporation and the University of Washington took the lessons learned from these designs and developed a new hexapod that addresses the requirements of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's planned space borne interferometry missions. This system has unique mechanical design details and is built with 4 sensors in each strut. This, along with a real time computer to implement controllers, allows for a great deal of flexibility in controller design and research into sensor selection. Other unique design features include a very soft axial stiffness, a custom designed voice coil actuator with a large displacement capability and elastomeric flexures both for guiding the actuator and providing pivot points on each strut. The second part, and the primary area of this research, is to examine multi-sensor control strategies in an effort to improve the performance of the controllers, their stability and/or how implementable they are. Up to this point, the primary method of control for systems of this type has been classical, designing single-input, single output controller loops to be closed around each strut. But because of the geometry of the hexapod and the different problems that can occur with some sensors, the classical approach is limited in what it can accomplish. This research shows the benefits to be gained by going to a multiple sensor controller and implementing controllers that are designed using a frequency

  20. Ischemia Activates Neutrophils But Inhibits Their Local and Remote Diapedesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    mediated polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) activation and diapedesis . Anesthetized rabbits were subjected to three hours of hindlimb ischemia (n = 8) or...introduced into an abraded skin chamber or intratracheally induced diapedesis in non-ischemic animals. PMN accumulations in the+skin chamber were...exp 4) PMN/mm(exp 3) compared to 5 +/- 1 X 10(exp 4) PMN/mm(exp 3) with sham plasma (n = 4, pɘ.05). Diapedesis was completely prevented (0-3 PMN/mm(exp

  1. Characterization of Deep Tunneling Activity through Remote-Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Best, P. J. Etzler, and J. D. Bloom

    1997-10-01

    This work is a case study demonstrating the uses of multispectral and multi-temporal imagery to characterize deep tunneling activity. A drainage tunnel excavation in Quincy, MA is the case locality. Data used are aerial photographs (digitized) and Daedalus 3600 MSS image data that were collected in July and October of 1994. Analysis of the data includes thermal characterization, spectral characterization, multi-temporal analysis, and volume estimation using digital DEM generation. The results demonstrate the type of information that could be generated by multispectral, multi-temporal data if the study locality were a clandestine excavation site with restricted surface access.

  2. "Speech in remote areas and inspiration to young students"—An outreach activity for women in physics in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Man-Ling; Guo, Xia; Gu, Dong-Mei; Sun, Xiu-Dong; Feng, Ya-Qing; Zhu, Shao-Ping

    2015-12-01

    The Working Group on Women in Physics of the Chinese Physical Society in Beijing has worked since 2002 to improve the situation of women in physics in China. Because development is not balanced in vast mainland China—remote areas lag behind in education—a new outreach activity, "Speech in Remote Areas and Inspiration to Young Students," was launched in 2013. This program aims to broaden the horizons of students in remote areas and to inspire their exploration and enterprise.

  3. Better physical activity classification using smartphone acceleration sensor.

    PubMed

    Arif, Muhammad; Bilal, Mohsin; Kattan, Ahmed; Ahamed, S Iqbal

    2014-09-01

    Obesity is becoming one of the serious problems for the health of worldwide population. Social interactions on mobile phones and computers via internet through social e-networks are one of the major causes of lack of physical activities. For the health specialist, it is important to track the record of physical activities of the obese or overweight patients to supervise weight loss control. In this study, acceleration sensor present in the smartphone is used to monitor the physical activity of the user. Physical activities including Walking, Jogging, Sitting, Standing, Walking upstairs and Walking downstairs are classified. Time domain features are extracted from the acceleration data recorded by smartphone during different physical activities. Time and space complexity of the whole framework is done by optimal feature subset selection and pruning of instances. Classification results of six physical activities are reported in this paper. Using simple time domain features, 99 % classification accuracy is achieved. Furthermore, attributes subset selection is used to remove the redundant features and to minimize the time complexity of the algorithm. A subset of 30 features produced more than 98 % classification accuracy for the six physical activities.

  4. Data assimilation of an airborne multiple-remote-sensor system and of satellite images for the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Olaf; Hunsaenger, Thomas; Tufte, Lars; Barjenbruch, Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Marine pollution in the sensible North and Baltic Sea forces an international aerial surveillance. Within this framework the German aerial surveillance operates an advanced instrumentation on board of two 'Dornier 228" aircrafts. The instrumentation consists of a set of state-of-the-art imaging remote sensors, like side looking airborne radar (SLAR), IR/UV line scanner and particularly a microwave radiometer (MWR) and a laser-fluoro-sensor (LFS). The most important aim is to detect oil discharges on the water surface, emitted accidentally or illegally. In case of discharge, the pollution has to be classified and quantified with a high accuracy. Another aim is to monitor biological and hydrological parameters, as there are the concentration of chlorophyll and dissolved organic matter (DOM) or the growth of phytoplancton. This paper describes the set of instruments and their potential to fulfill these demands. The SLAR operates to locate oil discharges and phytoplancton, whereas the IR/UV scanner allows to distinct the detected area. The IR/UV and especially the MWR sensor allow to quantify the thickness of the oil film. Finally, the LFS classifies the oil species as well as organic material. Emphasis is placed on the results of the sensor measurements and their synergy effects. The combination of the sensor data yields value added information for the operational users. An use of satellite data to improve the operational surveillance will be discussed. The potential and limitations of satellite and airborne data for the surveillance tasks will be compared.

  5. Active hydrothermal and non-active massive sulfide mound investigation using a new multiparameter chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Wu, G.; Qin, H.; Wang, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Investigation of active hydrothermal mound as well as non-active massive sulfide mound are studied recently. However, there is still lack of in-situ detection method for the non-active massive sulfide mound. Even though Transient ElectroMagnetic (TEM) and Electric Self-potential (SP) methods are good, they both are labour, time and money cost work. We proposed a new multiparameter chemical sensor method to study the seafloor active hydrothermal mound as well as non-active massive sulfide mound. This sensor integrates Eh, S2- ions concentration and pH electrochemical electrodes together, and could found chemical change caused by the active hydrothermal vent, even weak chemical abnormalities by non-active massive sulfide hydrothermal mound which MARP and CTD sometimes cannot detect. In 2012, the 1st Leg of the Chinese 26th cruise, the multiparameter chemical sensor was carried out with the deepsea camera system over the Carlsberg Ridge in Indian Ocean by R/V DAYANGYIHAO. It was shown small Eh and S2- ions concentration abnormal around a site at Northwest Indian ridge. This site was also evidenced by the TV grab. In the 2nd Leg of the same cruise in June, this chemical sensor was carried out with TEM and SP survey system. The chemical abnormalities are matched very well with both TEM and SP survey results. The results show that the multiparameter chemical sensor method not only can detect active hydrothermal mound, but also can find the non-active massive sulfide hydrothermal mound.

  6. Spatiotemporal analysis of soil moisture in using active and passive remotely sensed data and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Soil moisture plays a vital role in ecosystem, biological processes, climate, weather and agriculture. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) improves data by combining the advantages and avoiding the limitation of passive microwave remote sensing (low resolution), and active microwave (challenge of soil moisture retrieval). This study will advance the knowledge of the application of soil moisture by using the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) data as well as data collected at Walnut Gulch Arizona in August 2015 during SMAPVEX15. Specifically, we will analyze the 5m radar data from Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to study spatial variability within the PALS radiometer pixel. SMAPVEX12/15 and SMAP data will also be analyzed to evaluate disaggregation algorithms. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and regulations for protecting land resources and improving environmental conditions. Keywords: soil moisture, Remote Sensing (RS), spatial statistic

  7. Dealing with the Effects of Sensor Displacement in Wearable Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Banos, Oresti; Toth, Mate Attila; Damas, Miguel; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Most wearable activity recognition systems assume a predefined sensor deployment that remains unchanged during runtime. However, this assumption does not reflect real-life conditions. During the normal use of such systems, users may place the sensors in a position different from the predefined sensor placement. Also, sensors may move from their original location to a different one, due to a loose attachment. Activity recognition systems trained on activity patterns characteristic of a given sensor deployment may likely fail due to sensor displacements. In this work, we innovatively explore the effects of sensor displacement induced by both the intentional misplacement of sensors and self-placement by the user. The effects of sensor displacement are analyzed for standard activity recognition techniques, as well as for an alternate robust sensor fusion method proposed in a previous work. While classical recognition models show little tolerance to sensor displacement, the proposed method is proven to have notable capabilities to assimilate the changes introduced in the sensor position due to self-placement and provides considerable improvements for large misplacements. PMID:24915181

  8. Water Quality Monitoring of the Upper St Lawrence River Using Remote Sensor Arrays Placed in a Hydropower Dam Combined with Hydrodynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, F.; Sprague, H. M.; Skufca, J. D.; Twiss, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    There are limited long-term data available on the ecological health and environmental state of the Upper St. Lawrence River (CA,US; average discharge 6,910 m3/s). Our research objective is to establish long-term remote water quality monitoring stations in the Moses-Saunders hydroelectric power dam at Massena, New York using a network of sensors. Such a placement of sensors allows for year-round monitoring of water and hence, the ability to measure at times of year and during extreme weather events that previously made monitoring infeasible. The sensor array was installed on 17 June 2014 and draws water from the penstock at a rate of 6-10 L per minute. Sensors in flow through chambers collect data on temperature, turbidity, color dissolved organic material (CDOM), phycocyanin, chlorophyll-a, and specific conductivity at one minute intervals. In combination with a hydrodynamic flow model we are able to hind-cast water movements so that the quality of water passing through the dam can be related to environmental conditions in the river upstream from the sensor array. We conducted field surveys using sensors in a ferry box on a vessel moving upstream (40 km) at a velocity providing a spatial resolution of 100 m and determined that main channel water is more homogenous than water along the shorelines (2 m isopleth) of the river, despite the high turbulence in this river. The sensor array located in the turbine unit nearest the US shore is able to discern tributary inputs for CDOM from the Oswegatchie River (discharge 40-120 m3/s), located 67 km upstream. This research is an important proof-of-concept for installing similar arrays in dams throughout the Great Lakes region and is applicable to smaller rivers containing power dams.

  9. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S> ; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity (EVA) in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation Portable Life Support System (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode (LD) spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen (O2) channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)/microcontroller architecture. Based on the results of the initial instrument development, further prototype development and testing of instruments leveraging the lessons learned were desired. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU. .

  10. A study of selected environmental quality remote sensors for free flyer missions launched from the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. W.; Grenda, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    The sensors were examined for adaptability to shuttle by reviewing pertinent information regarding sensor characteristics as they related to the shuttle and Multimission Modular Spacecraft environments. This included physical and electrical characteristics, data output and command requirements, attitude and orientation requirements, thermal and safety requirements, and adaptability and modification for space. The sensor requirements and characteristics were compared with the corresponding shuttle and Multimission Modular Spacecraft characteristics and capabilities. On this basis the adaptability and necessary modifications for each sensor were determined. A number of the sensors were examined in more detail and estimated cost for the modifications was provided.

  11. Active Microwave Remote Sensing Observations of Weddell Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Since July 1991, the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites have acquired radar data of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The Active Microwave Instrument on board ERS has two modes; SAR and Scatterometer. Two receiving stations enable direct downlink and recording of high bit-rate, high resolution SAR image data of this region. When not in an imaging mode, when direct SAR downlink is not possible, or when a receiving station is inoperable, the latter mode allows normalized radar cross-section data to be acquired. These low bit-rate ERS scatterometer data are tape recorded, downlinked and processed off-line. Recent advances in image generation from Scatterometer backscatter measurements enable complementary medium-scale resolution images to be made during periods when SAR images cannot be acquired. Together, these combined C-band microwave image data have for the first time enabled uninterrupted night and day coverage of the Weddell Sea region at both high (25 m) and medium-scale (-20 km) resolutions. C-band ERS-1 radar data are analyzed in conjunction with field data from two simultaneous field experiments in 1992. Satellite radar signature data are compared with shipborne radar data to extract a regional and seasonal signature database for recognition of ice types in the images. Performance of automated sea-ice tracking algorithms is tested on Antarctic data to evaluate their success. Examples demonstrate that both winter and summer ice can be effectively tracked. The kinematics of the main ice zones within the Weddell Sea are illustrated, together with the complementary time-dependencies in their radar signatures. Time-series of satellite images are used to illustrate the development of the Weddell Sea ice cover from its austral summer minimum (February) to its winter maximum (September). The combination of time-dependent microwave signatures and ice dynamics tracking enable various drift regimes to be defined which relate closely to the circulation of the

  12. Yield and quality prediction using satellite passive imagery and ground-based active optical sensors in sugar beet, spring wheat, corn, and sunflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Honggang

    Remote sensing is one possible approach for improving crop nitrogen use efficiency to save fertilizer cost, reduce environmental pollution, and improve crop yield and quality. Feasibility and potential of using remote sensing tools to predict crops yield and quality as well as detect nitrogen requirements, application timing, rate, and places in season were investigated based on 2012-2013 two-year and four-crop (corn, spring wheat, sugar beet, and sunflower) study. Two ground-based active optical sensors, GreenSeeker and Holland Scientific Crop Circle, and the RapidEye satellite imagery were used to collect sensing data. Highly significant statistical relationships between INSEY (NDVI normalized by growing degree days) and crop yield and quality indices were found for all crops, indicating that remote sensing tools may be useful for managing in-season crop yield and quality prediction.

  13. Spectral interdependence of remote-sensing reflectance and its implications on the design of ocean color satellite sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zhongping; Shang, Shaoling; Hu, Chuanmin; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-20

    Using 901 remote-sensing reflectance spectra (R(rs)(λ), sr⁻¹, λ from 400 to 700 nm with a 5 nm resolution), we evaluated the correlations of R(rs)(λ) between neighboring spectral bands in order to characterize (1) the spectral interdependence of R(rs)(λ) at different bands and (2) to what extent hyperspectral R(rs)(λ) can be reconstructed from multiband measurements. The 901 R(rs) spectra were measured over a wide variety of aquatic environments in which water color varied from oceanic blue to coastal green or brown, with chlorophyll-a concentrations ranging from ~0.02 to >100  mg  m⁻³, bottom depths from ~1  m to >1000  m, and bottom substrates including sand, coral reef, and seagrass. The correlation coefficient of R(rs)(λ) between neighboring bands at center wavelengths λ(k) and λ(l), r(Δλ)(λ(k), λ(l)), was evaluated systematically, with the spectral gap (Δλ=λ(l)-λ(k)) changing between 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 nm, respectively. It was found that r(Δλ) decreased with increasing Δλ, but remained >0.97 for Δλ≤20  nm for all spectral bands. Further, using 15 spectral bands between 400 and 710 nm, we reconstructed, via multivariant linear regression, hyperspectral R(rs)(λ) (from 400 to 700 nm with a 5 nm resolution). The percentage difference between measured and reconstructed R(rs) for each band in the 400-700 nm range was generally less than 1%, with a correlation coefficient close to 1.0. The mean absolute error between measured and reconstructed R(rs) was about 0.00002  sr⁻¹ for each band, which is significantly smaller than the R(rs) uncertainties from all past and current ocean color satellite radiometric products. These results echo findings of earlier studies that R(rs) measurements at ~15 spectral bands in the visible domain can provide nearly identical spectral information as with hyperspectral (contiguous bands at 5 nm spectral resolution) measurements. Such results provide insights for data

  14. Remote activation of a microactuator using a photo-responsive nanoparticle-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeberoff, Anthony

    Stimulus response materials are a class of novel materials that are currently being explored in various technologies, including biomedical devices and components, food packaging, fabrics, energy harvesting and conversion, and other elementary components such as sensors and actuators. Hybrid organic-inorganic materials such as nanoparticle-polymer composites are attractive candidates as their properties can be significantly tuned for particular applications where selectivity and localized responses are critical factors. In this work we developed and optimized a photo-responsive microactuator that can operate selectively to a specific wavelength of light. The photo-responsive microactuator is comprised of monodispersed microspheres that contain gold nanoparticles. Upon irradiation, these microspheres transduce optical energy to thermal energy, driving a localized phase change in the matrix in which they are embedded. Our remotely powered microactuator can be further realized in applications where decoupling the physical connection of the energy/control source from the actuating component is necessary.

  15. Microwave backscattering theory and active remote sensing of the ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S.; Miller, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    The status is reviewed of electromagnetic scattering theory relative to the interpretation of microwave remote sensing data acquired from spaceborne platforms over the ocean surface. Particular emphasis is given to the assumptions which are either implicit or explicit in the theory. The multiple scale scattering theory developed during this investigation is extended to non-Gaussian surface statistics. It is shown that the important statistic for the case is the probability density function of the small scale heights conditioned on the large scale slopes; this dependence may explain the anisotropic scattering measurements recently obtained with the AAFE Radscat. It is noted that present surface measurements are inadequate to verify or reject the existing scattering theories. Surface measurements are recommended for qualifying sensor data from radar altimeters and scatterometers. Additional scattering investigations are suggested for imaging type radars employing synthetically generated apertures.

  16. Adhesive disbond detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, William; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace industry continues to increase the use of adhesives for structural bonding due to the increased joint efficiency (reduced weight), even distribution of the load path and decreases in stress concentrations. However, the limited techniques for verifying the strength of adhesive bonds has reduced its use on primary structures and requires an intensive inspection schedule. This paper discusses a potential structural health monitoring (SHM) technique for the detection of disbonds through the in situ inspection of adhesive joints. This is achieved through the use of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), thin unobtrusive sensors which are permanently bonded to the aircraft structure. The detection method discussed in this study is electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS), a local vibration method. This method detects disbonds from the change in the mechanical impedance of the structure surrounding the disbond. This paper will discuss how predictive modeling can provide valuable insight into the inspection method, and provide better results than empirical methods alone. The inspection scheme was evaluated using the finite element method, and the results were verified experimentally using a large aluminum test article, and included both pristine and disbond coupons.

  17. Geographic information systems, remote sensing, and spatial analysis activities in Texas, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, D.K.; Gary, R.H.; Wilson, Z.D.

    2007-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become an important tool for scientific investigation, resource management, and environmental planning. A GIS is a computer-aided system capable of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatially referenced digital data. GIS technology is particularly useful when analyzing a wide variety of spatial data such as with remote sensing and spatial analysis. Remote sensing involves collecting remotely sensed data, such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, or radar images, and analyzing the data to gather information or investigate trends about the environment or the Earth's surface. Spatial analysis combines remotely sensed, thematic, statistical, quantitative, and geographical data through overlay, modeling, and other analytical techniques to investigate specific research questions. It is the combination of data formats and analysis techniques that has made GIS an essential tool in scientific investigations. This document presents information about the technical capabilities and project activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TWSC) GIS Workgroup from 2002 through 2007.

  18. Remote sensing reflectance model of optically active components of turbid waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutser, Tiit; Arst, Helgi

    1994-12-01

    A mathematical model that simulates the spectral curves of remote sensing reflectance is developed. The model is compared to measurements obtained from research vessel or boat in the Baltic Sea and Estonian lakes. The model simulates the effects of light backscattering from water and suspended matter, and the effects of its absorption due to water, phytoplankton, suspended matter and yellow substance. Measured by remote sensing spectral curves are compared by multiple of spectra obtained from model calculations to find the theoretical spectrum which is closest to experimental. It is assumed that in case of coincidence of the spectral curves concentrations of optically active substances in the model correspond to real ones. Preliminary testing of the model demonstrates that this model is useful for estimation of concentration of optically active substances in the waters of the Baltic Sea and Estonian lakes.

  19. Summary. [California activities in remote sensing and management of water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.

    1973-01-01

    University of California activities in the development of remote sensing techniques and their application in the study of water resources within the state are summarized. It is pointed out that the summary is very lengthy due to fact that NASA had requested a dramatic reorientation of the study. For this reason it was felt that the co-investigators and other participants, need a rather detailed and systematic tabulation of the relevant facts that have been uncovered during the period since the reorientation.

  20. SHM of wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Gyuhae; Taylor, Stuart G; Farinholt, Kevin M; Farrar, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations, frequency response functions, and time series based methods are utilized to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Overall, these three methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation into field deployment. A full-scale fatigue test of a CX-100 wind turbine blade is also conducted. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and practical implementation issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  1. Background Subtraction Based on Color and Depth Using Active Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Enrique J.; Diaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Depth information has been used in computer vision for a wide variety of tasks. Since active range sensors are currently available at low cost, high-quality depth maps can be used as relevant input for many applications. Background subtraction and video segmentation algorithms can be improved by fusing depth and color inputs, which are complementary and allow one to solve many classic color segmentation issues. In this paper, we describe one fusion method to combine color and depth based on an advanced color-based algorithm. This technique has been evaluated by means of a complete dataset recorded with Microsoft Kinect, which enables comparison with the original method. The proposed method outperforms the others in almost every test, showing more robustness to illumination changes, shadows, reflections and camouflage. PMID:23857259

  2. Effects of Activation Energy to Transient Response of Semiconductor Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akira; Ohtani, Tatsuki

    The smell classifiable gas sensor will be desired for many applications such as gas detection alarms, process controls for food production and so on. We have tried to realize the sensor using transient responses of semiconductor gas sensor consisting of tin dioxide and pointed out that the sensor gave us different transient responses for kinds of gas. Results of model calculation showed the activation energy of chemical reaction on the sensor surface strongly depended on the transient response. We tried to estimate the activation energies by molecular orbital calculation with SnO2 Cluster. The results show that there is a liner relationship between the gradient of the transient responses and activation energies for carboxylic and alcoholic gases. Transient response will be predicted from activation energy in the same kind of gas and the smell discrimination by single semiconductor gas sensor will be realized by this relationship.

  3. NASA'S Earth Science Enterprise Embraces Active Laser Remote Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luther, Michael R.; Paules, Granville E., III

    1999-01-01

    Several objectives of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise are accomplished, and in some cases, uniquely enabled by the advantages of earth-orbiting active lidar (laser radar) sensors. With lidar, the photons that provide the excitation illumination for the desired measurement are both controlled and well known. The controlled characteristics include when and where the illumination occurs, the wavelength, bandwidth, pulse length, and polarization. These advantages translate into high signal levels, excellent spatial resolution, and independence from time of day and the sun's position. As the lidar technology has rapidly matured, ESE scientific endeavors have begun to use lidar sensors over the last 10 years. Several more lidar sensors are approved for future flight. The applications include both altimetry (rangefinding) and profiling. Hybrid missions, such as the approved Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) sensor to fly on the ICESat mission, will do both at the same time. Profiling applications encompass aerosol, cloud, wind, and molecular concentration measurements. Recent selection of the PICASSO Earth System Science Pathfinder mission and the complementary CLOUDSAT radar-based mission, both flying in formation with the EOS PM mission, will fully exploit the capabilities of multiple sensor systems to accomplish critical science needs requiring such profiling. To round out the briefing a review of past and planned ESE missions will be presented.

  4. Vector disparity sensor with vergence control for active vision systems.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Francisco; Diaz, Javier; Gibaldi, Agostino; Sabatini, Silvio P; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based) and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system.

  5. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  6. High-resolution remote sensing data to monitor active volcanic areas: an application to the 2011-2015 eruptive activity of Mount Etna (Italy) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsella, Maria

    2016-10-01

    In volcanic areas, where it could be difficult to gain access to the most critical zones for carrying out direct surveys, remote sensing proved to have remarkable potentialities to follow the evolution of lava flow, as well as to detect slope instability processes induced by volcanic activity. By exploiting SAR and optical data a methodology for observing and quantifying eruptive processes was developed. The approach integrates HR optical images and SAR interferometric products and can optimize the observational capability of standard surveillance activities based on in-situ video camera network. A dedicated tool for mapping the evolution of the lava field, using both ground-based and satellite data, was developed and tested to map lava flows during the 2011-2015 eruptive activities. Ground based data were collected using the permanent ground NEtwork of Thermal and VIsible Sensors located on Mt. Etna (Etna_NETVIS) and allowed to downscale the information derived from satellite data and to integrate the satellite datasets in case of incomplete coverage or missing acquisitions. This work was developed in the framework of the EU-FP7 project "MED-SUV" (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes).

  7. Geographic information systems, remote sensing, and spatial analysis activities in Texas, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2009-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) technology has become an important tool for scientific investigation, resource management, and environmental planning. A GIS is a computer-aided system capable of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatially referenced digital data. GIS technology is useful for analyzing a wide variety of spatial data. Remote sensing involves collecting remotely sensed data, such as satellite imagery, aerial photography, or radar images, and analyzing the data to gather information or investigate trends about the environment or the Earth's surface. Spatial analysis combines remotely sensed, thematic, statistical, quantitative, and geographical data through overlay, modeling, and other analytical techniques to investigate specific research questions. It is the combination of data formats and analysis techniques that has made GIS an essential tool in scientific investigations. This fact sheet presents information about the technical capabilities and project activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TWSC) GIS Workgroup during 2008 and 2009. After a summary of GIS Workgroup capabilities, brief descriptions of activities by project at the local and national levels are presented. Projects are grouped by the fiscal year (October-September 2008 or 2009) the project ends and include overviews, project images, and Internet links to additional project information and related publications or articles.

  8. Measurement of seasonal and yearly aquatic macrophyte changes in a reservoir using multidate aerial photography and SPOT digital remote sensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.R.; Narumalani, S.; Weatherbee, O. . Dept. of Geography); Mackey, H.E. Jr. )

    1992-01-01

    Wetlands assimilate pollutants, provide flood control, and serve as breeding, nursery, and feeding grounds for fish and wildlife. Information on wetland distribution and condition are essential for their effective protection and management. Unfortunately, wetlands present challenges to effective evaluation and quantification. For example, inland wetlands are found in diverse geographic areas ranging from small tributary streams, shrub/scrub and marsh communities, to open water lacustrine environments. In addition, the type and spatial distribution of wetlands can change dramatically between season, especially when non-persistent species are present. There are four alternatives for collecting aquatic macrophyte wetland information, including: (1) in situ field investigation, ideally using global positioning systems, (2) interpreting aerial photography, (3) analyzing high resolution aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data and (4) digital analysis of satellite remote sensor data. An earlier study reviewed these alternatives in detail and provided a case study on the use of (a) multidate color and color-infrared aerial photography, and (b) a single year of SPOT remote sensor data. This study builds on the initial work by demonstrating the use of multiple season and multiple year SPOT panchromatic satellite digital data for aquatic macrophyte inventory and analysis in Par Pond on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.

  9. A sensor and video based ontology for activity recognition in smart environments.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D; Morrow, Philip J; Nugent, Chris D

    2014-01-01

    Activity recognition is used in a wide range of applications including healthcare and security. In a smart environment activity recognition can be used to monitor and support the activities of a user. There have been a range of methods used in activity recognition including sensor-based approaches, vision-based approaches and ontological approaches. This paper presents a novel approach to activity recognition in a smart home environment which combines sensor and video data through an ontological framework. The ontology describes the relationships and interactions between activities, the user, objects, sensors and video data.

  10. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzo, S.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Paschen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 μm, produced at CiS, and 100-200 μm thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The performance of the different sensor thicknesses and edge designs are compared before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1.4 × 1016 neq/cm2.

  11. An Evidence-Based Adoption of Technology Model for Remote Monitoring of Elders’ Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    What benefit will new technologies offer if they are inadequately or not used? This work presents a meta-synthesis of adoption of technology related findings from four innovative monitoring intervention research studies with older adults and their informal and/or formal caregivers. Each study employed mixed methods analyses that lead to an understanding of the key variables that influenced adoption of telephone and Internet based wireless remote monitoring technologies by elders and their caregivers. The studies were all conducted in “real world” homes ranging from solo residences to multi-story independent living residential buildings. Insights gained came from issues not found in controlled laboratory environments but in the complex interplay of family-elder-staff dynamics around balancing safety and independence. Findings resulted in an adoption of technology model for remote monitoring of elders’ daily activities derived from evidence based research to advance both practical and theoretical development in the field of gerontechnology. PMID:21423843

  12. Implementing Remote Image Capture/Control in a Wireless Sensor Network Utilizing the IEEE 802.15.4 Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    signal processing, analog components for sensor input interfacing, the temperature, pressure, and position sensors, and six lithium thionyl ...storage • 3.0” TFT Display (240x240 resolution) • Lithium -ion 1200 mAh rechargeable battery • RS232 Port for serial communications 33 2. OOPic...Modulation Parameters [From:[11

  13. Monitoring of acoustic emission activity using thin wafer piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei; Meisner, Daniel; Momeni, Sepand

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-known technique for monitoring onset and propagation of material damage. The technique has demonstrated utility in assessment of metallic and composite materials in applications ranging from civil structures to aerospace vehicles. While over the course of few decades AE hardware has changed dramatically with the sensors experiencing little changes. A traditional acoustic emission sensor solution utilizes a thickness resonance of the internal piezoelectric element which, coupled with internal amplification circuit, results in relatively large sensor footprint. Thin wafer piezoelectric sensors are small and unobtrusive, but they have seen limited AE applications due to low signal-to-noise ratio and other operation difficulties. In this contribution, issues and possible solutions pertaining to the utility of thin wafer piezoelectrics as AE sensors are discussed. Results of AE monitoring of fatigue damage using thin wafer piezoelectric and conventional AE sensors are presented.

  14. Seasonal variation in American black bear Ursus americanus activity patterns: Quantification via remote photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, A.S.; Vaughan, M.R.; Klenzendorf, S.

    2004-01-01

    Activity pattern plasticity may serve as an evolutionary adaptation to optimize fitness in an inconstant environment, however, quantifying patterns and demonstrating variation can be problematic. For American black bears Ursus americanus, wariness and habitat inaccessibility further complicate quantification. Radio telemetry has been the primary technique used to examine activity, however, interpretation error and limitation on numbers of animals available to monitor prevent extrapolation to unmarked or untransmittered members of the population. We used remote cameras to quantify black bear activity patterns and examined differences by season, sex and reproductive class in the Alleghany Mountains of western Virginia, USA. We used 1,533 pictures of black bears taken during 1998-2002 for our analyses. Black bears generally were diurnal in summer and nocturnal in autumn with a vespertine activity peak during both seasons. Bear-hound training seasons occurred during September and may offer explanation for the observed shift towards nocturnal behaviour. We found no substantial differences in activity patterns between sex and reproductive classes. Use of remote cameras allowed us to efficiently sample larger numbers of individual animals and likely offered a better approximation of population-level activity patterns than individual-level, telemetry-based methodologies.

  15. Remote enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylations of furans through HOMO activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Long; Yue, Cai-Zhen; Chen, Peng-Qiao; Xiao, You-Cai; Chen, Ying-Chun

    2014-05-19

    Catalytic asymmetric Friedel-Crafts alkylation is a powerful protocol for constructing a chiral C(sp(2))-C(sp(3)) bond. Most previous examples rely on LUMO activation of the electrophiles using chiral catalysts with subsequent attack by electron-rich arenes. Presented herein is an alternative strategy in which the HOMO of the aromatic π system of 2-furfuryl ketones is raised through the formation of a formal trienamine species using a chiral primary amine. Exclusive regioselective alkylation at the 5-position occurred with alkylidenemalononitriles, and high reactivity and excellent enantioselectivity (up to 95% ee) was obtained by this remote activation.

  16. Active Sensor Reflectance Measurements of Corn Nitrogen Status and Yield Potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of active crop canopy sensor reflectance measurements of in-season corn (Zea mays L.) nitrogen (N) status for directing spatially-variable N applications has been advocated to improve N use efficiency. However, first it is necessary to confirm that active sensors can reliably assess N status. Ou...

  17. 77 FR 52317 - Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active Sonar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) sonar systems with certain...

  18. Toward real time detection of the basic living activity in home using a wearable sensor and smart home sensors.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sunlee; Kim, Minho; Song, Sa-Kwang; Park, Soo-Jun

    2008-01-01

    As the elderly people living alone are enormously increasing recently, we need the system inferring activities of daily living (ADL) for maintaining healthy life and recognizing emergency. The system should be constructed with sensors, which are used to associate with people's living while remaining as non intrusive views as possible. To do this, the proposed system use a triaxial accelerometer sensor and environment sensors indicating contact with subject in home. Particularly, in order to robustly infer ADLs, we present component ADL, which is decided with conjunction of human motion together, not just only contacted object identification. It is an important component in inferring ADL. In special, component ADL decision firstly refines misclassified initial activities, which improves the accuracy of recognizing ADL. Preliminary experiments results for proposed system provides overall recognition rate of over 97% over 8 component ADLs, which can be effectively applicable to recognize the final ADLs.

  19. Absence of Remote Triggering in Geothermal Fields Due to Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Zhang, Q.; Lin, G.

    2014-12-01

    Operational geothermal fields typically have high seismicity rates, which could be caused by both tectonic and anthropogenic activities. Due to the high background seismicity and possible interaction between fluid and seismic waves, geothermal areas have been recognized to be susceptible to large remote earthquakes. However, whether human activity (geothermal production) affects remote earthquake triggering by changing the stress state is unclear. Here we choose two geothermal fields, Coso and Salton Sea in southern California, to study the spatiotemporal distributions of the triggered earthquakes following the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers and 1999 Mw 7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes. These two geothermal fields have been in operation since 1980s with comparable net capacity, and have long-term geothermal fluid loss. By analyzing the regional catalog recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network, we find that these two operational geothermal areas remain unaffected by the remote mainshocks, whereas the surrounding areas show vigorous triggered responses. We interpret this phenomenon as a result of human activity, which presumably has brought the stress state away from failure by reducing pore pressure. To further understand how much the human activity can affect the stress state, we also conduct a systematic study on Long Valley Caldera in northern California as a comparison site. Long Valley Caldera hosts an active geothermal field with net capacity about one sixth of that in Coso or Salton Sea geothermal field, and the extraction volume is not constantly larger than the injection. We will show comparisons of the triggered response in Long Valley with the two geothermal fields in southern California.

  20. Electro-active sensor, method for constructing the same; apparatus and circuitry for detection of electro-active species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electro-active sensor includes a nonconductive platform with a first electrode set attached with a first side of a nonconductive platform. The first electrode set serves as an electrochemical cell that may be utilized to detect electro-active species in solution. A plurality of electrode sets and a variety of additional electrochemical cells and sensors may be attached with the nonconductive platform. The present invention also includes a method for constructing the aforementioned electro-active sensor. Additionally, an apparatus for detection and observation is disclosed, where the apparatus includes a sealable chamber for insertion of a portion of an electro-active sensor. The apparatus allows for monitoring and detection activities. Allowing for control of attached cells and sensors, a dual-mode circuitry is also disclosed. The dual-mode circuitry includes a switch, allowing the circuitry to be switched from a potentiostat to a galvanostat mode.

  1. Flexible and Stretchable Physical Sensor Integrated Platforms for Wearable Human-Activity Monitoringand Personal Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Trung, Tran Quang; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable physical sensors that can measure and quantify electrical signals generated by human activities are attracting a great deal of attention as they have unique characteristics, such as ultrathinness, low modulus, light weight, high flexibility, and stretchability. These flexible and stretchable physical sensors conformally attached on the surface of organs or skin can provide a new opportunity for human-activity monitoring and personal healthcare. Consequently, in recent years there has been considerable research effort devoted to the development of flexible and stretchable physical sensors to fulfill the requirements of future technology, and much progress has been achieved. Here, the most recent developments of flexible and stretchable physical sensors are described, including temperature, pressure, and strain sensors, and flexible and stretchable sensor-integrated platforms. The latest successful examples of flexible and stretchable physical sensors for the detection of temperature, pressure, and strain, as well as their novel structures, technological innovations, and challenges, are reviewed first. In the next section, recent progress regarding sensor-integrated wearable platforms is overviewed in detail. Some of the latest achievements regarding self-powered sensor-integrated wearable platform technologies are also reviewed. Further research direction and challenges are also proposed to develop a fully sensor-integrated wearable platform for monitoring human activity and personal healthcare in the near future.

  2. Impact of Sensor Misplacement on Dynamic Time Warping Based Human Activity Recognition using Wearable Computers

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Nimish; Lee, Jaeseong; Lotfian, Reza; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2017-01-01

    Daily living activity monitoring is important for early detection of the onset of many diseases and for improving quality of life especially in elderly. A wireless wearable network of inertial sensor nodes can be used to observe daily motions. Continuous stream of data generated by these sensor networks can be used to recognize the movements of interest. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) is a widely used signal processing method for time-series pattern matching because of its robustness to variations in time and speed as opposed to other template matching methods. Despite this flexibility, for the application of activity recognition, DTW can only find the similarity between the template of a movement and the incoming samples, when the location and orientation of the sensor remains unchanged. Due to this restriction, small sensor misplacements can lead to a decrease in the classification accuracy. In this work, we adopt DTW distance as a feature for real-time detection of human daily activities like sit to stand in the presence of sensor misplacement. To measure this performance of DTW, we need to create a large number of sensor configurations while the sensors are rotated or misplaced. Creating a large number of closely spaced sensors is impractical. To address this problem, we use the marker based optical motion capture system and generate simulated inertial sensor data for different locations and orientations on the body. We study the performance of the DTW under these conditions to determine the worst-case sensor location variations that the algorithm can accommodate.

  3. Human movement activity classification approaches that use wearable sensors and mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaghyan, Sahak; Sarukhanyan, Hakob; Akopian, David

    2013-03-01

    Cell phones and other mobile devices become part of human culture and change activity and lifestyle patterns. Mobile phone technology continuously evolves and incorporates more and more sensors for enabling advanced applications. Latest generations of smart phones incorporate GPS and WLAN location finding modules, vision cameras, microphones, accelerometers, temperature sensors etc. The availability of these sensors in mass-market communication devices creates exciting new opportunities for data mining applications. Particularly healthcare applications exploiting build-in sensors are very promising. This paper reviews different approaches of human activity recognition.

  4. Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Actively Perform Designated Occupational Activities according to Simple Instructions with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Shu-Hui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology, turning the Nintendo Wii Remote Controller into a high performance three-dimensional object orientation detector. This study extended Wii Remote Controller functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated simple…

  5. Research activity of the greenhouse gas measurements using optical remote sensing in Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, K.

    2009-12-01

    Japan might be one of the most active countries dedicating themselves to studying the greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements using optical remote sensing not only on the ground but also from space. There are two reasons; one of them ascends to the Kyoto Protocol, agreed in December 1997 in Kyoto, an ancient city of Japan until 19th centuries, was designed to address the international response to serious climate change due to greenhouse gases. The other reason is due to a revision of the Basic Environment Law of Japan in order to meet the Kyoto Protocol in 1998. The State makes efforts to ensure international collaboration so as to effectively promote the monitoring, observation and measurement of the environmental situation with regard to global warming. Main activities are listed in a Table1. They are divided into two categories, i.e. the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), launched on Jan.23, 2009 and active remote sensing using lidar technology. In case of GOSAT, an initial analysis of carbon dioxide and methane concentrations was obtained for clear-sky scenes over land. In the future, after further calibration and validation of the data, observation data and corresponding analyzed products will be made available. On the other hand, studies of the laser remote sensing for measuring GHG have been actively carrying out to achieve reliable data with a higher accuracy at wavelengths of 1.6micron meter (Tokyo Metropolitan University, JAXA, Mitsubishi Electric Co.) and 2 micron meter (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology). As well-known, one of the most interests regarding atmospheric CO2 measurements is that carbon dioxide molecule measured are due to anthropological emission from fossil fuel burning or due to natural one from forest fires etc. We proposed a newly advanced CO2/CO DIAL using a hybrid of pulsed Tm,Ho:YLF and pulsed OPO pumped by it for better understanding them. Now, our effort is directed to find out the most suitable

  6. Self-Activated Transparent All-Graphene Gas Sensor with Endurance to Humidity and Mechanical Bending.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Hoo; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Yong-Jin; Shim, Yeong-Seok; Kim, Soo Young; Hong, Byung Hee; Jang, Ho Won

    2015-10-27

    Graphene is considered as one of leading candidates for gas sensor applications in the Internet of Things owing to its unique properties such as high sensitivity to gas adsorption, transparency, and flexibility. We present self-activated operation of all graphene gas sensors with high transparency and flexibility. The all-graphene gas sensors which consist of graphene for both sensor electrodes and active sensing area exhibit highly sensitive, selective, and reversible responses to NO2 without external heating. The sensors show reliable operation under high humidity conditions and bending strain. In addition to these remarkable device performances, the significantly facile fabrication process enlarges the potential of the all-graphene gas sensors for use in the Internet of Things and wearable electronics.

  7. International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, Fourth Thematic Conference: Remote Sensing for Exploration Geology, San Francisco, CA, April 1-4, 1985, Proceedings. Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    State of the art applications of remote sensing in geological exploration programs are discussed along with research and development activities aimed at increasing the future capabilities of this technology for exploration geology. The topics considered include: technical issues in the state of the art; regional exploration models; remote sensing applications for hydrocarbon exploration; commercialization of remote sensing satellites; and data integration. Also addressed are: remote sensing applications for mineral exploration; geobotanical and environmental remote sensing; image processing techniques and applications; advanced sensors, radar, and airborne systems; and engineering, logistics, and marine applications.

  8. International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, Fourth Thematic Conference: Remote Sensing for Exploration Geology, San Francisco, CA, April 1-4, 1985, Proceedings. Volumes 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    State of the art applications of remote sensing in geological exploration programs are discussed along with research and development activities aimed at increasing the future capabilities of this technology for exploration geology. The topics considered include: technical issues in the state of the art; regional exploration models; remote sensing applications for hydrocarbon exploration; commercialization of remote sensing satellites; and data integration. Also addressed are: remote sensing applications for mineral exploration; geobotanical and environmental remote sensing; image processing techniques and applications; advanced sensors, radar, and airborne systems; and engineering, logistics, and marine applications.

  9. The promise of mHealth: daily activity monitoring and outcome assessments by wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Dobkin, Bruce H; Dorsch, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Mobile health tools that enable clinicians and researchers to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of everyday activities of patients and trial participants have long been needed to improve daily care, design more clinically meaningful randomized trials of interventions, and establish cost-effective, evidence-based practices. Inexpensive, unobtrusive wireless sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure-sensitive textiles, combined with Internet-based communications and machine-learning algorithms trained to recognize upper- and lower-extremity movements, have begun to fulfill this need. Continuous data from ankle triaxial accelerometers, for example, can be transmitted from the home and community via WiFi or a smartphone to a remote data analysis server. Reports can include the walking speed and duration of every bout of ambulation, spatiotemporal symmetries between the legs, and the type, duration, and energy used during exercise. For daily care, this readily accessible flow of real-world information allows clinicians to monitor the amount and quality of exercise for risk factor management and compliance in the practice of skills. Feedback may motivate better self-management as well as serve home-based rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring patients with chronic diseases and after hospitalization or the start of new medications for a decline in daily activity may help detect medical complications before rehospitalization becomes necessary. For clinical trials, repeated laboratory-quality assessments of key activities in the community, rather than by clinic testing, self-report, and ordinal scales, may reduce the cost and burden of travel, improve recruitment and retention, and capture more reliable, valid, and responsive ratio-scaled outcome measures that are not mere surrogates for changes in daily impairment, disability, and functioning.

  10. The Promise of mHealth: Daily Activity Monitoring and Outcome Assessments by Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Dorsch, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health tools that enable clinicians and researchers to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of everyday activities of patients and trial participants have long been needed to improve daily care, design more clinically meaningful randomized trials of interventions, and establish cost-effective, evidence-based practices. Inexpensive, unobtrusive wireless sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure-sensitive textiles, combined with Internet-based communications and machine-learning algorithms trained to recognize upper- and lower-extremity movements, have begun to fulfill this need. Continuous data from ankle triaxial accelerometers, for example, can be transmitted from the home and community via WiFi or a smartphone to a remote data analysis server. Reports can include the walking speed and duration of every bout of ambulation, spatiotemporal symmetries between the legs, and the type, duration, and energy used during exercise. For daily care, this readily accessible flow of real-world information allows clinicians to monitor the amount and quality of exercise for risk factor management and compliance in the practice of skills. Feedback may motivate better self-management as well as serve home-based rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring patients with chronic diseases and after hospitalization or the start of new medications for a decline in daily activity may help detect medical complications before rehospitalization becomes necessary. For clinical trials, repeated laboratory-quality assessments of key activities in the community, rather than by clinic testing, self-report, and ordinal scales, may reduce the cost and burden of travel, improve recruitment and retention, and capture more reliable, valid, and responsive ratio-scaled outcome measures that are not mere surrogates for changes in daily impairment, disability, and functioning. PMID:21989632

  11. A Method for Application of Classification Tree Models to Map Aquatic Vegetation Using Remotely Sensed Images from Different Sensors and Dates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Dehua; Cai, Ying; An, Shuqing

    2012-01-01

    In previous attempts to identify aquatic vegetation from remotely-sensed images using classification trees (CT), the images used to apply CT models to different times or locations necessarily originated from the same satellite sensor as that from which the original images used in model development came, greatly limiting the application of CT. We have developed an effective normalization method to improve the robustness of CT models when applied to images originating from different sensors and dates. A total of 965 ground-truth samples of aquatic vegetation types were obtained in 2009 and 2010 in Taihu Lake, China. Using relevant spectral indices (SI) as classifiers, we manually developed a stable CT model structure and then applied a standard CT algorithm to obtain quantitative (optimal) thresholds from 2009 ground-truth data and images from Landsat7-ETM+, HJ-1B-CCD, Landsat5-TM and ALOS-AVNIR-2 sensors. Optimal CT thresholds produced average classification accuracies of 78.1%, 84.7% and 74.0% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. However, the optimal CT thresholds for different sensor images differed from each other, with an average relative variation (RV) of 6.40%. We developed and evaluated three new approaches to normalizing the images. The best-performing method (Method of 0.1% index scaling) normalized the SI images using tailored percentages of extreme pixel values. Using the images normalized by Method of 0.1% index scaling, CT models for a particular sensor in which thresholds were replaced by those from the models developed for images originating from other sensors provided average classification accuracies of 76.0%, 82.8% and 68.9% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. Applying the CT models developed for normalized 2009 images to 2010 images resulted in high classification (78.0%–93.3%) and overall (92.0%–93.1%) accuracies. Our results suggest

  12. Fault tolerant photodiode and photogate active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Cory; Chapman, Glenn H.; La Haye, Michelle L.; Djaja, Sunjaya; Cheung, Desmond Y. H.; Lin, Henry; Loo, Edward; Audet, Yves R.

    2005-03-01

    As the pixel counts of digital imagers increase, the challenge of maintaining high yields and ensuring reliability over an imager"s lifetime increases. A fault tolerant active pixel sensor (APS) has been designed to meet this need by splitting an APS in half and operating both halves in parallel. The fault tolerant APS will perform normally in the no defect case and will produce approximately half the output for single defects. Thus, the entire signal can be recovered by multiplying the output by two. Since pixels containing multiple defects are rare, this design can correct for most defects allowing for higher production yields. Fault tolerant photodiode and photogate APS" were fabricated in 0.18-micron technology. Testing showed that the photodiode APS could correct for optically induced and electrically induced faults, within experimental error. The photogate APS was only tested for optically induced defects and also corrects for defects within experimental error. Further testing showed that the sensitivity of fault tolerant pixels was approximately 2-3 times more sensitive than the normal pixels. HSpice simulations of the fault tolerant APS circuit did not show increased sensitivity, however an equivalent normal APS circuit with twice width readout and row transistors was 1.90 times more sensitive than a normal pixel.

  13. Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture was just a taste of radar remote sensing techniques and applications. Other important areas include Stereo radar grammetry. PolInSAR for volumetric structure mapping. Agricultural monitoring, soil moisture, ice-mapping, etc. The broad range of sensor types, frequencies of observation and availability of sensors have enabled radar sensors to make significant contributions in a wide area of earth and planetary remote sensing sciences. The range of applications, both qualitative and quantitative, continue to expand with each new generation of sensors.

  14. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  15. New Active Remote-sensing Capabilities: Laser Ablation Spectrometer and Lidar Atmospheric Species Profile Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, R. J.; Bergstralh, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: With the anticipated development of high-capacity fission power and electric propulsion for deep-space missions, it will become possible to propose experiments that demand higher power than current technologies (e.g. radioisotope power sources) provide. Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), the first mission in the Project Prometheus program, will explore the icy moons of Jupiter with a suite of high-capability experiments that take advantage of the high power levels (and indirectly, the high data rates) that fission power affords. This abstract describes two high-capability active-remote-sensing experiments that will be logical candidates for subsequent Prometheus-class missions.

  16. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of small ellipsoidal scatterers. [of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Kubacsi, M. C.; Kong, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied within the Rayleigh approximation to calculate the backscattering cross section of a layer of randomly positioned and oriented small ellipsoids. The orientation of the ellipsoids is characterized by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative approach to first order in albedo. In the half space limit the results are identical to those obtained via the approach of Foldy's and distorted Born approximation. Numerical results of the theory are illustrated using parameters encountered in active remote sensing of vegetation layers. A distinctive characteristic is the strong depolarization shown by vertically aligned leaves.

  17. Overview of the Tank Focus Area HLW Tank Retrieval Activities (Remote Operations)

    SciTech Connect

    GIBBONS, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites are currently retrieving or preparing to retrieve radioactive waste from underground storage tanks with technical assistance from the Tanks Focus Area. The Tanks Focus Area is a national program that provides information and technologies to safely and effectively remediate radioactive waste stored in DOE's underground tanks. Funding for the Tanks Focus Area is provided by the DOE Offices of Science and Technology, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management. This paper provides an overview of recent remote waste retrieval activities as well as recent successes sponsored by the Tanks Focus Area.

  18. Characterization of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors for particle detection: Beam test of the four-sensors RAPS03 stacked system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, Daniele; Servoli, Leonello; Biagetti, Daniele; Meroli, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    In this work, in order to check the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) detectors for vertexing/tracking applications, four stacked CMOS APS sensors featuring 256×256 pixels with 10×10 μm 2 size have been tested at the INFN Beam Test Facility (BFT), Frascati (Rome). For this purpose, a dedicated mechanical and electrical set-up has been devised and implemented, allowing for the simultaneous read-out of four sensors arranged in a stacked structure. A compact and fast system (up to 64 MHz read-out clock) based on external ADCs and FPGA allows for the PC communication through USB2.0. Preliminary results in terms of track reconstructions of electrons of different energies (up to 496 MeV) are presented. This work has been carried out within the framework of the SHARPS project, supported by INFN.

  19. A framework for nowcasting and forecasting of rainfall-triggered landslide activity using remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Stanley, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing data offers the unique perspective to provide situational awareness of hydrometeorological hazards over large areas in a way that is impossible to achieve with in situ data. Recent work has shown that rainfall-triggered landslides, while typically local hazards that occupy small spatial areas, can be approximated over regional or global scales in near real-time. This work presents a regional and global approach to approximating potential landslide activity using the landslide hazard assessment for situational awareness (LHASA) model. This system couples remote sensing data, including Global Precipitation Measurement rainfall data, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and other surface variables to estimate where and when landslide activity may be likely. This system also evaluates the effectiveness of quantitative precipitation estimates from the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 to provide a 24 forecast of potential landslide activity. Preliminary results of the LHASA model and implications for are presented for a regional version of this system in Central America as well as a prototype global approach.

  20. A real-time snow water equivalent interpolation system using wireless sensor networks and historical remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Molotch, N. P.; Glaser, S.; Bales, R. C.; Conklin, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over 100 wireless sensors for monitoring real-time snow conditions were deployed in ten clusters distributed across the headwaters of the American River Basin. The sensors are strategically placed to measure snow depth across elevation gradients and local differences in slope, aspect and canopy coverage. The sensors provided near-real-time snow-depth readings during the 2014 and 2015 snow seasons. Also, time series of snow water equivalent (SWE) maps were reconstructed for 2012-2014 using energy-balance modeling with modeled energy forcings (NLDAS), terrain corrections for solar radiation (TOPORAD), and fractional snow cover data (MODIS). We blended the real-time snow-depth readings with the historical SWE reconstructions to interpolate real-time SWE conditions across the basin. Snow-depth readings from all sensors for selected dates in 2014 were converted into SWE estimates using density values from snow-pillow sites in the basin. SWE values for pixels where sensors were located were extracted from the reconstructed 2012-2013 data to develop a time-series array. Using a Nearest-Neighbor algorithm we searched the array for the closest conditions that matched the sensor data, interpolated the residuals between reconstructed versus measured SWE across the basin, and added the interpolated values to the reconstructed SWE. We also blended the sensor measurements with the 2014 reconstruction results that were from the same dates. We evaluated both the historical SWE blending results and the concurrent SWE blending results with the operational networks measurements, finding that the concurrent SWE blending has a slightly lower RMSE compared to that of historical SWE blending. Since the reconstruction results could only be estimated after the end of the season, concurrent SWE blending is not applicable to the real time SWE interpolation even though it has a more accurate estimation. However, the small difference of RMSE between the two approaches informs us that the