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  1. Renal Primordia Activate Kidney Regenerative Events in a Rat Model of Progressive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  2. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Barbara; Corna, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Abbate, Mauro; Longaretti, Lorena; Cassis, Paola; Benedetti, Valentina; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration. PMID:25811887

  3. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  4. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  5. Pharmacokinetics in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, G

    1977-04-01

    The physiologic perturbations associated with renal disease can have a pronounced effect on the kinetics of elimination of drugs and their metabolites from the body. Drugs are ordinarily cleared from the body by a number of routes, each of which can be characterized by a clearance value. The sum of these clearances (renal, hepatic, etc.) is the total or body clearance which is inversely proportional to the steady-state plasma concentration produced by a given drug dosage regimen. The quantitative contribution of each route of elimination to the metabolic fate of a drug is proportional to the clearance value of that route relative to the body clearance. As a first approximation, the reduction in the renal clearance of a drug caused by renal disease is proportional to the reduction in the renal clearance of creatinine. The metabolic (biotransformation) clearance of many extensively plasma protein bound drugs is proportional to their free fraction (ratio of concentrations of free to total drug) in plasma. Since severe renal disease causes a reduction in the plasma protein binding of many drugs, the metabolic clearance of such drugs will be increased. The contribution of hemodialysis to the total clearance of a drug depends on the magnitude of the clearance obtained by hemodialysis relative to the magnitude of the body clearance of the drug on a day between dialyses. To compensate for the increased elimination of a drug during hemodialysis, the dosing rate (i.e., the dose per unit of time) must be increased by the factor (hemodialysis clearance and body clearance):body clearance, where body clearance is that during a day between dialyses. Further dosage compensation may be needed if body clearance is increased during hemodialysis due to decreased plasma protein binding of the drug. Under certain conditions, an increased accumulation of pharmacologically active drug metabolites during renal failure becomes a matter of serious concern. PMID:851113

  6. Renal cystic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of renal cystic disease and a presentation of simple renal cysts. Subsequent chapters cover cystic disease in association with renal neoplasms and medullary sponge kidney. The chapters addressing autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease discuss and differentiate the infantile and adult forms of the disease. There are also separate discussions of medullary cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and cysts of the renarenal sinus.

  7. The role of the Janus kinase family/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling pathway in fibrotic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Futoshi; Meldrum, Kirstan K.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, a number of cytokines and growth factors including transforming growth factor β1, tumor necrosis factor α, and angiotensin II have been shown to play a crucial role in renal fibrosis. The Janus kinase family (JAK) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) constitute one of the primary signaling pathways that regulate cytokine expression, and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway has increasingly been implicated in the pathophysiology of renal disease. This review examines the role of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in fibrotic renal disease. The JAK/STAT signaling pathway is activated in a variety of renal diseases and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of renal fibrosis. Experimental evidence suggests that inhibition of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, in particular JAK2 and STAT3, may suppress renal fibrosis and protect renal function. However, it is incompletely understood which cells activate the JAK/STAT signaling pathway and which JAK/STAT signaling pathway is activated in each renal disease. Research regarding JAK/STAT signaling and its contribution to renal disease is still ongoing in humans. Future studies are required to elucidate the potential role of JAK/STAT signaling inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in the attenuation of renal fibrosis. PMID:22883438

  8. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  9. Autophagy in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    De Rechter, Stéphanie; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Ivanova, Ekaterina; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; De Smedt, Humbert; Levtchenko, Elena; Mekahli, Djalila

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is the cell biology process in which cytoplasmic components are degraded in lysosomes to maintain cellular homeostasis and energy production. In the healthy kidney, autophagy plays an important role in the homeostasis and viability of renal cells such as podocytes and tubular epithelial cells and of immune cells. Recently, evidence is mounting that (dys)regulation of autophagy is implicated in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases, and might be an attractive target for new renoprotective therapies. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of autophagy in kidney physiology and kidney diseases. PMID:26141928

  10. Renal disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rafael Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Chronic renal disease represents a problem of public health in Colombia. Its prevalence has increased in last decade, with a prevalence of 44.7 patients per million (ppm) in 1993 to 294.6 ppm in 2004, considering that only 56.2% of the population has access to the health. This increase complies with the implementation of Law 100 of 1993, offering greater coverage of health services to the Colombian population. The cost of these pathologies is equivalent to the 2.49% of the budget for health of the nation. The three most common causes of renal failure are diabetes mellitus (DM; 30%), arterial hypertension (30%), and glomerulonephritis (7.85%). In incident patients, the DM accounts for 32.9%. The rate of global mortality is 15.8%, 17.4% in hemodialysis and 15.1% in peritoneal dialysis. In 2004, 467 renal transplants were made, 381 of deceased donor with an incidence of 10.3 ppm. The excessive cost of these pathologies can cause the nation's health care system to collapse if preventative steps are not taken. In December of 2004, the Colombian Association of Nephrology with the participation of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Arterial Hypertension wrote the "Declaration of Bogotá," committing the state's scientific societies and promotional health companies to develop a model of attention for renal health that, in addition to implementing national registries, continues to manage renal disease. PMID:17162422

  11. Metabolomics and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Eugene P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes recent metabolomics studies of renal disease, outlining some of the limitations of the literature to date. Recent findings The application of metabolomics in nephrology research has expanded from initial analyses of uremia to include both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of earlier stages of kidney disease. Although these studies have nominated several potential markers of incident CKD and CKD progression, lack of overlap in metabolite coverage has limited the ability to synthesize results across groups. Further, direct examination of renal metabolite handling has underscored the substantial impact kidney function has on these potential markers (and many other circulating metabolites). In experimental studies, metabolomics has been used to identify a signature of decreased mitochondrial function in diabetic nephropathy and a preference for aerobic glucose metabolism in PKD; in each case, these studies have outlined novel therapeutic opportunities. Finally, as a complement to the longstanding interest in renal metabolite clearance, the microbiome has been increasingly recognized as the source of many plasma metabolites, including some with potential functional relevance to CKD and its complications. Summary The high-throughput, high-resolution phenotyping enabled by metabolomics technologies has begun to provide insight on renal disease in clinical, physiologic, and experimental contexts. PMID:26050125

  12. Effects of hemodialysis on ventricular activation time in children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Laszki-Szcząchor, Krystyna; Polak-Jonkisz, Dorota; Zwolińska, Danuta; Makulska, Irena; Rehan, Leopold; Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease are affected by cardiovascular complications, including disturbances of the heart intraventricular conduction. Body surface potential mapping is a non-invasive electrocardiographic detection method of initial disturbances in heart activation propagation. A goal of the study was to analyze the effects of single hemodialysis (HD) session on ventricular activation time (VAT) maps obtained from hemodialyzed children. The study group consisted of 13 hemodialyzed children (age: 6-18 years). The control group is composed of 26 healthy subjects. In each HD patient, 12-lead electrocardiogram and echocardiography examinations were performed. Isochrone heart maps, reflecting body surface distribution of VAT isolines, were recorded from an 87-electrode HPM-7100 system for body surface potential mapping, before (group B) and after HD session (group A). The distribution of isochrones and VAT values, as recorded in the HD patients, differed significantly from the reference VAT map for controls. The highest VAT maximal value was noted in group B (Me: 110 vs. 62 ms in the control group; P < 0.001), becoming significantly lower after HD session (Me: 98 ms for group A vs. 110 ms for group B; P < 0.001). Ventricular activation time maps, recorded before HD session, showed significant VAT delays with isochrone arrangement specific for the left bundle branch block. After HD session, VAT maps presented significant changes, suggesting a normalization process. Ventricular activation time maps in children with end-stage renal disease exhibited disturbances of intraventricular conduction within the left bundle branch block, undetectable on standard electrocardiogram. A single HD session resulted in VAT map improvement related to overall HD treatment duration. PMID:24992701

  13. Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Noah K; Ananthakrishnan, Shubha; Campbell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Renal hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) is a common complication of chronic kidney disease characterized by elevated parathyroid hormone levels secondary to derangements in the homeostasis of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D. Patients with rHPT experience increased rates of cardiovascular problems and bone disease. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend that screening and management of rHPT be initiated for all patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 (estimated glomerular filtration rate, < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Since the 1990s, improving medical management with vitamin D analogs, phosphate binders, and calcimimetic drugs has expanded the treatment options for patients with rHPT, but some patients still require a parathyroidectomy to mitigate the sequelae of this challenging disease. PMID:27479950

  14. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  15. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  16. Oxygen radicals and renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S

    1997-01-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and hypochlorous acid) are important mediators of renal damage in acute renal failure and glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases. The role of these oxygen metabolites in the above entities is discussed, and the effects of antioxidants and scavengers of O2 radicals are considered. The role of oxygen radicals in the regulation of gene transcription is also considered. PMID:9387104

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease As a Potential Indication for Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation is being used as a blood pressure lowering therapy for patients with apparent treatment resistant hypertension. However, this population does not represent a distinct disease condition in which benefit is predictable. In fact, the wide range in effectiveness of renal denervation could be a consequence of this heterogeneous pathogenesis of hypertension. Since renal denervation aims at disrupting sympathetic nerves surrounding the renal arteries, it seems obvious to focus on patients with increased afferent and/or efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity. In this review will be argued, from both a pathophysiological and a clinical point of view, that chronic kidney disease is particularly suited to renal denervation. PMID:27375498

  18. The uremic toxin oxythiamine causes functional thiamine deficiency in end-stage renal disease by inhibiting transketolase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Masania, Jinit; Anwar, Attia; Xue, Mingzhan; Zehnder, Daniel; Kanji, Hemali; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Decreased transketolase activity is an unexplained characteristic of patients with end-stage renal disease and is linked to impaired metabolic and immune function. Here we describe the discovery of a link to impaired functional activity of thiamine pyrophosphate cofactor through the presence, accumulation, and pyrophosphorylation of the thiamine antimetabolite oxythiamine in renal failure. Plasma oxythiamine was significantly increased by 4-fold in patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and 15-fold in patients receiving hemodialysis immediately before the dialysis session (healthy individuals, 0.18 [0.11-0.22] nM); continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients, 0.64 [0.48-0.94] nM; and hemodialysis patients (2.73 [1.52-5.76] nM). Oxythiamine was converted to the transketolase inhibitor oxythiamine pyrophosphate. The red blood cell oxythiamine pyrophosphate concentration was significantly increased by 4-fold in hemodialysis (healthy individuals, 15.9 nM and hemodialysis patients, 66.1 nM). This accounted for the significant concomitant 41% loss of transketolase activity (mU/mg hemoglobin) from 0.410 in healthy individuals to 0.240 in hemodialysis patients. This may be corrected by displacement with excess thiamine pyrophosphate and explain lifting of decreased transketolase activity by high-dose thiamine supplementation in previous studies. Oxythiamine is likely of dietary origin through cooking of acidic thiamine-containing foods. Experimentally, trace levels of oxythiamine were not formed from thiamine degradation under physiologic conditions but rather under acidic conditions at 100(°)C. Thus, monitoring of the plasma oxythiamine concentration in renal failure and implementation of high-dose thiamine supplements to counter it may help improve the clinical outcome of patients with renal failure. PMID:27198804

  19. Pathophysiology and management of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Crowell, W A; Brown, C A; Barsanti, J A; Finco, D R

    1997-09-01

    Recently, the hypothesis that all renal diseases are inherently progressive and self-perpetuating has focused attention on adaptive changes in renal structure and function that occur whenever renal function is reduced. These glomerular adaptations to renal disease include increases in filtration rate, capillary pressure and size, and are referred to as glomerular hyperfiltration, glomerular hypertension and glomerular hypertrophy, respectively. Extrarenal changes, such as dietary phosphate excess, systemic hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, acidosis and hyperparathyroidism occur in animals with renal disease and may be contributors to progression of renal disease. Emphasis in the management of companion animals with renal disease has shifted to identifying, understanding and controlling those processes that play a role in the progression from early to end-stage renal failure. Advances made by veterinary nephrologists in the past 15 years permit resolution of old controversies, formulation of new hypotheses and discussion of unresolved issues about the nature of progressive renal disease in dogs and cats. PMID:9308397

  20. Management of diabetic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Eboh, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage renal failure (ESRF) worldwide, representing over 50% of patients on renal replacement therapy in some parts of the world. The condition is common in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, although the incidence appears to be declining, especially in type 1 diabetes. More than 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes have impaired kidney function. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis and natural history of the condition have enabled us to consider earlier therapy aimed at renal preservation and reduction in cardiovascular morbidity. Microalbuminuria is now established as the earliest risk marker for nephropathy in type 1 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. This review examines the current concepts in the pathogenesis and management of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26244141

  1. Mitochondrial Sirtuin 3 and Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Perico, Luca; Morigi, Marina; Benigni, Ariela

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose functions are tightly regulated at multiple levels to maintain proper cellular homeostasis. Mitochondrial Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), which belongs to an evolutionary conserved family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases, is a key regulator of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, ATP production, and fatty acid β-oxidation, and it exerts an antioxidant activity. Changes in SIRT3 expression are critical in the pathophysiology of several diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cancer, and aging. In experimental acute kidney injury (AKI), impairment of renal function and development of tubular injury are associated with SIRT3 reduction and mitochondrial dysfunction in proximal tubuli. SIRT3-deficient mice are more susceptible to AKI and die. Pharmacological manipulations able to increase SIRT3 preserve mitochondrial integrity, markedly limit renal injury, and accelerate functional recovery. This review highlights all the selective rescue mechanisms that point to the key role of SIRT3 as a new therapeutic target for curing renal diseases. PMID:27362524

  2. [Renal failure and cystic kidney diseases].

    PubMed

    Correas, J-M; Joly, D; Chauveau, D; Richard, S; Hélénon, O

    2011-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases often are discovered at the time of initial work-up of renal failure through ultrasound or family history, or incidentally at the time of an imaging test. Hereditary diseases include autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD), tuberous sclerosis (TS) and medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD). Autosomal dominant PKD is characterized by large renal cysts developing in young adults. Renal failure is progressive and becomes severe around 50-60 years of age. Atypical cysts (hemorrhagic or hyperdense) are frequent on CT and MRI examinations. Imaging plays a valuable role in the management of acute complications such as cyst hemorrhage or infection. Autosomal recessive PKD is often detected in neonates, infants or young adults. It is characterized by renal enlargement due to the presence of small cysts and liver disease (fibrosis and biliary ductal dilatation). Late manifestation or slow progression of autosomal recessive PKD may be more difficult to distinguish from autosomal dominant PKD. These cystic kidney diseases should not be confused with non-hereditary incidental multiple renal cysts. In tuberous sclerosis, renal cysts are associated with angiomyolipomas and sometimes pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Renal failure is inconstant. Other hereditary cystic kidney diseases, including MCKD and nephronophtisis, are usually associated with renal failure. Non-hereditary cystic kidney diseases include multicystic renal dysplasia (due to complete pelvi-ureteric atresia or hydronephrosis), acquired multicystic kidney disease (chronic renal failure, chronic hemodialysis) and varied cystic kidney diseases (multicystic renal disease, glomerulocystic kidney disease, microcystic kidney disease). PMID:21549887

  3. Effect of Hemodialysis on Plasma Myeloperoxidase Activity in End Stage Renal Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Rao, A Madhusudhana; Apoorva, R; Anand, Usha; Anand, C V; Venu, G

    2012-07-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis (HD) have an increased oxidative stress, with a high risk of atherosclerosis and other co-morbid conditions. Recent studies have suggested that myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in dialysis patients. Furthermore, dialysis treatment 'per se' can aggravate oxidative stress. Hence this study was designed to determine whether HD leads to an alteration in the plasma levels of MPO and malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of oxidative stress in ESRD patients on maintenance HD. To study the effect of HD, plasma MPO and MDA were determined before and after HD in forty ESRD patients (24 men and 16 women, age between 8 and 71 years, median being 40.5 years) on maintenance HD. Plasma MPO and MDA were assayed by spectrophotometric methods. Haematological and other biochemical parameters were obtained from patients' case records. Plasma MPO and MDA levels were significantly higher after HD when compared with pre-dialysis levels (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between MPO and MDA (r = 0.184, p = 0.10) and other biochemical parameters (p > 0.05). However, there was a significant correlation between MPO and MDA with haemodialysis vintage (p < 0.05). In univariate regression analysis duration of HD (β = 1.470, p = 0.045, β = 0.388, p = 0.013), was independently associated with MPO and MDA. Although HD is indispensable for survival of patients with ESRD, it is fraught with undesirable side-effects, such as an increase in the plasma MPO and MDA levels. The elevated levels of MPO contribute to the increased oxidative stress as free radicals are produced by the reaction catalyzed by it. PMID:26405383

  4. Early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E

    2004-07-01

    The main goal of early diagnosis of renal disease and renal failure in dogs and cats is to enable timely application of therapeutic interventions that may slow or halt disease progression. Strategies for early diagnosis of renal disease use urine tests that detect proteinuria that is a manifestation of altered glomerular permselectivity or impaired urine-concentrating ability as well blood tests to evaluate plasma creatinine concentration. Animals with progressive renal disease should be carefully investigated and treated appropriately. Animals with mild, possibly nonprogressive, renal disease should be monitored adequately to detect any worsening trends,which should lead to further investigation and treatment even if the increments of change are small. PMID:15223206

  5. Dental management of people with renal disease and renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C A; Whyman, R A

    1998-09-01

    Chronic renal failure is the result of progressive loss of functioning nephrons leading to loss of renal function and accumulation of excretory products. Loss of the regulatory and excretory functions of the kidneys causes oral manifestations and multiple complications which have implications for dental care. Dental management of patients with renal failure and renal transplants involves consideration of specific haematological and cardiovascular effects, and implications for the prescribing and use of pharmaceuticals. It also requires the dentist to appreciate the potential for involvement of multiple organ systems in the disease process and the implications this has for dental care. The orofacial manifestations of chronic renal failure are secondary to systemic manifestations and are not specific to the diagnosis of end-stage renal disease. PMID:9775650

  6. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Andrade, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine (Arg) is oxidized to l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO) by the action of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS). In contrast, protein-incorporated Arg residues can be methylated with subsequent proteolysis giving rise to methylarginine compounds, such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) that competes with Arg for binding to NOS. Most ADMA is degraded by dimethylarginine dimethyaminohydrolase (DDAH), distributed widely throughout the body and regulates ADMA levels and, therefore, NO synthesis. In recent years, several studies have suggested that increased ADMA levels are a marker of atherosclerotic change, and can be used to assess cardiovascular risk, consistent with ADMA being predominantly absorbed by endothelial cells. NO is an important messenger molecule involved in numerous biological processes, and its activity is essential to understand both pathogenic and therapeutic mechanisms in kidney disease and renal transplantation. NO production is reduced in renal patients because of their elevated ADMA levels with associated reduced DDAH activity. These factors contribute to endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the progression of renal damage, but there are treatments that may effectively reduce ADMA levels in patients with kidney disease. Available data on ADMA levels in controls and renal patients, both in adults and children, also are summarized in this review. PMID:23109853

  7. Renal Autoregulation in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarenal autoregulatory mechanisms maintain renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) independent of renal perfusion pressure (RPP) over a defined range (80–180 mmHg). Such autoregulation is mediated largely by the myogenic and the macula densa-tubuloglomerular feedback (MD-TGF) responses that regulate preglomerular vasomotor tone primarily of the afferent arteriole. Differences in response times allow separation of these mechanisms in the time and frequency domains. Mechanotransduction initiating the myogenic response requires a sensing mechanism activated by stretch of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and coupled to intracellular signaling pathways eliciting plasma membrane depolarization and a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Proposed mechanosensors include epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), integrins, and/or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Increased [Ca2+]i occurs predominantly by Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). Increased [Ca2+]i activates inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) to mobilize Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticular stores. Myogenic vasoconstriction is sustained by increased Ca2+ sensitivity, mediated by protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase that favors a positive balance between myosin light-chain kinase and phosphatase. Increased RPP activates MD-TGF by transducing a signal of epithelial MD salt reabsorption to adjust afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction. A combination of vascular and tubular mechanisms, novel to the kidney, provides for high autoregulatory efficiency that maintains RBF and GFR, stabilizes sodium excretion, and buffers transmission of RPP to sensitive glomerular capillaries, thereby protecting against hypertensive barotrauma. A unique aspect of the myogenic response in the renal vasculature is modulation of its strength and speed by the MD-TGF and by a connecting tubule glomerular feedback (CT-GF) mechanism

  8. Diffuse elevated MIBG activity in the renal parenchyma caused by compromised renal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Codreanu, Ion; Yang, Jigang; Servaes, Sabah; Zhuang, Hongming

    2014-11-01

    Increased metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) activity in the kidneys is usually focal and commonly attributed to radioactive urine accumulation in the renal pelvis. Hereby, we present 2 cases of abnormal diffuse MIBG activity in the kidneys caused by compromised renal blood flow. The patterns should be differentiated from physiologic renal MIBG activity, especially when the uptake is relatively symmetric as well as from regional MIBG-avid disease. PMID:24999702

  9. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  10. Renal disease and chronic renal failure in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J J; Wilson, M H; McArdle, N S; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with renal diseases are increasingly common in dental practice. This is due to advances in medicine, and the increasing life expectancy of western populations. Chronic renal failure is a serious condition that general dental practitioners may see in their practice. This article discusses the functions of the kidney, and the causes and medical management of chronic renal failure, as well as considerations in the dental management of these patients. Common complications such as infection and bleeding are discussed. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence with respect to prescribing of medications. PMID:18986093

  11. Sickle cell disease: renal manifestations and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Karl A.; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) substantially alters renal structure and function, and causes various renal syndromes and diseases. Such diverse renal outcomes reflect the uniquely complex vascular pathobiology of SCD and the propensity of red blood cells to sickle in the renal medulla because of its hypoxic, acidotic, and hyperosmolar conditions. Renal complications and involvement in sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) include altered haemodynamics, hypertrophy, assorted glomerulopathies, chronic kidney disease, acute kidney injury, impaired urinary concentrating ability, distal nephron dysfunction, haematuria, and increased risks of urinary tract infections and renal medullary carcinoma. SCN largely reflects an underlying vasculopathy characterized by cortical hyperperfusion, medullary hypoperfusion, and an increased, stress-induced vasoconstrictive response. Renal involvement is usually more severe in homozygous disease (sickle cell anaemia, HbSS) than in compound heterozygous types of SCD (for example HbSC and HbSβ+-thalassaemia), and is typically mild, albeit prevalent, in the heterozygous state (sickle cell trait, HbAS). Renal involvement contributes substantially to the diminished life expectancy of patients with SCD, accounting for 16–18% of mortality. As improved clinical care promotes survival into adulthood, SCN imposes a growing burden on both individual health and health system costs. This Review addresses the renal manifestations of SCD and focuses on their underlying mechanisms. PMID:25668001

  12. Imaging Manifestations of Hematologic Diseases with Renal and Perinephric Involvement.

    PubMed

    Purysko, Andrei S; Westphalen, Antonio C; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Leão Filho, Hilton M; Herts, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    The kidneys and perinephric tissues can be affected by a variety of hematologic disorders, which usually occur in the setting of multisystem involvement. In many of these disorders, imaging is used to evaluate the extent of disease, guide biopsy, and/or monitor disease activity and patient response to therapy. Lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma commonly manifest as multiple parenchymal or perinephric lesions. Erdheim-Chester disease and Rosai-Dorfman disease, rare forms of multisystemic histiocytosis, are often identified as perinephric and periureteral masses. Renal abnormalities depicted at imaging in patients with sickle cell disease include renal enlargement, papillary necrosis, and renal medullary carcinoma. Sickle cell disease, along with other causes of intravascular hemolysis, can also lead to hemosiderosis of the renal cortex. Thrombosis of renal veins is sometimes seen in patients with coagulation disorders but more often occurs in association with certain malignancies and nephrotic syndrome. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease is another multisystem process that often produces focal renal lesions, seen along with involvement of more characteristic organs such as the pancreas. Perinephric lesions with calcifications should raise the possibility of secondary amyloidosis, especially in patients with a history of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the imaging patterns of renal and perinephric involvement are usually not specific for a single entity, and the same entity can manifest with different or overlapping patterns, familiarity with these patterns and key clinical and histopathologic features may help to narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the next step of care. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27257766

  13. Purinergic signaling in inflammatory renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Turner, Clare M.; Sixma, Marije L.; Singer, Mervyn; Unwin, Robert; Tam, Frederick W. K.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular purines have a role in renal physiology and adaption to inflammation. However, inflammatory renal disease may be mediated by extracellular purines, resulting in renal injury. The role of purinergic signaling is dependent on the concentrations of extracellular purines. Low basal levels of purines are important in normal homeostasis and growth. Concentrations of extracellular purines are significantly elevated during inflammation and mediate either an adaptive role or propagate local inflammation. Adenosine signaling mediates alterations in regional renal blood flow by regulation of the renal microcirculation, tubulo-glomerular feedback, and tubular transport of sodium and water. Increased extracellular ATP and renal P2 receptor-mediated inflammation are associated with various renal diseases, including hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and glomerulonephritis. Experimental data suggests P2 receptor deficiency or receptor antagonism is associated with amelioration of antibody-mediated nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic (rather than adaptive) role of purinergic signaling. We discuss the role of extracellular nucleotides in adaptation to ischemic renal injury and in the pathogenesis of inflammatory renal disease. PMID:23908631

  14. Early origin of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Maringhini, Silvio; Corrado, Ciro; Maringhini, Guido; Cusumano, Rosa; Azzolina, Vitalba; Leone, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animals have clearly shown that renal failure may start early in life. 'Fetal programming' is regulated by adaptations occurring in uterus including maternal nutrition, placental blood supply, and epigenetic changes. Low birth weight predisposes to hypertension and renal insufficiency. Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract, adverse postnatal events, wrong nutritional habits may produce renal damage that will become clinically relevant in adulthood. Prevention should start early in children at risk of renal disease. PMID:20822331

  15. Cystic Renal Disease in the Domestic Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Courtnye N; Rogers, Arlin B; Maurer, Kirk J; Lofgren, Jennifer LS; Fox, James G; Marini, Robert P

    2008-01-01

    Cystic renal diseases in domestic ferrets are a common anecdotal finding but have received scant systematic assessment. We performed a 17-y, case-control retrospective analysis of the medical records of 97 ferrets housed at our institution between 1987 and 2004, to determine the prevalence and morphotypes of cystic renal diseases in this species. Histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson trichrome, or periodic acid–Schiff were evaluated by a comparative pathologist, and statistical analysis of hematologic and serum chemistry values was correlated with morphologic diagnosis. Of the 97 available records, 43 were eliminated due to lack of accompanying tissues. Of the 54 remaining cases, 37 (69% prevalence) had documented renal cysts, and 14 of the 54 ferrets (26%) had primary polycystic disease consisting of either polycystic kidney disease affecting renal tubules or, more commonly, glomerulocystic kidney disease. Secondary polycystic lesions were identified in 11 ferrets (20%), and 12 ferrets (22%) exhibited focal or isolated tubular cysts only as an incidental necropsy finding. Ferrets with secondary renal cysts associated with other developmental anomalies, mesangial glomerulopathy, or end-stage kidney disease had hyperphosphatemia and elevated BUN in comparison with those with primary cystic disease and elevated BUN compared with those without renal lesions. Although reflecting institutional bias, these results implicate primary and secondary cystic renal diseases as highly prevalent and underreported in the domestic ferret. In addition to the clinical implications for ferrets as research subjects and pets, these findings suggest a potential value for ferrets as a model of human cystic renal diseases. PMID:18524174

  16. Renal erythropoietin-producing cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Souma, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is an indispensable erythropoietic hormone primarily produced from renal Epo-producing cells (REPs). Epo production in REPs is tightly regulated in a hypoxia-inducible manner to maintain tissue oxygen homeostasis. Insufficient Epo production by REPs causes renal anemia and anemia associated with chronic disorders. Recent studies have broadened our understanding of REPs from prototypic hypoxia-responsive cells to dynamic fibrogenic cells. In chronic kidney disease, REPs are the major source of scar-forming myofibroblasts and actively produce fibrogenic molecules, including inflammatory cytokines. Notably, myofibroblast-transformed REPs (MF-REPs) recover their original physiological properties after resolution of the disease insults, suggesting that renal anemia and fibrosis could be reversible to some extent. Therefore, understanding the plasticity of REPs will lead to the development of novel targeted therapeutics for both renal fibrosis and anemia. This review summarizes the regulatory mechanisms how hypoxia-inducible Epo gene expression is attained in health and disease conditions. PMID:26089800

  17. Renal disease associated with colic in horses.

    PubMed

    Seanor, J W; Byars, T D; Boutcher, J K

    1984-05-01

    Renal dysfunction secondary to GI disorders may be relatively common in horses. Persistent dehydration of 8-10% of body weight can lead to prerenal azotemia, which may result in renal ischemia and renal disease if uncorrected. Dehydrated azotemic horses with a urine specific gravity less than 1.018 may have renal disease. Urine specific gravity readings greater than 1.025 usually indicate normal kidney function. A urine Na level less than 20 mEq/L and a urine/plasma creatinine ratio greater than or equal to 20:1 indicate prerenal problems. Use of nephrotoxic drugs should be avoided in septicemic or dehydrated horses. Salmonellosis and proximal enteritis often lead to renal complications. Renal disease associated with DIC warrants a poor prognosis. Treatment of acute renal failure is aimed at eliminating the underlying cause and correcting metabolic abnormalities. Use of IV fluids, dopamine, prostaglandin inhibitors, fresh and electrolyte-spiked water ad libitum, water-soluble vitamins and high-P diets is beneficial. Success of therapy should be judged by laboratory results rather than clinical impressions. PMID:6738502

  18. Chemerin in renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-02-01

    The potential involvement of chemerin in cardiovascular and renal dysfunction has recently been acknowledged. There are indeed many links between this protein and inflammation, atherosclerosis, and multiple obesity- and diabetes-related parameters such as body mass index, insulin resistance, and blood levels of insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose. In addition, in the last few years, several reports have investigated the circulating chemerin levels and their pathophysiologic significance in chronic kidney disease populations. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of this matter, in particular as to whether elevated chemerin might be the cause behind, or simply mirror, a reduced renal function. The limitations of the present knowledge on chemerin may partly relate to the lack of specific antibodies for assessing the different active isoforms of the protein. Measuring its bioactive serum concentration, and achieving a precise overall pattern of the tissue-specific formation of different isoforms, with the use of suitable technology, will ultimately help define the role of chemerin in disease pathophysiology, or as a diagnostic or therapeutic marker. PMID:26545628

  19. Cystic renal neoplasms and renal neoplasms associated with cystic renal diseases in adults: cross-sectional imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Garg, Deepak; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Vikram, Raghu

    2012-01-01

    Cystic renal neoplasms in adults are a heterogeneous group of tumors with characteristic histogenesis, pathological findings, and variable biological profiles. They include disparate entities that are either biologically benign (lymphangioma, cystic nephroma, and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor) or malignant (cystic renal cell carcinoma, multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma, and primary renal synovial sarcoma). Renal cystic diseases are characterized by cystic changes of the kidneys due to hereditary, developmental, or acquired etiology. Cystic renal diseases such as acquired cystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis are associated with the development of a wide spectrum of benign and malignant renal neoplasms. Most cystic renal tumors and cystic disease-associated renal neoplasms show characteristic cross-sectional imaging findings that permit accurate diagnosis. In addition, cross-sectional imaging is pivotal in the follow-up and surveillance of adult cystic tumors of the kidney. PMID:23192202

  20. Patient and disease characteristics associated with activation for self-management in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure and chronic renal disease: a cross-sectional survey study.

    PubMed

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Schuurmans, Marieke; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Korpershoek, Yvonne; Spruit-Bentvelzen, Lotte; Ertugrul-van der Graaf, Inge; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD). Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13) and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate); 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain the greater

  1. Controversies in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Leslie A.; Nelson, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The two most common HIV-associated renal diseases, HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV-immune-complex kidney disease, share the common pathologic finding of hyperplasia within the glomerulus. Podocyte injury is central to the pathogenesis of these diseases; however, the source of the proliferating glomerular epithelial cell remains a topic of debate. Parenchymal injury has been linked to direct infection of renal epithelial cells by HIV-1, although the mechanism of viral entry into this non-lymphoid compartment is unclear. Although transgenic rodent models have provided insight into viral proteins responsible for inducing renal disease, such models have important limitations. Rodent HIV-1 models, for instance, cannot replicate all aspects of immune activation, a process that could have an important role in the pathogenesis PMID:19776779

  2. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric renal inflammatory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Schroeder, B.A.; Starshak, R.J.

    1986-08-15

    Some form of imaging procedure should be used to document the presence of infection of the upper urinary tract in troublesome cases in children. During the past several years, sonography, nuclear radiology, and computed tomography (CT) have had a significant influence on renal imaging. The purpose of this article is to reevaluate the noninvasive imaging procedures that can be used to diagnose pediatric renal inflammatory disease and to assess the relative value of each modality in the various types of renal infection. The authors will not discuss the radiologic evaluation of the child who has had a previous renal infection, in whom cortical scarring or reflux nephropathy is a possibility; these are different clinical problems and require different diagnostic evaluation.

  3. Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor-2, HIV-Tat, and Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A in HIV-Infected Children with Renal Disease Activate Rho-A and Src in Cultured Renal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jharna R; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Ray, Patricio E

    2016-01-01

    Renal endothelial cells (REc) are the first target of HIV-1 in the kidney. The integrity of REc is maintained at least partially by heparin binding growth factors that bind to heparan sulfate proteoglycans located on their cell surface. However, previous studies showed that the accumulation of two heparin-binding growth factors, Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF-2), in combination with the viral protein Tat, can precipitate the progression of HIV-renal diseases. Nonetheless, very little is known about how these factors affect the behavior of REc in HIV+ children. We carried out this study to determine how VEGF-A, FGF-2, and HIV-Tat, modulate the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of cultured REc, identify key signaling pathways involved in this process, and develop a functional REc assay to detect HIV+ children affected by these changes. We found that VEGF-A and FGF-2, acting in synergy with HIV-Tat and heparin, affected the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of REc through changes in Rho-A, Src, and Rac-1 activity. Furthermore, urine samples from HIV+ children with renal diseases, showed high levels of VEGF-A and FGF-2, and induced similar changes in cultured REc and podocytes. These findings suggest that FGF-2, VEGF-A, and HIV-Tat, may affect the glomerular filtration barrier in HIV+ children through the induction of synergistic changes in Rho-A and Src activity. Further studies are needed to define the clinical value of the REc assay described in this study to identify HIV+ children exposed to circulating factors that may induce glomerular injury through similar mechanisms. PMID:27097314

  4. Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor-2, HIV-Tat, and Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A in HIV-Infected Children with Renal Disease Activate Rho-A and Src in Cultured Renal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Jharna R; Gutkind, J Silvio; Ray, Patricio E

    2016-01-01

    Renal endothelial cells (REc) are the first target of HIV-1 in the kidney. The integrity of REc is maintained at least partially by heparin binding growth factors that bind to heparan sulfate proteoglycans located on their cell surface. However, previous studies showed that the accumulation of two heparin-binding growth factors, Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF-2), in combination with the viral protein Tat, can precipitate the progression of HIV-renal diseases. Nonetheless, very little is known about how these factors affect the behavior of REc in HIV+ children. We carried out this study to determine how VEGF-A, FGF-2, and HIV-Tat, modulate the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of cultured REc, identify key signaling pathways involved in this process, and develop a functional REc assay to detect HIV+ children affected by these changes. We found that VEGF-A and FGF-2, acting in synergy with HIV-Tat and heparin, affected the cytoskeletal structure and permeability of REc through changes in Rho-A, Src, and Rac-1 activity. Furthermore, urine samples from HIV+ children with renal diseases, showed high levels of VEGF-A and FGF-2, and induced similar changes in cultured REc and podocytes. These findings suggest that FGF-2, VEGF-A, and HIV-Tat, may affect the glomerular filtration barrier in HIV+ children through the induction of synergistic changes in Rho-A and Src activity. Further studies are needed to define the clinical value of the REc assay described in this study to identify HIV+ children exposed to circulating factors that may induce glomerular injury through similar mechanisms. PMID:27097314

  5. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  6. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  7. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  8. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57... disease. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed chronic renal disease following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed chronic renal disease must be supported by medical documentation. (b)...

  9. End-stage renal disease and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Limperger, Verena; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2016-05-10

    Chronic kidney disease is an established risk factor for arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE). Whereas the overall risk of TE in moderately decreased kidney function is approximately 2.5-fold higher compared to patients with normal renal function, the risk increase is 5.5-fold in patients with severe renal dysfunction. In patients with renal dysfunction and arterial thrombosis (OR: 4.9), malignancy (OR: 5.8) surgery (OR: 14.0) or thrombophilia (OR: 4.3) the risk to suffer from venous TE is higher compared to the risk associated to the baseline renal dysfunction alone. The treatment options for end-stage renal diseases include hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and kidney transplantation. During all treatment modalities thrombotic complications have been described, namely catheter malfunction and shunt thrombosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis in up to 25% of patients, and TE, pulmonary embolism or graft vessel thrombosis in approximately 8% of patients. The reported incidence of reno-vascular thrombosis following renal transplantation leading to hemorrhagic infarction with organ rejection or organ loss varied between 2-12%. Keeping in mind the multifactorial etiology of TE in patients with kidney dysfunction a general screening for thrombophilia in this patient group is not indicated. Selected screening on an individual patient basis should be discussed if the family history for TE is positive or the patient itself had suffered one thrombosis before the onset of the renal disease or multiple TEs during hemodialysis or post kidney transplantation in patients waiting for living donor kidney transplantation. PMID:25639843

  10. Activation of Sirtuin-1 Promotes Renal Fibroblast Activation and Aggravates Renal Fibrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Murugavel; Zhuang, Michelle A; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Tolbert, Evelyn; Bayliss, George; Zhao, Ting C; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-08-01

    Although activation of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) has been shown to protect the kidney from acute injury, its role in renal fibrosis remains controversial since both inhibition and activation of SIRT1 have been reported to attenuate renal fibrosis. To resolve this conflict, we further examined the effect of SIRT1 activators on the activation of renal interstitial fibroblasts and development of renal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. In a murine model of renal fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction, administration of SRT1720 (N-[2-[3-(piperazin-1-ylmethyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazol-6-yl]phenyl]quinoxaline-2-carboxamide), a potent activator of SIRT1, accelerated deposition of collagen fibrils and increased expression of fibroblast activation markers (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA], collagen I, and fibronectin) in the obstructive kidney of mice. In cultured rat renal interstitial fibroblasts (NRK-49F), exposure of cells to SRT1720 or YK-3-237 (B-[2-methoxy-5-[(1E)-3-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1-propen-1-yl]phenyl]-boronic acid), another SIRT1 activator, also resulted in enhanced expression of α-SMA and fibronectin. Mechanistic studies showed that augmentation of renal fibrogenesis by SRT1720 is associated with elevated phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). SRT1720 treatment also increased the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and protein kinase B in the fibrotic kidney and NRK-49F cells. However, SRT1720 treatment did not affect expression of proliferating cell nuclear protein, a proliferation marker and activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that SIRT1-activating compounds can provoke renal fibrogenesis through a mechanism involved in the activation of EGFR and PDGFR signaling pathways and suggest that long-term use of SIRT1 activators risks the development and progression of chronic

  11. Developing a provisional and national renal disease registry for Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Askarianzadeh, Mahdi; Mortazavi, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disease registry is a database that includes information about people suffering a special kind of disease. The aim of this study was to first identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR) characteristics in some countries with Iran; and second, develop a provisional and NRDR for Iran. Materials and Methods: Retrieval of data of the NRDR was performed by scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, Malaysia, and Iran. This research was applied, and the study was descriptive-comparative. The study population consisted of the NRDR in selected countries in which data were collected by forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, related documents, and people who are active in this regard, and related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and patient support charity. The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as a single center experiences. America and Britain have a preeminent national registry of renal disease compared to other countries. Conclusion: Given that control, prevention, and treatment of chronic renal diseases incur high expenses and the disease is one of leading mortality factors in Iran and across the world and since national registry system for chronic renal diseases can provide better tools and strategies to manage and evaluate patients’ characteristics as well as risk factors which eventually leads to making better decisions. PMID:26109970

  12. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  13. Castleman Disease Presenting as Renal Hilar Mass

    PubMed Central

    Radfar, Mohammad Hadi; Torbati, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: We report a case of unicentric Castleman disease, a rare type of benign proliferation of lymphoid tissue. We present an uncommon disease that was managed effectively using laparoscopy. Case Presentation: A 32-year-old woman presented with left-sided flank pain. A large retroperitoneal mass was detected in the left renal hilum close to the renal vessels. Laparoscopic removal of the mass was effectively performed. The pathologic examination was in favor of a rare type of benign proliferation of lymphoid tissue compatible with Castleman disease. The patient was cured with no evidence of recurrence in 1-year follow-up. Conclusion: Transperitoneal laparoscopic approach is feasible and effective in the management of this disease and is curative.

  14. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  15. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  16. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  17. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  18. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  19. Dental considerations for the patient with renal disease receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, S S; Glick, M

    1996-02-01

    An increasing number of Americans are living with end-stage renal disease. This disease has many implications for dentistry, in terms of oral manifestations and management of afflicted patients. The authors present pertinent information to help dentists treat patients who exhibit the oral and systemic manifestations of renal disease, from the onset of renal impairment through hemodialysis. PMID:8682990

  20. Fetal environment, epigenetics, and pediatric renal disease.

    PubMed

    Woroniecki, Robert; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas; Susztak, Katalin

    2011-05-01

    The notion that some adult diseases may have their origins in utero has recently captured scientists' attention. Some of these effects persist across generations and may involve epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic modifications, DNA methylation together with covalent modifications of histones, alter chromatin density and accessibility of DNA to cellular machinery, modulating the transcriptional potential of the underlying DNA sequence. Here, we will discuss the different epigenetic modifications and their potential role in and contribution to renal disease development. PMID:21174217

  1. Vaccinations in children on immunosuppressive medications for renal disease.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sushmita; Dissanayake, Pathum Vindana; Abeyagunawardena, Asiri Samantha

    2016-09-01

    Renal diseases are often treated with immunosuppressive medications, placing patients at risk of infections, some of which are vaccine-preventable. However, in such patients vaccinations may be delayed or disregarded due to complications of the underlying disease process and challenges in its management. The decision to administer vaccines to immunosuppressed children is a risk-benefit balance as such children may have a qualitatively diminished immunological response or develop diseases caused by the vaccine pathogen. Vaccination may cause a flare-up of disease activity or provocation of graft rejection in renal transplant recipients. Moreover, it cannot be assumed that a given antibody level provides the same protection in immunosupressed children as in healthy ones. We have evaluated the safety and efficacy of licensed vaccines in children on immunosuppressive therapy and in renal transplant recipients. The limited evidence available suggests that vaccines are most effective if given early, ideally before the requirement for immunosuppressive therapy, which may require administration of accelerated vaccine courses. Once treatment with immunosuppressive drugs is started, inactivated vaccines are usually considered to be safe when the disease is quiescent, but supplemental doses may be required. In the majority of cases, live vaccines are to be avoided. All vaccines are generally contraindicated within 3-6 months of a renal transplant. PMID:26450774

  2. Recurrent and de novo disease after renal transplantation: a report from the Renal Allograft Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Sundaram; Savin, Virginia J

    2004-08-01

    Recurrent and de novo disease is an increasing problem and is known to negatively impact transplant graft survival. Immunosuppressive medications have not had an impact on the prevalence of recurrent and de novo disease. Renal Allograft Disease Registry (RADR) was established to study the prevalence, impact and risk factors for the development of recurrent and de novo disease. Retrospective and prospective study on recurrent disease is discussed in this manuscript. PMID:15265160

  3. Oxidant Mechanisms in Renal Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Brian B.; Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Pawar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A common link between all forms of acute and chronic kidney injuries, regardless of species, is enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) during injury/disease progression. While low levels of ROS and RNS are required for prosurvival signaling, cell proliferation and growth, and vasoreactivity regulation, an imbalance of ROS and RNS generation and elimination leads to inflammation, cell death, tissue damage, and disease/injury progression. Recent Advances: Many aspects of renal oxidative stress still require investigation, including clarification of the mechanisms which prompt ROS/RNS generation and subsequent renal damage. However, we currently have a basic understanding of the major features of oxidative stress pathology and its link to kidney injury/disease, which this review summarizes. Critical Issues: The review summarizes the critical sources of oxidative stress in the kidney during injury/disease, including generation of ROS and RNS from mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The review next summarizes the renal antioxidant systems that protect against oxidative stress, including superoxide dismutase and catalase, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems, and others. Next, we describe how oxidative stress affects kidney function and promotes damage in every nephron segment, including the renal vessels, glomeruli, and tubules. Future Directions: Despite the limited success associated with the application of antioxidants for treatment of kidney injury/disease thus far, preventing the generation and accumulation of ROS and RNS provides an ideal target for potential therapeutic treatments. The review discusses the shortcomings of antioxidant treatments previously used and the potential promise of new ones. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 119–146. PMID:26906267

  4. Efficacy & safety of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) in treating renal anaemia in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease not on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Vankar, Sameer G.; Dutta, Pinaki; Kohli, H.S.; Bhansali, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on dialysis regularly receive erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) for treating renal anaemia during their dialysis unlike those who are not on dialysis. In such patients, the longer acting ESA can be helpful in reducing their frequent visits to the health care facilities and improving their compliance. This study was aimed to examine the efficacy and safety of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA), a long acting ESA in treating renal anaemia in patients with diabetic CKD not on dialysis. Methods: In this prospective, open-labelled, pilot clinical study, 35 adult type 2 diabetes patients with nephropathy and renal anaemia, who were not on dialysis nor receiving treatment with ESA were administered CERA subcutaneously once in two weeks for a period of 24 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was to evaluate the Hb response (Hb rise of ≥1 g/dl above the baseline or Hb level ≥11 g/dl) during the study period. Results: All patients showed Hb rise ≥1 g/dl during the study period and 80 per cent patients could achieve Hb value ≥11 g/dl. The maximum median Hb rise of 1.2 g/dl occurred in the initial 6 weeks after starting the treatment. The mean creatinine clearance (CrCl) improved by 2.8 ml/min, with mean Hb rise of 2.6 g/dl from the baseline after administration of CERA. Worsening of blood pressure (BP) control (42.9%) was the most common adverse event. Interpretation & conclusions: CERA once in two weeks was found to be efficacious in correcting anaemia in the ESA-naïve patients with diabetic nephropathy who are not on dialysis. However, regular monitoring of blood pressure is required while on treatment with CERA. PMID:24604046

  5. Reversible renal impairment caused by thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Chakera, Aron; Paul, Hans-Joerg; O'Callaghan, Chris A

    2010-04-01

    Renal impairment is a common finding in clinical practice and is increasingly recognized with the routine reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rates. Clinical assessment is essential to determine which of the many possible investigations are appropriate. Thyroid hormones regulate many cellular functions, and abnormalities of the active thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T(4)) and tri-iodothyronine (T(3)), can influence serum creatinine levels. Evaluation of thyroid function is easily overlooked, but important in this context, as hypothyroidism is common and can cause renal impairment, which is typically reversible. Renal dysfunction may also be more frequent in hyperthyroidism than is recognized. This report describe how a dramatic elevation in serum creatinine paralleled the development of hyperthyroidism, with a return of the creatinine to normal following treatment of the hyperthyroid state. PMID:20199343

  6. Fructokinase activity mediates dehydration-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Roncal Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Rivard, Christopher J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Ejaz, A Ahsan; Cicerchi, Christina; Inaba, Shinichiro; Le, MyPhuong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Glaser, Jason; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; González, Marvin A; Aragón, Aurora; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    The epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Nicaragua (Mesoamerican nephropathy) has been linked with recurrent dehydration. Here we tested whether recurrent dehydration may cause renal injury by activation of the polyol pathway, resulting in the generation of endogenous fructose in the kidney that might subsequently induce renal injury via metabolism by fructokinase. Wild-type and fructokinase-deficient mice were subjected to recurrent heat-induced dehydration. One group of each genotype was provided water throughout the day and the other group was hydrated at night, after the dehydration. Both groups received the same total hydration in 24 h. Wild-type mice that received delayed hydration developed renal injury, with elevated serum creatinine, increased urinary NGAL, proximal tubular injury, and renal inflammation and fibrosis. This was associated with activation of the polyol pathway, with increased renal cortical sorbitol and fructose levels. Fructokinase-knockout mice with delayed hydration were protected from renal injury. Thus, recurrent dehydration can induce renal injury via a fructokinase-dependent mechanism, likely from the generation of endogenous fructose via the polyol pathway. Access to sufficient water during the dehydration period can protect mice from developing renal injury. These studies provide a potential mechanism for Mesoamerican nephropathy. PMID:24336030

  7. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A.; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  8. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    San Agustin, Jovenal T; Klena, Nikolai; Granath, Kristi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Stewart, Eileen; Devine, William; Strittmatter, Lara; Jonassen, Julie A; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lo, Cecilia W; Pazour, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Structural birth defects in the kidney and urinary tract are observed in 0.5% of live births and are a major cause of end-stage renal disease, but their genetic aetiology is not well understood. Here we analyse 135 lines of mice identified in large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen and show that 29% of mutations causing congenital heart disease (CHD) also cause renal anomalies. The renal anomalies included duplex and multiplex kidneys, renal agenesis, hydronephrosis and cystic kidney disease. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we examined patients with CHD and observed a 30% co-occurrence of renal anomalies of a similar spectrum. Together, these findings demonstrate a common shared genetic aetiology for CHD and renal anomalies, indicating that CHD patients are at increased risk for complications from renal anomalies. This collection of mutant mouse models provides a resource for further studies to elucidate the developmental link between renal anomalies and CHD. PMID:27002738

  9. End stage renal disease and its dental management.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dileep C G; Pradeep, A R

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of renal disease has become more common in middle-aged to geriatric patients. This has led to greater exposure of dental surgeons to patients with renal disease and on hemodialysis. This article highlights the clinical features of patients with end-stage renal disease, the oral manifestations and the precautions to be taken while managing them in a dental setting. PMID:17378316

  10. Adult renal cystic disease: a genetic, biological, and developmental primer.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Kota, Gopi; Dasyam, Anil K; Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2010-10-01

    Renal cystic diseases in adults are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of multiple cysts in the kidneys. These diseases may be categorized as hereditary, acquired, or developmental on the basis of their pathogenesis. Hereditary conditions include autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, medullary cystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis. Acquired conditions include cystic kidney disease, which develops in patients with end-stage renal disease. Developmental cystic diseases of the adult kidney include localized renal cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and medullary sponge kidney. In recent years, many molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of renal cystic diseases have been identified. Hereditary renal cystic diseases are characterized by genetic mutations that lead to defects in the structure and function of the primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, abnormal proliferation of tubular epithelium, and increased fluid secretion, all of which ultimately result in the development of renal cysts. A better understanding of these pathophysiologic mechanisms is now providing the basis for the development of more targeted therapeutic drugs for some of these disorders. Cross-sectional imaging provides useful information for diagnosis, surveillance, prognostication, and evaluation of treatment response in renal cystic diseases. PMID:21071372

  11. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD. PMID:21262823

  12. MRI appearance of massive renal replacement lipomatosis in the absence of renal calculus disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, E; Melamed, J; Taneja, S S; Rosenkrantz, A B

    2011-01-01

    Renal replacement lipomatosis is a rare benign entity in which extensive fibrofatty proliferation of the renal sinus is associated with marked renal atrophy. In this report, we present a case of massive renal replacement lipomatosis demonstrated on MRI. The presentation was atypical given an absence of associated renal calculus disease, and an initial CT scan was interpreted as suspicious for a liposarcoma. The differential diagnosis and key MRI findings that served to establish this specific diagnosis are reviewed. Histopathological correlation is also presented, as the patient underwent nephroureterectomy. PMID:21257835

  13. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  14. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature. PMID:20586909

  15. Effect of Treatment With Tabalumab, a B Cell-Activating Factor Inhibitor, on Highly Sensitized Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease Awaiting Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, M A; Komocsar, W J; Nantz, E; Samaniego, M D; Henson, S L; Hague, J A; Lobashevsky, A L; Higgins, N G; Czader, M; Book, B K; Anderson, M D; Pescovitz, M D; Taber, T E

    2016-04-01

    B cell-activation factor (BAFF) is critical for B cell maturation. Inhibition of BAFF represents an appealing target for desensitization of sensitized end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We conducted a Phase 2a, single-arm, open-label exploratory study investigating the effect of tabalumab (BAFF inhibitor) in patients with ESRD and calculated panel reactive antibodies (cPRAs) >50%. The treatment period duration was 24 weeks. Eighteen patients received tabalumab, at doses of 240-mg subcutaneous (SC) at Week 0 followed by 120-mg SC monthly for 5 additional months. Patients were followed for an additional 52 weeks. Immunopharmacologic effects were characterized through analysis of blood for HLA antibodies, BAFF concentrations, immunoglobulins, T and B cell subsets, as well as pre- and posttreatment tonsil and bone marrow biopsies. Significant reductions in cPRAs were observed at Weeks 16 (p = 0.043) and 36 (p = 0.004); however, absolute reductions were small (<5%). Expected pharmacologic changes in B cell subsets and immunoglobulin reductions were observed. Two tabalumab-related serious adverse events occurred (pneumonia, worsening of peripheral neuropathy), while the most common other adverse events were injection-site pain and hypotension. Three patients received matched deceased donor transplants during follow-up. Treatment with a BAFF inhibitor resulted in statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful reduction in the cPRA from baseline (NCT01200290, Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:26780484

  16. 28 CFR 79.57 - Proof of chronic renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of chronic renal disease. 79.57 Section 79.57 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.57 Proof of chronic renal disease. (a) In determining whether a...

  17. Gout secondary to chronic renal disease: studies on urate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, L F

    1980-10-01

    A report of 20 cases of gout considered to be secondary to chronic renal disease is presented. Studies of renal function and of uric acid metabolism were carried out in 16 patients. The daily production of urate remained within normal limits in the face of progressive renal dysfunction. Renal excretion of uric acid was decreased to a mean of 35.5% of the turnover. The cumulative urinary recovery of intravenously injected 14C-uric acid averaged 32.0%. In 3 patients 14C was successively retrieved in urinary allantoinand urea, in carbon dioxide of expired air, and in faeces. As in normal man, carbon dioxide and ammonia were the principal uricolytic products. The extrarenal excretion of uric acid assumes a greater role in chronic renal disease and eventually becomes the major route of elimination of uric acid. The possibility that gout may be secondary to intrinsic renal disease should be entertained when azotaemia is present. PMID:7436573

  18. Hyperphosphatemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Indridason, Olafur S; Quarles, L Darryl

    2002-07-01

    Hyperphosphatemia occurs universally in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) unless efforts are made to prevent positive phosphate balance. Positive phosphate balance results from the loss of renal elimination of phosphate and continued obligatory intestinal absorption of dietary phosphate. Increased efflux of phosphate from bone because of excess parathyroid hormone-mediated bone resorption can also contribute to increased serum phosphate concentrations in the setting of severe hyperparathyroidism. It is important to treat hyperphosphatemia because it contributes to the pathogenesis of hyperparathyroidism, vascular calcifications, and increased cardiovascular mortality in ESRD patients. Attaining a neutral phosphate balance, which is the key to the management of hyperphosphatemia in ESRD, is a challenge. Control of phosphorus depends on its removal during dialysis and the limitation of gastrointestinal absorption by dietary phosphate restriction and chelation of phosphate. Knowledge of the quantitative aspects of phosphate balance is useful in optimizing our use of phosphate binders, dialysis frequency, and vitamin D sterols. The development of new phosphate binders and efforts to find new ways to inhibit gastrointestinal absorption of phosphate will lead to improvements in the control of serum phosphate levels in ESRD. PMID:12203200

  19. Interplay between Superoxide Dismutase, Glutathione Peroxidase, and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Polymorphisms on the Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease among Han Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Chen, Yen-Ching; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Chang, Chen-Chih; Yen, Chung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), play an important role in the risk for cancer and metabolic disorders. However, little is known regarding the effect of antioxidant SNPs on renal events. Methods. We prospectively enrolled multicenter patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and those without chronic kidney disease (CKD) of Han Chinese origin, with SOD2 (Val16Ala), GPX1 (Pro197Leu), and PPAR-γ (Pro12Ala, C161T) genotyped. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the significant risk determinants for ESRD. Results. Compared to ESRD patients, non-CKD subjects were more likely to have T allele at SOD2 Val16Ala (p = 0.036) and CC genotype at PPAR-γ Pro12Ala (p = 0.028). Regression analysis showed that TT genotype of SOD2 Val16Ala conferred significantly lower ESRD risk among patients without diabetes (odds ratio 0.699; p = 0.018). GPX1 SNP alone did not alter the risk. We detected significant interactions between SNPs including PPAR-γ Pro12Ala, C161T, and GPX1 regarding the risk of ESRD. Conclusion. This is the first and largest study on the association between adverse renal outcomes and antioxidant SNPs among Han Chinese population. Determination of SOD2 and PPAR-γ SNPs status might assist in ESRD risk estimation. PMID:26881045

  20. The emerging role of hepatocyte growth factor in renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a kringle-containing polypeptide, acts on various epithelial cells to regulate cell growth, cell motility, and morphogenesis. HGF also accelerates tissue regeneration of injured organs and is regarded as a key molecule in organ regeneration. Besides the regeneration of the liver, HGF also plays a role in the renal regeneration. In addition, an adaptive alteration of HGF status in various renal diseases occurs. However, the precise role of HGF in various renal diseases remains elusive. The signaling pathways of HGF may be associated with renal diseases. In this review, we will try to provide an in-depth understanding of the underlying role of HGF and its possible interactions with other molecules in renal diseases. PMID:26460681

  1. Transperitoneal laparoscopic right radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma and end-stage renal disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery (partial nephrectomy) results are similar to those of radical nephrectomy for small (<4 cm) renal tumors. However, in patients with end-stage renal disease, radical nephrectomy emerges as a more efficient treatment for localized renal cell cancer. Laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (LRN) increasingly is being performed. The objective of the present study was to present a case of a patient under hemodialysis who was submitted to LRN for a small renal mass and discuss the current issues concerning this approach. It appears that radical nephrectomy should be the standard treatment in dialysis patients even for small tumors. The laparoscopic technique is associated with acceptable cancer-specific survival and recurrence rate along with shorter hospital stay, less postoperative pain and earlier return to normal activities. PMID:20062705

  2. Current MRI Techniques for the Assessment of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takamune; Wang, Feng; Quarles, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the past decade a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods have been developed and applied to many kidney diseases. These MRI techniques show great promise, enabling the noninvasive assessment of renal structure, function, and injury in individual subjects. This review will highlight current applications of functional MRI techniques for the assessment of renal disease and discuss future directions. Recent findings Many pathological (functional and structural) changes or factors in renal disease can be assessed by advanced MRI techniques. These include renal vascular structure and function (contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labeling), tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), renal tissue injury and fibrosis (diffusion or magnetization transfer imaging, MR elastography), renal metabolism (chemical exchange saturation transfer, spectroscopic imaging), nephron endowment (cationic-contrast imaging), sodium concentration (23Na-MRI), and molecular events (targeted-contrast imaging). Summary Current advances in MRI techniques have enabled the non-invasive investigation of renal disease. Further development, evaluation, and application of the MRI techniques should facilitate better understanding and assessment of renal disease and the development of new imaging biomarkers, enabling the intensified treatment to high-risk populations and a more rapid interrogation of novel therapeutic agents and protocols. PMID:26066472

  3. Chemokines as Potential Markers in Pediatric Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, André Barreto; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2014-01-01

    Glomerular diseases and obstructive uropathies are the two most frequent causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric renal diseases. Among several putative biomarkers, chemokines emerge as promising molecules since they play relevant roles in the pathophysiology of pediatric renal diseases. The evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help in the management of diverse renal diseases in children and the detection of patients at high risk to develop CKD. The aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of chemokines and the potential link between chemokines and the most common pediatric renal diseases by including experimental and clinical evidence. PMID:24692841

  4. The Genetics of Ultra-Rare Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Muff-Luett, Melissa; Nester, Carla M

    2016-03-01

    The complement-mediated renal diseases are a group of ultra-rare renal diseases that disproportionately affect children and young adults and frequently lead to irreversible renal failure. Genetic mutations in alternate pathway of complement genes are pathomechanistically involved in a significant number of these unique diseases. Here, we review our current understanding of the role of genetics in the primary complement-mediated renal diseases affecting children, with a focus on atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and C3 glomerulopathy. Also, included is a brief discussion of the related diseases whose relationship to complement abnormality has been suspected but not yet confirmed. Advances in genetics have transformed both treatment and outcomes in these historically difficult to treat, highly morbid diseases. PMID:27617140

  5. Serum and urinary enzyme activities in renal artery embolism.

    PubMed

    Donadio, C; Auner, I; Giordani, R; Lucchetti, A; Pentimone, F

    1986-10-31

    Renal artery embolism is not a rare occurrence, especially in patients with valvular heart disease, but the early diagnosis of this condition is infrequently accomplished. We report the clinical and laboratory data of 2 patients with valvular heart disease who presented with unilateral renal artery embolization. The usefulness of the determination of serum and urinary enzymes and renal function tests is discussed. We propose that these parameters support an earlier and more accurate diagnosis of renal artery embolism. PMID:2877758

  6. CT of acquired cystic kidney disease and renal tumors in long-term dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.; Slusher, S.L.; Greathouse, J.L.; Krohn, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    The kidneys of long term dialysis patients frequently demonstrate multiple small acquired cysts and renal cell tumors on pathologic examination. The original kidneys of 30 long-term dialysis patients and six renal transplant patients were evaluated by computed tomography to determine the incidence of these abnormalities. Among dialysis patients, 43.3% had diffuse bilateral cysts, while 16.7% had occasional cysts (fewer than five per kidney), and 40% showed no renal cysts. Seven solid renal tumors were detected in four dialysis patients with renal cysts. Acquired cystic kidney disease tends to result in renal enlargement, is more common in patients who have been maintained on dialysis for prolonged periods, and may lead to spontaneous renal hemorrhage. The six transplant patients showed no evidence of renal cysts, and all had markedly shrunken kidneys. Acquired cystic disease and renal cell tumors in the original kidneys of dialysis patients may be due to biologically active substances that are not cleared effectively by dialysis but that are removed by normally functioning transplant kidneys.

  7. In vivo bone aluminum measurements in patients with renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.; Kelleher, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Contamination of the dialysis solution with trace amounts of aluminum and long-term use of aluminum-based phosphate binders have led to increased body burden of aluminum in patients with end-stage renal disease. A significant clinical problem associated with aluminum-overload is the early diagnosis of aluminum-induced dialysis dementia and osteomalacic osteodystrophy. There are few, if any, blood or urine indices that provide an early monitor of this bone disease, especially in the asymptomatic patient. Although a bone biopsy is usually the basis for the final clinical diagnosis, this procedure is not recommended for routine monitoring of patients. The present technique demonstrates the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum levels in patients with renal failure. The interference normally present from activation of bone phosphorus is eliminated by using a thermal/epithermal neutron beam. For the clinical management of the patients, the Al/Ca ratio for the hand may be more useful than an absolute measurement of the total body or skeletal aluminum burden. The relationship between the increased serum Al levels following disferrioxamine infusion and the direct in vivo measurement of bone aluminum using the Al/Ca ratio are currently under investigation. The neutron activation procedure presented in this pilot study is a promising new technique with an immediate clinical application. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Diabetic nephropathy: mechanisms of renal disease progression.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Yashpal S; Wada, Jun; Sun, Lin; Xie, Ping; Wallner, Elisabeth I; Chen, Sheldon; Chugh, Sumant; Danesh, Farhad R

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by excessive amassing of extracellular matrix (ECM) with thickening of glomerular and tubular basement membranes and increased amount of mesangial matrix, which ultimately progress to glomerulosclerosis and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis. In view of this outcome, it would mean that all the kidney cellular elements, i.e., glomerular endothelia, mesangial cells, podocytes, and tubular epithelia, are targets of hyperglycemic injury. Conceivably, high glucose activates various pathways via similar mechanisms in different cell types of the kidney except for minor exceptions that are related to the selective expression of a given molecule in a particular renal compartment. To begin with, there is an obligatory excessive channeling of glucose intermediaries into various metabolic pathways with generation of advanced glycation products (AGEs), activation of protein kinase C (PKC), increased expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), GTP-binding proteins, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS seem to be the common denominator in various pathways and are central to the pathogenesis of hyperglycemic injury. In addition, there are marked alterations in intraglomerular hemodynamics, i.e., hyperfiltration, and this along with metabolic derangements adversely compounds the hyperglycemia-induced injury. Here, the information compiled under various subtitles of this article is derived from an enormous amount of data summarized in several excellent literature reviews, and thus their further reading is suggested to gain in-depth knowledge of each of the subject matter. PMID:18156300

  9. Macroscopic Hydatiduria: An Uncommon Pathognomonic Presentation of Renal Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    HAMIDI MADANI, Ali; ENSHAEI, Ahmad; POURREZA, Farshid; ESMAEILI, Samaneh; HAMIDI MADANI, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Isolated renal hydatid disease is a rare endemic infestation caused by larval form of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatiduria is an uncommon presentation of renal hydatid disease. In 2012 a 34-year-old female referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran with complaints of right flank pain and grape-like material in urine. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography and CT scan. The patient was treated surgically with nephrectomy in combination with perioperative chemotherapy with albendazol. PMID:26587504

  10. Macroscopic Hydatiduria: An Uncommon Pathognomonic Presentation of Renal Hydatid Disease.

    PubMed

    Hamidi Madani, Ali; Enshaei, Ahmad; Pourreza, Farshid; Esmaeili, Samaneh; Hamidi Madani, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Isolated renal hydatid disease is a rare endemic infestation caused by larval form of Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatiduria is an uncommon presentation of renal hydatid disease. In 2012 a 34-year-old female referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran with complaints of right flank pain and grape-like material in urine. Diagnosis was made by ultrasonography and CT scan. The patient was treated surgically with nephrectomy in combination with perioperative chemotherapy with albendazol. PMID:26587504

  11. Radiation-induced renal disease. A clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Keane, W F; Crosson, J T; Staley, N A; Anderson, W R; Shapiro, F L

    1976-01-01

    Radiation injury to the renal parenchyma is an unusual cause of renal insufficiency. Light, immunofluorescence and electron microscopic studies were performed on the renal tissue from two patients in whom renal insufficiency developed within a year after they received abdominal irradiation. The glomerular lesion in both patients was similar. Mild endothelial cell swelling and basement membrane splitting were noted consistently on light microscopy. The electron microscopic examination revealed marked subendothelial expansion with electron-lucent material associated with deposition of basement membrane-like material adjacent to the endothelial cells. In some capillary loops, the endothelial cell lining appeared to be completely lost. The pathogenesis of radiation-induced renal injury is still uncertain. It is speculated that local activation of the coagulation system with consequent thrombosis of the renal microvasculature may be extremely important. PMID:1251842

  12. Spectrum of Renal and Urinary Tract Diseases in Kashmiri Children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Virender; Bano, Rifat Ara; Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmed, Kaisar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Definite paucity of data pertaining to spectrum of renal and urinary tract diseases in our state and in various parts of India forms the basis of this study. Available data has emphasized more on specific clinical syndromes and chronic renal diseases rather than over all spectrums of renal and urinary tract diseases, that too in adult population. Aim The present study a retrospective analysis, forms one of the basic data of paediatric nephrology and urology related disorders in our state. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of the case records of all the hospitalized patients with renal and urinary tract diseases between 2012 and 2013 were performed. Case records were analysed and categorized into various groups like; Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN), Nephrotic Syndrome (NS), haematuria, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PCKD), Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV), Vesicoureteric Reflux (VUR), Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Iract (CAKUT) and others. These groups were divided into subgroups to get more insight about the pattern of these diseases. Results Out of 28114 patients hospitalized between 2012 and 2013 years, 447 (232 males and 215 females) patients were diagnosed of renal and urinary tract diseases which forms 1.58% the total admitted patients. Among these patients 32.9% (147/447) were diagnosed Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); 24.1% (108/447): Urinary Tract Infection (UTI); 9.6% (43/447): Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN); 5.6% (25/447): bilateral hydronephrosis with UTI; 4.47% (20/447): nephrotic syndrome (NS); 3.5% (16/447): haematuria; and 4% (18/447) were having CAKUT (Congenital Anomalies Of Kidney And Urinary Tract). In addition to this there were 17 cases of Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA), 3 cases of Barter syndrome and one case of Liddle syndrome. Conclusion A substantial number of children are hospitalized with renal and urinary tract diseases with

  13. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously. PMID:27032222

  14. Pharmacokinetics of iothalamate in endstage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.R.; Cutler, R.E.; Forland, S.C.

    1988-09-01

    Some nephrologists make alterations in routine peritoneal and hemodialysis schedules after diagnostic studies that use radiographic contrast agents. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of one contrast agent, iothalamate, is reported. The plasma (total body) clearance of iothalamate was measured in seven patients who had endstage renal disease (ESRD) and who received maintenance hemodialysis. During an interdialytic period, plasma clearance of iothalamate varied from 0.7 to 5.2 mL/min (3.1 +/- 1.8 mL/min, mean +/- SD) with an elimination rate constant (beta) of 0.0164 +/- 0.01 hr-1, a terminal half-life of 61 +/- 42 hours, and an estimated distribution volume of 11 +/- 3.9 L. Hemodialysis clearance of iothalamate was 104 +/- 54 mL/min. With the assumption that iothalamate is mainly distributed in the extracellular fluid (ECF) compartment, the theoretical fluid shift from the intracellular fluid (ICF) compartment to the ECF compartment was 323 mL after administration of the largest dose (2.1 mL/kg or 1.6 mmol/kg of body weight) of 60% meglumine iothalamate solution. The average maximum serum osmolarity change was less than expected, suggesting some type of internal buffering of meglumine iothalamate. In the first few hours after radiocontrast administration in four patients, the average change in serum osmolarity was 5 mmol/L; the average change in serum sodium concentration during this same time was a decrease of 0.5 mmol/L. The minor increase in ECF volume induced by hyperosmolar contrast agents does not require immediate dialysis in most patients. When needed, however, for contrast-related adverse effects, hemodialysis is efficient in rapidly removing iothalamate.

  15. Renal handling of free sialic acid in normal humans and patients with Salla disease or renal disease.

    PubMed

    Seppala, R; Renlund, M; Bernardini, I; Tietze, F; Gahl, W A

    1990-08-01

    The renal handling of free sialic acid, a negatively charged sugar, was investigated in normal humans and in patients with impaired sialic acid metabolism or impaired renal function. A sensitive assay for sialic acid, based upon the specific degradation of free sialic acid by N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase, was developed to measure small amounts of sialic acid in human plasma. Using this assay on plasma from patients with disorders of sialic acid metabolism, we determined that the fractional excretion of sialic acid was maintained at approximately 98% over a wide range of filtered loads, i.e., from 40 to 2617 nmoles/minute. In other patients with different degrees of renal insufficiency, free sialic acid clearance varied directly with creatinine clearance, indicating filtration of this sugar by renal glomeruli. In patients with renal Fanconi syndrome, the urinary excretion of free sialic acid was independent of the severity of the generalized tubular defect, indicating that sialic acid was not reabsorbed by renal tubular cells. These findings indicate that sialic acid is filtered but not reabsorbed by the human kidney, in contrast with the handling of other sugars known to be reabsorbed by renal tubular cells. In addition, three of eight patients with Salla disease, a storage disorder due to impaired lysosomal transport of free sialic acid, were found to have reduced creatinine clearances, but all Salla disease patients had entirely normal renal tubular function. PMID:2381164

  16. Epidemic renal disease of unknown etiology in the Zuni Indians

    SciTech Connect

    Hoy, W.E.; Megill, D.M.; Hughson, M.D.

    1987-06-01

    An epidemic of renal disease is occurring among the Zuni Indians in western New Mexico. In 1985, 1.6% of Zunis had clinically recognized renal disease and 1% had renal insufficiency. The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 1984 and 1985 was 14 times the rate for US whites, and three times the rates of other Indians in ESRD network 6. One third of the cases of renal disease and ESRD is due to type 2 diabetes, but the etiology of disease in most of the remainder is unknown. Affected subjects range from early childhood to old age. Early signs are hematuria, mild to moderate proteinuria, normal BP, and low total hemolytic complement, normal or low C3 and C4 levels, in about 40% of the cases. The clinical course varies from benign to rapidly progressive renal failure. Biopsies usually reflect an immune-complex mediated mesangiopathic glomerulonephritis, with IgA, IgG, IgM, and C3 variably present in the mesangium. In some cases, there is a very strong familial pattern suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance or a marked communal exposure effect. This may be a genetic disease educed by the consanguinity in the ethnically homogeneous Zuni population. Mesangiopathic renal disease is common in some Oriental populations, and this phenomenon may reflect the American Indians' Oriental ancestry. This disease may also be due to toxic exposures related to jewelry-making, potting, Zuni water, Zuni salt, or herbal or other products used for medicinal or religious purposes. This epidemic is causing much morbidity and generating huge costs for ESRD treatment. Further study is needed to better understand its etiology.

  17. Multiple facets of HIV-associated renal disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, D.R.; Gluz, I.C.; Kurz, J.; Thomé, G.G.; Zancan, R.; Bringhenti, R.N.; Schaefer, P.G.; dos Santos, M.; Barros, E.J.G.; Veronese, F.V.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection has a broad spectrum of renal manifestations. This study examined the clinical and histological manifestations of HIV-associated renal disease, and predictors of renal outcomes. Sixty-one (64% male, mean age 45 years) HIV patients were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical presentation and renal histopathology were assessed, as well as CD4 T-cell count and viral load. The predictive value of histological lesion, baseline CD4 cell count and viral load for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death were determined using the Cox regression model. The outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESRD or death were evaluated by baseline CD4 cell count. The percent distribution at initial clinical presentation was non-nephrotic proteinuria (54%), acute kidney injury (28%), nephrotic syndrome (23%), and chronic kidney disease (22%). Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (28%), mainly the collapsing form (HIVAN), acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) (26%), and immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) (25%) were the predominant renal histology. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was a protective factor against CKD (hazard ratio=0.997; 95%CI=0.994-0.999; P=0.012). At last follow-up, 64% of patients with baseline CD4 ≥200 cells/mm3 had eGFR >60 mL·min-1·(1.73 m2)-1 compared to the other 35% of patients who presented with CD4 <200 cells/mm3 (log rank=9.043, P=0.003). In conclusion, the main histological lesion of HIV-associated renal disease was HIVAN, followed by AIN and ICGN. These findings reinforce the need to biopsy HIV patients with kidney impairment and/or proteinuria. Baseline CD4 cell count ≥200 cells/mm3 was associated with better renal function after 2 years of follow-up. PMID:27007656

  18. Down syndrome with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Vanikar, Aruna V; Shah, Pankaj R; Gumber, Manoj R; Patel, Himanshu V; Engineer, Divyesh P; Thakkar, Umang G; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2013-10-01

    Down syndrome is one of the most common genetic causes of learning disabilities in children. Although the incidence of renal and urological involvement in Down syndrome is not very common, monitoring of patients with Down syndrome for renal diseases should be done regularly as patient's age into the second and third decades. With increased survival, it appears that a growing number of these patients present with chronic renal failure. Down syndrome patients are apparently not suited for peritoneal dialysis because of lacking cooperation. This procedure can be prone to failure, mainly because of an increased risk of peritonitis. Handling such patients especially those on peritoneal dialysis is challenging. Here we report a case of Down syndrome with end-stage renal disease treated with hemodialysis for 6 months. To the best of our knowledge and current literature review this is the first case report of a patient with Down syndrome undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:24426250

  19. Deaths from Occlusive Arterial Disease in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ibels, L. S.; Stewart, J. H.; Mahony, J. F.; Sheil, A. G. R.

    1974-01-01

    In a series of 325 recipients of cadaveric renal transplants sudden occlusive arterial disease was found to be responsible for 12% of deaths. Acute myocardial infarction (9%) occurred 25 times more than expected in the normal population and cerebral thrombosis (3%) 300 times more. The greatest loss was in the initial three-month period after transplantation. Patients with renal failure due to essential hypertension were especially at risk, accounting for six of the 12 deaths. PMID:4606408

  20. Emotional trauma associated with renal disease and natural disasters.

    PubMed

    McClellan, M J

    2001-10-01

    Emotional trauma frequently follows any disaster such as fire, flood, earthquake, accidents, war, bombings, and life-threatening disease. One such disease is end stage renal disease (ESRD), an irreversible, progressive loss of renal function (Lancaster, 1995). Since this is a "do or die" situation, it requires artificial methods of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, or transplant, which require learned coping skills. Emotional trauma may occur pre or post-disaster and may include flashbacks when events trigger suppressed memories or unresolved emotions. Aftercare of disasters requires dedicated professionals to guide patients toward essential lifelines. PMID:12143429

  1. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias. PMID:26740184

  2. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  3. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  4. Pax genes in renal development, disease and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Bouchard, Maxime

    2015-08-01

    The execution of developmental programs entails specific spatio-temporal expression of transcriptional regulators that ultimately control tissue morphogenesis and embryo patterning. Pax transcription factors are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins exerting such regulatory activity in several tissues. In the urogenital system, Pax2 and Pax8 have emerged as crucial players at multiple steps of kidney and urinary tract development. They are involved in important processes such as cell survival, cell lineage decisions and tissue interactions through the regulation of sophisticated gene regulatory networks. Pax2/8 have additionally been directly associated with Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) and renal cancers in human. In this review, we provide an overview of landmark contributions to the understanding of Pax gene function in urinary tract development and disease with an emphasis on recent advances in the field. PMID:26410163

  5. Pattern of renal diseases in children: A developing country experience.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shankar Prasad; Shah, Gauri Shankar; Mishra, Om Prakash; Baral, Nirmal

    2016-03-01

    Spectrum of renal disease varies in different ethnic population, geographical location, and by environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinical spectrum and occurrence of different pediatric renal diseases at a teaching hospital in the Eastern part of Nepal. All cases of renal diseases from one month to 15 years of age, attending the pediatric renal outpatient department and/or were admitted to the wards during the period of February 2012 to January 2013, were included in the study. Detailed clinical and laboratory evaluations were performed on all patients. Diseases were categorized as per standard definitions and managed with hospital protocols. Renal diseases accounted to be 206 cases (6.9%) of total annual pediatric admissions, of which (58%) were male and (42%) female. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) was the most common disorder (37.7%) followed by nephrotic syndrome (26.1%), urinary tract infection (21.3%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (17.9%), obstructive uropathy (1.9%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (1.2%), and others. In AGN group, the most common cause was post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) (32.9%) followed by lupus nephritis (4%) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (0.8%). Urine culture was positive in (9.22%) and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (57.9%). The causes of AKI were urosepsis, septicemia, and AGN (18.9%) each, followed by dehydration (13.5%). Mortality was found in 5% of cases and the etiologies were AKI in (72.7%), PIGN (18.1%), and CKD (9%). Renal diseases are a significant problem among children and are one of the common causes of hospital admission. These patients need comprehensive services for early identification and management. PMID:26997393

  6. Primary hyperaldosteronism, a mediator of progressive renal disease in cats.

    PubMed

    Javadi, S; Djajadiningrat-Laanen, S C; Kooistra, H S; van Dongen, A M; Voorhout, G; van Sluijs, F J; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Boer, W H; Rijnberk, A

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in primary hyperaldosteronism, particularly because of its possible role in the progression of kidney disease. While most studies have concerned humans and experimental animal models, we here report on the occurrence of a spontaneous form of (non-tumorous) primary hyperaldosteronism in cats. At presentation, the main physical features of 11 elderly cats were hypokalemic paroxysmal flaccid paresis and loss of vision due to retinal detachment with hemorrhages. Primary hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed on the basis of plasma concentrations of aldosterone (PAC) and plasma renin activity (PRA), and the calculation of the PAC:PRA ratio. In all animals, PACs were at the upper end or higher than the reference range. The PRAs were at the lower end of the reference range, and the PAC:PRA ratios exceeded the reference range. Diagnostic imaging by ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed no or only very minor changes in the adrenals compatible with nodular hyperplasia. Adrenal gland histopathology revealed extensive micronodular hyperplasia extending from zona glomerulosa into the zona fasciculata and reticularis. In three cats, plasma urea and creatinine concentrations were normal when hyperaldosteronism was diagnosed but thereafter increased to above the upper limit of the respective reference range. In the other eight cats, urea and creatinine concentrations were raised at first examination and gradually further increased. Even in end-stage renal insufficiency, there was a tendency to hypophosphatemia rather than to hyperphosphatemia. The histopathological changes in the kidneys mimicked those of humans with hyperaldosteronism: hyaline arteriolar sclerosis, glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The non-tumorous form of primary hyperaldosteronism in cats has many similarities with "idiopathic" primary hyperaldosteronism in humans. The condition is associated with progressive renal disease

  7. Non-Diabetic renal disease in Diabetes Mellitus: clinical features and renal biopsy findings

    PubMed Central

    Yenigun, E C; Dede, F; Ozturk, R; Turgut, D; Koc, E; Piskinpasa, S V; Ozkayar, N; Odabas, A R

    2015-01-01

    Aim Renal diseases in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, include diabetic nephropathies (DN) and non-diabetic renal diseases (NDRD). The clinical differentiation among them is usually not so clear and effective. Aim of this study which examined renal biopsies in patients with type-2 DM was to identify the prevalence and the nature of NDRD. Materials and Methods We recorded the clinical and laboratory finding alongside with the histopathological examination of the renal biopsies obtained from 71 type-2 DM patients who underwent renal biopsy in our center. Based on the renal biopsy findings patients were classified into two groups (DN and NDRD) and data was compared between the two groups. Results There were 42 women and 29 men; aged 55 ± 12 years. In patients with DN (n: 34), diabetic retinopathy was more common [16 (47.1 %) vs. 6 (16.2 %) respectively, p =0.01], duration of DM was longer (108.8 ± 58.8 months vs 57.8 ± 55.9 months respectively, p <0.001) and the degree of proteinuria was more severe (6 ± 4.3 g/day vs. 4.5 ± 4.6 g/day respectively, p =0.04) compared to the patients with NDRD. Regression analysis revealed that diabetes duration >60 months, presence of diabetic retinopathy and proteinuria >3.5 g/day were independent predictors of DN with 79.4 % sensitivity and 86.5% specificity. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis was the most frequent diagnosis in patients with NDRD. Conclusions The prevalence of NDRD is remarkably frequent in DM patients in whom nephrologists consider renal biopsy an appropriate measure. Short duration of DM, degree of proteinuria and absence of retinopathy were predictors of NDRD. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):148-152.

  8. Primary disease recurrence—effects on paediatric renal transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bacchetta, Justine; Cochat, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Primary disease recurrence after renal transplantation is mainly diagnosed by examination of biopsy samples, but can also be associated with clinical symptoms. In some patients, recurrence can lead to graft loss (7-8% of all graft losses). Primary disease recurrence is generally associated with a high risk of graft loss in patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, membranous proliferative glomerulonephritis, primary hyperoxaluria or atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. By contrast, disease recurrence is associated with a limited risk of graft loss in patients with IgA nephropathy, renal involvement associated with Henoch-Schönlein purpura, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated glomerulonephritis or lupus nephritis. The presence of systemic diseases that affect the kidneys, such as sickle cell anaemia and diabetes mellitus, also increases the risk of delayed graft loss. This Review provides an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of primary disease recurrence in paediatric renal graft recipients, and describes the overall effect on graft survival of each of the primary diseases listed above. With appropriate management, few paediatric patients should be excluded from renal transplantation programmes because of an increased risk of recurrence. PMID:25917555

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inherited renal disease and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Parikh, Samir M; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as key players in genetic and acquired renal diseases. Most mitochondrial cytopathies that cause renal symptoms are characterized by tubular defects, but glomerular, tubulointerstitial and cystic diseases have also been described. For example, defects in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis and the mitochondrial DNA 3243 A>G mutation are important causes of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in children and in adults, respectively. Although they sometimes present with isolated renal findings, mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with symptoms related to central nervous system and neuromuscular involvement. They can result from mutations in nuclear genes that are inherited according to classic Mendelian rules or from mutations in mitochondrial DNA, which are transmitted according to more complex rules of mitochondrial genetics. Diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders involves clinical characterization of patients in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses. In particular, prompt diagnosis of CoQ10 biosynthesis defects is imperative because of their potentially reversible nature. In acute kidney injury (AKI), mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the physiopathology of tissue injury, whereas mitochondrial biogenesis has an important role in the recovery of renal function. Potential therapies that target mitochondrial dysfunction or promote mitochondrial regeneration are being developed to limit renal damage during AKI and promote repair of injured tissue. PMID:26804019

  10. Rosuvastatin-induced arrest in progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Donald G; Cressman, Michael D; Harris, Susan; Pears, John S; Hutchinson, Howard G

    2004-01-01

    Preclinical and limited clinical data suggest that statins decrease the progressive decline in renal function that occurs in patients with renal disease. Pooled analysis of data obtained from a population of hyperlipidemic patients enrolled in the rosuvastatin (Crestor) clinical development program permitted assessment of its effects on renal function both early and later in the course of treatment. Study participants were initially included in controlled clinical trials that evaluated the lipid-lowering efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin when compared with placebo or other lipid-lowering agents (i.e., atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, cholestyramine, fenofibrate or extended-release niacin). The median duration of treatment with the various doses of statins in these trials was approximately 8 weeks. Following completion of a controlled clinical trial, patients were permitted to enter an open-label extension trial and received rosuvastatin treatment. These data permitted assessment of renal function in a diverse group of over 10,000 patients who received rosuvastatin in its recommended dose range (5-40 mg) for up to 3.8 years. Mean serum creatinine concentrations were lower when compared with baseline both early and later in the course of rosuvastatin treatment. In contrast, no change in mean serum creatinine was observed with placebo. Mean glomerular filtration rates (GFR) predicted from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation were higher when compared with baseline both early and later in the course of rosuvastatin treatment. No change in GFR was observed in the placebo group. Among patients who received long-term rosuvastatin treatment (> or =96 weeks), GFR was unchanged or tended to increase, rather than decrease, when compared with baseline irrespective of age, gender, hypertensive or diabetic status, level of renal function (GFR > or =60 vs. <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) at entry or urine dipstick protein status prior to or during the period

  11. Management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease after Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL).

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Sandra M S; Saad, Ahmed; Textor, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Many patients with occlusive atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial and the Stent Placement and Blood Pressure and Lipid-Lowering for the Prevention of Progression of Renal Dysfunction Caused by Atherosclerotic Ostial Stenosis of the Renal Artery (STAR) and ASTRAL. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Although hemodynamically significant, ARVD can reduce renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate; adaptive mechanisms preserve both cortical and medullary oxygenation over a wide range of vascular occlusion. Progression of ARVD to severe vascular compromise eventually produces cortical hypoxia, however, associated with active inflammatory cytokine release and cellular infiltration of the renal parenchyma. In such cases ARVD produces a loss of glomerular filtration rate that no longer is reversible simply by restoring vessel patency with technically successful renal revascularization. Each of these trials reported adverse renal functional outcomes ranging between 16 and 22% over periods of 2-5 years of follow-up. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of ARVD for clinical nephrologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials and experimental research. PMID:24723543

  12. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. PMID:26206106

  13. Predicting the effects of dietary manipulation in chronic renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    El Nahas, A.M.; Brady, S.A.; Masters-Thomas, A.; Wilkinson, V.; Hilson, A.J.W.; Moorhead, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that the progressive fall in renal function in some patients with CRF is due to hyperfusion of the remnant nephrons in response to the relatively high protein diet of modern life. The authors attempted to assess this and to see what was the shortest time in which any effect could be demonstrated. In the first phase, 39 patients with CRF had their renal function followed for 6 months on their normal diet and 6 months on a low-protein diet (LPD). The patients on LPD all showed an improvement in the rate of fall of renal function. This was marked in patients with mainly tubular disease, and poor in those with glomerular and vascular disease. In the second phase, 11 of these patients (and 1 other) were started on a high protein diet (HPD) for two weeks, and then switched back to a LPD for 2 weeks. There was no change in GFR during this period, but there were marked changes in ERPF, which correlated well with the changes in renal function in the first phase (r = 0.76, rho < 0.01); 4/4 patients with tubular disease showed a rise in ERPF on HPD and a fall on LPD, while only 4/8 with glomerular or vascular disease responded. In the third phase, they assessed the effect of a single high-protein meal in normal volunteers. This showed that there are major changes in hemodynamics following a meal, such that it is not possible to make any statement about renal function using the single-shot methods. The authors conclude that a 2-week period of HPD followed by LPD allows prediction of the possible beneficial response to diet in CRF; that this is best monitored by ERPF; and that a single meal may invalidate renal function measurement.

  14. Relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with renal and cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Catalano, Daniela; Ragusa, Angela; Martines, G Fabio; Pirri, Clara; Buccheri, Maria Antonietta; Di Nora, Concetta; Trovato, Guglielmo M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of different methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T gene polymorphism and hyperhomocysteinemia for the development of renal failure and cardiovascular events, which are controversial. METHODS: We challenged the relationship, if any, of MTHFR 677C>T and MTHFR 1298A>C polymorphisms with renal and heart function. The present article is a reappraisal of these concepts, investigating within a larger population, and including a subgroup of dialysis patients, if the two most common MTHFR polymorphisms, C677T and A1298C, as homozygous, heterozygous or with a compound heterozygous state, show different association with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. MTHFR polymorphism could be a favorable evolutionary factor, i.e., a protective factor for many ominous conditions, like cancer and renal failure. A similar finding was reported in fatty liver disease in which it is suggested that MTHFR polymorphisms could have maintained and maintain their persistence by an heterozygosis advantage mechanism. We studied a total of 630 Italian Caucasian subject aged 54.60 ± 16.35 years, addressing to the increased hazard of hemodialysis, if any, according to the studied MTHFR genetic polymorphisms. RESULTS: A favorable association with normal renal function of MTHFR polymorphisms, and notably of MTHFR C677T is present independently of the negative effects of left ventricular hypertrophy, increased Intra-Renal arterial Resistance and hyperparathyroidism. CONCLUSION: MTHFR gene polymorphisms could have a protective role on renal function as suggested by their lower frequency among our dialysis patients in end-stage renal failure; differently, the association with left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced left ventricular relaxation suggest some type of indirect, or concurrent mechanism. PMID:25664255

  15. Distribution of hypertension and renal disease in Oregon.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, W E; Knudsen, J C; Porter, G A

    1975-01-01

    Expecting to find agreement between the geographic distribution of hypertension and renal disease, we developed regional mortality rates for 1950-72 and prevalence rates for a Selective Service cohort born in 1939-41 and examined during 1957-69. For this purpose the State's counties were grouped into eight geographically homogeneous regions. The general decline in hypertension mortality was most pronounced in Portland, Oregon's major urban center. However, the decline halted during 1968-72 in the southern Cascade region which has become an area of relatively higher risk within the State. During these 23 years nephritis mortality fell, kidney infection mortality was stable, and both syndromes showed peak mortality in other, different regions of the State. The geographic pattern of hypertension prevalence among the draftee cohort resembled the 1963-67 hypertension mortality pattern, but more recent morbidity data are needed to confirm the southern Cascade region's recent change to a high-risk area. Of 529 draftees with diagnosed hypertension, only 35 percent of the cases were previously known, only 7 percent has had any previous treatment, and only 7 percent were associated with known renal conditions. Among 521 registrants with a history of renal disorders, the prevalence of hypertension was increased for all categories of renal disease but was significantly high only for those with a history of glomerulonephritis. To date in Oregon we have found no evidence that renal disorders are major determinants of hypertension morbidity or mortality. PMID:803695

  16. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the renal protective effect of RAAS-blockade is incomplete. Short-term clinical studies have demonstrated that dietary sodium restriction potentiates the antiproteinuric effect of RAAS-blockade. More recently, it was shown that this effect is accompanied by a lower risk of end-stage renal disease and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The modulation of RAAS-blockade efficacy by sodium intake is likely multifactorial, and is mediated by effects of sodium on local tissue RAAS in kidney, vasculature and brain, and by effects on the immune system. Despite the evidence showing the beneficial effects of even a moderate sodium restriction (∼2.5g/d), it remains difficult to realize in clinical practice. In an analysis based on 24-h urinary sodium excretion data from more than 10,000 CKD patients and renal transplant recipients, we found that sodium intake in these patients is on average 3.8g/d, closely resembling the global general population (3.95g/d). Behavioral approaches including the use of online dietary coaching (ehealth) and feedback using data from 24-h urine collections may be useful to successfully lower dietary sodium intake, aiming to improve cardio-renal outcomes in patients with CKD. PMID:27041482

  17. 77 FR 67449 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ...-Stage Renal Disease Bundled FDA Food and Drug Administration FI/MAC Fiscal Intermediary/Medicare..., 2010, we published in the Federal Register a final (75 FR 49030) titled, ``End-Stage Renal Disease... comment period (76 FR 18930) titled, ``Changes in the End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment...

  18. CT and MR imaging for evaluation of cystic renal lesions and diseases.

    PubMed

    Wood, Cecil G; Stromberg, LeRoy J; Harmath, Carla B; Horowitz, Jeanne M; Feng, Chun; Hammond, Nancy A; Casalino, David D; Goodhartz, Lori A; Miller, Frank H; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cystic renal lesions are commonly encountered in abdominal imaging. Although most cystic renal lesions are benign simple cysts, complex renal cysts, infectious cystic renal disease, and multifocal cystic renal disease are also common phenomena. The Bosniak classification system provides a useful means of categorizing cystic renal lesions but places less emphasis on their underlying pathophysiology. Cystic renal diseases can be categorized as focal, multifocal, or infectious lesions. Diseases that manifest with focal lesions, such as cystic renal cell carcinoma, mixed epithelial and stromal tumor, and cystic nephroma, are often difficult to differentiate but have differing implications for follow-up after resection. Multifocal cystic renal lesions can be categorized as acquired or heritable. Acquired entities, such as glomerulocystic kidney disease, lithium-induced nephrotoxicity, acquired cystic kidney disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and localized cystic renal disease, often have distinct imaging and clinical features that allow definitive diagnosis. Heritable diseases, such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis, are usually easily identified and have various implications for patient management. Infectious diseases have varied imaging appearances, and the possibility of infection must not be overlooked when assessing a cystic renal lesion. A thorough understanding of the spectrum of cystic renal disease will allow the radiologist to make a more specific diagnosis and provide the clinician with optimal recommendations for further diagnostic testing and follow-up imaging. PMID:25590393

  19. Oligoarray comparative genomic hybridization of renal cell tumors that developed in patients with acquired cystic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Eva; Yusenko, Maria V; Nagy, Anetta; Kovacs, Gyula

    2010-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma occurs at higher frequency in acquired cystic renal disease than in the general population. We have analyzed 4 tumors obtained from the kidneys of 2 patients with acquired cystic renal disease, including 2 conventional renal cell carcinomas and 2 acquired cystic renal disease-associated tumors, for genetic alterations. DNA changes were established by applying the 44K Agilent Oligonucleotide Array-Based CGH (Agilent Technologies, Waldbronn, Germany), and mutation of VHL gene was detected by direct sequencing of the tumor genome. DNA losses and mutation of the VHL gene, which are characteristic for conventional renal cell carcinomas, were seen in 2 of the tumors. The acquired cystic renal disease-associated eosinophilic-vacuolated cell tumor showed gain of chromosomes 3 and 16. No DNA alterations occurred in the papillary clear cell tumor. We suggest that not only the morphology but also the genetics of renal cell tumors associated with acquired cystic renal disease may differ from those occurring in the general population. PMID:20646738

  20. Serum antioxidant capacity in neurological, psychiatric, renal diseases and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sofic, E; Rustembegovic, A; Kroyer, G; Cao, G

    2002-05-01

    The role of free radicals (FR) in the pathogenesis and in the progression of many diseases has been often discussed, but not widely investigated. However, the total antioxidant capacity in the serum seems to be of great evidence. Total antioxidant capacity was determined using oxygen absorbance capacity assay (ORAC) in serum of patients suffering from depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), anorexia nervosa, Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Aids-encephalopathy, diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP), cardiomyopathy (CM), renal disease, and healthy individuals as controls (C). The results showed that the total antioxidant capacity in serum decreased significantly (p < 0.01) by 24, 20, 13, and 17% for anorexia nervosa, Aids-encephalopathy, PNP and CM respectively. In serum of patients with renal disease significantly elevated antioxidant capacity was found. The data indicated that increased oxidative stress can be involved in the pathogenesis or in the progression of PNP and CM. Decrease of serum antioxidant capacity in patients with anorexia nervosa and Aids-encephalopathy are probably due primarily to malnutrition and secondly to insufficient antioxidant and immune system. In renal disease, the accumulation of urea in serum seems to be responsible for high antioxidant capacity. In contrast, there were no changes in PD, AD, depression syndrome and schizophrenia. PMID:12111462

  1. Capillary rarefaction, hypoxia, VEGF and angiogenesis in chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial hypoxia and peritubular capillary rarefaction are typical features of chronic progressive renal disease. In response to low oxygen supply, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are activated but until now, it is unclear if this increased expression leads to a stabilization of the disease process and thus is nephroprotective or contributes to interstitial fibrosis and/or tubular atrophy. This duality has also been described as far as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the major target genes of HIFs, is concerned. On the one hand, neoangiogenesis driven by VEGF, if intact, ameliorates hypoxia, on the other, VEGF is a potent pro-inflammatory mediator and neoangiogenesis, if defective because interference by other pathologies exaggerates injury. In summary, experimental data support the idea that dependent on timing and predominant pathology, hypoxia counter-regulatory factors exert beneficial or undesirable effects. Thus, before their therapeutic potential can be fully explored, a better way to characterize the clinical and pathophysiological situation in an individual patient is mandatory. PMID:21330358

  2. Renal biopsy and pathologic evaluation of glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Lees, George E; Cianciolo, Rachel E; Clubb, Fred J

    2011-08-01

    Presence of suspected primary glomerular disease is the most common and compelling reason to consider renal biopsy. Pathologic findings in samples from animals with nephritic or nephrotic glomerulopathies, as well as from animals with persistent subclinical glomerular proteinuria that is not associated with advanced chronic kidney disease, frequently guide treatment decisions and inform prognosis when suitable specimens are obtained and examined appropriately. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy techniques generally are satisfactory; however, other methods of locating or approaching the kidney, such as manual palpation (e.g., in cats), laparoscopy, or open surgery, also can be used. Visual assessment of the tissue content of needle biopsy samples to verify that they are renal cortex (i.e., contain glomeruli) as they are obtained is a key step that minimizes the submission of uninformative samples for examination. Adequate planning for a renal biopsy also requires prior procurement of the fixatives and preservatives needed to process and submit samples that will be suitable for electron microscopic examination and immunostaining, as well as for light microscopic evaluation. Finally, to be optimally informative, renal biopsy specimens must be processed by laboratories that routinely perform the required specialized examinations and then be evaluated by experienced veterinary nephropathologists. The pathologic findings must be carefully integrated with one another and with information derived from the clinical investigation of the patient's illness to formulate the correct diagnosis and most informative guidance for therapeutic management of the animal's glomerular disease. PMID:21782145

  3. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling preserves microvascular integrity and renal function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hao; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, M Golam; Sood, Manish M; Gibson, Ian W; Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Marsden, Philip A; Kelly, Darren J; Gilbert, Richard E; Advani, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The progressive decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by both disruption of the microvascular architecture and the accumulation of fibrotic matrix. One angiogenic pathway recently identified as playing an essential role in renal vascular development is the stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1)/CXCR4 pathway. Because similar developmental processes may be recapitulated in the disease setting, we hypothesized that the SDF-1/CXCR4 system would regulate microvascular health in CKD. Expression of CXCR4 was observed to be increased in the kidneys of subtotally nephrectomized (SNx) rats and in biopsies from patients with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a rodent model and human correlate both characterized by aberration of the renal microvessels. A reno-protective role for local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling was indicated by i) CXCR4-dependent glomerular eNOS activation following acute SDF-1 administration; and ii) acceleration of renal function decline, capillary loss and fibrosis in SNx rats treated with chronic CXCR4 blockade. In contrast to the upregulation of CXCR4, SDF-1 transcript levels were decreased in SNx rat kidneys as well as in renal fibroblasts exposed to the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), the latter effect being attenuated by histone deacetylase inhibition. Increased renal SDF-1 expression was, however, observed following the treatment of SNx rats with the ACE inhibitor, perindopril. Collectively, these observations indicate that local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling functions to preserve microvascular integrity and prevent renal fibrosis. Augmentation of this pathway, either purposefully or serendipitously with either novel or existing therapies, may attenuate renal decline in CKD. PMID:24637920

  4. Acetylcholinesterase activity in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Prall, Y G; Gambhir, K K; Cruz, I A; Blassingale, J; Ampy, F R

    2000-01-21

    Twenty healthy subjects and 39 Chronic Renal Failure patients (CRF-patients) maintained on chronic hemodialysis were used in this investigation to study the changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of red blood cells (RBCs). The CRF-patients were all undergoing hemodialysis treatment. AChE activity from the CRF-patients was determined before and after dialysis. An additional objective was to study the effect of chronic renal failure on human red blood cell aging. Blood samples were drawn from controls and CRF-patients in tubes containing EDTA or sodium heparin as an anticoagulant. Red blood cells were purified to avoid interference with monocytes, reticulocytes and leukocytes. The purified RBCs were subfractionated into young (y) (1.08-1.09), mid (m) (1.09-1.11) and old (o) (1.11-1.12) percoll density (g/mL) fractions using a discontinous percoll gradient. The mean +/- SD AChE per gram hemoglobin (U/g Hgb) activities in whole blood (WB), purified human red blood cells (PRBCs), young human red blood cells (y-RBCs), mid age human red blood cells (m-RBCs) and old human red blood cells (o-RBCs) in CRF-patients were 31.2+/-3.43, 29.3+/-3.26, 30.4+/-3.91, 25.1+/-5.25, 17.1+/-6.02 in females and 29.8+/-5.39, 28.8+/-5.29, 28.7+/-5.29, 23.7+/-5.39 and 16.0+/-5.60 in males. AChE activity from CRF-patients were higher than that found in the control subjects. The aging of human RBCs in both the controls and CRF-patients showed a progressive reduction in AChE activity. AChE activity of RBCs from female CRF-patients were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the female control subjects. The RBCs isolated from male CRF-patients showed a higher AChE activity than control males, but a significant difference was only observed with the mid-age-cells. These studies further indicate that AChE activity remained insignificantly different in the various density based age subfractions of RBCs of both CRF-patients and controls. PMID:10698358

  5. Advances in the Urinary Exosomes in Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Pei; Qin, Yan; Li, Xue-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Cells secrete around 30-100 nm membrane-enclosed vesicles that are released into the extracellular spaceis termed exosomes(EXs). EXs widely present in body fluids and incorporated proteins,nucleic acids that reflect the physiological state of their cells of origin and they may play an important role in cell-to-cell communication in various physiological and disease processes. In this article we review the recent basic and clinical studies in urinary EXs in renal diseases,focusing on their biological characteristics and potential roles as new biological markers,intervention treatment goals,and targeted therapy vectors in renal diseases.However,some issues still exist;in particular,the clinical application of EXs as a liquid biopsy technique warrants further investigations. PMID:27594162

  6. Prognostic Indicators of Cardiovascular Risk in Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, Cara M.

    2011-01-01

    Although the annual mortality rate for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is decreasing, likely due to an increase in kidney transplantation rate, the survival probability for ESRD patients from day one of dialysis has not changed, and is still poor with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 34%. This is contributed to by a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in ESRD patients. In order to improve survival outcomes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular related mortality need to be identified. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index can be used to assess heart rate control and may predict cardiovascular mortality. This paper will discuss how HRV, baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index are altered in renal disease and the utility of these indices as markers of cardiac risk in this patient population. PMID:22294981

  7. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  8. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space.

    PubMed

    Zerwekh, Joseph E

    2002-10-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis. PMID:12361779

  9. Chronic renal failure and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Kitsou, V K; Konstantinidis, A; Siamopoulos, K C

    2000-05-01

    In order to define the effects of chronic renal failure (CRF) in the progress of gingival inflammation, we studied 6 patients (4 male, 2 female) with CRF who were on chronic hemodialysis for 4.25 (range 1-15) years. Six healthy individuals, age and sex matched were used as controls. The protocol which we used comprised of two periods (a) a 40-day duration period of preparation and (b) a 28-day duration experimental period. During the (a) period, all subjects went through: (1) therapy of the chronic gingivitis and (2) complete control of dental plaque by oral hygiene. During the experimental period, all subjects were advised to avoid, for at least 21 days, any mechanical or chemical media of oral hygiene and went through photographing, recording of gingival index (GI), recording of plaque index (PII), and the collection and quantification of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). On the 21st day, root planning and polishing were performed and subjects were advised to carry out oral hygiene. On the 28th day, all previous examinations (GI, PII, GCF) were repeated. In both patients and controls, GI, PII and GCF were increased on 7th, 14th and 21st day, without significant differences between the groups and returned to normal (close to zero point) on the 28th day. There are no significant differences between patients with CRF and normal controls in the evolution of experimental gingivitis. Therefore, chronic uremia has no effect on the defense of periodontal tissue against microbial plaque. PMID:10843241

  10. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Seth G.; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A.; Brantner, Christine A.; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  11. Lipoprotein X Causes Renal Disease in LCAT Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Neufeld, Edward B; Thacker, Seth G; Vaisman, Boris; Pryor, Milton; Freeman, Lita A; Brantner, Christine A; Baranova, Irina; Francone, Nicolás O; Demosky, Stephen J; Vitali, Cecilia; Locatelli, Monica; Abbate, Mauro; Zoja, Carlamaria; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura; Remaley, Alan T

    2016-01-01

    Human familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency (FLD) is characterized by low HDL, accumulation of an abnormal cholesterol-rich multilamellar particle called lipoprotein-X (LpX) in plasma, and renal disease. The aim of our study was to determine if LpX is nephrotoxic and to gain insight into the pathogenesis of FLD renal disease. We administered a synthetic LpX, nearly identical to endogenous LpX in its physical, chemical and biologic characteristics, to wild-type and Lcat-/- mice. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated an apoA-I and LCAT-dependent pathway for LpX conversion to HDL-like particles, which likely mediates normal plasma clearance of LpX. Plasma clearance of exogenous LpX was markedly delayed in Lcat-/- mice, which have low HDL, but only minimal amounts of endogenous LpX and do not spontaneously develop renal disease. Chronically administered exogenous LpX deposited in all renal glomerular cellular and matrical compartments of Lcat-/- mice, and induced proteinuria and nephrotoxic gene changes, as well as all of the hallmarks of FLD renal disease as assessed by histological, TEM, and SEM analyses. Extensive in vivo EM studies revealed LpX uptake by macropinocytosis into mouse glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells and delivery to lysosomes where it was degraded. Endocytosed LpX appeared to be degraded by both human podocyte and mesangial cell lysosomal PLA2 and induced podocyte secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in vitro and renal Cxl10 expression in Lcat-/- mice. In conclusion, LpX is a nephrotoxic particle that in the absence of Lcat induces all of the histological and functional hallmarks of FLD and hence may serve as a biomarker for monitoring recombinant LCAT therapy. In addition, our studies suggest that LpX-induced loss of endothelial barrier function and release of cytokines by renal glomerular cells likely plays a role in the initiation and progression of FLD nephrosis. PMID:26919698

  12. Specific MAPK inhibitors prevent hyperglycemia-induced renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhe; Hong, Zongyuan; Wu, Denglong; Nie, Hezhongrong

    2016-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play critical roles in the process of renal diseases, but their interaction has not been comprehensively discussed. In the present studies, we investigated the renoprotective effects of MPAK inhibitors on renal diseases in type 1 diabetic mouse model, and clarify the crosstalk among MAPK signaling. Type 1 diabetic mouse model was established in male C57BL/6 J mice, and treated with or without 10 mg/kg MAPK blockers, including ERK inhibitor PD98059, p38 inhibitor SB203850, and JNK inhibitor SP600125 for four weeks. Hyperglycemia induced renal injuries, but treating them with MAPK inhibitors significantly decreased glomerular volume and glycogen in renal tissues. Although slightly changed body weight and fasting blood glucose levels, MAPK inhibitors attenuated blood urea nitrogen, urea protein, and microalbuminuria. Administration also reduced the diabetes-induced RAS activation, including angiotensin II converting enzyme (c) and Ang II, which contributed to its renal protective effects in the diabetic mice. In addition, the anti-RAS of MAPK inhibitor treatment markedly reduced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, fibrotic accumulation, and transforming growth factor-β1 levels in renal tissues. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors and genetic siRNA results identified the crosstalk among the three MAPK signaling, and proved JNK signaling played a critical role in MAPK-mediated ACE pathway in hyperglycemia state. Collectively, these results support the therapeutic effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, especially JNK inactivation, on hyperglycemia-induced renal damages. PMID:27389030

  13. Early Renal Abnormalities in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Esther; Rook, Mieneke; Tent, Hilde; Navis, Gerjan; van der Jagt, Eric J.; de Jong, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Potential therapeutic interventions are being developed for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A pivotal question will be when to initiate such treatment, and monitoring disease progression will thus become more important. Therefore, the prevalence of renal abnormalities in ADPKD at different ages was evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Included were 103 prevalent ADPKD patients (Ravine criteria). Measured were mean arterial pressure (MAP), total renal volume (TRV), GFR, effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), renal vascular resistance (RVR), and filtration fraction (FF). Twenty-four-hour urine was collected. ADPKD patients were compared with age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Results: Patients and controls were subdivided into quartiles of age (median ages 28, 37, 42, and 52 years). Patients in the first quartile of age had almost the same GFR when compared with controls, but already a markedly decreased ERPF and an increased FF (GFR 117 ± 32 versus 129 ± 17 ml/min, ERPF 374 ± 119 versus 527 ± 83 ml/min, FF 32% ± 4% versus 25% ± 2%, and RVR 12 (10 to 16) versus 8 (7 to 8) dynes/cm2, respectively). Young adult ADPKD patients also had higher 24-hour urinary volumes, lower 24-hour urinary osmolarity, and higher urinary albumin excretion (UAE) than healthy controls, although TRV in these young adult patients was modestly enlarged (median 1.0 L). Conclusions: Already at young adult age, ADPKD patients have marked renal abnormalities, including a decreased ERPF and increased FF and UAE, despite modestly enlarged TRV and near-normal GFR. ERPF, FF, and UAE may thus be better markers for disease severity than GFR. PMID:20413443

  14. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Zavattaro, Elisa; Veronese, Federica; Fava, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. PMID:27548160

  15. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle; Fornoni, Alessia

    2016-03-15

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  16. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mbarki, Houda; Tazi, Nada; Najdi, Adil; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Sqalli, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual's health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years). All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF), active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . However, the small sample size does not allow us to draw any firm conclusions on fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended. PMID:25758882

  17. TLR4 mutant mice are protected from renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ana C P; Tsuji, Takayuki; Baranova, Irina N; Bocharov, Alexander V; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Street, Jonathan M; Alvarez-Prats, Alejandro; Hu, Xuzhen; Eggerman, Thomas; Yuen, Peter S T; Star, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with persistent low-grade inflammation and immunosuppression. In this study we tested the role of Toll-like receptor 4, the main receptor for endotoxin (LPS), in a mouse model of renal fibrosis and in a model of progressive CKD that better resembles the human disease. C3HeJ (TLR4 mutant) mice have a missense point mutation in the TLR4 gene, rendering the receptor nonfunctional. In a model of renal fibrosis after folic acid injection, TLR4 mutant mice developed less interstititial fibrosis in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy with continuous low-dose angiotensin II infusion, C3HeOuJ (TLR4 WT) mice developed progressive CKD with albuminuria, increased serum levels of BUN and creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and interstitial fibrosis, whereas TLR4 mutant mice were significantly protected from CKD progression. TLR4 WT mice also developed low-grade systemic inflammation, splenocyte apoptosis and increased expression of the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1 in the spleen, which were not observed in TLR4 mutant mice. In vitro, endotoxin (LPS) directly upregulated NLRP3 inflammasome expression in renal epithelial cells via TLR4. In summary, TLR4 contributes to renal fibrosis and CKD progression, at least in part, via inflammasome activation in renal epithelial cells, and may also participate in the dysregulated immune response that is associated with CKD. PMID:26416975

  18. Novel Methodology to Evaluate Renal Cysts in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyongtae T; Sun, Hongliang; Lee, June Goo; Bae, Kyungsoo; Wang, Jinhong; Tao, Cheng; Chapman, Arlene B; Torres, Vicente E; Grantham, Jared J; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M; Flessner, Michael F; Landsittel, Doug P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop and assess a semi-automated method for segmenting and counting individual renal cysts from mid-slice MR images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) Materials and Methods A semi-automated method was developed to segment and count individual renal cysts from mid-slice MR images in 241 participants with ADPKD from the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of ADPKD (CRISP). For each subject, a mid-slice MR image was selected from each set of coronal T2-weighted MR images covering the entire kidney. The selected mid-slice image was processed with the semi-automated method to segment and count individual renal cysts. The number of cysts from the mid-slice image of each kidney was also measured by manual counting. The level of agreement between the semi-automated and manual cyst counts was compared using intra-class correlation (ICC) and a Bland-Altman plot. Results Individual renal cysts were successfully segmented using the semi-automated method in all 241 cases. The number of cysts in each kidney measured with the semi-automated and manual counting methods correlated well (ICC=0.96 for the right or left kidney), with a small average difference (-0.52, with higher semi-automated counts, for the right and 0.13, with higher manual counts, for the left) in the semi-automated method. There was, however, substantial variation in a small number of subjects: 6 of 241 (2.5%) participants had a difference in the total cyst count of more than 15. Conclusion We have developed a semi-automated method to segment individual renal cysts from mid-slice of MR images in ADPKD kidneys for a quantitative indicator of characterization and disease progression of ADPKD. PMID:24576800

  19. Mild systemic thermal therapy ameliorates renal dysfunction in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Takashige; Hayata, Manabu; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Izumi, Yuichiro; Iiyama, Junichi; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Thermal therapy has become a nonpharmacological therapy in clinical settings, especially for cardiovascular diseases. However, the practical role of thermal therapy on chronic kidney disease remains elusive. We performed the present study to investigate whether a modified thermal protocol, repeated mild thermal stimulation (MTS), could affect renal damages in chronic kidney disease using a mouse renal ablation model. Mice were subjected to MTS or room temperature (RT) treatment once daily for 4 wk after subtotal nephrectomy (Nx) or sham operation (Sh). We revealed that MTS alleviated renal impairment as indicated by serum creatinine and albuminuria in Nx groups. In addition, the Nx + MTS group showed attenuated tubular histological changes and reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion approximately by half compared with the Nx + RT group. Increased apoptotic signaling, such as TUNEL-positive cell count and cleavage of caspase 3, as well as enhanced oxidative stress were significantly reduced in the Nx + MTS group compared with the Nx + RT group. These changes were accompanied with the restoration of kidney Mn-SOD levels by MTS. Heat shock protein 27, a key molecular chaperone, was phosphorylated by MTS only in Nx kidneys rather than in Sh kidneys. MTS also tended to increase the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt in Nx kidneys, possibly associated with the activation of heat shock protein 27. Taken together, these results suggest that modified MTS can protect against renal injury in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease. PMID:27029428

  20. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  1. The Economic Burden of Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Virginia; Vilme, Helene; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    The growing prevalence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) raises concerns about our capacity to manage its economic burden to patients, caregivers, and society. The societal direct and indirect costs of CKD and end-stage renal disease are substantial and increase throughout disease progression. There is significant variability in the evidence about direct and indirect costs attributable to CKD and end-stage renal disease, with the most complete evidence concentrated on direct health care costs of patients with advanced to end-stage CKD. There are substantial gaps in evidence that need to be filled to inform clinical practice and policy. PMID:27475662

  2. CTGF promotes inflammatory cell infiltration of the renal interstitium by activating NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rayego, Sandra; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Rodriguez, Javier Sánchez; Rodrigues-Díez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Carvajal, Gisselle; Aroeira, Luiz Stark; Selgas, Rafael; Mezzano, Sergio A; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2009-07-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an important profibrotic factor in kidney diseases. Blockade of endogenous CTGF ameliorates experimental renal damage and inhibits synthesis of extracellular matrix in cultured renal cells. CTGF regulates several cellular responses, including adhesion, migration, proliferation, and synthesis of proinflammatory factors. Here, we investigated whether CTGF participates in the inflammatory process in the kidney by evaluating the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) pathway, a key signaling system that controls inflammation and immune responses. Systemic administration of CTGF to mice for 24 h induced marked infiltration of inflammatory cells in the renal interstitium (T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages) and led to elevated renal NF-kappaB activity. Administration of CTGF increased renal expression of chemokines (MCP-1 and RANTES) and cytokines (INF-gamma, IL-6, and IL-4) that recruit immune cells and promote inflammation. Treatment with a NF-kappaB inhibitor, parthenolide, inhibited CTGF-induced renal inflammatory responses, including the up-regulation of chemokines and cytokines. In cultured murine tubuloepithelial cells, CTGF rapidly activated the NF-kappaB pathway and the cascade of mitogen-activated protein kinases, demonstrating crosstalk between these signaling pathways. CTGF, via mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-kappaB activation, increased proinflammatory gene expression. These data show that in addition to its profibrotic properties, CTGF contributes to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the kidney by activating the NF-kappaB pathway. PMID:19423687

  3. CTGF Promotes Inflammatory Cell Infiltration of the Renal Interstitium by Activating NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rayego, Sandra; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Rodriguez, Javier Sánchez; Rodrigues-Díez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Carvajal, Gisselle; Aroeira, Luiz Stark; Selgas, Rafael; Mezzano, Sergio A.; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesús; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an important profibrotic factor in kidney diseases. Blockade of endogenous CTGF ameliorates experimental renal damage and inhibits synthesis of extracellular matrix in cultured renal cells. CTGF regulates several cellular responses, including adhesion, migration, proliferation, and synthesis of proinflammatory factors. Here, we investigated whether CTGF participates in the inflammatory process in the kidney by evaluating the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway, a key signaling system that controls inflammation and immune responses. Systemic administration of CTGF to mice for 24 h induced marked infiltration of inflammatory cells in the renal interstitium (T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages) and led to elevated renal NF-κB activity. Administration of CTGF increased renal expression of chemokines (MCP-1 and RANTES) and cytokines (INF-γ, IL-6, and IL-4) that recruit immune cells and promote inflammation. Treatment with a NF-κB inhibitor, parthenolide, inhibited CTGF-induced renal inflammatory responses, including the up-regulation of chemokines and cytokines. In cultured murine tubuloepithelial cells, CTGF rapidly activated the NF-κB pathway and the cascade of mitogen-activated protein kinases, demonstrating crosstalk between these signaling pathways. CTGF, via mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB activation, increased proinflammatory gene expression. These data show that in addition to its profibrotic properties, CTGF contributes to the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the kidney by activating the NF-κB pathway. PMID:19423687

  4. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  5. Serum and Urinary Interleukin-6 in Assessment of Renal Activity in Egyptian Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    EL-Shereef, Rawhya R.; Lotfi, Ahmed; Abdel-Naeam, Emad A.; Tawfik, Heba

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF THE WORK This study investigates whether serum and urinary interleukin-6 (IL-6) represent an early marker of kidney involvement and assesses the difference between them and renal biopsy in lupus nephritis (LN). PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 60 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients were compared to 20 healthy controls. Urinary and serum IL-6 were measured in both patients and controls. In addition, renal biopsy was done prior or shortly after urine and blood sampling; the results were classified according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society classification of LN by recording the activity score and chronicity score for each sample. RESULTS There was a significant higher level of urinary IL-6 in the SLE patients with biopsy-proven LN than in those without LN and those of the control group. However, no significant difference was reported between the three groups as regards serum IL-6. A strong positive correlation was found between urinary IL-6 and renal disease activity based on the renal SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score with no significant correlation regarding the extra renal SLEDAI. Urinary IL-6 was positively correlated with renal biopsy results and with its activity scores but weakly correlated with the chronicity scores. CONCLUSION Urinary IL-6 may provide a simple noninvasive potential marker of disease activity of renal involvement in adult patients with SLE. PMID:26966395

  6. Pranlukast inhibits renal epithelial cyst progression via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-02-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) antagonists were found to inhibit chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells. Since chloride secretion in renal epithelial cells, which shares common mechanisms with airway epithelial cells, plays important roles in renal cyst progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), this study was aimed to investigate effects of drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst progression and its underlying mechanisms. Effects of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst growth and formation were determined using Madine Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cyst models. Mechanisms of actions of CysLT1 receptor antagonists were determined using short-circuit current measurement, assays of cell viability and cell proliferation, and immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins. Of the three drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists (montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast) tested, pranlukast was the most promising drug that inhibited MDCK cyst growth and formation without affecting cell viability. Its effect was independent of the inhibition of CysLT1 receptors. Instead, it reduced cAMP-activated chloride secretion and proliferation of MDCK cells in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner and had no effect on CFTR protein expression. Interestingly, pranlukast enhanced AMPK activation via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) with consequent activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results indicate that pranlukast retards renal epithelial cyst progression by inhibiting cAMP-activated chloride secretion and cell proliferation via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Therefore, pranlukast represents a class of known drugs that may have potential utility in PKD treatment. PMID:24360935

  7. IgG4-related renal disease: clinical and pathological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Nao, Tomoya; Fukuhara, Hideo; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Keiji; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Takeuchi, Mai; Zen, Yoh; Sato, Yasuharu; Notohara, Kenji; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently established systemic condition. Tubulointerstitial nephritis is the most common renal manifestation. Glomerular lesions, particularly membranous glomerulonephritis, can develop simultaneously. Some patients present with serological renal dysfunction associated with elevated IgG or IgE levels and hypocomplementemia, while others are incidentally found to have abnormalities in kidneys on imaging. A majority of patients with IgG4-related kidney disease have similar lesions at other anatomical sites, which help us to suspect this condition. Serum IgG4 elevation (>135 mg/dL) is the most, although not entirely, specific marker for the diagnosis. Imaging findings varies from small nodules to bilateral diffuse abnormalities. In addition to the renal parenchyma, the renal pelvis and perirenal adipose tissue can be affected. Histological features include dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, storiform or "bird's eye" fibrosis (highlighted by PAM stain), and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration (>10 cells/high-power field and IgG4/IgG-positive cell ratio >40%). Immune complex deposition is detectable in the tubular basement membrane by immunofluorescence and/or electron microscopy. Patients usually respond well to corticosteroids, but highly active diseases may require other immunosuppressive therapies. Further investigations will be required to fully understand pathophysiology underlying this emerging condition. PMID:25337295

  8. Serum aldosterone and death, end-stage renal disease, and cardiovascular events in blacks and whites: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Deo, Rajat; Yang, Wei; Khan, Abigail M; Bansal, Nisha; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leonard, Mary B; Keane, Martin G; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Steigerwalt, Susan; Townsend, Raymond R; Shlipak, Michael G; Feldman, Harold I

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that elevated aldosterone concentrations are an independent risk factor for death in patients with cardiovascular disease. Limited studies, however, have evaluated systematically the association between serum aldosterone and adverse events in the setting of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the association between serum aldosterone and death and end-stage renal disease in 3866 participants from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort. We also evaluated the association between aldosterone and incident congestive heart failure and atherosclerotic events in participants without baseline cardiovascular disease. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate independent associations between elevated aldosterone concentrations and each outcome. Interactions were hypothesized and explored between aldosterone and sex, race, and the use of loop diuretics and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors. During a median follow-up period of 5.4 years, 587 participants died, 743 developed end-stage renal disease, 187 developed congestive heart failure, and 177 experienced an atherosclerotic event. Aldosterone concentrations (per SD of the log-transformed aldosterone) were not an independent risk factor for death (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-1.12), end-stage renal disease (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.17), or atherosclerotic events (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.18). Aldosterone was associated with congestive heart failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.35). Among participants with chronic kidney disease, higher aldosterone concentrations were independently associated with the development of congestive heart failure but not for death, end-stage renal disease, or atherosclerotic events. Further studies should evaluate whether mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may reduce adverse events in individuals with

  9. Assessment of Renal Pathology and Dysfunction in Pediatric Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswami, Uma; Najafian, Behzad; Schieppati, Arrigo; Mauer, Michael; Bichet, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Overt renal disease often first presents in males with Fabry disease in early-to-mid adulthood, but proteinuria and reduced glomerular filtration rate may occur in adolescents and in young children. More recently, kidney biopsy data have shown early renal histological changes in pediatric patients. Renal investigations and their timing in children remain poorly defined. A consensus on renal investigations is necessary to understand the natural progression of the disease and to evaluate the efficacy of treatments such as enzyme replacement therapies. This manuscript addresses three main categories, including the use of glomerular filtration rates, measuring albuminuria and renal biopsies in children. PMID:20056758

  10. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  11. Meaningful rehabilitation of the end-stage renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Thornton, T A; Hakim, R M

    1997-05-01

    In this highly technological age, health care providers are called to attend to the patient as a whole person, with dreams and goals and a desire for purpose and meaning in life. In this article, we propose a broadened definition of rehabilitation and a rehabilitation program designed to effect an improvement in the quality of life of each renal patient by aiming to restore meaningful existence in each of their lives. An individualized plan for rehabilitation can be constructed and implemented with far-reaching success when the focus is on the life goals of the patient, whether physical, social, psychological, or intellectual. These programs not only enhance the quality of life of the patient with end-stage renal disease, but are cost-effective, both at the societal level and at the level of the dialysis clinic. PMID:9165654

  12. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  13. An update on renal involvement in hemophagocytic syndrome (macrophage activation syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Esmaili, Haydarali; Mostafidi, Elmira; Mehramuz, Bahareh; Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Mohajel-Shoja, Mohammadali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is mainly characterized by massive infiltration of bone marrow by activated macrophages and often presents with pancytopenia. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is also present with thrombocytopenia and renal involvement. Both conditions could coexist with each other and complicate the condition. Evidence Acquisition: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science with keywords relevant to; Hemophagocytic syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, interferon-gamma and thrombotic microangiopathy, have been searched. Results: Viral infection, rheumatologic disease and malignancies are the main underlying causes for secondary HPS. calcineurin inhibitors and viral infections are also the main underlying causes of TMA in transplant recipients. In this review, we discussed a 39-year-old male who presented with pancytopenia and renal allograft dysfunction. With the diagnosis of HPS induced TMA his renal condition and pancytopenia improved after receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis therapy. Conclusions: HPS is an increasingly recognized disorder in the realm of different medical specialties. Renal involvement complicates the clinical picture of the disease, and this condition even is more complex in renal transplant recipients. We should consider the possibility of HPS in any renal transplant recipient with pancytopenia and allograft dysfunction. The combination of HPS with TMA future increases the complexity of the situation. PMID:27047804

  14. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  15. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  16. Nephrology Update: End-Stage Renal Disease and Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Niraj; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-05-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, and increased health care use. Optimal management of patients with ESRD requires close collaboration among primary care physicians, nephrology subspecialists, and other subspecialists. Critical issues for the family physician include helping patients transition from chronic kidney disease to ESRD, recognizing and managing common issues in patients receiving dialysis or after kidney transplantation, and understanding palliative care for patients with ESRD. Dialysis typically is initiated for patients with a glomerular filtration rate less than 15 mL/min/1.73 m(2) if they are symptomatic due to uremia or if medical management of metabolic conditions is unsuccessful. Kidney transplantation is the optimal form of renal replacement therapy in suitable patients. The choice between hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis often is based on patient preference and coexisting conditions. Meticulous monitoring of volume status is necessary to achieve and maintain control of blood pressure. Sleep disorders and pruritus are common and can be managed by optimization of metabolic parameters, adequacy of dialysis, and drugs. PMID:27163762

  17. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  18. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  19. Evaluation of circulating levels and renal clearance of natural amino acids in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, A; Pivonello, R; Melis, D; Alfieri, R; Filippella, M; Spagnuolo, G; Salvatore, F; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2002-02-01

    Although the hypercortisolism-induced impairment of protein homeostasis is object of several studies, a detailed evaluation of the complete amino acid profile of patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) has never been performed. The aim of the current open transversal controlled study was to evaluate serum and urinary concentrations as well as renal clearance of the complete series of natural amino acids and their relationship with glucose tolerance in patients with Cushing's disease (CD). Twenty patients with CD (10 active and 10 cured) and 20 sex- and age-matched healthy controls entered the study. Measurement of serum and urinary levels of the complete series of natural amino acids was performed in all patients analyzed by cationic exchange high performance liquid cromatography (HPLC) after 2 weeks of a standardized protein intake regimen. The renal clearance (renal excretion rate) of each amino acid was calculated on the basis of the serum and urinary concentrations of creatinine and the specific amino acid. Fasting glucose and insulin levels, glucose and insulin response to standard glucose load, insulinogenic and homeostasis model insulin resistance (Homa-R) indexes were also evaluated and correlated to the circulating levels and renal clearances of each amino acid. Significantly higher serum (p<0.01) and urinary (p<0.05) levels of alanine and cystine, lower serum and higher urinary levels of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.05) and higher renal excretion rates of leucine, isoleucine and valine (p<0.01) were found in patients with active CD than in patients cured from the disease and in controls. No difference was found between cured patients and controls. Creatinine clearance was similar in active and cured patients and in controls. In patients with active CD, urinary cortisol levels were significantly correlated to urinary cystine levels (r=0.85; p<0.01) and renal excretion rate of leucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05), isoleucine (r=-0.76; p<0.05) and valine (r=-0

  20. The Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease after Parathyroidectomy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The changes of the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with end-stage renal disease after parathyroidectomy are scant. Methods We used a nationwide health insurance claims database to select all dialysis-dependent patients with end-stage renal disease aged 18 years and older for the study population in 2000 to 2006. Of the patients with end-stage renal disease, we selected 947 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy as the parathyroidectomy group and frequency matched 3746 patients with end-stage renal disease by sex, age, years since the disease diagnosis, and the year of index date as the non-parathyroidectomy group. We used a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with the use of a robust sandwich covariance matrix estimate, accounting for the intra-cluster dependence of hospitals or clinics, to measure the risk of peripheral arterial disease for the parathyroidectomy group compared with the non-parathyroidectomy group after adjusting for sex, age, premium-based income, urbanization, and comorbidity. Results The mean post-op follow-up periods were 5.08 and 4.52 years for the parathyroidectomy and non-parathyroidectomy groups, respectively; the incidence density rate of PAD in the PTX group was 12.26 per 1000 person-years, significantly lower than the data in the non-PTX group (24.09 per 1000 person-years, adjusted HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46–0.94). Conclusion Parathyroidectomy is associated with reduced risk of peripheral arterial disease in patients with end-stage renal disease complicated with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27284924

  1. Diagnosing and treating renal disease in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is mostly related to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), precipitated by either an acute disturbance of hemodynamics, or acute structural damage to the kidneys. The incidence of chronic renal failure is rising, due to increasing prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, viral hepatitis, which can be associated with renal damage. AKI is defined as a rise in serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dL in <48 hours or by 50% from baseline within the past 3 months without setting a threshold for the final serum creatinine. Stages 1, 2, and 3 of AKI are defined as 150%, 200% and 300% of baseline serum creatinine respectively, which allows for assessment of AKI progression. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min for >3 months. Treatment of AKI consists of removal of precipitating factors and replenishment of the intravascular volume using colloids such as albumin. Frequently, AKI can be reversed using these measures alone. Non-responders to removal of precipitating factors and volume challenge can receive vasoconstrictors such as terlipressin or norepinephrine together with albumin. Midodrine is inferior in efficacy as a vasoconstrictor when compared to terlipressin. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome with liver failure. Delay in receiving a liver transplant can result in non-recovery of renal function post transplant. Treatment of CKD in cirrhosis is unsatisfactory, mostly aimed at optimizing management of comorbid conditions, or treating the underlying refractory ascites in patients with type 2 hepatorenal syndrome. PMID:27096702

  2. Oxalate-induced changes in renal epithelial cell function: role in stone disease.

    PubMed

    Scheid, C; Honeyman, T; Kohjimoto, Y; Cao, L C; Jonassen, J

    2000-01-01

    Many studies on the etiology of stone disease have focused on the properties of urine that affect crystal nucleation and growth. More recent studies have focused on the properties of the renal epithelium and the role of injury in crystal retention. The latter studies have shown that oxalate exposure per se can damage renal epithelial cells and enhance crystal binding. This overview summarizes findings of specific biochemical and genetic alterations observed in renal epithelial cells after exposure to oxalate. In LLC-PK1 and MDCK cells, oxalate exposure produces marked effects on membranes, causing a redistribution of phosphatidylserine and activation of two lipid signaling cascades, one involving phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) and one involving ceramide. Longer exposure to oxalate leads to membrane damage and cell death. Adaptive responses are also observed, including proliferation (for replacement of damaged cells) and induction of various genes (for cellular replacement and repair). Many or all of these responses are blocked by antioxidants, and many can be mimicked by PLA(2) agonists/products. This finding suggests links between oxalate-induced increases in oxidant stress, lipid signaling pathways, and subsequent molecular responses that may eventuate in renal cell damage or death. Whether such changes play a role in stone disease in vivo, and whether strategies to inhibit these changes would be beneficial therapeutically, is unknown. PMID:11156705

  3. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  4. Medicare end stage renal disease population, 1982-87

    PubMed Central

    Breidenbaugh, M. Zermain; Sarsitis, Ida M.; Milam, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    A synopsis is given between the relationship of the number of end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients to the total Medicare population and their associated expenditures. The aging trend within the ESRD population is examined in terms of enrollment statistics and incidence (new cases) counts. Also, longitudinal trends in expenditures, program enrollment, and incidence of ESRD are included. Findings indicate that the ESRD population is growing at a faster rate than Medicare in general. Further, within ESRD, the beneficiary population is aging. PMID:10113457

  5. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  6. Cyst infection in unilateral renal cystic disease and the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Takase, Yasukazu; Kodama, Koichi; Motoi, Isamu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2012-11-01

    In multicystic renal diseases, cyst infection is a complex issue because of the absence of validated diagnostic methods. Unilateral renal cystic disease is a rare multicystic disease, believed to have an acquired maldevelopmental origin. Unilateral renal cystic disease is often confused with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease but has some distinguishing characteristics: unilateral localization, negative family history, and no progression to chronic renal failure. We describe a case of unilateral renal cystic disease with cyst infection that could be detected by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, but not by conventional imaging techniques. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be useful for detecting infected cysts, especially in multicystic renal diseases. PMID:22990058

  7. New Strategies in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Targeting the Genetic and Metabolic Basis of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Sourbier, Carole; Linehan, W. Marston

    2016-01-01

    The development of new forms of treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma over the past two decades has been primarily focused on targeting the VHL/HIF pathway. The recent identification of mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), of genomic heterogeneity and of a Warburg-like metabolic phenotype in advanced disease has had a profound effect on our understanding of the evolution of clear cell RCC and on potential approaches to personalized therapy. Early approaches to therapy for patients with advanced type 1 papillary renal cell carcinoma that have centered around the MET/HGF pathway will expand as more genomic information becomes available. Sporadic and familial Type 2 papillary renal cell carcinoma are characterized by enhanced aerobic glycolysis and share an antioxidant response phenotype. In fumarate hydratase-deficient RCC, fumarate-induced succination of KEAP1 activates Nrf2 signaling. CUL3 and Nrf2 mutations as well as an Nrf2 activation phenotype are found in sporadic type 2 papillary RCC. Therapeutic approaches designed to target the Nrf2 pathway as well as to impair blood flow and glucose delivery in these cancers that are highly dependent on a robust tumor vasculature and on ready availability of glucose for energy production and glycolysis are in development. PMID:25564569

  8. Mechanisms mediating renal sympathetic nerve activation in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Leo, S; Weng, C; Yang, X; Wu, Y; Tang, X

    2015-04-01

    Excessive renal sympathetic nerve activation may be one of the mechanisms underlying obesity-related hypertension. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity, adipokine disorders-such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-activation of the renin-angiotensin system, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and renal sodium retention present in obesity increase renal sympathetic nerve activity, thus contributing to the development of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation reduces both renal sympathetic activity and blood pressure in patients with obesity-related hypertension. PMID:24609799

  9. Fibroblast activation protein predicts prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, José I; Errarte, Peio; Erramuzpe, Asier; Guarch, Rosa; Cortés, Jesús M; Angulo, Javier C; Pulido, Rafael; Irazusta, Jon; Llarena, Roberto; Larrinaga, Gorka

    2016-08-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is a complex disease with only partial response to therapy and scarce reliable clinical parameters indicative of progression and survival. Fibroblast activation protein expression has been correlated with prognosis in several malignancies but never in renal cancer. We aim to analyze the immunohistochemical expression of fibroblast activation protein in 208 clear cell renal cell carcinomas and to evaluate its impact on the prognosis and survival. A positive cytoplasmic immunostaining of this protein in the stromal fibroblasts associated to cancer cells is associated with large tumor diameter (≥4cm), high-grade (G3/4) tumors, and high-stage (≥pT3) tumors. Fibroblast activation protein-positive cases had significantly shorter survivals after 5 (P=.00015), 10 (P=.0000042), and 15 (P=.000043) years of follow-up, with a hazard ratio of 0.31. Multivariate analysis showed that fibroblast activation protein (P=.00117) was stronger than grade and stage in predicting clinical aggressiveness in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This study confirms the usefulness of fibroblast activation protein detection in the stromal fibroblast associated to cancer in clear cell renal cell carcinoma and adds a new immunohistochemical marker to predict clinical behavior in these patients. PMID:27063470

  10. HDR Syndrome (Hypoparathyroidism, Sensorineural Deafness and Renal Disease) Accompanied by Hirschsprung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sepahi, Mohsen Akhavan; Baraty, Behrouz; Shooshtary, Fatemeh Khalifeh

    2010-01-01

    Background HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness and renal disease) is an autosomal dominant condition, defined by the triad hypoparathyroidism, renal dysplasia and hearing loss. Hirschsprung (HSCR) disease is a variable congenital absence of ganglion cells of the enteric nervous system resulting in degrees of functional bowel obstruction. Rarer chromosomal anomalies are reported in combination with Hirschsprung disease like DiGeorge syndrome, mosaic trisomy 8, XXY chromosomal constitution, partial duplication of chromosome 2q, tetrasomy 9p, and 20p deletion. Case Presentation Here, we describe an 8 year-old girl with HDR syndrome accompanied by Hirschsprung disease. Although the association of Hirschsprung disease with chromosomal anomalies has been reported, according to our knowledge, this is the first report of associated HSCR with HDR syndrome. PMID:23056694

  11. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  12. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  13. Biomarkers of Renal Disease and Progression in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hojs, Radovan; Ekart, Robert; Bevc, Sebastjan; Hojs, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence is increasing worldwide, mainly due to the increase in type 2 diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy occurs in up to 40% of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is important to identify patients at risk of diabetic nephropathy and those who will progress to end stage renal disease. In clinical practice, most commonly used markers of renal disease and progression are serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria or albuminuria. Unfortunately, they are all insensitive. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the prognostic value and benefits of targeting some novel risk markers for development of diabetic nephropathy and its progression. It is focused mainly on tubular biomarkers (neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule 1, liver-fatty acid-binding protein, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase), markers of inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-α and tumour necrosis factor-α receptors, adhesion molecules, chemokines) and markers of oxidative stress. Despite the promise of some of these new biomarkers, further large, multicenter prospective studies are still needed before they can be used in everyday clinical practice. PMID:26239462

  14. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-08-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r (2) 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r (2) 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r (2) 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  15. Renal replacement therapy in Latin American end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Diez, Guillermo; Gonzalez-Bedat, Maria; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Marinovich, Sergio; Fernandez, Sdenka; Lugon, Jocemir; Poblete-Badal, Hugo; Elgueta-Miranda, Susana; Gomez, Rafael; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Almaguer-Lopez, Miguel; Freire, Nelly; Leiva-Merino, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Gaspar; Luna-Guerra, Jorge; Bochicchio, Tomasso; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Cano, Nuria; Iron, Norman; Cuero, Cesar; Cuevas, Dario; Tapia, Carlos; Cangiano, Jose; Rodriguez, Sandra; Gonzalez, Haydee; Duro-Garcia, Valter

    2014-01-01

    The Latin American Dialysis and Renal Transplant Registry (RLADTR) was founded in 1991; it collects data from 20 countries which are members of Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nefrología e Hipertension. This paper presents the results corresponding to the year 2010. This study is an annual survey requesting data on incident and prevalent patients undergoing renal replacement treatment (RRT) in all modalities: hemodialysis (HD), peritoneal dialysis (PD) and living with a functioning graft (LFG), etc. Prevalence and incidence were compared with previous years. The type of renal replacement therapy was analyzed, with special emphasis on PD and transplant (Tx). These variables were correlated with the gross national income (GNI) and the life expectancy at birth. Twenty countries participed in the surveys, covering 99% of the Latin American. The prevalence of end stage renal disease (ESRD) under RRT in Latin America (LA) increased from 119 patients per million population (pmp) in 1991 to 660 pmp in 2010 (HD 413 pmp, PD 135 pmp and LFG 111 pmp). HD proportionally increased more than PD, and Tx HD continues to be the treatment of choice in the region (75%). The kidney Tx rate increased from 3.7 pmp in 1987 to 6.9 pmp in 1991 and to 19.1 in 2010. The total number of Tx's in 2010 was 10 397, with 58% deceased donors. The total RRT prevalence correlated positively with GNI (r2 0.86; P < 0.05) and life expectancy at birth (r2 0.58; P < 0.05). The HD prevalence and the kidney Tx rate correlated significantly with the same indexes, whereas the PD rate showed no correlation with these variables. A tendency to rate stabilization/little growth was reported in the most regional countries. As in previous reports, the global incidence rate correlated significantly only with GNI (r2 0.63; P < 0.05). Diabetes remained the leading cause of ESRD. The most frequent causes of death were cardiovascular (45%) and infections (22%). Neoplasms accounted for 10% of the causes of death. The

  16. Obesity end stage renal disease and survival in an elderly cohort with cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is highly prevalent in African-Americans and is associated with increased risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. It is not known if the effect of obesity is similar among Blacks and whites. The aim of this study is to examine racial differences in the association of obesity with E...

  17. Genomic profiling of renal cell carcinoma in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toru; Matsuura, Keiko; Yoshimoto, Taichiro; Nguyen, Lam Tung; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakada, Chisato; Hijiya, Naoki; Narimatsu, Takahiro; Nomura, Takeo; Sato, Fuminori; Nagashima, Yoji; Kashima, Kenji; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Ohyama, Chikara; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Habuchi, Tomonori; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Seto, Masao; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the genomic profile of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by analyzing genomic copy number aberrations. Seventy-nine tumor samples from 63 patients with RCC-ESRD were analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization using the Agilent Whole Human Genome 4 × 44K Oligo Micro Array (Agilent Technologies Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that the 63 cases could be divided into two groups, Clusters A and B. Cluster A was comprised mainly of clear cell RCC (CCRCC), whereas Cluster B was comprised mainly of papillary RCC (PRCC), acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated RCC, and clear cell papillary RCC. Analysis of the averaged frequencies revealed that the genomic profiles of Clusters A and B resembled those of sporadic CCRCC and sporadic PRCC, respectively. Although it has been proposed on the basis of histopathology that ACD-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC and PRCC-ESRD are distinct subtypes, the present data reveal that the genomic profiles of these types, categorized as Cluster B, resemble one another. Furthermore, the genomic profiles of PRCC, ACD-associated RCC and clear cell papillary RCC admixed in one tissue tended to resemble one another. On the basis of genomic profiling of RCC-ESRD, we conclude that the molecular pathogenesis of CCRCC-ESRD resembles that of sporadic CCRCC. Although various histologic subtypes of non-clear cell RCC-ESRD have been proposed, their genomic profiles resemble those of sporadic PRCC, suggesting that the molecular pathogenesis of non-CCRCC-ESRD may be related to that of sporadic PRCC. PMID:22145865

  18. Overview: end-stage renal disease in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    2002-09-01

    Although the vast majority of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide live in what is called the developing world, little is known about its epidemiology and management. With the current paucity of credible and adequately representative registries, it is justified to resort to innovative means of obtaining information. In this attempt, world-renowned leading nephrologists in 10 developing countries collaborated in filling a 103-item questionnaire addressing epidemiology, etiology, and management of ESRD in their respective countries on the basis of integrating available data from different sources. Through this joint effort, it was possible to identify a number of important trends. These include the expected high prevalence of ESRD, despite the limited access to renal replacement therapy, and the dependence of prevalence on wealth. Glomerulonephritis, rather than diabetes, remains as the main cause of ESRD with significant geographical variations in the prevailing histopathological types. The implementation of different modalities of renal replacement therapy (RRT) is inhibited by the lack of funding, although governments, insurance companies, and donations usually constitute the major sponsors. Hemodialysis is the preferred modality in most countries with the exception of Mexico where chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) takes the lead. In several other countries, dialysis is available only for those on the transplant waiting list. Dialysis is associated with a high frequency of complications particularly HBV and HCV infections. Data on HIV are lacking. Aluminum intoxication remains as a major problem in a number of countries. Treatment withdrawal is common for socioeconomic reasons. Transplantation is offered to an average of 4 per million population (pmp). Recipient exclusion criteria are minimal. Donor selection criteria are generally loose regarding tissue typing, remote viral infection, and, in some countries, blood-relation to the

  19. Renal electrolyte circadian rhythms - Independence from feeding and activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six unanesthetized chair-acclimatized adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) weighing 600-900 g to determine whether internal synchronization is the result of simple passive dependence of renal excretory rhythms on endogenous rhythms of those variable that influence electrolyte excretion such as dietary intake and muscular activity. Independence of the urinary rhythms from diurnal variations in feeding, drinking, and activity was secured by depriving the animals of food, water, and training them to perform a two-hourly schedule of feeding, drinking, and activity throughout day and night. Results indicate that the internal synchronization which is normally observed between the behavioral and urinary rhythms cannot be explained by any direct dependence of renal function on behavioral patterns. The most probable mechanism for circadian internal synchronization is that the various behavioral and renal rhythms are controlled by potentially independent separate oscillators which are normally kept in synchrony with one another.

  20. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M.; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S.; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  1. Inhibition of lysosomal protease cathepsin D reduces renal fibrosis in murine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Cocchiaro, Pasquale; Oakley, Fiona; Howarth, Rachel; Callaghan, Krystena; Leslie, Jack; Luli, Saimir; Wood, Katrina M; Genovese, Federica; Sheerin, Neil S; Moles, Anna

    2016-01-01

    During chronic kidney disease (CKD) there is a dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis leading to renal fibrosis. Lysosomal proteases such as cathepsins (Cts) regulate this process in other organs, however, their role in CKD is still unknown. Here we describe a novel role for cathepsins in CKD. CtsD and B were located in distal and proximal tubular cells respectively in human disease. Administration of CtsD (Pepstatin A) but not B inhibitor (Ca074-Me), in two mouse CKD models, UUO and chronic ischemia reperfusion injury, led to a reduction in fibrosis. No changes in collagen transcription or myofibroblasts numbers were observed. Pepstatin A administration resulted in increased extracellular urokinase and collagen degradation. In vitro and in vivo administration of chloroquine, an endo/lysosomal inhibitor, mimicked Pepstatin A effect on renal fibrosis. Therefore, we propose a mechanism by which CtsD inhibition leads to increased collagenolytic activity due to an impairment in lysosomal recycling. This results in increased extracellular activity of enzymes such as urokinase, triggering a proteolytic cascade, which culminates in more ECM degradation. Taken together these results suggest that inhibition of lysosomal proteases, such as CtsD, could be a new therapeutic approach to reduce renal fibrosis and slow progression of CKD. PMID:26831567

  2. 77 FR 34047 - Medicare Program; Proposal Evaluation Criteria and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organizations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... procedures we will use to evaluate an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organization's capabilities to perform, and actual performance of, the duties and functions under the ESRD Network Statement of Work...

  3. Care of the Patient with Renal Disease: Peritoneal Dialysis and Transplants, Nursing 321A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulburd, Kimberly

    A description is provided of a course, "Care of the Patient with Renal Disease," offered at the community college level to prepare licensed registered nurses to care for patients with renal disease, including instruction in performing the treatments of peritoneal dialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The first sections of…

  4. Pattern and outcome of renal diseases in hospitalized children in Khartoum State, Sudan*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Amal H. A; Karrar, Zein A.

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, renal diseases in children constitute important causes of morbidity and mortality. In Sudan, data about patterns and outcome of these disorders is generally scanty. We conducted this study to provide basic renal data that may be utilized by researchers and health planners in a resource poor setting. A retrospective record review of all pediatric patients, followed in four teaching hospitals in Khartoum State over a five-year period (January 2000-June 2004), was achieved. In 150 hospitalized children a total of 200 renal diagnoses were recorded. Urinary tract infection (UTI), occurring with other underlying renal morbidities or isolated, was the commonest renal diagnosis (20%). The second common renal disorders were nephrotic syndrome (NS) and urolithiasis/stones accounting for 16% and 15.5% of cases, respectively. Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) and congenital anomalies were relatively less common (12% and 10.5%, respectively). Other less frequently detected diseases were acute renal failure (ARF) in 6%, chronic renal failure (CRF) in 4%, hereditary nephropathies in 3.5% and renal tumors in 2.5%. There was a significant correlation between the pattern of renal diseases and age of patients (P =0.001) but not their gender or social class (P = 0.211 and 0.34, respectively). On follow up, 99 out of 150 patients (66%) recovered their normal renal function, 6/150 (4%) remained with persistent proteinuria, 30/150 (20%) progressed to CRF, 10/150 (6.7%) died, and 5/150 (3.3%) were referred to radiotherapy department for further management. Our data reflects geographical variations of patterns of renal diseases in Sudanese children as in other countries. Many of these diseases are preventable or potentially curable. Therefore, improvement of pediatric renal services and training of health workers would help in early detection and treatment of these conditions leading to reduction in their morbidity and mortality.

  5. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient. PMID:27388683

  6. Renal disease in patients infected with hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Jaryal, Ajay; Kumar, Vivek; Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can result in hepatic diseases which may include an asymptomatic non-replicative carrier state, immunotolerant phase characterized by high DNA levels without significant hepatic injury, immune-reactive phase characterized by occurrence of chronic hepatitis and fibrosis in the liver, or complications like cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Extrahepatic manifestations may also accompany HBV infection. These may include serum sickness syndrome, polyarthralgia, polyarthritis, dermatologic manifestations like pitted keratolysis, urticaria, purpura, oral lichen planus or Gianotti-Crosti syndrome-a childhood papular eruption. Renal involvement may occur with HBV infection and usually involves glomerular or vascular injury. Various morphologic forms of renal injury have been reported with HBV infection, the commonest being membranous glomerulonephritis. The manifestations may include swelling over face and body, pedal edema, and urinary abnormalities. Evaluation may detect proteinuria, hematuria and reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The management options include use of antiviral drugs targeting HBV infection with or without concomitant immunosuppressive medication. With availability of newer drugs like entecavir and tenofovir, these have become the first line agents as they have a high barrier to resistance. Sole use of immunosuppression is not recommended for lack of clear benefit and the possible risk of HBV reactivation or flare. PMID:27509699

  7. Pharmacologically active drug metabolites: therapeutic and toxic activities, plasma and urine data in man, accumulation in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drayer, D E

    1976-01-01

    Drugs that are administered to man may be biotransformed to yield metabolites that are pharmacologically active. The therapeutic and toxic activities of drug metabolites and the species in which this activity was demonstrated are compiled for the metabolites of 58 drugs. The metabolite to parent drug ratio in the plasma of non-uraemic man and the percentage urinary excretion of the metabolite in non-uraemic man are also tabulated. Those active metabolites with significant pharmacological activity and high plasma levels, both relative to that of the parent drug, will probably contribute substantially to the pharmacological effect ascribed to the parent drug. Active metabolites may accumulate in patients with end stage renal disease if renal excretion is a major elimination pathway for the metabolite. This is true even if the active metabolite is a minor metabolite of the parent drug, as long as the minor metabolite is not further biotransformed and is mainly excreted in the urine. Minor metabolite accumulation may also occur if it is further biotransformed by a pathway inhibited in uraemia. Some clinical examples of the accumulation of active drug metabolites in patients with renal failure are: (a) The abolition of premature ventricular contractions and prevention of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia in some cardiac patients with poor renal function treated with procainamide are associated with high levels of N-acetylprocainamide. (b) The severe irritability and twitching seen in a uraemic patient treated with pethidine (meperidine) are associated with high levels of norpethidine. (c) The severe muscle weakness and tenderness seen in patients with renal failure receiving clofibrate are associated with excessive accumulation of the free acid metabolite of clofibrate. (d) Patients with severe renal insufficiency taking allopurinol appear to experience a higher incidence of side reactions, possibly due to the accumulation of oxipurinol. (e) Accumulation of free and

  8. Smaller caliber renal arteries are a novel feature of uromodulin-associated kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Prejbisz, Aleksander; Sellin, Lorenz; Szwench-Pietrasz, Elżbieta; Woznowski, Magdalena; Michałowska, Ilona; Blondin, Dirk; Sajnaga, Dariusz; Epplen, Jorg T; Litwin, Mieczysław; Dekomien, Gabriele; Januszewicz, Magdalena; Helmchen, Udo; Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Adamczak, Marcin; Więcek, Andrzej; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Rump, Lars C

    2015-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is very common in industrialized countries and known to promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Juvenile hyperuricemia is a hallmark of uromodulin-associated kidney disease characterized by progressive interstitial renal fibrosis leading to end-stage renal disease within decades. Here we describe a member of a Polish-German family with a history of familial background of chronic kidney disease, hyperuricemia, and gout. This patient had hypertension because of bilateral small renal arteries, hyperuricemia, and chronic kidney disease. Clinical and molecular studies were subsequently performed in 39 family members, which included a physical examination, Duplex ultrasound of the kidneys, laboratory tests for renal function, and urine analysis. In eight family members contrast-enhanced renal artery imaging by computed tomography-angiography or magnetic resonance imaging was conducted and showed that bilateral non-arteriosclerotic small caliber renal arteries were associated with hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease. Of the 26 family members who underwent genotyping, 11 possessed the P236R mutation (c.707C>G) of the uromodulin gene. All family members with a small caliber renal artery carried the uromodulin P236R mutation. Statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between reduced renal artery lumen and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate. Thus, bilateral small caliber renal arteries are a new clinical phenotype associated with an uromodulin mutation. PMID:25671765

  9. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Padullés, Ariadna; Rama, Inés; Llaudó, Inés; Lloberas, Núria

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms). Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. PMID:25206311

  10. End-stage renal disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Saraladevi

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is at least 3-4 times more frequent in Africa than in developed countries. Hypertension affects approximately 25% of the adult population and is the cause of chronic kidney failure in 21% of patients on renal replacement therapy in the South African Registry. The prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is estimated to be 14%-16% in South Africa, 23.8% in Zambia, 12.4% in Egypt, 9% in Sudan, and 6.1% in Ethiopia. The current dialysis treatment rate ranges from 70 per million population (pmp) in South Africa to < 20 pmp in the most of sub-Saharan Africa. The transplant rate in Africa averages 4 pmp and is 9.2 pmp in South Africa. The goal for sub-Saharan Africa should be to have a circumscribed chronic dialysis program, with as short a time on dialysis as possible, and to increase the availability of transplantation (both living related and cadaver) and promotion of prevention strategies at all levels of health care. Screening for kidney disease in high-risk populations, eg, patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus and a family history of kidney disease, should be instituted as the first step in kidney disease prevention in developing countries. PMID:19484867

  11. Cardiovascular risk and mortality in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing dialysis: sleep study, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life: a prospective, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most serious public health problems. The increasing prevalence of CKD in developed and developing countries has led to a global epidemic. The hypothesis proposed is that patients undergoing dialysis would experience a marked negative influence on physiological variables of sleep and autonomic nervous system activity, compromising quality of life. Methods/Design A prospective, consecutive, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial is proposed to address the effect of dialysis on sleep, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life in patients with CKD. The measurement protocol will include body weight (kg); height (cm); body mass index calculated as weight/height2; circumferences (cm) of the neck, waist, and hip; heart and respiratory rates; blood pressures; Mallampati index; tonsil index; heart rate variability; maximum ventilatory pressures; negative expiratory pressure test, and polysomnography (sleep study), as well as the administration of specific questionnaires addressing sleep apnea, excessive daytime sleepiness, depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life. Discussion CKD is a major public health problem worldwide, and its incidence has increased in part by the increased life expectancy and increasing number of cases of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Sleep disorders are common in patients with renal insufficiency. Our hypothesis is that the weather weight gain due to volume overload observed during interdialytic period will influence the degree of collapsibility of the upper airway due to narrowing and predispose to upper airway occlusion during sleep, and to investigate the negative influences of haemodialysis in the physiological variables of sleep, and autonomic nervous system, and respiratory mechanics and thereby compromise the quality of life of patients. Trial registration The

  12. Con: Nutritional vitamin D replacement in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Georgianos, Panagiotis I

    2016-05-01

    Insufficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is highly prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is a critical component in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Accordingly, current National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend the correction of hypovitaminosis D through nutritional vitamin D replacement as a first-step therapeutic approach targeting secondary hyperparathyroidism. In this Polar Views debate, we summarize the existing evidence, aiming to defend the position that nutritional vitamin D replacement is not evidence-based and should not be applied to patients with CKD. This position is supported by the following: (i) our meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials shows that whereas nutritional vitamin D significantly increases serum 25(OH)D levels relative to placebo, there is no evidence either in predialysis CKD or in ESRD that parathyroid hormone (PTH) is lowered; (ii) on the other hand, in randomized head-to-head comparisons, nutritional vitamin D is shown to be inferior to activated vitamin D analogs in reducing PTH levels; (iii) nutritional vitamin D is reported to exert minimal to no beneficial actions in a series of surrogate risk factors, including aortic stiffness, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), epoetin utilization and immune function among others; and (iv) there is no evidence to support a benefit of nutritional vitamin D on survival and other 'hard' clinical outcomes. Whereas nutritional vitamin D replacement may restore 25(OH)D concentration to near normal, the real target of treating vitamin D insufficiency is to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism, which is untouched by nutritional vitamin D. Furthermore, the pleotropic benefits of nutritional vitamin D remain to be proven. Thus, there is little, if any, benefit of nutritional vitamin D replacement in CKD. PMID:27190392

  13. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. PMID:27169876

  14. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  15. Clinicopathologic findings associated with chronic renal disease in cats: 74 cases (1973-1984).

    PubMed

    DiBartola, S P; Rutgers, H C; Zack, P M; Tarr, M J

    1987-05-01

    The historic, physical, laboratory, and histologic findings for 74 cats with chronic renal disease were reviewed. Most cats were older, and no breed or sex predilection was detected. This most common clinical signs detected by owners were lethargy, anorexia, and weight loss. Dehydration and emaciation were common physical examination findings. Common laboratory findings were nonregenerative anemia, lymphopenia, azotemia, hypercholesterolemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, and isosthenuria. The most common morphologic diagnosis was chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis of unknown cause. The other pathologic diagnoses were renal lymphosarcoma, renal amyloidosis, chronic pyelonephritis, chronic glomerulonephritis, polycystic renal disease, and pyogranulomatous nephritis secondary to feline infectious peritonitis. PMID:3583899

  16. Impaired renal corin expression contributes to sodium retention in proteinuric kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Danny; Kaminski, Henriette J.; Kastner, Christian; Wang, Wei; Krämer, Stephanie; Gambaryan, Stepan; Russwurm, Michael; Peters, Harm; Wu, Qingyu; Vandewalle, Alain; Bachmann, Sebastian; Theilig, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Patients with proteinuric kidney diseases often experience symptoms of salt and water retention. It has been hypothesized that the dysregulated Na+ absorption is due to increased proteolytic cleavage of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and increased Na,K-ATPase expression. Microarray analysis identified a reduced corin mRNA expression in kidneys from rat models of puromycin aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic syndrome (PAN) and acute anti-Thy1 glomerulonephritis (GN). Corin has been shown to convert pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to ANP. Because ANP resistance has been assumed to be a mechanism accounting for volume retention, experiments were undertaken to analyze the renal expression and function of corin. Immunohistochemistry revealed that corin co-localized with ANP. In PAN and GN, kidneys exhibited concomitant increased pro-ANP and decreased ANP protein expression levels consistent with low corin levels. Importantly, kidneys from corin −/− mice showed increased levels of renal β-ENaC, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) and protein kinase G II (PKGII) when compared to wild-type mice. Similar expression profile was observed in cell culture experiments suggesting that the increase in PDE5 and PKGII could account for the increase in β-ENaC as observed in PAN and GN. To conclude, our data provide novel insights into the mechanisms of volume retention in renal disease with corin as an important new mediator that acts through PKGII induction and ENaC activation. PMID:20613715

  17. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  18. Renal infarct: a rare disease due to a rare etiology

    PubMed Central

    Akshintala, Divya; Bansal, Saurabh K.; Emani, Vamsi Krishna; Yadav, Manajyoti

    2015-01-01

    Renal infarction is caused by profound hypoperfusion secondary to embolic/thrombotic occlusion of the renal artery or vasospasm of the renal artery. We present a case of a 54-year-old patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, and vague abdominal pain. He had frequent episodes of migraine headaches and he treated himself with as needed rizatriptan. CT scan of the abdomen showed renal cortical infarction. After extensive investigations, etiology of his renal infarct was deemed to be due to rizatriptan. PMID:26091657

  19. Effect of renal insufficiency on the active transport of calcium by the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Baerg, Richard D.; Kimberg, Daniel V.; Gershon, Elaine

    1970-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium is often depressed in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Furthermore, the malabsorption of calcium and the osteodystrophy which occur in association with chronic renal disease are often “resistant” to vitamin D; the basis for this resistance remains uncertain however. Recent studies by others have emphasized the role of an abnormality in the metabolism of vitamin D in accounting for the alterations in the calcium absorption and the apparent vitamin D-resistance which accompany the uremic syndrome. The present studies with an experimentally uremic animal model demonstrate a defect in the active transport of calcium by duodenal gut sacs in vitro. This abnormality is not due to the semistarvation associated with renal insufficiency and cannot be corrected by the administration of physiologic amounts of vitamin D3: it is reversed by massive doses of the vitamin. Neither the metabolism of vitamin D3 nor the levels of calcium binding protein activity in the duodenal mucosa are affected by renal insufficiency under the conditions employed in the present studies. The results of the present studies strongly suggest that in addition to the recently proposed mechanism involving an interference with the metabolism of vitamin D renal insufficiency also affects the cellular mechanisms for calcium transport in a manner which, while opposite in direction to that of vitamin D, is independent of a direct interaction with the vitamin or its metabolites. PMID:5422027

  20. Persistent activation of autophagy in kidney tubular cells promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Man J; Ding, Han-Fei; Huang, Shuang; Hill, Joseph A; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Dong, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    Renal fibrosis is the final, common pathway of end-stage renal disease. Whether and how autophagy contributes to renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here we first detected persistent autophagy in kidney proximal tubules in the renal fibrosis model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mice. UUO-associated fibrosis was suppressed by pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy and also by kidney proximal tubule-specific knockout of autophagy-related 7 (PT-Atg7 KO). Consistently, proliferation and activation of fibroblasts, as indicated by the expression of ACTA2/α-smooth muscle actin and VIM (vimentin), was inhibited in PT-Atg7 KO mice, so was the accumulation of extracellular matrix components including FN1 (fibronectin 1) and collagen fibrils. Tubular atrophy, apoptosis, nephron loss, and interstitial macrophage infiltration were all inhibited in these mice. Moreover, these mice showed a specific suppression of the expression of a profibrotic factor FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2). In vitro, TGFB1 (transforming growth factor β 1) induced autophagy, apoptosis, and FN1 accumulation in primary proximal tubular cells. Inhibition of autophagy suppressed FN1 accumulation and apoptosis, while enhancement of autophagy increased TGFB1-induced-cell death. These results suggest that persistent activation of autophagy in kidney proximal tubules promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during UUO. The profibrotic function of autophagy is related to the regulation on tubular cell death, interstitial inflammation, and the production of profibrotic factors. PMID:27123926

  1. Budd-chiari syndrome and renal arterial neurysms due to behcet disease: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Batur, Abdussamet; Dorum, Meltem; Yüksekkaya, Hasan Ali; Koc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with a chronic relapsing course. Vasculitis in Behcet's disease with predominant vascular involvement is the only vasculitis that affects both arteries and veins of any size. Involvement of the renal artery and inferior vena cava is rare among the arteries and veins, respectively. When disease affect the veins, it is in the form of thrombosis. Arterial complications include aneurysms, stenosis and occlusions. Both rupture of arterial aneurysm and occlusion of suprahepatic veins, causing Budd-Chiari syndrome, are associated with a high mortality rate. Vascular involvement is more common in male patients than in female patients. Men and patients with a younger age of onset present with a more severe prognosis. In this case report, we describe a very rare cause of intrarenal arterial aneurysm's rupture with previous Budd-Chiari syndrome due to Behcet's disease and successful angiographic embolization of actively bleeding aneurysm. PMID:26491527

  2. [Diabetic renal disease: the World Kidney Day in Chile].

    PubMed

    Ardiles, Leopoldo; Mezzano, Sergio

    2010-04-01

    The third version of the World Kidney Day will be held on May 13, 2010 in Chile and will be focused in diabetic renal damage, the main cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Currently, we are living a pandemic of CKD, a progressive and irreversible condition with high social and economic impact. In Chile, we have 857 patients per million inhabitants in hemodialysis and 35% are secondary to diabetes. Our general prevalence of diabetes is 4.2%, rising to 15% in people aged more than 64 years. With a 34% prevalence of hypertension, an aging population, high prevalence of obesity, and a sedentary lifestyle, there is an estimation of a rise in 85% of the prevalence of diabetes in South-America, for the next decades. The steps to be taken are clear: campaigns should be aimed at (1) prevention of type 2 diabetes; (2) screening for early diabetic kidney disease; (3) increasing patient awareness of kidney disease; (4) using medications of proven strategy and finally (5) research on new therapies. These concepts must be included in community and professional education to reduce the effects of this pandemic. PMID:20668785

  3. Nutrition in the critical care settings of renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, L W; Acchiardo, S R; Smith, S O; Gaber, A O

    1996-07-01

    Acute catabolic events during the course of renal dysfunction lead to exacerbation of nutritional abnormalities often present in these patients. Whether the renal failure is acute or chronic, the nutritional management of these patients is extremely challenging. Traditional methods of nutritional assessment must be extrapolated to include the effects of the renal dysfunction and renal replacement therapy being used. Cases of patients with acute renal failure, chronic renal failure with an acute insult, pancreas-kidney transplant recipient with delayed graft function, and a liver transplant recipient who developed renal failure are reviewed with emphasis on the nutritional management during the course of illness. Monitoring techniques are reviewed, and comparisons are made to other nutrition support protocols. PMID:8827206

  4. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  5. The knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplantation among patients with end-stage renal disease in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Takure, A O; Jinadu, Y O; Adebayo, S A; Shittu, O B; Salako, B L; Kadiri, S

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is well established in the USA, Europe, India, and South Africa. However, it is still in its infancy in Nigeria. The objective of our study is to determine the knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplant among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the factors which are responsible for the low level of transplantation in Ibadan, Nigeria. A 15-item pilot-tested questionnaire was administered to willing patients with ESRD seen at the medical outpatient clinic of the University Teaching Hospital, from January to December 2011. There was 81% participation rate of the respondents. Exactly 90.1% had formal education and 44% earned <50,000 naira per month. Seventy-nine percent of respondents was aware of renal transplantation, 70.4% would recommend it to others, and 66.7% accepted renal transplantation; 77.8% would maintain a close relationship with their donors. About 61.7% considered it very expensive, while 33.3% did not know the cost for transplantation. Of the reason for the low level of kidney transplantation in Nigeria, 39.5% had no idea and in 27.2% of the respondents, the fear of death by potential donors may be responsible. Eleven percent of responded that recipients had no money for kidney transplantation and another 11% thought the potential donors would like to be paid for donating their kidneys. Most of the respondents with ESRD were knowledgeable, aware of, and accepted renal transplantation as the next step to treat chronic renal failure. However, majority of these patients could not afford the cost for renal transplantation. PMID:27424696

  6. Diabetes treatment in patients with renal disease: Is the landscape clear enough?

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is the most important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The risk of CKD attributable to diabetes continues to rise worldwide. Diabetic patients with CKD need complicated treatment for their metabolic disorders as well as for related comorbidities. They have to treat, often intensively, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, bone disease, anaemia, and frequently established cardiovascular disease. The treatment of hypoglycaemia in diabetic persons with CKD must tie their individual goals of glycaemia (usually less tight glycaemic control) and knowledge on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs available to a person with kidney disease. The problem is complicated from the fact that in many efficacy studies patients with CKD are excluded so data of safety and efficacy for these patients are missing. This results in fear of use by lack of evidence. Metformin is globally accepted as the first choice in practically all therapeutic algorithms for diabetic subjects. The advantages of metformin are low risk of hypoglycaemia, modest weight loss, effectiveness and low cost. Data of UKPDS indicate that treatment based on metformin results in less total as well cardiovascular mortality. Metformin remains the drug of choice for patients with diabetes and CKD provided that their estimate Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) remains above 30 mL/min per square meter. For diabetic patients with eGFR between 30-60 mL/min per square meter more frequent monitoring of renal function and dose reduction of metformin is needed. The use of sulfonylureas, glinides and insulin carry a higher risk of hypoglycemia in these patients and must be very careful. Lower doses and slower titration of the dose is needed. Is better to avoid sulfonylureas with active hepatic metabolites, which are renally excreted. Very useful drugs for this group of patients emerge dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors. These drugs do not cause hypoglycemia and most of them (linagliptin is an exception

  7. Quantitative EEG: investigation in children with end stage renal disease before and after haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Balzar, E; Saletu, B; Khoss, A; Wagner, U

    1986-10-01

    Changes in brain function of 9 children (6 males and 3 females) ages 7 to 14 years (mean 12 years) with end stage renal disease (ESRD) were investigated before and after haemodialysis treatment, utilizing computer assisted spectral analysis of the scalp-recorded EEG. A control group of age-matched healthy children was studied as well. Statistical analyses demonstrated that ESRD children exhibited more Delta and Theta activity, less Beta activity, a slower dominant frequency of the Alpha activity as well as a slower centroid of the total activity before treatment than the controls. These findings suggest a deterioration of vigilance as characterized by Head. Haemodialysis decreased slow activity and increased Alpha and Beta activity, thereby inducing an improvement of brain function. PMID:3791647

  8. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  9. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice

  10. Sevelamer carbonate experience in Indian end stage renal disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, G.; Kher, V.; Saxena, S.; Jayakumar, M.; Chafekar, D.; Pargaonkar, P.; Shetty, M.; Reddy, Y. N. V.; Reddy, Y. N. V.

    2012-01-01

    This open label, multicentric, comparative clinical trial was done to compare the efficacy and tolerability of two sevelamer formulations, sevelamer carbonate, and sevelamer hydrochloride, in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in Indian end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 97 ESRD patients on hemodialysis, were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sevelamer carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. All patients were evaluated every week for 6 weeks for efficacy and safety variables. Total 88 patients completed the study. After 6 weeks of therapy, there were similar reductions (P<0.0001) in mean serum phosphorus and the CaxP product both the groups. The responder rates for test and reference groups were 75%, 68.18% respectively (P=0.3474). The adverse events reported were nausea, abdominal pain/discomfort, heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, increased prothrombin time, and severe arthritis. No serious adverse events were reported. There was no significant difference between the groups for adverse events and the laboratory parameters. From the results of this multicentric, comparative, randomized clinical study on sevelamer carbonate we can recommend that sevelamer carbonate may be used as a phosphate binder in Indian chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:23087553

  11. Renal replacement therapy in geriatric end-stage renal disease patients: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Kooman, Jeroen P; Cornelis, Tom; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L

    2012-01-01

    The number of geriatric patients on dialysis is increasing. This is due to demographic factors, a wider acceptance of elderly patients on dialysis, and an earlier start of dialysis in this patient group. Recent studies have questioned the effect of dialysis on quality of life in elderly patients with severe comorbidity and showed limited survival in this specific patient group. Therefore, the decision whether or not to start dialysis may be a difficult one for both the clinician and patient. Risk scores can be of help in facilitating shared decision making, but not as a tool to withhold dialysis. However, in the elderly patient with severe comorbidity, conservative care can sometimes be a reasonable alternative to dialysis. In the process of shared decision making, a balance should be pursued between life expectancy and quality of life. If the decision to initiate dialysis is taken, choices have to be made regarding dialysis modality and treatment prescription. If adequate support is provided, assisted peritoneal dialysis can be an acceptable alternative to hemodialysis. Care for the elderly with end-stage renal disease should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team with special dedication to a multidimensional approach in this population. PMID:22269680

  12. Distal, intermediate, and proximal mediators of racial disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kidney failure and associated mortality is one of the major components of racial disparities in the United States. Objectives: The current study aimed to investigate the role of distal (socioeconomic status, SES), intermediate (chronic medical diseases), and proximal (health behaviors) factors that may explain Black-White disparities in mortality due to renal diseases. Patients and Methods: This is a nationally representative prospective cohort with 25 years of follow up. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, 1986 to 2011. The study included 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults who were followed for up to 25 years. Race was the main predictor and death due to renal disease was the outcome. SES, chronic medical disease (diabetes, hypertension, obesity), and health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) at baseline were potential mediators. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Results: In age and gender adjusted models, Blacks had higher risk of death due to renal disease over the follow up period. Separate models suggested that SES, health behaviors and chronic medical disease fully explained the effect of race on renal disease mortality. Conclusions: Black-White disparities in rate of death due to renal diseases in the United States are not genuine but secondary to racial differences in income, health behaviors, hypertension, and diabetes. As distal, intermediate, and proximal factors contribute to racial disparities in renal disease mortality, elimination of such disparities requires a wide range of policies and programs that target income, medical conditions, and health behaviors. PMID:27047811

  13. Baclofen-induced neurotoxicity in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Hemachandar

    2016-05-01

    Baclofen, predominantly excreted by the kidneys is accumulated in patients with renal insufficiency leading to the central nervous system toxicity. Here the author reports a patient with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) who developed drowsiness and became unresponsive within a day after taking single 10 mg dose of baclofen. Patient improved completely after two sessions of HD. PMID:27215257

  14. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  15. TRPV4 Dysfunction Promotes Renal Cystogenesis in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Berrout, Jonathan; Boukelmoune, Nabila; O'Neil, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of cyst formation and expansion in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is poorly understood, but impaired mechanosensitivity to tubular flow and dysfunctional calcium signaling are important contributors. The activity of the mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable TRPV4 channel underlies flow-dependent Ca2+ signaling in murine collecting duct (CD) cells, suggesting that this channel may contribute to cystogenesis in ARPKD. Here, we developed a method to isolate CD-derived cysts and studied TRPV4 function in these cysts laid open as monolayers and in nondilated split-open CDs in a rat model of ARPKD. In freshly isolated CD-derived cyst monolayers, we observed markedly impaired TRPV4 activity, abnormal subcellular localization of the channel, disrupted TRPV4 glycosylation, decreased basal [Ca2+]i, and loss of flow-mediated [Ca2+]i signaling. In contrast, nondilated CDs of these rats exhibited functional TRPV4 with largely preserved mechanosensitive properties. Long-term systemic augmentation of TRPV4 activity with a selective TRPV4 activator significantly attenuated the renal manifestations of ARPKD in a time-dependent manner. At the cellular level, selective activation of TRPV4 restored mechanosensitive Ca2+ signaling as well as the function and subcellular distribution of TRPV4. In conclusion, the functional status of TRPV4, which underlies mechanosensitive Ca2+ signaling in CD cells, inversely correlates with renal cystogenesis in ARPKD. Augmenting TRPV4 activity may have therapeutic potential in ARPKD. PMID:23411787

  16. Tolvaptan delays the onset of end-stage renal disease in a polycystic kidney disease model by suppressing increases in kidney volume and renal injury.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Miki; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroshi; Hattori, Katsuji; Ohmoto, Koji; Ishikawa, Makoto; Nagano, Keisuke; Yamamura, Yoshitaka

    2014-05-01

    Tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist, slows the increase in total kidney volume and the decline in kidney function in patients with the results of the Tolvaptan Efficacy and Safety in Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease and Outcome (TEMPO) 3:4 trial. However, it was unclear which dose of tolvaptan was optimal or whether tolvaptan was able to delay progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Here we examined the relationship with aquaresis and the inhibitory effect on cyst development in short-term treatment and mortality as an index of ESRD in long-term treatment with tolvaptan using DBA/2FG-pcy mice, an animal model of nephronophthisis. With short-term treatment from 5 to 15 weeks of age, tolvaptan (0.01-0.3% via diet) dose-dependently enhanced aquaresis, prevented increases in kidney weight and cyst volume, and was associated with significant reductions in kidney cAMP levels and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity. Maximal effects of tolvaptan on aquaresis and the prevention of development of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) were obtained at 0.1%. Interestingly, tolvaptan also dose-dependently reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels in correlation with the kidney volume. With long-term treatment from 5 to 29 weeks of age, tolvaptan significantly attenuated the increase in kidney volume by up to 50% and reduced urinary albumin excretion. Furthermore, tolvaptan significantly reduced the mortality rate to 20%, compared with 60% in the control group. These data indicate that tolvaptan may delay the onset of ESRD in PKD by suppressing the increases in kidney volume and renal injury, providing a promising treatment for PKD. PMID:24570071

  17. Diabetes, Renal and Cardiovascular Disease in p47phox−/− Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Zerbe, Christa S.; DeRavin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a rare immunodeficiency due to defects in the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. The X-linked form (gp91phox deficiency) accounts for about 70 % of cases; autosomal recessive p47phox deficiency accounts for about 25 % of cases. We identified a 10 % incidence of diabetes in p47phox deficient CGD, but none in X-linked CGD. Renal and cardiovascular diseases were also higher in p47phox deficiency. p47phox deficient CGD has noninfectious morbidities distinct from those in X-linked CGD. PMID:23386289

  18. Prevalence of renal artery disease and its prognostic significance in patients undergoing coronary bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Aboyans, Victor; Tanguy, Benedicte; Desormais, Ileana; Bonnet, Vincent; Chonchol, Michel; Laskar, Marc; Mohty, Dania; Lacroix, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Several studies demonstrated the prognostic importance of renal failure and peripheral artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), but data regarding the prognostic value of renal artery disease in this context are scarce. We aimed to study the prevalence and prognostic value of renal artery disease in patients undergoing CABG. We assessed by duplex ultrasound the renal arteries of 429 consecutive patients who underwent CABG, of whom 401 had satisfactory imaging quality to detect >60% renal artery stenosis (RAS) and/or an elevated resistive index (ERI>0.80). Of the 401 subjects included (age 68±10 years, 83% men), 40 (10%) had RAS and 35 (9%) had ERI. Nine patients (2.2%) had both conditions. Patients were followed up for 12.4±7.0 months. The primary outcome was composite, including 30-day death, stroke, and/or myocardial infarction. In a multivariate model adjusted for age, gender, cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, renal function, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the use of off-pump CABG, CV co-morbidities, and drugs, the presence of ERI was strongly associated with the occurrence of the composite outcome (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 9.9, p=0.0006). Similarly, ERI, not RAS, was significantly associated with the 30-day acute kidney disease and the midterm mortality, as well as fatal and nonfatal CV events. In conclusion, regardless of renal function and other factors, the renal resistive index is a strong predictor of CV and renal events after CABG. Renal duplex ultrasound can identify a subgroup of patients at high risk of CABG. PMID:25150754

  19. Renovascular disease, microcirculation, and the progression of renal injury: role of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chade, Alejandro R

    2011-04-01

    Emerging evidence supports the pivotal role of renal microvascular disease as a determinant of tubulo-interstitial and glomerular fibrosis in chronic kidney disease. An intact microcirculation is vital to restore blood flow to the injured tissues, which is a crucial step to achieve a successful repair response. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact and mechanisms of the functional and structural changes of the renal microvascular network, as well as the role of these changes in the progression and irreversibility of renal injury. Damage of the renal microcirculation and deterioration of the angiogenic response may constitute early steps in the complex pathways involved in progressive renal injury. There is limited but provocative evidence that stimulation of vascular proliferation and repair may stabilize renal function and slow the progression of renal disease. The feasibility of novel potential therapeutic interventions for stabilizing the renal microvasculature is also discussed. Targeted interventions to enhance endogenous renoprotective mechanisms focused on the microcirculation, such as cell-based therapy or the use of angiogenic cytokines have shown promising results in some experimental and clinical settings. PMID:21307362

  20. Time course and localization of endothelin-1 gene expression in a model of renal disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzi, I.; Corna, D.; Zoja, C.; Orisio, S.; Schiffrin, E. L.; Cavallotti, D.; Remuzzi, G.; Benigni, A.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and human proteinuric glomerulopathies are associated with tubulo-interstitial injury that correlates with the decline of renal function even better than glomerular lesions do. Mechanism(s) leading to tubulo-interstitial damage are unknown. It has been proposed that excessive reabsorption of filtered proteins activates renal cells to produce vasoactive and inflammatory molecules including endothelin-1. The aim of the present study was twofold: we first evaluated the cellular origin of excessive renal endothelin-1 production in the renal mass reduction model and then related endothelin-1 distribution to the development of kidney lesions. Four groups of renal mass reduction (n = 15) and four groups of control rats (n = 5) were studied at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after surgery. Urinary proteins in renal mass reduction rats were comparable with controls at day 7 but became significantly higher thereafter. Renal mass reduction rats first developed tubulo-interstitial changes, which were already evident at day 14 in the majority of them. At 28 days, renal mass reduction rats also developed glomerulosclerosis. A parallel increase of renal endothelin-1 gene expression and synthesis of the corresponding peptide in renal mass reduction rats versus controls was observed from day 14. Nonradioactive in situ hybridization confirmed a pattern of endothelin-1 mRNA consistent with the distribution of lesions. At day 14, endothelin-1 staining was stronger in renal mass reduction than in control kidneys and mainly localized to the cytoplasm of tubular cells, whereas glomeruli were negative. At day 28, endothelin-1 expression further increased in renal mass reduction rats as compared with controls, and the staining was apparent also in glomeruli. Thus, in renal mass reduction, a progressive up-regulation of endothelin-1 occurs during the development of renal injury, that first involves the tubules and, only in a subsequent phase, the glomeruli. Images Figure 2 PMID:9358749

  1. Resistin as a potential marker of renal disease in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, J; Ye, Y; Han, J; Arriens, C; Saxena, R; Li, Q-Z; Mohan, C; Wu, T

    2015-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) have strong concomitance with cardiovascular disease that cannot be explained fully by typical risk factors. We examined the possibility that serum or urine expression of adipokines may act as biomarkers for LN, as these proteins have been associated previously with cardiovascular disease as well as SLE. Antibody arrays were performed on serum and urine from lupus patients and matched controls using a cross-sectional study design. From the initial array-based screening data of 15 adipokines, adiponectin, leptin and resistin were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations were determined between adipokine expression levels and measures of disease activity or lupus nephritis. The expression of adiponectin and resistin was increased in both sera and urine from LN patients, while leptin was increased in LN patient sera, compared to matched controls. Serum resistin, but not urine resistin, was correlated with measures of renal dysfunction in LN. Serum resistin expression may be useful as a marker of renal dysfunction in patients with LN, although longitudinal studies are warranted. Further studies are necessary to determine if resistin has functional consequences in LN. PMID:25345756

  2. Resistin as a potential marker of renal disease in lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, J; Ye, Y; Han, J; Arriens, C; Saxena, R; Li, Q-Z; Mohan, C; Wu, T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis (LN) have strong concomitance with cardiovascular disease that cannot be explained fully by typical risk factors. We examined the possibility that serum or urine expression of adipokines may act as biomarkers for LN, as these proteins have been associated previously with cardiovascular disease as well as SLE. Antibody arrays were performed on serum and urine from lupus patients and matched controls using a cross-sectional study design. From the initial array-based screening data of 15 adipokines, adiponectin, leptin and resistin were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations were determined between adipokine expression levels and measures of disease activity or lupus nephritis. The expression of adiponectin and resistin was increased in both sera and urine from LN patients, while leptin was increased in LN patient sera, compared to matched controls. Serum resistin, but not urine resistin, was correlated with measures of renal dysfunction in LN. Serum resistin expression may be useful as a marker of renal dysfunction in patients with LN, although longitudinal studies are warranted. Further studies are necessary to determine if resistin has functional consequences in LN. PMID:25345756

  3. Antidiabetic Therapy in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Suzanne M; Simon, Barbara; Kobrin, Sidney M

    2015-01-01

    There has been substantial growth in the variety of available antidiabetic agents during the last decade and a half. The role of these newer agents in patients with diabetes and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population, and their relative benefits and risks in this population compared to patients without ESRD are not yet clear. This stems from the altered state of glucose homeostasis in ESRD, which places patients at high risk for hypoglycemia and, in certain situations, hyperglycemia. In addition, there is a dearth of evidence to support a benefit of tight glycemic control on either micro- or macrovascular outcomes in ESRD patients; furthermore, the metrics by which glycemic control is conventionally measured are less valid in ESRD. In this review, we will discuss noninsulin and insulin-based therapies as well as unique challenges, contraindications, advantages, and disadvantages to their use in ESRD. We will also review issues pertinent to both hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. PMID:25898790

  4. Psychotherapeutic Agents in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Rachel F; Unruh, Mark L; Quinn, Davin K; Vilay, Aloun Mary

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are often affected by many comorbid conditions, including mental health disorders. Psychiatric illness among patients with ESRD has been associated with increased risks for nonadherence, hospitalizations, suicide, and all-cause mortality. We reviewed the pharmacokinetic data available with psychotherapeutic agents, focusing on physiologic data rather than specific dosing recommendations. Unfortunately data regarding the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of psychotherapeutic agents in ESRD remain rather limited. Of the agents available, it appears that the most data in this patient group were found with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and benzodiazepines. Given the small number of patients enrolled in many of the studies and the wide inter-individual variability, it was difficult to interpret the significance of results in many instances. A number of agents, such as tricyclic antidepressants, were associated with adverse effects that would be imperative to avoid in patients with ESRD. Psychotherapeutic medications should be started at low doses and titrated carefully, while monitoring the efficacy and safety of each agent. PMID:25857865

  5. Identification of human nephron progenitors capable of generation of kidney structures and functional repair of chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Metsuyanim, Sally; Omer, Dorit; Gnatek, Yehudit; Gershon, Rotem; Pri-Chen, Sara; Ozdemir, Derya D; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Noiman, Tzahi; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Vaknin, Zvi; Schneider, David F; Aronow, Bruce J; Goldstein, Ronald S; Hohenstein, Peter; Dekel, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Identification of tissue-specific renal stem/progenitor cells with nephrogenic potential is a critical step in developing cell-based therapies for renal disease. In the human kidney, stem/progenitor cells are induced into the nephrogenic pathway to form nephrons until the 34 week of gestation, and no equivalent cell types can be traced in the adult kidney. Human nephron progenitor cells (hNPCs) have yet to be isolated. Here we show that growth of human foetal kidneys in serum-free defined conditions and prospective isolation of NCAM1+ cells selects for nephron lineage that includes the SIX2-positive cap mesenchyme cells identifying a mitotically active population with in vitro clonogenic and stem/progenitor properties. After transplantation in the chick embryo, these cells—but not differentiated counterparts—efficiently formed various nephron tubule types. hNPCs engrafted and integrated in diseased murine kidneys and treatment of renal failure in the 5/6 nephrectomy kidney injury model had beneficial effects on renal function halting disease progression. These findings constitute the first definition of an intrinsic nephron precursor population, with major potential for cell-based therapeutic strategies and modelling of kidney disease. PMID:23996934

  6. The many faces of Merlin: IgG4-associated pulmonary-renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; Lioen, Pieter; Meijers, Björn; Lerut, Evelyne; Meersschaert, Joke; Blockmans, Daniel; Claes, Kathleen

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary-renal syndrome is a common and serious disorder with a broad differential diagnosis. We describe a case of a middle-aged man presenting with interstitial pulmonary disease and severe renal impairment caused by a hypocomplementemic immune-complex-mediated interstitial nephritis. Serum levels of IgG4 were elevated, and renal biopsy specimens revealed the presence of interstitial IgG4(+) plasma cells. There was a rapid improvement of both pulmonary and renal abnormalities after the initiation of corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this report is the first to show interstitial pulmonary disease in association with interstitial kidney disease as the predominant and presenting symptoms of IgG4-related disease. PMID:21896524

  7. In-vivo Vascular Wall Shear Rate and Circumferential Strain of Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H.; Rubin, Jonathan M.; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E.; Shih, Albert J.; Weitzel, William F.

    2012-01-01

    This study measures the vascular wall shear rate at the vessel edge using decorrelation based ultrasound speckle tracking. Results for nine healthy and eight renal disease subjects are presented. Additionally, the vascular wall shear rate and circumferential strain during physiologic pressure, pressure equalization and hyperemia are compared for five healthy and three renal disease subjects. The mean and maximum wall shear rates were measured during the cardiac cycle at the top and bottom wall edges. The healthy subjects had significantly higher mean and maximum vascular wall shear rate than the renal disease subjects. The key findings of this research were that the mean vascular wall shear rates and circumferential strain changes between physiologic pressure and hyperemia that was significantly different between healthy and renal disease subjects. PMID:23211936

  8. Association Between Graves’ Disease and Renal Coloboma Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takeshi; Muroya, Koji; Hanakawa, Junko; Asakura, Yumi; Takahashi, Eihiko; Shiroyanagi, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Yukichi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Adachi, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Renal coloboma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by renal lesions and optic nerve abnormalities. We report an 11-yr-old Japanese girl with familial renal coloboma syndrome, who also had Graves’ disease. Four affected family members had a previously reported heterozygous mutation (c.76dupG, p.Val26Glyfs*28) in the PAX2 gene. We hypothesized that PAX2 mutations may increase the risk of autoimmune diseases through alterations of human β-defensin 1 expression. PMID:23966757

  9. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    PubMed Central

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì’, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well. PMID:26034591

  10. Extra-renal manifestations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD): considerations for routine screening and management.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L; Dahl, Neera K

    2014-02-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a systemic disease, marked by progressive increase of bilateral renal cysts, resulting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and often leading to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Apart from renal cysts, patients often have extra-renal disease, involving the liver, heart and vasculature. Other less common but equally important extra-renal manifestations of ADPKD include diverticular disease, hernias, male infertility and pain. Extra-renal disease burden is often asymptomatic, but may result in increased morbidity and mortality. If the disease burden is significant, screening may prove beneficial. We review the rationale for current screening recommendations and propose some guidelines for screening and management of ADPKD patients. PMID:24215018

  11. Acceptance and effects of a therapeutic renal food in pet cats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Dale A; Jewell, Dennis E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal foods are used to manage chronic kidney disease (CKD) in dogs and cats, but their effectiveness may be limited by the ability to transition animals to them. Material and Methods In a prospective study, pet cats with previously undiagnosed kidney disease (20 International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) 1, 61 IRIS 2, 14 IRIS 3/4, 33 at risk for CKD) were transitioned to a renal food. Markers of renal function were measured and owners answered questionnaires about their pet over one year. Results All but eight cats (120/128; 94 per cent) successfully transitioned to the renal food. Most of the time, cats moderately or extremely liked the food (89 per cent), ate at least half (73 per cent) and were moderately or extremely enthusiastic while eating (68 per cent). Cats rarely disliked the food (2 per cent) or refused to eat it (1 per cent). Markers of renal function were unchanged in IRIS 1 and 2 cats and changed little in IRIS 3/4 cats. In all groups, owner-assessed quality of life improved initially and then remained stable. Mean bodyweight did not change in cats with CKD. Conclusions Most cats with CKD successfully transitioned to the renal food. The results also support previous studies that the renal food can help stabilise cats with CKD. PMID:26587240

  12. Secondary amyloidosis in autoinflammatory diseases and the role of inflammation in renal damage

    PubMed Central

    Scarpioni, Roberto; Ricardi, Marco; Albertazzi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The release of proinflammatory cytokines during inflammation represents an attempt to respond to injury, but it may produce detrimental effects. The inflammasome is a large, multiprotein complex that drives proinflammatory cytokine production in response to infection and tissue injury; the best-characterized inflammasome is the nod-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP3). Once activated, inflammasome leads to the active form of caspase-1, the enzyme required for the maturation of interleukin-1beta. Additional mechanisms bringing to renal inflammatory, systemic diseases and fibrotic processes were recently reported, via the activation of the inflammasome that consists of NLRP3, apoptosis associated speck-like protein and caspase-1. Several manuscripts seem to identify NLRP3 inflammasome as a possible therapeutic target in the treatment of progressive chronic kidney disease. Serum amyloid A (SAA), as acute-phase protein with also proinflammatory properties, has been shown to induce the secretion of cathepsin B and inflammasome components from human macrophages. SAA is a well recognised potent activator of the NLRP3. Here we will address our description on the involvement of the kidney in autoinflammatory diseases driven mainly by secondary, or reactive, AA amyloidosis with a particular attention on novel therapeutic approach which has to be addressed in suppressing underlying inflammatory disease and reducing the SAA concentration. PMID:26788465

  13. Renal disease and dysfunction in two patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Brotman, A W; Stern, T A; Brotman, D L

    1986-08-01

    Two patients are described who illustrate the association between renal abnormalities and eating disorders. The relevant literature is reviewed, and the difficulty in managing these patients on medical and surgical services is highlighted. PMID:3733679

  14. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban in subjects with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Tirucherai, Giridhar; Marbury, Thomas C; Wang, Jessie; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Donglu; Song, Yan; Pursley, Janice; Boyd, Rebecca A; Frost, Charles

    2016-05-01

    An open-label, parallel-group, single-dose study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of apixaban in 8 subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis compared with 8 subjects with normal renal function. A single oral 5-mg dose of apixaban was administered once to healthy subjects and twice to subjects with ESRD, separated by ≥7 days: 2 hours before (on hemodialysis) and immediately after a 4-hour hemodialysis session (off hemodialysis). Blood samples were collected for determination of apixaban pharmacokinetic parameters, measures of clotting (prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time), and anti-factor Xa (FXa) activity. Compared with healthy subjects, apixaban Cmax and AUCinf were 10% lower and 36% higher, respectively, in subjects with ESRD off hemodialysis. Hemodialysis in subjects with ESRD was associated with reductions in apixaban Cmax and AUCinf of 13% and 14%, respectively. The percent change from baseline in clotting measures was similar in healthy subjects and subjects with ESRD, and differences in anti-FXa activity were similar to differences in apixaban concentration. A single 5-mg oral dose of apixaban was well tolerated in both groups. In conclusion, ESRD resulted in a modest increase (36%) in apixaban AUC and no increase in Cmax , and hemodialysis had a limited impact on apixaban clearance. PMID:26331581

  15. Toll-Like Receptor Family Polymorphisms Are Associated with Primary Renal Diseases but Not with Renal Outcomes Following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Damman, Jeffrey; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Seelen, Marc; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in innate- and adaptive immunity. The TLR pathways were shown to play key functional roles in experimental acute and chronic kidney injury, including the allo-immune response after experimental renal transplantation. Data about the precise impact of TLRs and their negative regulators on human renal transplant outcomes however are limited and contradictory. We studied twelve non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of which eleven in TLR1-8 and one in SIGIRR in a final cohort comprising 1116 matching donors and recipients. TLR3 p.Leu412Phe and SIGIRR p.Gln312Arg significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and were excluded. The frequency distribution of the minor alleles of the remaining 10 TLR variants were compared between patients with end-stage renal disease (recipients) and controls (kidney donors) in a case-control study. Secondly, the associations between the minor allele frequency of the TLR variants and delayed graft function, biopsy-proven acute rejection and death-censored graft failure after transplantation were investigated with Cox regression. Carrier frequencies of the minor alleles of TLR1 p.His305Leu (OR = 4.79, 95% CI = 2.35–9.75, P = 0.0002), TLR1 p.Asn248Ser (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.07–1.47, P = 0.04) and TLR8 p.Met1Val (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.14–1.64, P = 0.008) were significantly higher in patients with ESRD, with little specificity for the underlying renal disease entity (adjusted for age, gender and donor-recipient relatedness). The minor allele frequency of none of the TLR variants significantly associated with the surrogate and definite outcomes, even when multivariable models were created that could account for TLR gene redundancy. In conclusion, genetic variants in TLR genes were associated with the prevalence of ESRD but not renal transplant outcomes. Therefore, our data suggests that specific TLR signaling routes might play a role in the final common pathway of

  16. Natural History, Growth Kinetics and Outcomes of Untreated Clinically Localized Renal Tumors Under Active Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Crispen, Paul L.; Viterbo, Rosalia; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Chen, David Y.T.; Uzzo, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Background The growth kinetics of untreated solid organ malignancies are not defined. Radiographic active surveillance (AS) of renal tumors in patient unfit or unwilling to undergo intervention provides an opportunity to quantitate the natural history of untreated localized tumors. Here we report the radiographic growth kinetics of renal neoplasms during a period of surveillance. Methods We identified patients with enhancing renal masses who were radiographically observed for at least 12 months. Clinical and pathological records were reviewed to determine tumor growth kinetics and clinical outcomes. Tumor growth kinetics were expressed in terms of absolute and relative linear and volumetric growth. Results We identified 172 renal tumors in 154 patients under AS. Median tumor diameter and volume on presentation was 2.0 cm (mean 2.5, range 0.4 - 12.0) and 4.18 cm3 (mean 20.0, range 0.0033 – 904). Median duration of follow-up was 24 months (mean 31, range 12 – 156). A significant association between presenting tumor size and proportional growth was noted, with smaller tumors growing faster than larger tumors. 39% (68/173) of tumors underwent delayed intervention and 84% (57/68) were pathologically malignant. Progression to metastatic disease was noted in 1.3% (2/154) of patients. Conclusions We demonstrate the association between a tumor’s volume and subsequent growth with smaller tumors exhibiting significantly faster volumetric growth than larger tumors, consistent with Gompertzian kinetics. Surveillance of localized renal tumors is associated with a low rate of disease progression in the intermediate term and suggests potential over-treatment biases in select patients. PMID:19402168

  17. How to differentiate renal senescence from chronic kidney disease in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R

    2016-09-01

    Renal aging is frequently confused with chronic nephropathy in clinical practice, since there are some similarities between them, particularly regarding reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, there are many differences between these two entities which can help any practitioner to distinguish between them, such as: GFR deterioration rate, hematocrit, renal handling of urea, creatinine and some electrolytes, tubular acidification, urinalysis, and renal imaging. Differentiation between renal aging and chronic renal disease is crucial in order to avoid unnecessary medicalization of what is a physiological change associated with the healthy aging process, and the potential harmful consequences of such overdiagnosis. A recently described equation (HUGE), as well as an adequate nephrological evaluation and follow up can help physicians to distinguish both entities. PMID:27383288

  18. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update.

    PubMed

    Wan, Cheng; Su, Hua; Zhang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  19. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  20. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression –but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  1. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  2. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1β-Associated Kidney Disease: More than Renal Cysts and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Verhave, Jacobien C; Bech, Anneke P; Wetzels, Jack F M; Nijenhuis, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β)-associated disease is a recently recognized clinical entity with a variable multisystem phenotype. Early reports described an association between HNF1B mutations and maturity-onset diabetes of the young. These patients often presented with renal cysts and renal function decline that preceded the diabetes, hence it was initially referred to as renal cysts and diabetes syndrome. However, it is now evident that many more symptoms occur, and diabetes and renal cysts are not always present. The multisystem phenotype is probably attributable to functional promiscuity of the HNF1β transcription factor, involved in the development of the kidney, urogenital tract, pancreas, liver, brain, and parathyroid gland. Nephrologists might diagnose HNF1β-associated kidney disease in patients referred with a suspected diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, medullary cystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, or CKD of unknown cause. Associated renal or extrarenal symptoms should alert the nephrologist to HNF1β-associated kidney disease. A considerable proportion of these patients display hypomagnesemia, which sometimes mimics Gitelman syndrome. Other signs include early onset diabetes, gout and hyperparathyroidism, elevated liver enzymes, and congenital anomalies of the urogenital tract. Because many cases of this disease are probably undiagnosed, this review emphasizes the clinical manifestations of HNF1β-associated disease for the nephrologist. PMID:26319241

  3. Use of computed tomography for measurement of kidneys in dogs without renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hoey, Seamus E; Heder, Brianne L; Hetzel, Scott J; Waller, Kenneth R

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the size of the left and right kidneys by use of CT in dogs of various breeds without evidence of renal disease. DESIGN Retrospective, observational study. ANIMALS 21 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Renal length, diameter of the abdominal aorta, and length of the L2 vertebral body were measured independently on multiplanar reformatted non-contrast-enhanced CT images by 3 observers at 3 time points. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement for renal length were determined. Associations of renal length with body weight, aorta diameter, and L2 vertebral body length were assessed by calculation of Pearson correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals. Renal measurements were normalized to patient size by calculating renal length-to-aorta diameter and renal length-to-L2 vertebral body length ratios for comparison with previously published radiographic and ultrasonographic measurements. RESULTS All kidneys were identified and measured on CT images by all observers. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement were excellent. Body weight, aorta diameter, and length of the L2 vertebral body were significantly correlated with renal length. Renal length-to-aorta diameter and renal length-to-L2 vertebral body length ratios (7.4 and 2.7, respectively) fell within the ranges of previously published values for these measurements. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE As CT becomes more widely available in general practice, knowledge of typical renal measurements and anatomic ratios obtained with this modality in dogs may be useful. A prospective study with a larger population of dogs, ideally including formulation of a reference range, is needed. PMID:26799106

  4. Suitability of Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease for Renal Transcatheter Arterial Embolization.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, Tatsuya; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Mise, Koki; Ueno, Toshiharu; Sumida, Keiichi; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Hayami, Noriko; Hoshino, Junichi; Kawada, Masahiro; Imafuku, Aya; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei

    2016-07-01

    In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), massive renal enlargement is a serious problem. Renal transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) can reduce renal volume (RV), but effectiveness varies widely, and the reasons remain unclear. We investigated factors affecting renal volume reduction rate (RVRR) after renal TAE in all 449 patients with ADPKD who received renal TAE at Toranomon Hospital from January of 2006 to July of 2013, including 228 men and 221 women (mean age =57.0±9.1 years old). One year after renal TAE, the RVRR ranged from 3.9% to 84.8%, and the least squares mean RVRR calculated using a linear mixed model was 45.5% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 44.2% to 46.8%). Multivariate analysis using the linear mixed model revealed that RVRR was affected by the presence of large cysts with wall thickening (regression coefficient [RC], -6.10; 95% CI, -9.04 to -3.16; P<0.001), age (RC, -0.82; 95% CI, -1.03 to -0.60; P<0.001), dialysis duration (RC, -0.10; 95% CI, -0.18 to -0.03; P<0.01), systolic BP (RC, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.59; P<0.001), and the number of microcoils used for renal TAE (RC, 1.35; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.86; P<0.001). Significantly more microcoils were needed to achieve renal TAE in patients with younger age and shorter dialysis duration. In conclusion, cyst wall thickening had an important effect on cyst volume reduction. Renal TAE was more effective in patients who were younger, had shorter dialysis duration, or had hypertension, parameters that might associate with cyst wall stiffness and renal artery blood flow. PMID:26620095

  5. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation contributes to aldosterone-induced renal tubular cells injury.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Guo, Honglei; Xu, Chengyan; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Minmin; Ding, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), and although Aldo directly induces renal tubular cell injury, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. NLRP3 inflammasome and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have recently been implicated in various kinds of CKD. The present study hypothesized that mitochondrial ROS and NLRP3 inflammasome mediated Aldo-induced tubular cell injury. The NLRP3 inflammasome is induced by Aldo in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by increased NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, and downstream cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome was significantly prevented by the selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist eplerenone (EPL) (P < 0.01). Mice harboring genetic knock-out of NLRP3 (NLRP3(-/-)) showed decreased maturation of renal IL-1β and IL-18, reduced renal tubular apoptosis, and improved renal epithelial cell phenotypic alternation, and attenuated renal function in response to Aldo-infusion. In addition, mitochondrial ROS was also increased in Aldo-stimulated HK-2 cells, as assessed by MitoSOXTM red reagent. Mito-Tempo, the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, significantly decreased HK-2 cell apoptosis, oxidative stress, and the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We conclude that Aldo induces renal tubular cell injury via MR dependent, mitochondrial ROS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation. PMID:27014913

  6. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation contributes to aldosterone-induced renal tubular cells injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Guo, Honglei; Xu, Chengyan; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Minmin; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), and although Aldo directly induces renal tubular cell injury, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. NLRP3 inflammasome and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have recently been implicated in various kinds of CKD. The present study hypothesized that mitochondrial ROS and NLRP3 inflammasome mediated Aldo–induced tubular cell injury. The NLRP3 inflammasome is induced by Aldo in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by increased NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, and downstream cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome was significantly prevented by the selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist eplerenone (EPL) (P < 0.01). Mice harboring genetic knock-out of NLRP3 (NLRP3−/−) showed decreased maturation of renal IL-1β and IL-18, reduced renal tubular apoptosis, and improved renal epithelial cell phenotypic alternation, and attenuated renal function in response to Aldo-infusion. In addition, mitochondrial ROS was also increased in Aldo-stimulated HK-2 cells, as assessed by MitoSOXTM red reagent. Mito-Tempo, the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, significantly decreased HK-2 cell apoptosis, oxidative stress, and the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We conclude that Aldo induces renal tubular cell injury via MR dependent, mitochondrial ROS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation. PMID:27014913

  7. Resveratrol Protects against High-Fat Diet Induced Renal Pathological Damage and Cell Senescence by Activating SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Li, Zhongchi; Xu, Kang; Wang, Yanying; Wang, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related renal diseases have been a worldwide issue. Effective strategy that prevents high fat-diet induced renal damage is of great significance. Resveratrol, a natural plant polyphenol, is famous for its antioxidant activity, cardioprotective effects and anticancer properties. However whether resveratrol can play a role in the treatment of renal diseases is unknown. In this study, we added resveratrol in normal glucose or high glucose medium and provide evidences that resveratrol protects against high-glucose triggered oxidative stress and cell senescence. Moreover, mice were fed with standard diet, standard diet plus resveratrol, high-fat diet or high-fat diet plus resveratrol for 3 months, and results show that resveratrol treatment prevents high-fat diet induced renal pathological damage by activating SIRT1, a key member in the mammalian sirtuin family that response to calorie restriction life-extension method. This research confirms the potential role of resveratrol in the treatment of renal diseases and may provide an effective and convenient method to mimic the beneficial effects of calorie restriction. PMID:27582325

  8. Pattern of biopsy proven renal diseases at PNS SHIFA, Karachi: A cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Sohail; Mubarak, Muhammed; Ul-Haq, Irfan; Bibi, Aisha

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous renal biopsy (RB) is an invaluable diagnostic procedure in patients with medical renal diseases.Objectives: To determine the pattern of biopsy proven renal disease (BPRD) from a tertiary care naval hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods and Materials: All the renal biopsies in adult patients (≥18 years) performed at our hospital from 2008 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The biopsies were evaluated by light microscopy and immunofluorescence. Results: A total 60 cases were analyzed. The mean age was 33.3±12.9 years (range: 18 to 72 years).The male to female ratio was 3:1. The most common indication of renal biopsy was nephrotic syndrome (43.3%), followed by renal failure (26.6%) and non-nephrotic proteinuria (23.3%). Primary glomerulonephritides (PGN) were predominant overall lesions, found in 46 (76.6%) of the total biopsies. Among PGN, the most common lesion was focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), followed by membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis (CSGN) and a variety of rare lesions. Secondary glomerulonephritides (SGN) were found in only three (5%) cases. There were two cases of amyloidosis and one of lupus nephritis (LN). Tubulointerstitial disease (TID) and vascular disease were rare. Conclusion: This study provides information about the epidemiology of BPRD in a large tertiary care naval center in Southern Pakistan. PMID:25340152

  9. Histopathological retrospective study of canine renal disease in Korea, 2003~2008

    PubMed Central

    Yhee, Ji-Young; Yu, Chi-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Im, Keum-Soon; Chon, Seung-Ki

    2010-01-01

    Renal disease includes conditions affecting the glomeruli, tubules, interstitium, pelvis, and vasculature. Diseases of the kidney include glomerular diseases, diseases of the tubules and interstitium, diseases of renal pelvis, and developmental abnormalities. Renal tissue samples (n = 70) submitted to the Department of Veterinary Pathology of Konkuk University from 2003 to 2008 were included in this study. Tissue histopathology was performed using light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin stains. Masson's trichrome, Congo Red, and Warthin starry silver staining were applied in several individual cases. Glomerular diseases (22.9%), tubulointerstitial diseases (8.6%), neoplastic diseases (8.6%), conditions secondary to urinary obstruction (24.3%), and other diseases (35.7%) were identified. Glomerulonephritis (GN) cases were classified as acute proliferative GN (5.7%), membranous GN (4.3%), membranoproliferative GN (4.3%), focal segmental GN (2.9%), and other GN (4.2%). The proportion of canine GN cases presently identified was not as high as the proportions identified in human studies. Conversely, urinary obstruction and end-stage renal disease cases were relatively higher in dogs than in human populations. PMID:21113095

  10. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet–fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms

  11. Cross-Reactive Myelin Antibody Induces Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lisa K.; Masaki, Takahisa; Wheelwright, Steven R.; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Previously, we reported renal immunoglobulin (Ig) deposition in mice with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG92-106) induced progressive-EAE and naïve mice injected with MOG92-106 hybridoma cells producing antibody that cross-reacts with various autoantigens including double-stranded DNA. To assess whether MOG92-106 antibodies actually induce kidney changes, the extent of renal Ig deposition and changes in glomerular histology and filtration were investigated. Mice with progressive-EAE exhibited Ig deposition, glomerular hypercellularity and proteinuria indicating kidney dysfunction. MOG92-106 hybridoma cell injected mice also had Ig in the kidneys and proteinuria. Therefore, sensitization with MOG92-106 and transfer of MOG92-106 antibodies can induce both central nervous system and renal pathology. The renal involvement reported in MS is believed to occur as a side effect of nephrotoxic drugs or neurogenic bladder. Our results demonstrate that an autoimmune response against myelin could induce pathologic changes in the kidney and may help explain renal changes reported in patients with progressive MS. PMID:18608179

  12. Silicosis and renal disease: insights from a case of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    RICCÒ, Matteo; THAI, Elena; CELLA, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A 68-yr-old male, smoker, is admitted for proteinuria (2,800 mg/24 h) and reduced renal function (serum creatinine 2 mg/dl, GFR 35 ml/min). Renter, he started working 20-yr-old as a sandstone cave miner. Despite the high levels of silica dusts, he reported no mandatory use of airways protection devices during the first 25 yr of activity. No clinical or radiological signs of silicosis or pneumoconiosis where reported until the year of retirement (1997). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (91 mm/h) and C reactive protein (35 mg/l) suggested a pro-inflammatory status. High serum IgA was found (465 mg/dl). A renal biopsy identified glomerular sclerosis with IgA deposition, signs of diffuse vasculitis and tubular atrophia suggesting a diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Chest X-Rays showed emphysema and diffuse nodularity suggesting diagnosis of silicosis. Chest tomography was also positive for mild signs of silicosis with silicotic nodules and without honeycombing. IgA nephropathy is the most common type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. Several clues suggest a genetic or acquired abnormality of immune system as a trigger of the increased production of IgA. In our case report, simultaneous kidney and pulmonary disease could suggest same triggers (e.g. exposure to virus, bacteria or environmental agents) inducing IgA synthesis and pulmonary immune system activation. PMID:26423329

  13. Silicosis and renal disease: insights from a case of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Riccò, Matteo; Thai, Elena; Cella, Simone

    2016-01-01

    A 68-yr-old male, smoker, is admitted for proteinuria (2,800 mg/24 h) and reduced renal function (serum creatinine 2 mg/dl, GFR 35 ml/min). Renter, he started working 20-yr-old as a sandstone cave miner. Despite the high levels of silica dusts, he reported no mandatory use of airways protection devices during the first 25 yr of activity. No clinical or radiological signs of silicosis or pneumoconiosis where reported until the year of retirement (1997). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (91 mm/h) and C reactive protein (35 mg/l) suggested a pro-inflammatory status. High serum IgA was found (465 mg/dl). A renal biopsy identified glomerular sclerosis with IgA deposition, signs of diffuse vasculitis and tubular atrophia suggesting a diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Chest X-Rays showed emphysema and diffuse nodularity suggesting diagnosis of silicosis. Chest tomography was also positive for mild signs of silicosis with silicotic nodules and without honeycombing. IgA nephropathy is the most common type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. Several clues suggest a genetic or acquired abnormality of immune system as a trigger of the increased production of IgA. In our case report, simultaneous kidney and pulmonary disease could suggest same triggers (e.g. exposure to virus, bacteria or environmental agents) inducing IgA synthesis and pulmonary immune system activation. PMID:26423329

  14. A Comparative Study of Sonographic Grading of Renal Parenchymal Changes and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) using Modified Diet in Renal Disease Formula

    PubMed Central

    Shivalli, Siddharudha; Pai, B.H. Santhosh; Acharya, Koteshwara Devadasa; Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandra; Srikanth, Vivek; Reddy, Vishwanath; Haris, Arafat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The sonographic findings are of help in evaluating the nephrological diseases. Glomerular filtration rate is another parameter for assessing the reserved renal function and an indicator of prognosis. In clinical practice GFR estimation (eGFR) is done by using a mathematical formula. In our study, we compared the sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes with eGFR calculated using Modified Diet in Renal Diseases formula based on serum creatinine, age, gender and ethnicity. Aim To evaluate the relevance of sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes in assessing the severity of the renal disease and comparing it to the eGFR calculated using MDRD formula based on the age, gender and serum creatinine value of the patient. Materials and Methods The adult patients with suspected kidney disease referred for sonography of abdomen were our study participants. As per our study design following strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, patients were selected as study participants and for each of the patient’s renal parenchymal status, serum creatinine, age, gender and ethnicity were documented. Results A total of 70 patients were our study participants, out of which 67.1% were males and 32.9% were females. Our study showed a linear correlation between sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes with eGFR. Conclusion We conclude that by evaluating the kidneys with sonography and calculating eGFR using MDRD formula the renal status will be more accurately interpreted. PMID:27042555

  15. Rare diseases with renal involvement in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Tasic, V; Lozanovski, V J; Danilovski, D; Laban, N; Pop-Jordanova, N; Polenakovic, M; Gucev, Z S

    2011-01-01

    Rare diseases (RDs) pose a significant set of problems for patients, since their disease and general social and health situation are often not recognized by the medical community and shunned by health insurance. The sheer number of RDs (5000-8000) and the number of patients (6-8% of the population) are challenging for every society. We wanted to get a better understanding of the rare diseases affecting the kidneys and urinary tract (RDAKUT) in the Republic of Macedonia and we investigated principally the PubMed Central articles of Macedonian medical professionals dealing with RDAKUT, but we also used information on RDAKUT from local sources. A significant number of RDs have been published, demonstrating the awareness and skill of Macedonian medical professionals despite pretty limited diagnostic facilities. We still feel that RDAKUT are underdiagnosed (e.g. Fabry's disease has not yet been reported), and that many patients with RDs have a long way to go before an accurate diagnosis. Increased awareness and ameliorated education are needed by the physicians; while health insurance must include RDAKUT covering their diagnosis and treatment costs. Neonatal screening for ~30 diseases (instead of just hypothyroidism) is also required. Patients' organizations exist and they are active in promoting their interests before of the health authorities. PMID:21822178

  16. [Decline in renal function in old age : Part of physiological aging versus age-related disease].

    PubMed

    Braun, F; Brinkkötter, P T

    2016-08-01

    The incidence and prevalence of chronic renal disease (CKD) in elderly patients are continuously increasing worldwide. Loss of renal function is not only considered to be part of the aging process itself but also reflects the multimorbidity of many geriatric patients. Calculating the glomerular filtration rate using specific algorithms validated for the elderly population and measuring the amount of proteinuria allow an estimation of renal function in elderly patients with high accuracy. Chronic renal failure has many clinical consequences and not only results in a delayed excretion of toxins cleared by the kidneys but also affects hematogenesis, water and electrolyte balance as well as mineral bone metabolism. Furthermore, CKD directly leads to and aggravates geriatric syndromes and in particular the onset of frailty. Therapeutic strategies to halt progression of CKD not only comprise treatment of the underlying disease but also efficient blood pressure and diabetic control and the avoidance of nephrotoxic medications. PMID:27457360

  17. Periodontitis and the end-stage renal disease patient receiving hemodialysis maintenance therapy.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ronald G; Kotanko, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Atherosclerotic complications, including myocardial infarction and stroke, are highly prevalent and associated with increased systemic inflammation in patients who have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and are receiving renal hemodialysis maintenance therapy. In the general population, an increasing body of evidence suggests periodontitis can contribute to systemic inflammation and may contribute to atherosclerotic complications. In addition, results of recent interventional trials suggest effective periodontal therapy may decrease systemic inflammation as well as endothelial dysfunction, an early predictor of atherosclerotic complications. Because moderate-to-severe periodontitis appears to be highly prevalent in the renal hemodialysis population, effective periodontal therapy may reduce systemic inflammation and thereby become a treatment consideration for this population. This article will acquaint dental practitioners with ESRD and the association between systemic inflammation and mortality. Also discussed are the possible contributions of destructive periodontal diseases to systemic inflammation and the dental management of patients receiving renal replacement therapies. PMID:19824568

  18. Curvilinear bodies in hydroxychloroquine-induced renal phospholipidosis resembling Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Rui M.; Martul, Eduardo V.; Reboredo, Juan M.; Cigarrán, Secundino

    2013-01-01

    Inherited and acquired metabolic disorders are responsible for renal intracellular accumulation of phospholipids. Ultrastructural analysis revealing typical myeloid or zebra bodies was previously thought to be exclusive to Fabry disease. However, chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine toxicity can cause similar abnormalities. Recent studies have mentioned curvilinear bodies (CLB) in renal cells in such cases, never described in Fabry nephropathy. We report a 31-year-old patient with systemic lupus erythematosus who was on long-term hydroxychloroquine treatment. The presence of zebra bodies on electron microscopy lead to initial interpretation of Fabry disease, but subsequent genetic analysis did not show a relevant mutation. Further evaluation revealed CLB in renal cells, supporting the diagnosis of hydroxycholoroquine-induced renal phospholipidosis. PMID:26120446

  19. End-Stage Renal Disease From Cast Nephropathy in a Teenager With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Butani, Lavjay; Ducore, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Cast nephropathy is the most common manifestation of renal injury in patients with multiple myeloma but is rarely reported in other conditions. We are reporting our experience in caring for a teenager with a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma who developed rapidly progressive kidney injury that advanced to end-stage renal disease. On renal biopsy extensive tubular necrosis and intratubular eosinophilic casts were noted. This previously unreported finding should prompt oncologists to closely monitor for such a complication in patients with secretory tumors. Whether early plasmapheresis could be of benefit, as has been tried in multiple myeloma, remains to be determined. PMID:26989910

  20. Sequential sampling and analysis of renal hydroxylase activities of cattle given 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Littledike, E T; Engstrom, G W; Sachs, M

    1986-04-01

    A new method was developed for sequential sampling of bovine renal cortex. This method results in minimum hemorrhage and adhesions and provides sufficient renal cortex tissue for assay of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1 alpha-, 24-, and 23-hydroxylase activities. Application of this procedure in calves and pregnant cows treated with 1 alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 is described. The success of these experiments suggests these techniques could be used to follow enzyme activities that control crucial aspects of vitamin D metabolism in normal peripartum cows and cows with milk fever or other diseases of mineral metabolism. PMID:3722540

  1. Management of the oral and maxillofacial surgery patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, V B; Saini, J; Demas, P N; Braun, T W

    1992-11-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is the consequence of a multitude of diseases that cause permanent destruction of the nephron. Concurrent with renal failure are a host of changes affecting the homeostatic functioning of the individual. This report outlines the pathophysiology of CRF and highlights its effects on surgical manipulation of the oral and maxillofacial region in this patient population. In addition, some of the common physical findings and alterations in blood chemistries frequently observed in these patients are discussed. PMID:1403277

  2. En Bloc Retroperitoneoscopic Removal of Horseshoe Kidney for End-stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, David; Budzyn, Brian; Steinhardt, George F; Barber, Theodore D

    2015-10-01

    Horseshoe kidney (HSK) is the most common renal fusion anomaly. There have been reports of an association of HSKs with medical renal disease. We report a case of a child with nephrotic-range proteinuria and a HSK. As the patient was on peritoneal dialysis, the entire HSK was removed en bloc via a retroperitoneoscopic approach with early postoperative reinitiation of peritoneal dialysis. PMID:26254173

  3. Secondary prevention of renal and cardiovascular disease: results of a renal and cardiovascular treatment program in an Australian aboriginal community.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Wendy E; Wang, Zhiqiang; Baker, Philip R A; Kelly, Angela M

    2003-07-01

    Australian Aborigines are experiencing an epidemic of renal and cardiovascular disease. In late 1995 we introduced a treatment program into the Tiwi community, which has a three- to fivefold increase in death rates and a recent annual incidence of treated ESRD of 2760 per million. Eligible for treatment were people with hypertension, diabetics with micro or overt albuminuria, and all people with overt albuminuria. Treatment centered around use of perindopril (Coversyl, Servier), with other agents added to reach BP goals; attempts to control glucose and lipid levels; and health education. Thirty percent of the adult population, or 267 people, were enrolled, with a mean follow up of 3.39 yr. Clinical parameters were followed every 6 mo, and rates of terminal endpoints were compared with those of 327 historical controls matched for baseline disease severity, followed in the pretreatment program era. There was a dramatic reduction in BP in the treatment group, which was sustained through 3 yr of treatment. Albuminuria and GFR stabilized or improved. Rates of natural deaths were reduced by an estimated 50% (P = 0.012); renal deaths were reduced by 57% (P = 0.038); and nonrenal deaths by 46% (P = 0.085). Survival benefit was suggested at all levels of overt albuminuria, and regardless of diabetes status, baseline BP, or prior administration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI). No significant benefit was apparent among people without overt albuminuria, nor among those with GFR less than 60 ml/min. An estimated 13 renal deaths and 10 nonrenal deaths were prevented, with the number-needed-to-treat to avoid one terminal event of only 11.6. Falling deaths and renal failure in the whole community support these estimates. The program was extremely cost-effective. Programs like this should be introduced to all high-risk communities as a matter of urgency. PMID:12819325

  4. Usefulness of resistive index on spectral Doppler ultrasonography in the detection of renal cell carcinoma in patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of the resistive index (RI) on spectral Doppler ultrasonography (US) in the detection of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods: Seventeen ESRD patients with kidneys in which renal masses were suspected in routine US were subjected. They underwent computed tomography scans and additional Doppler US for the characterization of the detected lesions. All underwent radical nephrectomy with the suspicion of RCC. Fourteen patients finally were included. RI measurements were conducted in the region of the suspected renal mass and the background renal parenchyma. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess the reproducibility of the RI measurement. A paired t-test was used to compare the RI values between the renal mass and the background renal parenchyma (P<0.05). Results: The RI values measured at the RCCs were significantly lower than those measured at the background renal parenchyma (0.41-0.65 vs. 0.75-0.89; P<0.001). The intrareader reproducibility proved to be excellent and good for the renal masses and the parenchyma, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion: RI on spectral Doppler US is useful in detecting RCC in patients with ESRD. The RI values measured at the RCCs were significantly lower than those measured at the background renal parenchyma. PMID:24936507

  5. CT and MRI findings of renal infestation by a huge active hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kizildag, Betul; Dagistan, Emine; Gurel, Safiye; Alan, Cabir

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid cysts derived from a type of tapeworm called Echinococcus granulosis larvaes which can situate in various organs or tissues in human body. It encounters as an endemic zoonosis in many regions all over the world including eastern part of Turkey. Renal involvement of hydatid cysts is uncommon even in endemic areas. The imaging properties vary according to the phase of the disease. Although it is a benign condition, the diagnosis of a renal hydatid cyst is critical in managing treatment and complications, such as nephrectomy, medical treatment before surgery and the risk of anaphylaxis or dissemination during intervention. Herein authors reported a case of an isolated involvement of the right kidney by a huge active hydatid cyst in a young man who was treated surgically, emphasising its ultrasound, CT, contrast-enhanced MR and diffusion-weighted imaging findings. PMID:23833098

  6. Renal depletion of myo-inositol is associated with its increased degradation in animal models of metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-H; Chao, H-N; Walker, C S; Choong, S-Y; Phillips, A; Loomes, K M

    2015-11-01

    Renal depletion of myo-inositol (MI) is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms involved are unclear. We hypothesized that MI depletion was due to changes in inositol metabolism and therefore examined the expression of genes regulating de novo biosynthesis, reabsorption, and catabolism of MI. We also extended the analyses from diabetes mellitus to animal models of dietary-induced obesity and hypertension. We found that renal MI depletion was pervasive across these three distinct disease states in the relative order: hypertension (-51%)>diabetes mellitus (-35%)>dietary-induced obesity (-19%). In 4-wk diabetic kidneys and in kidneys derived from insulin-resistant and hypertensive rats, MI depletion was correlated with activity of the MI-degrading enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX). By contrast, there was decreased MIOX expression in 8-wk diabetic kidneys. Immunohistochemistry localized the MI-degrading pathway comprising MIOX and the glucuronate-xylulose (GX) pathway to the proximal tubules within the renal cortex. These findings indicate that MI depletion could reflect increased catabolism through MIOX and the GX pathway and implicate a common pathological mechanism contributing to renal oxidative stress in metabolic disease. PMID:26311112

  7. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  8. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  9. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  10. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  11. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  12. [HYPERURICEMIA AND POTENTIAL RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND RENAL DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Schils, R; Krzesinski, J M

    2016-05-01

    Besides the well accepted need to treat hyperuricemia associated with gout, some large observational studies and small prospective therapeutic trials have suggested that treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia, especially by xanthine oxidase inhibition, the enzyme producing uric acid, could be beneficial for cardiovascular and renal risk prevention. This article discusses the literature about this promising approach, which, however, requests prospective validation. PMID:27337847

  13. Hypertension, End-Stage Renal Disease and Rehabilitation: A Look at Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Ackah, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the important relationship between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and hypertension for African Americans; and considers issues associated with ESRD and the subsequent need for kidney transplants, including organ availability. Individual and societal implications of these diseases are discussed. (SLD)

  14. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease... achievement of ESRD program objectives. (c) New applicant. A facility which has not previously participated...

  15. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease... achievement of ESRD program objectives. (c) New applicant. A facility which has not previously participated...

  16. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease... achievement of ESRD program objectives. (c) New applicant. A facility which has not previously participated...

  17. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease... achievement of ESRD program objectives. (c) New applicant. A facility which has not previously participated...

  18. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease... achievement of ESRD program objectives. (c) New applicant. A facility which has not previously participated...

  19. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  20. Advanced glycation end-products and skin autofluorescence in end-stage renal disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Stefan; Graaff, Reindert; van Oeveren, Wim; Stegmayr, Bernd; Sikole, Aleksandar; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Smit, Andries J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially in its end stage, is marked by extremely high cardiovascular rates of morbidity and mortality; hemodialysis patients have a five-fold shorter life expectancy than healthy subjects of the same age. In CKD the metabolic products that accumulate in the body are so-called uremic toxins. These include advanced glycation end-products (AGE). AGE levels are markedly increased in CKD patients not only because of impaired excretion but also because of increased production. AGE formation has initially been described as a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and glucose in the so-called Maillard reaction, but they are also more rapidly formed during oxidative stress and subsequent formation of reactive carbonyl compounds like (methyl)glyoxal. AGE accumulate in tissue where they cross-link with proteins, e.g., collagen, inducing tissue stiffening of blood vessels and skin. They may also interact with receptor of AGE (RAGE) and other receptors, which lead to activation of intracellular transduction mechanisms resulting in cytokine release and further tissue damage in CKD. The accumulation of AGE in the skin can be measured non-invasively using autofluorescence. The skin autofluorescence is a strong marker of cardiovascular mortality in CKD. The focus of this review is on the role of tissue and plasma AGE, and of skin autofluorescence as a proxy of tissue AGE accumulation, in the increase in cardiovascular disease in end stage renal disease (ESRD). This review will also present the possibility of reducing the AGE accumulation in ESRD patients using the following five methods: 1) use of low AGE peritoneal dialysis solutions; 2) use of advanced hemodialysis techniques; 3) use of AGE reducing drugs; 4) optimizing the nutrition of hemodialysis patients; and 5) renal transplantation. PMID:23612551

  1. Risk factors for renal scarring in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sevgi; Ertan, Pelin; Ozkayin, Nese

    2013-01-01

    To determine the incidence of renal scarring among patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and the possible risk factor(s), we studied 90 children (60 girls and 30 boys) with VUR followed in the Pediatric Nephrology Unit at the Ege University Hospital from 1998 to 2003. All the patients were assessed for VUR grade by voiding cystoureterography and for presence of renal scarring by (99 m) technetium dimercapto-succinic acid scintigraphy. All infants with VUR were given low-dose prophylactic antibiotics and followed-up until resolution of the reflux. Grade of reflux and number of urinary tract infection (UTI) episodes (≥3) were found to be statistically significant risk factors for renal scarring (P <0.05). However, gender, familial history and laterality of the disease were not found to be statistically significant risk factors (P >0.05). Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference of frequency of renal scarring among the different age groups (P >0.05). We conclude that recurrences of UTI and VUR severity are significant risk factors for renal scarring in children with VUR. Therefore, identification of VUR at an early age may offer the opportunity to prevent episodes of UTI and possible formation of renal scars that may result in end-stage renal failure. PMID:23354192

  2. End-Stage Renal Disease in an Infant With Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Battelino, Nina; Writzl, Karin; Bratanič, Nevenka; Irving, Melita D; Novljan, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HJCYS) is a rare, autosomal dominant, skeletal disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH2 signaling pathway for which genetic testing has recently become available. Renal abnormalities are associated in at least 10% of cases. We present an 8-year-old Caucasian boy, born with multiple dysmorphic features consistent with HJCYS. Imaging of the urinary tract revealed bilateral cystic dysplastic kidneys with associated vesicoureteral reflux. Renal function has been impaired since birth and deteriorated progressively to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by the age of two and a half years, when peritoneal dialysis was initiated and only recently renal transplantation was performed. Additional congenital abnormalities and multisystem involvement in HJCYS further complicated management, and he developed refractory anemia. Molecular diagnosis was confirmed by identification of a truncating mutation in exon 34 of NOTCH2. Although, renal abnormalities are considered an integral part of the HJCYS, published reports on ESRD are scarce. In those few published cases, where ESRD was recognized, renal failure developed either in late adolescence or adulthood. This is the first report of early ESRD occurring in a child. Patients with HJCYS may need chronic renal replacement therapy even in early childhood. The management of these children can be challenging given the multisystemic manifestations of HJCYS. PMID:27312922

  3. Contribution of renal and non-renal clearance on increased total clearance of adalimumab in glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brittney V; Susano, Isidro; Gipson, Debbie S; Trachtman, Howard; Joy, Melanie S

    2013-09-01

    The contribution of renal and non-renal clearance toward targeted concentrations and/or effects of therapeutic proteins in nephrotic patients are unknown. This study dissected the contribution of clearance pathways to adalimumab elimination in patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Urine was collected from seven patients treated with adalimumab. Renal clearance (ClR ) was measured and non-renal clearance (ClNR ) was calculated as the difference between total clearance and ClR . Differences in cumulative amount in urine, ClR, and ClNR between study weeks 1 and 16 and relationships between proteinuria (protein:creatinine ratio (Up/c)), and ClR and ClNR were evaluated. Up to 13% of the adalimumab dose was lost in urine. ClNR contributed more than ClR to enhanced total clearance. There was a nonlinear relationship between Up/c and ClR (R(2) 0.7059); an increase in ClR beginning at Up/c of 12 mg/mg [slope 1.755, (C.I. -7.825 to 11.34)]. There was a linear relationship between Up/c and ClNR (R(2) 0.5039); for every one unit increase in Up/c, ClNR would increase by 3.5 mL/hr (P = 0.01). Both ClR and ClNR contribute to enhanced total clearance of adalimumab in glomerular disease secondary to FSGS. Additional research is needed to identify mechanisms for the increased ClNR pathways. PMID:23813330

  4. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Linda S; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  5. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linda S.; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  6. Evaluation of anti-urolithiatic activity of Pashanabhedadi Ghrita against experimentally induced renal calculi in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Baghel, Madhav Singh; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Ravishankar, B.; Ashok, B. K.; Patil, Panchakshari D.

    2012-01-01

    Population in an industrialized world is afflicted by urinary stone disease. Kidney stones are common in all kinds of urolithiasis. One distinguished formulation mentioned by Sushruta for management of Ashmari (urolithiasis) is Pashanabhedadi Ghrita (PBG), which is in clinical practice since centuries. Validation of drug is the requirement of time through the experimental study. In this study, trial of PBG has been made against ammonium oxalate rich diet and gentamicin injection induced renal calculi in albino rats. The calculi were induced by gentamicin injection and ammonium oxalate rich diet. Test drug was administered concomitantly in the dose of 900 mg/kg for 15 consecutive days. Rats were sacrificed on the 16th day. Parameters like kidney weight, serum biochemical, kidney tissue and histopathology of kidney were studied. Concomitant treatment of PBG attenuates blood biochemical parameters non-significantly, where as it significantly attenuated lipid peroxidation and enhanced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activities. It also decreased crystal deposition markedly into the renal tubules in number as well as size and prevented damage to the renal tubules. The findings showed that PBG is having significant anti-urolithiatic activities against ammonium oxalate rich diet plus gentamicine injection induced urolithiasis in rats. PMID:23723654

  7. Evaluation of anti-urolithiatic activity of Pashanabhedadi Ghrita against experimentally induced renal calculi in rats.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Baghel, Madhav Singh; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Ravishankar, B; Ashok, B K; Patil, Panchakshari D

    2012-07-01

    Population in an industrialized world is afflicted by urinary stone disease. Kidney stones are common in all kinds of urolithiasis. One distinguished formulation mentioned by Sushruta for management of Ashmari (urolithiasis) is Pashanabhedadi Ghrita (PBG), which is in clinical practice since centuries. Validation of drug is the requirement of time through the experimental study. In this study, trial of PBG has been made against ammonium oxalate rich diet and gentamicin injection induced renal calculi in albino rats. The calculi were induced by gentamicin injection and ammonium oxalate rich diet. Test drug was administered concomitantly in the dose of 900 mg/kg for 15 consecutive days. Rats were sacrificed on the 16(th) day. Parameters like kidney weight, serum biochemical, kidney tissue and histopathology of kidney were studied. Concomitant treatment of PBG attenuates blood biochemical parameters non-significantly, where as it significantly attenuated lipid peroxidation and enhanced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activities. It also decreased crystal deposition markedly into the renal tubules in number as well as size and prevented damage to the renal tubules. The findings showed that PBG is having significant anti-urolithiatic activities against ammonium oxalate rich diet plus gentamicine injection induced urolithiasis in rats. PMID:23723654

  8. SORCS1 contributes to the development of renal disease in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jozef; O'Meara, Caitlin C.; Sarkis, Allison B.; Prisco, Sasha Z.; Xu, Haiyan; Fox, Caroline S.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Broeckel, Ulrich; Arnett, Donna K.; Moreno, Carol; Provoost, Abraham P.

    2013-01-01

    Many lines of evidence demonstrate that genetic variability contributes to chronic kidney disease susceptibility in humans as well as rodent models. Little progress has been made in discovering causal kidney disease genes in humans mainly due to genetic complexity. Here, we use a minimal congenic mapping strategy in the FHH (fawn hooded hypertensive) rat to identify Sorcs1 as a novel renal disease candidate gene. We investigated the hypothesis that genetic variation in Sorcs1 influences renal disease susceptibility in both rat and human. Sorcs1 is expressed in the kidney, and knocking out this gene in a rat strain with a sensitized genome background produced increased proteinuria. In vitro knockdown of Sorcs1 in proximal tubule cells impaired protein trafficking, suggesting a mechanism for the observed proteinuria in the FHH rat. Since Sorcs1 influences renal function in the rat, we went on to test this gene in humans. We identified associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in SORCS1 and renal function in large cohorts of European and African ancestry. The experimental data from the rat combined with association results from different ethnic groups indicates a role for SORCS1 in maintaining proper renal function. PMID:23780848

  9. Ligand trap for the activin type IIA receptor protects against vascular disease and renal fibrosis in mice with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Agapova, Olga A; Fang, Yifu; Sugatani, Toshifumi; Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-06-01

    The causes of cardiovascular mortality associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are partly attributed to the CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The causes of the early CKD-MBD are not well known. Our discovery of Wnt (portmanteau of wingless and int) inhibitors, especially Dickkopf 1, produced during renal repair as participating in the pathogenesis of the vascular and skeletal components of the CKD-MBD implied that additional pathogenic factors are critical. In the search for such factors, we studied the effects of activin receptor type IIA (ActRIIA) signaling by using a ligand trap for the receptor, RAP-011 (a soluble extracellular domain of ActRIIA fused to a murine IgG-Fc fragment). In a mouse model of CKD that stimulated atherosclerotic calcification, RAP-011 significantly increased aortic ActRIIA signaling assessed by the levels of phosphorylated Smad2/3. Furthermore, RAP-011 treatment significantly reversed CKD-induced vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation as assessed by smooth muscle 22α levels, osteoblastic transition, and neointimal plaque calcification. In the diseased kidneys, RAP-011 significantly stimulated αklotho levels and it inhibited ActRIIA signaling and decreased renal fibrosis and proteinuria. RAP-011 treatment significantly decreased both renal and circulating Dickkopf 1 levels, showing that Wnt activation was downstream of ActRIIA. Thus, ActRIIA signaling in CKD contributes to the CKD-MBD and renal fibrosis. ActRIIA signaling may be a potential therapeutic target in CKD. PMID:27165838

  10. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with the SphygmoCor® device. Circulating biomarkers were assessed in plasma using xMAP® multiplexing technology. Results Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had greater PWV compared to those with CAD and normal renal function (10.2 [9.1;11.2] vs 7.3 [6.9;7.7] m/s; P < 0.001). In all patients, PWV was a function of eGFR (β = −0.293; P < 0.001) even after adjustment for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and presence or absence of CAD. Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had higher levels of adhesion and inflammatory molecules including E-selectin and osteopontin (all P < 0.05) compared to those with CAD alone, but had similar levels of markers of oxidative stress. Conclusions Renal function is a determinant of vascular stiffness even in patients with severe atherosclerotic disease. This was paralleled by differences in markers of cell adhesion and inflammation. Increased vascular stiffness may therefore be linked to inflammatory remodeling of the vasculature in people with impaired renal function, irrespective of concomitant atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23937620

  11. Chronic renal failure in a patient with Sotos syndrome due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cefle, K; Yildiz, A; Palanduz, S; Ozturk, S; Ozbey, N; Kylyçaslan, I; Colakoglu, S; Balci, C

    2002-05-01

    Sotos syndrome is characterised by accelerated growth, acromegalic appearance, mental retardation and social maladjustment. Most cases are sporadic, but familial cases have also been reported. We report a case of Sotos syndrome presenting with chronic renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Ultrasonographic examination of the patient, his father and other family members revealed polycystic kidneys. Renal failure was present only in the Sotos case, who also had considerably larger cysts than other family members. We suggest that the underlying mechanism responsible from the somatic overgrowth in Sotos syndrome may also be linked with the development of larger cysts and earlier onset of renal failure in ADPKD. Although Sotos syndrome has been associated with urological abnormalities, chronic renal failure is very rare. To our knowledge, Sotos syndrome associated with ADPKD has not been reported before. PMID:12074220

  12. Renal venogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008:chap 6. Rankin S. Renal parenchymal disease, including renal failure, renovascular disease and transportation. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 39. Read ... arteriography Renal vein thrombosis Tumor Venogram Wilms ...

  13. Case report: laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for isolated renal hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Basiri, A; Nadjafi-Semnani, M; Nooralizadeh, A

    2006-01-01

    A 73-year-old male patient with an isolated calcified hydatid cyst in the lower pole of the right kidney presented with a history of weight loss and cloudy, foul-smelling urine. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was performed, at which the cyst was removed en bloc. Six months postoperatively, a CT scan revealed no recurrence of hydatidosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for the treatment of isolated renal echinococcosis. PMID:16426127

  14. Determinants of renal tissue hypoxia in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ow, Connie P C; Abdelkader, Amany; Hilliard, Lucinda M; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Evans, Roger G

    2014-11-15

    Renal tissue oxygen tension (PO2) and its determinants have not been quantified in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Therefore, we measured kidney tissue PO2 in the Lewis rat model of PKD (LPK) and in Lewis control rats. We also determined the relative contributions of altered renal oxygen delivery and consumption to renal tissue hypoxia in LPK rats. PO2 of the superficial cortex of 11- to 13-wk-old LPK rats, measured by Clark electrode with the rat under anesthesia, was higher within the cysts (32.8 ± 4.0 mmHg) than the superficial cortical parenchyma (18.3 ± 3.5 mmHg). PO2 in the superficial cortical parenchyma of Lewis rats was 2.5-fold greater (46.0 ± 3.1 mmHg) than in LPK rats. At each depth below the cortical surface, tissue PO2 in LPK rats was approximately half that in Lewis rats. Renal blood flow was 60% less in LPK than in Lewis rats, and arterial hemoglobin concentration was 57% less, so renal oxygen delivery was 78% less. Renal venous PO2 was 38% less in LPK than Lewis rats. Sodium reabsorption was 98% less in LPK than Lewis rats, but renal oxygen consumption did not significantly differ between the two groups. Thus, in this model of PKD, kidney tissue is severely hypoxic, at least partly because of deficient renal oxygen delivery. Nevertheless, the observation of similar renal oxygen consumption, despite markedly less sodium reabsorption, in the kidneys of LPK compared with Lewis rats, indicates the presence of inappropriately high oxygen consumption in the polycystic kidney. PMID:25209412

  15. Stem cells and progenitor cells in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Haller, Hermann; de Groot, Kirsten; Bahlmann, Ferdinand; Elger, Marlies; Fliser, Danilo

    2005-11-01

    Stem cells and progenitor cells are necessary for repair and regeneration of injured renal tissue. Infiltrating or resident stem cells can contribute to the replacement of lost or damaged tissue. However, the regulation of circulating progenitor cells is not well understood. We have analyzed the effects of erythropoietin on circulating progenitor cells and found that low levels of erythropoietin induce mobilization and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells. In an animal model of 5/6 nephrectomy we could demonstrate that erythropoietin ameliorates tissue injury. Full regeneration of renal tissue demands the existence of stem cells and an adequate local "milieu," a so-called stem cell niche. We have previously described a stem cell niche in the kidneys of the dogfish, Squalus acanthus. Further analysis revealed that in the regenerating zone of the shark kidney, stem cells exist that can be induced by loss of renal tissue to form new glomeruli. Such animal models improve our understanding of stem cell behavior in the kidney and may eventually contribute to novel therapies. PMID:16221168

  16. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activator induces renal CYP2C23 activity and protects from angiotensin II-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Muller, Dominik N; Theuer, Juergen; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Kaergel, Eva; Honeck, Horst; Park, Joon-Keun; Markovic, Marija; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Dechend, Ralf; Wellner, Maren; Kirsch, Torsten; Fiebeler, Anette; Rothe, Michael; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2004-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites are involved in the regulation of renal vascular tone and salt excretion. The epoxygenation product 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) is anti-inflammatory and inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B activation. We tested the hypothesis that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-activator fenofibrate (Feno) induces CYP isoforms, AA hydroxylation, and epoxygenation activity, and protects against inflammatory organ damage. Double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) overexpressing human renin and angiotensinogen genes were treated with Feno. Feno normalized blood pressure, albuminuria, reduced nuclear factor-kappa B activity, and renal leukocyte infiltration. Renal epoxygenase activity was lower in dTGRs compared to nontransgenic rats. Feno strongly induced renal CYP2C23 protein and AA-epoxygenase activity under pathological and nonpathological conditions. In both cases, CYP2C23 was the major isoform responsible for 11,12-EET formation. Moreover, we describe a novel CYP2C23-dependent pathway leading to hydroxy-EETs (HEETs), which may serve as endogenous peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activators. The capacity to produce HEETs via CYP2C23-dependent epoxygenation of 20-HETE and CYP4A-dependent hydroxylation of EETs was reduced in dTGR kidneys and induced by Feno. These results demonstrate that Feno protects against angiotensin II-induced renal damage and acts as inducer of CYP2C23-mediated epoxygenase activities. We propose that CYP-dependent EET/HEET production may serve as an anti-inflammatory control mechanism. PMID:14742258

  17. A Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Activator Induces Renal CYP2C23 Activity and Protects from Angiotensin II-Induced Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Dominik N.; Theuer, Juergen; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Kaergel, Eva; Honeck, Horst; Park, Joon-Keun; Markovic, Marija; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Dechend, Ralf; Wellner, Maren; Kirsch, Torsten; Fiebeler, Anette; Rothe, Michael; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C.; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2004-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites are involved in the regulation of renal vascular tone and salt excretion. The epoxygenation product 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) is anti-inflammatory and inhibits nuclear factor-κB activation. We tested the hypothesis that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-activator fenofibrate (Feno) induces CYP isoforms, AA hydroxylation, and epoxygenation activity, and protects against inflammatory organ damage. Double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) overexpressing human renin and angiotensinogen genes were treated with Feno. Feno normalized blood pressure, albuminuria, reduced nuclear factor-κB activity, and renal leukocyte infiltration. Renal epoxygenase activity was lower in dTGRs compared to nontransgenic rats. Feno strongly induced renal CYP2C23 protein and AA-epoxygenase activity under pathological and nonpathological conditions. In both cases, CYP2C23 was themajor isoform responsible for 11,12-EET formation. Moreover, we describe a novel CYP2C23-dependent pathway leading to hydroxy-EETs (HEETs), which may serve as endogenous peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α activators. The capacity to produce HEETs via CYP2C23-dependent epoxygenation of 20-HETE and CYP4A-dependent hydroxylation of EETs was reduced in dTGR kidneys and induced by Feno. These results demonstrate that Feno protects against angiotensin II-induced renal damage and acts as inducer of CYP2C23-mediated epoxygenase activities. We propose that CYP-dependent EET/HEET production may serve as an anti-inflammatory control mechanism. PMID:14742258

  18. [Direct renin inhibitor aliskiren in the treatment of cardiovascular and renal diseases].

    PubMed

    Horký, Karel

    2010-02-01

    The role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in regulating the volume and composition of extracellular fluid, blood pressure (BP) as well as onset and progression of cardiovascular and renal diseases has been studied for more than 150 years. The compounds that block the vital stages of the RAAS cascade, such as ACE-inhibitors (ACEI), AT1-receptor blockers (ARB) and aldosterone receptor antagonists, importantly extended our treatment options. However, the positive therapeutic effects of these compounds also have certain negative consequences. Administration of ACEIs and ARBs interrupts physiological feedback for renal renin release and leads to reactive elevation of circulating active renin and greater production of angiotensin I and angiotensin II with subsequent return of aldosterone secretion to the pre-treatment levels ('escape' phenomenon). These possible adverse effects of the intermediary products of incomplete RAAS blockade leading to organ complications have facilitated the efforts to develop compounds blocking the initial stages of renin-angiotensin cascade--i.e. direct renin blockers. After several years of unsuccessful attempts, the recent years have seen development of the first non-peptide, orally long-term effective renin inhibitor, aliskiren fumarate. In monotherapy or in combination with other antihypertensives (hydrochlorothiazide, ARB, ACEI), aliskiren reduces BP in a dose-dependent manner (75-600 mg/den). Aliskiren reduces plasma renin activity (PRA) and neutralises hydrochlorothiazide-induced RAAS activation. Once daily administration of the drug leads to longer than 24-hour activity and its prolonged blocking effects on the kidneys are the basis for its renoprotectivity. In addition to the significant antihypertensive effect, clinical studies also showed a range of organoprotective properties in patients with left ventricle hypertrophy (ALLAY study), heart failure (ALOFT study) and diabetic nephropathy (AVOID study). Similar to other

  19. Retrospective evaluation of renal disease in captive black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya).

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Deidre K; Gregory, Christopher R; Lamberski, Nadine

    2004-09-01

    Six of 15 (40%) inactive medical records of adult black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) at one zoological institution included either a pre- or postmortem diagnosis of renal disease. In these six cases, significantly abnormal hematologic and serum chemistry values were reported at onset of azotemia, onset of clinical signs, and at euthanasia. Average age of onset of azotemia was 14.8 +/- 2.9 yr, with clinical signs of disease noted at 17 +/- 4.7 yr. In four of the cases (66.6%), azotemia was documented earlier than the onset of clinical signs of renal disease. Average duration of clinical disease was 2.83 +/- 1.6 yr, with an average age at euthanasia of 18 +/- 4.7 yr. Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis with secondary glomerular sclerosis was present in all cases. Thirteen of an additional 20 institutions in the United States that have held Alouatta caraya responded to a survey for prevalence of renal disease. These institutions showed a lower prevalence (15.1%) of renal disease in complete, inactive records, a higher prevalence of glomerulonephritis, and similar significant clinicopathologic values. PMID:15526883

  20. Chronic renal disease in a captive two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salas, Elisa; Wolf, Tiffany; Harris, Seth

    2014-06-01

    A 13-yr-old female two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) with a prolonged history of worsening azotemia was necropsied shortly after euthanasia. On necropsy, the sloth had poor body condition, bilaterally shrunken kidneys, and a large neoplastic mass replacing the right liver lobe. Histologic examination demonstrated chronic renal disease with metastatic mineralization as the cause of morbidity. The liver mass was not associated with any known clinical signs and was diagnosed as a solitary and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in a sloth and the first detailed description of chronic renal disease in this species. PMID:25000707

  1. Renal function assessment in atrial fibrillation: Usefulness of chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration vs re-expressed 4 variable modification of diet in renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Abumuaileq, Rami Riziq-Yousef; Abu-Assi, Emad; López-López, Andrea; Raposeiras-Roubin, Sergio; Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Martínez-Sande, Luis; García-Seara, Francisco Javier; Fernandez-López, Xesus Alberte; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the performance of the re-expressed Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation vs the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. METHODS: We studied 911 consecutive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation on vitamin-K antagonist. The performance of the re-expressed Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation vs the new Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation with respect to either a composite endpoint of major bleeding, thromboembolic events and all-cause mortality or each individual component of the composite endpoint was assessed using continuous and categorical ≥ 60, 59-30, and < 30 mL/min per 1.73 m2 estimated glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS: During 10 ± 3 mo, the composite endpoint occurred in 98 (10.8%) patients: 30 patients developed major bleeding, 18 had thromboembolic events, and 60 died. The new equation provided lower prevalence of renal dysfunction < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (32.9%), compared with the re-expressed equation (34.1%). Estimated glomerular filtration rate from both equations was independent predictor of composite endpoint (HR = 0.98 and 0.97 for the re-expressed and the new equation, respectively; P < 0.0001) and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.98 for both equations, P < 0.01). Strong association with thromboembolic events was observed only when estimated glomerular filtration rate was < 30 mL/min per 1.73 m2: HR is 5.1 for the re-expressed equation, and HR = 5.0 for the new equation. No significant association with major bleeding was observed for both equations. CONCLUSION: The new equation reduced the prevalence of renal dysfunction. Both equations performed similarly in predicting major adverse outcomes. PMID:26516423

  2. Eculizumab reduces complement activation, inflammation, endothelial damage, thrombosis, and renal injury markers in aHUS

    PubMed Central

    Cofiell, Roxanne; Kukreja, Anjli; Bedard, Krystin; Yan, Yan; Mickle, Angela P.; Ogawa, Masayo; Bedrosian, Camille L.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic, life-threatening disease characterized by uncontrolled complement activation, systemic thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), and vital organ damage. We evaluated the effect of terminal complement blockade with the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody eculizumab on biomarkers of cellular processes involved in TMA in patients with aHUS longitudinally, during up to 1 year of treatment, compared with in healthy volunteers. Biomarker levels were elevated at baseline in most patients, regardless of mutational status, plasma exchange/infusion use, platelet count, or lactate dehydrogenase or haptoglobin levels. Eculizumab reduced terminal complement activation (C5a and sC5b-9) and renal injury markers (clusterin, cystatin-C, β2-microglobulin, and liver fatty acid binding protein-1) to healthy volunteer levels and reduced inflammation (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1), coagulation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and d-dimer), and endothelial damage (thrombomodulin) markers to near-normal levels. Alternative pathway activation (Ba) and endothelial activation markers (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) decreased but remained elevated, reflecting ongoing complement activation in aHUS despite complete terminal complement blockade. These results highlight links between terminal complement activation and inflammation, endothelial damage, thrombosis, and renal injury and underscore ongoing risk for systemic TMA and progression to organ damage. Further research regarding underlying complement dysregulation is warranted. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01194973. PMID:25833956

  3. Stability and Species Specificity of Renal VEGF-A Splicing Patterns in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, R J; Eikmans, M; Bajema, I M; Bruijn, J A; Baelde, H J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is essential for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier. Absolute renal levels of VEGF-A change in patients with diabetic nephropathy and inflammatory kidney diseases, but whether changes in the renal splicing patterns of VEGF-A play a role remains unclear. In this study, we investigated mRNA splicing patterns of pro-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A in glomeruli and whole kidney samples from human patients with kidney disease and from mouse models of kidney disease. Kidney biopsies were obtained from patients with acute rejection following kidney transplantation, patients with diabetic nephropathy, and control subjects. In addition, kidney samples were obtained from mice with lupus nephritis, mice with diabetes mellitus, and control mice. The relative expression of each VEGF-A splice variant was measured using RT-PCR followed by quantitative fragment analysis. The pattern of renal VEGF-A splice variants was unchanged in diabetic nephropathy and lupus nephritis and was stable throughout disease progression in acute transplant rejection and diabetic nephropathy; these results suggest renal VEGF-A splicing stability during kidney disease. The splicing patterns were species-specific; in the control human kidney samples, VEGF-A 121 was the dominant isoform, whereas VEGF-A 164 was the dominant isoform measured in the mouse kidney samples. PMID:27598902

  4. Blood, urine and faecal metabolite profiles in the study of adult renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Clara; Spector, Tim D; Menni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health burden and to date traditional biomarkers of renal function (such as serum creatinine and cystatin C) are unable to identify at-risk individuals before the disease process is well under way. To help preventive strategies and maximize the potential for effective interventions, it is important to characterise the molecular changes that take place in the development of renal damage. Metabolomics is a promising tool to identify markers of renal disease since the kidneys are involved in the handling of major biochemical classes of metabolites. These metabolite levels capture a snap-shot of the metabolic profile of the individual, allowing for the potential identification of early biomarkers, and the monitoring of real-time kidney function. In this review, we describe the current status of the identification of blood/urine/faecal metabolic biomarkers in different entities of kidney diseases including: acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplant, diabetic nephropathy and other disorders. PMID:26476344

  5. Altered Nitric Oxide System in Cardiovascular and Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized by a family of NO synthases (NOS), including neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOS (n/i/eNOS). NO-mediated effects can be beneficial or harmful depending on the specific risk factors affecting the disease. In hypertension, the vascular relaxation response to acetylcholine is blunted, and that to direct NO donors is maintained. A reduction in the activity of eNOS is mainly responsible for the elevation of blood pressure, and an abnormal expression of iNOS is likely to be related to the progression of vascular dysfunction. While eNOS/nNOS-derived NO is protective against the development of atherosclerosis, iNOS-derived NO may be proatherogenic. eNOS-derived NO may prevent the progression of myocardial infarction. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury is significantly enhanced in eNOS-deficient animals. An important component of heart failure is the loss of coronary vascular eNOS activity. A pressure-overload may cause severer left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction in eNOS null mice than in wild-type mice. iNOS-derived NO has detrimental effects on the myocardium. NO plays an important role in regulating the angiogenesis and slowing the interstitial fibrosis of the obstructed kidney. In unilateral ureteral obstruction, the expression of eNOS was decreased in the affected kidney. In triply n/i/eNOS null mice, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus developed along with reduced aquaporin-2 abundance. In chronic kidney disease model of subtotal-nephrectomized rats, treatment with NOS inhibitors decreased systemic NO production and induced left ventricular systolic dysfunction (renocardiac syndrome). PMID:27231671

  6. Assessing the outcome of rehabilitation in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Porter, G A

    1994-07-01

    Assessing the rehabilitative/restorative process requires the definition of desired outcome. Traditionally, medicine has defined the desired outcome of treatment as curing disease. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) cannot be cured by applying current biotechnology. Thus, to assess treatment interventions in patients with ESRD, the desired outcome must be expanded to incorporate the broader components of health, which include physical, mental, and social well-being or quality of life. Based on this expanded definition of health, desirable treatment outcomes in patients with ESRD include employment of those able to work, individual control over the effects of kidney disease and dialysis, enhanced fitness, improved communications with caregivers and family, improved compliance with the dialysis regimen, and resumption of many activities enjoyed before the initiation of dialysis. Broadening the definition of desired outcome requires new measurement techniques. Measurement instruments for health status must evaluate fixed disease, which imposes certain limits on expected outcome; mutable health status, which represents the focus of intervention; and factors unrelated to healthcare, which will modify the scope of intervention that can be prescribed. Health-care status involves both self-reported evaluation and physical assessment. The reporting forms should be comprehensive, convenient, controlled, and valid. Such forms can be targeted to gain information about the natural evolution of a disease or disability process, to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment or other intervention on altering the disease or disability outcome, and to measure the quality of care. Two examples of the application of health status assessment will be reviewed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8023836

  7. Diagnosis of cardiac disease in pediatric end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Chavers, Blanche M.; Solid, Craig A.; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Frank X.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Frankenfield, Diane L.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cardiac disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study aimed to report the frequency of cardiac disease diagnostic methods used in US pediatric maintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of all US pediatric (ages 0.7–18 years, n = 656) maintenance hemodialysis patients was performed using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. Clinical and laboratory information was collected in 2001. Results were analysed by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, dialysis duration, body mass index (BMI), primary ESRD cause and laboratory data. Results. Ninety-two percent of the patients had a cardiovascular risk factor (63% hypertension, 38% anemia, 11% BMI > 94th percentile, 63% serum phosphorus > 5.5 mg/dL and 55% calcium–phosphorus product ≥ 55 mg2/dL2). A diagnosis of cardiac disease was reported in 24% (n = 155) of all patients: left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement 17%, congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema 8%, cardiomyopathy 2% and decreased left ventricular function 2%. Thirty-one percent of patients were not tested. Of those tested, the diagnostic methods used were chest X-rays in 60%, echocardiograms in 35% and electrocardiograms in 33%; left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement was diagnosed using echocardiogram (72%), chest X-ray (20%) and electrocardiogram (15%). Conclusions. Although 92% of patients had cardiovascular risk factors, an echocardiography was performed in only one-third of the patients. Our study raises the question of why echocardiography, considered the gold standard for cardiac disease diagnosis, has been infrequently used in pediatric maintenance dialysis patients, a high-risk patient population. PMID:20861193

  8. l-Carnitine improves cognitive and renal functions in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Abu Ahmad, Nur; Armaly, Zaher; Berman, Sylvia; Jabour, Adel; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Mosenego-Ornan, Efrat; Avital, Avi

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has reached epidemic proportions. The search for novel pharmacological treatment for CKD has become an area of intensive clinical research. l-Carnitine, considered as the "gatekeeper" responsible for admitting long chain fatty acids into cell mitochondria. l-Carnitine synthesis and turnover are regulated mainly by the kidney and its levels inversely correlate with serum creatinine of normal subjects and CKD patients. Previous studies showed that l-carnitine administration to elderly people is improving and preserving cognitive function. As yet, there are no clinical intervention studies that investigated the effect of l-carnitine administration on cognitive impairment evidenced in CKD patients. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of l-carnitine treatment on renal function and on the cognitive performance in a rat model of progressive CKD. To assess the role of l-carnitine on CKD condition, we estimated the renal function and cognitive abilities in a CKD rat model. We found that all CKD animals exhibited renal function deterioration, as indicated by elevated serum creatinine, BUN, and ample histopathological abnormalities. l-Carnitine treatment of CKD rats significantly reduced serum creatinine and BUN, attenuated renal hypertrophy and decreased renal tissue damage. In addition, in the two way shuttle avoidance learning, CKD animals showed cognitive impairment which recovered by the administration of l-carnitine. We conclude that in a rat model of CKD, l-carnitine administration significantly improved cognitive and renal functions. PMID:27241631

  9. Renal expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α in patients with chronic kidney disease: a clinicopathologic study from nephrectomized kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Tung-Wei, Hung; Jia-Hung, Liou; Kun-Tu, Yeh; Jen-Pi, Tsai; Sheng-Wen, Wu; Hui-Chun, Tai; Wei-Tse, Kao; Shu-Hui, Lin; Ya-Wen, Cheng; Horng-Rong, Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of renal interstitial fibrosis. However, the relationship of HIF-1α expression intensity in human renal tissue with the degree of renal function or renal fibrosis has not been investigated. We therefore, undertook this study to assess the relationship between HIF-1α expression and degree of renal impairment and renal fibrosis using renal tissue from nephrectomized kidneys from patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods: This retrospective study was performed with 70 patients undergoing unilateral or bilateral nephrectomy because of renal cell carcinoma, urothelial cell carcinoma, or renal abscess. Immunohistochemical analysis of HIF-1α expression in non-tumourous or non-abscess renal parenchyma was performed. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (n=37) with low intensity HIF-1α expression and group 2 (n=33) with high intensity HIF-1α expression. Results: The intensity of renal HIF-1α expression was significantly associated with serum creatinine level (P=0.005), estimated glomerular filtration rate (P=0.02), fibrosis score of the interstitium (P=0.004) and glomerular sclerosis (P=0.013). A high intensity of HIF-1α expression tended to be associated with lower serum creatinine, higher estimated glomerular filtration rate, low interstitial fibrosis score and low glomerular sclerosis. In addition, multivariate analysis by step-wise logistic regression demonstrated that interstitial fibrosis was the only independent factor associated with the intensity of renal HIF-1α expression (OR 4.107, CI 1.535-11.313, P=0.005). Interpretation & conclusions: This study demonstrated a correlation between intensity of HIF-1α expression and degree of renal interstitial fibrosis. The association demonstrated an elevated HIF-1α expression in less severe kidney disease. The intensity of HIF-1α renal expression plays a role in the pathogenesis of

  10. Analysis of the New Zealand Black contribution to lupus-like renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, C.G.; Rozzo, S.J.; Hirschfeld, H.F.; Smarnworawong, N.P.; Palmer, E.; Kotzin, B.L. |

    1995-03-01

    F{sub 1} progeny of New Zealand Black (NZB) and New Zealand White (NZW) mice spontaneously develop an autoimmune process remarkably similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus. Previous studies have implicated major genetic contributions from the NZW MHC and from a dominant NZB gene on chromosome 4. To identify additional NZB contributions to lupus-like disease, (NZB x SM/J)F{sub 1} x NZW backcross mice were followed for the development of severe renal disease and were comprehensively genotyped. Despite a 50% incidence of disease significant associations between the presence of the NZB genotype and disease were noted on chromosomes 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, and 19. The data indicated that multiple NZB genes, in different combinations, contribute to severe renal disease, and that no single gene is required. To further investigate this NZB contribution, NZB x SM/J (NXSM) recombinant inbred (RI) strains were crossed with NZW mice, and F{sub 1} progeny were analyzed for the presence of lupus-like renal disease. Interestingly, nearly all of the (RI x NZW)F{sub 1} cohorts studies expressed some level of disease. Five RI strains generated a high incidence of disease, similar to (NZB x NZW)F{sub 1} mice, and nearly one-half of the cohorts developed disease at intermediate levels. Only two cohorts demonstrated very little disease, supporting the conclusion that multiple genes are capable of disease induction. Experiments correlating the genotypes of these RI strains with their ability to generate disease revealed that none of the disease-associated loci defined by the backcross analysis were present in all five RI strains that generated disease at high levels. Overall, both the backcross data and RI analysis provide additional support for the genetic complexity of lupus nephritis and uphold the conclusion that heterogeneous combinations of contributing NZB genes seem to operate in a threshold manner to generate the disease phenotype. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Influence of Socio-Economic Inequalities on Access to Renal Transplantation and Survival of Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kihal-Talantikite, Wahida; Vigneau, Cécile; Deguen, Séverine; Siebert, Muriel; Couchoud, Cécile; Bayat, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Background Public and scientific concerns about the social gradient of end-stage renal disease and access to renal replacement therapies are increasing. This study investigated the influence of social inequalities on the (i) access to renal transplant waiting list, (ii) access to renal transplantation and (iii) patients’ survival. Methods All incident adult patients with end-stage renal disease who lived in Bretagne, a French region, and started dialysis during the 2004–2009 period were geocoded in census-blocks. To each census-block was assigned a level of neighborhood deprivation and a degree of urbanization. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify factors associated with each study outcome. Results Patients living in neighborhoods with low level of deprivation had more chance to be placed on the waiting list and less risk of death (HR = 1.40 95%CI: [1.1–1.7]; HR = 0.82 95%CI: [0.7–0.98]), but this association did not remain after adjustment for the patients’ clinical features. The likelihood of receiving renal transplantation after being waitlisted was not associated with neighborhood deprivation in univariate and multivariate analyses. Conclusions In a mixed rural and urban French region, patients living in deprived or advantaged neighborhoods had the same chance to be placed on the waiting list and to undergo renal transplantation. They also showed the same mortality risk, when their clinical features were taken into account. PMID:27082113

  12. 76 FR 70227 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System and Quality Incentive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ...This final rule updates and makes certain revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2012. We are also finalizing the interim final rule with comment period published on April 6, 2011, regarding the transition budget-neutrality adjustment under the ESRD PPS,. This final rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive......

  13. Obstetric outcomes in women with end-stage renal disease on chronic dialysis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, L Y; Thia, E W H; Tan, L K

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancies in women on chronic dialysis for end-stage renal disease are high risk, but outcomes appear to have improved with increasing experience and advances in dialysis care. This paper reviews the existing data on outcomes in such pregnancies to enable evidence-based preconception counselling and anticipation of antenatal complications.

  14. 75 FR 49029 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Federal Register a proposed rule entitled ``End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System'' (74 FR... separately billable services into a single base rate of $198.64 developed from CY 2007 claims data (74 FR... FR 49949). The case-mix adjusters would include variables for age, body surface area (BSA), low...

  15. Research in HIV-related renal diseases lags behind their burden to the 'positive' community.

    PubMed

    Szczech, L A

    2007-12-01

    Although outcomes for persons with HIV infection and renal disease have improved, the analysis by Choi et al. suggests that they remain similar to or worse than outcomes for persons with diabetes mellitus. This study should be used to frame the research resources that we devote to furthering knowledge in this area. PMID:18004309

  16. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  17. 77 FR 40951 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... rule (75 FR 49030 through 49214) titled, ``End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System... November 10, 2011, we published in the Federal Register, a final rule (76 FR 70228 through 70316) titled... the CY 2012 ESRD PPS final rule (76 FR 70228), we clarified the following: For the low-volume...

  18. Active video gaming in patients with renal transplant: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with renal transplant are at higher risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. Physical activity has been shown to reduce the risk of CVD mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, barriers such as the harsh Canadian climate prevent patients from engaging in and harvesting the health benefits of physical activity. This pilot study explored active video gaming (AVG) as a way for patients with renal transplant to obtain physical activity and examined its effect on their functional status and quality of life (QOL). Main text We recruited nine patients for an 8-week prospective pilot study. All patients received a Microsoft Xbox 360™ video gaming console, a Microsoft Kinect™ sensor, and the video game Your Shape Fitness Evolved 2012. Assessment of each participant before and after the intervention included blood pressure measures, a 6-minute walk test, and the Godin Leisure Time Questionnaire (GLTQ). We analyzed all nine patients at the end of the 8-week study period, and found no changes in blood pressure or GLTQ scores. However, there was a significant increase in the 6-minute walk distance (P = 0.022), which represented a consistent increase for most patients (correlation = 0.977). In addition, participants over the age of 45 years (n = 4) were more likely to use the AVG system (P = 0.042). Conclusion AVG has the potential to improve the functional status in patients with renal transplant. Further research is required to corroborate the full health benefits of AVG in this patient population. PMID:25114788

  19. Copious Podocyturia without Proteinuria and with Normal Renal Function in a Young Adult with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, H; Canzonieri, R; Muryan, A; Schiel, A; Araoz, A; Forrester, M; Karl, A; Lombi, F; Andrews, J; Pomeranz, V; Rengel, T; Zotta, E

    2015-01-01

    The time for starting a patient with Fabry disease on enzyme replacement therapy is still a matter of debate, particularly when no overt classical clinical signs or symptoms are present. With respect to Fabry nephropathy, a dual problem coexists: the reluctance of many nephrologists to start enzyme replacement infusion until signs of renal disease appear as the appearance of proteinuria or an elevation in serum creatinine and the lack of validated biomarkers of early renal damage. In this regard, proteinuria is nowadays considered as an early and appropriate marker of kidney disease and of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, in this report we demonstrate that podocyturia antedates the classical appearance of proteinuria and could be considered as an even earlier biomarker of kidney damage. Podocyturia may be a novel indication for the initiation of therapy in Fabry disease. PMID:26064721

  20. Copious Podocyturia without Proteinuria and with Normal Renal Function in a Young Adult with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trimarchi, H.; Canzonieri, R.; Muryan, A.; Schiel, A.; Forrester, M.; Karl, A.; Lombi, F.; Andrews, J.; Pomeranz, V.; Rengel, T.; Zotta, E.

    2015-01-01

    The time for starting a patient with Fabry disease on enzyme replacement therapy is still a matter of debate, particularly when no overt classical clinical signs or symptoms are present. With respect to Fabry nephropathy, a dual problem coexists: the reluctance of many nephrologists to start enzyme replacement infusion until signs of renal disease appear as the appearance of proteinuria or an elevation in serum creatinine and the lack of validated biomarkers of early renal damage. In this regard, proteinuria is nowadays considered as an early and appropriate marker of kidney disease and of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, in this report we demonstrate that podocyturia antedates the classical appearance of proteinuria and could be considered as an even earlier biomarker of kidney damage. Podocyturia may be a novel indication for the initiation of therapy in Fabry disease. PMID:26064721

  1. Biopsy-proven renal disease in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A histopathologic review

    PubMed Central

    Onwubuya, I. M.; Adelusola, K. A.; Sabageh, D.; Ezike, K. N.; Olaofe, O. O.

    2016-01-01

    Although various patterns of renal diseases have been reported from different renal biopsy registries worldwide, data from Nigeria remain scanty. A 10-year retrospective review of renal biopsies was conducted in our tertiary health care facility. All cases were reclassified based on their light microscopic features after the application of standard histochemical stains. A total of 165 cases were reviewed with a male:female ratio of 1.8:1 and a mean age of 15.4 ± 12.0 years. About 69.7% of the cases were below the age of 16 years, while only 2.4% were older than 50 years. The most common indications for biopsy were nephrotic syndrome (72.1%) and acute renal failure of unknown etiology (11.5%). Overall, glomerulonephritis (80%) was the most common histologic category and occurred only in individuals younger than 50 years old. Minimal change disease (22.9%) and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (21.9%) were the most common varieties in children, while membranous glomerulonephritis (30.6%) and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (27.8%) were the commonest among the adult population. The initial histologic diagnosis was revised in 18 cases while a diagnosis was arrived at in seven cases initially adjudged as inadequate for assessment. This study showed that renal biopsy was predominantly performed in children and adolescents. Although glomerulonephritis was the predominant disease, the predominant histologic patterns varied with the patient age. Despite the scarcity of advanced diagnostic tools in resource-poor environments, routine use of histochemical stains is helpful in the evaluation of renal biopsies. PMID:26937073

  2. Bortezomib produces high hematological response rates with prolonged renal survival in monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Camille; Royer, Bruno; Javaugue, Vincent; Szalat, Raphael; El Karoui, Khalil; Caulier, Alexis; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Jaccard, Arnaud; Chevret, Sylvie; Touchard, Guy; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Arnulf, Bertrand; Bridoux, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD) is a rare complication of plasma cell disorders, defined by linear Congo red-negative deposits of monoclonal light chain, heavy chain, or both along basement membranes. While renal involvement is prominent, treatment strategies, such as the impact of novel anti-myeloma agents, remain poorly defined. Here we retrospectively studied 49 patients with MIDD who received a median of 4.5 cycles of intravenous bortezomib plus dexamethasone. Of these, 25 received no additional treatment, 18 also received cyclophosphamide, while 6 also received thalidomide or lenalidomide. The hematological diagnoses identified 38 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance, 10 with symptomatic multiple myeloma, and 1 with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. The overall hematologic response rate, based on the difference between involved and uninvolved serum-free light chains (dFLCs), was 91%. After median follow-up of 54 months, 5 patients died and 10 had reached end-stage renal disease. Renal response was achieved in 26 patients, with a 35% increase in median eGFR and an 86% decrease in median 24-h proteinuria. Predictive factors were pre-treatment eGFR over 30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and post-treatment dFLC under 40 mg/l; the latter was the sole predictive factor of renal response by multivariable analysis. Thus, bortezomib-based therapy is a promising treatment strategy in MIDD, mainly when used early in the disease course. dFLC response is a favorable prognostic factor for renal survival. PMID:26176826

  3. Continuous renal replacement therapy outcomes in acute kidney injury and end-stage renal disease: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a widely used but resource-intensive treatment. Despite its broad adoption in intensive care units (ICUs), it remains challenging to identify patients who would be most likely to achieve positive outcomes with this therapy and to provide realistic prognostic information to patients and families. Methods We analyzed a prospective cohort of all 863 ICU patients initiated on CRRT at an academic medical center from 2008 to 2011 with either new-onset acute kidney injury (AKI) or pre-admission end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We examined in-hospital and post-discharge mortality (for all patients), as well as renal recovery (for AKI patients). We identified prognostic factors for both in-hospital and post-discharge mortality separately in patients with AKI or ESRD. Results In-hospital mortality was 61% for AKI and 54% for ESRD. In patients with AKI (n = 725), independent risk factors for mortality included age over 60 (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3, 2.7), serum lactate over 4 mmol/L (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.5, 3.1), serum creatinine over 3 mg/dL at time of CRRT initiation (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.43, 0.92) and comorbid liver disease (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.1, 2.9). Among patients with ESRD (n = 138), liver disease was associated with increased mortality (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.1, 11.1) as was admission to a medical (vs surgical) ICU (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1, 4.7). Following discharge, advanced age became a predictor of mortality in both groups (AKI: HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2, 3.0; ESRD: HR 4.1, 95% CI 1.5, 10.9). At the end of the study period, only 25% (n = 183) of patients with AKI achieved dialysis-free survival. Conclusions Among patients initiating CRRT, risk factors for mortality differ between patients with underlying ESRD or newly acquired AKI. Long-term dialysis-free survival in AKI is low. Providers should consider these factors when assessing prognosis or appropriateness of CRRT. PMID:23782899

  4. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacology of atenolol and effect of renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wan, S H; Koda, R T; Maronde, R F

    1979-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous and oral atenolol (50 mg) in six healthy volunteers was studied. Plasma, saliva and urine were collected up to 24 h after each dose. 2. There was no significant difference in atenolol half-life when administered by the two routes. Bioavailability of the orally administered atenolol was 50%. 3. Atenolol levels in saliva required about 2 h to reach equilibrium with plasma drug levels. 4. A comparison between the pharmacokinetics and pharmacology of atenolol was made in twelve healthy subjects. 5. Dose-independent pharmacokinetics were observed. Reductions in resting heart rate and arterial blood pressure were proportional to either the logarithm of dose or area under the plasma concentration time curve or cumulative urinary atenolol excretion. 6. Plasma elimination half-life in five subjects with renal failure was prolonged. PMID:465278

  5. Renal Lesions Associated with IgM-Secreting Monoclonal Proliferations: Revisiting the Disease Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Audard, Vincent; Georges, Benoit; Vanhille, Philippe; Toly, Cécile; Deroure, Benjamin; Fakhouri, Fadi; Cuvelier, René; Belenfant, Xavier; Surin, Brigitte; Aucouturier, Pierre; Mougenot, Béatrice; Ronco, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Since the first description of pathology of the kidney in Waldenström disease in 1970, there have been few reports on kidney complications of IgM-secreting monoclonal proliferations. Here, we aimed to revisit the spectrum of renal lesions occurring in patients with a serum monoclonal IgM. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Fourteen patients with a circulating monoclonal IgM and a kidney disease related to B cell proliferation were identified retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were assessed for each patient at the time of kidney biopsy. Results: Seven patients had a nephrotic syndrome. Patients without nephrotic syndrome all had impaired renal function. Mean serum creatinine was 238 μmol/L. For five patients, the diagnosis of monoclonal IgM preceded the kidney disease by 28.8 mo (range 12 to 60). Seven patients had Waldenström disease, two had a small B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, one had an IgM-excreting multiple myeloma, one had a marginal zone B cell lymphoma, and three had an IgM-related disorder. Renal lesions included (1) intracapillary monoclonal deposits disease with granular, electron-dense IgM thrombi occluding capillary lumens (5); (2) atypical membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (3); (3) λ light chain amyloidosis (2) associated with μ deposits in one patient; (4) acute tubular necrosis (1); and (5) CD20+ lymphomatous infiltration (3). Remission of the nephrotic syndrome was attained in three of seven patients, and renal function improved after chemotherapy. Conclusions: Although renal complications of IgM proliferations are rare, a wide spectrum of kidney lesions is observed, without correlation with the type of hematologic disorder. PMID:18632851

  6. Activity-based funding model provides foundation for province-wide best practices in renal care.

    PubMed

    Levin, Adeera; Lo, Clifford; Noel, Kevin; Djurdjev, Ogjnenka; Amano, Erlyn C

    2013-01-01

    British Columbia has a unique funding model for renal care in Canada. Patient care is delivered through six health authorities, while funding is administered by the Provincial Renal Agency using an activity-based funding model. The model allocates funding based on a schedule of costs for every element of renal care, excluding physician fees. Accountability, transparency of allocation and tracking of outcomes are key features that ensure successful implementation. The model supports province-wide best practices and equitable care and fosters innovation. Since its introduction, the outpatient renal services budget has grown less than the population, while maintaining or improving clinical outcomes. PMID:24485244

  7. The Human Variome Project: ensuring the quality of DNA variant databases in inherited renal disease.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard Gh; den Dunnen, Johan T; Macrae, Finlay; Povey, Sue

    2015-11-01

    A recent review identified 60 common inherited renal diseases caused by DNA variants in 132 different genes. These diseases can be diagnosed with DNA sequencing, but each gene probably also has a thousand normal variants. Many more normal variants have been characterised by individual laboratories than are reported in the literature or found in publicly accessible collections. At present, testing laboratories must assess each novel change they identify for pathogenicity, even when this has been done elsewhere previously, and the distinction between normal and disease-associated variants is particularly an issue with the recent surge in exomic sequencing and gene discovery projects. The Human Variome Project recommends the establishment of gene-specific DNA variant databases to facilitate the sharing of DNA variants and decisions about likely disease causation. Databases improve diagnostic accuracy and testing efficiency, and reduce costs. They also help with genotype-phenotype correlations and predictive algorithms. The Human Variome Project advocates databases that use standardised descriptions, are up-to-date, include clinical information and are freely available. Currently, the genes affected in the most common inherited renal diseases correspond to 350 different variant databases, many of which are incomplete or have insufficient clinical details for genotype-phenotype correlations. Assistance is needed from nephrologists to maximise the usefulness of these databases for the diagnosis and management of inherited renal disease. PMID:25384529

  8. Histomorphometry of feline chronic kidney disease and correlation with markers of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Syme, H M; Brown, C A; Elliott, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in geriatric cats, but most cases have nonspecific renal lesions, and few studies have correlated these lesions with clinicopathological markers of renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to identify the lesions best correlated with renal function and likely mediators of disease progression in cats with chronic kidney disease. Cats were recruited through 2 first-opinion practices between 1992 and 2010. When postmortem examinations were authorized, renal tissues were preserved in formalin. Sections were evaluated by a pathologist masked to all clinicopathological data. They were scored semiquantitatively for the severity of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis. Glomerular volume was measured using image analysis; the percentage of glomeruli that were obsolescent was recorded. Sections were assessed for hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis and tubular mineralization. Kidneys from 80 cats with plasma biochemical data from the last 2 months of life were included in the study. Multivariable linear regression (P < .05) was used to assess the association of lesions with clinicopathological data obtained close to death. Interstitial fibrosis was the lesion best correlated with the severity of azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and anemia. Proteinuria was associated with interstitial fibrosis and glomerular hypertrophy, whereas higher time-averaged systolic blood pressure was associated with glomerulosclerosis and hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis. PMID:22773469

  9. Distinct genetic regulation of progression of diabetes and renal disease in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    PubMed

    Nobrega, Marcelo A; Solberg Woods, Leah C; Fleming, Stewart; Jacob, Howard J

    2009-09-01

    Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats develop early-onset type 2 diabetes (T2D) symptoms, with signs of diabetic nephropathy becoming apparent with aging. To determine whether T2D and renal disease share similar genetic architecture, we ran a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in the F2 progeny of a GK x Brown Norway (BN) rat cross. Further, to determine whether genetic components change over time, we ran the QTL analysis on phenotypes collected longitudinally, at 3, 6, 9 and 12 mo, from the same animals. We confirmed three chromosomal regions that are linked to early diabetes phenotypes (chromosomes 1, 5, and 10) and a single region involved in the late progression of the disorder (chromosome 4). A single region was identified for the onset of the renal phenotype proteinuria (chromosome 5). This region overlaps the diabetic QTL, although it is not certain whether similar genes are involved in both phenotypes. A second QTL linked to the progression of the renal phenotype was found on chromosome 7. Linkage for triglyceride and cholesterol levels were also identified (chromosomes 7 and 8, respectively). These results demonstrate that, in general, different genetic components control diabetic and renal phenotypes in a diabetic nephropathy model. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that, over time, different genetic components are involved in progression of disease from those that were involved in disease onset. This observation would suggest that clinical studies collecting participants over a wide age distribution may be diluting genetic effects and reducing power to detect true effects. PMID:19584172

  10. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Acute arterial occlusion - kidney Acute kidney failure Aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Blood clots Renal cell carcinoma Renal venogram X-ray Update Date 4/7/2014 Updated by: Jason ... Failure Kidney Tests X-Rays Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  11. Activated protein C protects against renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury, independent of its anticoagulant properties.

    PubMed

    Lattenist, Lionel; Jansen, Marcel P B; Teske, Gwendoline; Claessen, Nike; Meijers, Joost C M; Rezaie, Alireza R; Esmon, Charles T; Florquin, Sandrine; Roelofs, Joris J T H

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal failure, a serious condition characterised by a drastic decline in renal function, often follows ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) episodes. I/R is characterised by necrosis, inflammation and activation of coagulation, in concert causing renal tissue damage. In this context, activated protein C (APC) might be of importance in the pathogenesis of renal I/R. APC is a serine protease which has anticoagulant but also several anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects such as protection of endothelial barrier function. It was our objective to study the role of cytoprotective and anticoagulant functions of APC during renal I/R. C57BL/6j mice subjected to renal I/R were treated with intraperitoneally injected exogenous human APC, or two mutant forms of APC (200 µg/kg) which specifically lack anticoagulant or signalling properties. In a different experiment mice received specific monoclonal antibodies (20 mg/kg) that block the cytoprotective and/or anticoagulant properties of endogenous APC. Treatment with APC reduced tubular injury and enhanced renal function without altering the inflammatory response and did reduce renal fibrin deposition. Administration of APC mutant lacking anticoagulant properties reduced renal damage and enhanced renal function. Blocking the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of endogenous APC resulted in elevated tubular damage and reduced tubular cell proliferation, however, without influencing renal function or the inflammatory response. Furthermore, blocking both the anticoagulant and cytoprotective effects of APC resulted in dramatic renal interstitial haemorrhage, indicative of impaired vascular integrity. Blocking only the anticoagulant function of APC did not result in interstitial bleeding. In conclusion, the renoprotective effect of APC during I/R is independent of its anticoagulant properties. PMID:27052416

  12. Effect of urinary stone disease and its treatment on renal function

    PubMed Central

    Mehmet, Necmettin Mercimek; Ender, Ozden

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease that affects urinary tract in all age groups. Both in adults and in children, stone size, location, renal anatomy, and other factors, can influence the success of treatment modalities. Recently, there has been a great advancement in technology for minimally invasive management of urinary stones. The epoch of open treatment modalities has passed and currently there are much less invasive treatment approaches, such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy, shockwave lithotripsy, and retrograde internal Surgery. Furthermore, advancement in imaging technics ensures substantial knowledge that permit physician to decide the most convenient treatment method for the patient. Thus, effective and rapid treatment of urinary tract stones is substantial for the preservation of the renal function. In this review, the effects of the treatment options for urinary stones on renal function have been reviewed. PMID:25949941

  13. High-density renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease demonstrated by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    Unenhanced abdominal CT scans of 35 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) showed multiple high-density (58-84 HU) renal cysts in 42.9% of patients, occasional high-density cysts in 25.7%, and no high-density cysts in 31.4%. These high-density cysts were usually subcapsular and were more frequent in patients with markedly enlarged kidneys and flank pain at the time of CT. Follow-up CT often showed a reduction in cyst densities, although some cysts developed mural calcification and calcification of their contents. Renal carcinomas occur rarely in ADPKD and may occasionally be hyperdense. However, high-density cysts may usually be distinguished from carcinomas on CT by their smooth contours, sharp interfaces with renal parenchyma, homogeneity, and lack of contrast enhancement.

  14. Captopril-induced sialadenitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahdiabadi, Fatemeh Musavi; Nikvarz, Naemeh

    2016-01-01

    Sialadenitis is a rare adverse effect of captopril. We report a case of captopril-induced sialadenitis in a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A 20-year-old man with ESRD encountered parotid and submandibular swelling after receiving two doses of captopril, administered sublingually. Despite of prescribing dexamethasone, resuming hemodialysis, and discontinuing other drugs that also can cause parotitis, he improved later than what was reported in patients with normal renal function. In conclusion recovery from captopril-induced sialadenitis in patients with ESRD may be more prolonged than that of patients with normal renal function; moreover, early hemodialysis which helps in drug removal may be the most effective treatment. PMID:27162811

  15. Studies on the Release of Renin by Direct and Reflex Activation of Renal Sympathetic Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents data on release of renin during direct and indirect stimulation of renal nerves. Conclusions show that renin release is influenced by change in activity of carotid and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor systems, and excitation of discrete areas of brain and hypothalamus by changes in renal sympathetic nerve. (Author/SA)

  16. Constitutive renal Rel/nuclear factor-κB expression in Lewis polycystic kidney disease rats

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Michelle H T; Schwensen, Kristina G; Liuwantara, David; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Rangan, Gopala K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the temporal expression and pattern of Rel/nuclear factor (NF)-κB proteins in renal tissue in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). METHODS: The renal expression of Rel/NF-κB proteins was determined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis in Lewis polycystic kidney rats (LPK, a genetic ortholog of human nephronopthsis-9) from postnatal weeks 3 to 20. At each timepoint, renal disease progression and the mRNA expression of NF-κB-dependent genes (TNFα and CCL2) were determined. NF-κB was also histologically assessed in human PKD tissue. RESULTS: Progressive kidney enlargement in LPK rats was accompanied by increased renal cell proliferation and interstitial monocyte accumulation (peaking at weeks 3 and 10 respectively), and progressive interstitial fibrosis (with α smooth muscle actin and Sirius Red deposition significantly increased compared to Lewis kidneys from weeks 3 to 6 onwards). Rel/NF-κB proteins (phosphorylated-p105, p65, p50, c-Rel and RelB) were expressed in cystic epithelial cells (CECs) of LPK kidneys as early as postnatal week 3 and sustained until late-stage disease at week 20. From weeks 10 to 20, nuclear p65, p50, RelB and cytoplasmic IκBα protein levels, and TNFα and CCL2 expression, were upregulated in LPK compared to Lewis kidneys. NF-κB proteins were consistently expressed in CECs of human PKD. The DNA damage marker γ-H2AX was also identified in the CECs of LPK and human polycystic kidneys. CONCLUSION: Several NF-κB proteins are consistently expressed in CECs in human and experimental PKD. These data suggest that the upregulation of both the canonical and non-canonical pathways of NF-κB signaling may be a constitutive and early pathological feature of cystic renal diseases. PMID:27458563

  17. Peripheral arterial disease in diabetic patients with renal insufficiency: a review.

    PubMed

    Lepäntalo, Mauri; Fiengo, Leslie; Biancari, Fausto

    2012-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is common among diabetic patients with renal insufficiency, and most of the diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have peripheral arterial disease. Ischaemia is probably overrepresented as an etiological factor for a diabetic foot ulcer in this group of patients compared with other diabetic patients. ESRD is a strong risk factor for both ulceration and amputation in diabetic patients. It increases the risk of nonhealing of ulcers and major amputation with an OR of 2.5-3. Renal disease is a more important predictor of poor outcome after revascularizations than commonly expected. Preoperative vascular imaging is also affected by a number of limitations, mostly related to side effects of contrast agents poorly eliminated because of kidney dysfunction. Patients with renal failure have high perioperative morbidity and mortality. Persistent ischaemia, extensive infection, forefoot and heel gangrene, poor run-off, poor cardiac function, and the length of dialysis-dependent renal failure all affect the outcome adversely. Despite dismal overall outcome, recent data indicate that by proper selection, favourable results can be obtained even in ESRD patients, with the majority of studies reporting 1-year limb salvage rates of 65-75% after revascularization among survivors. High 1-year mortality of 38% reported in a recent review has to be taken into consideration, though. The preferential use of endovascular-first approach is attractive in this vulnerable multimorbid group of patients, but the evidence for endovascular treatment is very scarce. The need for complete revascularization of the foot may be even more important than in other patients with ischaemic ulcerated diabetic foot because there are a number of factors counteracting healing in these patients. Typically, half of the patients are reported to lose their legs despite open bypass. To control tissue damage and improve chances of ulcer healing, one should understand that

  18. A prospective study of renal disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Y; Terai, C; Moriguchi, M; Uesato, M; Kamatani, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—This prospective study was designed to clarify the frequency, causes, and clinical course of renal disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—235 patients (185 women, mean age 49.4 years) with early RA of less than one year's duration were enrolled and assessed monthly. Proteinuria was defined as a positive dipstick result and microscopic haematuria was defined as the presence of ⩾5 red blood cells per high power field. Urinary abnormalities lasting three months or longer were defined as persistent abnormalities.
RESULTS—At entry, 40 patients exhibited haematuria, two had a raised serum creatinine concentration, and none had proteinuria. During the observation period (average 42 months), persistent haematuria was found in 43, persistent proteinuria in 17, and a raised serum creatinine concentration in 14 patients. Persistent proteinuria was caused by drugs in 14 of 17 patients and disappeared in most cases. Risk factors for drug induced proteinuria included a raised C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate and age over 50 at entry. Drugs resulted in a raised serum creatinine concentration in eight of 14 patients. The incidence of haematuria at entry did not differ among patients who had been treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, or no drugs. In some patients with isolated haematuria, the haematuria appeared when the activity of RA was high and resolved when it was low.
CONCLUSIONS—This study suggests that a raised serum creatinine concentration or persistent proteinuria in patients with early RA is predominantly drug related whereas, in contrast, isolated haematuria is more directly associated with the activity of the disease process.

 PMID:11247860

  19. Arterial and Aortic Valve Calcification Abolished by Elastolytic Cathepsin S Deficiency in Chronic Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Elena; Aikawa, Masanori; Libby, Peter; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Rusanescu, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Kohler, Rainer H.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinical studies have demonstrated that 50% of individuals with chronic renal disease (CRD) die of cardiovascular causes, including advanced calcific arterial and valvular disease; however, the mechanisms of accelerated calcification in CRD remain obscure, and no therapies can prevent disease progression. We recently demonstrated in vivo that inflammation triggers cardiovascular calcification. In vitro evidence also indicates that elastin degradation products may promote osteogenesis. Here, we used genetically modified mice and molecular imaging to test the hypothesis in vivo that cathepsin S (catS), a potent elastolytic proteinase, accelerates calcification in atherosclerotic mice with CRD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein-deficient (apoE−/−)/catS+/+ (n = 24) and apoE−/−/catS−/− (n = 24) mice were assigned to CRD and control groups. CRD mice had significantly higher serum phosphate, creatinine, and cystatin C levels than those without CRD. To visualize catS activity and osteogenesis in vivo, we coadministered catS-activatable and calcification-targeted molecular imaging agents 10 weeks after nephrectomy. Imaging coregistered increased catS and osteogenic activities in the CRD apoE−/−/catS+/+ cohort, whereas CRD apoE−/−/catS−/− mice exhibited less calcification. Quantitative histology demonstrated greater catS-associated elastin fragmentation and calcification in CRD apoE−/−/catS+/+ than CRD apoE−/−/catS−/− aortas and aortic valves. Notably, catS deletion did not cause compensatory increases in RNA levels of other elastolytic cathepsins or matrix metalloproteinases. Elastin peptide and recombinant catS significantly increased calcification in smooth muscle cells in vitro, a process further amplified in phosphate-enriched culture medium. Conclusions The present study provides direct in vivo evidence that catS-induced elastolysis accelerates arterial and aortic valve calcification in CRD

  20. Bilateral multiple cystic kidney disease and renal cortical abscess in a Boerboel.

    PubMed

    Kitshoff, A M; McClure, V; Lim, C K; Kirberger, R M

    2011-06-01

    Cystic renal disease is rare in dogs and although infected renal cysts have been reported in humans, no report could be found in dogs. A 58 kg, 5-year-old, castrated, male Boerboel presented with weight loss, pyrexia, lethargy and vomiting, 20 months after an incident of haematuria was reported. The initial ultrasonographic diagnosis was bilateral multiple renal cysts of unknown aetiology. The cysts had significantly increased in size over the 20-month period and some contained echogenic specks which could be related to infection, normal cellular debris or haemorrhage. In both kidneys the renal contours were distorted (the left more than the right). The abnormal shape of the left kidney was largely due to multiple cysts and a large crescent-shaped septate mass on the cranial pole of the kidney. Aspirates of the septate mass were performed (left kidney) and the cytology and culture were indicative of an abscess. It is suggested that the previous incident of haematuria provided a portal of entry for bacteria into the cysts resulting in renal cortical abscess formation. PMID:22135926

  1. Transglutaminase activation in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Muma, Nancy A; Battaile, Kevin P; Cooper, Arthur JL

    2009-01-01

    The following review examines the role of calcium in promoting the in vitro and in vivo activation of transglutaminases in neurodegenerative disorders. Diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease exhibit increased transglutaminase activity and rises in intracellular calcium concentrations, which may be related. The aberrant activation of transglutaminase by calcium is thought to give rise to a variety of pathological moieties in these diseases, and the inhibition has been shown to have therapeutic benefit in animal and cellular models of neurodegeneration. Given the potential clinical relevance of transglutaminase inhibitors, we have also reviewed the recent development of such compounds. PMID:20161049

  2. Spectrum of HNF1B Mutations in a Large Cohort of Patients Who Harbor Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Decramer, Stéphane; Pawtowski, Audrey; Morinière, Vincent; Bandin, Flavio; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lebre, Anne-Sophie; Faguer, Stanislas; Guigonis, Vincent; Antignac, Corinne; Salomon, Rémi

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is a transcription factor that is critical for the development of kidney and pancreas. In humans, mutations in HNF1B lead to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pancreas atrophy, and maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 and genital malformations. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report HNF1B screening in a cohort of 377 unrelated cases with various kidney phenotypes (hyperechogenic kidneys with size not more than +3 SD, multicystic kidney disease, renal agenesis, renal hypoplasia, cystic dysplasia, or hyperuricemic tubulointerstitial nephropathy not associated with UMOD mutation). Results: We found a heterozygous mutation in 75 (19.9%) index cases, consisting of a deletion of the whole gene in 42, deletion of one exon in one, and small mutations in 32. Eighteen mutations were novel. De novo mutations accounted for 66% of deletions and 40% of small mutations. In patients who carried HNF1B mutation and for whom we were able to study prenatal ultrasonography (56 probands), isolated hyperechogenic kidneys with normal or slightly enhanced size were the more frequent (34 of 56) phenotype before birth. Various other prenatal renal phenotypes were associated with HNF1B mutations, at a lesser frequency. Diabetes developed in four probands. Hyperuricemia and hypomagnesemia, although not systematically investigated, were frequently associated. Conclusions: This large series showed that the severity of the renal disease associated with HNF1B mutations was extremely variable (from prenatal renal failure to normal renal function in adulthood) and was not correlated with the genotype. PMID:20378641

  3. A case of successful renal transplantation for hydatid disease after surgical treatment of disseminated cysts.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, M; Ringe, K I; Schrem, H; Kleine, M; Meyer Zu Vilsendorf, A; Klempnauer, J; Lehner, F; Jäger, M; Bektas, H

    2015-06-01

    Hydatid disease is a systemic disorder affecting especially the liver and lungs. Although it is not endemic in Europe, it can be seen sporadically, particularly because of travel and immigration. Severe, multiple organ involvement is quite rare. A 39-year-old Kurdish male patient presented with the previous diagnosis of hydatid disease and disseminated cysts in the liver, lung, and left kidney, leading to renal failure and the need for hemodialysis. Following multiple operations, complete eradication of infectious cysts was achieved, and kidney transplantation was performed. After 4 years of follow-up, the patient is in good condition, especially with normal renal function and no sign of recurrent hydatid disease. PMID:25704879

  4. APOL1 renal-risk genotypes associate with longer hemodialysis survival in prevalent nondiabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D; Comeau, Mary E; Bonomo, Jason A; Rocco, Michael V; Burkart, John M; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Bowden, Donald W; Lea, Janice P; Krisher, Jenna O; Clay, Margo J; Freedman, Barry I

    2016-08-01

    Relative to European Americans, evidence supports that African Americans with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) survive longer on dialysis. Renal-risk variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1), associated with nondiabetic nephropathy and less subclinical atherosclerosis, may contribute to dialysis outcomes. Here, APOL1 renal-risk variants were assessed for association with dialytic survival in 450 diabetic and 275 nondiabetic African American hemodialysis patients from Wake Forest and Emory School of Medicine outpatient facilities. Outcomes were provided by the ESRD Network 6-Southeastern Kidney Council Standardized Information Management System. Dates of death, receipt of a kidney transplant, and loss to follow-up were recorded. Outcomes were censored at the date of transplantation or through 1 July 2015. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were computed separately in patients with nondiabetic and diabetic ESRD, adjusting for the covariates age, gender, comorbidities, ancestry, and presence of an arteriovenous fistula or graft at dialysis initiation. In nondiabetic ESRD, patients with 2 (vs. 0/1) APOL1 renal-risk variants had significantly longer dialysis survival (hazard ratio 0.57), a pattern not observed in patients with diabetes-associated ESRD (hazard ratio 1.29). Thus, 2 APOL1 renal-risk variants are associated with longer dialysis survival in African Americans without diabetes, potentially relating to presence of renal-limited disease or less atherosclerosis. PMID:27157696

  5. Hypothalamic stimulation and baroceptor reflex interaction on renal nerve activity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. F.; Ninomiya, I.; Franz, G. N.; Judy, W. V.

    1971-01-01

    The basal level of mean renal nerve activity (MRNA-0) measured in anesthetized cats was found to be modified by the additive interaction of hypothalamic and baroceptor reflex influences. Data were collected with the four major baroceptor nerves either intact or cut, and with mean aortic pressure (MAP) either clamped with a reservoir or raised with l-epinephrine. With intact baroceptor nerves, MRNA stayed essentially constant at level MRNA-0 for MAP below an initial pressure P1, and fell approximately linearly to zero as MAP was raised to P2. Cutting the baroceptor nerves kept MRNA at MRNA-0 (assumed to represent basal central neural output) independent of MAP. The addition of hypothalamic stimulation produced nearly constant increments in MRNA for all pressure levels up to P2, with complete inhibition at some level above P2. The increments in MRNA depended on frequency and location of the stimulus. A piecewise linear model describes MRNA as a linear combination of hypothalamic, basal central neural, and baroceptor reflex activity.

  6. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation. PMID:26239457

  7. Developmental Origins of Chronic Renal Disease: An Integrative Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Boubred, F.; Saint-Faust, M.; Buffat, C.; Ligi, I.; Grandvuillemin, I.; Simeoni, U.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality. Hypertension (HT) is one of the principal risk factors associated with death. Chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is probably underestimated, increases the risk and the severity of adverse cardiovascular events. It is now recognized that low birth weight is a risk factor for these diseases, and this relationship is amplified by a rapid catch-up growth or overfeeding during infancy or childhood. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the “early programming” of CKD are multiple and partially understood. It has been proposed that the developmental programming of arterial hypertension and chronic kidney disease is related to a reduced nephron endowment. However, this mechanism is still discussed. This review discusses the complex relationship between birth weight and nephron endowment and how early growth and nutrition influence long term HT and CKD. We hypothesize that fetal environment reduces moderately the nephron number which appears insufficient by itself to induce long term diseases. Reduced nephron number constitutes a “factor of vulnerability” when additional factors, in particular a rapid postnatal growth or overfeeding, promote the early onset of diseases through a complex combination of various pathophysiological pathways. PMID:24073334

  8. Genetic spectrum of Saudi Arabian patients with antenatal cystic kidney disease and ciliopathy phenotypes using a targeted renal gene panel

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; Kurdi, Wesam; Alsahan, Nada; Alabdullah, Zainab; Abudraz, Rania; Tulbah, Maha; Alnemer, Maha; Khan, Rubina; Al-Jurayb, Haya; Alahmed, Ahmed; Tahir, Asma I; Khalil, Dania; Edwards, Noel; Al Abdulaziz, Basma; Binhumaid, Faisal S; Majid, Salma; Faquih, Tariq; El-Kalioby, Mohamed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Altassan, Nada; Monies, Dorota; Meyer, Brian; Sayer, John A; Albaqumi, Mamdouh

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited cystic kidney disorders are a common cause of end-stage renal disease. Over 50 ciliopathy genes, which encode proteins that influence the structure and function of the primary cilia, are implicated in cystic kidney disease. Methods To define the phenotype and genotype of cystic kidney disease in fetuses and neonates, we correlated antenatal ultrasound examination and postnatal renal ultrasound examination with targeted exon sequencing, using a renal gene panel. A cohort of 44 families in whom antenatal renal ultrasound scanning findings in affected cases included bilateral cystic kidney disease, echogenic kidneys or enlarged kidneys was investigated. Results In this cohort, disease phenotypes were severe with 36 cases of stillbirth or perinatal death. Extra renal malformations, including encephalocele, polydactyly and heart malformations, consistent with ciliopathy phenotypes, were frequently detected. Renal gene panel testing identified causative mutations in 21 out of 34 families (62%), where patient and parental DNA was available. In the remaining 10 families, where only parental DNA was available, 7 inferred causative mutations were found. Together, mutations were found in 12 different genes with a total of 13 novel pathogenic variants, including an inferred novel variant in NEK8. Mutations in CC2D2A were the most common cause of an antenatal cystic kidney disease and a suspected ciliopathy in our cohort. Conclusions In families with ciliopathy phenotypes, mutational analysis using a targeted renal gene panel allows a rapid molecular diagnosis and provides important information for patients, parents and their physicians. PMID:26862157

  9. Segmentation of Individual Renal Cysts from MR Images in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyungsoo; Park, Bumwoo; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Jinhong; Tao, Cheng; Chapman, Arlene B.; Torres, Vicente E.; Grantham, Jared J.; Mrug, Michal; Bennett, William M.; Flessner, Michael F.; Landsittel, Doug P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To evaluate the performance of a semi-automated method for the segmentation of individual renal cysts from magnetic resonance (MR) images in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements This semi-automated method was based on a morphologic watershed technique with shape-detection level set for segmentation of renal cysts from MR images. T2-weighted MR image sets of 40 kidneys were selected from 20 patients with mild to moderate renal cyst burden (kidney volume < 1500 ml) in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP). The performance of the semi-automated method was assessed in terms of two reference metrics in each kidney: the total number of cysts measured by manual counting and the total volume of cysts measured with a region-based thresholding method. The proposed and reference measurements were compared using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results Individual renal cysts were successfully segmented with the semi-automated method in all 20 cases. The total number of cysts in each kidney measured with the two methods correlated well (ICC, 0.99), with a very small relative bias (0.3% increase with the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 15.2% reduction to 17.2% increase). The total volume of cysts measured using both methods also correlated well (ICC, 1.00), with a small relative bias of <10% (9.0% decrease in the semi-automated method; limits of agreement, 17.1% increase to 43.3% decrease). Conclusion This semi-automated method to segment individual renal cysts in ADPKD kidneys provides a quantitative indicator of severity in early and moderate stages of the disease. PMID:23520042

  10. Franz Volhard and Theodor Fahr: achievements and controversies in their research in renal disease and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Heidland, A; Gerabek, W; Sebekova, K

    2001-01-01

    The clinician, Franz Volhard, and the pathologist, Theodor Fahr, worked closely together in Mannheim from 1909 until 1915 and introduced a novel classification of renal diseases. In the monograph entitled 'Die Bright'sche Nierenkrankheit, Klinik, Pathologie und Atlas' (1914) they differentiated between degenerative (nephroses), inflammatory (nephritides) and arteriosclerotic (scleroses) diseases. Nephrosclerosis was divided into the benign and malignant form, of which the latter stood the test of time as a new disease entity. Fahr further divided benign nephrosclerosis into the compensated and decompensated form--depending on the presence or absence of glomerular injury. In the pathogenesis of malignant nephrosclerosis, Volhard stressed the decisive role of severe blood pressure elevation, while Fahr postulated an inflammatory mechanism, a concept later confirmed by Adalbert Bohle for at least a minority of patients. A very far reaching concept of Franz Volhard was his idea that pale (renal) hypertension results from a pressor substance released from ischaemic kidney(s) contributing--via a vicious circle--to a further rise in blood pressure with subsequent renovascular injury and aggravation of hypertension. This hypothesis was supported in 1930 by initial experiments of his collaborator, Hartwich (demonstrating in dogs a mild rise in blood pressure after ligation of branches of the renal artery) and definitively proven by Goldblatt (1934) in dogs by induction of severe and persistent hypertension after clamping of both renal arteries. The consequent detection of the renin angiotensin system was the final confirmation of Volhard's postulated renal pressor substance. In the pathogenesis of red (essential) hypertension, Volhard stressed the role of hereditary factors, age, obesity and potentially of severe alcoholism. He emphasised a premature reduction of vascular distensibility (due to elastosis of the prearterioles), a high cardiac output as well as a dampening of

  11. High urinary sulfate concentration is associated with reduced risk of renal disease progression in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    van den Born, Joost C; Frenay, Anne-Roos S; Bakker, Stephan J L; Pasch, Andreas; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J; van Goor, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is associated with a high incidence of microvascular disease, including nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in the Western world. Sulfate in the urine is the metabolic end product of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a recent discovered gaseous signaling molecule. Urinary sulfate has earlier shown beneficial predictive properties in renal transplant recipients. Based on the protective role of exogenous H2S in experimental models of diabetic nephropathy, we aimed to cross-sectionally investigate the association of sulfate with renal risk markers, and to prospectively investigate its predictive value for renal events in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Post-hoc analysis on data of the sulodexide macroalbuminuria (Sun-MACRO) trial and the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease (PREVEND) study was performed. A total of 1004 patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Urinary sulfate concentration was measured and cross-sectionally associated to renal risk markers by linear regression. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was performed to assess the prospective association of sulfate with renal events, which was defined as end stage renal disease or a doubling of baseline serum creatinine. Mean age was 63 ± 9 years, median sulfate concentration was 8.0 (IQR 5.8-11.4) mmol/L. Urinary sulfate positively associated with male gender, hemoglobin, and negatively associated with albuminuria at baseline. During follow-up for 12 (IQR 6-18) months, 38 renal events occurred. Each doubling of urinary sulfate was associated with a 19% (95%CI 1%-34%) lower risk of renal events, independent of adjustment for potential confounders, including age, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and albuminuria. To conclude, higher urinary sulfate concentration is associated with a more beneficial profile of renal risk markers, and is independently associated with a reduced risk for renal events in type 2 diabetes patients

  12. Marked increase of asymmetric dimethylarginine in patients with incipient primary chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kielstein, Jan T; Böger, Rainer H; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M; Frölich, Jürgen C; Haller, Hermann; Ritz, Eberhard; Fliser, Danilo

    2002-01-01

    In patients with uremia, increased blood concentrations of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) have been linked to the severity of atherosclerosis and to excess cardiovascular mortality. The ADMA levels and several traditional cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 44 untreated nonsmoking patients with confirmed primary chronic renal disease at different stages of renal disease. True GFR was assessed by means of the inulin-clearance technique. For comparison, nonsmoking subjects matched with respect to age, gender, and body-mass index were examined. Mean plasma ADMA concentration was markedly higher (P < 0.0001) in all patients combined (4.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/L) than in control subjects (n = 16; age 45 +/- 10 yr; serum creatinine 1.0 +/- 0.1 mg/dl; ADMA 1.4 +/- 0.7 micromol/L). However, mean ADMA levels were similar in patients with normal renal function (n = 16; age 41 +/- 9 yr; serum creatinine 1.1 +/- 0.1 mg/dl; GFR 120 +/- 14 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; ADMA 4.0 +/- 0.7 micromol/L), in patients with moderate renal failure (n = 15; 47 +/- 7 yr; 1.8 +/- 0.3 mg/dl; 65 +/- 10 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; 3.8 +/- 0.6 micromol/L) and in patients with advanced renal failure (n = 13; 46 +/- 9 yr; 4.2 +/- 0.9 mg/dl; 25 +/- 4 ml x min(-1) x 1.73 m2; 4.7 +/- 1.2 micromol/L). Furthermore, ADMA levels were increased to the same extent in normotensive (n = 17; 4.0 +/- 0.8 micromol/L) and in hypertensive (n = 27; 4.2 +/- 0.9 micromol/L) patients. In contrast to ADMA, mean total plasma homocysteine concentration were similar in control subjects (10.6 +/- 2.9 micromol/L) and in patients with normal GFR (11.0 +/- 2.9 micromol/L), but were significantly higher in patients with moderate renal failure (17.7 +/- 4.1 micromol/L) and particularly in patients with advanced renal failure (28.2 +/- 10.6 micromol/L). Finally, mean total serum cholesterol concentrations were comparable in the control group and in the three groups of patients with

  13. Renal proximal tubular dysgenesis associated with severe neonatal hemosiderotic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bale, P M; Kan, A E; Dorney, S F

    1994-01-01

    We report the necropsy findings for three infants with the unusual combination of proximal renal tubular dysgenesis and severe congenital liver disease with excessive iron in several organs resembling neonatal hemochromatosis. Two of the infants were caucasian siblings and one was an Australian aborigine. One died in utero at 35 weeks of gestation and two died at 7 days. The liveborn infants presented with anuria and liver failure. The livers all showed marked loss of hepatocytes and replacement by pseudotubules in the collapsed lobules. The liveborn infants also showed giant cell transformation of hepatocytes, small regenerative nodules, cholestasis, and normal bile ducts. Absence of proximal renal convolutions was confirmed by epithelial membrane antigen positivity in nearly all tubules. In each family there was another sibling with congenital liver disease, fatal in one case, but no renal tubular dysgenesis. No infection or metabolic disease was uncovered in any of our patients, and the cause of the hepatocyte destruction was not determined. The combination in three infants of two rare congenital diseases could be genetic or acquired in utero from the same etiological agent. Alternatively, the absence of proximal convolutions could be secondary to hypoperfusion, perhaps because of shock due to extensive necrosis of hepatocytes. PMID:8066004

  14. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). Approximately 90% of systemic erythropoietin in adults is produced by peritubular interstitial fibroblasts in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the kidney (3-5). A feedback mechanism involving oxygen delivery to the tissues seems to regulate erythropoietin production. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates transcription of the erythropoietin gene in the kidney, which determines erythropoietin synthesis (3-5). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow (4-6). Kidney fibrosis is the last common pathway in chronic renal failure irrespective of the initial etiology (5,6). Constant inflammatory cell infiltration and pericyte-myofibroblast transition lead to renal fibrosis and insufficiency which result in decreased production of erythropoietin (4-7). Thus far, therapeutic efforts to treat patients with chronic renal failure by administering erythropoietin have been made only to correct anemia and putative hypoxic tissue damage. The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin has marked a significant advance in the management of anemia associated with chronic renal failure (6-9). With an increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure receiving erythropoietin treatment, emerging evidence suggests that erythropoietin not only has an erythropoietic function, but also has renoprotective potential. In fact, in recent years, the additional non

  15. Renal transplantation in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, B; Yazici, H; Gulluoglu, M; Caliskan, Y; Turkmen, A; Sever, M S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a genetic disease caused by structural mutations in the enzyme NADPH oxidase that results in severe immunodeficiency. End-stage renal disease occurs in this patient population and is attributed to various factors, including infections, amyloidosis, and nephrotoxic anti-infective agents. In this report, we present our experience in transplantation for a patient with CGD complicated by isolated hepatic tuberculosis abscess. The course of the case demonstrates the absolute requirements for a multidisciplinary and compulsive approach before, during, and after transplantation. This case report also highlights the unexpectedly benign effects of immunosuppressive therapy in this patient population. PMID:25480525

  16. A complex case of congenital cystic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Cordiner, David S; Evans, Clair A; Brundler, Marie-Anne; McPhillips, Maeve; Murio, Enric; Darling, Mark; Taheri, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    This case outlines the potential complexity of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). It highlights the challenges involved in managing this condition, some of the complications faced and areas of uncertainty in the decision making process. With a paucity of published paediatric cases on this subject, this should add to the pool of information currently available. PMID:22605879

  17. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  18. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  19. Review of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with focus on pathobiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Ohe, Chisato; Mikami, Shuji; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Shuin, Taro; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-09-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a recently established entity. In this article, we introduce the general view of this new entity. Macroscopically, the disease exclusively occurs in ACD and may arise as a dominant mass or non-dominant masses. Histologically, the tumor is characterized by a microcystic pattern, neoplastic cells with an eosinophilic or oncocytic cytoplasm and frequent intratumoral oxalate crystal deposition. Prominent nucleoli of tumor cells are often observed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells are generally positive for AMACR but negative for cytokeratin 7. Ultrastructurally, neoplastic cells contain abundant mitochondria in the cytoplasm. Genetically, the gain of chromosomes 3, 7, 17 and abnormality of the sex chromosome were frequently observed in several studies. In conclusion, ACD-associated RCC may be widely recognized as a distinct entity in the near future because this tumor is morphologically and genetically different from other renal tumor entities that have been previously established. PMID:21751153

  20. Severe gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus disease in two patients with renal vasculitis after immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kian-Guan; Teo, Su-Hooi; Lim, Cynthia; Loh, Alwin; Chidambaram, Viswanath; Choo, Jason

    2016-09-01

    Although the use of current immunosuppressive regimens has significantly improved the outcomes of autoimmune renal diseases, infectious complications remain an important clinical concern. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been shown to be one of the major causes of mortality in this group of patients. We report two cases of renal vasculitis (Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)) that developed into severe gastrointestinal CMV disease and manifested with massive small bowel bleeding, resulting in an eventual fatal outcome for one of the patients. Risk factors, pathogenesis, role of immunosuppression in the development of CMV infection, and antiviral treatment are discussed in this review. These cases highlight the need for further research to evaluate the complex mechanisms between immunosuppression and CMV occurrence as well as the role of antiviral prophylaxis in high-risk patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapies.
. PMID:27443566

  1. Postoperative oxycodone toxicity in a patient with chronic pain and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bryant W; Kohan, Lynn R; Vorenkamp, Kevin E

    2015-02-15

    We present this case to review the metabolism of oxycodone and the effects of end-stage renal disease on the elimination of oxycodone and its metabolites. A 42-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who was dependent on hemodialysis presented for left hamstring posterior capsule release. She had been receiving methadone for 2 years for chronic leg pain. On postoperative day 1, the patient's medication was changed from IV hydromorphone to oral oxycodone to treat breakthrough pain. By the next day, the patient was unarousable with notable respiratory depression. She did not fully recover after urgent hemodialysis but did have full recovery after receiving an IV naloxone infusion for 22 hours. Further study of the safety of oxycodone in hemodialysis patients is warranted. PMID:25689360

  2. Cross Talk Between Ceramide and Redox Signaling: Implications for Endothelial Dysfunction and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pin-Lan; Zhang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cross talk between ceramide and redox signaling modulates various cell activities and functions and contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases and renal dysfunctions. Ceramide triggers the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases oxidative stress in many mammalian cells and animal models. On the other hand, inhibition of ROS-generating enzymes or treatment of antioxidants impairs sphingomyelinase activation and ceramide production. As a mechanism, ceramide-enriched signaling platforms, special cell membrane rafts (MR) (formerly lipid rafts), provide an important microenvironment to mediate the cross talk of ceramide and redox signaling to exert a corresponding regulatory role on cell and organ functions. In this regard, activation of acid sphingomyelinase and generation of ceramide mediate the formation of ceramide-enriched membrane platforms, where trans-membrane signals are transmitted or amplified through recruitment, clustering, assembling, or integration of various signaling molecules. A typical such signaling platform is MR redox signaling platform that is centered on ceramide production and aggregation leading to recruitment and assembling of NADPH oxidase to form an active complex in the cell plasma membrane. This redox signaling platform not only conducts redox signaling or regulation but also facilitates a feedforward amplification of both ceramide and redox signaling. In addition to this membrane MR redox signaling platform, the cross talk between ceramide and redox signaling may occur in other cell compartments. This book chapter focuses on the molecular mechanisms, spatial–temporal regulations, and implications of this cross talk between ceramide and redox signaling, which may provide novel insights into the understanding of both ceramide and redox signaling pathways. PMID:23563657

  3. Factors Associated with the Choice of Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Pei-Chun; Hou, Jia-Jeng; Jong, Ing-Ching; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hsiao, Chih-Yen; Ma, Tsung-Liang; Hsu, Yueh-Han

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors associated with receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a hospital in Southern Taiwan. Methods. The study included all consecutive patients with incident ESRD who participated in a multidisciplinary predialysis education (MPE) program and started their first dialysis therapy between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013, in the study hospital. We provided small group teaching sessions to advanced CKD patients and their family to enhance understanding of various dialysis modalities. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the association of patient characteristics with the chosen dialysis modality. Results. Of the 656 patients, 524 (80%) chose hemodialysis and 132 chose PD. Our data showed that young age, high education level, and high scores of activities of daily living (ADLs) were positively associated with PD treatment. Patients who received small group teaching sessions had higher percentages of PD treatment (30.5% versus 19.5%; P = 0.108) and preparedness for dialysis (61.1% versus 46.6%; P = 0.090). Conclusion. Young age, high education level, and high ADL score were positively associated with choosing PD. Early creation of vascular access may be a barrier for PD. PMID:27042665

  4. Factors Associated with the Choice of Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Pei-Chun; Hou, Jia-Jeng; Jong, Ing-Ching; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hsiao, Chih-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors associated with receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a hospital in Southern Taiwan. Methods. The study included all consecutive patients with incident ESRD who participated in a multidisciplinary predialysis education (MPE) program and started their first dialysis therapy between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013, in the study hospital. We provided small group teaching sessions to advanced CKD patients and their family to enhance understanding of various dialysis modalities. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the association of patient characteristics with the chosen dialysis modality. Results. Of the 656 patients, 524 (80%) chose hemodialysis and 132 chose PD. Our data showed that young age, high education level, and high scores of activities of daily living (ADLs) were positively associated with PD treatment. Patients who received small group teaching sessions had higher percentages of PD treatment (30.5% versus 19.5%; P = 0.108) and preparedness for dialysis (61.1% versus 46.6%; P = 0.090). Conclusion. Young age, high education level, and high ADL score were positively associated with choosing PD. Early creation of vascular access may be a barrier for PD. PMID:27042665

  5. Functional Assessment in End-Stage Renal Disease: Enhancing Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Saby, Adam; Miller, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Why do functional assessments in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) matter? Multiple studies show that new dialysis patients undergo a substantial decline among activities of daily living. Moreover, poor functional status in ESRD patients is associated with early morality. That is why CMS has developed new criteria to assess ESRD patients in regards to their functional, psychologic, and cognitive capabilities. Functional assessments by health providers have been used in field of Rehabilitation Medicine for over 50 years; rehabilitation physicians have found them effective in establishing goals and monitoring improvement. Assessments can provide guidance by identifying the needs and types of intervention most suited for patients. Impairments can be addressed with referrals to physical therapy for gross motor issues, occupational therapy for self-care problems, psychiatry for mental disorders, and neurology for cognitive deficits. The more accurate the assessments over time, the more targeted and effective the therapies become. We believe that the new CMS goals to assess functionality will improve ESRD patient's quality of life, longevity, and long-term healthcare costs. PMID:26756940

  6. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, S.; Nasir, K.; Drohlia, M. F.; Salman, B.; Ahmad, A.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9%) were more than females 178 (42.1%). Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3%) and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1%) followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN) in 27 (6.4%) and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%). Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD) was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3%) cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8%) and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent. PMID:27194835

  7. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, S; Nasir, K; Drohlia, M F; Salman, B; Ahmad, A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9%) were more than females 178 (42.1%). Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3%) and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1%) followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN) in 27 (6.4%) and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%). Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD) was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3%) cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8%) and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent. PMID:27194835

  8. Podocyturia: A Clue for the Rational Use of Amiloride in Alport Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trimarchi, H.; Canzonieri, R.; Muryan, A.; Schiel, A.; Araoz, A.; Paulero, M.; Andrews, J.; Rengel, T.; Forrester, M.; Lombi, F.; Pomeranz, V.; Iriarte, R.; Zotta, E.

    2016-01-01

    No specific or efficient treatment exists for Alport syndrome, an X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in collagen type IV, a crucial component of the glomerular basement membrane. Kidney failure is usually a major complication of the disease, and patients require renal replacement therapy early in life. Microhematuria and subsequently proteinuria are hallmarks of kidney involvement, which are due to primary basement membrane alterations that mainly cause endothelial thrombosis and podocyte contraction and ulterior irreversible detachment. Commonly drug-based approaches include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, which are employed to reduce proteinuria and thus retard kidney disease progression and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, as any hereditary disease, it is expressed as early as in the intrauterine life, and usually an index case is helpful to detect family-related cases. As no specific treatment exists, pathophysiologically based approaches are useful. The present case illustrates the reduction rate of urinary podocyte loss and proteinuria after amiloride administration and suggests the molecular pathways involved in Alport renal disease. Finally, podocyturia rather than proteinuria should be considered as an earlier biomarker of kidney involvement and disease progression in Alport disease. PMID:26942026

  9. Podocyturia: A Clue for the Rational Use of Amiloride in Alport Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, H; Canzonieri, R; Muryan, A; Schiel, A; Araoz, A; Paulero, M; Andrews, J; Rengel, T; Forrester, M; Lombi, F; Pomeranz, V; Iriarte, R; Zotta, E

    2016-01-01

    No specific or efficient treatment exists for Alport syndrome, an X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in collagen type IV, a crucial component of the glomerular basement membrane. Kidney failure is usually a major complication of the disease, and patients require renal replacement therapy early in life. Microhematuria and subsequently proteinuria are hallmarks of kidney involvement, which are due to primary basement membrane alterations that mainly cause endothelial thrombosis and podocyte contraction and ulterior irreversible detachment. Commonly drug-based approaches include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, which are employed to reduce proteinuria and thus retard kidney disease progression and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, as any hereditary disease, it is expressed as early as in the intrauterine life, and usually an index case is helpful to detect family-related cases. As no specific treatment exists, pathophysiologically based approaches are useful. The present case illustrates the reduction rate of urinary podocyte loss and proteinuria after amiloride administration and suggests the molecular pathways involved in Alport renal disease. Finally, podocyturia rather than proteinuria should be considered as an earlier biomarker of kidney involvement and disease progression in Alport disease. PMID:26942026

  10. [Itai-itai disease: cadmium-induced renal tubular osteomalacia].

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic elements to which humans could be exposed at work or in the environment. The outbreak of itai-itai disease, which is the most severe stage of chronic Cd poisoning, occurred in the Cd-polluted Jinzu River basin in Toyama. In this area, the river was contaminated by slag from a mine upstream; as a consequence, the soil in rice paddies was polluted with heavy metals including Cd through irrigation water from around 1910 to the 1960s. The government of Toyama prefecture carried out an extensive survey on Cd concentration in rice and soil of the paddy fields and declared that the upper layer of a total of 1500 ha of paddy fields should be replaced by nonpolluted soil. Then, an intervention program of soil replacement in the polluted paddy fields was continually carried out from 1980 to 2011. As a result, Cd concentration in rice markedly decreased. The kidney is the organ critically affected after long-term exposure to Cd. Proximal tubular dysfunction (RTD) has been found among the inhabitants of the Jinzu River basin. The very recent report by the Environmental Agency in Japan in 2009 has disclosed that b2-microglobulinuria with RTD is still found at a high prevalence among the inhabitants of the Jinzu River basin of both sexes. Twenty patients with itai-itai disease (1 male and 19 females), who attended our hospital and received medical examination during 2000 to 2008, had applied for recognition as itai-itai disease patients to the government of Toyama prefecture. In this paper, the recent epidemiological and clinical features of itai-itai disease are discussed on the basis of a review of the cases of these 19 female patients. PMID:23095355

  11. Functional thiamine deficiency in end-stage renal disease: malnutrition despite ample nutrients.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Hamid; Said, Hamid M

    2016-08-01

    Zhang et al. found that plasma concentrations of the thiamine antimetabolite oxythiamine are significantly increased in patients with end-stage renal disease. These investigators discuss the potential sources of oxythiamine and the consequences of its plasma elevation. This commentary addresses the significance of these findings and expands on the potential role of gut microbiome in the generation of this antithiamine metabolite. PMID:27418090

  12. [Determinants of vascular wall stiffness in patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Kharlamova, U V; Il'icheva, O E

    2012-01-01

    Examination of 109 patients with chronic renal disease undergoing hemodialysis revealed significant impairment of arterial wall distensibility (accordingly, decreased Peterson's and Young's elastic moduli, distensibility coefficient). The relative thickness of the common carotid artery and pulse wave velocity were significantly greater than in practically healthy subjects. Independent factors influencing arterial wall rigidity included age, arterial pressure, total cholesterol and homocystein, stable metabolites of nitric oxide, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus levels, calcium x phosphorus product, duration of hemodialysis, interdialytic weight gain. PMID:23516853

  13. Is Anatomic Complexity Associated with Renal Tumor Growth Kinetics Under Active Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Mehrazin, Reza; Smaldone, Marc C.; Egleston, Brian; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J.; Concodora, Charles W.; Ito, Timothy K.; Abbosh, Philip H.; Chen, David Y.T.; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Linear growth rate (LGR) is the most commonly employed trigger for definitive intervention in patients with renal masses managed with an initial period of active surveillance (AS). Using our institutional cohort, we explored the association between tumor anatomic complexity at presentation and LGR in patients managed with AS. Methods and Materials Enhancing renal masses managed expectantly for at least 6 months were included for analysis. The association between NS and LGR was assessed using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for age, Charlson score, race, sex, and initial tumor size. Results 346 patients (401 masses) met inclusion criteria (18% ≥cT1b), with a median follow-up of 37 months (range: 6-169). 44% of patients progressed to definitive intervention with a median duration of 27 months (range: 6-130). Comparing patients managed expectantly to those requiring intervention, no difference was seen in median tumor size at presentation (2.2 vs. 2.2 cm), while significant differences in median age (74 vs. 65 years, p<0.001), Charlson co-morbidity score (3 vs. 2, p<0.001), and average LGR (0.23 vs. 0.49 cm/year, p<0.001) were observed between groups. Following adjustment, for each 1-point increase in NS sum, the average tumor LGR increased by 0.037 cm/year (p=0.002). Of the entire cohort, 6 patients (1.7%) progressed to metastatic disease. Conclusions The demonstrated association between anatomic tumor complexity at presentation and LGR of clinical stage 1 renal masses under AS may afford a clinically useful cue to tailor individual patient radiographic surveillance schedules and warrants further evaluation. PMID:25778696

  14. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oseltamivir in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with automated peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kashyap; Rayner, Craig R; Giraudon, Mylène; Kamal, Mohamed A; Morcos, Peter N; Robson, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Carl M

    2015-01-01

    AIMS Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are at increased risk of developing complications associated with influenza infection. Oseltamivir is indicated for influenza treatment in ESRD patients, but the disposition is poorly understood in this patient population. This study aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oseltamivir in automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and construct a pharmacokinetic model to assist with optimized dosing. METHODS Ten adults with ESRD were prescribed an aggressive APD regimen consisting of three continuous cycler-assisted peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) sessions during the day and two continuous ambulatory (CAPD) sessions overnight. Oseltamivir was administered as a single 75 mg dose, immediately before APD treatment. RESULTS Oseltamivir was rapidly eliminated via first-pass metabolism, with most of the dose (Fraction metabolized = 0.964) reaching the circulation as the active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate. This metabolite was cleared slowly and was quantifiable throughout the sampling interval. The disposition of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate was described by a two- and a one-compartment model, respectively. Metabolite clearance by CCPD [0.32 l h−1 (70 kg)−1] was 1.9-fold faster than via CAPD [0.17 l h−1 (70 kg)−1], with renal elimination being dominant in patients with residual urine production. Model simulations showed that a single 75 mg dose attained target exposures in patients with negligible or low urine clearance. However, higher doses are recommended for further investigation in patients with high residual renal function. In all patients, oseltamivir was well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS In APD patients with anuria or low residual renal elimination, a single 75 mg dose of oseltamivir produced exposures at the upper end of the safety margin. PMID:25289522

  15. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid.

    PubMed

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-06-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5'-CpApG-3' trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  16. 20-HETE Mediates Proliferation of Renal Epithelial Cells in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Frank; Sweeney, William E.; Jia, Guangfu; Roman, Richard J.; Avner, Ellis D.

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic kidney diseases are characterized by abnormal proliferation of renal epithelial cells. In this study, the role of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), an endogenous cytochrome P450 metabolite of arachidonic acid with mitogenic properties, was evaluated in cystic renal disease. Daily administration of HET-0016, an inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis, significantly reduced kidney size by half in the BPK mouse model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. In addition, compared with untreated BPK mice, this treatment significantly reduced collecting tubule cystic indices and approximately doubled survival. For evaluation of the role of 20-HETE as a mediator of epithelial cell proliferation, principal cells isolated from cystic BPK and noncystic Balb/c mice were genetically modified using lentiviral vectors. Noncystic Balb/c cells overproducing Cyp4a12 exhibited a four- to five-fold increase in cell proliferation compared with control Balb/c cells, and this increase was completely abolished when 20-HETE synthesis was inhibited; therefore, this study suggests that 20-HETE mediates proliferation of epithelial cells in the formation of renal cysts. PMID:18596124

  17. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5′-CpApG-3′ trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  18. Pkd1 transgenic mice: adult model of polycystic kidney disease with extrarenal and renal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kurbegovic, Almira; Côté, Olivier; Couillard, Martin; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Trudel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    While high levels of Pkd1 expression are detected in tissues of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), it is unclear whether enhanced expression could be a pathogenetic mechanism for this systemic disorder. Three transgenic mouse lines were generated from a Pkd1-BAC modified by introducing a silent tag via homologous recombination to target a sustained wild-type genomic Pkd1 expression within the native tissue and temporal regulation. These mice specifically overexpressed the Pkd1 transgene in extrarenal and renal tissues from ∼2- to 15-fold over Pkd1 endogenous levels in a copy-dependent manner. All transgenic mice reproducibly developed tubular and glomerular cysts leading to renal insufficiency. Interestingly, Pkd1TAG mice also exhibited renal fibrosis and calcium deposits in papilla reminiscent of nephrolithiasis as frequently observed in ADPKD. Similar to human ADPKD, these mice consistently displayed hepatic fibrosis and ∼15% intrahepatic cysts of the bile ducts affecting females preferentially. Moreover, a significant proportion of mice developed cardiac anomalies with severe left-ventricular hypertrophy, marked aortic arch distention and/or valvular stenosis and calcification that had profound functional impact. Of significance, Pkd1TAG mice displayed occasional cerebral lesions with evidence of ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms. This Pkd1TAG mouse model demonstrates that overexpression of wild-type Pkd1 can trigger the typical adult renal and extrarenal phenotypes resembling human ADPKD. PMID:20053665

  19. Plasmapheresis in overall treatment of renal immune diseases.

    PubMed

    Dzhavad-Zade, M D; Agaev, M M; Feldman, V M

    1989-01-01

    Polymorphism of the clinical picture manifested in pregnancy induced nephropathies necessitates the development of special immune methods of diagnosis, prevention and overall treatment. The changes in cellular and humoral immunity disclosed in this group of patients may serve as a starting point for elucidating the mechanism underlying pathogenesis of the disease and complications. Complex therapy, including medicinal preparations, dietotherapy and plasmapheresis contributes to normalizing the clinical course of pregnancy, correcting the immunologic status and decreasing the incidence of complications in the postpartum period. PMID:2819256

  20. A Novel Mutation of the HNF1B Gene Associated With Hypoplastic Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease and Neonatal Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvelos, Maria Inês; Rodrigues, Magda; Lobo, Luísa; Medeira, Ana; Sousa, Ana Berta; Simão, Carla; Lemos, Manuel Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 beta (HNF1B) plays an important role in embryonic development, namely in the kidney, pancreas, liver, genital tract, and gut. Heterozygous germline mutations of HNF1B are associated with the renal cysts and diabetes syndrome (RCAD). Affected individuals may present a variety of renal developmental abnormalities and/or maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). A Portuguese 19-month-old male infant was evaluated due to hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease and renal dysfunction diagnosed in the neonatal period that progressed to stage 5 chronic renal disease during the first year of life. His mother was diagnosed with a solitary hypoplastic microcystic left kidney at age 20, with stage 2 chronic renal disease established at age 35, and presented bicornuate uterus, pancreatic atrophy, and gestational diabetes. DNA sequence analysis of HNF1B revealed a novel germline frameshift insertion (c.110_111insC or c.110dupC) in both the child and the mother. A review of the literature revealed a total of 106 different HNF1B mutations, in 236 mutation-positive families, comprising gross deletions (34%), missense mutations (31%), frameshift deletions or insertions (15%), nonsense mutations (11%), and splice-site mutations (8%). The study of this family with an unusual presentation of hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease with neonatal renal dysfunction identified a previously unreported mutation of the HNF1B gene, thereby expanding the spectrum of known mutations associated with renal developmental disorders. PMID:25700310

  1. World Small Animal Veterinary Association Renal Pathology Initiative: Classification of Glomerular Diseases in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, R E; Mohr, F C; Aresu, L; Brown, C A; James, C; Jansen, J H; Spangler, W L; van der Lugt, J J; Kass, P H; Brovida, C; Cowgill, L D; Heiene, R; Polzin, D J; Syme, H; Vaden, S L; van Dongen, A M; Lees, G E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of canine renal biopsy tissue has generally relied on light microscopic (LM) evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections ranging in thickness from 3 to 5 µm. Advanced modalities, such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunofluorescence (IF), have been used sporadically or retrospectively. Diagnostic algorithms of glomerular diseases have been extrapolated from the World Health Organization classification scheme for human glomerular disease. With the recent establishment of 2 veterinary nephropathology services that evaluate 3-µm sections with a panel of histochemical stains and routinely perform TEM and IF, a standardized objective species-specific approach for the diagnosis of canine glomerular disease was needed. Eight veterinary pathologists evaluated 114 parameters (lesions) in renal biopsy specimens from 89 dogs. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the data revealed 2 large categories of glomerular disease based on the presence or absence of immune complex deposition: The immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN) category included cases with histologic lesions of membranoproliferative or membranous patterns. The second category included control dogs and dogs with non-ICGN (glomerular amyloidosis or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis). Cluster analysis performed on only the LM parameters led to misdiagnosis of 22 of the 89 cases-that is, ICGN cases moved to the non-ICGN branch of the dendrogram or vice versa, thereby emphasizing the importance of advanced diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of canine glomerular disease. Salient LM, TEM, and IF features for each pattern of disease were identified, and a preliminary investigation of related clinicopathologic data was performed. PMID:25957358

  2. New aspects of treatment of renal bone disease in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, G

    2007-07-01

    The abnormalities in bone and mineral metabolism in chronic kidney disease patients are associated with an increased risk of fractures, vascular calcifications and cardiovascular diseases. A few decades ago hyperphosphatemia and the common development of secondary hyperparathyroidism were thought to be the main problem to deal with. Since dietary phosphate restriction and haemodialysis were not proven to be sufficient measures to reduce phosphorus, phosphate-binding therapy has been widely instituted as a treatment option. Various types of phosphate binders employed over the years have contributed to the changing spectrum of renal osteodystrophy from high to low bone turnover along with the shift from hypocalcemia and negative calcium balance towards hypercalcemia and the positive calcium balance. Thus, hypercalcemia instead of hyperphosphatemia is nowadays associated with the increased risk of vascular calcification, morbidity and mortality in the dialysis population. Besides the very expensive non-calcium based phosphate binders, at least two common tools may be helpful in the treatment of hypercalcemia and adynamic bone. A reduced daily use of calcium carbonate/acetate up to 1g per main meal is an easily manageable and inexpensive tool. The second option for stimulation of parathyroid gland activity and bone turnover is the lowering of the dialysate calcium concentration. In conclusion, an aggressive treatment of hyperphosphatemia and calcium overload might lead towards an opposite effect of hypoparathyroidism and hypercalcemia. Reasonable treatment strategies based on a careful monitoring should be employed in order to prevent related consequences and to contribute to a better long-term quality of life and survival of dialysis patients. PMID:17932468

  3. Sunitinib activates Axl signaling in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Mijn, Johannes C; Broxterman, Henk J; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R; De Haas, Richard R; Dekker, Henk; Pham, Thang V; Van Beusechem, Victor W; Halmos, Balazs; Mier, James W; Jiménez, Connie R; Verheul, Henk M W

    2016-06-15

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics provides a unique unbiased approach to evaluate signaling network in cancer cells. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is registered as treatment for patients with renal cell cancer (RCC). We investigated the effect of sunitinib on tyrosine phosphorylation in RCC tumor cells to get more insight in its mechanism of action and thereby to find potential leads for combination treatment strategies. Sunitinib inhibitory concentrations of proliferation (IC50) of 786-O, 769-p and A498 RCC cells were determined by MTT-assays. Global tyrosine phosphorylation was measured by LC-MS/MS after immunoprecipitation with the antiphosphotyrosine antibody p-TYR-100. Phosphoproteomic profiling of 786-O cells yielded 1519 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 675 unique proteins including 57 different phosphorylated protein kinases. Compared to control, incubation with sunitinib at its IC50 of 2 µM resulted in downregulation of 86 phosphopeptides including CDK5, DYRK3, DYRK4, G6PD, PKM and LDH-A, while 94 phosphopeptides including Axl, FAK, EPHA2 and p38α were upregulated. Axl- (y702), FAK- (y576) and p38α (y182) upregulation was confirmed by Western Blot in 786-O and A498 cells. Subsequent proliferation assays revealed that inhibition of Axl with a small molecule inhibitor (R428) sensitized 786-O RCC cells and immortalized endothelial cells to sunitinib up to 3 fold. In conclusion, incubation with sunitinib of RCC cells causes significant upregulation of multiple phosphopeptides including Axl. Simultaneous inhibition of Axl improves the antitumor activity of sunitinib. We envision that evaluation of phosphoproteomic changes by TKI treatment enables identification of new targets for combination treatment strategies. PMID:26815723

  4. Genes, Exomes, Genomes, Copy Number: What is Their Future in Pediatric Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Matthew G.; Jüppner, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The influence of genetic variation on the pathogenesis of pediatric kidney disease extends from the earliest stages of kidney development in utero to conditions arising throughout a child’s life. Major advances in genomic technologies, computing power, and bioinformatics analyses have resulted in the accelerated discovery of novel genes and risk loci associated with both inherited and sporadic forms of pediatric kidney disease. In this review, we will highlight studies over the past year that used diverse approaches to discover novel genes and loci associated with pediatric renal disease. We will also discuss reports that investigate the association with disease of previously discovered risk variants in novel populations, different phenotypes, or in model systems. Finally, we will discuss how we believe genomic inquiry will evolve in pediatric kidney disease in the future. Together, these studies illustrate that almost every child with a kidney condition could participate in some form of genomic investigation.

  5. Asymptomatic pontine and extra-pontine lesions in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Raj Kanwar; Das, Chandan J; Bagchi, Soumita; Agarwal, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome leading to central pontine/extra-pontine myelinolysis (CPM/EPM) occurs mainly in patients with history of alcohol abuse, malnourishment, following liver transplantation and less commonly, in association with other systemic diseases. Asymptomatic CPM/EPM is rare. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who develop CPM/EPM are usually symptomatic with florid neurologic manifestations. Herein, we present a patient with ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis who was incidentally detected to have pontine and extra-pontine lesions suggestive of myelinolysis without any neurologic signs or symptoms. PMID:26997398

  6. A 44 year-old lady with chronic renal disease and intractable ulcers: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pujar, Thejeswi; Spinello, Irene M

    2009-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare but potentially fatal condition occurring in patients with end stage renal disease on dialysis. Due to interplay of various factors, disturbances occur in the metabolism of calcium and phosphate leading to calcification within the vessel walls. The net result is tissue ischemia and necrosis. Clinically this presents as painful non-healing skin ulcers, which contribute to significant morbidity and mortality due to septic progression of the lesion. In this case report, we highlight the rapidly progressive nature of this disease, its etiopathogenesis and the role of early diagnosis in preventing life-threatening complications. PMID:19646226

  7. NEK8 links the ATR-regulated replication stress response and S phase CDK activity to renal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Lin, Jia-Ren; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Slaats, Gisela G; Kile, Andrew C; Paulsen, Renee D; Manning, Danielle K; Beier, David R; Giles, Rachel H; Boulton, Simon J; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2013-08-22

    Renal ciliopathies are a leading cause of kidney failure, but their exact etiology is poorly understood. NEK8/NPHP9 is a ciliary kinase associated with two renal ciliopathies in humans and mice, nephronophthisis (NPHP) and polycystic kidney disease. Here, we identify NEK8 as a key effector of the ATR-mediated replication stress response. Cells lacking NEK8 form spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that further accumulate when replication forks stall, and they exhibit reduced fork rates, unscheduled origin firing, and increased replication fork collapse. NEK8 suppresses DSB formation by limiting cyclin A-associated CDK activity. Strikingly, a mutation in NEK8 that is associated with renal ciliopathies affects its genome maintenance functions. Moreover, kidneys of NEK8 mutant mice accumulate DNA damage, and loss of NEK8 or replication stress similarly disrupts renal cell architecture in a 3D-culture system. Thus, NEK8 is a critical component of the DNA damage response that links replication stress with cystic kidney disorders. PMID:23973373

  8. End-stage renal disease in sub-Saharan and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Saraladevi

    2003-02-01

    The major health problems in Africa are AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, gastroenteritis and hypertension; hypertension affects about 20% of the adult population. Renal disease, especially glomerular disease, is more prevalent in Africa and seems to be of a more severe form than that found in Western countries. The most common mode of presentation is the nephrotic syndrome, with the age of onset at five to eight years. It is estimated that 2 to 3% of medical admissions in tropical countries are due to renal-related complaints, the majority being the glomerulonephritides. There are no reliable statistics for ESRD in all African countries. Statistics of the South African Dialysis and Transplant Registry (SADTR) reflect the patients selected for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and do not accurately reflect the etiology of chronic renal failure (CRF), where public sector state facilities will offer RRT only to patients who are eligible for a transplant. In 1994, glomerulonephritis was recorded as the cause of ESRD in 1771 (52.1%) and hypertension in 1549 (45.6%) of patients by the SADTR. In a six-year study of 3632 patients with ESRD, based on SADTR statistics, hypertension was reported to be the cause of ESRD in 4.3% of whites, 34.6% of blacks, 20.9% mixed race group and 13.8% of Indians. Malignant hypertension is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among urban black South Africans, with hypertension accounting for 16% of all hospital admissions. In a ten-year study of 368 patients with chronic renal failure in Nigeria, the etiology of renal failure was undetermined in 62%. Of the remaining patients whose etiology was ascertained, hypertension accounted for 61%, diabetes mellitus for 11% and chronic glomerulonephritis for 5.9%. Patients with CRF constituted 10% of all medical admissions in this center. Chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertension are principal causes of CRF in tropical Africa and East Africa, together with diabetes mellitus and obstructive

  9. Risk-benefit ratio of angiotensin antagonists versus ACE inhibitors in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, D A; Gehr, T W; Fernandez, A

    2000-05-01

    The effective treatment of hypertension is an extremely important consideration in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Virtually any drug class--with the possible exception of diuretics--can be used to treat hypertension in the patient with ESRD. Despite there being such a wide range of treatment options, drugs which interrupt the renin-angiotensin axis are generally suggested as agents of choice in this population, even though the evidence in support of their preferential use is quite scanty. ACE inhibitors, and more recently angiotensin antagonists, are the 2 drug classes most commonly employed to alter renin-angiotensin axis activity and therefore produce blood pressure control. ACE inhibitor use in patients with ESRD can sometimes prove an exacting proposition. ACE inhibitors are variably dialysed, with compounds such as catopril, enalapril, lisinopril and perindopril undergoing substantial cross-dialyser clearance during a standard dialysis session. This phenomenon makes the selection of a dose and the timing of administration for an ACE inhibitor a complex issue in patients with ESRD. Furthermore, ACE inhibitors are recognised as having a range of nonpressor effects that are pertinent to patients with ESRD. Such effects include their ability to decrease thirst drive and to decrease erythropoiesis. In addition, ACE inhibitors have a unique adverse effect profile. As is the case with their use in patients without renal failure, use of ACE inhibitors in patients with ESRD can be accompanied by cough and less frequently by angioneurotic oedema. In the ESRD population, ACE inhibitor use is also accompanied by so-called anaphylactoid dialyser reactions. Angiotensin antagonists are similar to ACE inhibitors in their mechanism of blood pressure lowering. Angiotensin antagonists are not dialysable and therefore can be distinguished from a number of the ACE inhibitors. In addition, the adverse effect profile for angiotensin antagonists is remarkably bland

  10. Renal transplantation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Nada; Devuyst, Olivier; Pirson, Yves

    2014-08-01

    In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) evaluated for kidney transplantation, issues related to native nephrectomy, cystic liver involvement, screening for intracranial aneurysms and living-related kidney donation deserve special consideration. Prophylactic native nephrectomy is restricted to patients with a history of cyst infection or recurrent haemorrhage or to those in whom space must be made to implant the graft. Patients with liver involvement require pretransplant imaging. Selection of patients for pretransplant screening of intracranial aneurysms should follow the general recommendations for patients with ADPKD. In living related-donor candidates aged <30 years and at-risk of ADPKD, molecular genetic testing should be carried out when ultrasonography and MRI findings are normal or equivocal. After kidney transplantation, patient and graft survival rates are excellent and the volume of native kidneys decreases. However, liver cysts continue to grow and treatment with a somatostatin analogue should be considered in patients with massive cyst involvement. Cerebrovascular events have a marginal effect on post-transplant morbidity and mortality. An increased risk of new-onset diabetes mellitus and nonmelanoma skin cancers has been reported, but several studies have challenged these findings. Finally, no data currently support the preferential use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as immunosuppressive agents in transplant recipients with ADPKD. PMID:24935705

  11. Responses of Proximal Tubular Cells to Injury in Congenital Renal Disease: Fight or Flight

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.; Forbes, Michael S.; Galarreta, Carolina I.; Thornhill, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic kidney disease in children results from congenital or inherited disorders, which can be studied in mouse models. Following 2 weeks of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the adult mouse, nephron loss is due to proximal tubular mitochondrial injury and cell death. In neonatal mice, proximal tubular cell death is delayed beyond 2 weeks of complete UUO, and release of partial UUO allows remodeling of remaining nephrons. Progressive cyst expansion develops in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a common inherited renal disorder. The PCY mutant mouse (which develops late-onset PKD) develops thinning of the glomerulotubular junction in parallel with growth of cysts in adulthood. Renal insufficiency in nephropathic cystinosis, a rare inherited renal disorder, results from progressive tubular cystine accumulation. In the Ctns knock out mouse (a model of cystinosis), proximal tubular cells become flattened, with loss of mitochondria and thickening of tubular basement membrane. In each model, persistent obstructive or metabolic stress leads ultimately to the formation of atubular glomeruli. The initial “fight” response (proximal tubular survival) switches to a “flight” response (proximal tubular cell death) with ongoing oxidative injury and mitochondrial damage. Therapies should be directed at reducing proximal tubular mitochondrial oxidative injury to enhance repair and regeneration. PMID:23949631

  12. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma: further characterization of the morphologic and immunopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Soomin; Kwon, Ghee Young; Cho, Yong Mee; Jun, Sun-Young; Choi, Chan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yong Wook; Park, Weon Seo; Shim, Jung Won

    2013-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma (ACD-RCC) is a subtype of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with unique morphologic features found exclusively in the background of end-stage renal disease. We analyzed the clinicopathologic features and immumoreactive profiles of 12 cases of ACD-RCC to further characterize this recently recognized entity. Review of histologic slides was performed in conjunction with immunohistochemical staining directed to the contemporary diagnostic antibodies and the putative target therapy-related markers. Histologically, the tumors showed characteristic inter-or intracellular microlumens and eosinophilic tumor cells. Intratumoral hemosiderin deposition and degenerating foamy tumor cells were consistent findings which were not previously described. Immunohistochemically, all the tumors were positive for alpha-methylacyl-CoA-racemase, CD10, pan-cytokeratin, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and c-met, while negative for carbonic anhydrase-9, CD57, CD68, c-kit, pax-2, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2. Heterogenous staining was found for CK7 and kidney-specific cadherin. Positive reaction to c-met suggests its utility as a plausible therapeutic target in ACD-RCC. Thus, we present the unique morphologic and immunopathologic features of ACD-RCC, which may be helpful in both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. PMID:23471757

  13. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Progression of Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in Individuals Without Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ticiana C.; Maahs, David M.; Johnson, Richard J.; Jalal, Diana I.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Rivard, Christopher; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine uric acid (UA) as a possible predictor of the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) using data from the prospective Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS CAC was measured by electron beam tomography at the baseline and at a follow-up 6.0 ± 0.5 years later. The study population included 443 participants with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects who were free of diagnosed coronary artery disease at baseline. The presence of renal disease was defined by the presence of albuminuria and/or low glomerular filtration rate. RESULTS In subjects without renal disease, serum UA predicted CAC progression (odds ratio 1.30 [95% CI 1.07–1.58], P = 0.007) independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and the presence of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Serum UA levels predict the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and may be useful in identifying who is at risk for vascular disease in the absence of significant chronic kidney disease. PMID:20798338

  14. A novel LMX1B mutation in a family with end-stage renal disease of 'unknown cause'.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Noel; Rice, Sarah J; Raman, Shreya; Hynes, Ann Marie; Srivastava, Shalabh; Moore, Iain; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Xu, Yaobo; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Thwaites, David T; Gale, Daniel P; Sayer, John A

    2015-02-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) presenting in a familial autosomal dominant pattern points to an underlying monogenic cause. Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder that may lead to ESRD caused by mutations in the transcription factor LMX1B. Renal-limited forms of this disease, termed nail-patella-like renal disease (NPLRD), and LMX1B nephropathy have recently been described. We report a large family, from the North East of England, with seven affected members with varying phenotypes of renal disease, ranging from ESRD at 28 years of age to microscopic haematuria and proteinuria and relatively preserved renal function. In this family, there were no extra-renal manifestations to suggest NPS. Genome-wide linkage studies and inheritance by descent (IBD) suggested disease loci on Chromosome 1 and 9. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis identified a novel sequence variant (p.R249Q) in the LMX1B gene in each of the three samples submitted, which was confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The variant segregated with the disease in all affected individuals. In silico modelling revealed that R249 is putatively located in close proximity to the DNA phosphoskeleton, supporting a role for this residue in the interaction between the LMX1B homeodomain and its target DNA. WES and analysis of potential target genes, including CD2AP, NPHS2, COL4A3, COL4A4 and COL4A5, did not reveal any co-inherited pathogenic variants. In conclusion, we confirm a novel LMX1B mutation in a large family with an autosomal dominant pattern of nephropathy. This report confirms that LMX1B mutations may cause a glomerulopathy without extra-renal manifestations. A molecular genetic diagnosis of LMX1B nephropathy thus provides a definitive diagnosis, prevents the need for renal biopsies and allows at risk family members to be screened. PMID:25713721

  15. A novel LMX1B mutation in a family with end-stage renal disease of ‘unknown cause’

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Noel; Rice, Sarah J.; Raman, Shreya; Hynes, Ann Marie; Srivastava, Shalabh; Moore, Iain; Al-Hamed, Mohamed; Xu, Yaobo; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Thwaites, David T.; Gale, Daniel P.; Sayer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) presenting in a familial autosomal dominant pattern points to an underlying monogenic cause. Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder that may lead to ESRD caused by mutations in the transcription factor LMX1B. Renal-limited forms of this disease, termed nail-patella-like renal disease (NPLRD), and LMX1B nephropathy have recently been described. We report a large family, from the North East of England, with seven affected members with varying phenotypes of renal disease, ranging from ESRD at 28 years of age to microscopic haematuria and proteinuria and relatively preserved renal function. In this family, there were no extra-renal manifestations to suggest NPS. Genome-wide linkage studies and inheritance by descent (IBD) suggested disease loci on Chromosome 1 and 9. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis identified a novel sequence variant (p.R249Q) in the LMX1B gene in each of the three samples submitted, which was confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The variant segregated with the disease in all affected individuals. In silico modelling revealed that R249 is putatively located in close proximity to the DNA phosphoskeleton, supporting a role for this residue in the interaction between the LMX1B homeodomain and its target DNA. WES and analysis of potential target genes, including CD2AP, NPHS2, COL4A3, COL4A4 and COL4A5, did not reveal any co-inherited pathogenic variants. In conclusion, we confirm a novel LMX1B mutation in a large family with an autosomal dominant pattern of nephropathy. This report confirms that LMX1B mutations may cause a glomerulopathy without extra-renal manifestations. A molecular genetic diagnosis of LMX1B nephropathy thus provides a definitive diagnosis, prevents the need for renal biopsies and allows at risk family members to be screened. PMID:25713721

  16. Erythropoietin production in renal cell carcinoma and renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in a chronic dialysis patient with polycythemia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keiichi; Asano, Takako; Tominaga, Susumu; Yoshii, Hidehiko; Sawazaki, Harutake; Asano, Tomohiko

    2014-11-01

    In patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis (HD), erythropoietin (EPO) production from the kidney generally decreases and renal anemia develops. Patients without anemia, but with high serum EPO (sEPO) levels are rare among HD patients. The current study presents the case of a 67-year-old female HD patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC), manifesting polycythemia with elevated sEPO levels. A radical nephrectomy was performed, which diminished the polycythemia, but the sEPO levels remained high. To determine the origin of the EPO production, immunohistochemistry was performed to detect EPO in the RCC and the renal cysts of the surgically resected kidney. In addition, the sEPO and EPO levels in a renal cyst were determined by enzyme immunoassay. EPO expression was demonstrated in RCC and cyst epithelial cells using immunohistochemistry, revealing extremely high EPO levels in the cyst fluid. Due to the remission of polycythemia following the nephrectomy, EPO production from the resected kidney appeared to have been the cause of the polycythemia. Positive EPO staining of the renal cysts in the resected polycystic kidney and sustained sEPO elevation following nephrectomy led to the hypothesis of EPO production in the renal cysts of the contralateral polycystic kidney. Although the postoperative EPO level was higher than the normal range, the hematocrit (Hct) level gradually decreased and recombinant human EPO was required again three months following the nephrectomy. Eight months after the nephrectomy, the Hct level was 30.2% with the use of rHuEPO. In conclusion, EPO production from RCC and renal cysts in ADPKD appeared to cause polycythemia in the HD patient. PMID:25295086

  17. [First-line screening guidelines for renal stone disease patients: a CLAFU update].

    PubMed

    Haymann, J-P; Daudon, M; Normand, M; Hoznek, A; Meria, P; Traxer, O

    2014-01-01

    This text summarizes the CLAFU first-line screening guidelines for renal stone disease patients. We have focused on the useful information provided by renal stone analysis and also the identification of relevant stone risk factors detected in a 24-hour urine collection. Indeed, evaluation of water, sodium and protein intake may be easily achieved in a current clinical setting and allows a useful pedagogic tool for patients' advices and follow-up: daily diuresis above 2000 mL, calcium intake between 800 mg and 1 g/day, a moderate daily sodium and proteins restricted diet (<9 g and <1.2 g/kg per day respectively). General therapeutical principles are reviewed, including circumstances requiring specialized management. PMID:24365623

  18. Renal and urological diseases of the newborn neonatal acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Kirtida

    2014-01-01

    Survival of critically ill neonates in the intensive care unit has improved over the past decades reflecting improvements in obstetric, delivery room and neonatal intensive care, however, morbidity remains significant. Acute kidney injury is a common occurrence in these neonates and despite improved understanding of the pathophysiology and management of acute kidney injury in full term and preterm infants, the mortality remains as high as 61%. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that despite recovery from the acute injury, these infants are at risk for developing hypertension and chronic kidney disease later in life. Emphasis on improving our capability to detect renal insult and injury early, before renal failure occurs, and identification of novel therapeutic agents to prevent and treat acute kidney injury may impact mortality and morbidity. This review focuses on our current knowledge of acute kidney injury in the newborn, approaches to investigating and managing this complication and what future trends in this field may bring. PMID:25088261

  19. Total Joint Arthroplasty in Patients with Chronic Renal Disease: Is It Worth the Risk?

    PubMed

    Warth, Lucian C; Pugely, Andrew J; Martin, Christopher T; Gao, Yubo; Callaghan, John J

    2015-09-01

    26-27% of patients with end stage hip and knee arthritis requiring TJR have chronic renal disease. A multi-center, prospective clinical registry was queried for TJA's from 2006 to 2012, and 74,300 cases were analyzed. Renal impairment was quantified using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to stratify each patient by stage of CRD (1-5). There was a significantly greater rate of overall complications in patients with moderate to severe CRD (6.1% vs. 7.6%, P<0.001). In those with CRD (Stage 3-5), mortality was twice as high (0.26% vs. 0.48%, P<0.001). Patients with Stage 4 and 5 CRD had a 213% increased risk of any complication (OR 2.13, 95% CI: 1.73-2.62). Surgeons may use these findings to discuss the risk-benefit ratio of elective TJR in patients with CRD. PMID:26122111

  20. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the kidney in renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Mairiang, Eimorn; Hanpanich, Petcharakorn; Sriboonlue, Pote

    2002-12-01

    Previous studies of renal stone disease (RSD) in Thailand indicated abnormal urinary aggregator and inhibitor composition among farmers with excessive sweat loss. Our aim was to compare the proton MR spectra obtained from the kidneys of 32 proven cases of RSD (aged 38 to 65 yrs) with nine age-matched normal control subjects. We used the STEAM sequence with TE = 15 ms and TR = 2,000 ms. The spectra at 3.25, 3.6 and 3.9 ppm were analyzed. The results showed a correlation between the three peaks (p < 0.001), however, there was no significant difference between the RSD group and the normal control subjects. We therefore concluded that there was no overloading of these osmolytes among the renal stone patients. PMID:12591573

  1. Kyrle's disease in a patient of diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A.; Jivani, Nidhi B.; Diwan, Nilofar G.

    2015-01-01

    Kyrle's disease (KD) is an acquired perforating dermatosis associated with an underlying disorder such as diabetes mellitus or chronic renal failure. It presents as multiple discrete, eruptive papules with a central crust or plug, often on the lower extremities. A keratotic plug is seen histologically in an atrophic epidermis and may penetrate the papillary dermis with transepidermal elimination of keratotic debris without collagen or elastic fibers. Various therapies have been reported that include cryotherapy, laser therapy, narrow-band ultraviolet B and use of topical or systemic retinoids. Hereby a case of 64-year-old male, a known case of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and chronic renal failure who developed KD is presented. PMID:25949985

  2. Mechanisms of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to improve cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Huanji; Chen, Jie; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2013-02-15

    Both clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated that cardiac remodeling in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) is very common. It is a key feature during the course of heart failure and an important risk factor for subsequent cardiac mortality. Traditional drugs or therapies rarely have effects on cardiac regression of CRF and cardiovascular events are still the first cause of death. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are the products of arachidonic acids metabolized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases. It has been found that EETs have important biological effects including anti-hypertension and anti-inflammation. Recent data suggest that EETs are involved in regulating cardiomyocyte injury, renal dysfunction, chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related risk factors and signaling pathways, all of which play key roles in cardiac remodeling induced by CRF. This review analyzes the literature to identify the possible mechanisms for EETs to improve cardiac remodeling induced by CRF and indicates the therapeutic potential of EETs in it. PMID:23313758

  3. Whole-transcriptome analysis of UUO mouse model of renal fibrosis reveals new molecular players in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Arvaniti, Eleni; Moulos, Panagiotis; Vakrakou, Athina; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Chadjichristos, Christos; Kavvadas, Panagiotis; Charonis, Aristidis; Politis, Panagiotis K

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis by RNA-seq technology allows novel insights into gene expression and regulatory networks in health and disease. To better understand the molecular basis of renal fibrosis, we performed RNA-seq analysis in the Unilateral Ureteric Obstruction (UUO) mouse model. We analysed sham operated, 2- and 8-day post-ligation renal tissues. Thousands of genes with statistical significant changes in their expression were identified and classified into cellular processes and molecular pathways. Many novel protein-coding genes were identified, including critical transcription factors with important regulatory roles in other tissues and diseases. Emphasis was placed on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a class of molecular regulators of multiple and diverse cellular functions. Selected lncRNA genes were further studied and their transcriptional activity was confirmed. For three of them, their transcripts were also examined in other mouse models of nephropathies and their up- or down-regulation was found similar to the UUO model. In vitro experiments confirmed that one selected lncRNA is independent of TGFβ or IL1b stimulation but can influence the expression of fibrosis-related proteins and the cellular phenotype. These data provide new information about the involvement of protein-coding and lncRNA genes in nephropathies, which can become novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets in the near future. PMID:27189340

  4. Whole-transcriptome analysis of UUO mouse model of renal fibrosis reveals new molecular players in kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arvaniti, Eleni; Moulos, Panagiotis; Vakrakou, Athina; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Chadjichristos, Christos; Kavvadas, Panagiotis; Charonis, Aristidis; Politis, Panagiotis K.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis by RNA-seq technology allows novel insights into gene expression and regulatory networks in health and disease. To better understand the molecular basis of renal fibrosis, we performed RNA-seq analysis in the Unilateral Ureteric Obstruction (UUO) mouse model. We analysed sham operated, 2- and 8-day post-ligation renal tissues. Thousands of genes with statistical significant changes in their expression were identified and classified into cellular processes and molecular pathways. Many novel protein-coding genes were identified, including critical transcription factors with important regulatory roles in other tissues and diseases. Emphasis was placed on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a class of molecular regulators of multiple and diverse cellular functions. Selected lncRNA genes were further studied and their transcriptional activity was confirmed. For three of them, their transcripts were also examined in other mouse models of nephropathies and their up- or down-regulation was found similar to the UUO model. In vitro experiments confirmed that one selected lncRNA is independent of TGFβ or IL1b stimulation but can influence the expression of fibrosis-related proteins and the cellular phenotype. These data provide new information about the involvement of protein-coding and lncRNA genes in nephropathies, which can become novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets in the near future. PMID:27189340

  5. Proximal tubular efflux transporters involved in renal excretion of p-cresyl sulfate and p-cresyl glucuronide: Implications for chronic kidney disease pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Mutsaers, Henricus A M; Caetano-Pinto, Pedro; Seegers, Andries E M; Dankers, Anita C A; van den Broek, Petra H H; Wetzels, Jack F M; van den Brand, Jan A J G; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Hoenderop, Joost G; Wilmer, Martijn J G; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2015-10-01

    The uremic solutes p-cresyl sulfate (pCS) and p-cresyl glucuronide (pCG) accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and might contribute to disease progression. Moreover, retention of these solutes may directly be related to renal tubular function. Here, we investigated the role of the efflux transporters Multidrug Resistance Protein 4 (MRP4) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) in pCS and pCG excretion, and studied the impact of both solutes on the phenotype of human conditionally immortalized renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC). Our results show that p-cresol metabolites accumulate during CKD, with a shift from sulfation to glucuronidation upon progression. Moreover, pCS inhibited the activity of MRP4 by 40% and BCRP by 25%, whereas pCG only reduced MRP4 activity by 75%. Moreover, BCRP-mediated transport of both solutes was demonstrated. Exposure of ciPTEC to pCG caused epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, indicated by increased expression of vimentin and Bcl-2, and diminished E-cadherin. This was associated with altered expression of key tubular transporters. In conclusion, BCRP is likely involved in the renal excretion of both solutes, and pCG promotes phenotypical changes in ciPTEC, supporting the notion that uremic toxins may be involved in CKD progression by negatively affecting renal tubule cell phenotype and functionality. PMID:26216510

  6. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  7. Immunologic findings, thrombocytopenia and disease activity in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W. F.; Linton, A. L.; Cordy, P. E.; Keown, P. E.; Lohmann, R. C.; Lindsay, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty patients with nephritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus were followed up for a mean of 34 months after renal biopsy with serial determinations of total serum complement and C3 and C4 concentrations, binding of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), antinuclear antibody pattern and platelet count. There were 25 episodes of nonhematologic observed disease activity in 16 of the 20 patients; elevated DNA binding and thrombocytopenia correlated well with these episodes. The mean platelet count during episodes of observed disease activity was 96 +/- 42 X 10(9)/L, which was significantly different from the mean count of 248 +/- 90 X 10(9)/L during disease quiescence. The proportion of false-positive results with the immunologic tests varied from 25% to 67% and with platelet counts it was 11%. It is suggested that thrombocytopenia may be a simple and accurate index of disease activity in lupus nephritis. PMID:350367

  8. Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Maeshima, Yohei; Mosterman, Barbara; Kalluri, Raghu

    2002-01-01

    During progression of chronic renal disease, qualitative and quantitative changes in the composition of tubular basement membranes (TBMs) and interstitial matrix occur. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated activation of tubular epithelial cells (TECs) is speculated to be a key contributor to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. To further understand the pathogenesis associated with renal fibrosis, we developed an in vitro Boyden chamber system using renal basement membranes that partially mimics in vivo conditions of TECs during health and disease. Direct stimulation of TECs with TGF-β1/epithelial growth factor results in an increased migratory capacity across bovine TBM preparations. This is associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9. Indirect chemotactic stimulation by TGF-β1/EGF or collagen type I was insufficient in inducing migration of untreated TECs across bovine TBM preparation, suggesting that basement membrane integrity and composition play an important role in protecting TECs from interstitial fibrotic stimuli. Additionally, neutralization of MMPs by COL-3 inhibitor dramatically decreases the capacity of TGF-β1-stimulated TECs to migrate through bovine TBM preparation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that basement membrane structure, integrity, and composition play an important role in determining interstitial influences on TECs and subsequent impact on potential aberrant cell-matrix interactions. PMID:12057905

  9. Genetics, Environment, and Diabetes-Related End-Stage Renal Disease in the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    González, Ana M.; Maceira, Benito M.; Pérez, Estefanía; Cabrera, Vicente M.; López, Alfonso J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Type 1 and type 2 diabetes, complicated with renal disease, have a significantly higher incidence in the Canary Islands than in mainland Spain and other European countries. Present-day Canarian inhabitants consist of a mixed population with North African indigenous and European colonizer ancestors who have rapidly evolved from a rural to an urban life style. The aim of this work was to assess the possible role of genetic and environmental factors on diabetes-related end-stage renal disease incidence in the Canary Islands. Results: For both types of diabetes there is an ethnic susceptibility increased by diabetes family history. Whereas the Y-chromosome does not play a significant role, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup differences point to a maternal origin for this ethnic predisposition, confirming susceptible and protective effects for haplogroups J and T, respectively. In addition, urban life style seems to be an additional risk factor for type 1 diabetes. Conclusions: The maternal ethnic predisposition to diabetes complicated with kidney disease detected in the Canary Islands signals mtDNA and X-chromosome markers as the best candidates to uncover the genetic predisposition to this disease. PMID:22480375

  10. Predicting Renal Failure Progression in Chronic Kidney Disease Using Integrated Intelligent Fuzzy Expert System

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Jamshid; Mirbagheri, Seyed Ahmad; Mazdeh, Mitra Mahdavi; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a covert disease. Accurate prediction of CKD progression over time is necessary for reducing its costs and mortality rates. The present study proposes an adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for predicting the renal failure timeframe of CKD based on real clinical data. Methods. This study used 10-year clinical records of newly diagnosed CKD patients. The threshold value of 15 cc/kg/min/1.73 m2 of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was used as the marker of renal failure. A Takagi-Sugeno type ANFIS model was used to predict GFR values. Variables of age, sex, weight, underlying diseases, diastolic blood pressure, creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, and GFR were initially selected for the predicting model. Results. Weight, diastolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus as underlying disease, and current GFR(t) showed significant correlation with GFRs and were selected as the inputs of model. The comparisons of the predicted values with the real data showed that the ANFIS model could accurately estimate GFR variations in all sequential periods (Normalized Mean Absolute Error lower than 5%). Conclusions. Despite the high uncertainties of human body and dynamic nature of CKD progression, our model can accurately predict the GFR variations at long future periods. PMID:27022406

  11. Defining end-stage renal disease in clinical trials: a framework for adjudication.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Unlike definition of stroke and myocardial infarction, there is no uniformly agreed upon definition to adjudicate end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD remains the most unambiguous and clinically relevant end point for clinical trialists, regulators, payers and patients with chronic kidney disease. The prescription of dialysis to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is subjective and great variations exist among physicians and countries. Given the difficulties in diagnosing ESRD, the presence of estimated GFR <15 mL/min/1.7 3m(2) itself has been suggested as an end point. However, this definition is still a surrogate since many patients may live years without being symptomatic or needing dialysis. The purpose of this report is to describe a framework to define when the kidney function ends and when ESRD can be adjudicated. Discussed in this report are (i) the importance of diagnosing symptomatic uremia or advanced asymptomatic uremia thus establishing the need for dialysis; (ii) establishing the chronicity of dialysis so as to distinguish it from acute dialysis; (iii) establishing ESRD when dialysis is unavailable, refused or considered futile and (iv) the adjudication process. Several challenges and ambiguities that emerge in clinical trials and their possible solutions are provided. The criteria proposed herein may help to standardize the definition of ESRD and reduce the variability in adjudicating the most important renal end point in clinical trials of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26264780

  12. Protein biomarkers associated with acute renal failure and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Perco, P; Pleban, C; Kainz, A; Lukas, A; Mayer, G; Mayer, B; Oberbauer, R

    2006-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) as well as chronic kidney disease (CKD) are currently categorized according to serum creatinine concentrations. Serum creatinine, however, has shortcomings because of its low predictive values. The need for novel markers for the early diagnosis and prognosis of renal diseases is imminent, particularly for markers reflecting intrinsic organ injury in stages when glomerular filtration is not impaired. This review summarizes protein markers discussed in the context of ARF as well as CKD, and provides an overview on currently available discovery results following 'omics' techniques. The identified set of candidate marker proteins is discussed in their cellular and functional context. The systematic review of proteomics and genomics studies revealed 56 genes to be associated with acute or chronic kidney disease. Context analysis, i.e. correlation of biological processes and molecular functions of reported kidney markers, revealed that 15 genes on the candidate list were assigned to the most significant ontology groups: immunity and defence. Other significantly enriched groups were cell communication (14 genes), signal transduction (22 genes) and apoptosis (seven genes). Among 24 candidate protein markers, nine proteins were also identified by gene expression studies. Next generation candidate marker proteins with improved diagnostic and prognostic values for kidney diseases will be derived from whole genome scans and protemics approaches. Prospective validation still remains elusive for all proposed candidates. PMID:17032342

  13. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase: A Crucial Player and Potential Therapeutic Target in Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Terry King-Wing; McAdoo, Stephen P; Tam, Frederick Wai-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a 72 kDa cytoplasmic non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, plays an important role in signal transduction in a variety of cell types. Ever since its discovery in the early 1990s, there has been accumulating evidence to suggest a pathogenic role of Syk in various allergic disorders, autoimmune diseases and malignancies. Additionally, there is emerging data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies that Syk is implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN), including anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated GN, lupus nephritis and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Moreover, recent animal studies have shed light on the importance of Syk in mediating acute renal allograft rejection, Epstein Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and kidney fibrosis. Fostamatinib, an oral Syk inhibitor, has undergone clinical testing in rheumatoid arthritis, refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura, leukemia and lymphoma. The recent STOP-IgAN trial showed that the addition of non-selective immunosuppressive therapy to intensive supportive care did not improve clinical outcomes in high-risk IgAN patients. A Syk-targeted approach may be beneficial and is currently being evaluated in a phase II randomized controlled trial. In this review, we will discuss the pathogenic role of Syk and potential use of Syk inhibitor in a variety of renal diseases. PMID:27476075

  14. Utility of Iron Staining in Identifying the Cause of Renal Allograft Dysfunction in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingchun; Doshi, Mona; Khan, Salman; Li, Wei; Zhang, Ping L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is associated with iron/heme deposition in proximal renal tubules and related acute tubular injury (ATI). Here we report the utility of iron staining in differentiating causes of renal allograft dysfunction in patients with a history of sickle cell disease. Case 1: the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction two years after renal transplant. Her renal biopsy showed ATI, supported by patchy loss of brush border and positive staining of kidney injury molecule-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells, where diffuse increase in iron staining (2+) was present. This indicated that ATI likely resulted from iron/heme toxicity to proximal tubules. Electron microscope confirmed aggregated sickle RBCs in glomeruli, indicating a recurrent SCN. Case 2: four years after renal transplant, the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction and became positive for serum donor-specific antibody. His renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and diffuse positive C4d stain in peritubular capillaries. Iron staining was negative in the renal tubules, implying that TMA was likely associated with acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR, type 2) rather than recurrent SCN. These case reports imply that iron staining is an inexpensive but effective method in distinguishing SCN-associated renal injury in allograft kidney from other etiologies. PMID:26697257

  15. Red blood cell calcium homeostasis in patients with end-stage renal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gafter, U.; Malachi, T.; Barak, H.; Djaldetti, M.; Levi, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Low cell calcium level is essential for preservation of red blood cell (RBC) membrane deformability and survival. RBCs from patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) demonstrate reduction in membrane deformability, possibly as a result of increased RBC cellular calcium level. To evaluate calcium homeostasis in RBCs from patients with ESRD, we measured cell calcium level, basal and calmodulin-stimulated calcium-stimulated Mg-dependent ATPase (CaATPase) activity, and calcium 45 efflux were measured before and after hemodialysis. The in vitro effect of uremic plasma and of urea on CaATPase activity of normal RBCs was tested, and 45Ca influx into RBCs of patients undergoing hemodialysis also was determined. A morphologic evaluation of red cells from patients with ESRD was performed with a scanning electron microscope. RBC calcium level in patients (mean +/- SEM 21.2 +/- 2.8 mumol/L of cells; n = 28) was higher than in controls (4.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/L of cells; n = 24; p less than 0.001). Hemodialysis had no effect on cell calcium level. Both basal and calmodulin-stimulated RBC CaATPase activities in patients with ESRD (n = 9) were reduced by approximately 50% (p less than 0.01), but after hemodialysis, enzyme activity returned to normal. 45Ca efflux from calcium-loaded cells, which was 2574.0 +/- 217.0 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours before hemodialysis, increased to 3140.7 +/- 206.8 mumol/L of cells per 0.5 hours after hemodialysis (p less than 0.005). In vitro incubation of normal RBCs with uremic plasma depressed CaATPase activity, but incubation with urea had no effect. RBCs of patients with ESRD revealed increased 45Ca influx, 7.63 +/- 1.15 mumol/L of cells per hour versus 4.61 +/- 0.39 mumol/L of cells per hour (p less than 0.025). RBCs of patients revealed a high incidence of spherocytosis and echynocytosis, which correlated with a high cell calcium level (r = 0.894, p less than 0.01).

  16. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma-like tumors in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease are unrelated to sporadic clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Zhang, Shaobo; Eble, John N; Grignon, David J; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Wang, Mingsheng; Gobbo, Stefano; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Cheng, Liang

    2013-08-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) shares morphologic overlap with clear cell renal cell carcinoma, although it lacks chromosome 3p and VHL gene abnormalities. Rare cases have been reported in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) patients (germline mutation of the VHL gene), the significance of which is uncertain. We analyzed morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features in 14 CCPRCC-like tumors and 13 clear cell renal cell carcinomas from 12 patients with VHL disease. Gross appearance of CCPRCC-like tumors ranged from yellow-orange to tan, red-brown, or extensively cystic. Histologic features included: small papillary tufts (79%), branched tubules (71%), branched papillae (64%), flattened peripheral cysts (64%), and apically aligned nuclei (43%). Almost all CCPRCC-like tumors (82%) lacked the characteristic immunoprofile of sporadic CCPRCC (CK7, CAIX, CD10, AMACR), often showing diffuse CD10 labeling (64%), negative or focal CK7 reactivity (55%), or both (18%). Three tumors (27%) showed strong AMACR staining. Chromosome 3p deletion was often present (82%), similar to that observed in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (80%); no CCPRCC-like tumor had chromosome 7 or 17 abnormalities. In summary, tumors that histologically resemble CCPRCC sometimes occur in patients with VHL disease but usually lack the characteristic immunohistochemical and molecular profile, suggesting that they do not share the same pathogenesis. PMID:23648463

  17. IgG4-related Disease: A Mass Lesion in the Intrarenal Sinus near the Renal Pelvis.

    PubMed

    Inenaga, Jun-Ichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Kawada, Masahiro; Imafuku, Aya; Mise, Koki; Sumida, Keiichi; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Hayami, Noriko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Okaneya, Toshikazu; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital with the renal pelvic mass lesion detected on a health screening examination. The surgical specimen contained a mass exhibiting the histological features of immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related disease, including lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and sclerosis with numerous IgG4-producing plasma cells. Postoperatively, an elevation of the serum IgG4 level was confirmed at 403 mg/dL; however, there was no evidence of tubulointerstitial nephritis or glomerulopathy, including membranous nephropathy, and the urothelium of the renal pelvis was intact without inflammation. We herein report this case in which IgG4-related disease of the renal pelvic region presented with a mass lesion in the intrarenal sinus near the renal pelvis, not 'pyelitis' (as described by Stone). PMID:26234232

  18. Reduced methotrexate clearance and renal impairment in a boy with osteosarcoma and earlier undetected autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

    PubMed

    Alberer, Martin; Hoefele, Julia; Bergmann, Carsten; Hartrampf, Steffen; Hilberath, Jutta; Pawlita, Ingo; Albert, Michael H; Benz, Marcus R; Weber, Lutz T; Schmid, Irene

    2010-11-01

    We report a 12-year-old boy with osteoblastic osteosarcoma of the right femur. He was started on chemotherapy according to the EURAMOS/COSS 1 protocol. Chemotherapy with doxorubicin/cisplatin resulted in reversible acute renal failure and methotrexate levels were repeatedly elevated. Family history suggested an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Genetic testing revealed a novel mutation c.10707_10712del (p.Val3569_3570del) in exon 36 of the PKD1 gene. Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may be at risk for acute renal failure during chemotherapy without signs of renal impairment. A careful family history is important to exclude risk factors for renal impairment before introducing high-dose chemotherapy. PMID:20921908

  19. Oxidative stress during erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness anemia at end stage renal disease: Molecular and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Samar K M; Amer, H A; El Behairy, Adel M; Warda, Mohamad

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are two faces of one coin in end stage renal disease patients (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis. Their interconnection induces anemia complicated with erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness. The biochemical bases behind the resistance to erythropoietin therapy with frequent hemoglobinemia, oxidative stress and iron status have not been fully understood. Here two equal groups (40 patients each) of responders and non-responders to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy (higher than 300 IU/kg/wk of epoetin) were investigated. Hematological and biochemical analyses of collected blood and serum samples were performed along with serum electrophoretic protein footprinting. The leukocytic DNA fragmentation was used to evaluate the degree of oxidative insult. The good responders showed lower erythrocyte malondialdehyde (E-MDA) level and less DNA fragmentation of circulating leukocytes than poor responders with elevated hemoglobin, albumin, A/G ratio, total iron, and ferritin levels. Contrariwise, lower erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (E-SOD) and catalase activities in EPO poor responder group were noticed. Neither other serum constituents nor electrophoretic protein pattern showed any difference between the two groups. There were higher levels of inflammatory markers, interleukin-6 (IL6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in EPO poor responder than good responder. The negative correlations between Hb and both IL6 and CRP levels in the present data remotely indicate a positive correlation between inflammatory markers and severity of anemia. A direct correlation between Hb and antioxidant enzymes (E-SOD and catalase) was noticed, while inverse correlation with E-MDA was recorded. The study proved that oral supplementation of vitamin C to ESRD patients might mitigate the previously elevated serum MDA level in these patients. PMID:27222740

  20. Oxidative stress during erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness anemia at end stage renal disease: Molecular and biochemical studies

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Samar K.M.; Amer, H.A.; El Behairy, Adel M.; Warda, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are two faces of one coin in end stage renal disease patients (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis. Their interconnection induces anemia complicated with erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness. The biochemical bases behind the resistance to erythropoietin therapy with frequent hemoglobinemia, oxidative stress and iron status have not been fully understood. Here two equal groups (40 patients each) of responders and non-responders to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy (higher than 300 IU/kg/wk of epoetin) were investigated. Hematological and biochemical analyses of collected blood and serum samples were performed along with serum electrophoretic protein footprinting. The leukocytic DNA fragmentation was used to evaluate the degree of oxidative insult. The good responders showed lower erythrocyte malondialdehyde (E-MDA) level and less DNA fragmentation of circulating leukocytes than poor responders with elevated hemoglobin, albumin, A/G ratio, total iron, and ferritin levels. Contrariwise, lower erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (E-SOD) and catalase activities in EPO poor responder group were noticed. Neither other serum constituents nor electrophoretic protein pattern showed any difference between the two groups. There were higher levels of inflammatory markers, interleukin-6 (IL6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in EPO poor responder than good responder. The negative correlations between Hb and both IL6 and CRP levels in the present data remotely indicate a positive correlation between inflammatory markers and severity of anemia. A direct correlation between Hb and antioxidant enzymes (E-SOD and catalase) was noticed, while inverse correlation with E-MDA was recorded. The study proved that oral supplementation of vitamin C to ESRD patients might mitigate the previously elevated serum MDA level in these patients. PMID:27222740

  1. Targeting Survivin Inhibits Renal Cell Carcinoma Progression and Enhances the Activity of Temsirolimus.

    PubMed

    Carew, Jennifer S; Espitia, Claudia M; Zhao, Weiguo; Mita, Monica M; Mita, Alain C; Nawrocki, Steffan T

    2015-06-01

    Elevated expression of the antiapoptotic factor survivin has been implicated in cancer cell survival and disease progression. However, its specific contribution to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis is not well defined. We investigated the roles of survivin in RCC tumor progression, resistance to mTOR inhibitors, and evaluated the therapeutic activity of the survivin suppressant YM155 in RCC models. Here, we report that survivin expression levels were significantly higher in RCC cell lines compared with normal renal cells. Stable targeted knockdown of survivin completely abrogated the ability of 786-O RCC tumors to grow in mice, thus demonstrating its importance as a regulator of RCC tumorigenesis. We next explored multiple strategies to therapeutically inhibit survivin function in RCC. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus partially diminished survivin levels and this effect was augmented by the addition of YM155. Further analyses revealed that, in accordance with their combined anti-survivin effects, YM155 significantly improved the anticancer activity of temsirolimus in a panel of RCC cell lines in vitro and in xenograft models in vivo. Similar to pharmacologic inhibition of survivin, shRNA-mediated silencing of survivin expression not only inhibited RCC tumor growth, but also significantly sensitized RCC cells to temsirolimus therapy. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that the effectiveness of this dual survivin/mTOR inhibition strategy was mediated by a potent decrease in survivin levels and corresponding induction of apoptosis. Our findings establish survivin inhibition as a novel approach to improve RCC therapy that warrants further investigation. PMID:25808836

  2. Activation of EP4 receptors contributes to prostaglandin E2-mediated stimulation of renal sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Ulla C; Cicha, Michael Z; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Nüsing, Rolf M; Smith, Lori A; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2004-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the renal pelvic wall increases prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) leading to stimulation of cAMP production, which results in substance P (SP) release and activation of renal mechanosensory nerves. The subtype of PGE receptors involved, EP2 and/or EP4, was studied by immunohistochemistry and renal pelvic administration of agonists and antagonists of EP2 and EP4 receptors. EP4 receptor-like immunoreactivity (LI) was colocalized with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-LI in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) at Th(9)-L(1) and in nerve terminals in the renal pelvic wall. Th(9)-L(1) DRG neurons also contained EP3 receptor-LI and COX-2-LI, each of which was colocalized with CGRP-LI in some neurons. No renal pelvic nerves contained EP3 receptor-LI and only very few nerves COX-2-LI. The EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH-6809 (20 microM) had no effect on SP release produced by PGE(2) (0.14 microM) from an isolated rat renal pelvic wall preparation. However, the EP4 receptor antagonist L-161,982 (10 microM) blocked the SP release produced by the EP2/EP4 receptor agonist butaprost (10 microM) 12 +/- 2 vs. 2 +/- 1 and PGE(2), 9 +/- 1 vs. 1 +/- 0 pg/min. The SP release by butaprost and PGE(2) was similarly blocked by the EP4 receptor antagonist AH-23848 (30 microM). In anesthetized rats, the afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA) responses to butaprost 700 +/- 100 and PGE(2).780 +/- 100%.s (area under the curve of ARNA vs. time) were unaffected by renal pelvic perfusion with AH-6809. However, 1 microM L-161,982 and 10 microM AH-23848 blocked the ARNA responses to butaprost by 94 +/- 5 and 78 +/- 10%, respectively, and to PGE(2) by 74 +/- 16 and 74 +/- 11%, respectively. L-161,982 also blocked the ARNA response to increasing renal pelvic pressure 10 mmHg, 85 +/- 5%. In conclusion, PGE(2) increases renal pelvic release of SP and ARNA by activating EP4 receptors on renal sensory nerve fibers. PMID:15292051

  3. Acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid change and rhabdoid features.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Tamura, Masato; Hamaguchi, Nobumasa; Mikami, Shuji; Pan, Chin-Chen; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Hes, Ondrej; Michal, Michal; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2011-12-01

    Acquired cystic disease (ACD)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a recently described entity. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid and rhabdoid changes. In this article, we present the first case of such a tumor. A 56-year-old Japanese man has received long-term hemodialysis and had a history of right renal cancer. Following the discovery of metastatic cancer in the thoracic wall, detailed imaging studies revealed a mass in the left kidney. The histologic examination of the left renal tumor showed ACD-associated RCC with sarcomatoid change and rhabdoid features. Immunohistochemically, intracytoplasmic globular inclusions in rhabdoid cells were positive for vimentin and cytokeratin CAM5.2. The G-band karyotype showed the following changes: 46, X, +X. -Y[1]/43, idem, add(2)(q31), -6, -9, -14, -15, +16, -22, +mar1[6]/46, XY[2]/abnormal cell[11]. In conclusion, pathologists and urologists should be aware that rhabdoid features may occur in ACD-associated RCC and that the loss of chromosomes 9 and 14 may occur during the process of sarcomatoid change in ACD-associated RCC. PMID:21036640

  4. Transient Hypocalcemia in a Dialysis Patient With Paget’s disease and Presumed Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Kenneth R.; Mo, Jay; Czerwinskyj, Chrystina; Mathew, Roy O.

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with end-stage renal disease was hospitalized because of radicular pain and weakness in the left arm and hand. Sonography and computed tomography had recently shown a large right renal mass. On admission, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated vertebral metastases with epidural extension, and radiotherapy was directed to the spine and kidney. Hypocalcemia was first noted on the fourth hospital day. A second computed tomography scan showed bleeding into and around the kidney, and arterial embolization was required to halt the bleeding. Hypocalcemia persisted for at least 27 days at values between 6.0 and 7.7 mg/dL and was consistently associated with ionized calcium concentrations less than or equal to 4.44 mg/dL. After an unrevealing search for a recognized cause, we attributed hypocalcemia to persistent sequestration of calcium in the right retroperitoneum. Exogenous supplementation eventually restored the concentration to normal. In the absence of renal and intestinal loss, hypocalcemia reflects abnormal flux of calcium from the extracellular compartment into tissue. Our patient’s repository appears to have been a necrotic and hemorrhagic cancer. Tumor-induced sequestration of calcium should be included in the differential diagnosis of hypocalcemia. PMID:27081654

  5. Beethoven's renal disease based on his autopsy: a case of papillary necrosis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, A

    1993-06-01

    The autopsy report of Ludwig van Beethoven written by Dr Johann Wagner in 1827 reveals that he had renal calculi that had not been diagnosed during his lifetime, together with perirenal fibrosis. The most comprehensive interpretation of this autopsy finding is that the regular calcareous deposits in every one of his renal calices represented calcified necrotic papillae. Severe urinary obstruction or diabetes as possible causes of papillary necrosis were not present. Analgesic abuse because of headaches, back pain, and attacks of rheumatism or gout may be presumed on the basis of Beethoven's uncontrolled way of taking medication. Salicin, a commonly used analgesic substance of that time (dried and powdered willow bark), is able to cause papillary necrosis. Perirenal fibrosis may be due to chronic infection or drug intake. Beethoven's other well-known diseases are deafness caused by otosclerosis of the inner ear, relapsing attacks of diarrhea as the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, and liver cirrhosis following viral hepatitis and chronic alcohol consumption. Liver cirrhosis also may cause papillary necrosis. In Beethoven's case, renal papillary necrosis was most probably the consequence of analgesic abuse together with decompensated liver cirrhosis. The autopsy report of Beethoven is the first case of papillary necrosis recorded in the literature. PMID:8503419

  6. The effect of ONCE Renal on minerals and electrolytes in predialysis patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Prapakorn, Janjira; Punpanich, Dollapas; Pongsuparbchon, Chantima; Supasyndh, Ouppatham

    2016-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is one common adverse consequence in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), and most patients have a lower-than-normal dietary energy intake. The present study was undertaken to examine whether orally administered ONCE Renal formula (ORF) supplement would improve energy intake without minerals and electrolytes disturbances in predialysis patients with CKD. Methods All eligible nondiabetic patients with CKD received ORF supplement for 1 week. Nutrition markers, renal function, and minerals and electrolytes were evaluated before and after supplementing. All patients kept a 3-day food record and were interviewed by a registered dietitian. Results A total of 29 patients with mean age 64.9±13.3 years were included. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 37.7±12.1 mL/min/1.73 m2. A significant increase was observed in amount of energy, fat, fiber, calcium, and magnesium intake after 1 week of ORF supplement. Moreover, in comparison with baseline values, the patients displayed decreased dietary protein intake and blood urea nitrogen and increased serum magnesium. However, no significant change was found in renal function, nutritional markers (body weight, prealbumin, albumin, and protein equivalence of total nitrogen appearance), serum calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate. Conclusion In patients with CKD, ingestion of ORF was well tolerated and had a positive effect with an increase in dietary energy, fat, and fiber intake, as well as a decreased dietary protein intake. No mineral or electrolyte abnormalities were observed during the study. PMID:27103839

  7. Cost-effectiveness of kidney transplantation compared with chronic dialysis in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rosselli, Diego; Rueda, Juan-David; Diaz, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the costs and effectiveness measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALY) of kidney transplantation compared with dialysis in adults suffering from end-stage renal disease from the perspective of the Colombian healthcare system, we designed a Markov model with monthly cycles over a five-year time horizon and eight transitional states, including death as an absorbing state. Transition probabilities were obtained from international registries, costs from different local sources [case studies, official tariffs (ISS 2001 + 35%) for procedures and SISMED for medications]. Data were validated by an expert panel and we performed univariate, multivariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Effectiveness indicators were months of life gained, months of dialysis averted and deaths prevented. The annual discount rate was 3% and the cost-utility threshold (willingness to pay) was three times gross domestic product (GDP) = USD 20,000 per QALY. The costs were adopted in US dollars (USD) using the 2012 average exchange rate (1 USD = COP$ 1798). The discounted average total cost for five years was USD 76,718 for transplantation and USD 76,891 for dialysis, with utilities 2.98 and 2.10 QALY, respectively. Additionally, renal transplantation represented 6.9 months gained, 35 months in dialysis averted per patient and one death averted for each of the five patients transplanted in five years. We conclude that renal transplantation improves the overall survival rates and quality of life and is a cost-saving alternative compared with dialysis. PMID:26178546

  8. Efficacy of loop diuretics in the management of undocumented patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salman; Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles; Workeneh, Biruh

    2016-08-01

    An estimated 6000 patients who are undocumented immigrants have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and routinely present to public safety-net hospitals for life-saving emergent dialysis treatments. Because these patients lack a dialysis unit, they often do not have access to medication management consistently coordinated by a nephrologist, and this can result in more frequent emergency department (ED) utilization and cost of care. We hypothesized that patients who were taking loop diuretics had fewer ED visits for emergency dialysis. Loop diuretics can potentially take advantage of residual renal function and mitigate excess fluid gain that can induce heart failure and high potassium, the two most common indications for emergency dialysis. In our univariable analysis, patients on furosemide had 3.1 fewer ED visits on average compared with patients who are not on furosemide. After adjusting for vintage and serum potassium measures, the average number of ED visits was about 1.1 visits less in furosemide-treated patients compared with patients not receiving furosemide (95% confidence interval, -4.4 to 2.1). These results suggest that loop diuretics may have an important role in undocumented patients with ESRD with residual renal function. Further study to develop practical approaches to the care of undocumented patients with ESRD is greatly needed. PMID:27260551

  9. Transient Hypocalcemia in a Dialysis Patient With Paget's disease and Presumed Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Kenneth R; Mo, Jay; Czerwinskyj, Chrystina; Mathew, Roy O

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with end-stage renal disease was hospitalized because of radicular pain and weakness in the left arm and hand. Sonography and computed tomography had recently shown a large right renal mass. On admission, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated vertebral metastases with epidural extension, and radiotherapy was directed to the spine and kidney. Hypocalcemia was first noted on the fourth hospital day. A second computed tomography scan showed bleeding into and around the kidney, and arterial embolization was required to halt the bleeding. Hypocalcemia persisted for at least 27 days at values between 6.0 and 7.7 mg/dL and was consistently associated with ionized calcium concentrations less than or equal to 4.44 mg/dL. After an unrevealing search for a recognized cause, we attributed hypocalcemia to persistent sequestration of calcium in the right retroperitoneum. Exogenous supplementation eventually restored the concentration to normal. In the absence of renal and intestinal loss, hypocalcemia reflects abnormal flux of calcium from the extracellular compartment into tissue. Our patient's repository appears to have been a necrotic and hemorrhagic cancer. Tumor-induced sequestration of calcium should be included in the differential diagnosis of hypocalcemia. PMID:27081654

  10. Multicentric Castleman’s disease with renal amyloidosis and mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhicheng; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Chen; Gao, Lifang; Yang, Yanrong

    2015-01-01

    Renal involvement is a significant complication of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD) and various glomerular involvements have been reported. A 56-year-old Chinese woman presented with proteinuria and skin rash, with lymphadenopathy and hypergammaglobulinemia. Lymph nodes and skin biopsy proven the case was multicentric CD with plasma cell pathological pattern. The renal biopsy was performed and six glomeruli were observed and two of these showed global sclerosis. Moderate increasing of mesangial matrix with mesangial cell proliferation were seen in every glomerulus. In addition, one-segmental sclerosis accompanied by adhesion of the Bowman’s capsule was revealed. Two of the glomeruli had crescents formation. Under immunofluorescence microscopy, immunofluorescence for anti-IgA, IgM, C3, C1q and FRA showed coarse and fine granular depositions along capillary walls and sparsely in the mesangium. Staining for anti-IgG was negative. Under electron microscopy revealed indiscriminate amyloidal deposits in glomerular basement membrane. The foot process of glomerular podocytes was fusion. Moderate increasing of mesangial matrix and mesangial cell proliferation were found. Subsequently, she was successfully treated with prednisone combined with cyclophosphamide therapy not only for proteinuria but also for renal function. PMID:25932265

  11. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  12. Recent advances in the treatment of renal diseases with nebivolol: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Shamekhi Amiri, Fateme

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in both acute and chronic kidney diseases. Chronic kidney disease is associated with various consequences to the cardiovascular system and metabolic profiles. Nebivolol, a highly cardioselective third-generation β-blocker, has nitric oxide (NO) induced vasodilation and antioxidant properties. Nebivolol affects the endothelial NO pathway in two complementary ways: it increases endothelial mediated NO expression and has antioxidant action, which leads to a decrease in degradation. Central blood pressure can be effectively lowered by nebivolol in the prehypertension phase. Clinically nebivolol's ability to modulate endothelial dysfunction may offer additional vascular protection in treating hypertension. As well, pre-treatment with 5mg nebivolol every 24 hours for 4 days is protective against nephrotoxic effects of contrast media. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on the efficacy and safety of nebivolol in the treatment of various states of renal diseases. PMID:27117765

  13. Novel Biomarkers for Renal Diseases? None for the Moment (but One).

    PubMed

    Gentile, Giorgio; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Recent years have witnessed the unprecedented development and integration of genomics, epigenetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, as well as a growing interest in novel single biomarkers and process-specific biomarker panels in human renal diseases. In a scenario currently dominated by kidney biopsy and established biomarkers such as serum creatinine, albuminuria, and proteinuria, novel biomarkers could potentially provide vital diagnostic and prognostic information and help to predict response to treatment in several clinical settings, including acute kidney injury, renal transplant, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and glomerulopathies. However, it is still uncertain whether and to what extent novel biomarkers will succeed in this difficult task. To date, they have generally failed to provide relevant information over and above what is already granted by established, cheap, and easily available biomarkers such as proteinuria, while the complexity and costs of these technology platforms are an important obstacle to their wide adoption. On the other hand, the successful implementation of anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of membranous nephropathy, as well as the huge number of ongoing collaborative efforts worldwide, should induce the nephrology community to be rather optimistic about a potential breakthrough in the management of kidney diseases over the next few decades. PMID:26950928

  14. Predictors of renal function progression in adults with homozygous sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Asnani, Monika; Serjeant, Graham; Royal-Thomas, Tamika; Reid, Marvin

    2016-05-01

    Longitudinal studies of renal function may improve understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying sickle cell disease (SCD) nephropathy and may identify possible biological and clinical markers of renal function determined over time. Data from the Jamaica Sickle Cell Cohort Study (JSCCS) were extracted and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiological and the SCD specific JSCCS-GFR equations from all adulthood serum creatinine measurements in homozygous SS patients. The other dataset consisted of measured GFR at two times about 13 years apart. Linear mixed model (LMM) regression analyses were conducted to determine predictors of GFR and serum creatinine over time. 191 individuals with SS disease had 867 GFR estimates available. Serum creatinine significantly increased from baseline whereas estimated GFR showed a significant decline. Serum creatinine showed positive association with increasing age, male gender, body mass index and sodium levels. Haemoglobin was a significant negative predictor of estimated GFR in age- and gender-adjusted models. A total of 24 females and 17 males had repeat measurements of their GFR. The mean annual decline in GFR was -3·2 ± 2·83 ml/min/1·73 m(2) . Haemoglobin was a significant positive predictor whereas serum creatinine, systolic blood pressure and urinary albumin: creatinine ratio were negative predictors of GFR. PMID:27018388

  15. Brain Microstructural Abnormalities Are Related to Physiological Alterations in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Junzhang; Dong, Jianwei; He, Jinlong; Zhan, Wenfeng; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Yikai; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study whole-brain microstructural alterations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and examine the relationship between brain microstructure and physiological indictors in the disease. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 35 patients with ESRD (28 men, 18–61 years) and 40 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs, 32 men, 22–58 years). A voxel-wise analysis was then used to identify microstructural alterations over the whole brain in the ESRD patients compared with the HCs. Multiple biochemical measures of renal metabolin, vascular risk factors, general cognitive ability and dialysis duration were correlated with microstructural integrity for the patients. Results Compared to the HCs, the ESRD patients exhibited disrupted microstructural integrity in not only white matter (WM) but also gray matter (GM) regions, as characterized by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). Further correlation analyses revealed that the in MD, AD and RD values showed significantly positive correlations with the blood urea nitrogen in the left superior temporal gyrus and significantly negative correlations with the calcium levels in the left superior frontal gyrus (orbital part) in the patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ESRD is associated with widespread diffusion abnormalities in both WM and GM regions in the brain, and microstructural integrity of several GM regions are related to biochemical alterations in the disease. PMID:27227649

  16. Six-Digit CPK and Mildly Affected Renal Function in McArdle Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mcinnes, Andrew D.; DeGroote, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy, white 12-year-old girl presented with diffuse body aches and poor perfusion. She developed severe respiratory failure and marked rhabdomyolysis and was mechanically ventilated. Although her CPK peaked at 500,000 IU/L, her renal function was mildly affected and her creatinine did not exceed the 0.8 mg/dL. The rhabdomyolysis was gradually resolved following aggressive fluid hydration. The patient did not require dialysis and made a complete recovery. Genetic studies revealed the diagnosis of McArdle disease. PMID:25371840

  17. Control-relevant erythropoiesis modeling in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Chait, Yossi; Horowitz, Joseph; Nichols, Brendan; Shrestha, Rajiv P; Hollot, C V; Germain, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Anemia is prevalent in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The discovery of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) over 30 years ago has shifted the treatment of anemia for patients on dialysis from blood transfusions to rHuEPO therapy. Many anemia management protocols (AMPs) used by clinicians comprise a set of experience-based rules for weekly-to-monthly titration of rHuEPO doses based on hemoglobin (Hb) measurements. In order to facilitate the design of an AMP using model-based feedback control theory, we present a physiologically relevant erythropoiesis model and demonstrate its applicability using clinical data. PMID:24235247

  18. A Case of von Hippel–Lindau Disease with Colorectal Adenocarcinoma, Renal Cell Carcinoma and Hemangioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su Jin; Lee, Choong-kun; Hahn, Kyu Yeon; Kim, Gyuri; Hur, Hyuk; Choi, Sung Hoon; Han, Kyung Seok; Cho, Arthur; Jung, Minkyu

    2016-01-01

    von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominant inherited tumor syndrome associated with mutations of the VHL tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 3p25. The loss of functional VHL protein contributes to tumorigenesis. This condition is characterized by development of benign and malignant tumors in the central nervous system (CNS) and the internal organs, including kidney, adrenal gland, and pancreas. We herein describe the case of a 74-year-old man carrying the VHL gene mutation who was affected by simultaneous colorectal adenocarcinoma, renal clear cell carcinoma, and hemangioblastomas of CNS. PMID:25715769

  19. Removal of Dolutegravir by Hemodialysis in HIV-Infected Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Moltó, José; Graterol, Fredzzia; Miranda, Cristina; Khoo, Saye; Bancu, Ioana; Amara, Alieu; Bonjoch, Anna; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2016-04-01

    Data on dolutegravir removal by hemodialysis are lacking. To study this, we measured dolutegravir plasma concentrations in samples of blood entering and leaving the dialyzer and of the resulting dialysate from 5 HIV-infected patients with end-stage renal disease. The median dolutegravir hemodialysis extraction ratio was 7%. The dolutegravir concentrations after the dialysis session remained far above the protein-binding-adjusted inhibitory concentration. Our results show minimal dolutegravir removal by hemodialysis, with no specific dolutegravir dosage adjustments required in this setting. (This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02487706.). PMID:26856824

  20. End state renal disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J M; Marfin, A A; Eggers, P W; Helgerson, S D

    1990-01-01

    We used data reported to Medicare from 1983 through 1986 to determine the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States. The 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence, age-adjusted to the White population, of 269 per million, 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of the White cases were attributed to diabetes, indicating that ESRD is a major problem. Diabetes control provides the greatest opportunity for prevention. PMID:2305914

  1. Brown Norway chromosome 1 congenic reduces symptoms of renal disease in fatty Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Warden, Craig H; Slupsky, Carolyn; Griffey, Stephen M; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Min, Esther; Le, Anh; Fisler, Janis S; Hansen, Susan; Haj, Fawaz; Stern, Judith S

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that a congenic rat with Brown Norway (BN) alleles on chromosome 1 reduces renal disease of 15-week old fatty Zucker rats (ZUC). Development of renal disease in fatty BN congenic and fatty ZUC rats from 9 through 28 weeks is now examined. Analysis of urine metabolites by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy revealed a significantly increased urinary loss of glucose, myo-inositol, urea, creatine, and valine in ZUC. Food intake was lower in the BN congenic rats at weeks 9-24, but they weighed significantly more at 28 weeks compared with the ZUC group. Fasting glucose was significantly higher in ZUC than congenic and adiponectin levels were significantly lower in ZUC, but there was no significant genotype effect on Insulin levels. Glucose tolerance tests exhibited no significant differences between ZUC and congenic when values were normalized to basal glucose levels. Quantitative PCR on livers revealed evidence for higher gluconeogenesis in congenics than ZUC at 9 weeks. Plasma urea nitrogen and creatinine were more than 2-fold higher in 28-week ZUC. Twelve urine protein markers of glomerular, proximal and distal tubule disease were assayed at three ages. Several proteins that indicate glomerular and proximal tubular disease increased with age in both congenic and ZUC. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) level, a marker whose levels decrease with distal tubule disease, was significantly higher in congenics. Quantitative histology of 28 week old animals revealed the most significant genotype effect was for tubular dilation and intratubular protein. The congenic donor region is protective of kidney disease, and effects on Type 2 diabetes are likely limited to fasting glucose and adiponectin. The loss of urea together with a small increase of food intake in ZUC support the hypothesis that nitrogen balance is altered in ZUC from an early age. PMID:24498189

  2. Fear of Movement and Low Self-Efficacy Are Important Barriers in Physical Activity after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Dorien M.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Klaassen, Gerald; Schutte, Elise; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) and exercise are commonly used as preventive measures for cardiovascular disease in the general population, and could be effective in the management of post-transplantation cardiovascular risk. PA levels are low after renal transplantation and very few renal transplant recipients (RTR) meet the PA guidelines. Identification of barriers to regular PA is important to identify targets for intervention to improve PA levels after renal transplantation. We investigated fear of movement and physical self-efficacy as barriers to PA in RTR. Methods RTR were investigated between 2001–2003. The Tampa Score of Kinesiophobia–Dutch Version (TSK-11) was used to assess fear of movement. Physical self-efficacy was measured with the LIVAS-scale. PA was assessed using validated questionnaires (Tecumseh Occupational Activity Questionnaire and the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire). Results A total of 487 RTR (age 51±12 years, 55% men) were studied. Median score [interquartile range] on TSK-11 was 22 [17–26]. Low physical self-efficacy (Exp B:0.41[0.31–0.54], p<0.001) and history of myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack and cerebrovascular accident (Exp B:1.30[1.03–1.63],p = 0.03) were independent determinants for fear of movement. Fear of movement was associated with lower daily PA, occupational, sports and leisure time PA. Mediation-analysis showed that a large part (73%) of the effect of fear of movement on PA was explained by low physical self-efficacy. Conclusions This study was the first to examine fear of movement and self-efficacy in relation to PA in RTR. Fear of movement was associated with a low PA level, and the larger part of this relation was mediated by low physical self-efficacy. Both fear of movement and physical self-efficacy level are important targets for intervention during rehabilitation after renal transplantation. PMID:26844883

  3. Renal sympathetic nerve activity is increased in monosodium glutamate induced hyperadipose rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva Mattos, Alexandro Márcio; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Karlen-Amarante, Marlusa; da Cunha, Natália Veronez; Fontes, Marco Antonio Peliky; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2012-08-01

    The literature suggests that both obesity and hypertension are associated with increased sympathetic nerve activity. In the present study we evaluated the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in hyperadipose rats induced by neonatal administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Neonatal Wistar male rats were injected with MSG (4 mg/g body weight ID) or equimolar saline (control) for 5 days. At 90th day, all rats were anesthetized (urethane 1.4 g/kg) and prepared for MAP, HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity recordings. The anesthetized MSG rats presented baseline hypertension and increased baseline RSNA compared with control. Our results suggest the involvement of the renal sympathetic nervous system in the physiopathology of the MSG obesity. PMID:22705582

  4. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Kiu, Kee-Thai; Chen, Hsin-An; Wu, Chia-Chang; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wang, Yuan-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients commonly have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases than general population. Chronic kidney disease is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF); however, little is known about the AF risk among ESRD patients with various modalities of renal replacement therapy. We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to determine the incident AF among peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients in Taiwan. Our ESRD cohort include Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 15,947 patients, who started renal replacement therapy between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. From the same data source, 47,841 controls without ESRD (3 subjects for each patient) were identified randomly and frequency matched by gender, age (±1 year), and the year of the study patient's index date for ESRD between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2003. During the follow-up period (mean duration: 8–10 years), 3428 individuals developed the new-onset AF. The incidence rate ratios for AF were 2.07 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.93–2.23) and 1.78 (95% CI = 1.30–2.44) in HD and PD groups, respectively. After we adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, the hazard ratios for the AF risk were 1.46 (95% CI = 1.32–1.61) and 1.32 (95% CI = 1.00–1.83) in HD and PD groups, respectively. ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have significantly increased risks of AF. This nationwide, population-based study suggests that incidence of AF is increased among dialysis ESRD patients. Furthermore, we have to pay more attention in clinical practice and long-term care for those ESRD patients with a history of certain comorbidities. PMID:27336884

  5. Effects of smoking on renal hemodynamics in healthy volunteers and in patients with glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Ritz, E; Benck, U; Franek, E; Keller, C; Seyfarth, M; Clorius, J

    1998-10-01

    Patients with renal disease who smoke have a poor renal functional prognosis, but the mechanisms involved have not been explored. In this controlled study, the effects of smoking and sham smoking were compared in 15 healthy normotensive volunteers. All were occasional smokers and abstained from smoking for 48 h as documented by urinary cotinine measurements. These data were compared with those of seven patients with biopsy-confirmed IgA glomerulonephritis, also occasional smokers. Renal clearance examinations were obtained after hydration in the supine position before and while smoking two cigarettes or sham cigarettes in random order on 2 consecutive days. GFR and effective renal plasma flow were determined using In111-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid and 131I-hippurate with a dual tracer infusion clearance technique. In an ancillary study with six volunteers, the effect of smoking was compared with the effect of nicotine-containing chewing gum. In healthy volunteers, sham smoking caused a minor but significant increase of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and GFR with no significant change of effective renal plasma flow, filtration fraction (FF), or renovascular resistance. Smoking caused a significant and more marked increase of MAP (from baseline 92.8+/-8.98 to 105+/-7.78 mmHg) and heart rate (from 61.7+/-7.52 to 86.4+/-9.87 min(-1)), accompanied by a significant increase in arginine vasopressin (from 1.27+/-0.72 to 19.9+/-27.2 pg/ml) and epinephrine (from 37+/-13 to 140+/-129 pg/ml). During smoking, GFR decreased in all but one volunteer (from 120+/-17.7 to 102+/-19.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and this was accompanied by a significant decrease of FF (from 21.3+/-4.24 to 17.4+/-3.41%) and an increase in renovascular resistance (from 97.6+/-27.2 to 108+/-30.4 mmHg x min/ml per 1.73 m2). These findings were reproduced with nicotine-containing chewing gum. In contrast, when patients with IgA glomerulonephritis smoked, a similar increment in MAP was noted, the changes of

  6. End-Stage Renal Disease in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Rasheeda K.; O’Hare, Ann M.; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Introduction Demand for nursing home (NH) care by patients with endstage renal disease (ESRD) is likely to increase with growing numbers of older adults initiating chronic dialysis. We completed a systematic review to summarize the literature on NH residents with ESRD. Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and relevant conference proceedings were searched to identify articles using the following MESH terms or related key words in the title or abstract: “residential facilities”, “renal dialysis”, “renal replacement therapy”, and “chronic kidney failure”. We selected case control, cohort studies, and clinical trials that included older adults with ESRD (defined as those receiving chronic dialysis or those with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD)) living in residential care facilities. We abstracted information on study design, quality, and results. Results Of 198 unique citations identified by the search strategy, 14 articles met eligibility criteria. The majority of articles were multicenter studies that were conducted in the 1990s. One study focused on patients with Stage 5 CKD, and the remaining thirteen studies focused on chronic dialysis patients of which eight studies included only peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, four studies included both PD and hemodialysis (HD) patients, and one study included only HD patients. All studies were observational, no clinical trials were identified, and study design limitations and heterogeneity within study populations were common. Summarizing results across these studies suggests that NH residents with ESRD have limited survival, particularly early after dialysis initiation. Functional impairment is highly prevalent in this population and independently associated with poor outcomes. Conclusions NH residents with ESRD appear to be a particularly vulnerable population, but current information on their prevalence, characteristics, and outcomes is limited. Further research is needed to provide a better

  7. Obese and diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease: Peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that is increasingly prevalent around the world and is a well-recognized risk factor for type 2 diabetes and hypertension, leading causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The obese diabetic patient with ESRD is a challenge for the nephrologist with regard to the type of renal replacement therapy that should be suggested and offered to the patient. There is no evidence that either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis is contraindicated in obese ESRD patients. In the literature, we can find a discrepancy in the impact of obesity on mortality among hemodialysis vs. peritoneal dialysis patients. Several studies in hemodialysis patients suggest that a higher BMI confers a survival advantage - the so-called "reverse epidemiology". In contrast, the literature among obese peritoneal dialysis patients is inconsistent, with various studies reporting an increased risk of death, no difference, or a decreased risk of death. Many of these studies only spanned across a few years, and this is probably too short of a time frame for a realistic assessment of obesity's impact on mortality in ESRD patients. The decision for dialysis modality in an obese diabetic patient with ESRD should be individualized. According to the results of published studies, we cannot suggest PD or HD as a better solution for all obese diabetic patients. The obese patient should be educated about all their dialysis options, including home dialysis therapies. In this review, the available literature related to the dialysis modality in obese patients with diabetes and ESRD was reviewed. PMID:27067614

  8. Determinants of renal volume in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Grantham, J J; Cook, L T; Torres, V E; Bost, J E; Chapman, A B; Harris, P C; Guay-Woodford, L M; Bae, K T

    2008-01-01

    The Consortium of Radiologic Imaging Studies of Polycystic Kidney Disease (CRISP) recently showed that renal enlargement in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease mimicked exponential growth. We determined the effects of cyst initiation rate, total number, and growth rate on the time-dependent change of total cyst volume (TCV). Mathematical models with equations integrating cyst surface area, volume, and an invariant growth rate constant were used to compute the time-dependent change in volume of solitary and multiple cysts. Multiple expanding cysts increased TCV in an exponential-like pattern even when individual cysts formed at different rates or exhibited different but constant growth rates. TCV depended on the rate of cyst initiation and on the total number of cysts; however, the compounding effect of exponential-like growth was the most powerful determinant of long-term cyst expansion. Extrapolation of TCV data plots for individual subjects back to an age of 18 predicted TCV values within an established range. We conclude that cysts started early in life were the main contributor to eventual TCV while their growth rate primarily determined renal size; although the rate of formation and the ultimate number of cysts also contributed. The good fit between the exponential models and the extrapolated CRISP data indicates that the TCV growth rate is a defining trait for individual patients and may be used as a prognostic marker. PMID:17960141

  9. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in renal disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Marlies E J; Fibbe, Willem E; Rabelink, Ton J

    2010-01-01

    Cell therapies aim at differentiation of stem cells into the specific cell type required to repair damaged or destroyed cells or tissues. Over recent years, cell therapy has been introduced in a variety of application areas, including cardiovascular repair, diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders and renal repair. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), often referred to as mesenchymal stem cells, are of particular interest as a cell therapy model, as this is one of the few cell types that are on the brink of entering the clinical arena in different areas of application. MSCs can be differentiated in vitro and in vivo into various cell types of mesenchymal origin such as bone, fat and cartilage. They have important effects on the innate and adaptive immune system and possess striking anti-inflammatory properties that make them attractive for potential use in diseases characterized by autoimmunity and inflammation. In addition, MSCs have been shown to migrate to sites of tissue injury and to enhance repair by secreting anti-fibrotic and pro-angiogenic factors. In this review, evidence for the renoprotective mechanisms of MSCs as well as their therapeutic possibilities and potential hazards in acute and chronic renal disease and allograft rejection is summarized. PMID:19861311

  10. Animal Models to Study Links between Cardiovascular Disease and Renal Failure and Their Relevance to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hewitson, Tim D.; Holt, Stephen G.; Smith, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    The close association between cardiovascular pathology and renal dysfunction is well documented and significant. Patients with conventional risk factors for cardiovascular disease like diabetes and hypertension also suffer renal dysfunction. This is unsurprising if the kidney is simply regarded as a “modified blood vessel” and thus, traditional risk factors will affect both systems. Consistent with this, it is relatively easy to comprehend how patients with either sudden or gradual cardiac and or vascular compromise have changes in both renal hemodynamic and regulatory systems. However, patients with pure or primary renal dysfunction also have metabolic changes (e.g., oxidant stress, inflammation, nitric oxide, or endocrine changes) that affect the cardiovascular system. Thus, cardiovascular and renal systems are intimately, bidirectionally and inextricably linked. Whilst we understand several of these links, some of the mechanisms for these connections remain incompletely explained. Animal models of cardiovascular and renal disease allow us to explore such mechanisms, and more importantly, potential therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review various experimental models used, and examine critically how representative they are of the human condition. PMID:26441970

  11. Comparison of the relation between renal impairment, angiographic coronary artery disease, and long-term mortality in women versus men.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoling; Kumar, Sanjeev; Timmis, Adam; Feder, Gene; Yaqoob, Muhammed M; Hemingway, Harry

    2006-03-01

    Mild to moderate renal impairment has recently been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. However, gender differences in the association of mild to moderate renal impairment with the presence of angiographic coronary artery disease and long-term mortality remain unknown. We examined a prospective cohort of consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography from the ACRE study in the Royal Hospitals Trust (London, United Kingdom) with referral from 5 contiguous health authorities. Among 1,609 patients (465 women) who had angiographic and serum creatinine measurements at baseline, renal impairment at modification of diet in renal disease glomerular filtration rates of 45 to 59, 30 to 44, and <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) was more common in women than in men and was significantly associated with the presence of angiographic coronary artery disease in women but not in men. At each level of glomerular filtration rate, multivariate adjusted hazard ratios of 7-year all-cause mortality for women compared with men were higher: 2.64 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.21 to 5.73) versus 1.34 (95% CI 0.995 to 1.79); 2.62 (95% CI 1.12 to 16.12) versus 2.35 (95% CI 1.60 to 3.43); and 10.42 (95% CI 3.97 to 27.39) versus 4.77 (95% CI 2.95 to 7.70), respectively. Similar patterns were observed in cardiovascular and coronary deaths. In conclusion, mild to moderate renal impairment may be a marker for unmeasured proatherogenic factors for women only, and women may bear a greater mortality burden that is attributable to renal impairment compared with men. Gender may influence the prognostic effect of renal impairment in coronary disease. PMID:16490426

  12. Association of CD30 transcripts with Th1 responses and proinflammatory cytokines in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Sonia Y; Opelz, Gerhard; Rojas, Mauricio; Süsal, Caner; Alvarez, Cristiam M

    2016-05-01

    High serum sCD30 levels are associated with inflammatory disorders and poor outcome in renal transplantation. The contribution to these phenomena of transcripts and proteins related to CD30-activation and -cleavage is unknown. We assessed in peripheral blood of end-stage renal disease patients (ESRDP) transcripts of CD30-activation proteins CD30 and CD30L, CD30-cleavage proteins ADAM10 and ADAM17, and Th1- and Th2-type immunity-related factors t-bet and GATA3. Additionally, we evaluated the same transcripts and release of sCD30 and 32 cytokines after allogeneic and polyclonal T-cell activation. In peripheral blood, ESRDP showed increased levels of t-bet and GATA3 transcripts compared to healthy controls (HC) (both P<0.01) whereas levels of CD30, CD30L, ADAM10 and ADAM17 transcripts were similar. Polyclonal and allogeneic stimulation induced higher levels of CD30 transcripts in ESRDP than in HC (both P<0.001). Principal component analysis (PCA) in allogeneic cultures of ESRDP identified two correlation clusters, one consisting of sCD30, the Th-1 cytokine IFN-γ, MIP-1α, RANTES, sIL-2Rα, MIP-1β, TNF-β, MDC, GM-CSF and IL-5, and another one consisting of CD30 and t-bet transcripts, IL-13 and proinflammatory proteins IP-10, IL-8, IL-1Rα and MCP-1. Reflecting an activated immune state, ESRDP exhibited after allostimulation upregulation of CD30 transcripts in T cells, which was associated with Th1 and proinflammatory responses. PMID:26970513

  13. Autoantibodies in renal diseases - clinical significance and recent developments in serological detection.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Hornig, Nora; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune dysfunctions are the "bête noire" in a range of debilitating nephropathies. Autoimmune-mediated damage to the kidneys can be triggered by autoantibodies directed against specific proteins or renal structures, for example, the phospholipase A2 receptor or the glomerular basement membrane, resulting in glomerular diseases such as primary membranous nephropathy or Goodpasture's disease. Moreover, secondary damage to the kidney can be part of the wide-reaching effects of systemic autoimmune diseases such as vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) - the latter counts lupus nephritis among its most severe manifestations. Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by non-organ-specific autoantibodies, directed for example against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis and against double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes in SLE. A large variety of innovative and highly specific and sensitive autoantibody tests have been developed in the last years that are available to identify autoimmune kidney diseases at an early stage. Thus, serological in vitro diagnostics allow for appropriate interventional therapy in order to prevent disease progression often resulting in need of dialysis and transplantation. PMID:26029207

  14. Autoantibodies in Renal Diseases – Clinical Significance and Recent Developments in Serological Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Hornig, Nora; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune dysfunctions are the “bête noire” in a range of debilitating nephropathies. Autoimmune-mediated damage to the kidneys can be triggered by autoantibodies directed against specific proteins or renal structures, for example, the phospholipase A2 receptor or the glomerular basement membrane, resulting in glomerular diseases such as primary membranous nephropathy or Goodpasture’s disease. Moreover, secondary damage to the kidney can be part of the wide-reaching effects of systemic autoimmune diseases such as vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) – the latter counts lupus nephritis among its most severe manifestations. Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by non-organ-specific autoantibodies, directed for example against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis and against double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes in SLE. A large variety of innovative and highly specific and sensitive autoantibody tests have been developed in the last years that are available to identify autoimmune kidney diseases at an early stage. Thus, serological in vitro diagnostics allow for appropriate interventional therapy in order to prevent disease progression often resulting in need of dialysis and transplantation. PMID:26029207

  15. The role of neutrophils and NETosis in autoimmune and renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sarthak; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2016-07-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders characterized by a failure in self-tolerance to a wide variety of autoantigens. In genetically predisposed individuals, these diseases occur as a multistep process in which environmental factors have key roles in the development of abnormal innate and adaptive immune responses. Experimental evidence collected in the past decade suggests that neutrophils - the most abundant type of white blood cell - might have an important role in the pathogenesis of these diseases by contributing to the initiation and perpetuation of immune dysregulation through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and direct tissue damage. Many of the molecules externalized through NET formation are considered to be key autoantigens and might be involved in the generation of autoimmune responses in predisposed individuals. In several systemic autoimmune diseases, the imbalance between NET formation and degradation might increase the half-life of these lattices, which could enhance the exposure of the immune system to modified autoantigens and increase the capacity for NET-induced organ damage. This Review details the role of neutrophils and NETs in the pathophysiology of systemic autoimmune diseases, including their effect on renal damage, and discusses neutrophil targets as potential novel therapies for these diseases. PMID:27241241

  16. Effects of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Blockade in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Teresa; Lennon, Emily S; Akbar, Hina; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Oliphant, Carrie S; Khouzam, Rami N

    2016-03-01

    Blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are routinely used in patients with chronic kidney disease because of their cardiovascular (CV) and renoprotective effects. However, there are no uniform recommendations about RAAS blockers for CV protection in the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) population other than the preferred drug class for blood pressure control. This uncertainty stems from the fact that patients with ESRD were generally excluded from randomized controlled trials evaluating the cardioprotective benefits of RAAS blockers. It is important to weigh the potential harms associated with the use of RAAS blockers, such as electrolyte disturbances and worsening anemia, with their role in protection of residual kidney function, alleviation of thirst and potential CV benefits. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the use of RAAS blockers in patients with ESRD. PMID:26992264

  17. Serum uric acid and the risk of cardiovascular and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Claudio; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Bardin, Thomas; Dawson, Jesse; Dominiczak, Anna; Kielstein, Jan T; Manolis, Athanasios J; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that chronic hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for hypertension, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular diseases. This highlights the need for greater attention to serum uric acid levels when profiling patients, and suggests that the threshold above which uricemia is considered abnormal is 6  mg/dl, in light of the available evidence. Another important question is whether lowering serum uric acid can improve cardiovascular and renal outcomes, and what therapeutic mechanism of action could provide more clinical benefits to patients; the available literature shows a trend toward improvement associated with administration of urate-lowering drugs, in particular for the xanthine oxidase inhibitors. The demonstrated efficacy of urate-lowering therapy on outcomes other than gout flares leads to the consideration that treatment may be beneficial even in the absence of overt gout when hyperuricemia accompanies other clinical conditions, such as urate deposition, advanced CKD or cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26136207

  18. A retrospective study of end-stage renal disease in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    LaDouceur, Elise E B; Davis, Barbara; Tseng, Flo

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study summarizes 11 cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from eight zoologic institutions across the United States and Canada. Ten bears were female, one was male, and the mean age at the time of death was 24 yr old. The most common clinical signs were lethargy, inappetence, and polyuria-polydipsia. Biochemical findings included azotemia, anemia, hyperphosphatemia, and isosthenuria. Histologic examination commonly showed glomerulonephropathies and interstitial fibrosis. Based on submissions to a private diagnostic institution over a 16-yr period, ESRD was the most commonly diagnosed cause of death or euthanasia in captive polar bears in the United States, with an estimated prevalence of over 20%. Further research is needed to discern the etiology of this apparently common disease of captive polar bears. PMID:24712164

  19. Phosphate control in end-stage renal disease: barriers and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Ahmed A.; Pedraza, Fernando; Lenz, Oliver; Isakova, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a nearly universal complication of end-stage renal disease that is widely recognized as one of the most important and most challenging clinical targets to meet in the care of dialysis patients. Left untreated, it can lead to bone pain, pruritus and worsening secondary hyperparathyroidism. Data from observational studies demonstrate that an elevated serum phosphorus level is an independent risk factor for mortality, and that treatment with phosphate binders is independently associated with improved survival. Experimental studies provide support for the epidemiologic findings: phosphate excess promotes vascular calcification, induces endothelial dysfunction and may contribute to other emerging chronic kidney disease-specific mechanisms of cardiovascular toxicity. On the basis of this evidence, clinical practice guidelines recommend specific targets for serum phosphorus levels in the dialysis population. The purpose of this review is to summarize common challenges in meeting these targets and to identify potential opportunities for improvement. PMID:23901051

  20. Etiology and management of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Mona; Silverstein, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are essential components of cell membranes, contributing to cell fuel, myelin formation, subcellular organelle function, and steroid hormone synthesis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) exhibit various co-morbidities, including dyslipidemia. The prevalence of dyslipidemias in children with CKD and ESRD is high, being present in 39-65% of patients. Elevated lipid levels in children without renal disease are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), while the risk for CVD in pediatric CKD/ESRD is unclear. The pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD features various factors, including increased levels of triglycerides, triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC-III), decreased levels of cholesterylester transfer protein and high-density lipoproteins, and aberrations in serum very low-density and intermediate-density lipoproteins. If initial risk assessment indicates that a child with advanced CKD has 2 or more co-morbidities for CVD, first-line treatment should consist of non-pharmacologic management such as therapeutic lifestyle changes and dietary counseling. Pharmacologic treatment of dyslipidemia may reduce the incidence of CVD in children with CKD/ESRD, but randomized trials are lacking. Statins are the only class of lipid-lowering drugs currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the pediatric population. FDA-approved pediatric labeling for these drugs is based on results from placebo-controlled trial results, showing 30-50% reductions in baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statins are generally well tolerated in adults, a spectrum of adverse events has been reported with their use in both the clinical trial and post-marketing settings. PMID:25801207

  1. Renal disease and hypertension in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ismail, N; Becker, B; Strzelczyk, P; Ritz, E

    1999-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic data demonstrate a dramatic increase in the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), thus dispelling the mistaken belief that renal prognosis is benign in NIDDM. Currently, the leading cause of ESRD in the United States, Japan, and in most industrialized Europe is NIDDM, accounting for nearly 90% of all cases of diabetes. In addition to profound economic costs, patients with NIDDM and diabetic nephropathy have a dramatically increased morbidity and premature mortality. NIDDM-related nephropathy varies widely among racial and ethnic groups, genders and lifestyles; and gender may interact with race to affect the disease progression. While the course of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) progresses through well-defined stages, the natural history of NIDDM is less well characterized. NIDDM patients with coronary heart disease have a higher urinary albumin excretion rate at the time of diagnosis and follow-up. This greater risk may also be associated with hypertension and hyperlipidemia, and genes involved in blood pressure are obvious candidate genes for diabetic nephropathy. Hyperglycemia appears to be an important factor in the development of proteinuria in NIDDM, but its role and the influence of diet are not yet clear. Tobacco smoking can also be deleterious to the diabetic patient, and is also associated with disease progression. Maintaining euglycemia, stopping smoking and controlling blood pressure may prevent or slow the progression of NIDDM-related nephropathy and reduce extrarenal injury. Treatment recommendations include early screening for hyperlipidemia, appropriate exercise and a healthy diet. Cornerstones of management should also include: (1) educating the medical community and more widely disseminating data supporting the value of early treatment of microalbuminuria; (2) developing a comprehensive, multidisciplinary team approach that involves physicians

  2. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L.; Robinson, Bruce M.; Massy, Ziad A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. Methods A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60–90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. Conclusions The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and

  3. Association Between the Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Risk of ESRD in Renal Diseases: A Population-Based, Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yen-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Chang, Chi-Sen; Wu, Yu-Lin; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) use may be associated with nephritis and acute renal injury. The risk of PPIs and deterioration of renal function, in patients with renal diseases, needs to be investigated. A case-control study was conducted in a nation-wide data setting from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). This case-control study used data extracted from NHIRD between the years 2006 and 2011. We used propensity scores to match 3808 patients suffering from renal diseases (ICD-9-CM codes 580–589), with patients (aged ≥20 years) who had had a recent diagnosis of end-stage renal diseases (ESRDs) and had undertaken renal replacement therapy during the period of 2006 to 2011. The 3808 control subjects were selected from people who had a history of renal diseases, but no ESRD. The risk of ESRD in patients with renal diseases and PPIs use was estimated by using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The use of a PPIs was associated with a significantly higher risk of ESRD (adjusted OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.71–2.06) in renal disease patients. Of all the types of PPI combined, the adjusted OR was 1.92 (95% CI = 1.74–2.13) for those on <100 cumulative DDD and was 1.74-fold (95% CI = 1.52–2.00) for those on ≥100 cumulative DDD. PPIs use is associated with the risk of ESRD in patients with renal diseases. It is necessary that appropriate prescription of PPIs coordinated with the close monitoring renal function of patients diagnosed with renal disease. PMID:27082596

  4. High Activity of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Is Associated With Renal Insufficiency in Puumala Hantavirus Induced Nephropathia Epidemica

    PubMed Central

    Outinen, Tuula K.; Mäkelä, Satu M.; Ala-Houhala, Ilpo O.; Huhtala, Heini S.A.; Hurme, Mikko; Libraty, Daniel H.; Oja, Simo S.; Pörsti, Ilkka H.; Syrjänen, Jaana T.; Vaheri, Antti; Mustonen, Jukka T.

    2013-01-01

    Nephropathia epidemica (NE) is a hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome caused by Puumala hantavirus. The severity of NE varies greatly. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether serum indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity is associated with the severity of NE. A prospectively collected cohort of 102 consecutive patients with acute serologically confirmed NE was examined. Serum kynurenine, tryptophan, creatinine, CRP, and blood cell count were measured for up to 5 consecutive days after admission. The kynurenine to tryptophan (kyn/trp) ratio reflecting IDO activity was calculated. A maximum kyn/trp ratio >202 μmol/mmol had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 75% for detecting maximum serum creatinine values >250 μmol/L by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. A maximum kyn/trp ratio >202 μmol/mmol (high IDO level) was also associated with other parameters reflecting the severity of the disease and renal impairment. Patients with high IDO levels had higher maximum serum creatinine (379 vs. 102 μmol/L, P < 0.001), plasma C-reactive protein (104.1 vs. 72.1 mg/L, P = 0.029), and blood leukocyte values (11.9 vs. 9.0 × 109/L, P < 0.001) compared to patients with kyn/trp ratio ≤202 μmol/mmol. They also had lower minimum urinary output (1,100 vs. 1,900 ml/day, P < 0.001) and longer hospital stays (8 vs. 5 days, P < 0.001). In conclusion, high serum IDO activity was associated with increased disease severity and renal impairment in NE. PMID:21328391

  5. Roles of Lymphocyte Kv1.3-Channels in the Pathogenesis of Renal Diseases and Novel Therapeutic Implications of Targeting the Channels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Delayed rectifier K+-channels (Kv1.3) are predominantly expressed in T lymphocytes. Based on patch-clamp studies, the channels play crucial roles in facilitating the calcium influx necessary to trigger lymphocyte activation and proliferation. Using selective channel inhibitors in experimental animal models, in vivo studies then revealed the clinically relevant relationship between the channel expression and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In renal diseases, in which “chronic inflammation” or “the overstimulation of cellular immunity” is responsible for the pathogenesis, the overexpression of Kv1.3-channels in lymphocytes promotes their cellular proliferation and thus contributes to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. We recently demonstrated that benidipine, a potent dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, which also strongly and persistently inhibits the lymphocyte Kv1.3-channel currents, suppressed the proliferation of kidney lymphocytes and actually ameliorated the progression of renal fibrosis. Based on the recent in vitro evidence that revealed the pharmacological properties of the channels, the most recent studies have revealed novel therapeutic implications of targeting the lymphocyte Kv1.3-channels for the treatment of renal diseases. PMID:25866450

  6. Role of tumor necrosis factor alpha in disease using a mouse model of Shiga toxin-mediated renal damage.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Erin K; Cherla, Rama P; Jaspers, Valery; Weeks, Bradley R; Tesh, Vernon L

    2010-09-01

    Mice have been extensively employed as an animal model of renal damage caused by Shiga toxins. In this study, we examined the role of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the development of toxin-mediated renal disease in mice. Mice pretreated with TNF-alpha and challenged with Shiga toxin type 1 (Stx1) showed increased survival compared to that of mice treated with Stx1 alone. Conversely, mice treated with Stx1 before TNF-alpha administration succumbed more quickly than mice given Stx1 alone. Increased lethality in mice treated with Stx1 followed by TNF-alpha was associated with evidence of glomerular damage and the loss of renal function. No differences in renal histopathology were noted between animals treated with Stx1 alone and the TNF-alpha pretreatment group, although we noted a sparing of renal function when TNF-alpha was administered before toxin. Compared to that of treatment with Stx1 alone, treatment with TNF-alpha after toxin altered the renal cytokine profile so that the expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) increased, and the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 decreased. Increased lethality in mice treated with Stx1 followed by TNF-alpha was associated with higher numbers of dUTP-biotin nick end labeling-positive renal tubule cells, suggesting that increased lethality involved enhanced apoptosis. These data suggest that the early administration of TNF-alpha is a candidate interventional strategy blocking disease progression, while TNF-alpha production after intoxication exacerbates disease. PMID:20605983

  7. End-Stage Renal Disease from Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in the United States, 1995 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Donal J.; Reule, Scott; Solid, Craig A.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Foley, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has evolved rapidly, and optimal treatment strategies are controversial. However, it is unknown whether the burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from HUS has changed, and outcomes on dialysis in the US are not well described. Methods We retrospectively examined data for patients initiating maintenance renal replacement therapy (RRT) (n = 1,557,117), 1995–2010, to define standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and outcomes of ESRD from HUS) (n = 2241). Results Overall ESRD rates from HUS in 2001–2002 were 0.5 cases/million per year; and were higher for patients characterized by age 40–64 years (0.6), ≥ 65 years (0.7), female sex (0.6), and non-Hispanic African American race (0.7). SIRs remained unchanged (P ≥ 0.05) between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010 in the overall population. Compared with patients with ESRD from other causes, patients with HUS were more likely to be younger, female, white, and non-Hispanic. Over 5.4 years of follow-up, HUS patients differed from matched controls with ESRD from other causes by lower rates of death (8.3 per 100 person-years in cases vs. 10.4 in controls, P < 0.001), listing for renal transplant (7.6 vs. 8.6 per 100 person-years, P = 0.04), and undergoing transplant (6.9 vs. 9 per 100 person-years, P < 0.001). Conclusions The incidence of ESRD from HUS appears not to have risen substantially in the last decade. However, given that HUS subtypes could not be determined in this study, these findings should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25689876

  8. Tissue specific regulation of renal N-nitrosodimethylamine-demethylase activity by testosterone in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Mohla, S; Ahir, S; Ampy, F R

    1988-07-01

    Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), like several other nitrosamines, is activated by the enzymes--mixed-function oxidases--present in the tissue microsomal fractions, producing mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. Previous studies in BALB/c mice have shown an age, sex and androgenic regulation of NDMA-induced mutagenicity. The present study was designed to test the correlation between renal NDMA-demethylase activity and previously published reports on NDMA-induced mutagenicity. Renal and hepatic NDMA-demethylases were determined from the microsomal fractions by quantitating formaldehyde. Renal NDMA-demethylase showed the presence of two isozymes, I and II, with Km values of 0.6 +/- 0.2 and 20.2 +/- 6.8 mM respectively. Isozyme I was detected in adult males and first appeared at the onset of puberty; it was absent in adult females and in immature mice. Renal isozyme II was detected in both males and females and was independent of age. Testosterone treatment of adult females resulted in the appearance of renal isozyme I. Castration of adult males caused a dramatic decrease in activity, whereas testosterone administration to such castrates increased activity, of renal isozyme I. Hepatic NDMA-demethylase activities were independent of age, sex or testosterone treatment. In conclusion, these results show an age, sex and tissue specific regulation of renal NDMA activity. Renal and hepatic NDMA-demethylase activities correlated positively with earlier studies on NDMA-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:3390228

  9. Lower Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease but Suboptimal Pre-Dialysis Renal Care in Schizophrenia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yueh-Han; Cheng, Jur-Shan; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Lin, Chen-Li; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors which are consequently attributable to the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, no study has been conducted to examine ESRD-related epidemiology and quality of care before starting dialysis for patients with schizophrenia. By using nationwide health insurance databases, we identified 54,361 ESRD-free patients with schizophrenia and their age-/gender-matched subjects without schizophrenia for this retrospective cohort study (the schizophrenia cohort). We also identified a cohort of 1,244 adult dialysis patients with and without schizophrenia (1:3) to compare quality of renal care before dialysis and outcomes (the dialysis cohort). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for dialysis and death. Odds ratio (OR) derived from logistic regression models were used to delineate quality of pre-dialysis renal care. Compared to general population, patients with schizophrenia were less likely to develop ESRD (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.8), but had a higher risk for death (HR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3). Patients with schizophrenia at the pre-ESRD stage received suboptimal pre-dialysis renal care; for example, they were less likely to visit nephrologists (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8) and received fewer erythropoietin prescriptions (OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9). But they had a higher risk of hospitalization in the first year after starting dialysis (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, P < .05). Patients with schizophrenia undertaking dialysis had higher risk for mortality than the general ESRD patients. A closer collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists or internists to minimize the gaps in quality of general care is recommended. PMID:26469976

  10. The Impact of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Renal Function in Children with Overweight/Obesity.

    PubMed

    Pacifico, Lucia; Bonci, Enea; Andreoli, Gian Marco; Di Martino, Michele; Gallozzi, Alessia; De Luca, Ester; Chiesa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease has attracted interest and attention over recent years. However, no data are available in children. We determined whether children with NAFLD show signs of renal functional alterations, as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urinary albumin excretion. We studied 596 children with overweight/obesity, 268 with NAFLD (hepatic fat fraction ≥5% on magnetic resonance imaging) and 328 without NAFLD, and 130 healthy normal-weight controls. Decreased GFR was defined as eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m². Abnormal albuminuria was defined as urinary excretion of ≥30 mg/24 h of albumin. A greater prevalence of eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m² was observed in patients with NAFLD compared to those without liver involvement and healthy subjects (17.5% vs. 6.7% vs. 0.77%; p < 0.0001). The proportion of children with abnormal albuminuria was also higher in the NAFLD group compared to those without NAFLD, and controls (9.3% vs. 4.0% vs. 0; p < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with decreased eGFR and/or microalbuminuria (odds ratio, 2.54 (confidence interval, 1.16-5.57); p < 0.05) independently of anthropometric and clinical variables. Children with NAFLD are at risk for early renal dysfunction. Recognition of this abnormality in the young may help to prevent the ongoing development of the disease. PMID:27472326

  11. The Impact of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease on Renal Function in Children with Overweight/Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Lucia; Bonci, Enea; Andreoli, Gian Marco; Di Martino, Michele; Gallozzi, Alessia; De Luca, Ester; Chiesa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease has attracted interest and attention over recent years. However, no data are available in children. We determined whether children with NAFLD show signs of renal functional alterations, as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urinary albumin excretion. We studied 596 children with overweight/obesity, 268 with NAFLD (hepatic fat fraction ≥5% on magnetic resonance imaging) and 328 without NAFLD, and 130 healthy normal-weight controls. Decreased GFR was defined as eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. Abnormal albuminuria was defined as urinary excretion of ≥30 mg/24 h of albumin. A greater prevalence of eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 was observed in patients with NAFLD compared to those without liver involvement and healthy subjects (17.5% vs. 6.7% vs. 0.77%; p < 0.0001). The proportion of children with abnormal albuminuria was also higher in the NAFLD group compared to those without NAFLD, and controls (9.3% vs. 4.0% vs. 0; p < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with decreased eGFR and/or microalbuminuria (odds ratio, 2.54 (confidence interval, 1.16–5.57); p < 0.05) independently of anthropometric and clinical variables. Children with NAFLD are at risk for early renal dysfunction. Recognition of this abnormality in the young may help to prevent the ongoing development of the disease. PMID:27472326

  12. Activation of AMP-activated kinase as a strategy for managing autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    There is evidence that overactivity of both mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes importantly to the progressive expansion of renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Recent research has established that AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) can suppress the activity of each of these proteins. Clinical AMPK activators such as metformin and berberine may thus have potential in the clinical management of ADPKD. The traditional use of berberine in diarrhea associated with bacterial infections may reflect, in part, the inhibitory impact of AMPK on chloride extrusion by small intestinal enterocytes. PMID:19570618

  13. Active Learning in a Large Medical Classroom Setting for Teaching Renal Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, John R.; Stevenson, Frazier T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an active learning exercise which has been used to replace some lecture hours in the renal portion of an integrated, organ system-based curriculum for first-year medical students. The exercise takes place in a large auditorium with ~150 students. The authors, who are faculty members, lead the discussions,…

  14. Plasma rennin activity: Early indicator of renal injury in bilateral pelviureteric junction obstruction in children

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit; Bajpai, Minu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study is to analyze the early indicators of renal injury in children with bilateral pelviuretric junction obstruction. Materials and Methods: We investigated 23 children, 46 kidney units who were diagnosed with bilateral pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO) and underwent unilateral or bilateral pyeloplasty between January 2001 and December 2011. Ipsilateral kidney biopsy was performed during pyeloplasty. Kidney biopsy results were divided into three categories. Pre-operative investigation included ultrasonography with the Society of Fetal Urology (SFU) grading, plasma rennin activity (PRA) and differential renal function (DRF). Results: Out of 23 children there were 17 (73.9%) boys while 6 (26.1%) girls. Median age at operation was 35.4 months (range: 9-60 months). Unilateral pyeloplasty was performed in 14 (60.8%), simultaneous bilateral pyeloplasty in 2 (8.6%) and sequential bilateral pyeloplasty in 7 (30.4%). Conclusion: In bilateral PUJO where DRF and SFU grading of hydronephrosis did not correctly reflect renal injury, PRA showed a significant relationship with renal histopathologic grade and could be an early indicator of renal injury in bilateral PUJO. PMID:25371604

  15. The relationship of provider organizational status and erythropoietin dosing in end stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    de Lissovoy, G; Powe, N R; Griffiths, R I; Watson, A J; Anderson, G F; Greer, J W; Herbert, R J; Eggers, P W; Milam, R A; Whelton, P K

    1994-02-01

    Controversy exists as to whether provider organizational characteristics such as profit status and setting are associated with the content of medical care or efficiency with which care is rendered. Following FDA approval of human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) for use in clinical practice, Medicare approved coverage for beneficiaries in its end stage renal disease program and established a fixed payment per dose. Because cost of EPO administration varied positively with dose, providers could realize larger profit with prescription of smaller doses. We used Medicare claims data to assess EPO use by renal dialysis providers one year after FDA approval (June 1990) as a function of provider ownership (for-profit, not-for-profit, government agency) and setting (hospital-based, free-standing). Mean dose of EPO was 236 units greater (P = 0.0001) for not-for-profit freestanding facilities, 593 units greater (P = 0.0001) for government facilities, and 555 units greater for not-for-profit hospitals (P = 0.0001) than among for-profit freestanding providers. With fixed payment per dose of EPO, for-profit, freestanding providers prescribed EPO more often and administered smaller doses than not-for-profit or government providers, behavior that is consistent with profit maximization. PMID:8302105

  16. Aquaporin-1 retards renal cyst development in polycystic kidney disease by inhibition of Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiling; Li, Fei; Sun, Yi; Lei, Lei; Zhou, Hong; Lei, Tianluo; Xia, Yin; Verkman, A S; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-04-01

    Water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed at epithelial cell plasma membranes in renal proximal tubules and thin descending limb of Henle. Recently, AQP1 was reported to interact with β-catenin. Here we investigated the relationship between AQP1 and Wnt signaling in in vitro and in vivo models of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD). AQP1 overexpression decreased β-catenin and cyclinD1 expression, suggesting down-regulation of Wnt signaling, and coimmunoprecipitation showed AQP1 interaction with β-catenin, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, LRP6, and Axin1. AQP1 inhibited cyst development and promoted branching in matrix-grown MDCK cells. In embryonic kidney cultures, AQP1 deletion increased cyst development by up to ∼ 40%. Kidney size and cyst number were significantly greater in AQP1-null PKD mice than in AQP1-expressing PKD mice, with the difference mainly attributed to a greater number of proximal tubule cysts. Biochemical analysis revealed decreased β-catenin phosphorylation and increased β-catenin expression in AQP1-null PKD mice, suggesting enhanced Wnt signaling. These results implicate AQP1 as a novel determinant in renal cyst development that may involve inhibition of Wnt signaling by an AQP1-macromolecular signaling complex. PMID:25573755

  17. Recurrence of light chain deposit disease after renal allograft transplantation: potential role of rituximab?

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J; Lerut, Evelyne; Claes, Kathleen; Evenepoel, Pieter; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2007-04-01

    Light chain deposit disease (LCDD) is a monoclonal plasma cell disorder characterized by tissue deposition of nonamyloid immunoglobulin light chains, predominantly kappa chains, causing renal insufficiency. LCDD reoccurs almost invariably after renal grafting, leading to early graft loss, usually within a time span of months to years. We describe a female patient with LCDD who lost her first living donor graft after 1 year due to extensive recurrence of kappa chain deposition. Rituximab was administered on the seventh day after her second transplantation with a graft from a deceased donor, in order to prevent early recurrence of LCDD. The 2-year protocol biopsy - similarly to the completely normal 1-year protocol biopsy - revealed persistent absence of light chain deposition on light microscopy but immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy showed very mild recurrence of light chain deposits. A second 4-week course of rituximab was repeated because of these electron microscopic findings. Subsequently, free kappa light chain concentration decreased from 693 to 74 mg/l and remained low 4 months after completion of therapy. Rituximab could be considered for delaying early LCDD recurrence in patients in whom treatment of the underlying bone marrow disorder failed or is contraindicated, but maintenance therapy is apparently necessary to consolidate this response. PMID:17326779

  18. Recurrent reciprocal genomic rearrangements of 17q12 are associated with renal disease, diabetes, and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mefford, Heather C; Clauin, Severine; Sharp, Andrew J; Moller, Rikke S; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kapur, Raj; Pinkel, Dan; Cooper, Gregory M; Ventura, Mario; Ropers, H Hilger; Tommerup, Niels; Eichler, Evan E; Bellanne-Chantelot, Christine

    2007-11-01

    Most studies of genomic disorders have focused on patients with cognitive disability and/or peripheral nervous system defects. In an effort to broaden the phenotypic spectrum of this disease model, we assessed 155 autopsy samples from fetuses with well-defined developmental pathologies in regions predisposed to recurrent rearrangement, by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. We found that 6% of fetal material showed evidence of microdeletion or microduplication, including three independent events that likely resulted from unequal crossing-over between segmental duplications. One of the microdeletions, identified in a fetus with multicystic dysplastic kidneys, encompasses the TCF2 gene on 17q12, previously shown to be mutated in maturity-onset diabetes, as well as in a subset of pediatric renal abnormalities. Fine-scale mapping of the breakpoints in different patient cohorts revealed a recurrent 1.5-Mb de novo deletion in individuals with phenotypes that ranged from congenital renal abnormalities to maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5. We also identified the reciprocal duplication, which appears to be enriched in samples from patients with epilepsy. We describe the first example of a recurrent genomic disorder associated with diabetes. PMID:17924346

  19. Evaluation and management of diabetic and non-diabetic hypoglycemia in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of diabetes status are at increased risk of hypoglycemia with a resultant array of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, hypoglycemia should be thoroughly evaluated in ESRD patients. In diabetic dialysis patients, hypoglycemic agents and nutritional alterations can trigger hypoglycemia in the background of diminished gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin clearance by the kidney and improved insulin sensitivity following initiation of renal replacement therapy. Detailed evaluation of antidiabetic regimen and nutriti