Science.gov

Sample records for active research field

  1. Annual Report for 2003 Wild Horse Research and Field Activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Jason; Singer, Francis J.; Zeigenfuss, Linda C.

    2004-01-01

    This report is meant to highlight the activities of the 2003 field season, as well as to provide a general overview of the data collected. More in-depth data analysis will be conducted following the conclusion of each I phase of the research project, and in many cases will not be possible until several seasons of data are collected.

  2. Computer Based Procedures for Field Workers - FY16 Research Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Bly, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    The Computer-Based Procedure (CBP) research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. One area that could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety is in improving procedure use. A CBP provides the opportunity to incorporate context-driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, and just-in-time training. The presentation of information in CBPs can be much more flexible and tailored to the task, actual plant condition, and operation mode. The dynamic presentation of the procedure will guide the user down the path of relevant steps, thus minimizing time spent by the field worker to evaluate plant conditions and decisions related to the applicability of each step. This dynamic presentation of the procedure also minimizes the risk of conducting steps out of order and/or incorrectly assessed applicability of steps. This report provides a summary of the main research activities conducted in the Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers effort since 2012. The main focus of the report is on the research activities conducted in fiscal year 2016. The activities discussed are the Nuclear Electronic Work Packages – Enterprise Requirements initiative, the development of a design guidance for CBPs (which compiles all insights gained through the years of CBP research), the facilitation of vendor studies at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a pilot study for how to enhance the plant design modification work process, the collection of feedback from a field evaluation study at Plant Vogtle, and path forward to

  3. Annual report for 2004 wild horse research and field activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Jason; Singer, Francis J.; Zeigenfuss, Linda; Coates-Markle, Linda

    2005-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Geological Survey-Biological Resources Discipline (USGS/BRD) continued wild horse research in 2004, investigating the strategic research elements of fertility control and population estimation. Fertility control research was focused on the individual-based porcine zonae pellucid (PZP) field trials at the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range (WHR), Little Rock Cliffs WHR, and McCullough Peaks Wild Horse Management Area (WHMA). Aerial population estimation research was conducted on a number of western wild horse herds to test different survey techniques as applied to various habitat types and population sizes.

  4. Deep Borehole Field Test Research Activities at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Kneafsey, Timothy; Borglin, Sharon; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary; Nakagawa, Seiji; Nihei, Kurt; Rutqvist, Jonny; Doughty, Christine; Reagan, Matthew

    2016-08-19

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition’s (UFD) Deep Borehole Field Test is to drill two 5 km large-diameter boreholes: a characterization borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 8.5 inches and a field test borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 17 inches. These boreholes will be used to demonstrate the ability to drill such holes in crystalline rocks, effectively characterize the bedrock repository system using geophysical, geochemical, and hydrological techniques, and emplace and retrieve test waste packages. These studies will be used to test the deep borehole disposal concept, which requires a hydrologically isolated environment characterized by low permeability, stable fluid density, reducing fluid chemistry conditions, and an effective borehole seal. During FY16, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists conducted a number of research studies to support the UFD Deep Borehole Field Test effort. This work included providing supporting data for the Los Alamos National Laboratory geologic framework model for the proposed deep borehole site, conducting an analog study using an extensive suite of geoscience data and samples from a deep (2.5 km) research borehole in Sweden, conducting laboratory experiments and coupled process modeling related to borehole seals, and developing a suite of potential techniques that could be applied to the characterization and monitoring of the deep borehole environment. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  5. Topical delivery of active principles: the field of dermatological research.

    PubMed

    Nino, Massimiliano; Calabrò, Gabriella; Santoianni, Pietro

    2010-01-15

    To be effective an active drug or principle must cross the stratum corneum barrier; this process can be influenced to obtain better functional and therapeutical effects. In spite of the wide variety of the methods studied in order to improve the transdermal transfer to obtain systemic effects, the applicability is limited in this field. Attention to the epidermal barrier and penetration of active principles has been reported mostly in studies concerning dermocosmetics. Studies regarding methods of penetration are gaining experimental and clinical interest. Cutaneous bioavailability of most commercially available dermatological formulations is low. Increase of intradermal delivery can relate to chemical, biochemical, or physical manipulations. Chemical enhancers have been adopted to: (a) increase the diffusibility of the substance across the barrier; (b) increase product solubility in the vehicle; (c) improve the partition coefficient. Moreover methods of interference with the biosynthesis of some lipids allow the modification of the structure of the barrier to increase the penetration. The main physical techniques that increase cutaneous penetration of substances are: iontophoresis (that increases the penetration of ionized substances), electroporation (that electrically induces penetration through the barrier), and sonophoresis, based on 20 to 25 KHz ultrasound that induces alterations of the horny barrier, allowing penetration of active principles. Recent development of these methods are here reported and underline the importance and role of vehicles and other factors that determine effects of partition and diffusion, crucial to absorption.

  6. Quality Assurance Plan for Field Activities at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.C.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program Field Research Center (FRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The FRC is located in Bear Creek Valley within the Y-12 Plant area of responsibility on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The NABIR program is a long-term effort designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. The FRC provides a site for investigators in the NABIR program to conduct research and obtain samples related to in situ bioremediation. The FRC is integrated with existing and future laboratory and field research and provides a means of examining the biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) documents the quality assurance protocols for field and laboratory activities performed by the FRC staff. It supplements the requirements in the ORNL Nuclear Quality Assurance Program and the ESD Quality Assurance Program. The QAP addresses the requirements in Title 10 CFR, Part 830 Subpart A, ''Quality Assurance Requirements'', using a graded approach appropriate for Research and Development projects based on guidance from ''Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research'' (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). It also supports the NABIR FRC Management Plan (Watson and Quarles 2000a) which outlines the overall procedures, roles and responsibilities for conducting research at the FRC. The QAP summarizes the organization, work activities, and qualify assurance and quality control protocols that will be used to generate scientifically defensible data at the FRC. The QAP pertains to field measurements and sample collection conducted by the

  7. Lessons learned from applied field research activities in Africa during the malaria eradication era

    PubMed Central

    Bruce-Chwatt, Leonard J.

    1984-01-01

    The Malaria Conference in Equatorial Africa, convened by the World Health Organization in 1950 in Kampala, Uganda, was a milestone in the history of modern malaria control activities on the continent of Africa. It presented and assessed the available international information on epidemiological aspects of this disease and attempted to coordinate the various methods of research and control of malaria. Its two main recommendations were that malaria should be controlled by all available methods, irrespective of the degree of endemicity of the disease, and that the benefits that malaria control might bring to the indigenous population should be evaluated. The first period of field research and pilot control projects in Africa was between 1950 and 1964. A large number of studies in several African countries showed that the use of residual insecticides such as DDT and HCH might decrease, at times considerably, the amount of malaria transmission, but interruption of transmission could not be achieved, except in two relatively small projects in the forest areas of Cameroon and Liberia. During the second period, from 1965 to 1974, the difficulties of malaria eradication and control in Africa became more evident because of the development of resistance of Anopheles gambiae to DDT, HCH, and dieldrin; moreover administrative, logistic, and financial problems had emerged. It became clear that the prospects for malaria control (let alone those for eradication) were related to the availability of a network of basic health services. A number of “pre-eradication” programmes were set up in order to develop better methods of malaria control and to improve the rural health infrastructures. Much field research on the chemotherapy of malaria was carried out and the value of collective or selective administration of antimalarial drugs was fully recognized, although it became obvious that this could not play an important part in the decrease of transmission of malaria in Africa. The

  8. Herding Cats: Geocuration Practices Employed for Field Research Data Collection Activities and Visualization by Blueprint Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, R.; Harrison, M.; Sonnenthal, N.; Hernandez, A.; Pelaez, J.

    2015-12-01

    Researchers investigating interdisciplinary topics must work to understand the barriers created by information siloes in order to productively collaborate on complex Earth science questions. These barriers create acute challenges when research is driven by observations rather than hypotheses, as communication between collaborators hinges on data synthesis techniques that often vary greatly between disciplines. Field data collection across disciplines creates even more challenges, and employing student researchers of varying abilities demands an approach that is structured, and yet still flexible enough to accommodate inherent differences in the subjective portions of student data collection. Blueprint Earth is performing system-level environmental observations in the broad areas of geology, biology, hydrology, and atmospheric science. Traditional field data collection methodologies are employed for ease of reproducibility, but must translate across disciplinary information siloes. Information collected must be readily useable in the formulation of hypotheses based on field observations, which necessitates an understanding of key metrics by all investigators involved in data analysis. Blueprint Earth demonstrates the ability to create clear data standards across several disciplines while incorporating a quality control process and this allows for conversion of data into functional visualizations. Additionally, geocuration is organized such that data will be ready for public dissemination upon completion of field research.

  9. Research activities on high-intensity laser and high field physics at APRI-GIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Tae Moon

    2015-05-01

    The performance of a 0.1-Hz-repetition-rate, 30-fs, 1.5-PW Ti:sapphire laser which is using for research on high field physics in APRI-GIST is presented. The charged particles (electrons and protons) are accelerated and an efficient x-ray generation is demonstrated using the PW laser. Protons are accelerated up to 80 MeV when an ultra-thin polymer target is irradiated by a circularly-polarized PW laser pulse. Electrons are accelerated to multi-GeV level with a help of injector and accelerator scheme. In the relativistic harmonic generation experiment, the harmonic order is dramatically extended, by optimizing the intensity of pre-pulse level, up to 164th that corresponds to 4.9 nm in wavelength and the experimental results can be explained by the oscillatory flying mirror model. The upgrade of the PW laser to the multi-PW level is under way.

  10. Research Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    The five parts of this report are: research on instruction; faculty dissertations; inter-institutional research; in-college research; and college-endorsed research. The first covers experiments in teaching French, practical nursing, English, math, and chemistry, and in giving examinations. Faculty dissertations include studies of post-graduate…

  11. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-21

    Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  12. Research in particles and fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the research activities in Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays, and Astrophysical Plasmas supported under NASA Grant NGR 05-002-160. The report is divided into sections which describe the activities, followed by a bibliography. This research program is directed toward the investigation of the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays and gamma rays and of the radiation and electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets. These investigations are carried out by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons.

  13. Research in particles and fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Research activities in Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays, and Astrophysical Plasmas supported under NASA Grant NGR 05-002-160 are discussed. The report is divided into sections which describe the activities, followed by a bibliography. This group's research program is directed toward the investigation of the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays and gamma rays and of the radiation and electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets. These investigations are carried out by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons.

  14. A Laboratory of Extremophiles: Iceland Coordination Action for Research Activities on Life in Extreme Environments (CAREX) Field Campaign.

    PubMed

    Marteinsson, Viggó; Vaishampayan, Parag; Kviderova, Jana; Mapelli, Francesca; Medori, Mauro; Calfapietra, Carlo; Aguilera, Angeles; Hamisch, Domenica; Reynisson, Eyjólfur; Magnússon, Sveinn; Marasco, Ramona; Borin, Sara; Calzada, Abigail; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; González-Toril, Elena; Amils, Ricardo; Elster, Josef; Hänsch, Robert

    2013-02-25

    Existence of life in extreme environments has been known for a long time, and their habitants have been investigated by different scientific disciplines for decades. However, reports of multidisciplinary research are uncommon. In this paper, we report an interdisciplinary three-day field campaign conducted in the framework of the Coordination Action for Research Activities on Life in Extreme Environments (CAREX) FP7EU program, with participation of experts in the fields of life and earth sciences. In situ experiments and sampling were performed in a 20 m long hot springs system of different temperature (57 °C to 100 °C) and pH (2 to 4). Abiotic factors were measured to study their influence on the diversity. The CO2 and H2S concentration varied at different sampling locations in the system, but the SO2 remained the same. Four biofilms, mainly composed by four different algae and phototrophic protists, showed differences in photosynthetic activity. Varying temperature of the sampling location affects chlorophyll fluorescence, not only in the microbial mats, but plants (Juncus), indicating selective adaptation to the environmental conditions. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA microarray and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analysis in laboratory showed the presence of a diverse microbial population. Even a short duration (30 h) deployment of a micro colonizer in this hot spring system led to colonization of microorganisms based on ribosomal intergenic spacer (RISA) analysis. Polyphasic analysis of this hot spring system was possible due to the involvement of multidisciplinary approaches.

  15. Research in particles and fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    Research activities in Cosmic Rays Gamma Rays, and Astrophysical Plasmas are covered The investigation of the astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays and gamma rays and of the radiation and electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets are studied. These investigations are carried ut by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons. The emphasis is on precision measurements with high resolution in charge mass and energy. An extensive bibliography is given.

  16. [Field Learning Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center, Reading, PA.

    Seventy field activities, pertinent to outdoor, environmental studies, are described in this compilation. Designed for elementary and junior high school students, the activities cover many discipline areas--science, social studies, language arts, health, history, mathematics, and art--and many are multidisciplinary in use. Topics range from soil…

  17. Research in rice fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1999, 2.4-3 million acres of rice were planted annually nationwide. Rice fields are a major component of the contemporary landscapes in the Gulf Coastal Plain, the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, and Central Valley of California. In 1998, approximately 600,000 acres of rice were planted in Louisiana. In the Louisiana plant commodities report for 1998, total value for rice was over $350 million; sugarcane was the only plant commodity that exceeded this value. Louisiana has over 2,000 rice farmers supporting over 12,000 jobs in the state. Rice fields in the United States receive high use by wildlife, especially shorebirds, wading birds, and waterfowl. Waterbirds use rice fields for food, shelter, and breeding habitat.

  18. Electromagnetic fields: activities in the European Commission with a focus on research projects and the Scientific Committee of Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR).

    PubMed

    Meroni, Donata; Schreck, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    The article summarizes the main activities of the European Commission concerning electromagnetic fields. It explains also the regulatory context, with a special focus on past and current research projects funded by the European Union and the role of the SCENIHR in assessing risks related to EMF. Main conclusions of the SCENIHR opinion adopted in 2015 on EMF are reported.

  19. Activities report of PTT Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In the field of postal infrastructure research, activities were performed on postcode readers, radiolabels, and techniques of operations research and artificial intelligence. In the field of telecommunication, transportation, and information, research was made on multipurpose coding schemes, speech recognition, hypertext, a multimedia information server, security of electronic data interchange, document retrieval, improvement of the quality of user interfaces, domotics living support (techniques), and standardization of telecommunication prototcols. In the field of telecommunication infrastructure and provisions research, activities were performed on universal personal telecommunications, advanced broadband network technologies, coherent techniques, measurement of audio quality, near field facilities, local beam communication, local area networks, network security, coupling of broadband and narrowband integrated services digital networks, digital mapping, and standardization of protocols.

  20. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-15

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the “fines” fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  1. Progress, opportunities, and key fields for groundwater quality research under the impacts of human activities in China with a special focus on western China.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyue; Tian, Rui; Xue, Chenyang; Wu, Jianhua

    2017-03-10

    Groundwater quality research is extremely important for supporting the safety of the water supply and human health in arid and semi-arid areas of China. This review article was constructed to report the latest research progress of groundwater quality in western China where groundwater quality is undergoing fast deterioration because of fast economic development and extensive anthropogenic activities. The opportunities brought by increasing public awareness of groundwater quality protection were also highlighted and discussed. To guide and promote further development of groundwater quality research in China, especially in western China, ten key groundwater quality research fields were proposed. The review shows that the intensification of human activities and the associated impacts on groundwater quality in China, especially in western China, has made groundwater quality research increasingly important, and has caught the attention of local, national, and international agencies and scholars. China has achieved some progress in groundwater quality research in terms of national and regional laws, regulations, and financial supports. The future of groundwater quality research in China, especially in western China, is promising reflected by the opportunities highlighted. The key research fields proposed in this article may also inform groundwater quality protection and management at the national and international level.

  2. Multiband radiometer for field research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. F.; Bauer, M. E.; Dewitt, D. P.; Silva, L. F.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1979-01-01

    A multiband radiometer for field research with 8 bands between 0.4 and 12.5 micrometers is described. The data acquisition system will record the results from the radiometer, a precision radiation thermometer, and ancillary sources. The radiometer and data handling systems will be adaptable to helicopter, truck, to tripod platforms; the system will also be suitable for portable hand-held operation. The general characteristics of this system are that it will be (1) inexpensive to acquire, maintain, and operate, (2) simple to calibrate, (3) complete with data handling hardware and software, and (4) well-documented for use by researchers.

  3. Transforming a Field Trip into an Expedition: Supporting Active Research and Science Content through a Museum Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Students love field trips, and why shouldn't they? Field trips provide a break from the routine of the school day and an opportunity to learn from the world outside the classroom. Science and natural history museums are popular field-trip destinations, filled with a dizzying array of displays, and hands-on learning opportunities. The author…

  4. Research in particles and fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

    1987-01-01

    The astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays and gamma rays and the radiation and electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets are investigated. These investigations are carried out by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons. Particle astrophysics is directed toward the investigation of galactic, solar, interplanetary, and planetary energetic particles and plasmas. The emphasis is on precision measurements with high resolution in charge, mass, and energy. Gamma ray research is directed toward the investigation of galactic, extragalactic, and solar gamma rays with spectrometers of high angular resolution and moderate energy resolution carried on spacecraft and balloons.

  5. Across the Arctic Teachers Experience Field Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Wiggins, H. V.; Marshall, S. A.; Darby, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    From studying snow geese on the North Slope of Alaska to sediment coring aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic Ocean, K-12 teachers embark on scientific expeditions as part of a program that strives to make science in the Arctic a "virtual" reality. In the past two years, seventeen K-12 teachers have participated in Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (TREC), a program that pairs teachers with researchers to improve science education through arctic field experiences. TREC builds on the scientific and cultural opportunities of the Arctic, linking research and education through topics that naturally engage students and the wider public. TREC includes expeditions as diverse as studying plants at Toolik Field Station, a research facility located 150 miles above the Arctic Circle; climate change studies in Norway's Svalbard archipelago; studying rivers in Siberia; or a trans-arctic expedition aboard the USCGC Healy collecting an integrated geophysical data set. Funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs, TREC offers educators experiences in scientific inquiry while encouraging the public and students to become active participants in the scientific inquiry by engaging them virtually in arctic research. TREC uses online outreach elements to convey the research experience to a broad audience. While in remote field locations, teachers and researchers interact with students and the public through online seminars and live calls from the field, online journals with accompanying photos, and online bulletin boards. Since the program's inception in 2004, numerous visitors have posted questions or interacted with teachers, researchers, and students through the TREC website (http://www.arcus.org/trec). TREC teachers are required to transfer their experience of research and current science into their classroom through the development of relevant activities and resources. Teachers and researchers are encouraged to participate

  6. Field research, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This article summarizes field research during the 1993-94 field season in the Antarctic. Among other studies were descriptions of the following: Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the photosynthesis of phytoplankton in the antarctic marginal ice zone; Long-term ecological research (LTER) on the Antarctic marine ecosystem: microbiology and carbon flux; Geologic record of late Wisconsinan/Holocene ice sheet advance and retreat from the Ross Sea; Late Quarernary paleoclimatic history of southern Chile: evidence from the marine record; Integrated biostratigraphy and high resolution seismic stratigraphy of the Ross Sea: Implications for Cenozoic eustatic and climate change; Oxygen-isotope record from McMurdo dome and its relation to the geological climate record of the McMurdo Dry Valleys; Evaluation of processes at polar glacier grounding lines to constrain glaciological and oceanographic models; Reconstruction of paleotemperatures from precision borehole temperature logging; Cenozoic glacial and climatic history of the antarctic region; Observation and modeling studies of episodic events in the south polar atmospheric boundary layer; biogeochemistry of carbon and silica on the antarctic shelf; Chlorine and bromine containing trace gases in Antarctica; South Pole monitoring for climatic change; Aerosol Sampling at Palmer Station; several Ozone depletion studies.

  7. Education and Education Research: Moribund Fields or Dynamic Interacting Systems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, C.

    2011-01-01

    The complex field of education is often depicted as a static field governed by technocratic approaches to activities that characterise the field. Education change is equally viewed in such limited and positivistic ways and linear means-end processes (Hoban 2002). In such orientations to the field, educational research therefore, is about finding…

  8. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  9. Research in particles and fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, R. E.; Buffington, A.; Davis, L., Jr.; Stone, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    The astrophysical aspects of cosmic and gamma rays and the radiation environment of the Earth and other planets investigated by means of energetic particle detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons are discussed. The theory of particles and fields in space is also addressed with particular emphasis on models of Saturn's magnetic field.

  10. Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2011-01-17

    The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

  11. Researching and Conceptualising the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Helen

    2013-01-01

    This concluding paper examines the contributions in this Guest Issue by locating them within the ongoing debates about the role and contribution of social science research, particularly through the production of journals. Set in the context of on-going attacks on the relevance of social science research and the failure to respond to major crises…

  12. Research in particles and fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Davis, L., Jr.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Prince, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The astrophysical aspects of cosmic rays and gamma rays and of the electromagnetic field environment of the Earth and other planets are investigated. These investigations are carried out by means of energetic particle and photon detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons.

  13. Planning and Conducting Research Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Some directions and influences on dental research activities in the near future are discussed. Current challenges include international competition, fellowships, and equipment. Potential research activity includes preventive medicine, epidemiology, chronic illness, the elderly, bioengineering, materials research, nutrition, soft tissue research,…

  14. 24 CFR 4100.3 - Field activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Field activities. 4100.3 Section...) NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION ORGANIZATION AND CHANNELING OF FUNCTIONS § 4100.3 Field activities. The Corporation conducts its field activities from district and field offices around the country. District...

  15. 24 CFR 4100.3 - Field activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Field activities. 4100.3 Section...) NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION ORGANIZATION AND CHANNELING OF FUNCTIONS § 4100.3 Field activities. The Corporation conducts its field activities from district and field offices around the country. District...

  16. 24 CFR 4100.3 - Field activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Field activities. 4100.3 Section...) NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION ORGANIZATION AND CHANNELING OF FUNCTIONS § 4100.3 Field activities. The Corporation conducts its field activities from district and field offices around the country. District...

  17. 24 CFR 4100.3 - Field activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Field activities. 4100.3 Section...) NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION ORGANIZATION AND CHANNELING OF FUNCTIONS § 4100.3 Field activities. The Corporation conducts its field activities from district and field offices around the country. District...

  18. 24 CFR 4100.3 - Field activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Field activities. 4100.3 Section...) NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION ORGANIZATION AND CHANNELING OF FUNCTIONS § 4100.3 Field activities. The Corporation conducts its field activities from district and field offices around the country. District...

  19. Optical Research and Field Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Planning, were prepared and delivered. 15 The initial project under Task Order #23 continued efforts to secure basic research (6.1) funding from the Air...1.314nm pulsed laser was delivered and the IR experiment lab set-up was basically completed. Rhesus subjects were screened in preparation for the first...method for calibration of the Varian Cary 5 spectrophotometer was assessed. This procedure will potentially provide a method for certifying the accuracy of

  20. Panspermia: A Promising Field of Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampelotto, P. H.

    2010-04-01

    In recent years, most of the major barriers against the acceptance of Panspermia have been demolished and this hypothesis emerges as a promising field of research. In this work, recent discoveries and the principal advances in Panspermia are discussed.

  1. Searching for converging research using field to field citations

    PubMed Central

    Noyons, Ed. C. M.; Van Raan, Anthony F. J.

    2010-01-01

    We define converging research as the emergence of an interdisciplinary research area from fields that did not show interdisciplinary connections before. This paper presents a process to search for converging research using journal subject categories as a proxy for fields and citations to measure interdisciplinary connections, as well as an application of this search. The search consists of two phases: a quantitative phase in which pairs of citing and cited fields are located that show a significant change in number of citations, followed by a qualitative phase in which thematic focus is sought in publications associated with located pairs. Applying this search on publications from the Web of Science published between 1995 and 2005, 38 candidate converging pairs were located, 27 of which showed thematic focus, and 20 also showed a similar focus in the other, reciprocal pair. PMID:21297857

  2. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, December 1990--February 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedemann, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Oil Implementation Task Force was appointed to implement the US DOE's new oil research program directed toward increasing domestic oil production by expanded research on near- or mid-term enhanced oil recovery methods. An added priority is to preserve access to reservoirs that have the largest potential for oil recovery, but that are threatened by the large number of wells abandoned each year. This report describes the progress of research activities in the following areas: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; microbial technology; geoscience technology; and environmental technology. (CK)

  3. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  4. Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) - Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    The Deep Vadoze Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ AFRI) was established to protect water resources and to address the challenge of preventing contamination in the deep vadose zone from reaching groundwater. This factsheet provides an overview of the initiative and the approach to integrate basic science and needs-driven applied research activities with cleanup operations.

  5. A Field Guide for Sign Language Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William; Kuschel, Rolf

    Field researchers of sign language are the target of this methodological guide. The prospective researcher is briefed on the rationale of sign language study as language study and as distinct from the study of kinesics. Subjects covered include problems of translating, use of interpreters, and ethics. Instruments for obtaining social and language…

  6. The interrelationship of research in the laboratory and the field to assess hydration status and determine mechanisms involved in water regulation during physical activity.

    PubMed

    Stachenfeld, Nina S

    2014-05-01

    Changes in skin blood and sweating are the primary mechanisms for heat loss in humans. A hot, humid environment concomitant with dehydration limits the ability to increase skin blood flow for the purpose of transferring heat from the body core to skin surface and evaporate sweat to maintain core temperature within safe limits during exercise. Adequate hydration improves thermoregulation by maintaining blood volume to support skin blood flow and sweating. Humans rely on fluid intake to maintain total body water and blood volume, and have developed complex mechanisms to sense changes in the amount and composition of fluid in the body. This paper addresses the interrelationship of research in the laboratory and the field to assess hydration status involved in body water and temperature regulation during exercise. In the controlled setting of a research laboratory, investigators are able to investigate the contributions of volume and tonicity of fluid in the plasma to body water and temperature regulation during exercise and recovery. For example, laboratory studies have shown that tonicity in a rehydration beverage maintains the thirst mechanism (and stimulates drinking), and contributes to the ongoing stimulation of renal fluid retention hormones, ultimately leading to a more complete rehydration. Research in the field cannot control the environment precisely, but these studies provide a natural, 'real-life' setting to study fluid and temperature regulation during exercise. The conditions encountered in the field are closest to the environment during competition, and data collected in the field can have an immediate impact on performance and safety during exercise. There is an important synergy between these two methods of collecting data that support performance and protect athletes from harm during training and improve performance during competition.

  7. Clean Coal Program Research Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Baxter; Eric Eddings; Thomas Fletcher; Kerry Kelly; JoAnn Lighty; Ronald Pugmire; Adel Sarofim; Geoffrey Silcox; Phillip Smith; Jeremy Thornock; Jost Wendt; Kevin Whitty

    2009-03-31

    Although remarkable progress has been made in developing technologies for the clean and efficient utilization of coal, the biggest challenge in the utilization of coal is still the protection of the environment. Specifically, electric utilities face increasingly stringent restriction on the emissions of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}, new mercury emission standards, and mounting pressure for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, an environmental challenge that is greater than any they have previously faced. The Utah Clean Coal Program addressed issues related to innovations for existing power plants including retrofit technologies for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) or green field plants with CCS. The Program focused on the following areas: simulation, mercury control, oxycoal combustion, gasification, sequestration, chemical looping combustion, materials investigations and student research experiences. The goal of this program was to begin to integrate the experimental and simulation activities and to partner with NETL researchers to integrate the Program's results with those at NETL, using simulation as the vehicle for integration and innovation. The investigators also committed to training students in coal utilization technology tuned to the environmental constraints that we face in the future; to this end the Program supported approximately 12 graduate students toward the completion of their graduate degree in addition to numerous undergraduate students. With the increased importance of coal for energy independence, training of graduate and undergraduate students in the development of new technologies is critical.

  8. CREST Research: Advancing the Field for Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda, Laura; Brandl, Bonnie; Otto, Joanne; Stiegel, Lori; Thomas, Randolph; Heisler, Candace

    2008-01-01

    An external advisory board consisting of members from the fields of geriatric internal medicine, family practice geriatrics, criminal prosecution, civil law, police force, adult protective services and victims advocacy was created to advise and guide the research conducted by the Consortium for Research in Elder Self-neglect of Texas (CREST). This panel of experts performed site visits and facilitated the research through responses to biweekly facts sheets and quarterly conference calls. This paper provides the perspective of five of the board members regarding the research findings that were presented at the CREST National Conference in 2006. The discussions outline the successes of the CREST research, describe obstacles and the necessary next steps for continuance of the scientific exploration of this syndrome, and highlight the practice implications of the current and proposed research. PMID:19016972

  9. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  10. Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

  11. Field Agent Activities: Level 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gussett, James

    One of a series of monographs providing information about the Delaware Model: A Systems Approach to Science Education (Del Mod System), this monograph describes the role of field agents. These agents are responsible for individual teachers who express a desire for involvement in improving teacher effectiveness and to be involved in the teaching of…

  12. The Evolution of the Physical Activity Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Steven N.; Powell, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    This article includes an historical review of research on physical activity and health, and how the findings have contributed to physical activity participation and promotion today. In the 20th century, research began to accumulate on the effects of exercise on physiological functions, and later on the relation between regular activity and various…

  13. Synthetic biology: An emerging research field in China

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Lei; Schmidt, Markus; Wei, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic biology is considered as an emerging research field that will bring new opportunities to biotechnology. There is an expectation that synthetic biology will not only enhance knowledge in basic science, but will also have great potential for practical applications. Synthetic biology is still in an early developmental stage in China. We provide here a review of current Chinese research activities in synthetic biology and its different subfields, such as research on genetic circuits, minimal genomes, chemical synthetic biology, protocells and DNA synthesis, using literature reviews and personal communications with Chinese researchers. To meet the increasing demand for a sustainable development, research on genetic circuits to harness biomass is the most pursed research within Chinese researchers. The environmental concerns are driven force of research on the genetic circuits for bioremediation. The research on minimal genomes is carried on identifying the smallest number of genomes needed for engineering minimal cell factories and research on chemical synthetic biology is focused on artificial proteins and expanded genetic code. The research on protocells is more in combination with the research on molecular-scale motors. The research on DNA synthesis and its commercialisation are also reviewed. As for the perspective on potential future Chinese R&D activities, it will be discussed based on the research capacity and governmental policy. PMID:21729747

  14. Field Research in the Teaching of Undergraduate Soil Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Senturklu, Songul; Landblom, Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that undergraduate students benefit from research experiences. Benefits of undergraduate research include 1) personal and intellectual development, 2) more and closer contact with faculty, 3) the use of active learning techniques, 4) creation of high expectations, 5) development of creative and problem-solving skills, 6) greater independence and intrinsic motivation to learn, and 7) exposure to practical skills. The scientific discipline also benefits, as studies have shown that undergraduates who engage in research experiences are more likely to remain science majors and finish their degree program (Lopatto, 2007). Research experiences come as close as possible to allowing undergraduates to experience what it is like to be an academic or research member of their profession working to advance their discipline. Soils form in the field, therefore, field experiences are very important in developing a complete and holistic understanding of soil science. Combining undergraduate research with field experiences can provide extremely beneficial outcomes to the undergraduate student, including increased understanding of and appreciation for detailed descriptions and data analysis as well as an enhanced ability to see how various parts of their undergraduate education come together to understand a complex problem. The experiences of the authors in working with undergraduate students on field-based research projects will be discussed, along with examples of some of the undergraduate research projects that have been undertaken. In addition, student impressions of their research experiences will be presented. Reference Lopatto, D. 2007. Undergraduate research experiences support science career decisions and active learning. CBE -- Life Sciences Education 6:297-306.

  15. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  16. An active antenna for ELF magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F.; Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The work of Nikola Tesla, especially that directed toward world-wide electrical energy distribution via excitation of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances, has stimulated interest in the study of these resonances. Not only are they important for their potential use in the transmission of intelligence and electrical power, they are important because they are an integral part of our natural environment. This paper describes the design of a sensitive, untuned, low noise active antenna which is uniquely suited to modern earth-ionosphere cavity resonance measurements employing fast-Fourier transform techniques for near-real-time data analysis. It capitalizes on a little known field-antenna interaction mechanism. Recently, the authors made preliminary measurements of the magnetic fields in the earth-ionosphere cavity. During the course of this study, the problem of designing an optimized ELF magnetic field sensor presented itself. The sensor would have to be small, light weight (for portable use), and capable of detecting the 5-50 Hz picoTesla-level signals generated by the natural excitations of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances. A review of the literature revealed that past researchers had employed very large search coils, both tuned and untuned. Hill and Bostick, for example, used coils of 30,000 turns wound on high permeability cores of 1.83 m length, weighing 40 kg. Tuned coils are unsuitable for modern fast-Fourier transform data analysis techniques which require a broad spectrum input. 'Untuned' coils connected to high input impedance voltage amplifiers exhibit resonant responses at the resonant frequency determined by the coil inductance and the coil distributed winding capacitance. Also, considered as antennas, they have effective areas equal only to their geometrical areas.

  17. Panspermia: A promising field of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Rampelotto, Pabulo

    Although Panspermia -the hypothesis that life migrates naturally through space -has been raised many times along the human history, due to lack of any validation it remained merely speculative until few decades ago. It is only with the recent discoveries and advances from different fields of research that Panspermia has been given serious scientific consideration. The natural movement of material from planetary surface to planetary surface has been explored and the mechanisms are well established. A variety of studies demonstrate that microorganisms can survive under extreme conditions such as ultracentrifugation, hypervelocity, shock pressure, high temperature variations, vacuum and different ultraviolet and ionizing radiation intensities, which simulate the conditions experienced by microbes during the ejection from one planet, the journey through space as well as the impact in another planet. The discovery of potential habitable environments such as the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn expands the possibility of transfer of life within the Solar System. Consequently, studies of natural transfer of biological material occurring between satellites have been developed. Furthermore, the probability of interplanetary transfer of life out the Solar System has been explored. Therefore, in the last few decades, most of the major barriers against the acceptance of this hypothesis have been demolished and Panspermia reemerges as a promising field of research.

  18. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  19. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  20. Summarizing the field of surrogate modeling research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-10-01

    As computer simulations of complex physical interactions grow, so do the time and expense required to operate them. Mirroring the development of such full-scale models has been the related field of surrogate modeling or metamodeling. Surrogate models take a variety of forms, but their shared goal is to provide a numerical output similar to that of a fully complex physical model while minimizing the computational time and cost required to calculate the result. With an eye toward introducing those unfamiliar with the practices and pitfalls of surrogate modeling to the topic and with a focus on its applications to water resources research, Razavi et al. prepared a systematic review of the surrogate modeling literature.

  1. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  2. Supporting Medical Students to Do International Field Research: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Stephen; Parr, Jennifer; Ullah, Zafar; Omar, Maye

    2014-01-01

    Field research can benefit medical students' learning through experiential engagement with research and personal exposure to foreign health systems. However, the off-campus nature of the activity raises challenges for teachers. This article presents a case study that illustrates the benefits and challenges of organising a field research project…

  3. Research to Practice: Implementing Physical Activity Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sally M.; Cruz, Theresa H.; Kozoll, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dissemination and implementation (D&I) science focuses on bridging the gap between research and practice. The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) published recommendations for increasing physical activity based on scientific review and consensus. Little research on the D&I of these recommendations has been conducted in under-represented populations at high risk for inactivity and chronic disease. Methods Partnering with one rural community (beta site), the University of New Mexico Prevention Research Center studied the translation of CPSTF recommendations to practice. Strategies for increasing physical activity were selected, implemented, and analyzed in 2009 to 2013. Participant observations; content analysis of meeting minutes, field notes, and other documents; and in-depth interviews were conducted over the 5-year period to identify factors important for carrying out the CPSTF recommendations for physical activity in a rural New Mexico community. Results Included among the implementation outcomes were new sidewalks and trails, a community-wide campaign, social support of walking, and park improvements. The following factors were identified as important to the implementation process: an active community-academic partnership; multiple partners; culturally appropriate strategies; and approaches that fit local context and place characteristics (topography, land ownership, population clusters, existing roadways). Conclusions This study illustrates how evidence can be translated to practice and identifies key factors in that process. The successful beta model provides a practical blueprint for D&I in rural, under-represented populations. This model is currently being disseminated (scaled up) to other rural New Mexico communities. PMID:28215385

  4. Finnish Research Activities relevant to IHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, K.; Kauristie, K.; Vainio, R.

    Space physics is a traditional and strong field of research in Finland dating its early roots back to the mid-19th century i e several decennia before the First International Polar Year in 1882 Measurements of rapid variations of the geomagnetic field started in Helsinki already in 1844 and form now some of the longest and most uniform series of observations measuring the global state of the heliosphere Even further in the north at the Sodankyla Geophysical Observatory SGO continuous measurements span more than 90 years Today space physics activities are conducted mainly in the Universities of Helsinki HU Oulu OU and Turku TU and in the Finnish Meteorological Institute FMI SGO which maintains a versatile set of ground-based instrumentation belongs to OU Although several fields of common interest exist each of these parties also have their own research areas and specific expertise TU has a strong experimental and theoretical program in solar energetic particles HU has a wide program in planetary research as well as in auroral magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and theoretical space plasma physics OU and SGO have a strong involvement in ionospheric physics as well as in solar-terrestrial and heliospheric physics HU has long been active in space weather projects while OU is a key player in space climate i e in the research of long-term changes in the Sun heliosphere and the near-Earth space As one part of this cosmic rays have been continuously measured in Oulu since 42 years In addition to the versatile ground-based instrumentation

  5. Sparkling Geomagnetic Field: Involving Schools in Geomagnetic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Rachel; Leonhardt, Roman; Leichter, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Solar activity will be reaching a maximum in 2013/2014 as the sun reaches the end of its cycle, bringing with it an opportunity to study in greater detail the effect of solar wind or "space weather" on our planet's magnetic field. Heightened solar activity leads to a larger amount of clouds of energetic particles bombarding the Earth. Although the Earth's magnetic field shields us from most of these particles, the field becomes distorted and compacted by the solar wind, which leads to magnetic storms that we detect from the surface. These storms cause aurorae at higher latitudes and can lead to widespread disruption of communication and navigation equipment all over the Earth when sufficiently strong. This project, "Sparkling Geomagnetic Field," is a part of Austria's Sparkling Science programme, which aims to involve schools in active scientific research to encourage interest in science from a young age. Researchers from the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in Vienna have worked hand-in-hand with three schools across Austria to set up regional geomagnetic stations consisting of state-of-the-art scalar and vector magnetometers to monitor the effects of the solar wind on the geomagnetic field. The students have been an active part of the research team from the beginning, first searching for a suitable location to set up the stations as well as later overseeing the continued running of the equipment and analysing the data output. Through this project the students will gain experience in contemporary scientific methods: data processing and analysis, field work, as well as equipment setup and upkeep. A total of three stations have been established with schools in Innsbruck, Tamsweg and Graz at roughly equal distances across Austria to run alongside the already active station in the Conrad Observatory near Vienna. Data acquisition runs through a data logger and software developed to deliver data in near realtime. This network allows for

  6. Mars Analogue Field Research and Sample Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    We describe results from the data analysis from a series of field research campaigns (ILEWG EuroMoonMars campaigns 2009 to 2016) in the Utah desert and in other extreme environments (Iceland, Eifel, La Reunion) relevant to habitability and astrobiology in Mars environments, and in order to help in the interpretation of Mars missions measurements from orbit (MEX, MRO) or from the surface (MER, MSL). We discuss results relevant to the scientific study of the habitability factors influenced by the properties of dust, organics, water history and the diagnostics and characterisation of microbial life. We also discuss perspectives for the preparation of future lander and sample return missions. We deployed at Mars Desert Research station, Utah, a suite of instruments and techniques including sample collection, context imaging from remote to local and microscale, drilling, spectrometers and life sensors. We analyzed how geological and geochemical evolution affected local parameters (mineralogy, organics content, environment variations) and the habitability and signature of organics and biota. We find high diversity in the composition of soil samples even when collected in close proximity, the low abundances of detectable PAHs and amino acids and the presence of biota of all three domains of life with significant heterogeneity. An extraordinary variety of putative extremophiles was observed. A dominant factor seems to be soil porosity and lower clay-sized particle content. A protocol was developed for sterile sampling, contamination issues, and the diagnostics of biodiversity via PCR and DGGE analysis in soils and rocks samples. We compare campaign results from 2009-2013 campaigns in Utah and other sites to new measurements concerning: the comparison between remote sensing and in-situ measurements; the study of minerals; the detection of organics and signs of life.

  7. Teaching Research Integrity in the Field of Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wester, Kelly L.

    2007-01-01

    Little has been done in terms of teaching or writing about research integrity or research ethics in the counseling field. Because of the continual push for research in counseling to maintain evidence-based practices, there is a need for education in the area of research integrity in order for professionals in the counseling field to conduct…

  8. Magnetic fields, radicals and cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ryan D

    2017-01-01

    Some effects of low-intensity magnetic fields on the concentration of radicals and their influence on cellular functions are reviewed. These fields have been implicated as a potential modulator of radical recombination rates. Experimental evidence has revealed a tight coupling between cellular function and radical pair chemistry from signaling pathways to damaging oxidative processes. The effects of externally applied magnetic fields on biological systems have been extensively studied, and the observed effects lack sufficient mechanistic understanding. Radical pair chemistry offers a reasonable explanation for some of the molecular effects of low-intensity magnetic fields, and changes in radical concentrations have been observed to modulate specific cellular functions. Applied external magnetic fields have been shown to induce observable cellular changes such as both inhibiting and accelerating cell growth. These and other mechanisms, such as cell membrane potential modulation, are of great interest in cancer research due to the variations between healthy and deleterious cells. Radical concentrations demonstrate similar variations and are indicative of a possible causal relationship. Radicals, therefore, present a possible mechanism for the modulation of cellular functions such as growth or regression by means of applied external magnetic fields.

  9. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedemann, H.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

  10. Electromechanically active polymer transducers: research in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Graz, Ingrid; Jager, Edwin; Ladegaard Skov, Anne; Vidal, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Smart materials and structures based on electromechanically active polymers (EAPs) represent a fast growing and stimulating field of research and development. EAPs are materials capable of changing dimensions and/or shape in response to suitable electrical stimuli. They are commonly classified in two major families: ionic EAPs (activated by an electrically induced transport of ions and/or solvent) and electronic EAPs (activated by electrostatic forces). These polymers show interesting properties, such as sizable active strains and/or stresses in response to electrical driving, high mechanical flexibility, low density, structural simplicity, ease of processing and scalability, no acoustic noise and, in most cases, low costs. Since many of these characteristics can also describe natural muscle tissues from an engineering standpoint, it is not surprising that EAP transducers are sometimes also referred to as 'muscle-like smart materials' or 'artificial muscles'. They are used not only to generate motion, but also to sense or harvest energy from it. In particular, EAP electromechanical transducers are studied for applications that can benefit from their 'biomimetic' characteristics, with possible usages from the micro- to the macro-scale, spanning several disciplines, such as mechatronics, robotics, automation, biotechnology and biomedical engineering, haptics, fluidics, optics and acoustics. Currently, the EAP field is just undergoing its initial transition from academic research into commercialization, with companies starting to invest in this technology and the first products appearing on the market. This focus issue is intentionally aimed at gathering contributions from the most influential European groups working in the EAP field. In fact, today Europe hosts the broadest EAP community worldwide. The rapid expansion of the EAP field in Europe, where it historically has strong roots, has stimulated the creation of the 'European Scientific Network for Artificial

  11. Rapidly Deglaciating and Uplifting Landscapes in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve GBNPP Provide Alaskan High School Students with Summer Field Research Experiences in Paleoclimate Disciplines and Exposure to Active Researchers in Synergistic Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, C. L.; Hekkers, M.; Schaller, S.; Parks, R.

    2011-12-01

    During summer 2011, ten Alaska high school students enrolled in a summer college introductory field science course through the Design Discover Research Program (DDR) at University Alaska Southeast, with support from the Juneau Economic Development Council, the University Alaska Fairbanks Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA), the National Park Service, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-Interdisciplinary Scientific Environmental Technology (ISET) Cooperative Science Center (CSC). They conducted field surveys in Glacier Bay National Park and across the adjacent Gustavus glacier forefield landscape. This was the 4th summer for this program. Following a 2-1/2 day orientation on the UAS campus, students traveled by a newly established (2011) Alaska Marine Highway service from Juneau to Gustavus. They utilized bicycles and hiking to access the Dude Creek Critical Habitat, Good Creek watershed, and the Nagoonberry Trail built by the Nature Conservancy along the emerging shoreline of Icy Strait. This region is currently experiencing uplift rates of 20-28 mm/year as a result of Little Ice Age deglaciation and isostatic rebound, rates much higher than eustatic sea level rise. North of the Gustavus ferry dock, roughly 19 acres of emergent land is now a 9-hole golf course, raised from the sea since the 1950s. DDR-students interacted with wildlife biologists, ornithologists, quaternary geologists, glaciologists, and botanists to integrate their understanding of the response of plants and animals to this dynamic landscape. Radio-collared moose populations, which migrated into this area from Haines since the mind-1960s, are being studied to asses their impacts to local vegetation and the behavior of local predators (bears, wolves, and coyotes). Sitka spruce forest expansion onto Icy Strait uplifting salt marshes, now threaten Sandhill Crane habitat and their flyover stops along the Pacific Flyway. Intertidal areas in Bartlett Cove in GBNPP feature

  12. Matching software practitioner needs to researcher activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Menzies, T.; Connelly, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an approach to matching software practitioners' needs to software researchers' activities. It uses an accepted taxonomical software classfication scheme as intermediary, in terms of which practitioners express needs, and researchers express activities.

  13. Arguing Challenges to Validity in Field Research: A Realist Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsworth, Gerald R.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of field methods in education and social research. Highlights include the argument against antinaturalism; scientific realism and social science; challenges to the validity of inferences from field studies; and threats to the validity of field research. (Contains 52 references.) (LRW)

  14. Relating practitioner needs to research activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Menzies, T.; Connelly, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an approach to matching needs (practioner requirements) to solutions (researcher activities). A taxonomical classification scheme acts as intermediary between needs and activities. Expert practitioners exprss their needs in terms of this taxonomy. Researchers express their activities in the same terms. A decision support tool is used to assist in the combination and study of their expressions of needs and activities.

  15. Equating Research Production in Different Scientific Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Pedro; Pulgarin, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Diffusion in a scientific field is regarded as the dissemination of knowledge, channeled through citations distributed over different periods of time and propagated via scientific journals. Here it is considered to be a latent variable defined by a set of citations used in different fields; the Quantum Measurement technique is used to measure that…

  16. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  17. Chapter A9. Safety in Field Activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Susan L.; Ray, Ronald G.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols (requirements and recommendations) and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual addresses topics related to personal safety to be used in the collection of water-quality data, including: policies and general regulations on field safety; transportation of people and equipment; implementation of surface-water and ground-water activities; procedures for handling chemicals; and information on potentially hazardous environmental conditions, animals, and plants. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.usgs.gov/publications/ index.html.

  18. OCLC Research: 2012 Activity Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) Research is to expand knowledge that advances OCLC's public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing library costs. OCLC Research is dedicated to three roles: (1)To act as a community resource for shared research and development (R&D); (2) To provide advanced…

  19. Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field

    PubMed Central

    Romensky, Maksym; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions between the individuals might be completely different. In this work, we show that the dynamics of active particles in external fields can also be described in a way that resembles equilibrium condensed matter. It follows simple general laws, which are independent of the microscopic details of the system. The dynamics is revealed through hysteresis of the mean velocity of active particles subjected to a periodic orienting field. The hysteresis is measured in computer simulations and experiments on unicellular organisms. We find that the ability of the particles to follow the field scales with the ratio of the field variation period to the particles' orientational relaxation time, which, in turn, is related to the particle self-propulsion power and the energy dissipation rate. The collective behaviour of the particles due to aligning interactions manifests itself at low frequencies via increased persistence of the swarm motion when compared with motion of an individual. By contrast, at high field frequencies, the active group fails to develop the alignment and tends to behave like a set of independent individuals even in the presence of interactions. We also report on asymptotic laws for the hysteretic dynamics of active particles, which resemble those in magnetic systems. The generality of the assumptions in the underlying model suggests that the observed laws might apply to a variety of dynamic phenomena from the motion of

  20. THE FEDERAL INTEGRATED BIOTREATMENT RESEARCH CONSORTIUM (FLASK TO FIELD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Federal Integrated Biotreatment Research Consortium (Flask to Field) represented a 7-year concerted effort by several research laboratories to develop bioremediation technologies for contaminated DoD sites. The consortium structure consisted of a director and four thrust are...

  1. Partnering the University Field Experience Research Model with Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnorr, Donna; Painter, Diane D.

    This paper presents a collaborative action research partnership model that involved participation by graduate school of education preservice students, school and university teachers, and administrators. An elementary teacher-research group investigated what would happen when fourth graders worked in teams to research and produce a multimedia…

  2. The State of the Field: Interdisciplinary Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szostak, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the process of interdisciplinary research has expanded considerably over the last decades. The purpose of this brief paper is to take stock of where we are and where we are going. The first section addresses definitional issues and discusses the relationship between teaching and research. The second section discusses potential…

  3. Use of Field Research Sites to Teach Field Techniques in Graduate Level Soil Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes how a field research site provides grauduate soil physics students with practical field-oriented experiences. Explains the structure of the course and the nature of the course's investigations. Assesses the advantages and obstacles associated with the field research technique. (ML)

  4. Semantic Support Environment for Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maizatul Akmar; Yaacob, Mashkuri; Kareem, Sameem Abdul

    2008-01-01

    Scholarly activities are a collection of academic related activities such as research, teaching and consultation work which result in research outputs such as journals, theses and articles in proceedings. The output will then be disseminated to researchers all over the world by means of the WWW. The four pillars of this scholarship i.e. discovery,…

  5. 38 CFR 1.488 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Research activities. 1... PROVISIONS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 1.488 Research activities. Subject to the provisions of 38 U... disclosed for the purpose of conducting scientific research. (a) Information in individually...

  6. Current status of the polyamine research field.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Anthony E; Casero, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the polyamine field and introduces the 32 other chapters that make up this volume. These chapters provide a wide range of methods, advice, and background relevant to studies of the function of polyamines, the regulation of their content, their role in disease, and the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting polyamine content and function. The methodology provided in this new volume will enable laboratories already working in this area to expand their experimental techniques and facilitate the entry of additional workers into this rapidly expanding field.

  7. Current Status of the Polyamine Research Field

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the polyamine field and introduces the 32 other chapters that make up this volume. These chapters provide a wide range of methods, advice, and background relevant to studies of the function of polyamines, the regulation of their content, their role in disease, and the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting polyamine content and function. The methodology provided in this new volume will enable laboratories already working in this area to expand their experimental techniques and facilitate the entry of additional workers into this rapidly expanding field. PMID:21318864

  8. Adaptive wave field synthesis for active sound field reproduction: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction has applications in music reproduction, spatial audio, sound environment reproduction, and experimental acoustics. Sound field reproduction can be used to artificially reproduce the spatial character of natural hearing. The objective is then to reproduce a sound field in a real reproduction environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. The room response thus reduces the quality of the physical sound field reproduction by WFS. In recent research papers, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a potential solution to compensate for these quality reductions from which WFS objective performance suffers. In this paper, AWFS is experimentally investigated as an active sound field reproduction system with a limited number of reproduction error sensors to compensate for the response of the listening environment. Two digital signal processing algorithms for AWFS are used for comparison purposes, one of which is based on independent radiation mode control. AWFS performed propagating sound field reproduction better than WFS in three tested reproduction spaces (hemianechoic chamber, standard laboratory space, and reverberation chamber).

  9. Embedding Research in a Field-Based Module through Peer Review and Assessment for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Dawn T.

    2011-01-01

    A case study is presented of embedding research in a final year undergraduate, field-based, physical geography module. The approach is holistic, whereby research-based learning activities simulate the full life cycle of research from inception through to peer review and publication. The learning, teaching and assessment strategy emphasizes the…

  10. Integrating Research into LIS Field Experiences in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Selinda Adelle; Hoffmann, Kristin; Dawson, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Field experiences function as a link between LIS theory and practice. Students should be provided with an experience that is a true reflection of the professional environment. The increasing focus on research by academic librarians provides an opportunity and responsibility to integrate research into the field experiences of LIS students.…

  11. Field Experimental Research on Human Crowding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiello, John R.; And Others

    Overcrowded residence halls at Rutgers University form the basis for this research study on the effects of overcrowding. Subjects were the occupants of 31 rooms (7 triple male rooms, 7 triple female rooms, 7 double male rooms, and 10 double female rooms). Two sets of measures were used to determine whether crowding caused arousal and stress. The…

  12. Field Operations Program Activities Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

    1999-05-01

    The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

  13. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program: 10 years of field research-based education.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Gribbin, S.; Peteet, D. M.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.; Corbett, E.; Nguyen, K.; Bjornton, J.; Lee, D.; Dubossi, D.; Reyes, N.

    2014-12-01

    This fall marks the 10th year in which we have run a research-project-based educational program for high school students and science teachers at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. This summer's cohort included 31 teenagers, 7 science teachers, and 16 college students, most of whom are returning to the program to help run the research projects. Nearly all of our students attend non-competitive-entry public schools in NYC or the neighborhoods around the Observatory. Over 80% are from under-served minority populations. Most receive Title I/III assistance. About 60% are young women. During the past 10 years, nearly all of our participants have gone on to 4-year colleges. About half are declaring science and engineering majors. Our students receive scholarship support at rates several times higher than their graduating peers, including 5 Gates Millennium scholars over the past 5 years. Our science is centered on studies of a nearby tidal wetland, where we have expanded from fish collections in year one to include everything from sediment core analysis to soil chemistry to nutrient cycles to the local food web. In this presentation we will look back over 10 years of experience and focus on what lessons can be learned about (1) how to engage teams of young investigators in authentic scientific research; (2) what cultural/organizational structures encourage them to make use of place- and project-based learning and (3) what the participants themselves report as the most useful aspects of our programming. The presentation will include video clips from the students' field experiences and from reflective interviews with "graduates".

  14. Research in Action: Taking Classroom Learning to the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Abigail; Dresang, Eliza; Campana, Katie; Feldman, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, preparation of LIS professionals to conduct credible research has been both scrutinized and encouraged by a variety of scholars. The conclusion of these researchers has been that there is a paucity of courses and that opportunities for students to participate in authentic field research are few. There is a resulting need…

  15. Ethics in Field-Based Research: Contractual and Relational Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickhouse, Nancy W.

    The desire to abolish the gap between research theory and classroom practice has sparked an increasing interest in field-based research among science educators. Although most researchers are aware of the standard meanings of informed consent and confidentiality, and there are some codes of ethical principles published by such groups as the…

  16. 38 CFR 1.488 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Research activities. 1... PROVISIONS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 1.488 Research activities. Subject to the provisions of 38 U... paragraphs, patient medical record information covered by §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this part may...

  17. 38 CFR 1.488 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Research activities. 1... PROVISIONS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 1.488 Research activities. Subject to the provisions of 38 U... paragraphs, patient medical record information covered by §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this part may...

  18. 38 CFR 1.488 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Research activities. 1... PROVISIONS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 1.488 Research activities. Subject to the provisions of 38 U... paragraphs, patient medical record information covered by §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this part may...

  19. 38 CFR 1.488 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Research activities. 1... PROVISIONS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 1.488 Research activities. Subject to the provisions of 38 U... paragraphs, patient medical record information covered by §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this part may...

  20. IAU Project and Research Activity in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Suman

    2015-08-01

    The second half of the twentieth century has witnessed a tremendous development in the field of astronomy and space exploration. The large telescope both on the land and in the orbit, using the whole range of the electromagnetic spectra from radio waves to gamma rays are extending their range of exploration, right to the edge of the observable universe, and making astounding discoveries in the process. Many large international telescope facilities and global plans are accessible to all astronomers throughout the world, providing an inexpensive entry to cutting- edge international research for developing countries.Nepal is a mountainous country it has a wide range of climatic and altitude variations which varies from an elevation of 200 meter to ≥ 4000 meter. The average temperature varies from ≥ 25 o C to ≤ 0 to 5oC. Because of these diverse weather and climatic variation there is the potential for the establishment of sophisticated observatory/ data centre and link with each other. So, the future possible opportunity of astronomy in Nepal will be discussed. Besides Education and Research activities conducted in Tribhuvan University, Nepal under the support of International Astronomical Union (IAU) will also be highlighted. The importance brought by those two workshops conducted on data simulation supported by IAU under TF1 will also be discussed which is believed to play a vital role for the promotion and development of astronomy and astrophysics in developing countries.

  1. 42 CFR 2.52 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Research activities. 2.52 Section 2.52 Public... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.52 Research... research if the program director makes a determination that the recipient of the patient...

  2. 42 CFR 2.52 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Research activities. 2.52 Section 2.52 Public... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.52 Research... research if the program director makes a determination that the recipient of the patient...

  3. 42 CFR 2.52 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Research activities. 2.52 Section 2.52 Public... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.52 Research... research if the program director makes a determination that the recipient of the patient...

  4. 42 CFR 2.52 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Research activities. 2.52 Section 2.52 Public... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.52 Research... research if the program director makes a determination that the recipient of the patient...

  5. 42 CFR 2.52 - Research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Research activities. 2.52 Section 2.52 Public... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.52 Research... research if the program director makes a determination that the recipient of the patient...

  6. An Integrated Extravehicular Activity Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Ross, Amy J.; Cupples, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Multiple organizations within NASA and outside of NASA fund and participate in research related to extravehicular activity (EVA). In October 2015, representatives of the EVA Office, the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD), and the Human Research Program (HRP) at NASA Johnson Space Center agreed on a formal framework to improve multi-year coordination and collaboration in EVA research. At the core of the framework is an Integrated EVA Research Plan and a process by which it will be annually reviewed and updated. The over-arching objective of the collaborative framework is to conduct multi-disciplinary cost-effective research that will enable humans to perform EVAs safely, effectively, comfortably, and efficiently, as needed to enable and enhance human space exploration missions. Research activities must be defined, prioritized, planned and executed to comprehensively address the right questions, avoid duplication, leverage other complementary activities where possible, and ultimately provide actionable evidence-based results in time to inform subsequent tests, developments and/or research activities. Representation of all appropriate stakeholders in the definition, prioritization, planning and execution of research activities is essential to accomplishing the over-arching objective. A formal review of the Integrated EVA Research Plan will be conducted annually. External peer review of all HRP EVA research activities including compilation and review of published literature in the EVA Evidence Book is already performed annually. Coordination with stakeholders outside of the EVA Office, CTSD, and HRP is already in effect on a study-by-study basis; closer coordination on multi-year planning with other EVA stakeholders including academia is being actively pursued. Details of the current Integrated EVA Research Plan are presented including description of ongoing and planned research activities in the areas of: Benchmarking; Anthropometry and Suit Fit; Sensors; Human

  7. [Climate chance and research activity].

    PubMed

    Manuel, Celie

    2009-10-26

    There are three main focus areas relevant to health in research related to climate change: 1) disentangling of the complex associations between climate-sensitive risk factors and health 2) guidance as to where, when and how effective health adaptation strategies may be implemented for maximum effect, and 3) health impact assessment (with a focus on health co-benefits) of climate-related policies in other sectors. Further development in each of these areas will provide important opportunities for strengthening health promotion and protection.

  8. Transmission research activities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    A joint research program, to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions, consists of analytical and experimental efforts to achieve the overall goals of reducing transmission weight and noise, while increasing life and reliability. Recent activities in the areas of transmission and related component research are highlighted. Current areas include specific technologies in support of military rotary wing aviation, gearing technology, transmission noise reduction studies, a recent interest in gearbox diagnostics, and advanced transmission system studies. Results of recent activities are presented along with near term research plans.

  9. Sociology of International Education--An Emerging Field of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnik, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This article points to international education in elementary and post-elementary schools as an emerging and promising field of enquiry. It describes the state of art of this new field and sets out the nature of the research. The rapid development of international networks in recent decades; the contribution of international education policies to…

  10. Design, implementation, and results of LACIE field research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E.; Mcewen, M. C.; Malila, W. A.; Harlan, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The capability to acquire, process, and interpret remotely sensed multispectral measurements of the energy reflected and emitted from crops, soils, and other Earth surface features is considered. The LACIE Field Measurements Project is described including project objectives, the experimental approach, the data acquisition program, and selected results based on field data. The key accomplishments and results of the experiment and recommendations for future field research are summarized.

  11. Research activities of the Geodynamics Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D. (Editor); Cohen, S. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    A broad spectrum of geoscience disciplines including space geodesy, geopotential field modeling, tectonophysics, and dynamic oceanography are discussed. The NASA programs, include the Geodynamics and Ocean Programs, the Crustal Dynamics Project, the proposed Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX), and the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM). The papers are grouped into chapters on Crustal Movements, Global Earth Dynamics, Gravity Field Model Development, Sea Surface Topography, and Advanced Studies.

  12. Astrobiology Field Research in Moon/Mars Analogue Environments: Preface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foing, B. H.; Stoker, C.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2011-01-01

    Extreme environments on Earth often provide similar terrain conditions to landing/operation sites on Moon and Mars. Several field campaigns (EuroGeoMars2009 and DOMMEX/ILEWG EuroMoonMars from November 2009 to March 2010) were conducted at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in Utah. Some of the key astrobiology results are presented in this special issue on Astrobiology field research in Moon/Mars analogue environments relevant to investigate the link between geology, minerals, organics and biota. Preliminary results from a multidisciplinary field campaign at Rio Tinto in Spain are presented.

  13. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  14. Overview of Langley activities in active controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active controls technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. The activities of the Langley Research Center (laRC) in advancing active controls technology. Activities are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  15. The power of research exploration within education: lessons from an international field hydrology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Najm, M. R.; Stewart, R. D.; Rupp, D. E.; Selker, J. S.; Lane, J. W.; Casanova, F.; Arumí, J.; Rivera, D.

    2011-12-01

    Educating the next generation of scientists requires new educational methods and unconventional approaches to facilitate the interdisciplinary scholarship required to cope with fast-paced developments in the geosciences. We believe incorporation of field training with active research missions is an effective educational model. By participating in active research and open science dialogue, students are exposed to real-world examples of the principles and processes of complex systems in a manner that allows them to develop a deeper understanding of the subject. We find students are highly motivated by the knowledge that data they collect will advance the research mission; such an environment stokes their passions and imaginations and allows the students to explore the roots of their interest in geoscience. In this context, a two-week educational field course on hydrologic processes and measurements was integrated with ongoing research in Chile to understand the effect of soil shrinkage and swelling properties on watershed hydrologic response. Students witnessed the iterative process of field-experiment design and became part of science in the making. They experienced the complexity of field work and developed problem-solving skills through the myriad of challenges presented in the acquisition of field data in a remote area. All of these factors contributed to an atmosphere of creativity that led to an outstanding research and educational experience. We find the coupling of field training with active research to be extremely rewarding, and time- and cost-effective education in this fast-paced and cost-cautious age.

  16. Large space antenna communications systems: Integrated Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory development activities. 2: Langley Research Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, T. G.; Bailey, M. C.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, F. B.

    1983-01-01

    The electromagnetic analysis activities at the Langley Research Center are resulting in efficient and accurate analytical methods for predicting both far- and near-field radiation characteristics of large offset multiple-beam multiple-aperture mesh reflector antennas. The utilization of aperture integration augmented with Geometrical Theory of Diffraction in analyzing the large reflector antenna system is emphasized.

  17. Magnetic fields in umbral atmospheres under 'similarity' configuration /Research note/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    Depth variations in the sunspot magnetic field are studied, and their influence is investigated on the magnetically active line profiles and the resulting magnetographic measurements. An attempt is made to derive a crude, though theoretically sensible magnetic model of a spot, using a simple field configuration conditioned by the 'similarity' law of Schluter and Temesvary (1958). The umbral magnetic field is computed, and the results are presented in tabular form.

  18. Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Chief, Accession Medical Standards Analysis & Research Activity Li Yuanzhang, PhD Senior Statistician Department of Epidemiology David N...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AMSARA, Department of Epidemiology , Division of Preventive Medicine Walter Reed Army Institute of Research 503... Epidemiology of Injury form the Assessment of Recruit Strength and Motivation study ARMS) and Program

  19. Assessment of Electromagnetic Fields at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficklen, Carter B.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of ElectroMagnetic Fields (EMF) completed at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars Program. This project was performed to determine levels of electromagnetic fields, determine the significance of the levels present, and determine a plan to reduce electromagnetic field exposure, if necessary. This report also describes the properties of electromagnetic fields and their interaction with humans. The results of three major occupational epidemiological studies is presented to determine risks posed to humans by EMF exposure. The data for this report came from peer-reviewed journal articles and government publications pertaining to the health effects of electromagnetic fields.

  20. Sharpening the focus in EMF research. [Electric and Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T. )

    1992-03-01

    Research results have yet to settle whether or not exposure to magnetic fields can adversely affect human health, but recent studies have provided strong pointers to several fertile areas of inquiry. EPRI is planning new studies that will dig deeper into the mysteries of these key focus areas, including questions about what wire code classifications really represent as indicators of residential magnetic field exposure and whether they are appropriate surrogates for actual exposure measurements. Other questions surround the hypothesis that magnetic fields could suppress production of the hormone melatonin, representing a possible mechanism of biological interaction. In addition to health studies, EPRI is continuing work in other parts of its comprehensive EMF research program, which includes identification of significant field sources and investigation of potential field management methods.

  1. [Research activities in Kobe-Indonesia Collaborative Research Centers].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Hotta, Hak

    2013-01-01

    Kobe-Indonesia Collaborative Research Center was established in Institute of Tropical Disease (ITD), Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia in 2007 under the program of ''Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases'' supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, and then it has been under the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) since 2010. Japanese researchers have been stationed at ITD, conducting joint researches on influenza, viral hepatitis, dengue and infectious diarrhea. Also, another Japanese researcher has been stationed at Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, Jakarta, carrying out joint researches on'' Identification of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) substances and development of HCV and dengue vaccines'' in collaboration with University of Indonesia and Airlangga University through the Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) since 2009. In this article, we briefly introduce the background history of Kobe University Research Center in Indonesia, and discuss the research themes and outcomes of J-GRID and SATREPS activities.

  2. Research on Mobile Learning Activities Applying Tablets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Juskeviciene, Anita; Bireniene, Virginija

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to present current research on mobile learning activities in Lithuania while implementing flagship EU-funded CCL project on application of tablet computers in education. In the paper, the quality of modern mobile learning activities based on learning personalisation, problem solving, collaboration, and flipped class methods is…

  3. Client satisfaction. Operations research activities and results.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    Operations research (OR) is a major component of the Quality Assurance Project's (QAP) strategy for improving the quality of health care delivery worldwide. QAP's Operations Research Program aims to improve the feasibility, utility, and cost-effectiveness of quality assurance strategies in developing countries. QAP and its field partners work to maximize the utility of each field study's findings. As such, the project hopes to disseminate information on all aspects of important OR projects, from the initial design to implementation and results. Over the course of the project, QAP's staff and their partners will develop studies in 16 technical areas. One key area of interest is the study of client satisfaction with health care delivery. The project currently has two major studies on client satisfaction underway in Niger and Peru. Phase one results from the Niger research and QAP and the Max Salud Institute in Peru are discussed.

  4. Endogenous Electric Fields May Guide Neocortical Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Flavio; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Local field potentials and the underlying endogenous electric fields (EFs) are traditionally considered to be epiphenomena of structured neuronal network activity. Recently, however, externally applied EFs have been shown to modulate pharmacologically evoked network activity in rodent hippocampus. In contrast, very little is known about the role of endogenous EFs during physiological activity states in neocortex. Here we used the neocortical slow oscillation in vitro as a model system to show that weak sinusoidal and naturalistic EFs enhance and entrain physiological neocortical network activity with an amplitude threshold within the range of in vivo endogenous field strengths. Modulation of network activity by positive and negative feedback fields based on the network activity in real-time provide direct evidence for a feedback loop between neuronal activity and endogenous EF. This significant susceptibility of active networks to EFs that only cause small changes in membrane potential in individual neurons suggests that endogenous EFs could guide neocortical network activity. PMID:20624597

  5. Family planning field research projects: balancing internal against external validity.

    PubMed

    Fisher, A A; Carlaw, R W

    1983-01-01

    This report discusses the experience of a two-year family planning and maternal/child health project in Nepal. Although the project was planned as an experimental field research endeavor, a series of unanticipated events repeatedly compromised the internal validity of the project and forced design changes. While unexpected events are common in the history of most field projects, they present the research evaluator with the fundamental dilemma of trying to maintain a high degree of internal validity without sacrificing external validity. Rigid research designs with tight control over the introduction and measurement of experimental variables may serve to increase internal validity but they may also create an atypical and artificial situation that fails to mirror real field conditions and thus threatens external validity.

  6. Magnetic-field measurements for the Lewis Research Center cyclotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Lewis Center cyclotron was mapped by using a Hall-effect magnetic-field transducer. Main-field Fourier coefficients were determined on a polar mesh of 40 radii for each of seven levels of main-field coil current. Incremental fields for eight sets of trim coils and two sets of harmonic coils were also determined at four of these main-field levels. A stored-program, digital computer was used to perform the measurements. The process was entirely automatic; all data-taking and data-reduction activities were specified by the computer programs. A new method for temperature compensation of a Hall element was used. This method required no temperature control of the element. Measurements of the Hall voltage and Hall-element resistance were sufficient to correct for temperature effects.

  7. Field research with underserved minorities: the ideal and the real.

    PubMed

    Stiffman, Arlene Rubin; Freedenthal, Stacey; Brown, Eddie; Ostmann, Emily; Hibbeler, Patricia

    2005-06-01

    The realities of doing field research with high-risk, minority, or indigenous populations may be quite different than the guidelines presented in research training. There are overlapping and competing demands created by cultural and research imperatives. A National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)-funded study of American Indian youth illustrates competing pressures between research objectives and cultural sensitivity. This account of the problems that were confronted and the attempts made to resolve them will hopefully fill a needed gap in the research literature and serve as a thought-provoking example for other researchers. This study built cross-cultural bridges. Researchers worked as a team with stakeholders to modify the instruments and methods to achieve cultural appropriateness. The researchers agreed to the communities' demands for increased service access and rights of refusal for all publications and presentations. Data indicate that these compromises did not substantially harm the first year of data collection completeness or the well-being of the youth. To the contrary, it enhanced the ability to disseminate results to those community leaders with the most vested interests. The conflicts between ideal research requirements and cultural demands confronted by the researchers and interviewers in the American Indian community were not necessarily different from issues faced by researchers in other communities. Of major import is the recognition that there are no easy answers to such issues within research.

  8. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC) Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.B.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Field Research Center (FRC) to support the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the DOE Headquarters Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Office of Science.

  9. Team Teaching: Integrating Research and Lessons from the Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    USSOCOM RESEARCH CONDUCTED BY: SWA CONSULTING INC. Team teaching: Integrating research and lessons from the field Olin , J., & Harman, R. P. (2013...and Contributors: Mr. Hyderhusain Abadin Ms. Lindsey Jeralds Mrs. Cristina Lambert Mr. Jack  Olin Dr. Daniel Stanhope Dr. Eric A. Surface Sponsored by

  10. Development of high magnetic fields for energy research

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.D.; Campbell, L.J.; Modler, R.; Movshovich, R.; Lawrence, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The primary purpose of work has been to develop the scientific basis for DOE support of a program that would build a novel, nondestructive 100-tesla magnet that would be available as a user facility for cutting-edge, energy-related research and technology at very high magnetic fields.

  11. Activities at the Smart Structures Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Peter T.

    1991-12-01

    Smart Structures and Materials technology will undoubtedly yield a wide range of new materials plus new sensing and actuation technologies and this will have a radical effect on current approaches to structural design. To meet the multi-disciplinary research challenge posed by this technology, the Smart Structures Research Institute (SSRI) has been established at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow. This paper describes the background, current and planned activities and progress made in developing this new and very promising technology.

  12. Analysis of worldwide research in the field of cybernetics during 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Singh, Virender; Perdigones, Alicia; García, José Luis; Cañas-Guerrero, Ignacio; Mazarrón, Fernando R

    2014-12-01

    The study provides an overview of the research activity carried out in the field of cybernetics. To do so, all research papers from 1997 to 2011 (16,445 research papers) under the category of "Computer Science, Cybernetics" of Web of Science have been processed using our in-house software which is developed specifically for this purpose. Among its multiple capabilities, this software analyses individual and compound keywords, quantifies productivity taking into account the work distribution, estimates the impact of each article and determines the collaborations established at different scales. Keywords analysis identifies the evolution of the most important research topics in the field of cybernetics and their specificity in biological aspects, as well as the research topics with lesser interest. The analysis of productivity, impact and collaborations provides a framework to assess research activity in a specific and realistic context. The geographical and institutional distribution of publications reveals the leading countries and research centres, analysing their relation to main research journals. Moreover, collaborations analysis reveals great differences in terms of internationalization and complexity of research networks. The results of this study may be very useful for the characterization and the decisions made by research in the field of cybernetics.

  13. Large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W. Charles

    1955-01-01

    In this discussion of the methods to be used in large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents and of the results to be expected from such trials, special emphasis is laid on pertussis vaccine trials in Great Britain. After a review of the criteria for strictly controlled field studies and of the investigation of typhoid vaccines conducted in 1904-08 by the Antityphoid Committee of the British Army, the author describes the pertussis vaccine studies which have been and are now being carried by the Whooping-Cough Immunization Committee of the Medical Research Council of Great Britain. The original strictly controlled trials have been completed and the results published. Studies are now being made of vaccines prepared by different methods and evaluated both in the field and in the laboratory. Each vaccine is given to some 2000-3000 children of 4-6 months to 4 years of age. By the end of the studies 30 000-40 000 children will have been followed up for a period of two years. Since in the current studies all the children are vaccinated and none are left as unvaccinated controls, the relative and not the absolute protective value of the vaccines will be measured. PMID:13270079

  14. The CELSS research program - A brief review of recent activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Tremor, J.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Gale, J.

    1989-01-01

    The history of the Controlled Ecological Life Support System program, initiated by NASA in the late 1970s to explore the use of bioregenerative methods of life support, is reviewed. The project focused on examining the process involved in converting inorganic minerals and gases into life support materials using sunlight as the primary energy source. The research, planning, and technological development required by the CELSS program and conducted at NASA field centers, at various universities, and by commercial organizations are reviewed. Research activities at universities have focused upon exploring methods of reducing the size of the system, reducing system power requirements, understanding issues that are associated with its long-term stability, and identifying new technologies that might be useful in improving its efficiency. Research activities at Ames research center have focused on the use of common duckweed as a high biomass-producing plant, which is high in protein and on waste processing.

  15. An overview of Japanese CELSS research activities.

    PubMed

    Nitta, K

    1987-01-01

    Many research activities regarding Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) have been conducted and continued all over the world since the 1960's and the concept of CELSS is now changing from Science Fiction to Scientific Reality. Development of CELSS technology is inevitable for future long duration stays of human beings in space, for lunar base construction and for manned mars flight programs. CELSS functions can be divided into two categories, Environment Control and Material Recycling. Temperature, humidity, total atmospheric pressure and partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide, necessary for all living things, are to be controlled by the environment control function. This function can be performed by technologies already developed and used as the Environment Control Life Support System (ECLSS) of Space Shuttle and Space Station. As for material recycling, matured technologies have not yet been established for fully satisfying the specific metabolic requirements of each living thing including human beings. Therefore, research activities for establishing CELSS technology should be focused on material recycling technologies using biological systems such as plants and animals and physico-chemical systems, for example, a gas recycling system, a water purifying and recycling system and a waste management system. Based on these considerations, Japanese research activities have been conducted and will be continued under the tentative guideline of CELSS research activities as shown in documents /1/, /2/. The status of the over all activities are discussed in this paper.

  16. An overview of Japanese CELSS research activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Keiji

    Many research activities regarding Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) have been conducted and continued all over the world since the 1960's and the concept of CELSS is now changing from Science Fiction to Scientific Reality. Development of CELSS technology is inevitable for future long duration stays of human beings in space, for lunar base construction and for manned mars flight programs. CELSS functions can be divided into two categories, Environment Control and Material Recycling. Temperature, humidity, total atmospheric pressure and partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide, necessary for all living things, are to be controlled by the environment control function. This function can be performed by technologies already developed and used as the Environment Control Life Support System (ECLSS) of Space Shuttle and Space Station. As for material recycling, matured technologies have not yet been established for fully satisfying the specific metabolic requirements of each living thing including human beings. Therefore, research activities for establishing CELSS technology should be focused on material recycling technologies using biological systems such as plants and animals and physico-chemical systems, for example, a gas recycling system, a water purifying and recycling system and a waste management system. Based on these considerations, Japanese research activities have been conducted and will be continued under the tentative guideline of CELSS research activities as shown in documents /1/,/2/. The status of the over all activities are discussed in this paper.

  17. A Guide to Writing Student Laboratory and Field Research Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This document outlines the procedures to be followed in writing a field or research report. It describes the rationale behind a good report and explains the proper format and use of title, introduction, methods, data, discussion, conclusion, references, and abstract or summary elements. This guide gives aids to writing a good report. Finally, it…

  18. Longitudinal Field Research Methods for Studying Processes of Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Ven, Andrew H.; Huber, George P.

    1990-01-01

    This and the next issue of "Organization Science" contain eight papers that deal with the process of organizational change. The five papers in this issue feature the theory of method and practice of researchers engaged in longitudinal field studies aimed at understanding processes of organizational change. (MLF)

  19. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  20. Know your community: Model applications in field research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this community is to promote the application of cropping or range system models in field research to help evaluate and develop optimum agricultural systems and management to achieve long-term economic and environmental sustainability under a changing climate. Model applications to a var...

  1. Field Studies: Hands-on, Real-Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunniff, Patricia A.; McMillen, Janet L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an intensive three-week experience for 10th and 11th graders in a National Science Foundation Young Scholars Program. Two weeks of biology instruction precede one week of field research. The curriculum includes life histories of birds in the Chesapeake Bay area, reproductive ecology, aquatic ecology, entomology, and statistics. (DDR)

  2. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  3. Integrating teaching and research in the field and laboratory settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Kaseke, K. F.; Daryanto, S.; Ravi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Field observations and laboratory measurements are great ways to engage students and spark students' interests in science. Typically these observations are separated from rigorous classroom teaching. Here we assessed the potential of integrating teaching and research in the field and laboratory setting in both US and abroad and worked with students without strong science background to utilize simple laboratory equipment and various environmental sensors to conduct innovative projects. We worked with students in Namibia and two local high school students in Indianapolis to conduct leaf potential measurements, soil nutrient extraction, soil infiltration measurements and isotope measurements. The experience showed us the potential of integrating teaching and research in the field setting and working with people with minimum exposure to modern scientific instrumentation to carry out creative projects.

  4. Field and laboratory methods in human milk research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth M; Aiello, Marco O; Fujita, Masako; Hinde, Katie; Milligan, Lauren; Quinn, E A

    2013-01-01

    Human milk is a complex and variable fluid of increasing interest to human biologists who study nutrition and health. The collection and analysis of human milk poses many practical and ethical challenges to field workers, who must balance both appropriate methodology with the needs of participating mothers and infants and logistical challenges to collection and analysis. In this review, we address various collection methods, volume measurements, and ethical considerations and make recommendations for field researchers. We also review frequently used methods for the analysis of fat, protein, sugars/lactose, and specific biomarkers in human milk. Finally, we address new technologies in human milk research, the MIRIS Human Milk Analyzer and dried milk spots, which will improve the ability of human biologists and anthropologists to study human milk in field settings.

  5. Research on countermeasures to global environment change in the field of urban planning

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanaka, Takashi

    1993-12-31

    There are a lot of research themes in the field of urban planning and related fields as mitigation of global environment change. Main theme is reduction method of CO{sub 2} gas emission as a countermeasure against global warming. Some groups research on estimation of CO{sub 2} emission caused by construction activities both in building engineering and civil engineering and also on evaluation of countermeasures. They investigate reduction of CO{sub 2} emission by fossil fuel combustion and by building materials (cement, steel and so on) production process. But we cannot use data fitted to a spatial scale of urban planning. Many researches are focused on nation wide analysis. We, BRI, make a study of {open_quotes}Research on CO{sub 2} Emission in Urban Development and the Control Technologies{close_quotes} as will be seen later at 2. (2). There are two ways of research to reduce CO{sub 2} emission caused by daily activities to urban planning field. One is research on positive utilizing of natural environment in urban areas without depending to energy consuming artificial facilities. There is a research on mitigation of heat island phenomenon for instance. The other ways are research on improvement of energy consumption effect and on reusing of wasted energy In energy consuming type urban space for instance. There s a research on promoting District Heating and Cooling (DHC) and cogeneration.

  6. [Hot spots in basic research fields for gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingya

    2014-01-01

    Today, the comprehensive surgical treatment for gastrointestinal cancer is almost in the perfect stage. It is difficult to further improve the curative effect by surgery only. To improve the overall curative effect of gastrointestinal tumor, translational medicine research should be promoted in the fields of the early diagnosis, etiology and pathogenesis and comprehensive treatment. Researches of discovering the new tumor markers for early diagnosis of tumor, etiology and pathogenesis involve many aspects, including environmental factors, genetic susceptibility, variation and accumulation of genetics, and epigenetic changes, which should be transferred to new methods of treatment. This review summarizes the gastrointestinal tumor-associated hot topics in the field of basic research and its progress, and provides the clinical clues from their conversion.

  7. Engaging students in research learning experiences through hydrology field excursions and short films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Tracy; Seibert, Jan

    2015-04-01

    One of the best ways to engage students and instill enthusiasm for hydrology is to expose them to hands-on learning. A focus on hydrology field research can be used to develop context-rich and active learning, and help solidify idealized learning where students are introduced to individual processes through textbook examples, often neglecting process interactions and an appreciation for the complexity of the system. We introduced a field course where hydrological measurement techniques are used to study processes such as snow hydrology and runoff generation, while also introducing students to field research and design of their own field project. Additionally, we produced short films of each of these research-based field excursions, with in-house film expertise. These films present a short overview of field methods applied in alpine regions and will be used for our larger introductory hydrology courses, exposing students to field research at an early stage, and for outreach activities, including for potential high school students curious about hydrology. In the field course, students design a low-budget experiment with the aim of going through the different steps of a 'real' scientific project, from formulating the research question to presenting their results. During the field excursions, students make discharge measurements in several alpine streams with a salt tracer to better understand the spatial characteristics of an alpine catchment, where source waters originate and how they contribute to runoff generation. Soil moisture measurements taken by students in this field excursion were used to analyze spatial soil moisture patterns in the alpine catchment and subsequently used in a publication. Another field excursion repeats a published experiment, where preferential soil flow paths are studied using a tracer and compared to previously collected data. For each field excursion, observational data collected by the students is uploaded to an online database we

  8. Measuring scientific research in emerging nano-energy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jiancheng; Liu, Na

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively explore scientific research profiles in the field of emerging nano-energy during 1991-2012 based on bibliometrics and social network analysis. We investigate the growth pattern of research output, and then carry out across countries/regions comparisons on research performances. Furthermore, we examine scientific collaboration across countries/regions by analyzing collaborative intensity and networks in 3- to 4-year intervals. Results indicate with an impressively exponential growth pattern of nano-energy articles, the world share of scientific "giants," such as the USA, Germany, England, France and Japan, display decreasing research trends, especially in the USA. Emerging economies, including China, South Korea and India, exhibit a rise in terms of the world share, illustrating strong development momentum of these countries in nano-energy research. Strikingly, China displays a remarkable rise in scientific influence rivaling Germany, Japan, France, and England in the last few years. Finally, the scientific collaborative network in nano-energy research has expanded steadily. Although the USA and several major European countries play significantly roles on scientific collaboration, China and South Korea exert great influence on scientific collaboration in recent years. The findings imply that emerging economies can earn competitive advantages in some emerging fields by properly engaging a catch-up strategy.

  9. Plant organ chambers in plant physiology field research

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, T.R.

    1980-10-01

    Plant organ chambers used for measuring gas exchange demonstrate that with due-concern for the chamber environment and for the normal growth of the plants, useful data on physiological performance under field conditions can be collected. Recent advances in electronics, particularly the development of minicomputers and microprocessors, have greatly expanded the potential for monitoring and controlling plant organ chambers in field physiology research. These tools allow the scope of the research to be considerably broadened because many chambers can be observed essentially simultaneously and continuously on a long-term basis. The inherent limitations of artificialities and ambiguities in the data can be minimized by good control of the chamber environment and a multiplicity of chambers. While these technological advances allow intensive field physiological research, they also require a substantial commitment from the experimenter. During the data collection, a continuing, long-term effort is required to assure high quality data. Having completed the data collection, the experimenter is confronted with a very large volume of data that must be analyzed and interpreted. Yet, the rewards of these commitments appear to be an ever-increasing understanding of the physiological processes existing in plants grown under field conditions.

  10. An Automated Field Phenotyping Pipeline for Application in Grapevine Research

    PubMed Central

    Kicherer, Anna; Herzog, Katja; Pflanz, Michael; Wieland, Markus; Rüger, Philipp; Kecke, Steffen; Kuhlmann, Heiner; Töpfer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Due to its perennial nature and size, the acquisition of phenotypic data in grapevine research is almost exclusively restricted to the field and done by visual estimation. This kind of evaluation procedure is limited by time, cost and the subjectivity of records. As a consequence, objectivity, automation and more precision of phenotypic data evaluation are needed to increase the number of samples, manage grapevine repositories, enable genetic research of new phenotypic traits and, therefore, increase the efficiency in plant research. In the present study, an automated field phenotyping pipeline was setup and applied in a plot of genetic resources. The application of the PHENObot allows image acquisition from at least 250 individual grapevines per hour directly in the field without user interaction. Data management is handled by a database (IMAGEdata). The automatic image analysis tool BIVcolor (Berries in Vineyards-color) permitted the collection of precise phenotypic data of two important fruit traits, berry size and color, within a large set of plants. The application of the PHENObot represents an automated tool for high-throughput sampling of image data in the field. The automated analysis of these images facilitates the generation of objective and precise phenotypic data on a larger scale. PMID:25730485

  11. Engaging students in research learning experiences through hydrology field excursions and projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, T.; Seibert, J.

    2014-12-01

    One of the best ways to engage students and instill enthusiasm for hydrology is to expose them to hands-on learning. A focus on hydrology field research can be used to develop context-rich and active learning, and help solidify idealized learning where students are introduced to individual processes through textbook examples, often neglecting process interactions and an appreciation for the complexity of the system. We introduced a field course where hydrological measurement techniques are used to study processes such as snow hydrology and runoff generation, while also introducing students to field research and design of their own field project. In the field projects, students design a low-budget experiment with the aim of going through the different steps of a 'real' scientific project, from formulating the research question to presenting their results. In one of the field excursions, students make discharge measurements in several alpine streams with a salt tracer to better understand the spatial characteristics of an alpine catchment, where source waters originate and how they contribute to runoff generation. Soil moisture measurements taken by students in this field excursion were used to analyze spatial soil moisture patterns in the alpine catchment and subsequently used in a publication. Another field excursion repeats a published experiment, where preferential soil flow paths are studied using a tracer and compared to previously collected data. For each field excursion, observational data collected by the students is uploaded to an online database we developed, which also allows students to retrieve data from past excursions to further analyze and compare their data. At each of the field sites, weather stations were installed and a webviewer allows access to realtime data from data loggers, allowing students to explore how processes relate to climatic conditions. With in-house film expertise, these field excursions were also filmed and short virtual

  12. Vegetation and soils field research data base: Experiment summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, L. L.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding of the relationships between the optical, spectral characteristics and important biological-physical parameters of earth-surface features can best be obtained by carefully controlled studies over fields and plots where complete data describing the condition of targets are attainable and where frequent, timely spectral measurement can be obtained. Development of a vegetation and soils field research data base was initiated in 1972 at Purdue University's Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing and expanded in the fall of 1974 by NASA as part of LACIE. Since then, over 250,000 truck-mounted and helicopter-borne spectrometer/multiband radiometer observations have been obtained of more than 50 soil series and 20 species of crops, grasses, and trees. These data are supplemented by an extensive set of biophysical and meteorological data acquired during each mission. The field research data form one of the most complete and best-documented data sets acquired for agricultural remote sensing research. Thus, they are well-suited to serve as a data base for research to: (1) quantiatively determine the relationships of spectral and biophysical characteristics of vegetation, (2) define future sensor systems, and (3) develop advanced data analysis techniques.

  13. C. H. McCloy Lecture: Fifty Years of Advancements in Fitness and Activity Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 50 years progress in fitness and activity research has been influenced by social events, technical innovations, and changes in the field of physical education and kinesiology. The conventional wisdom of the 1950s yielded to a new wisdom based on research evidence. The author's research, as well as the research of others, from 1960 to…

  14. High field magnetic resonance imaging of rodents in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Laetitia; Gerber, Bernhard L; Gallez, Bernard; Po, Chrystelle; Magat, Julie; Jean-Luc, Balligand; Feron, Olivier; Moniotte, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Transgenic and gene knockout rodent models are primordial to study pathophysiological processes in cardiovascular research. Over time, cardiac MRI has become a gold standard for in vivo evaluation of such models. Technical advances have led to the development of magnets with increasingly high field strength, allowing specific investigation of cardiac anatomy, global and regional function, viability, perfusion or vascular parameters. The aim of this report is to provide a review of the various sequences and techniques available to image mice on 7-11.7 T magnets and relevant to the clinical setting in humans. Specific technical aspects due to the rise of the magnetic field are also discussed.

  15. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, Mark D.

    2008-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  16. Research plan and preliminary results - A field research site for emerging contaminants in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnoebelen, Douglas J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Barber, Larry B.; Furlong, Edward T.; Meyer, Michael; Skopec, M.

    2006-01-01

    Research has recently documented the prevalence of a wide variety of pharmaceuticals and other emerging contaminants (ECs) in streams across the United States. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been found to be an important source and collection point of ECs to streams as many ECs are incompletely removed during treatment. To investigate the complex in-stream processes (e.g., dilution, sorption, degradation, dispersion, etc.) that can affect ECs following their input from a WWTP and determining if such input is having an effect on the aquatic ecosystem requires the integration of multi-disciplinary efforts at a carefully selected field site. Preliminary work has identified an 8-km reach of Fourmile Creek in central Iowa as an ideal research site to investigate such important research questions pertaining to ECs. Unique aspects of Fourmile Creek included: (1) it single source effluent-dominated stream, (2) background data document the input of a wide variety of ECs from WWTP discharge, (3) small basin size, (4) relatively simple flow system, (5) background data suggest that undefined processes are taking place decreasing the level of select ECs during stream transport, (6) the WWTP uses a treatment technology (activated sludge) typical of many towns in Iowa and the United States (7) a hydrogeologic setting of a low-gradient, small stream (average discharge less than 1.41 m³/s) in glacial drift is typical of many areas in Iowa and across the Midwest, and (8) the existence of a low-head clam approximately 2 km upstream of the WWTP outfall allowing more accurate "above WWTP" and "below WWTP" comparisons in aquatic ecosystems. Furthermore, the WWTP is scheduled to close by 2011 providing a unique opportunity to determine how stream hydrology, water chemistry and aquatic biota react to the removal of the primary source of flow and ECs in this system. This will allow a novel "before" and "after" assessment not previously available in EC research. Research to date

  17. Do We Need More "Doing" Activities or "Thinking" Activities in the Field Practicum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mingun; Fortune, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    How do MSW students learn new professional skills in the field practicum? Does students' reflection affect the use of other learning activities during the field practicum? Students in field practica participate in activities that involve observation, doing (participatory), and conceptual linkage. In this study of MSW students, conceptual linkage…

  18. Early Environmental Field Research Career Exploration: An Analysis of Impacts on Precollege Apprentices

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Susan K.; Beyer, Katherine M.; Pérez, Maria; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    Research apprenticeships offer opportunities for deep understanding of scientific practice, transparency about research careers, and possible transformational effects on precollege youth. We examined two consecutive field-based environmental biology apprenticeship programs designed to deliver realistic career exploration and connections to research scientists. The Shaw Institute for Field Training (SIFT) program combines introductory field-skills training with research assistance opportunities, and the subsequent Tyson Environmental Research Fellowships (TERF) program provides immersive internships on university field station–based research teams. In a longitudinal mixed-methods study grounded in social cognitive career theory, changes in youth perspectives were measured during program progression from 10th grade through college, evaluating the efficacy of encouraging career path entry. Results indicate SIFT provided self-knowledge and career perspectives more aligned with reality. During SIFT, differences were found between SIFT-only participants compared with those who progressed to TERF. Transition from educational activities to fieldwork with scientists was a pivotal moment at which data showed decreased or increased interest and confidence. Continuation to TERF provided deeper relationships with role models who gave essential early-career support. Our study indicates the two-stage apprenticeship structure influenced persistence in pursuit of an environmental research career pathway. Recommendations for other precollege environmental career–exploration programs are presented. PMID:27909017

  19. Early Environmental Field Research Career Exploration: An Analysis of Impacts on Precollege Apprentices.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Susan K; Beyer, Katherine M; Pérez, Maria; Jeffe, Donna B

    2016-01-01

    Research apprenticeships offer opportunities for deep understanding of scientific practice, transparency about research careers, and possible transformational effects on precollege youth. We examined two consecutive field-based environmental biology apprenticeship programs designed to deliver realistic career exploration and connections to research scientists. The Shaw Institute for Field Training (SIFT) program combines introductory field-skills training with research assistance opportunities, and the subsequent Tyson Environmental Research Fellowships (TERF) program provides immersive internships on university field station-based research teams. In a longitudinal mixed-methods study grounded in social cognitive career theory, changes in youth perspectives were measured during program progression from 10th grade through college, evaluating the efficacy of encouraging career path entry. Results indicate SIFT provided self-knowledge and career perspectives more aligned with reality. During SIFT, differences were found between SIFT-only participants compared with those who progressed to TERF. Transition from educational activities to fieldwork with scientists was a pivotal moment at which data showed decreased or increased interest and confidence. Continuation to TERF provided deeper relationships with role models who gave essential early-career support. Our study indicates the two-stage apprenticeship structure influenced persistence in pursuit of an environmental research career pathway. Recommendations for other precollege environmental career-exploration programs are presented.

  20. Information Sharing in the Field of Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilerot, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on an extensive research project which aimed at exploring information sharing activities in a scholarly context. The paper presents and synthesises findings from a literature review and three qualitative case studies. The empirical setting is a geographically distributed Nordic network of design scholars. Method:…

  1. Magnetic-field variations and solar flare activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'eva, I. Yu.; Shakhovskaya, A. N.; Livshits, M. A.; Knyazeva, I. S.

    2012-11-01

    Solar filtergrams obtained at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory at the center and wings of the H α line are used to study variations in filaments, in particular, in arch filament systems (AFSs). These are considered as an indicator of emerging new magnetic flux, providing information about the spatial locations of magnetic-field elements. Magnetic-field maps for the active region NOAA 10030 are analyzed as an example. A method developed earlier for detecting elements of emerging flux using SOHO/MDI magnetograms indicates a close link between the increase in flare activity in theNOAA 10030 group during July 14-18, 2002 and variations in the topological disconnectedness of the magnetograms. Moreover, variations in the flare activity one day before a flare event are correlated with variations in the topological complexity of the field (the Euler characteristic) in regions with high field strengths (more than 700 G). Analysis of multi-wavelength polarization observations on the RATAN-600 radio telescope during July 13-17, 2002 indicate dominance of the radio emission above the central spot associated with the increase in flare activity. In addition to the flare site near the large spot in the group, numerous weak flares developed along an extended local neutral line, far from the central line of the large-scale field. The statistical characteristics of the magnetic-field maps analyzed were determined, and show flare activity of both types, i.e., localized in spot penumbras and above the neutral line of the field.

  2. Application research on microchannel plate in new fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhong; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) is a photoelectron multiplier as the core component of low-level light (LLL) image intensifier. MCP has two-dimensional space, time, and energy resolution, fast response time, low background noise, wide dynamic range and high gain characteristics, as well as electrons, ions, UV and soft X-ray photon detection capability directly. In recent years, with the publication of foreign advanced technology and Chinese research staff in-depth understanding of MCP's unique characteristics, the applications of MCP have extended into many new fields accordingly in China. In addition to the image intensifier, the MCP can be used in deep space exploration and scientific experiments, detecting kinds of trace rays and particles, such as pulsars navigation, nuclear simulation diagnostics, UV, EUV, neutron, neutrino detection and imaging. North Night Vision Technology Co. Ltd (NVT) as the only unit possessing MCP production capacity in China is constantly working on improving, innovation and application research on MCP technology. In this paper, based on the researches on MCP in some new fields the NVT Company has undertaken and ongoing, the technological breakthroughs and application research progresses achieved are described.

  3. A Decade of Field Changing Atmospheric Aerosol Research ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Conference: Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry, July 28 – August 2, 2013, VermontPresentation Type: PosterTitle: An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric AerosolsAuthors: Kristina M. Wagstrom1,2, Sherri W. Hunt31Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT2AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow hosted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Research3U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental ResearchA number of studies in the past decade have transformed the way we think about atmospheric aerosols. The advances include, but are not limited to, source apportionment of organics using aerosol mass spectrometer data, the volatility basis set approach, quantifying isoprene oxidation, and understanding the role of aqueous oxidation of organics on SOA formation. A series of grants funded by EPA just under ten years ago supported many of these advances. These projects make up the body of work awarded under two solicitations released by the EPA’s Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program: “Measurement, Modeling, and Analysis Methods for Airborne Carbonaceous Fine Particulate Matter” (2003) and “Source Apportionment of Particulate Matter” (2004). Our goal is to present the impact of the STAR solicitations and to show how they have pushed the field forward and led to new questions.In particular

  4. Summary of Chernobyl followup research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    In NUREG-1251, ``Implications of the Accident at Chernobyl for Safety Regulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plants in the United States,`` April 1989, the NRC staff concluded that no immediate changes in NRC`s regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors were needed; however, it recommended that certain issues be considered further. NRC`s Chernobyl followup research program consisted of the research tasks undertaken in response to the recommendations in NUREG-1251. It included 23 tasks that addressed potential lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl accident. This report presents summaries of NRC`s Chernobyl followup research tasks. For each task, the Chernobyl-related issues are indicated, the work is described, and the staff`s findings and conclusions are presented. More detailed reports concerning the work are referenced where applicable. This report closes out NRC`s Chernobyl followup research program as such, but additional research will be conducted on some issues as needed. The report includes remarks concerning significant further activity with respect to the issues addressed.

  5. Summary of Chernobyl followup research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    In NUREG-1251, Implications of the Accident at Chernobyl for Safety Regulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plants in the United States,'' April 1989, the NRC staff concluded that no immediate changes in NRC's regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors were needed; however, it recommended that certain issues be considered further. NRC's Chernobyl followup research program consisted of the research tasks undertaken in response to the recommendations in NUREG-1251. It included 23 tasks that addressed potential lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl accident. This report presents summaries of NRC's Chernobyl followup research tasks. For each task, the Chernobyl-related issues are indicated, the work is described, and the staff's findings and conclusions are presented. More detailed reports concerning the work are referenced where applicable. This report closes out NRC's Chernobyl followup research program as such, but additional research will be conducted on some issues as needed. The report includes remarks concerning significant further activity with respect to the issues addressed.

  6. Spirituality, religion, and health. An emerging research field.

    PubMed

    Miller, William R; Thoresen, Carl E

    2003-01-01

    The investigation of spiritual/religious factors in health is clearly warranted and clinically relevant. This special section explores the persistent predictive relationship between religious variables and health, and its implications for future research and practice. The section reviews epidemiological evidence linking religiousness to morbidity and mortality, possible biological pathways linking spirituality/religiousness to health, and advances in the assessment of spiritual/religious variables in research and practice. This introduction provides an overview of this field of research and addresses 3 related methodological issues: definitions of terms, approaches to statistical control, and criteria used to judge the level of supporting evidence for specific hypotheses. The study of spirituality and health is a true frontier for psychology and one with high public interest.

  7. Astronomy Education Research: A Review of the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    Despite astronomy's widespread inclusion in curricula prior to the 20th century, educational research in astronomy is a relatively new endeavor. To date there are no dedicated paper journals for astronomy education research, although the new electronic Astronomy Education Review (http://aer.noao.edu) has recently released its first issue. As the field of astronomy education research grows - and it is doing so with leaps and bounds - many may find it useful to know what has been done so far. The new SABER database (http://www.cdes-astro.com/saber) represents an ongoing and collaborative attempt for the astronomy education community to collect and summarize the highly dispersed literature on astronomy education research, although it is not yet complete. Starting with and expanding beyond this database, a systematic review and classification of the literature was performed. Some of the recurring research themes that emerged from this review include: student beliefs and misconceptions; collaborative learning; the large lecture classroom; and education in planetaria. Key studies in these areas are described and a detailed bibliography is presented.

  8. Global rhythmic activities in hippocampal neural fields and neural coding.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Global oscillations of the neural field represent some of the most interesting expressions of the hippocampal activity, being related also to learning and memory. To study oscillatory activities of the CA3 field in theta range, a model of this sub-field of Hippocampus has been formulated. The model describes the firing activity of CA3 neuronal populations within the frame of a kinetic theory of neural systems and it has been used for computer simulations. The results show that the propagation of activities induced in the neural field by hippocampal afferents occurs only in narrow time windows confined by inhibitory barrages, whose time-course follows the theta rhythm. Moreover, during each period of a theta wave, the entire CA3 field bears a firing activity with peculiar space-time patterns, a sort of specific imprint, which can induce effects with similar patterns on brain regions driven by the hippocampal formation. The simulation has also demonstrated the ability of medial septum to influence the global activity of the CA3 pyramidal population through the control of the population of inhibitory interneurons. At last, the possible involvement of global population oscillations in neural coding has been discussed.

  9. A wide bandwidth electrostatic field sensor for lightning research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaepfel, K. P.

    1986-01-01

    Data obtained from UHF Radar observation of direct-lightning strikes to the NASA F-106B airplane have indicated that most of the 690 strikes acquired during direct-strike lightning tests were triggered by the aircraft. As an aid in understanding the triggered lightning process, a wide bandwidth electric field measuring system was designed for the F-106B by implementing a clamped-detection signal processing concept originated at the Air Force Cambridge Research Lab in 1953. The detection scheme combines the signals from complementary stator pairs clamped to zero volts at the exact moment when each stator pair is maximally shielded by the rotor, a process that restores the dc level lost by the charge amplifier. The new system was implemented with four shutter-type field mills located at strategic points on the airplane. The bandwidth of the new system was determined in the laboratory to be from dc to over 100 Hz, whereas past designs had upper limits of 10 Hz to 100 Hz. To obtain the undisturbed electric field vector and total aircraft charge, the airborne field mill system is calibrated by using techniques involving results from ground and flight calibrations of the F-106B, laboratory tests of a metallized model, and a finite-difference time-domain electromagnetic computer code.

  10. A wide bandwidth electrostatic field sensor for lightning research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaepfel, Klaus P.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from UHF radar observation of direct-lightning strikes to the NASA F-106B aircraft have indicated that most of the 690 strikes acquired during direct-strike lightning tests were triggered by the aircraft. As an aid in understanding the triggered lightning process, a wide bandwidth electric field measuring system was designed for the F-106B by implementing a clamped-detection signal processing concept originated at the Air Force Cambridge Research Lab in 1953. The detection scheme combines the signals from complementary stator pairs clamped to zero bolts at the exact moment when each stator pair is maximally shielded by the rotor, a process that restores the dc level lost by the charge amplifier. The system was implemented with four shutter-type field mills located at strategic points on the aircraft. The bandwidth of the system was determined in the laboratory to be from dc to over 100 Hz, whereas past designs had upper limits of 10 to 100 Hz. To obtain the undisturbed electric field vector and total aircraft charge, the airborne field mill system is calibrated by using techniques involving results from ground and flight calibrations of the F-106B, laboratory tests of a metallized model, and a finite difference time-domain electromagnetic computer code.

  11. Background magnetic fields during last three cycles of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andryeyeva, O. A.; Stepanian, N. N.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes our studies of evolution of the solar magnetic field with different sign and field strength in the range from -100 G to 100 G. The structure and evolution of large-scale magnetic fields on the Sun during the last 3 cycles of solar activity is investigated using magnetograph data from the Kitt Peak Solar Observatory. This analysis reveals two groups of the large-scale magnetic fields evolving differently during the cycles. The first group is represented by relatively weak background fields, and is best observed in the range of 3-10 Gauss. The second group is represented by stronger fields of 75-100 Gauss. The spatial and temporal properties of these groups are described and compared with the total magnetic flux. It is shown that the anomalous behaviour of the total flux during the last cycle can be found only in the second group

  12. NASA's university program: Active grants and research contracts, fiscal year 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Active university research projects for Fiscal Year 1975 are reported by state, and foreign country. Cross indexes by: (1) grant/contract number; (2) field of science and engineering; (3) technical officer location; and (4) RTOP are included.

  13. About soil cover heterogeneity of agricultural research stations' experimental fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannik, Kaire; Kõlli, Raimo; Kukk, Liia

    2013-04-01

    Depending on local pedo-ecological conditions (topography, (geo) diversity of soil parent material, meteorological conditions) the patterns of soil cover and plant cover determined by soils are very diverse. Formed in the course of soil-plant mutual relationship, the natural ecosystems are always influenced to certain extent by the other local soil forming conditions or they are site specific. The agricultural land use or the formation of agro-ecosystems depends foremost on the suitability of soils for the cultivation of feed and food crops. As a rule, the most fertile or the best soils of the area, which do not present any or present as little as possible constraints for agricultural land use, are selected for this purpose. Compared with conventional field soils, the requirements for the experimental fields' soil cover quality are much higher. Experimental area soils and soil cover composition should correspond to local pedo-ecological conditions and, in addition to that, represent the soil types dominating in the region, whereas the fields should be as homogeneous as possible. The soil cover heterogeneity of seven arable land blocks of three research stations (Jõgeva, Kuusiku and Olustvere) was studied 1) by examining the large scale (1:10 000) digital soil map (available via the internet), and 2) by field researches using the transect method. The stages of soils litho-genetic and moisture heterogeneities were estimated by using the Estonian normal soils matrix, however, the heterogeneity of top- and subsoil texture by using the soil texture matrix. The quality and variability of experimental fields' soils humus status, was studied more thoroughly from the aspect of humus concentration (g kg-1), humus cover thickness (cm) and humus stocks (Mg ha-1). The soil cover of Jõgeva experimental area, which presents an accumulative drumlin landscape (formed during the last glacial period), consist from loamy Luvisols and associated to this Cambisols. In Kuusiku area

  14. Airborne water vapor DIAL research: System development and field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Chyba, Thomas H.; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurement of water vapor (H2O) and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. The airborne H2O DIAL system was flight tested aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Electra aircraft in three separate field deployments between 1989 and 1991. Atmospheric measurements were made under a variety of atmospheric conditions during the flight tests, and several modifications were implemented during this development period to improve system operation. A brief description of the system and major modifications will be presented, and the most significant atmospheric observations will be described.

  15. [Activities of Bay Area Research Corporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    During the final year of this effort the HALFSHEL code was converted to work on a fast single processor workstation from it s parallel configuration. This was done because NASA Ames NAS facility stopped supporting space science and we no longer had access to parallel computer time. The single processor version of HALFSHEL was upgraded to address low density cells by using a a 3-D SOR solver to solve the equation Delta central dot E = 0. We then upgraded the ionospheric load packages to provide a multiple species load of the ionosphere out to 1.4 Rm. With these new tools we began to perform a series of simulations to address the major topic of this research effort; determining the loss rate of O(sup +) and O2(sup +) from Mars. The simulations used the nominal Parker spiral field and in one case used a field perpendicular to the solar wind flow. The simulations were performed for three different solar EUV fluxes consistent with the different solar evolutionary states believed to exist before today. The 1 EUV case is the nominal flux of today. The 3 EUV flux is called Epoch 2 and has three times the flux of todays. The 6 EUV case is Epoch 3 and has 6 times the EUV flux of today.

  16. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  17. The Animal Exhibits at the Field Museum. Activities for Focused Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickland, Thomas, J.

    Museum visits allow students to see animals from South America, North America, Africa, Asia, and the North Pole without rain, snow, or mosquitoes. This activity guide was developed for teachers, chaperones, and students to use with the animal exhibits in the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Wing of the Field Museum of Chicago. Activities are designed for…

  18. An overview of Japanese CELSS research activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Keiji

    1987-01-01

    Development of Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) technology is inevitable for future long duration stays of human beings in space, for lunar base construction and for manned Mars flight programs. CELSS functions can be divided into 2 categories, Environmental Control and Material Recycling. Temperature, humidity, total atmospheric pressure and partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide, necessary for all living things, are to be controlled by the environment control function. This function can be performed by technologies already developed and used as the Environment Control Life Support System (ECLSS) of Space Shuttle and Space Station. As for material recycling, matured technologies have not yet been established for fully satisfying the specific metabolic requirements of each living thing including human beings. Therefore, research activities for establishing CELSS technology should be focused on material recycling technologies using biological systems such as plants and animals and physico-chemical systems, for example, a gas recycling system, a water purifying and recycling system and a waste management system. Japanese research activities were conducted and will be continued accordingly.

  19. Positive Activities: Qualitative Research with Parents. Solutions Research. Research Report. DCSF-RR142

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Children, Schools and Families, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This research was commissioned by COI and DCSF to understand in depth, the barriers, motivators and messages for parents to encourage participation in positive activities for young people. Within this the research was designed to understand the level of influence of parents in whether a young person participates/what a young person might…

  20. Enormous enhancement of electric field in active gold nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shu-Min; Wu, Da-Jian; Wu, Xue-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2014-04-01

    The electric field enhancement properties of an active gold nanoshell with gain material inside have been investigated by using Mie theory. As the gain coefficient of the inner core increases to a critical value, a super-resonance appears in the active gold nanoshell, and enormous enhancements of the electric fields can be found near the surface of the particle. With increasing shell thickness, the critical value of the gain coefficient for the super-resonance of the active gold nanoshell first decreases and then increases, and the corresponding surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor (G factor) also first increases and then decreases. The optimized active gold nanoshell can be obtained with an extremely high SERS G factor of the order of 1019-1020. Such an optimized active gold nanoshell possesses a high-efficiency SERS effect and may be useful for single-molecule detection.

  1. Research on USMC Marksmanship Training Assessment Tools, Instructional Simulations, and Qualitative Field-Based Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-10

    delivery of remedial training through the instructional simulations. ONR is also funding CHI Systems, Inc. to conduct field-based qualitative ... research on Navy and Marine Corps DL implementations to develop practical guidelines and procedures to support effective DL employment in the Navy and Marine Corps.

  2. The universe of activity that is bioengineering research.

    PubMed

    Cohn, T E

    2004-01-01

    What is bioengineering? A concise and meaningful answer to this question is important for pedagogy. This paper demonstrates that research activity within 'bioengineering' resides in a multidimensional space. A specific study can be characterized by an area into which it falls, a problem that it attacks, a specific level of analysis, a species of focus, pertinent disciplines, relevant tools that are employed, and temporal features. Each represents a dimension of the universe and each dimension may be shown to be largely orthogonal to every other dimension. The universe thus defined is sparsely populated. Accordingly, bioengineering is a field of rich opportunity within which frontiers lie almost everywhere.

  3. Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, Jens

    2012-09-01

    While the United States research program for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste over the past decades focused solely on an open tunnel emplacement in unsaturated densely fractured tuff, several international organizations have made significant progress in the characterization and performance evaluation of other disposal design options and host rock characteristics, most of which were very different from those studied in the U.S. As a result, areas of direct collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) and international geologic disposal programs were quite limited during that time. Recently, the decision by DOE to no longer pursue the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel at the Yucca Mountain site has shifted the nation’s focus to disposal design options and geologic environments similar to those being investigated by other nations. DOE started to recognize that close international collaboration is a beneficial and costeffective strategy for advancing disposal science and, in FY12, embarked on a comprehensive effort to identify international collaboration opportunities, to interact with international organizations and advance promising collaborations, and to plan/develop specific R&D activities in cooperation with international partners. This report describes the active collaboration opportunities available to U.S. researchers as a result of this effort, and presents specific cooperative research activities that have been recently initiated within DOE’s disposal research program. The focus in this report is on those opportunities that provide access to field data (and respective interpretation/modeling), and/or may allow participation in ongoing and planned field experiments.

  4. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers.

    PubMed

    Roach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals' pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers.

  5. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discourage entrepreneurship, from approximately 3% in engineering to approximately 12% in the life sciences. Within fields, there is no difference between labs that encourage entrepreneurship and those that do not with respect to basic research activity and the number of publications. At the same time, labs that encourage entrepreneurship are significantly more likely to report invention disclosures, particularly in engineering where such labs are 41% more likely to disclose inventions. With respect to career pathways, PhDs students in labs that encourage entrepreneurship do not differ from other PhDs in their interest in academic careers, but they are 87% more likely to be interested in careers in entrepreneurship and 44% more likely to work in a startup after graduation. These results persist even when accounting for individuals’ pre-PhD interest in entrepreneurship and the encouragement of other non-academic industry careers. PMID:28178270

  6. How Much Energy Can Be Stored in Solar Active Region Magnetic Fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, J.; Downs, C.; Torok, T.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Major solar eruptions such as X-class flares and very fast coronal mass ejections usually originate in active regions on the Sun. The energy that powers these events is believed to be stored as free magnetic energy (energy above the potential field state) prior to eruption. While coronal magnetic fields are not in general force-free, active regions have very strong magnetic fields and at low coronal heights the plasma beta is therefore very small, making the field (in equilibrium) essentially force-free. The Aly-Sturrock theorem shows that the energy of a fully force-free field cannot exceed the energy of the so-called open field. If the theorem holds, this places an upper limit on the amount of free energy that can be stored: the maximum free energy (MFE) is the difference between the open field energy and the potential field energy of the active region. In thermodynamic MHD simulations of a major eruption (the July 14, 2000 'Bastille' day event) and a modest event (February 13, 2009, we have found that the MFE indeed bounds the energy stored prior to eruption. We compute the MFE for major eruptive events in cycles 23 and 24 to investigate the maximum amount of energy that can be stored in solar active regions.Research supported by AFOSR, NASA, and NSF.

  7. Popularization activities for young children of the scientific activity in the field of environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Auguste; Le Gueut, Marie-Agathe; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Research projects now rely on various pillars which include of course high level science and equipments, and also communication, outreach and educational activities. This paper focuses on education for young children and present activities that aim at helping them (and their parents!) to grasp some of the complex underlying scientific issues in the field of environment. More generally it helps children to get familiarized with science and scientists, with the hope of enhancing scientific culture and promoting careers in this field. The activities which are part of the popularization effort of the NEW Interreg IV RainGain project (www.raingain.eu) : - Experiments led in classrooms of kinder garden to design and test a disdrometer made of a plate and flour or oil to observe the diversity of rain drop sizes. It simply consists in putting a bit (roughly 1 mm depth) of flour or oil in a plate. The features of the devices based either flour or oil were first studied inside with artificial drops. Then it was tested outside under actual rain. - The writing of scientific book with and for children aged 8-9 years with the help of the editor of the collection. The process leading to the final book is splat in three main successive steps: (i) A 1.5 h interactive session with the researcher and a class of 8-9 year children. They are simply given the general topic of the book few hours before and ask all the questions they have on it and get some answers; (ii) The researcher writes a book in which all the questions raised by children are answered (at least partially). The scientific elements should be inserted in a lively story with few characters. The story should be more than a simple dialogue; a genuine fiction should take place and come first so that children do not even notice they are understanding and learning; (iii) Once children have read the book, there is a second session to get some feedback and possibly edit the manuscript (altering a character, adding some

  8. Holocene eolian activity in the Minot dune field, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Been, J.; Mahan, S.A.; Burdett, J.; Skipp, G.; Rowland, Z.M.

    1997-01-01

    Stabilized eolian sand is common over much of the Great Plains region of the United States and Canada, including a subhumid area of ??? 1500 km2 near Minot, North Dakota. Eolian landforms consist of sand sheets and northwest-trending parabolic dunes. Dunes and sand sheets in the Minot field are presently stabilized by a cover of prairie grasses or oak woodland. Stratigraphic studies and accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of paleosols indicate at least two periods of eolian sand movement in the late Holocene. Pedologic data suggest that all of the dune field has experienced late Holocene dune activity, though not all parts of the dune field may have been active simultaneously. Similar immobile element (Ti, Zr, La, Ce) concentrations support the interpretation that eolian sands are derived from local glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments. However, glaciolacustrine and glaciofluvial source sediments have high Ca concentrations from carbonate minerals, whereas dune sands are depleted in Ca. Because noneolian-derived soils in the area are calcareous, these data indicate that the Minot dune field may have had extended periods of activity in the Holocene, such that eolian abrasion removed soft carbonate minerals. The southwest-facing parts of some presently stabilized dunes were active during the 1930s drought, but were revegetated during the wetter years of the 1940s. These observations indicate that severe droughts accompanied by high temperatures are the most likely cause of Holocene eolian activity.

  9. The Lamont-Doherty Secondary School Field Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Shaw, A.

    2007-12-01

    Three years ago the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory instituted an educational outreach program with several New York City high schools. The schools all serve lower-income students (greater than 90 percent Title 1 eligible), and are focused on the STEM disciplines as potentially "leveling" areas, where motivated students can make up ground if properly supported. The program enlists high school teachers and several of their students to work alongside Lamont scientists on funded research programs that have a local (NYC/Hudson Valley) field and/or laboratory measurement component. The program runs full-time for 6 weeks in the summer and continues through laboratory visits and enhanced curriculum during the school year. Preliminary results are positive: teachers report that the program has deepened their curriculum; heightened their enthusiasm; and expanded their view of their students' potential. Nearly all of the participating students are college bound, and several are working their way through their freshmen year in college as laboratory technicians. In addition, the participating teachers and students have been able to collect large numbers of samples in the Hudson estuary, contributing concretely to funded research there. Lessons learned and best practices will be discussed for expanding such partnerships, with a focus on issues faced by partnerships between research scientists and public school science programs in urban areas.

  10. Advancing the field of health systems research synthesis.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Etienne V; Ranson, Michael K; Bärnighausen, Till; Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Daniels, Karen; El-Jardali, Fadi; Ghaffar, Abdul; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Haines, Andy; Lavis, John N; Lewin, Simon; Meng, Qingyue; Oliver, Sandy; Pantoja, Tomás; Straus, Sharon; Shemilt, Ian; Tovey, David; Tugwell, Peter; Waddington, Hugh; Wilson, Mark; Yuan, Beibei; Røttingen, John-Arne

    2015-07-10

    Those planning, managing and working in health systems worldwide routinely need to make decisions regarding strategies to improve health care and promote equity. Systematic reviews of different kinds can be of great help to these decision-makers, providing actionable evidence at every step in the decision-making process. Although there is growing recognition of the importance of systematic reviews to inform both policy decisions and produce guidance for health systems, a number of important methodological and evidence uptake challenges remain and better coordination of existing initiatives is needed. The Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research, housed within the World Health Organization, convened an Advisory Group on Health Systems Research (HSR) Synthesis to bring together different stakeholders interested in HSR synthesis and its use in decision-making processes. We describe the rationale of the Advisory Group and the six areas of its work and reflects on its role in advancing the field of HSR synthesis. We argue in favour of greater cross-institutional collaborations, as well as capacity strengthening in low- and middle-income countries, to advance the science and practice of health systems research synthesis. We advocate for the integration of quasi-experimental study designs in reviews of effectiveness of health systems intervention and reforms. The Advisory Group also recommends adopting priority-setting approaches for HSR synthesis and increasing the use of findings from systematic reviews in health policy and decision-making.

  11. Update on U.S.EPA Cookstove Research Activities

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation includes background information on EPA's stove research, focuses on cookstove testing for air pollutant emissions and energy efficiency, and briefly describes current research activities. Ongoing activities are highlighted, and EPA contacts are provided.

  12. E region electric field dependence of the solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, C. M.; Moro, J.; Resende, L. C. A.; Chen, S. S.; Schuch, N. J.; Costa, J. E. R.

    2015-10-01

    We have being studying the zonal and vertical E region electric field components inferred from the Doppler shifts of type 2 echoes (gradient drift irregularities) detected with the 50 MHz backscatter coherent radar set at São Luis, Brazil (SLZ, 2.3°S, 44.2°W) during the solar cycle 24. In this report we present the dependence of the vertical and zonal components of this electric field with the solar activity, based on the solar flux F10.7. For this study we consider the geomagnetically quiet days only (Kp ≤ 3+). A magnetic field-aligned-integrated conductivity model was developed for proving the conductivities, using the IRI-2007, the MISIS-2000, and the IGRF-11 models as input parameters for ionosphere, neutral atmosphere, and Earth magnetic field, respectively. The ion-neutron collision frequencies of all the species are combined through the momentum transfer collision frequency equation. The mean zonal component of the electric field, which normally ranged from 0.19 to 0.35 mV/m between the 8 and 18 h (LT) in the Brazilian sector, show a small dependency with the solar activity. Whereas the mean vertical component of the electric field, which normally ranges from 4.65 to 10.12 mV/m, highlights the more pronounced dependency of the solar flux.

  13. Research of microwave scattering properties of snow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelakos, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results obtained in the research program of microwave scattering properties of snow fields are presented. Experimental results are presented showing backscatter dependence on frequency (5.8-8.0 GHz), angle of incidence (0-60 degrees), snow wetness (time of day), and frequency modulation (0-500 MHz). Theoretical studies are being made of the inverse scattering problem yielding some preliminary results concerning the determination of the dielectric constant of the snow layer. The experimental results lead to the following conclusions: snow layering affects backscatter, layer response is significant up to 45 degrees of incidence, wetness modifies snow layer effects, frequency modulation masks the layer response, and for the proper choice of probing frequency and for nominal snow depths, it appears to be possible to measure the effective dielectric constant and the corresponding water content of a snow pack.

  14. Annals of conflicting results: looking back on electromagnetic field research.

    PubMed

    Schoen, D

    1996-11-15

    Few environmental health issues are as contentious as the question of whether exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from power lines increases cancer risk. Among the many actors in this controversy, epidemiologists have played the leading role in raising the question and motivating research. Epidemiologic studies of the effects of exposure to power-line EMFs include the investigation by Dr. Gilles Thériault and colleagues into incidence rates of cancer among electric-utility workers in Quebec, Ontario and France. With the development of personal dosimeters to measure exposure to electric, magnetic and pulsed EMFs, occupational studies in the 1990s have made an important methodologic advance. But, as Thériault explains, improvements in assessing exposure have not yet translated into clear and consistent findings.

  15. The connection between stellar activity cycles and magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Boro Saikia, S.; Bouvier, J.; Fares, R.; Folsom, C. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Moutou, C.; do Nascimento, J. D.; Petit, P.; Waite, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    Zeeman-Doppler imaging (ZDI) has successfully mapped the large-scale magnetic fields of stars over a large range of spectral types, rotation periods and ages. When observed over multiple epochs, some stars show polarity reversals in their global magnetic fields. On the Sun, polarity reversals are a feature of its activity cycle. In this paper, we examine the magnetic properties of stars with existing chromospherically determined cycle periods. Previous authors have suggested that cycle periods lie on multiple branches, either in the cycle period-Rossby number plane or the cycle period-rotation period plane. We find some evidence that stars along the active branch show significant average toroidal fields that exhibit large temporal variations while stars exclusively on the inactive branch remain dominantly poloidal throughout their entire cycle. This lends credence to the idea that different shear layers are in operation along each branch. There is also evidence that the short magnetic polarity switches observed on some stars are characteristic of the inactive branch while the longer chromospherically determined periods are characteristic of the active branch. This may explain the discrepancy between the magnetic and chromospheric cycle periods found on some stars. These results represent a first attempt at linking global magnetic field properties obtained from ZDI and activity cycles.

  16. Sensing network for electromagnetic fields generated by seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Bambakidis, Gust; Ternovskiy, Igor V.

    2014-06-01

    The sensors network is becoming prolific and play now increasingly more important role in acquiring and processing information. Cyber-Physical Systems are focusing on investigation of integrated systems that includes sensing, networking, and computations. The physics of the seismic measurement and electromagnetic field measurement requires special consideration how to design electromagnetic field measurement networks for both research and detection earthquakes and explosions along with the seismic measurement networks. In addition, the electromagnetic sensor network itself could be designed and deployed, as a research tool with great deal of flexibility, the placement of the measuring nodes must be design based on systematic analysis of the seismic-electromagnetic interaction. In this article, we review the observations of the co-seismic electromagnetic field generated by earthquakes and man-made sources such as vibrations and explosions. The theoretical investigation allows the distribution of sensor nodes to be optimized and could be used to support existing geological networks. The placement of sensor nodes have to be determined based on physics of electromagnetic field distribution above the ground level. The results of theoretical investigations of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena are considered in Section I. First, we compare the relative contribution of various types of mechano-electromagnetic mechanisms and then analyze in detail the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by piezomagnetic and electrokinetic effects.

  17. Twist of Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongqi; Bao, Shudong; Kuzanyan, Kirill M.

    2002-05-01

    We study the twist properties of photospheric magnetic fields in solar active regions using magnetographic data on 422 active regions obtained at the Huairou Solar Observing Station in 1988 1997. We calculate the mean twist (force-free field αf) of the active regions and compare it with the mean current-helicity density of these same active regions, h c =B ∥·(∇×B)∥. The latitude and longitude distributions and time dependence of these quantities is analyzed. These parameters represent two different tracers of the α effect in dynamo theory, so we might expect them to possess similar properties. However, apart from differences in their definitions, they also display differences associated with the technique used to recalculate the magnetographic data and with their different physical meanings. The distributions of the mean αf and h c both show hemispherical asymmetry—negative (positive) values in the northern (southern) hemisphere—although this tendency is stronger for h c. One reason for these differences may be the averaging procedure, when twists of opposite sign in regions with weak fields make a small contribution to the mean current-helicity density. Such transequatorial regularity is in agreement with the expectations of dynamo theory. In some active regions, the average αf and h c do not obey this transequatorial rule. As a whole, the mean twist of the magnetic fields αf of active regions does not vary significantly with the solar cycle. Active regions that do not follow the general behavior for αf do not show any appreciable tendency to cluster at certain longitudes, in contrast to results for h c noted in previous studies. We analyze similarities and differences in the distributions of these two quantities. We conclude that using only one of these tracers, such as αf, to search for signatures of the α effect can have disadvantages, which should be taken into account in future studies.

  18. Consumer involvement in research projects: the activities of research funders.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Máire; Entwistle, Vikki

    2004-08-01

    This paper reports findings from a postal questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews with UK funders of health-related research that explored whether, why and how they promote consumer involvement in research projects. Many UK funders of health-related research are adopting a policy of promoting consumer involvement in research projects. Telephone interviews revealed they have several reasons for doing so, and that they vary in the ways they encourage and support researchers to involve consumers. For some, descriptions of consumer involvement in a research proposal are important for project funding decisions. They recognized a need for flexibility when assessing consumer involvement in different contexts. We suggest that funders should continue to work to clarify what they consider to be the parameters of acceptability in terms of consumer involvement and ensure that 'flexible' criteria are fairly applied. Researchers should be aware of particular funders' views when applying for project funding.

  19. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  20. 20 CFR 401.165 - Statistical and research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Statistical and research activities. 401.165... RECORDS AND INFORMATION Disclosure of Official Records and Information § 401.165 Statistical and research activities. (a) General. Statistical and research activities often do not require information in a...

  1. 20 CFR 401.165 - Statistical and research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Statistical and research activities. 401.165... RECORDS AND INFORMATION Disclosure of Official Records and Information § 401.165 Statistical and research activities. (a) General. Statistical and research activities often do not require information in a...

  2. 20 CFR 401.165 - Statistical and research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Statistical and research activities. 401.165... RECORDS AND INFORMATION Disclosure of Official Records and Information § 401.165 Statistical and research activities. (a) General. Statistical and research activities often do not require information in a...

  3. 20 CFR 401.165 - Statistical and research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Statistical and research activities. 401.165... RECORDS AND INFORMATION Disclosure of Official Records and Information § 401.165 Statistical and research activities. (a) General. Statistical and research activities often do not require information in a...

  4. 20 CFR 401.165 - Statistical and research activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statistical and research activities. 401.165... RECORDS AND INFORMATION Disclosure of Official Records and Information § 401.165 Statistical and research activities. (a) General. Statistical and research activities often do not require information in a...

  5. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua; Parker, Jack; Brandt, Craig; Holladay, Susan; Wolfe, Amy; Bogle, Mary Anna; Lowe, Kenneth; Hyder, Kirk

    2006-06-01

    The Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge (Fig. 1), Tennessee supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) goal of understanding the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites for new solutions to environmental remediation and long-term stewardship. In particular, the FRC provides the opportunity for researchers to conduct studies that promote the understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of existing remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies. It offers a series of contaminated sites around the former S-3 Waste Disposal Ponds and uncontaminated sites in which investigators and students conduct field research or collect samples for laboratory analysis. FRC research also spurs the development of new and improved characterization and monitoring tools. Site specific knowledge gained from research conducted at the FRC also provides the DOE-Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) the critical scientific knowledge needed to make cleanup decisions for the S-3 Ponds and other sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR).

  6. The magnetic field of gastrointestinal smooth muscle activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Alan; Ladipo, Jk; Richards, William; Wikswo, John

    1997-11-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract controls the absorption and transport of ingested materials. Its function is determined largely by the electrical activity of the smooth muscle that lines the GI tract. GI electrical activity consists of an omnipresent slowly oscillating wave known as the basic electrical rhythm (BER) that modulates a higher-frequency spiking activity associated with muscle contraction. The BER has been shown to be a reliable indicator of intestinal viability, and thus, recording of smooth muscle activity may have clinical value. The BER is difficult to measure with cutaneous electrodes because layers of low-conductivity fat between the GI tract and the abdominal surface attenuate the potential. On the other hand, the magnetic field associated with GI electrical activity is mostly unaffected by intervening fat layers. We recorded the magnetic fields from GI activity in 12 volunteers using a multichannel Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer. Characteristics typical of gastric and intestinal BER were apparent in the data. Channels near the epigastrium recorded gastric BER, and channels in intestinal areas recorded small bowel BER. These results suggest that a single multichannel SQUID magnetometer is able to measure gastrointestinal electrical activity from multiple locations around the abdomen simultaneously.

  7. Mathematics Education as a Field of Research: Have We Become Too Comfortable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrie, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics education is highly regarded as a research field within our region, especially when compared to other fields within the broader education discipline. The field has been relatively cohesive, well organised and internationally influential in a universally strong field. Mathematics education research has developed and evolved in…

  8. The Shape of Research in the Field of Higher Education and Graduate Employment: Some Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Brenda

    2003-01-01

    Offers a critical evaluation of research in the field of graduate employment in the United Kingdom. Probes the shape of the graduate employment literature and queries some taken-for-granted norms in the field. Explores issues such as the forces shaping research in the field, the foci of the research, and the scholarly and methodological…

  9. Conceptualising Higher Education Research and/or Academic Development as "Fields": A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This paper calls into question the idea that we can simply think about higher education as a research field and explores different meanings of the term field. It asks whether there are related fields: research into higher education, academic development and disciplinary teaching research, rather than one. The approach of the paper is conceptual,…

  10. Active experiments in the ionosphere and geomagnetic field variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, V. P.; Cherneva, N. V.; Khomutov, S. Y.; Serovetnikov, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Variations of ionospheric-magnetospheric relation energy, as one of the possible outer climatology factors, may be traced on the basis of analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Experiments on active impact on the ionosphere have been carried out for quite a long time in Russia as well. The most modern heating stand is located in Alaska; it has been used within the HAARP Program. The possibility of this stand to affect geophysical fields, in particular, the geomagnetic field is of interest.

  11. Plant genome size research: a field in focus.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M D; Leitch, I J

    2005-01-01

    This Special Issue contains 18 papers arising from presentations at the Second Plant Genome Size Workshop and Discussion Meeting (hosted by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 8-12 September, 2003). This preface provides an overview of these papers, setting their key contents in the broad framework of this highly active field. It also highlights a few overarching issues with wide biological impact or interest, including (1) the need to unify terminology relating to C-value and genome size, (2) the ongoing quest for accurate gold standards for accurate plant genome size estimation, (3) how knowledge of species' DNA amounts has increased in recent years, (4) the existence, causes and significance of intraspecific variation, (5) recent progress in understanding the mechanisms and evolutionary patterns of genome size change, and (6) the impact of genome size knowledge on related biological activities such as genetic fingerprinting and quantitative genetics. The paper offers a vision of how increased knowledge and understanding of genome size will contribute to holisitic genomic studies in both plants and animals in the next decade.

  12. International Permafrost Field Courses in Siberia: the Synthesis of Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablyazina, D.; Boitsov, A.; Grebenets, V.; Kaverin, D.; Klene, A.; Kurchatova, A.; Pfeiffer, E. M.; Zschocke, A.; Shiklomanov, N.; Streletskiy, D.

    2009-04-01

    During summers of 2007 and 2008 a series of International University Courses on Permafrost (IUCP) were conducted in West Siberia, Russia. Courses were organized as part of the International Permafrost Association (IPA) International Polar Year activities. The North of West Siberia region was selected to represent diverse permafrost, climatic and landscape conditions. The courses were jointly organized by the Moscow State University (MSU) and the Tumen' Oil and Gas University (TOGU) with the help from German and U.S. institutions. The program attracted undergraduate and graduate students with diverse interests and backgrounds from Germany, Russia and the U.S. and involved instructors specializing in different aspects of permafrost research. Courses were designed to address three major topics of permafrost-related research: a) permafrost environments characteristic of the discontinuous and continuous zones; b) field instrumentation and techniques; c) permafrost engineering and problems of development in permafrost regions. Methodologically, courses consisted of systematic permafrost investigations at long-term monitoring sites and survey-type expeditions. Systematic, process-based investigations were conducted at a network of sites which constitute the TEPO established by TOGU in collaboration with the gas company NadymGasProm. The observation complex includes an array of 30-m deep boreholes equipped with automatic data collection systems and representing characteristic permafrost landscapes of West Siberia. Boreholes are complemented by sites for snow cover, vegetation, soil, ground ice, and geomorphologic investigations. As part of student research activities, four new Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites were established in proximity to boreholes for monitoring spatial distribution and long-term dynamic of the active layer. New sites represent diverse landscapes characteristic of the West Siberian previously underrepresented in the CALM network

  13. Elucidating GPR Response to Biological Activity: Field and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Schillig, P. C.; McGlashan, M. A.; Roberts, J. A.; Devlin, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of “biogeophysics”. The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present field and laboratory experiments that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to further assess radar response to biomass growth. The first experiment monitored GPR wave transmission through a water-saturated quartz-sand reactor during the course of enhanced biostimulation. Radar wave velocity initially decreased as a result of bacterial activity and subsequently increased rapidly as biogenic gas formed in the pore space. Radar signal attenuation increased during the course of the experiment as a result of an

  14. Action Research as a Professional Development Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Reflective teachers are always searching for ways to improve their teaching. When this reflection becomes intentional and systematic, they are engaging in teacher research. This type of research, sometimes called "action research", can help bridge the gap between theory and practice by addressing topics that are relevant to practicing teachers.…

  15. National research and development program in the energy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    Scientific, technological, and economic criteria were established to clarify, in a total context, the choices open to Belgium in meeting the energy crisis and in reducing dependence on foreign sources of fuels and strategic materials. Mathematical models were developed to describe the energy supply and demand in both the industrial and residential sectors. For the period from 1982 to 1987, activities concentrate on analyzing the energy system; determining reasonable use of energy in all sectors; investigating fossil energy and the energetic vectors of substitution and biomass; automating processes for the production of solar cells and the development solar receivers and photovoltaic systems; and recycling and stockpiling strategic materials. A documentation center was established to evaluate national and international research results.

  16. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  17. 76 FR 12717 - Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Field Initiated (FI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program; Field Initiated (FI) Projects; Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers...

  18. Mercury's Magnetic Field: Active, Thermoelectric, or Decaying Dynamo or Crustal Remanence? - The MESSENGER Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, D. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of Mercury's intrinsic magnetic field in 1974 by Mariner 10 was a surprise because the planet's size, thermal state, and angular momentum seemed to rule out the possibility of an active dynamo. Additional encounters of Mercury by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1975 confirmed the initial results and allowed the estimation of the planetary magnetic dipole moment to within perhaps a factor of two. This discovery prompted a variety of suggestions for the source of the intrinsic field. The presence of sufficient sulfur in the outer core would allow a thin fluid outer core to persist to the present and perhaps serve as host to a thin-shell dynamo. Recent dynamo simulations under conditions appropriate to Mercury support this possibility and point to aspects of the external field that may be observable from an orbiting spacecraft. Remanent magnetization of the crust and mantle by a now-dead core dynamo field was proposed as an alternative explanation of the Mariner 10 observations in 1976, but this suggestion has been questioned on the grounds that the characteristic time between polarity reversals of a core dynamo field is likely much less than the timescale for acquisition of thermoremanence by the cooling crust and upper mantle. The discovery by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) in 1997 of an intensely magnetized Martian crust added fuel to this debate, because the Mariner 10 measurements can be reproduced if Mercury's crust is approximated by a magnetized shell having an intrinsic magnetization of the same order of magnitude as that suggested for Mars by the MGS measurements. The MESSENGER magnetic field investigation is designed to address this and other fundamental questions regarding the nature and origin of Mercury's internal field as well as the planet's thermal history. We present here a summary of the MESSENGER magnetic field investigation goals and an assessment of observations acquired during the spacecraft's Earth flyby on 2 August 2005.

  19. Commercial Style Market Research for Navy Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    market research and analysis and indicate their impact on the various elements of the plan. If the acquisition or part...was not or will not be conducted.. .Once the Government’s needs have been func- tionally described, market research and analysis shall be conducted to...Systems Management College, 1993, pp. 409-420. 44. Lee, Christopher, Office Director, Office of Market Research and Analysis , Defense Fuels Supply

  20. Biology Research Activities: Teacher's Edition (with Answers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Barbara

    This book is part of the series "Explorations in Science" which contains enrichment activities for the general science curriculum. Each book in the series contains innovative and traditional projects for both the bright and average, the self-motivated, and those who find activity motivating. Each activity is self-contained and provides everything…

  1. Fitness and Physical Activity. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2005-01-01

    What can be done to support fitness and physical activity? Schools can guide students in developing life-long habits of participating in physical activities. According to the National Association for Sports and Physical Education, the concepts of physical fitness activities and physical education are used synonymously, however, they are not the…

  2. Control of active liquid crystals with a magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Guillamat, Pau; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Living cells sense the mechanical features of their environment and adapt to it by actively remodeling their peripheral network of filamentary proteins, known as cortical cytoskeleton. By mimicking this principle, we demonstrate an effective control strategy for a microtubule-based active nematic in contact with a hydrophobic thermotropic liquid crystal. By using well-established protocols for the orientation of liquid crystals with a uniform magnetic field, and through the mediation of anisotropic shear stresses, the active nematic reversibly self-assembles with aligned flows and textures that feature orientational order at the millimeter scale. The turbulent flow, characteristic of active nematics, is in this way regularized into a laminar flow with periodic velocity oscillations. Once patterned, the microtubule assembly reveals its intrinsic length and time scales, which we correlate with the activity of motor proteins, as predicted by existing theories of active nematics. The demonstrated commanding strategy should be compatible with other viable active biomaterials at interfaces, and we envision its use to probe the mechanics of the intracellular matrix. PMID:27140604

  3. Control of active liquid crystals with a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Guillamat, Pau; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-05-17

    Living cells sense the mechanical features of their environment and adapt to it by actively remodeling their peripheral network of filamentary proteins, known as cortical cytoskeleton. By mimicking this principle, we demonstrate an effective control strategy for a microtubule-based active nematic in contact with a hydrophobic thermotropic liquid crystal. By using well-established protocols for the orientation of liquid crystals with a uniform magnetic field, and through the mediation of anisotropic shear stresses, the active nematic reversibly self-assembles with aligned flows and textures that feature orientational order at the millimeter scale. The turbulent flow, characteristic of active nematics, is in this way regularized into a laminar flow with periodic velocity oscillations. Once patterned, the microtubule assembly reveals its intrinsic length and time scales, which we correlate with the activity of motor proteins, as predicted by existing theories of active nematics. The demonstrated commanding strategy should be compatible with other viable active biomaterials at interfaces, and we envision its use to probe the mechanics of the intracellular matrix.

  4. Persistent Identifiers for Field Expeditions: A Next Step for the US Oceanographic Research Fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arko, Robert; Carbotte, Suzanne; Chandler, Cynthia; Smith, Shawn; Stocks, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Oceanographic research cruises are complex affairs, typically requiring an extensive effort to secure the funding, plan the experiment, and mobilize the field party. Yet cruises are not typically published online as first-class digital objects with persistent, citable identifiers linked to the scientific literature. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R; info@rvdata.us) program maintains a master catalog of oceanographic cruises for the United States research fleet, currently documenting over 6,000 expeditions on 37 active and retired vessels. In 2015, R2R started routinely publishing a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for each completed cruise. Cruise DOIs, in turn, are linked to related persistent identifiers where available including the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) for members of the science party, the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) for physical specimens collected during the cruise, the Open Funder Registry (FundRef) codes that supported the experiment, and additional DOIs for datasets, journal articles, and other products resulting from the cruise. Publishing a persistent identifier for each field expedition will facilitate interoperability between the many different repositories that hold research products from cruises; will provide credit to the investigators who secured the funding and carried out the experiment; and will facilitate the gathering of fleet-wide altmetrics that demonstrate the broad impact of oceanographic research.

  5. Can Neural Activity Propagate by Endogenous Electrical Field?

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chen; Shivacharan, Rajat S.; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that synaptic transmissions and gap junctions are the major governing mechanisms for signal traveling in the neural system. Yet, a group of neural waves, either physiological or pathological, share the same speed of ∼0.1 m/s without synaptic transmission or gap junctions, and this speed is not consistent with axonal conduction or ionic diffusion. The only explanation left is an electrical field effect. We tested the hypothesis that endogenous electric fields are sufficient to explain the propagation with in silico and in vitro experiments. Simulation results show that field effects alone can indeed mediate propagation across layers of neurons with speeds of 0.12 ± 0.09 m/s with pathological kinetics, and 0.11 ± 0.03 m/s with physiologic kinetics, both generating weak field amplitudes of ∼2–6 mV/mm. Further, the model predicted that propagation speed values are inversely proportional to the cell-to-cell distances, but do not significantly change with extracellular resistivity, membrane capacitance, or membrane resistance. In vitro recordings in mice hippocampi produced similar speeds (0.10 ± 0.03 m/s) and field amplitudes (2.5–5 mV/mm), and by applying a blocking field, the propagation speed was greatly reduced. Finally, osmolarity experiments confirmed the model's prediction that cell-to-cell distance inversely affects propagation speed. Together, these results show that despite their weak amplitude, electric fields can be solely responsible for spike propagation at ∼0.1 m/s. This phenomenon could be important to explain the slow propagation of epileptic activity and other normal propagations at similar speeds. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural activity (waves or spikes) can propagate using well documented mechanisms such as synaptic transmission, gap junctions, or diffusion. However, the purpose of this paper is to provide an explanation for experimental data showing that neural signals can propagate by means other than synaptic

  6. Active subthreshold dendritic conductances shape the local field potential

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Torbjørn V.; Remme, Michiel W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The local field potential (LFP), the low‐frequency part of extracellular potentials recorded in neural tissue, is often used for probing neural circuit activity. Interpreting the LFP signal is difficult, however.While the cortical LFP is thought mainly to reflect synaptic inputs onto pyramidal neurons, little is known about the role of the various subthreshold active conductances in shaping the LFP.By means of biophysical modelling we obtain a comprehensive qualitative understanding of how the LFP generated by a single pyramidal neuron depends on the type and spatial distribution of active subthreshold currents.For pyramidal neurons, the h‐type channels probably play a key role and can cause a distinct resonance in the LFP power spectrum.Our results show that the LFP signal can give information about the active properties of neurons and imply that preferred frequencies in the LFP can result from those cellular properties instead of, for example, network dynamics. Abstract The main contribution to the local field potential (LFP) is thought to stem from synaptic input to neurons and the ensuing subthreshold dendritic processing. The role of active dendritic conductances in shaping the LFP has received little attention, even though such ion channels are known to affect the subthreshold neuron dynamics. Here we used a modelling approach to investigate the effects of subthreshold dendritic conductances on the LFP. Using a biophysically detailed, experimentally constrained model of a cortical pyramidal neuron, we identified conditions under which subthreshold active conductances are a major factor in shaping the LFP. We found that, in particular, the hyperpolarization‐activated inward current, I h, can have a sizable effect and cause a resonance in the LFP power spectral density. To get a general, qualitative understanding of how any subthreshold active dendritic conductance and its cellular distribution can affect the LFP, we next performed a systematic

  7. Activated by Combined Magnrtic Field Gravitropic Reaction Reply on Nanodose of Biologicaly Active Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykina, Nadezhda; Bogatina, Nina

    The new science direction nanotechnologies initiated a big jump in the pharmacology and medicine. This leads to the big development of homeopathy. The most interest appeared while investigating of the reaction of biological object on the nano dose of iologically substances. The changing of concentration (in nmol/l) of biologically active material is also possible during weak energy action. For instance, weak combined magnetic field may change a little the concentration of ions that are oriented parallel to the external magnetic field and, by the analogy with said above, lead to the similar effects. Simple estimations give the value for the threshold to the magnetic field by two orders smaller than the geomagnetic field. By this investigation we wanted to understand whether the analogy in the action of nano dose of biologically active substances and weak combined magnetic field presents and whether the action of one of these factors may be replaced by other one. The effect of one of biologically active substances NPA (Naphtyl-Phtalame Acid) solution with the concentration 0.01 mol/l on the gravitropic reaction of cress roots was investigated. It was shown that its effect was the inhibition of cress roots gravitropic reaction. The same inhibition was achieved by the combined magnetic field action on the cress roots, germinated in water. The alternative component of the combined magnetic field coincided formally with the cyclotron frequency of NPA ions. So the analogy in the action of nano dose of biologically active substances and weak combined magnetic field was shown. The combined magnetic field using allows to decrease sufficiently the dose of biologically active substances. This fact can be of great importance in pharmacy and medicine.

  8. Nursing research--taking an active interest.

    PubMed

    Cleverly, D

    1998-05-01

    This paper discusses the issues raised by the still unfolding transformation of nurse education attitudes to research, from the traditional stance--that it was something that other people do--to the realization that quality research is central to the development of the profession and its competitive survival into the 21st century. In particular, the problems and challenges presented by the Higher Education Funding Council for England research assessment exercise, and the policy of the funding council, are examined. Research in schools of nursing is reviewed under the headings of funding, contracts, support, discipline, publication and staff recruitment and retention, to attempt to identify those approaches most likely to yield a research output of an acceptable volume and quality.

  9. Advances in Inner Magnetosphere Passive and Active Wave Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    This review identifies a number of the principal research advancements that have occurred over the last five years in the study of electromagnetic (EM) waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. The observations used in this study are from the plasma wave instruments and radio sounders on Cluster, IMAGE, Geotail, Wind, Polar, Interball, and others. The data from passive plasma wave instruments have led to a number of advances such as: determining the origin and importance of whistler mode waves in the plasmasphere, discovery of the source of kilometric continuum radiation, mapping AKR source regions with "pinpoint" accuracy, and correlating the AKR source location with dipole tilt angle. Active magnetospheric wave experiments have shown that long range ducted and direct echoes can be used to obtain the density distribution of electrons in the polar cap and along plasmaspheric field lines, providing key information on plasmaspheric filling rates and polar cap outflows.

  10. Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) 2007 Field Campaign Objectives and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph; Romig, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Desert "RATS" (Research and Technology Studies) is a combined, multi-discipline group of inter-NASA center scientists and engineers, net-working and collaborating with representatives of industry and academia, for the purpose of conducting planetary surface exploration-focused remote field exercises. These integrated testing exercises conducted under representative analog Lunar and Mars surface terrain conditions, provide NASA the capability to validate experimental prototype hardware and software systems as well as to evaluate and develop mission operational techniques in order to identify and establish technical requirements and identify potential technology "gaps" applicable for future planetary human exploration. The 2007 D-RATS field campaign test activities were initiated based on the major themes and objectives of a notional 5-year plan developed for conducting relative analog test activities in support of the engineering evaluation and assessment of various system architectural requirements, conceptual prototype support equipment and selected technologies necessary for the establishment of a lunar outpost. Specifically, the major objectives included measuring task efficiency during robot, human, and human-robot interactive tasks associated with lunar outpost site surveying and reconnaissance activities and deployment of a representative solar panel power and distribution system. In addition, technology demonstrations were conducted with a new Lithium-ion battery and autonomous software to coordinate multiple robot activities. Secondary objectives were evaluating airlock concept mockups and prototype removable space suit over-garment elements for dust mitigation, and upgrades to the prototype extravehicular activities (EVA) communication and information system. Dry run test activities, prior to testing at a designated remote field site location, were initially conducted at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Remote Field Demonstration Test Site. This is a multi

  11. Adaptive wave field synthesis for broadband active sound field reproduction: signal processing.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction is a physical approach to the reproduction of the natural spatial character of hearing. It is also useful in experimental acoustics and psychoacoustics. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. A real reflective reproduction space thus reduces the objective accuracy of WFS. Recently, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a combination of WFS and active compensation. AWFS is based on the minimization of reproduction errors and on the penalization of departure from the WFS solution. This paper focuses on signal processing for AWFS. A classical adaptive algorithm is modified for AWFS: filtered-reference least-mean-square. This modified algorithm and the classical equivalent leaky algorithm have similar convergence properties except that the WFS solution influences the adaptation rule of the modified algorithm. The paper also introduces signal processing for independent radiation mode control of AWFS on the basis of plant decoupling. Simulation results for AWFS are introduced for free-field and reflective spaces. The two algorithms effectively reproduce the sound field and compensate for the reproduction errors at the error sensors. The independent radiation mode control allows a more flexible tuning of the algorithm.

  12. US EPA, NERL-LAS VEGAS ACTIVITIES AND RESEARCH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than parts per billion, ppb). IAG with USGS ends in FY05. APM 20 due in FY05.Subtask 2: Coordination of interagency research and public outreach activities for PPCPs. Participate on NSTC Health and Environment subcommittee working group on PPCPs. Web site maintenance and expansion, invited technical presentations, invited articles for peer-reviewed journals, interviews for media, responding to public inquiries. S

  13. Influence of environmental static electric field on antioxidant enzymes activities in hepatocytes of mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, S X; Xu, Y Q; Di, G Q; Jiang, J H; Xin, L; Wu, T Y

    2016-07-25

    With the increasing voltage of direct current transmission line, the intensity of the environmental static electric field has also increased. Thus, whether static electric fields cause biological injury is an important question. In this study, the effects of chronic exposure to environmental static electric fields on some antioxidant enzymes activities in the hepatocytes of mice were investigated. Male Institute of Cancer Research mice were exposed for 35 days to environmental static electric fields of different electric field intensities of 9.2-21.85 kV/m (experiment group I, EG-I), 2.3-15.4 kV/m (experiment group II, EG-II), and 0 kV/m (control group, CG). On days 7, 14, 21, and 35 of the exposure cycle, liver homogenates were obtained and the activities of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase were determined, as well as the concentration of malonaldehyde. The results revealed a significant increase in superoxide dismutase activity in both EG-I and EG-II on the 7th (P < 0.05) and 35th days (P < 0.01) of the exposure cycle compared to that in the control group. However, the other test indices such as glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, and malonaldehyde showed only minimal changes during the exposure cycle. These results revealed a weak relationship between the exposure to environmental static electric fields and hepatic oxidative stress in living organisms.

  14. Remote field trips and on-line exhibitions: public understanding of research projects at the Exploratorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semper, R.; Hawkins, I.

    2003-04-01

    Science museums and science centers provide an opportunity for students and members of the general public to explore the world of science and technology through exhibits, objects and public programs. But it is often difficult to present the flavor and atmosphere of current scientific exploration in a museum setting. Recent advances in technology have facilitated the development of remote field trips to places of science creation and online exhibitions using the actual data of science research for both an on site and on line audiences. Over the past five years the Exploratorium has explored using its museum design sensibilities in combination with the Internet to present current scientific research to a broad public and school audience. Live @ the Exploratorium combines remote production from interesting scientific locations with a live studio audience on the museum’s exhibit floor to create Webcasts and Websites which provide an on-line audience with a unique fieldtrip experience. This program has visited research laboratories in Antarctica, field sites along the San Andrea Fault in California, and the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore that operates the Hubble Space Telescope. The Research Explorer project uses museum exhibit interpretive skills to create an on-line exhibition on current research data in global climate change or solar activity by providing a window onto the actual dynamic research activity available on the Web. In both of these projects the museum makes use of its content, pedagogy and design capabilities to act as a mediator between the world of science and the world of the public.

  15. The regulation of rat activity following exposure to hyperdynamic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.; Ishihama, Linda M.; Murakami, Dean M.

    1993-01-01

    The microgravity of space flight and the hyperdynamic fields produced via centrifugation have allowed researchers to examine the effect of altered gravitational environments on the regulation of physiological systems. In this study, a high frequency light/dark cycle was provided for 24 hours as an environmental challenge to assess the recovery of homeostatic and circadian components of physiological regulation in rats. For example, the nocturnal rat exhibited a homeostatic increase in body temperature during the dark periods and a decrease during the light periods. In addition, the magnitude of the body temperature response exhibits a time of day variation demonstrating the effect on circadian regulation.

  16. An overview of the ENEA activities in the field of coupled codes NPP simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Parisi, C.; Negrenti, E.; Sepielli, M.; Del Nevo, A.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the nuclear research activities in the fields of safety, training and education, ENEA (the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Sustainable Development) is in charge of defining and pursuing all the necessary steps for the development of a NPP engineering simulator at the 'Casaccia' Research Center near Rome. A summary of the activities in the field of the nuclear power plants simulation by coupled codes is here presented with the long term strategy for the engineering simulator development. Specifically, results from the participation in international benchmarking activities like the OECD/NEA 'Kalinin-3' benchmark and the 'AER-DYN-002' benchmark, together with simulations of relevant events like the Fukushima accident, are here reported. The ultimate goal of such activities performed using state-of-the-art technology is the re-establishment of top level competencies in the NPP simulation field in order to facilitate the development of Enhanced Engineering Simulators and to upgrade competencies for supporting national energy strategy decisions, the nuclear national safety authority, and the R and D activities on NPP designs. (authors)

  17. Research in subliminal psychodynamic activation: note on Masling (1998).

    PubMed

    Fudin, R

    1999-04-01

    Masling (1998) questioned Malik, Apel, Nelham, Rutkowski, and Ladd's 1997 suggestion that subliminal psychodynamic activation research with MOMMY AND I ARE ONE should be restricted. Problems in Masling's paper and the scope of research with MOMMY AND I ARE ONE are discussed. His position that such research should not be restricted is supported on the condition that subliminal psychodynamic activation research with MOMMY AND I ARE ONE (and other messages) use Fudin's 1986 procedure that could clarify the interpretation of successful experimental outcomes.

  18. Magnetic fields over active tectonic zones in ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Serebrianaya, P.M.; Nikitina, L.V.; Green, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our work is to estimate the electromagnetic effects that can be detected in the submarine zones with hydrothermal activity. It is known that meso-scale flows appear in the regions over underwater volcanoes or hot rocks. Their origin is connected with heat flux and hot jets released from underwater volcanoes or faults in a sea bottom. Values of mean velocities and turbulent velocities in plumes were estimated. Quasiconstant magnetic fields induced by a hot jet and a vortex over a plume top are about 1-40 nT. Variable magnetic fields are about 0.1-1 nT. These magnetic disturbances in the sea medium create an additional natural electromagnetic background that must be considered when making detailed magnetic surveys. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

  20. Higher Education Research as a Field in China: Its Formation and Current Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shuang-Ye; Hu, Li-Fang

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the field of higher education research in China from its historical roots through to its current development. It is a case study of how the field of higher education research emerged and was co-constructed by the state and the academic community of higher education researchers to become an established and recognised discipline…

  1. Higher Education as a Field of Study and Research in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehm, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the emergence of higher education as a field of research, scholarship and study. In the first part, the meaning of higher education as a field of research is defined contrasting Europe and the US. Then, the institutional basis of higher education research in Europe is analysed (learned societies, institutes and centres,…

  2. OSEP Funded Field and Student Initiated Research. Final Report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beling, Dorothy; And Others

    The report reviews results of a project to examine pilot approaches to documenting the contributions of research in improving educational practice. The project abstracted 110 currently funded research projects in progress (to facilitate dissemination to the field), processed final reports of field-initiated and student-initiated research funded by…

  3. Going To The Field: Immersing Student Researchers in Coupled Human-Natural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissmann, G. S.; Ibarra, R.

    2014-12-01

    Taking students into the field can offer a rich, grounded understanding of a particular environment and of a particular scientific approach to attaining a desired observation. Going into the field immerses students into coupled human-natural systems, which introduces two key elements to teaching: experiential learning and socio-cultural context. While these elements can greatly enrich student learning, instructors have to take extra steps to scaffold this learning. This scaffolding can present physical scientists with a challenge: how to reconcile views that such pedagogical activities are 'extraneous'/not central to the pursuit of physical science. Here we offer perspectives as an anthropologist and as an environmental scientist on the value of a diverse pedagogical approach to conducting field studies involving students. Insights drawn from facilitating a range of field experiences (e.g., short-term study abroad, service-learning and independent/supervised research both home and abroad) will be shared regarding approaches to scaffolding student learning. We will focus on an approach that the scholarship of teaching and learning has long shown to be effective - what can be called a "wrap-around" approach to the field: preparation before, support during, and reflection afterward. Of these steps, the post-trip reflection on the experience is a key, and often under-utilized, strategy, and suggestions as to why this are offered. This approach not only helps students understand better the course content, but it also helps them understand the role that socio-cultural context plays in shaping both the research and in the state of the environment. We illustrate these different dimensions of the field experience with examples from our courses.

  4. Neurophilia: Guiding Educational Research and the Educational Field?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeyers, Paul

    2016-01-01

    For a decade or so there has been a new "hype" in educational research: it is called educational neuroscience or even neuroeducation (and neuroethics)--there are numerous publications, special journals, and an abundance of research projects together with the advertisement of many positions at renowned research centres worldwide. After a…

  5. Implementation Practice and Implementation Research: A Report from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, John S.; Phillips, Elizabeth; Pancake, Laura; O, Anne; Lewis, Jenebah; Duke, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    The Interventions and Practice Research Infrastructure Program (IPRISP) funding mechanism was introduced by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to bridge the gap between the worlds of services research and the usual care practice in the community. The goal was to build infrastructure that would provide a platform for research to…

  6. Neutron Field Measurements in Phantom with Foil Activation Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-29

    jI25 Ii III uumu ullli~ S....- - Lb - w * .qJ’ AD-A 192 122 ulJ. IL (pj DNA-TR-87- 10 N EUTRON FIELD MEASUREMENTS IN PHANTOM WITH FOIL ACTIVATION...SAND II Measurements in Phantom 6 4 The 5-Foil Neutron Dosimetry Method 29 5 Comparison of SAND II and Simple 5-Foil Dosimetry Method 34 6 Thermal ...quite reasonable. The monkey phantom spectrum differs from the NBS U-235 fission spectrum in that the former has a I/E tail plus thermal -neutron peak

  7. Field-Dependence and Extraversion: Univariate or Multivariate Research Orientation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Field- dependence and extraversion have been considered by Eysenck to be similar, if not identical, dimensions, whereas Fine has found them to be...Witkin would be cited as ’key’ references for extraversion and field- dependence , respectively, 2722 journal articles published during calendar years 1986

  8. Boost-phase discrimination research activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David M.; Deiwert, George S.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical research in two areas was performed. The aerothermodynamics research focused on the hard-body and rocket plume flows. Analytical real gas models to describe finite rate chemistry were developed and incorporated into the three-dimensional flow codes. New numerical algorithms capable of treating multi-species reacting gas equations and treating flows with large gradients were also developed. The computational chemistry research focused on the determination of spectral radiative intensity factors, transport properties and reaction rates. Ab initio solutions to the Schrodinger equation provided potential energy curves transition moments (radiative probabilities and strengths) and potential energy surfaces. These surfaces were then coupled with classical particle reactive trajectories to compute reaction cross-sections and rates.

  9. Determining the stress field in active volcanoes using focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Bruno; D'Auria, Luca; Cristiano, Elena; De Matteo, Ada

    2016-11-01

    Stress inversion of seismological datasets became an essential tool to retrieve the stress field of active tectonics and volcanic areas. In particular, in volcanic areas, it is able to put constrains on volcano-tectonics and in general in a better understanding of the volcano dynamics. During the last decades, a wide range of stress inversion techniques has been proposed, some of them specifically conceived to manage seismological datasets. A modern technique of stress inversion, the BRTM, has been applied to seismological datasets available at three different regions of active volcanism: Mt. Somma-Vesuvius (197 Fault Plane Solutions, FPSs), Campi Flegrei (217 FPSs) and Long Valley Caldera (38,000 FPSs). The key role of stress inversion techniques in the analysis of the volcano dynamics has been critically discussed. A particular emphasis was devoted to performances of the BRTM applied to volcanic areas.

  10. Changes in thermal activity in the Rotorua geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, A.D. ); Lumb, J.T. )

    1992-04-01

    During a period when geothermal fluid was being withdrawn for energy use at an increasing rate, the level of natural hydrothermal activity in the Rotorua geothermal field declined in an all-time low in the mid 1980s. total heatflow from a major hot-spring area fell by almost 50 percent, springs ceased their flow, and geysers displayed abnormal behavior consistent with a low aquifer pressure. since the enforced closure of bores within 1.5 km of Pohutu Geyser, sings of recovery, including a return to normal behavior of Pohutu and Waikorohihi Geysers, a resumption of activity at Kereru Geyser, and an increase in water flow from some springs are presented in this paper.

  11. Boundary-Work in the Health Research Field: Biomedical and Clinician Scientists' Perceptions of Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Mathieu; Laberge, Suzanne; Hodges, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Funding agencies in Canada are attempting to break down the organizational boundaries between disciplines to promote interdisciplinary research and foster the integration of the social sciences into the health research field. This paper explores the extent to which biomedical and clinician scientists' perceptions of social science research operate…

  12. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  13. Modeling place field activity with hierarchical slow feature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, Fabian; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2015-01-01

    What are the computational laws of hippocampal activity? In this paper we argue for the slowness principle as a fundamental processing paradigm behind hippocampal place cell firing. We present six different studies from the experimental literature, performed with real-life rats, that we replicated in computer simulations. Each of the chosen studies allows rodents to develop stable place fields and then examines a distinct property of the established spatial encoding: adaptation to cue relocation and removal; directional dependent firing in the linear track and open field; and morphing and scaling the environment itself. Simulations are based on a hierarchical Slow Feature Analysis (SFA) network topped by a principal component analysis (ICA) output layer. The slowness principle is shown to account for the main findings of the presented experimental studies. The SFA network generates its responses using raw visual input only, which adds to its biological plausibility but requires experiments performed in light conditions. Future iterations of the model will thus have to incorporate additional information, such as path integration and grid cell activity, in order to be able to also replicate studies that take place during darkness. PMID:26052279

  14. SEURAT: Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing – Recommendations for future research in the field of predictive toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of non-animal methodology to evaluate the potential for a chemical to cause systemic toxicity is one of the grand challenges of modern science. The European research programme SEURAT is active in this field and will conclude its first phase, SEURAT-1, in December ...

  15. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) has extensive field testing capabilities that have been used in collaboration with the wind industry to accelerate wind technology development and deployment for more than 30 years.

  16. Partnerships for progress in active living: from research to action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The theme for the 2011 Active Living Research Annual Conference was "Partnerships for Progress in Active Living: From Research to Action." The rationale for this theme was simple: no person is an island. The theme recognizes that partnerships are essential to identify and implement solutions for co...

  17. Methods to Measure Physical Activity Behaviors in Health Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important concept to measure in health education research. The health education researcher might need to measure physical activity because it is the primary measure of interest, or PA might be a confounding measure that needs to be controlled for in statistical analysis. The purpose of this commentary is to…

  18. Melding Research on the Navajo Volcanic Field into Undergraduate Curriculum to Promote Scientific Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation highlights the curricular design and preliminary outcomes of undergraduate research in the Department of Geosciences at Fort Lewis College (FLC), supported by an NSF-RUI project on the Navajo volcanic field (NVF). A prime impact of this project was to support the education and career development of undergraduate students by further developing basic knowledge and skills in the context of authentic inquiry on petrologic-based research topics. Integrating research into the curriculum promoted scientific habits of mind by engaging students as "active agents" in discovery, and the creative development and testing of ideas. It also gave students a sense of ownership in the scientific process and knowledge construction. The initial phase of this project was conducted in Igneous Petrology at FLC in 2010. Eleven students were enrolled in this course which allowed them to work as a team in collaboration with the PI, and engage in all aspects of research to further develop and hone their skills in scientific inquiry. This course involved a small component of traditional lecture in which selected topics were discussed to provide students with a foundation to understand magmatic processes. This was complemented by a comprehensive review of the literature in which students read and discussed a spectrum of articles on Tertiary magmatism in the western United States and the NVF. Invited lectures by leading-scientists in geology provided opportunities for discussions and interaction with professional geologists. All of the students in the class engaged in the active collection of petrologic data in the field and laboratory sessions, and were introduced to the use of state-of-the art analytical tools as part of their experiences. Four students were recruited from the course to design, develop, and conduct long-term research projects on selected petrologic topics in the NVF. This research allowed these students to engage in the "messy" process of testing existing

  19. Human Research Program Science Management: Overview of Research and Development Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of research and development activities of NASA's Human Research Science Management Program is presented. The topics include: 1) Human Research Program Goals; 2) Elements and Projects within HRP; 3) Development and Maintenance of Priorities; 4) Acquisition and Evaluation of Research and Technology Proposals; and 5) Annual Reviews

  20. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 1: Integrated approach and field campaign results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Vugts, H. F.; Ramothwa, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. Results of the first part of the program (Botswana 1) which ran from 1 Jan. 1988 - 31 Dec. 1990 are summarized. Botswana 1 consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components in general are described and activities performed during the surface energy modeling component including the extensive field campaign are summarized. The results of the passive microwave component are summarized. The key of the field campaign was a multilevel approach, whereby measurements by various similar sensors were made at several altitudes and resolution. Data collection was performed at two adjacent sites of contrasting surface character. The following measurements were made: micrometeorological measurements, surface temperatures, soil temperatures, soil moisture, vegetation (leaf area index and biomass), satellite data, aircraft data, atmospheric soundings, stomatal resistance, and surface emissivity.

  1. A Typology of Nursing Research Activities According to Educational Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Jacqueline

    1985-01-01

    A typology of research activities (generation of basic, applied, and clinical research; dissemination of findings; and use of findings) considered appropriate to nurses with different levels of educational preparation (ADN, BSN, MSN, DNSc/EdD, and PhD) is presented to assist potential researchers and nurse educators in undertaking realistic and…

  2. BIOREMEDIATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTES - RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD EVALUATIONS - 1995

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings of the 1995 Symposium on Bioremediation of Hazardous Wastes, hosted by the Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the EPA in Rye Brook, New York. he symposium was the eighth annual meeting for the presentation of research conducted by EPA's Biosystems Technol...

  3. The Historical Origins of Mass Communication Research in Our Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Samuel L.

    The seeds of mass communication research in broadcasting were extracurricular, not academic, inspired by experimental campus radio stations. Prior to the mid-1930s, radio research was scarce. Until World War II, radio speech was the most important topic, followed by articles on how to use radio for improving instruction. There are three…

  4. Recruiting and Training Undergraduate Research Assistants for Longitudinal Field Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Richard I.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a research training project for undergraduate psychology students in the development, administration, and evaluation of strategies to deter addictive smoking in adolescents. Students worked closely with faculty and graduate student researchers and became aware of the constraints of institutional regulations and logistical problems…

  5. Research in Corporate Communication: An Overview of an Emerging Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Riel, Cees B. M.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. Gives three key concepts in such research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orchestration of communication. Advocates an interdisciplinary approach…

  6. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephen P; Hall Brown, Tyish S; Collier, Scott R; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-03-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O2, and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing.

  7. NASA Glenn Research Center Battery Activities Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the planned energy storage systems for the Orion Spacecraft and the Aries rockets that will be used in the return journey to the Moon and GRC's involvement in their development. Technology development goals and approaches to provide batteries and fuel cells for the Altair Lunar Lander, the new space suit under development for extravehicular activities (EVA) on the Lunar surface, and the Lunar Surface Systems operations will also be discussed.

  8. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  9. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  10. Steps toward validity in active living research: research design that limits accusations of physical determinism.

    PubMed

    Riggs, William

    2014-03-01

    "Active living research" has been accused of being overly "physically deterministic" and this article argues that urban planners must continue to evolve research and address biases in this area. The article first provides background on how researchers have dealt with the relationship between the built environment and health over years. This leads to a presentation of how active living research might be described as overly deterministic. The article then offers lessons for researchers planning to embark in active-living studies as to how they might increase validity and minimize criticism of physical determinism.

  11. South Baltic representative coastal field surveys, including monitoring at the Coastal Research Station in Lubiatowo, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Rafał; Schönhofer, Jan; Szmytkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    The paper contains a brief description of selected investigations carried out in the south Baltic coastal zone, with the particular focus on the history and recent activities conducted at the Coastal Research Station in Lubiatowo (CRS Lubiatowo), Poland. These activities comprise field investigations of nearshore hydrodynamic, lithodynamic, and morphodynamic processes. The study area is a sandy multi-bar shore with a mild slope, much exposed to the impact of waves approaching from NW-NE sector. The shore has a dissipative character which means that the wave energy is subject to gradual dissipation in the nearshore zone and only a small part of this energy is reflected by the shore. Due to the big wind fetch in N-NNE direction, the location of CRS Lubiatowo is favourable to registration of the maximum values of parameters of hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes which occur in the Baltic during extreme storms.

  12. RESEARCH ACTIVITIES IN THE FIELD OF MATERIALS SCIENCE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    crystals; transport properties and photochemistry of organic crystals; chemistry of complex compounds; nuclear magnetic resonance; semiconductor physics; electrochemistry and thermochemistry; optical properties of solids and liquids.

  13. Generation of field potentials and modulation of their dynamics through volume integration of cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Yoshinao; Schroeder, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    Field potentials (FPs) recorded within the brain, often called "local field potentials" (LFPs), are useful measures of net synaptic activity in a neuronal ensemble. However, due to volume conduction, FPs spread beyond regions of underlying synaptic activity, and thus an "LFP" signal may not accurately reflect the temporal patterns of synaptic activity in the immediately surrounding neuron population. To better understand the physiological processes reflected in FPs, we explored the relationship between the FP and its membrane current generators using current source density (CSD) analysis in conjunction with a volume conductor model. The model provides a quantitative description of the spatiotemporal summation of immediate local and more distant membrane currents to produce the FP. By applying the model to FPs in the macaque auditory cortex, we have investigated a critical issue that has broad implications for FP research. We have shown that FP responses in particular cortical layers are differentially susceptible to activity in other layers. Activity in the supragranular layers has the strongest contribution to FPs in other cortical layers, and infragranular FPs are most susceptible to contributions from other layers. To define the physiological processes generating FPs recorded in loci of relatively weak synaptic activity, strong effects produced by synaptic events in the vicinity have to be taken into account. While outlining limitations and caveats inherent to FP measurements, our results also suggest specific peak and frequency band components of FPs can be related to activity in specific cortical layers. These results may help improving the interpretability of FPs.

  14. Soldier Performance Research Project: Armor Field and SIMNET Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Event 5. The crew will react to an ATGM ambush. The TC must issue the contact report and fire command (both timed). The tank should take evasive ...Cammand’s (TEXO34) Armor and Engineer Board who conducted the Soldier Performance Research Project (SPRP) Armor tests: MC Royce Simson, Test Director CPI...the Soldier Performance Research Project (SPP), the Armor portion was conducted in two phases to provide a rigorous assessment of the cognitive skill

  15. Relationships between Interlibrary Loan and Research Activity in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duy, Joanna; Larivière, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Interlibrary Loan borrowing rates in academic libraries are influenced by an array of factors. This article explores the relationship between interlibrary loan borrowing activity and research activity at 42 Canadian academic institutions. A significant positive correlation was found between interlibrary loan borrowing activity and measures of…

  16. Research on an Active Seat Belt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Takeshi

    In a car crash, permanent injury can be avoided if deformation of an occupant's rib cage is maintained within the allowable value. In order to realize this condition, the occupant's seat belt tension must be instantaneously adjusted by a feedback control system. In this study, a seat belt tension control system based on the active shock control system is proposed. The semi-active control law used is derived from the sliding mode control method. One advantage of this proposed system is that it does not require a large power actuator because the seat belt tension is controlled by a brake mechanism. The effectiveness is confirmed by numerical simulation using general parameters of a human thorax and a passenger car in a collision scenario with a wall at a velocity of 100 km/h. The feasibility is then confirmed with a control experiment using a scale model of about 1/10 scale. The relative displacement of the thorax model approaches the allowable value smoothly along the control reference and settles near this value. Thus, the proposed seat belt tension control system design is established.

  17. Zoo visitors' understanding of terms denoting research activity.

    PubMed

    Carson, Lloyd

    2014-07-01

    Zoos have increasingly sought to justify their existence by reference to a scientific role particularly in the domains of animal welfare and conservation. Given recent initiatives by the UK government to foster public engagement with science, it is timely to investigate public attitudes towards primary research activity by zoos. This study reports the views of 83 visitors to Edinburgh Zoo. Within certain items in a structured interview noun terms denoting research activity were manipulated ("research" versus "studies") as was their qualification (adjective "scientific" present or absent before the noun term). "Research" was associated with a restricted and negative perception of investigatory activity. This effect was intensified when the noun term was preceded by "scientific". It is concluded that there is a continuing need to challenge public perceptions, particularly of the phrase "scientific research"; that in the meantime zoos should perhaps exercise caution when using it in relation to their activities.

  18. From Predicting Solar Activity to Forecasting Space Weather: Practical Examples of Research-to-Operations and Operations-to-Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Biesecker, D. A.; Millward, G. H.

    2014-02-01

    The successful transition of research to operations (R2O) and operations to research (O2R) requires, above all, interaction between the two communities. We explore the role that close interaction and ongoing communication played in the successful fielding of three separate developments: an observation platform, a numerical model, and a visualization and specification tool. Additionally, we will examine how these three pieces came together to revolutionize interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) arrival forecasts. A discussion of the importance of education and training in ensuring a positive outcome from R2O activity follows. We describe efforts by the meteorological community to make research results more accessible to forecasters and the applicability of these efforts to the transfer of space-weather research. We end with a forecaster "wish list" for R2O transitions. Ongoing, two-way communication between the research and operations communities is the thread connecting it all.

  19. Wide-field optical mapping of neural activity and brain haemodynamics: considerations and novel approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Kozberg, Mariel G.; Thibodeaux, David N.; Zhao, Hanzhi T.; Yu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Although modern techniques such as two-photon microscopy can now provide cellular-level three-dimensional imaging of the intact living brain, the speed and fields of view of these techniques remain limited. Conversely, two-dimensional wide-field optical mapping (WFOM), a simpler technique that uses a camera to observe large areas of the exposed cortex under visible light, can detect changes in both neural activity and haemodynamics at very high speeds. Although WFOM may not provide single-neuron or capillary-level resolution, it is an attractive and accessible approach to imaging large areas of the brain in awake, behaving mammals at speeds fast enough to observe widespread neural firing events, as well as their dynamic coupling to haemodynamics. Although such wide-field optical imaging techniques have a long history, the advent of genetically encoded fluorophores that can report neural activity with high sensitivity, as well as modern technologies such as light emitting diodes and sensitive and high-speed digital cameras have driven renewed interest in WFOM. To facilitate the wider adoption and standardization of WFOM approaches for neuroscience and neurovascular coupling research, we provide here an overview of the basic principles of WFOM, considerations for implementation of wide-field fluorescence imaging of neural activity, spectroscopic analysis and interpretation of results. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574312

  20. [Medical and biologic research of electromagnetic fields in radiofrequencies range. Results and prospects].

    PubMed

    Kaliada, T V; Vishnevskiĭ, A M; Gorodetskiĭ, B N; Plekhanov, V P; Kuznetsov, A V

    2014-01-01

    The authors present research findings on the problem of technology-related electromagnetic fields as an occupational risk factor of workers health disturbances, and on the issue of prevention measures development against this adverse physical factor effects. Prospects for further research development in the field of electromagnetic safety are discussed.

  1. The effects of professional irradiation, fields of research, results

    SciTech Connect

    Okladnikova, N.D.; Pesternikova, V.S.; Sumina, M.V.

    1993-12-31

    Main results of research of after effects of professional irradiation of the personnel of the first atomic power industry enterprise in the country ({open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes}) are presented. The earliest determinated effects (chronic and acute radiation sickness, local radiation traumae, plutonium pneumosclerosis) and the late effects of external gamma-irradiation and combined (pu-239, tritium) radiation effect in a wide range of doses have been studied. The basis of the paper are the results of a complex medical research of the personnel: the state of haemopoietic, nerve, cardiovascular systems, alimentary canal, other organs and systems, immunity, somatic cells genome and the frequency of tumor and non-tumor diseases. The observation and research period covered is 40 years from the first contact with the ionized radiation source.

  2. Nursing research on physical activity: a feminist critique.

    PubMed

    Im, E

    2001-04-01

    Studies on physical activity have rarely included women as research participants, and have been mainly conducted among Western populations. In this paper, nursing research on women's physical activity is analyzed and critiqued using a feminist perspective that respects and values women's own experiences and their diversities. An extensive literature search was conducted using computerized data retrieval systems and 47 empirical studies published in nursing literature were selected and analyzed. The critique is presented with three main themes emerged from the analysis: (a) "without considering women's own experiences"; (b) "implicit androcentric and ethnocentric assumptions"; (c) "without meaningful interactions". Based on the analysis, future directions for nursing research on physical activity are proposed.

  3. Perspectives and controversies in the field of stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano

    2006-09-01

    The fourth annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research focused on a number of pressing issues, including: (I) the need to better characterize the biology of stem cells; (II) the need to exploit and optimize the great therapeutic potential of stem cells in tissue regeneration; (III) ethical and safety considerations related to the use of human embryonic stem cells; (IV) the contribution of adult stem cells to carcinogenesis; (V) the need to investigate the biology of cancer stem cells. The purpose of this report is to summarize the current status of stem cell research, as surmised by the proceedings of this meeting.

  4. Future Research Directions for the Field of E/BD: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Jolivette, Kristine; Conroy, Maureen; Nelson, C. Michael; Benner, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    The origins and evolution of the field of emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) provide a context for offering suggestions for advancing the field. Building from this historical past and the research of others in the field, four broad recommendations which focus on academic and social needs of students with E/BD are offered: (a) ensuring high…

  5. Magnetic field measurements in and above a limb active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Judge

    2013-07-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of a limb active region (NOAA 11302) obtained on September 22nd 2011 using the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Stokes profiles including lines of Si I 1028.7 nm and He I 1083 nm were obtained in three scans over a 45"x75" area. Simultaneous narrow band Ca II K and G-band intensity data were acquired with a cadence of 5s at the DST. The He I data show not only typical active region polarization signatures, but also signatures in plumes -- cool post flare loops -- which extend many Mm into the corona across the visible limb. The plumes have remarkably uniform brightness, and the plume plasma is significantly Doppler shifted as it drains from the corona. Using carefully constructed observing and calibration sequences and applying Principal Component Analysis to remove instrumental artifacts, we achieved a polarization sensitivity approaching 0.02%. With this sensitivity we attempt to diagnose the vector magnetic fields and plasma properties of chromospheric and cool coronal material in and above NOAA 11302. Inversions using various radiative transfer models in the HAZEL code are remarkably consistent with the idea that plume spectra are formed in a simple, slab-like geometry, but that the ``disk'' spectra are formed under more traditional models (Milne-Eddington). The inverted magnetic data of He I lines are compared with photospheric inversions of DST Si I and Fe I data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  6. PREFACE: Yamada Conference LX on Research in High Magnetic Fields (RHMF2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motokawa, Mitsuhiro

    2006-12-01

    The 60th Yamada Conference on Research in High Magnetic Fields (RHMF2006) was held at Sendai Civic Auditorium, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, from 16 19 August 2006, as the 8th RHMF. The first was held in Osaka (1982) followed by Leuven (1988), Amsterdam (1991), Nijmegen (1994), Sydney (1997), Porto (2000), and Toulouse (2003). RHMF2006, which was also a satellite conference of the 17th International Conference on Magnetism (Kyoto, 20 25 August 2006), covered a broad range of topics concerned with research in high magnetic fields: (1) magnetism, (2) strongly correlated electron systems, (3) superconductors, (4) metals and metallic nanostructures, (5) molecular systems, (6) semiconductors, (7) field effects on non-magnetic systems, (8) neutron and x-ray experiments in high magnetic fields, (9) magnet technology, (10) measurement techniques in high magnetic fields, and (11) high field facilities. First of all we would like to express sincere thanks to the Yamada Science Foundation for their support and encouragement. We would like to thank all the members of the International Advisory Committee and the Program Committee for their collaboration. The conference was organized as usual with oral sessions having both invited and contributed talks and poster sessions. The technical program started on the morning of Thursday 17 August, with a tutorial lecture by Professor M von Ortenberg. The special posters were invited to introduce recent activities and up-to-date equipment of 17 high field facilities in the world. On the Friday evening, we had a banquet at Sendai City Museum for the history and culture of Sendai, with Emeritus Professor M Date (a Chairman for the first conference in Osaka) and many other guests. The conference was closed with a talk by Professor F Herlach on the afternoon of Saturday 19 August. We heard with great pleasure the announcement from Professor J Wosnitza that next RHMF will be held in Dresden in 2009. This conference had 197 participants, 9 of

  7. PREFACE: Yamada Conference LX on Research in High Magnetic Fields (RHMF2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motokawa, Mitsuhiro

    2006-12-01

    The 60th Yamada Conference on Research in High Magnetic Fields (RHMF2006) was held at Sendai Civic Auditorium, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, from 16 - 19 August 2006, as the 8th RHMF. The first was held in Osaka (1982) followed by Leuven (1988), Amsterdam (1991), Nijmegen (1994), Sydney (1997), Porto (2000), and Toulouse (2003). RHMF2006, which was also a satellite conference of the 17th International Conference on Magnetism (Kyoto, 20 - 25 August 2006), covered a broad range of topics concerned with research in high magnetic fields: (1) magnetism, (2) strongly correlated electron systems, (3) superconductors, (4) metals and metallic nanostructures, (5) molecular systems, (6) semiconductors, (7) field effects on non-magnetic systems, (8) neutron and x-ray experiments in high magnetic fields, (9) magnet technology, (10) measurement techniques in high magnetic fields, and (11) high field facilities. First of all we would like to express sincere thanks to the Yamada Science Foundation for their support and encouragement. We would like to thank all the members of the International Advisory Committee and the Program Committee for their collaboration. The conference was organized as usual with oral sessions having both invited and contributed talks and poster sessions. The technical program started on the morning of Thursday 17 August, with a tutorial lecture by Professor M von Ortenberg. The special posters were invited to introduce recent activities and up-to-date equipment of 17 high field facilities in the world. On the Friday evening, we had a banquet at Sendai City Museum for the history and culture of Sendai, with Emeritus Professor M Date (a Chairman for the first conference in Osaka) and many other guests. The conference was closed with a talk by Professor F Herlach on the afternoon of Saturday 19 August. We heard with great pleasure the announcement from Professor J Wosnitza that next RHMF will be held in Dresden in 2009. This conference had 197 participants, 9 of

  8. Engaging students as partners and outreach scientists in field-based research: The pedagogical potential of changing the power balance between students and academics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, V.

    2015-12-01

    Participating in authentic field-based research is an effective way of helping students develop a deeper understanding of theories and methodologies in earth sciences. However, professors and academics are generally in charge of the design of field-based activities and the roles played by the students in field research programs. In this presentation, I will discuss the pedagogical potential and impact of engaging students as i) genuine research partners, and ii) outreach scientists in field-based investigations. As research partners, students are given the opportunity to discuss and even influence the experimental design and acquisition of field data in research consortia. As outreach scientists, students engage their audience with their own inquiry-based fieldwork. I will use examples from a major geophysical research consortium and a community-based archaeological-geophysical project to illustrate these pedagogical approaches that involve changing the power balance between students and academics. The benefits to both the students and academics will be discussed.

  9. Diphenol activation of the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of field bean (Dolichos lablab) polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Lalitha R; Paul, Beena

    2002-03-13

    This paper reports a study on the hydroxylation of ferulic acid and tyrosine by field bean (Dolichos lablab) polyphenol oxidase, a reaction that does not take place without the addition of catechol. A lag period similar to the characteristic lag of tyrosinase activity was observed, the length of which decreased with increasing catechol concentration and increased with increasing ferulic acid concentration. The activation constant K(a) of catechol for ferulic acid hydroxylation reaction was 5 mM. The kinetic parameters of field bean polyphenol oxidase toward ferulic acid and tyrosine were evaluated in the presence of catechol. 4-Methyl catechol, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, pyrogallol, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoic acid, substrates with high binding affinity to field bean polyphenol oxidase, could stimulate this hydroxylation reaction. In contrast, diphenols such as protocatechuic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid, which were not substrates for the oxidation reaction, were unable to bring about this activation. It is most likely that only o-diphenols that are substrates for the diphenolase serve as cosubstrates by donating electrons at the active site for the monophenolase activity. The reaction mechanism for this activation is consistent with that proposed for tyrosinase (Sanchez-Ferrer, A.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. N.; Garcia-Canovas, F.; Garcia-Carmona, F. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1995, 1247, 1-11). The presence of o-diphenols, viz. catechol, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and 4-methyl catechol, is also necessary for the oxidation of the diphenols, caffeic acid, and catechin to their quinones by the field bean polyphenol oxidase. This oxidation reaction occurs immediately with no lag period and does not occur without the addition of diphenol. The kinetic parameters for caffeic acid (K(m) = 0.08 mM, V(max) = 32440 u/mg) in the presence of catechol and the activation constant K(a) of catechol (4.6 mM) for this reaction were enumerated. The absence of a lag

  10. Flipped Classroom Research and Trends from Different Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zainuddin, Zamzami; Halili, Siti Hajar

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to analyse the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 20 articles that report on flipped learning classroom initiatives from 2013-2015. The content analysis was used as a methodology to investigate methodologies, area of studies, technology tools or online platforms, the most frequently used keywords and works…

  11. Labouring in the Knowledge Fields: Researching Knowledge in Globalising Workspaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    While research on globalisation can hardly be said to have ignored the phenomenon of the global corporation or the globally distributed supply chain, the focus has overwhelmingly been on "globalization from above"--on corporate structures and on the movement of global capital in global "knowledge economies". My focus in this…

  12. Integrating Research Proposals into a Field Seminar: Feedback from Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvarfordt, Connie L.; Carter, Irene; Park, Wansoo; Yun, Sung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Teaching research to social work students continues to be the topic of an ongoing dialog within the profession. The literature suggests that some form of a "real-world" or "hands-on" learning opportunity has many benefits for teaching a subject that students often are reluctant to engage in. Using online survey methods,…

  13. Field-based phenomics for plant genetics research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perhaps the greatest challenge for crop research in the 21st century is how to predict crop performance as a function of genetic architecture and climate change. Advances in “next generation” DNA sequencing have greatly reduced genotyping costs. Methods for characterization of plant traits (phenotyp...

  14. An Emergent Research Agenda for the Field of Jewish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomberg, Linda Dale

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a qualitative analysis of the chapters of the forthcoming "What We NOW Know About Jewish Education" (to be published by Torah Aura, Spring 2008). The findings of this analysis outline an agenda for further research by highlighting a number of emergent themes pertaining to the practical and conceptual challenges that lie…

  15. Field Dependence Research: A Historical Analysis of a Psychological Construct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haaken, Janice

    1988-01-01

    Cultural and political biases in social science research contribute to bias in study methodology, as well as interpretations and conclusions. The work of Herman Witkin and Solomon Asch are discussed and used to demonstrate the effects and limitations of the environment versus ego on male and female perceptions. (AO)

  16. A Preparadigmatic Field: A Review of Research on School Vandalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, April; Ducey, Michael H.

    One of 52 theoretical papers on school crime and its relation to poverty, this chapter reviews the various approaches used in the study of school vandalism and attempts to define what is needed now. The main contribution of early research on vandalism is to point out an intellectual dead end. Conventional demographic approaches to the problem, by…

  17. Higher Education Research Community in Taiwan: An Emerging Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sheng-Ju; Chan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the evolution and characteristics of the higher education research community in Taiwan. In echoing the development of the East Asian region, Taiwan has made substantial progress during the past two decades. The massification of higher education itself has played a major role in promoting the academic differentiation or…

  18. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-04-18

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or

  19. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif; Hammer, David; Lipson, Michal

    2007-11-01

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in experiments on the COBRA pulsed power generator [1]. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. We will also present our progress on field measurements using an optical fiber sensor and a very small ``thin film waveguide'' coupled to a fiber optic system. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor for a greater fraction of the current pulse than magnetic probes, with which we compare our results. This research was sponsored by NNSA under SSAA program via DOE Coop Agreement DE-F03-02NA00057. [1] W. Syed, D. A. Hammer, & M. Lipson, 34^th ICOPS & 16^th PPPS, Albuquerque, NM, June 2007.

  20. Survey of research activity among multidisciplinary health professionals.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrea P; Roberts, Shelley; Baker, Mark J; Keijzers, Gerben; Young, Jessica; Stapelberg, N J Chris; Crilly, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe the research activities being undertaken by health service employees within one Australian health service and explore their experiences with undertaking research.Methods The present mixed-methods study was conducted across one health service in Queensland, Australia, and included a cross-sectional online survey and interviews with healthcare service employees. The anonymous survey was a self-administered online questionnaire, distributed to all 6121 employees at the health service via email, asking about research activity and engagement. Willing participants were also interviewed on their perceptions and experiences with research and capacity building.Results In all, 151 participants responded to the survey and 22 participated in interviews. Three-quarters of respondents reported actively participating in research over the past 6 years and several research outputs, such as publications, conference presentations and competitive grant funding, were displayed. Four concepts emerged from interview findings, namely collaborative partnerships, skilled mentorship, embedding research and organisational support, which represented the overall theme 'opportunities for a research-infused health service'.Conclusion Employees of the health service recognised the importance of research and had a range of research skills, knowledge and experience. They also identified several opportunities for building research capacity in this service.What is known about the topic? Building research capacity among healthcare professionals is important for enabling the conduct of high-quality research in healthcare institutions. However, building research capacity is complex and influenced by the uniqueness of organisational context. In order to successfully build research capacity among employees at any health service, current research activity, skills and experience, as well as staff perceptions around building research capacity in that

  1. Research on substances with activity against orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Marcin; Joniec, Justyna; Bartoszcze, Michał; Gryko, Romuald; Kocik, Janusz; Knap, Józef

    2013-01-01

    Although smallpox was eradicated over 30 years ago, the disease remains a major threat. High mortality, high infectivity and low resistance of the contemporary population make the smallpox virus very attractive to terrorists. The possible presence of illegal stocks of the virus or risk of deliberate genetic modifications cause serious concerns among experts. Hence, it is reasonable to seek effective drugs that could be used in case of smallpox outbreak. This paper reviews studies on compounds with proven in vitro or in vivo antipoxviruses potential, which show various mechanisms of action. Nucleoside analogues, such as cidofovir, can inhibit virus replication. Cidofovir derivatives are developed to improve the bioavailability of the drug. Among the nucleoside analogues under current investigation are: ANO (adenozine N1-oxide) and its derivatives, N-methanocarbothymidine [(N)-MCT], or derivatitives of aciklovir, peninclovir and brivudin. Recently, ST-246 - which effectively inhibits infection by limiting release of progeny virions - has become an object of attention. It has been also been demonstrated that compounds such as: nigericin, aptamers and peptides may have antiviral potential. An interesting strategy to fight infections was presented in experiments aimed at defining the role of individual genes (E3L, K3L or C6L) in the pathogenesis, and looking for their potential blockers. Additionally, among substances considered to be effective in the treatment of smallpox cases, there are factors that can block viral inhibitors of the human complement system, epidermal growth factor inhibitors or immunomodulators. Further studies on compounds with activity against poxviruses are necessary in order to broaden the pool of available means that could be used in the case of a new outbreak of smallpox.

  2. Small Group Dynamics in Cross-Cultural Collaborative Field Research: Voices from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Karen A.; Gahungu, Athanase

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) factors that influence effective cross-cultural collaboration, and (b) challenges and issues that face researchers in cross-cultural collaboration. During the summer of 2010, 20 researchers and student interns from Ghana Education Service, Chicago State University (CSU-USA), Winneba University of…

  3. Research Active Programme: A Pilot Inclusive Research Curriculum in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Nancy; García Iriarte, Edurne; Burns, Emma Q.

    2017-01-01

    Participation of people with disabilities in producing and using research is critical for monitoring the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The Research Active Programme (RAP) is a module designed to build research capacity of students with intellectual disabilities. RAP was…

  4. How the Doctorate Contributes to the Formation of Active Researchers: What the Research Tells Us

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Jennifer; Barnacle, Robyn; Cuthbert, Denise

    2014-01-01

    While much research focuses on factors contributing to doctoral completion, few studies explore the role of the doctorate in forming active researchers with the skills, know-how and appetite to pursue research post-completion. This article investigates 15 existing studies for evidence of what factors in the doctoral experience may contribute to…

  5. Bling My Research! A Mock Grant Panel Activity Illustrating the Importance of Basic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leander, Celeste A.; Whitton, Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    First-year university students have misconceptions about the source and dynamics of publicly funded research money. We designed an activity in which students take part in a mock grant panel. The results indicated a strong tendency toward student funding of applied medical research at the expense of basic research. Exposure to a few examples of…

  6. A review of research in the field of nanorobotics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, Dannelle P.; Weir, Nathan A.; Jones, James Frank

    2005-10-01

    This report highlights the findings of an extensive review of the literature in the area of nanorobotics. The main goal of this midyear LDRD effort is to survey and identify accomplishments and advancements that have been made in this relatively new and emerging field. As a result, it may be determined what routes in the area of nanorobotics are scientifically plausible and technically useful so that the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center can position itself to play a role in the future development of nanotechnology.

  7. Influence of honey bee, Apis mellifera, hives and field size on foraging activity of native bee species in pumpkin fields.

    PubMed

    Artz, Derek R; Hsu, Cynthia L; Nault, Brian A

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify bee species active in pumpkin fields in New York and to estimate their potential as pollinators by examining their foraging activity. In addition, we examined whether foraging activity was affected by either the addition of hives of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L., or by field size. Thirty-five pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) fields ranging from 0.6 to 26.3 ha, 12 supplemented with A. mellifera hives and 23 not supplemented, were sampled during peak flowering over three successive weeks in 2008 and 2009. Flowers from 300 plants per field were visually sampled for bees on each sampling date. A. mellifera, Bombus impatiens Cresson, and Peponapis pruinosa (Say) accounted for 99% of all bee visits to flowers. A. mellifera and B. impatiens visited significantly more pistillate flowers than would be expected by chance, whereas P. pruinosa showed no preference for visiting pistillate flowers. There were significantly more A. mellifera visits per flower in fields supplemented with A. mellifera hives than in fields not supplemented, but there were significantly fewer P. pruinosa visits in supplemented fields. The number of B. impatiens visits was not affected by supplementation, but was affected by number of flowers per field. A. mellifera and P. pruinosa visits were not affected by field size, but B. impatiens visited fewer flowers as field size increased in fields that were not supplemented with A. mellifera hives. Declining A. mellifera populations may increase the relative importance of B. impatiens in pollinating pumpkins in New York.

  8. Translational research on Trichoderma: from 'omics to the field.

    PubMed

    Lorito, Matteo; Woo, Sheridan L; Harman, Gary E; Monte, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics investigations are making an important impact on the current understanding and application of microbial agents used for plant disease control. Here, we review the case of Trichoderma spp., the most widely applied biocontrol fungi, which have been extensively studied using a variety of research approaches, including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, etc. Known for almost a century for their beneficial effects on plants and the soil, these fungi are the subject of investigations that represent a successful case of translational research, in which 'omics-generated novel understanding is directly translated in to new or improved crop treatments and management methods. We present an overview of the latest discoveries on the Trichoderma expressome and metabolome, of the complex and diverse biotic interactions established in nature by these microbes, and of their proven or potential importance to agriculture and industry.

  9. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities in the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association received an award of Cooperative Agreement #NCC5-356 on September 29, 1998. The mission of this activity, know as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, USRA recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members.

  10. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities in the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David; Marshall, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association received an award of Cooperative Agreement NCC5-356 on September 29, 1998. The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, USRA recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members.

  11. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities In the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David

    2002-01-01

    The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members. This paper is the final report from this now completed Cooperative Agreement.

  12. [Research progress of chemistry and anti-cancer activities of natural products from Chinese Garcinia plants].

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen-Wei; Tan, Hong-Sheng; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-02-01

    Garcinia plants are one of the rich sources of natural xanthones and benzophenones which have attracted a great deal of attention from the scientists in the fields of chemistry and pharmacology. Recently, many structurally unique constituents with various bioactivities, especially anti-tumor activity, have been isolated from Garcinia plants. This concise review focused on the anti-cancer activity natural products isolated from Chinese Garcinia plants, and the research finding by authors and collaborators over the past several years were cited.

  13. NASA's university program: Active grants and research contracts, fiscal year 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA Field Centers and certain Headquarters Program Offices provide funds for those research and development activities in universities which contribute to the mission needs of that particular NASA element. Although NASA has no predetermined amount of money to devote to university activities, the effort funded each year is substantial. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program.

  14. Phase-field dithering for active catheter tracking.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, Charles L; Mallozzi, Richard P; Darrow, Robert D; Schmidt, Ehud J

    2010-05-01

    A strategy to increase the robustness of active MR tracking of microcoils in low signal-to-noise ratio conditions was developed and tested. The method employs dephasing magnetic field gradient pulses that are applied orthogonal to the frequency-encoding gradient pulse used in conventional point-source MR tracking. In subsequent acquisitions, the orthogonal dephasing gradient pulse is rotated while maintaining a perpendicular orientation with respect to the frequency-encoding gradient. The effect of the dephasing gradient is to apply a spatially dependent phase shift in directions perpendicular to the frequency-encoding gradient. Since the desired MR signal for robust MR tracking comes from the small volume of nuclear spins near the small detection coil, the desired signal is not dramatically altered by the dephasing gradient. Undesired MR signals arising from larger volumes (e.g., due to coupling with the body coil or surface coils), on the other hand, are dephased and reduced in signal intensity. Since the approach requires no a priori knowledge of the microcoil orientation with respect to the main magnetic field, data from several orthogonal dephasing gradients are acquired and analyzed in real time. One of several selection algorithms is employed to identify the "best" data for use in the coil localization algorithm. This approach was tested in flow phantoms and animal models, with several multiplexing schemes, including the Hadamard and zero-phase reference approaches. It was found to provide improved MR tracking of untuned microcoils. It also dramatically improved MR tracking robustness in low signal-to-noise-ratio conditions and permitted tracking of microcoils that were inductively coupled to the body coil.

  15. A User’s Guide to the Coastal Engineering Research Center’s (CERC’S) Field Research Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER’S C(CERC’S) FIELD RESEARCH FACILITY(a 0by 5 William A. Birkemeier, H. Carl Miller, Stanton D. Wilhelm , I,) Allen E. DeWall, and...AUTHOR(.) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(*.) William A. Birkemeier, H. Carl Miller, Stanton D. Wilhelm , Allen E. DeWall, and Carol S. Gorbics 9...Stanton D. Wilhelm , William A. Birkemeier, and H. Carl Miller, under the supervision of Curtis Mason, FRF Group, Research Division, prepared this report

  16. Top 10 research questions related to children physical activity motivation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ang

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity is critical to healthy development of children. It is well documented that helping children develop and sustain a physically active lifestyle requires children to become motivated. Many studies have been conducted in the past 2.5 decades on determinants and correlates for children and adolescents' physical activity motivation. The findings have informed researchers and practitioners about motivation sources for children and effective strategies to motivate children in given physical activity settings. Built on the extensive knowledge base and theoretical platforms formed by these research studies, the purpose of this article is to take a look at the current research landscape and provide subjective thoughts about what we still need to know about children's physical activity motivation. The product of this subjective thinking process rendered 10 potential questions for future research on children's physical activity motivation in both in-school and out-of-school settings. These topics encompass those focusing on children's physical activity motivation as a mental dispositional process, those conceptualizing the motivation as an outcome of person-environment interactions, and those attempting to dissect the motivation as an outcome of social-cultural influences and educational policies. It is hoped that the topics can serve researchers interested in children's physical activity motivation as starting blocks from which they can extend their conceptual thinking and identify research questions that are personally meaningful. It is also hoped that the list of potential questions can be helpful to researchers in accomplishing the imperative and significant mission to motivate children to be physically active in the 21st century and beyond.

  17. Comparative research on activation technique for GaAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Qian, Yunsheng; Chang, Benkang; Chen, Xinlong; Yang, Rui

    2012-03-01

    The properties of GaAs photocathodes mainly depend on the material design and activation technique. In early researches, high-low temperature two-step activation has been proved to get more quantum efficiency than high-temperature single-step activation. But the variations of surface barriers for two activation techniques have not been well studied, thus the best activation temperature, best Cs-O ratio and best activation time for two-step activation technique have not been well found. Because the surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) before activation is only in connection with the body parameters for GaAs photocathode such as electron diffusion length and the spectral response current (SRC) after activation is in connection with not only body parameters but also surface barriers, thus the surface escape probability (SEP) can be well fitted through the comparative research between SPS before activation and SEP after activation. Through deduction for the tunneling process of surface barriers by Schrödinger equation, the width and height for surface barrier I and II can be well fitted through the curves of SEP. The fitting results were well proved and analyzed by quantitative analysis of angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ADXPS) which can also study the surface chemical compositions, atomic concentration percentage and layer thickness for GaAs photocathodes. This comparative research method for fitting parameters of surface barriers through SPS before activation and SRC after activation shows a better real-time in system method for the researches of activation techniques.

  18. Plasma Jet Motion Across the Geomagnetic Field in the ``North Star'' Active Geophysical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B. G.; Zetzer, J. I.; Podgorny, I. M.; Sobyanin, D. B.; Meng, C.-I.; Erlandson, R. E.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Lynch, K. A.

    2003-01-01

    The active geophysical rocket experiment ``North Star'' was carried out in the auroral ionosphere on January 22, 1999, at the Poker Flat Research Range (Alaska, USA) using the American research rocket Black Brant XII with explosive plasma generators on board. Separable modules with scientific equipment were located at distances of from 170 to 1595 m from the plasma source. The experiment continued the series of the Russian-American joint experiments started by the ``Fluxus'' experiment in 1997. Two injections of aluminum plasma across the magnetic field were conducted in the ``North Star'' experiment. They were different, since in the first injection a neutral gas cloud was formed in order to increase the plasma ionization due to the interaction of neutrals of the jet and cloud. The first and second injections were conducted at heights of 360 and 280 km, respectively. The measurements have shown that the charged particle density was two orders of magnitude higher in the experiment with the gas release. The magnetic field in the first injection was completely expelled by the dense plasma of the jet. The displacement of the magnetic field in the second injection was negligible. The plasma jet velocity in both injections decreased gradually due to its interaction with the geomagnetic field. One of the most interesting results of the experiment was the conservation of high plasma density during the propagation of the divergent jet to considerable distances. This fact can be explained by the action of the critical ionization velocity mechanism.

  19. [Research activities of cosmonauts in long-duration orbital missions].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the view of space medicine and human factor experts on the problems of cosmonaut's research activities. Readiness of ISS crewmembers for conducting experiments and research equipment handling depends on the pre-flight training quality and course of adaptation to the flight conditions, the latter of particular criticality for participation in human use tests as an object.

  20. RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AT THE US EPA'S GULF ECOLOGY DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this talk was to present an overview of research activities at the US EPA's Office of Research and Development, Gulf Ecology Division located on Pensacola Beach, Florida. The talk was organized into three major sections. The first section covered my educational b...

  1. Health and Physical Activity Research as Represented in RQES

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2005-01-01

    In the past 75 years, articles in Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) have contributed to the understanding of the role physical activity plays in the health of individuals and populations. Articles have described laboratory and community research studies in humans and animals, presented reviews of topics and conference proceedings,…

  2. Some patterns of woodcock activities on Maine summer fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krohn, W.B.

    1971-01-01

    Certain aspects of woodcock usage of summer fields were studied in Maine. Findings were as follows: ....1. On two study fields in 1968, numbers of woodcock first began spending nights in the fields during the second week of June. During 1968 and 1969, the number of birds flushed from the fields varied greatly between nights. Use of fields continued into the first week of November......2. Woodcock started flying into summer fields approximately 26 minutes after sunset. Unless disturbed, birds remained on fields throughout the night and started departing for diurnal covers about 48 minutes before sunrise. The duration of evening and morning flight periods averaged 13 to 15 minutes.....3. Woodcock did not necessarily use the same field throughout the summer. Five of the 36 birds taken as repeats were caught on fields other than where originally banded. However, it was believed that flights to and from fields were essentially local movements.....4. Vegetation appeared to have been a critical factor influencing the distribution of woodcock in fields. Areas of low ground cover interspersed with taller and denser cover were used most frequently.....5. Immatures, especially immature males, were the predominant age-sex class captured on Maine summer fields. The question of whether the age-sex composition of birds using summer fields is atypical of the total woodcock population requires additional study.

  3. Current Research Activities of the Department of Oceanography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    cores indicate that concentrations of both chemical The goal of this continuing classes have increased by up to a research is to assemble a unified...ofOeaorah 0 EvhmtL .. - CURRENT RESEARCH ACTIVITIES / OF THE DEPARTMENT OF OCEANOGRAPHY University of Washington Seattle, Washington 98195 Reference: A81-3...Production control mechanisms of the subarctic Pacific Oceano.............7 Subarctic Pacific ecosystem research : a planning project

  4. A stepwise validation of a wearable system for estimating energy expenditure in field-based research.

    PubMed

    Rumo, Martin; Amft, Oliver; Tröster, Gerhard; Mäder, Urs

    2011-12-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important contributor to a healthy lifestyle. Currently, standard sensor-based methods to assess PA in field-based research rely on a single accelerometer mounted near the body's center of mass. This paper introduces a wearable system that estimates energy expenditure (EE) based on seven recognized activity types. The system was developed with data from 32 healthy subjects and consists of a chest mounted heart rate belt and two accelerometers attached to a thigh and dominant upper arm. The system was validated with 12 other subjects under restricted lab conditions and simulated free-living conditions against indirect calorimetry, as well as in subjects' habitual environments for 2 weeks against the doubly labeled water method. Our stepwise validation methodology gradually trades reference information from the lab against realistic data from the field. The average accuracy for EE estimation was 88% for restricted lab conditions, 55% for simulated free-living conditions and 87% and 91% for the estimation of average daily EE over the period of 1 and 2 weeks.

  5. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 89

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Summaries are presented for the DOE contracts related to supported research for thermal recovery of petroleum, geoscience technology, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Data included for each project are: title, contract number, principal investigator, research organization, beginning date, expected completion date, amount of award, objectives of the research, and summary of technical progress.

  6. Critiquing Teacher Preparation Research: An Overview of the Field, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Villegas, Ana Maria; Abrams, Linda; Chavez-Moreno, Laura; Mills, Tammy; Stern, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part article intended to offer teacher educators a cohesive overview of the sprawling and uneven field of research on teacher preparation by identifying, analyzing, and critiquing its major programs. The article discusses research on teacher preparation for the knowledge society and research on teacher preparation for…

  7. Research on wood bending in a macrosonic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filipovici, J.; Mihai, D.; Mihai, S.; Dragan, O.; Ciovica, S.

    1974-01-01

    Woodworking often requires the wood to be bent into different shapes. In view of the fact that macrosonic waves compress and expand the medium through which they are being propagated we assumed that wood subjected to the action of these waves during the bending process would have enhanced plasticity as a result of the loosening-up that takes place in it, as well as of the reduction in effort. To this effect, the bending of wood plasticized in a macrosonic field was studied. This bending took place under good conditions, and structural analyses conducted with the aid of an electron microscope proved initial premises to be corrent. Applied on an industrial scale, this procedure would contribute to improving the technology of wood bending as well as to eliminating factory spoilage.

  8. Psychological wisdom research: commonalities and differences in a growing field.

    PubMed

    Staudinger, Ursula M; Glück, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Wisdom represents a fruitful topic for psychological investigations for at least two reasons. First, the study of wisdom emphasizes the search for the continued optimization and the further cultural evolution of the human condition. Second, it exemplifies the collaboration of cognitive, emotional, and motivational processes. The growth and scope of psychological wisdom research over the past few decades demonstrate that it is possible to investigate this complex construct with empirical rigor. Since the 1970s, five main areas have been established: lay definitions of wisdom, conceptualizing and measuring wisdom, understanding the development of wisdom, investigating the plasticity of wisdom, and applying psychological knowledge about wisdom in life contexts.

  9. Research fronts analysis : A bibliometric to identify emerging fields of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Sayaka; Ando, Satoko

    Research fronts analysis identifies emerging areas of research through observing co-clustering in highly-cited papers. This article introduces the concept of research fronts analysis, explains its methodology and provides case examples. It also demonstrates developing research fronts in Japan by looking at the past winners of Thomson Reuters Research Fronts Awards. Research front analysis is currently being used by the Japanese government to determine new trends in science and technology. Information professionals can also utilize this bibliometric as a research evaluation tool.

  10. Substance use disorders in Arab countries: research activity and bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance use disorders, which include substance abuse and substance dependence, are present in all regions of the world including Middle Eastern Arab countries. Bibliometric analysis is an increasingly used tool for research assessment. The main objective of this study was to assess research productivity in the field of substance use disorders in Arab countries using bibliometric indicators. Methodology Original or review research articles authored or co-authored by investigators from Arab countries about substance use disorders during the period 1900 – 2013 were retrieved using the ISI Web of Science database. Research activity was assessed by analyzing the annual research productivity, contribution of each Arab country, names of journals, citations, and types of abused substances. Results Four hundred and thirteen documents in substance use disorders were retrieved. Annual research productivity was low but showed a significant increase in the last few years. In terms of quantity, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (83 documents) ranked first in research about substance use disorders while Lebanon (17.4 documents per million) ranked first in terms of number of documents published per million inhabitants. Retrieved documents were found in different journal titles and categories, mostly in Drug and Alcohol Dependence Journal. Authors from USA appeared in 117 documents published by investigators from Arab countries. Citation analysis of retrieved documents showed that the average citation per document was 10.76 and the h - index was 35. The majority of retrieved documents were about tobacco and smoking (175 documents) field while alcohol consumption and abuse research was the least with 69 documents. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that research in this field was largely neglected in the past. However, recent research interest was observed. Research output on tobacco and smoking was relatively high compared to other substances of abuse like illicit drugs

  11. Research Activity in Computational Physics utilizing High Performance Computing: Co-authorship Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sul-Ah; Jung, Youngim

    2016-10-01

    The research activities of the computational physicists utilizing high performance computing are analyzed by bibliometirc approaches. This study aims at providing the computational physicists utilizing high-performance computing and policy planners with useful bibliometric results for an assessment of research activities. In order to achieve this purpose, we carried out a co-authorship network analysis of journal articles to assess the research activities of researchers for high-performance computational physics as a case study. For this study, we used journal articles of the Scopus database from Elsevier covering the time period of 2004-2013. We extracted the author rank in the physics field utilizing high-performance computing by the number of papers published during ten years from 2004. Finally, we drew the co-authorship network for 45 top-authors and their coauthors, and described some features of the co-authorship network in relation to the author rank. Suggestions for further studies are discussed.

  12. Active magnetic suspension in main magnetic field of electric motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urusov, I. D.; Galkin, V. I.; Likhoshvay, I. P.

    1985-10-01

    An active magnetic suspension for the rotor of an electric motor is considered, especially in small or miniature high-speed devices such as gyros, microturbomachines, and machine-tool spindle drives where it would eliminate the need for extra bearings and contribute to size and weight reduction. A disk-type rotor made of a ferromagnetic material is located horizontally inside the bore of a vertical stator so that weight and external loads compensate the magnetic pull upward. This pull is generated by the magnetic field in the air gap and can be automatically controlled by an electronic feedback circuit which regulates the stator input voltage depending on the rotor position along the stator bore, with a displacement transducer on the rotor indicating the position. The performance of such a suspension with automatic control in a 3-phase induction motor is analyzed on the basis of the system of differential equations describing the behavior of the electromechanical system during axial oscillations of the rotor, assuming a constant rotor speed during the transient periods.

  13. Drug releasing nanoplatforms activated by alternating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Damien; Sandre, Olivier; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie

    2017-02-24

    The use of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to generate non-invasively and spatially a localized heating from a magnetic nano-mediator has become very popular these last years to develop magnetic hyperthermia (MH) as a promising therapeutic modality already used in the clinics. AMF has become highly attractive this last decade over others radiations, as AMF allows a deeper penetration in the body and a less harmful ionizing effect. In addition to pure MH which induces tumor cell death through local T elevation, this AMF-generated magneto-thermal effect can also be exploited as a relevant external stimulus to trigger a drug release from drug-loaded magnetic nanocarriers, temporally and spatially. This review article is focused especially on this concept of AMF induced drug release, possibly combined with MH. The design of such magnetically responsive drug delivery nanoplatforms requires two key and complementary components: a magnetic mediator which collects and turns the magnetic energy into local heat, and a thermoresponsive carrier ensuring thermo-induced drug release, as a consequence of magnetic stimulus. A wide panel of magnetic nanomaterials/chemistries and processes are currently developed to achieve such nanoplatforms. This review article presents a broad overview about the fundamental concepts of drug releasing nanoplatforms activated by AMF, their formulations, and their efficiency in vitro and in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editors: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader.

  14. Research activities of Forestry Canada, 1990-91. Annual publication

    SciTech Connect

    Plexman, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    This document is an overview of current research and development activity in each of the regional establishments and national institutes. It provides a concise tabular summary of projects listed within key activity groups, together with the budget and person years assigned to each.

  15. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S CONSOLIDATED HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from 12 U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the Internet. The data system is called the Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD), and it is ...

  16. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S COMPREHENSIVE HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from nine U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the world-wide web. The data system is called CHAD-Consolidated Human Activity Database-and it is ...

  17. [Research and educational activities through perspective of pharmacognosy].

    PubMed

    Ito, Michiho

    2010-05-01

    The research field of pharmacognosy covers a wide variety of subjects based on a knowledge of natural medicines and extends its influence in all surrounding directions. Pharmacognosy itself is generally regarded as one of the branches of pharmaceutical science although the processes to achieve the objectives are not always analytical as are other branches in this field. The extraordinarily long history and broad view provide researchers opportunities to conduct unique projects which can enhance the perspective of the subject in the future. Fieldwork is one feature of scientific research and is viewed as more valuable to projects in pharmacognosy than to those in other fields of pharmaceutical sciences. The frame of my research has been formed around fieldwork; projects targeted are achieved based on information and samples gathered through this means, and further studies are suggested by the ideas obtained. Some of the results and experiences gathered in these projects are described in this article for discussion of the future image of the pharmacognosial field.

  18. USDA-ARS-SPA Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research Unit Annual Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Report on the research activities of the Small Grains and other Crops Research Unit of the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, was compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Stillwater, Oklahoma, February 24-26, 2009. Research summaries included predicting the...

  19. USDA-ARS-SPA Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research Unit annual report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Report on the research activities of the Small Grains and other Crops Research Unit of the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, was compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, September 2010. Research summaries included predicting the impa...

  20. Geophysical Institute Magnetometer Array: Magnetic Field Data in Real-Time for Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V. G.; Hampton, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetometer data from eight remote stations across Alaska have been collected continuously since the early 1980's by the Geophysical Institute Magnetometer Array (GIMA). These three-axis, 1Hz data, with ~ 1 nT precision, are used to determine the currents associated with auroral activity in the Alaska polar regions. A primary function of the GIMA is to supply magnetic field deflection data in real time to researchers so they can determine when to launch a sub-orbital sounding rocket from the Poker Flat Research Range into the proper auroral conditions. The aurora is a key coupling mechanism between the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere, and the magnetometers are used to remotely sense the ionospheric currents associated with aurora. The real-time magnetometer data are displayed through a web-based interface that functions on desktop and mobile devices. The displays are highly configurable to allow researchers the flexibility to interpret the magnetic signature they need to make a successful launch decision. The data are also available for download within 24 hours of collection. The existence of real-time data has been and will continue to be critical for successful rocket launches, however the real-time system needs to improve to meet the ever growing needs of the user community. Planned upgrades will improve the reliability and resolution of the displays as well as the ease of data download, and integration into NASA virtual observatories.

  1. Construction of the combined system of literature, intermediate data, and data in upper atmospheric research field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Y.; Nose, M.; Iyemori, T.; Murayama, Y.; Kurakawa, K.; Abe, S.; Ikeda, D.; Tanaka, Y.; Umemura, N.; Shinbori, A.; Ueno, S.; Yagi, M.; Sato, Y.

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the mechanism of long-term variations in the upper atmosphere, we need to create integrated links between a variety of ground-based observations made at various locations from the equator to the poles because what we observe is the result of complicated processes. However, the Japanese observational databases (e.g., by a global network of radars, magnetometers, and optical sensors) have been maintained and made available to the community by each institution that conducted the observations. Then researchers encountered the problem that is difficult to look for various kinds of observational data to clarify the global scale physical phenomena. In order to solve the problem, the Japanese IUGONET project built the metadata database for upper atmosphere to cross-search their databases and integrated analysis tools. It became easy to find data and to derive many data to intermediate data by using above mentioned infrastructure. However, it is still difficult to reproduce the past research from the paper as only key because of lack of supplementary information. We introduce our activity to solve above mentioned problem especially about data publication which mints DOI and metadata to dataset by the Japanese local community relevant to upper atmospheric research field. In order to beyond data publication and citation, we describe our challenge to cooperation of literature, data, identifiers, general metadata, domain specific metadata, derivation process, and code.

  2. Implementation Plan for the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gephart, Roy E.; Triplett, Mark B.; Johnson, Timothy C.

    2011-02-11

    The Long-Range Deep Vadose Zone Program Plan was published in October 2010. It summarized the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) state-of-knowledge about the contaminant remediation challenges facing the deep vadose zone (DVZ) beneath the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site and their approach to solving those challenges. Developing an implementation plan is the next step to address the knowledge and capabilities required to solve DVZ challenges when needed. This multi-year plan (FY-11 through FY-20) identifies the short to long-term research, management, and execution plans required to solve those problems facing the DVZ-Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The schedule supporting implementation overlies existing activities and milestones from Hanford’s DOE-Environmental Management (EM) end-user projects. Success relies upon multi-project teams focused on coordinated subsurface projects undertaken across the DOE Complex combined with facilitated, problem-focused, research investments implemented through the DVZ-AFRC.

  3. Research perspectives in the field of ground penetrating radars in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, Hovik; Knyazyan, Tamara; Hovhannisyan, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    Armenia is a country located in a very complicated region from geophysical point of view. It is situated on a cross of several tectonic plates and a lot of dormant volcanoes. The main danger is earthquakes and the last big disaster was in 1988 in the northwest part of contemporary Armenia. As a consequence, the main direction of geophysical research is directed towards monitoring and data analysis of seismic activity. National Academy of Sciences of Armenia is conducting these activities in the Institute of Geological Sciences and in the Institute of Geophysics and Engineering Seismology. Research in the field of ground penetrating radars is considered in Armenia as an advanced and perspective complement to the already exploiting research tools. The previous achievements of Armenia in the fields of radiophysics, antenna measurements, laser physics and existing relevant research would permit to initiate new promising area of research in the direction of theory and experiments of ground penetrating radars. One of the key problems in the operation of ground penetrating radars is correct analysis of peculiarities of electromagnetic wave interaction with different layers of the earth. For this, the well-known methods of electromagnetic boundary problem solutions are applied. In addition to the existing methods our research group of Fiber Optics Communication Laboratory at the State Engineering University of Armenia declares its interest in exploring the possibilities of new non-traditional method of boundary problems solution for electromagnetic wave interaction with the ground. This new method for solving boundary problems of electrodynamics is called the method of single expression (MSE) [1-3]. The distinctive feature of this method is denial from the presentation of wave equation's solution in the form of counter-propagating waves, i.e. denial from the superposition principal application. This permits to solve linear and nonlinear (field intensity-dependent) problems

  4. Groundwater protection and unconventional gas extraction: the critical need for field-based hydrogeological research.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R E; Gorody, A W; Mayer, B; Roy, J W; Ryan, M C; Van Stempvoort, D R

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional natural gas extraction from tight sandstones, shales, and some coal-beds is typically accomplished by horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing that is necessary for economic development of these new hydrocarbon resources. Concerns have been raised regarding the potential for contamination of shallow groundwater by stray gases, formation waters, and fracturing chemicals associated with unconventional gas exploration. A lack of sound scientific hydrogeological field observations and a scarcity of published peer-reviewed articles on the effects of both conventional and unconventional oil and gas activities on shallow groundwater make it difficult to address these issues. Here, we discuss several case studies related to both conventional and unconventional oil and gas activities illustrating how under some circumstances stray or fugitive gas from deep gas-rich formations has migrated from the subsurface into shallow aquifers and how it has affected groundwater quality. Examples include impacts of uncemented well annuli in areas of historic drilling operations, effects related to poor cement bonding in both new and old hydrocarbon wells, and ineffective cementing practices. We also summarize studies describing how structural features influence the role of natural and induced fractures as contaminant fluid migration pathways. On the basis of these studies, we identify two areas where field-focused research is urgently needed to fill current science gaps related to unconventional gas extraction: (1) baseline geochemical mapping (with time series sampling from a sufficient network of groundwater monitoring wells) and (2) field testing of potential mechanisms and pathways by which hydrocarbon gases, reservoir fluids, and fracturing chemicals might potentially invade and contaminate useable groundwater.

  5. NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program at NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.; Montegani, Francis J.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, a IO-week activity for university faculty entitled the NASA-OAI Collaborative Aerospace Research and Fellowship Program (CFP) was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in collaboration with the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). This is a companion program to the highly successful NASA Faculty Fellowship Program and its predecessor, the NASA- ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, that operated for 38 years at Glenn. This year s program began officially on June 3, 2002 and continued through August 9, 2002. This report is intended primarily to summarize the research activities comprising the 2002 CFP Program at Glenn. Fifteen research summaries are included.

  6. Research Station "Ice Base "Cape Baranov"- overview of activities in 2013 - 2015 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makshtas, Alexander; Sokolov, Vladimir; Bogorodskii, Peter; Kustov, Vasily; Movchan, Vadim; Laurila, Tuomas; Asmi, Eija; Popovicheva, Olga; Eleftheriadis, Kostas

    2016-04-01

    Research Station "Ice base "Cape Baranov" of Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) had been opened in the fall 2013 on the Bolshevik Island, Archipelago Severnaya Zemlia. Now it is going as the integrated observatory, conducting comprehensive studies in practically all areas of Earth Sciences: from free atmosphere to sea ice and sea water structure in the Shokalsky Strait, from glaciers to permafrost, from paleogeography to ornithology. Overview of activities together with some preliminary results of field works at the station performing in 2014 - 2015 years by international multidisciplinary team in frame of free atmosphere, atmospheric surface layer, greenhouse gases and aerosol studies is presented together with model estimations of active soil layer.

  7. Specially equipped aircraft used in Florida airborne field mill research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    CO2 study site manager and plant physiologist Graham Hymus (left) examines scrub oak foliage while project engineer David Johnson (right) looks on. The life sciences study is showing that rising levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere, caused by the burning of fossil fuels, could spur plant growth globally. The site of KSC's study is a natural scrub oak area near the Vehicle Assembly Building. Twelve-foot areas of scrub oak have been enclosed in 16 open-top test chambers into which CO2 has been blown. Five scientists from NASA and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md., work at the site to monitor experiments and keep the site running. Scientists hope to continue the study another five to 10 years. More information on this study can be found in Release No. 57- 00. Additional photos can be found at: www- pao.ksc.nasa.gov/captions/subjects/co2study.htm

  8. Postscript: Researching Stochastic Understanding--The Place of a Developing Research Field in PME.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truran, John

    2001-01-01

    Traces some aspects of the development of stochastics education and research to provide a background for understanding the place of the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) Stochastics Group in the research process. (MM)

  9. Neuron matters: electric activation of neuronal tissue is dependent on the interaction between the neuron and the electric field.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Steiger, Amanda

    2015-08-12

    In laboratory research and clinical practice, externally-applied electric fields have been widely used to control neuronal activity. It is generally accepted that neuronal excitability is controlled by electric current that depolarizes or hyperpolarizes the excitable cell membrane. What determines the amount of polarization? Research on the mechanisms of electric stimulation focus on the optimal control of the field properties (frequency, amplitude, and direction of the electric currents) to improve stimulation outcomes. Emerging evidence from modeling and experimental studies support the existence of interactions between the targeted neurons and the externally-applied electric fields. With cell-field interaction, we suggest a two-way process. When a neuron is positioned inside an electric field, the electric field will induce a change in the resting membrane potential by superimposing an electrically-induced transmembrane potential (ITP). At the same time, the electric field can be perturbed and re-distributed by the cell. This cell-field interaction may play a significant role in the overall effects of stimulation. The redistributed field can cause secondary effects to neighboring cells by altering their geometrical pattern and amount of membrane polarization. Neurons excited by the externally-applied electric field can also affect neighboring cells by ephaptic interaction. Both aspects of the cell-field interaction depend on the biophysical properties of the neuronal tissue, including geometric (i.e., size, shape, orientation to the field) and electric (i.e., conductivity and dielectricity) attributes of the cells. The biophysical basis of the cell-field interaction can be explained by the electromagnetism theory. Further experimental and simulation studies on electric stimulation of neuronal tissue should consider the prospect of a cell-field interaction, and a better understanding of tissue inhomogeneity and anisotropy is needed to fully appreciate the neural

  10. Field studies of safety security rescue technologies through training and response activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Robin R.; Stover, Sam

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the field-oriented philosophy of the Institute for Safety Security Rescue Technology (iSSRT) and summarizes the activities and lessons learned during calendar year 2005 of its two centers: the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue and the NSF Safety Security Rescue industry/university cooperative research center. In 2005, iSSRT participated in four responses (La Conchita, CA, Mudslides, Hurricane Dennis, Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Wilma) and conducted three field experiments (NJTF-1, Camp Hurricane, Richmond, MO). The lessons learned covered mobility, operator control units, wireless communications, and general reliability. The work has collectively identified six emerging issues for future work. Based on these studies, a 10-hour, 1 continuing education unit credit course on rescue robotics has been created and is available. Rescue robots and sensors are available for loan upon request.

  11. Cultural relevance of physical activity intervention research with underrepresented populations

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Chan, Keith; Banks, JoAnne; Ruppar, Todd M.; Scharff, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes cultural relevance in physical activity intervention research with underrepresented populations. Seventy-one extant studies which tested interventions to increase physical activity among underrepresented adults were included. Verbatim descriptions of efforts to enhance cultural relevance of study designs and interventions were extracted and then content analyzed. We found strategies to enhance cultural relevance of interventions as soliciting input from population members, linking intervention content with values, addressing language and literacy challenges, incorporating population media figures, using culturally relevant forms of physical activity, and addressing specific population linked barriers to activity. Methodological approaches included specialized recruitment and study locations, culturally relevant measures, underrepresented personnel, and cost-awareness study procedures to prevent fiscal barriers to participation. Most reported activities were surface matching. Existing research neither compared the effectiveness of cultural relevance approaches to standardized interventions nor addressed economic, education, geographic, or cultural heterogeneity among groups. PMID:25228486

  12. A brief review of aircraft controls research opportunities in the general aviation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    A review of aircraft controls research in the general aviation field is given. Among the topics included are: controls technology benefits, military and commercial test programs, flight tests, ride quality control, and wind loading.

  13. Deep Vadose Zone–Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

    2013-03-14

    This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2012.

  14. What constitutes the field of health information systems? Fostering a systematic framework and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Tobias; Raptis, Dimitri Aristotle

    2012-06-01

    The main aim of this article is to present a research agenda and systematic framework of what the field of health information systems is about, namely its central topics and connecting areas. In doing so, we try to provide a cohesive 'big picture' for academics and professionals that are interested in conducting research in this broad area. By using a large number of disparate data sources, we identified 3 major research fields and 18 sub-fields. As this discipline is quite new and heterogeneous in terms of themes and the educational backgrounds of its researchers, we see our conceptualisation as a first step in obtaining a collective understanding of this field, as well as being a common starting point for discussing future directions.

  15. Research engagement of health sciences librarians: a survey of research-related activities and attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Lessick, Susan; Perryman, Carol; Billman, Brooke L.; Alpi, Kristine M.; De Groote, Sandra L.; Babin, Ted D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The extent to which health sciences librarians are engaged in research is a little-studied question. This study assesses the research activities and attitudes of Medical Library Association (MLA) members, including the influence of work affiliation. Methods An online survey was designed using a combination of multiple-choice and open-ended questions and distributed to MLA members. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and significance testing. The authors used statistical tools and categorized open-ended question topics by the constant comparative method, also applying the broad subject categories used in a prior study. Pearson's chi-square analysis was performed on responses to determine significant differences among respondents employed in three different institutional environments. Results Analysis showed that 79% of respondents read research articles at least once a month; 58% applied published research studies to practice; 44% had conducted research; 62% reported acting on research had enhanced their libraries; 38% had presented findings; and 34% had authored research articles. Hospital librarians were significantly less likely than academic librarians to have participated in research activities. Highly ranked research benefits, barriers, and competencies of health sciences librarians are described. Conclusions Findings indicate that health sciences librarians are actively engaged in research activities. Practice implications for practitioners, publishers, and stakeholders are discussed. Results suggest that practitioners can use published research results and results from their own research to affect practice decisions and improve services. Future studies are needed to confirm and extend these findings, including the need for intervention studies to increase research and writing productivity. PMID:27076808

  16. Patterns of Field Learning Activities and Their Relation to Learning Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mingun; Fortune, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Field practicum is an active learning process. This study explores the different learning stages or processes students experience during their field practicum. First-year master's of social work students in field practica were asked how much they had engaged in educational learning activities such as observation, working independently, process…

  17. Evolution and Distribution of Hydrolytic Enzyme Activities during Preharvest Sprouting of Wheat (Triticum aestivum) in the Field.

    PubMed

    Olaerts, Heleen; Roye, Chiara; Derde, Liesbeth J; Sinnaeve, Georges; Meza, Walter R; Bodson, Bernard; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-20

    To date, research on preharvest sprouted (PHS) wheat has mostly been conducted on kernels germinated under laboratory conditions, which differ widely from conditions in the field. To obtain detailed knowledge of the evolution of hydrolytic enzyme activities in PHS wheat (Triticum aestivum), a broad collection of samples from three varieties was obtained by harvesting before, at, and after maturity. Delaying harvest time coupled with periods of heavy rainfall caused sprouting in the kernels, observed as a drop in Falling Number and an increase in α-amylase activity. The appearance of α- and β-amylase, peptidase, and endoxylanase activity during field sprouting was independent from each other. Consequently, Falling Number could not be used to predict activity of other hydrolytic enzymes. When differentiating endogenous from kernel-associated microbial enzymes, results showed that α- and β-amylase and peptidase activity of PHS kernels were predominantly of endogenous origin, whereas endoxylanase activity was largely from microbial origin.

  18. The Applied Behavior Analysis Research Paradigm and Single-Subject Designs in Adapted Physical Activity Research.

    PubMed

    Haegele, Justin A; Hodge, Samuel Russell

    2015-10-01

    There are basic philosophical and paradigmatic assumptions that guide scholarly research endeavors, including the methods used and the types of questions asked. Through this article, kinesiology faculty and students with interests in adapted physical activity are encouraged to understand the basic assumptions of applied behavior analysis (ABA) methodology for conducting, analyzing, and presenting research of high quality in this paradigm. The purposes of this viewpoint paper are to present information fundamental to understanding the assumptions undergirding research methodology in ABA, describe key aspects of single-subject research designs, and discuss common research designs and data-analysis strategies used in single-subject studies.

  19. Putting Families Into Place: Using Neighborhood-Effects Research and Activity Spaces to Understand Families

    PubMed Central

    Noah, Aggie J.

    2015-01-01

    Neighborhood is an important context in which individuals and families are embedded. Yet family studies researchers have been relatively slow to incorporate spatial approaches into family science. Although limited theoretical and methodological attention has been devoted to families in neighborhood-effects research, family scholars can contribute greatly to theories about neighborhood effects, and neighborhood-effects research can help move the field of family studies forward. This article reviews the theories, applications, and limitations of research on neighborhood effects and discusses how family studies can benefit from incorporating a spatial perspective from neighborhood-effects research. I then present an innovative methodology—referred to as activity spaces—emerging in neighborhood-effects research, and I discuss how this approach can be used to better understand the complexity and heterogeneity of families. Last, I highlight ways to incorporate space into family studies by “putting families into place.” PMID:26681979

  20. Analysis of miRNA market trends reveals hotspots of research activity.

    PubMed

    Oosta, Gary; Razvi, Enal

    2012-04-01

    We have conducted an analysis of the miRNA research marketplace by evaluating the publication trends in the field. In this article, we present the results of our analysis which reveals that hotspots exist in terms of research activities in the miRNA space--these hotspots illustrate the areas in the miRNA research space where specific miRNAs have been extensively studied, and other areas that represent new territory. We frame these data into the context of areas of opportunity for miRNA content harvest versus segments of opportunity for the development of research tools. Also presented in this article are the primary market data from online surveys we have performed with researchers involved in miRNA research around the world. Taken together, these data frame the current state of the miRNA marketplace and provide niches of opportunity for new entrants into this space.

  1. Role conflict: appropriateness of a nurse researcher's actions in the clinical field.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Lesley; Cert, Renal; Beale, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to judge the appropriateness of a particular nurse researcher's actions in a vignette from the clinical field, and to explore frameworks used to determine the appropriateness of actions. Twelve experienced nurse researchers were interviewed by telephone. They were given four vignettes of actual research situations and asked to comment and explain their judgement on the appropriateness of the nurse researcher's actions. The findings confirmed blurring of boundaries between professional and research roles for nurses. Nurses appear to use a mixture of frameworks, including scientific/rigour method, ethics, nursing competencies and their own personal-moral values. Frameworks need to be discussed and debated so that neophyte researchers are well-prepared before they enter the field to conduct research.

  2. Rotary-Wing Relevant Compressor Aero Research and Technology Development Activities at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Skoch, Gary J.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Technical challenges of compressors for future rotorcraft engines are driven by engine-level and component-level requirements. Cycle analyses are used to highlight the engine-level challenges for 3000, 7500, and 12000 SHP-class engines, which include retention of performance and stability margin at low corrected flows, and matching compressor type, axial-flow or centrifugal, to the low corrected flows and high temperatures in the aft stages. At the component level: power-to-weight and efficiency requirements impel designs with lower inherent aerodynamic stability margin; and, optimum engine overall pressure ratios lead to small blade heights and the associated challenges of scale, particularly increased clearance-to-span ratios. The technical challenges associated with the aerodynamics of low corrected flows and stability management impel the compressor aero research and development efforts reviewed herein. These activities include development of simple models for clearance sensitivities to improve cycle calculations, full-annulus, unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations used to elucidate stall, its inception, and the physics of stall control by discrete tip-injection, development of an actuator-duct-based model for rapid simulation of nonaxisymmetric flow fields (e.g., due inlet circumferential distortion), advanced centrifugal compressor stage development and experimentation, and application of stall control in a T700 engine.

  3. Integrating Science Communication Training and Public Outreach Activities into the Juneau Icefield Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, K.; Kavanaugh, J. L.; Beedle, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Creating better linkages between scientific research activities and the general public relies on developing the science communication skills of upcoming generations of geoscientists. Despite the valuable role of science outreach, education, and communication activities, few graduate and even fewer undergraduate science departments and programs actively foster the development of these skills. The Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP) was established in 1946 to train and engage primarily undergraduate students in the geosciences, field research skills, and to prepare students for careers in extreme and remote environments. During the course of the 8-week summer program, students make the 125-mile traverse across the Juneau Icefield from Juneau, Alaska to Atlin, British Columbia. Along the way, students receive hands on experience in field research methods, lectures from scientists across several disciplines, and develop and carry out individual research projects. Until the summer of 2012, a coordinated science communication training and field-based outreach campaign has not been a part of the program. During the 2012 Juneau Icefield Research Program, 15 undergraduate and graduate students from across the United States and Canada participated in JIRP. Throughout the 2-month field season, students contributed blog text, photos, and videos to a blog hosted at GlacierChange.org. In addition to internet outreach, students presented their independent research projects to public audiences in Atlin, British Columbia and Juneau, Alaska. To prepare students for completing these activities, several lectures in science communication and outreach related skills were delivered throughout the summer. The lectures covered the reasons to engage in outreach, science writing, photography, and delivering public presentations. There is no internet connection on the Icefield, few computers, and outreach materials were primarily sent out using existing helicopter support. The successes

  4. Analysis of Research Activity in Gastroenterology: Pancreatitis Is in Real Danger

    PubMed Central

    Szentesi, Andrea; Tóth, Emese; Bálint, Emese; Fanczal, Júlia; Madácsy, Tamara; Laczkó, Dorottya; Ignáth, Imre; Balázs, Anita; Pallagi, Petra; Maléth, József; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Kui, Balázs; Illés, Dóra; Márta, Katalin; Blaskó, Ágnes; Demcsák, Alexandra; Párniczky, Andrea; Pár, Gabriella; Gódi, Szilárd; Mosztbacher, Dóra; Szücs, Ákos; Halász, Adrienn; Izbéki, Ferenc; Farkas, Nelli; Hegyi, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Biomedical investment trends in 2015 show a huge decrease of investment in gastroenterology. Since academic research usually provides the basis for industrial research and development (R&D), our aim was to understand research trends in the field of gastroenterology over the last 50 years and identify the most endangered areas. Methods We searched for PubMed hits for gastrointestinal (GI) diseases for the 1965–2015 period. Overall, 1,554,325 articles were analyzed. Since pancreatology was identified as the most endangered field of research within gastroenterology, we carried out a detailed evaluation of research activity in pancreatology. Results In 1965, among the major benign GI disorders, 51.9% of the research was performed on hepatitis, 25.7% on pancreatitis, 21.7% on upper GI diseases and only 0.7% on the lower GI disorders. Half a century later, in 2015, research on hepatitis and upper GI diseases had not changed significantly; however, studies on pancreatitis had dropped to 10.7%, while work on the lower GI disorders had risen to 23.4%. With regard to the malignant disorders (including liver, gastric, colon, pancreatic and oesophageal cancer), no such large-scale changes were observed in the last 50 years. Detailed analyses revealed that besides the drop in research activity in pancreatitis, there are serious problems with the quality of the studies as well. Only 6.8% of clinical trials on pancreatitis were registered and only 5.5% of these registered trials were multicentre and multinational (more than five centres and nations), i.e., the kind that provides the highest level of impact and evidence level. Conclusions There has been a clear drop in research activity in pancreatitis. New international networks and far more academic R&D activities should be established in order to find the first therapy specifically for acute pancreatitis. PMID:27776171

  5. Research, Practice and Theory in Didactics of Mathematics: Towards Dialogue between Different Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussi, Maria G. Bartolini; Bazzini, Luciana

    2003-01-01

    Acknowledging the complex relationships which the field of didactics of mathematics has with other research fields (e.g. mathematics, educational sciences, epistemology, history, psychology, semiotics, sociology, cognitive science), the authors analyze in this paper some cases of fruitful and some of failed dialogue between experts of the…

  6. Heterogeneous mass transfer in HRE in the presence of electrostatic field research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, S. M.; Zyryanov, I. A.; Budin, A. G.; Pozolotin, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents research results of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) combustion in a hybrid rocket engine (HRE) under the influence of an electrostatic field. It is shown that the main mechanism of electrostatic field influence on the combustion rate is process changes in the condensed phase.

  7. Cognitive Style and Reading: Implications from Field Dependence Research for Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinski, Timothy

    Of all cognitive styles, field dependence/independence (FD/I) is by far the most researched and has the greatest application potential to educational problems. Briefly stated, the FD/I dimension refers to people's ability to experience and interpret their environment in terms of a global versus analytic continuum. Field dependents are likely to…

  8. The Emergence of a Field: Research and Training in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education as a field of study emerged as universities became complex institutions requiring data and interpretation for effective management and governance. The field expanded in the mid-20th century, and now includes many research and other journals, books, and other reports and publications. Academic departments and centers have been…

  9. [Qualitative research into the scientific production in the field of bioethics].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carlos Dimas Martins; Maksud, Ivia; Claro, Lenita Barreto Lorena; Un, Julio Wong

    2014-07-01

    This article discusses the character and use of qualitative research methods in the field of bioethics. A systematic review of articles published in Latin American countries and selected from the SciELO database was conducted, with special emphasis on articles that employed qualitative research methodology. The set of articles reveals a field of bioethics composed of three distinct vectors. The first refers to the dual characterization of bioethics that can be defined as a social movement or as a discipline; the second differentiates bioethics from other fields of ethics, especially from predominantly deontology-based professional ethics; and the third is related to ethical approaches adopted in the analyses conducted in the research. A relatively insignificant part of these texts result from qualitative research and they can be divided into four categories according to their themes and guidelines: bioethics as a field and/or discourse; training in health; ethics, care, and clinical practice; formulation of health policy. The production shows, on the one hand, a relatively timid approach of social science researchers to the field of bioethics and, on the other hand, little use of qualitative methodologies in research in the field and, in some cases, a certain lack of precision regarding use of the methods.

  10. 1991 research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Selected research and technology activities at Ames Research Center, including the Moffett Field site and the Dryden Flight Research Facility, are summarized. These activities exemplify the Center's varied and productive research efforts for 1991.

  11. Research and technology, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Selected research and technology activities at Ames Research Center, including the Moffett Field site and the Dryden Flight Research Facility, are summarized. These activities exemplify the Center's varied and productive research efforts for 1992.

  12. Commentary: The Relative Research Unit: An Approach to Measuring and Encouraging Clinician Participation in Research Activities

    PubMed Central

    Embi, Peter J.; Tsevat, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Recent nationwide initiatives to accelerate clinical and translational research, including comparative effectiveness research, increasingly will require clinician participation in research-related activities at the point-of-care, activities such as participant recruitment for clinical research studies and systematic data collection. A key element to the success of such initiatives that has not yet been adequately addressed is how to provide incentives to clinicians for the time and effort that such participation will require. Models to calculate the value of clinical care services are commonly used to compensate clinicians, and similar models have been proposed to calculate and compensate researchers’ efforts. However, to the authors’ knowledge, no such model has been proposed for calculating the value of research-related activities performed by non-investigator clinicians, be they in academic or community settings. In this commentary, the authors propose a new model for doing just that. They describe how such a relative research unit model could be used to provide both direct and indirect incentives for clinician participation in research activities. Direct incentives could include financial compensation, while indirect incentives could include credit towards promotion and tenure and towards the maintenance of specialty board certification. The authors discuss the principles behind this relative research unit approach as well as ethical, funding, and other considerations to fully developing and deploying such a model, across academic environments first and then more broadly across the health care community. PMID:22201633

  13. Summary of Research Activities Academic Departments 1980-1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    collaboration with personnel of the Coastal Studies Institute of Louisiana State University. SCOUR AROUND MULTIPLE PILE GROUPS SUBJECTED TO UNIDIRECTIONAL AND...academic excellence of an educational institution is measured by the achievements of its faculty in teaching, research, and related scholarly endeavors. It...the faculty and outstanding midshipmen may flourish. The research activities of the faculty range from very applied cooperative studies with the Navy

  14. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-15

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  15. Research Into the Role of Students’ Affective Domain While Learning Geology in Field Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Existing research programs in field-based geocognition include assessment of cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains. Assessment of the affective domain often involves the use of instruments and techniques uncommon to the geosciences. Research regarding the affective domain also commonly results in the collection and production of qualitative data that is difficult for geoscientists to analyze due to their lack of familiarity with these data sets. However, important information about students’ affective responses to learning in field environments can be obtained by using these methods. My research program focuses on data produced by students’ affective responses to field-based learning environments, primarily among students at the introductory level. For this research I developed a Likert-scale Novelty Space Survey, which presents student ‘novelty space’ (Orion and Hofstien, 1993) as a polygon; the larger the polygons, the more novelty students are experiencing. The axises for these polygons correspond to novelty domains involving geographic, social, cognitive, and psychological factors. In addition to the Novelty Space Survey, data which I have collected/generated includes focus group interviews on the role of recreational experiences in geology field programs. I have also collected data concerning the motivating factors that cause students to take photographs on field trips. The results of these studies give insight to the emotional responses students have to learning in the field and are important considerations for practitioners of teaching in these environments. Collaborative investigations among research programs that cross university departments and include multiple institutions is critical at this point in development of geocognition as a field due to unfamiliarity with cognitive science methodology by practitioners teaching geosciences and the dynamic nature of field work by cognitive scientists. However, combining the efforts of cognitive

  16. Snapshot of Active Flow Control Research at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, A. E.; Gorton, S. Althoff; Anders, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Langley is aggressively investigating the potential advantages of active flow control as opposed to more traditional aerodynamic techniques. Many of these techniques will be blended with advanced materials and structures to further enhance payoff. Therefore a multi-disciplinary approach to technology development is being attempted that includes researchers from the more historical disciplines of fluid mechanics. acoustics, material science, structural mechanics, and control theory. The overall goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids rather than on specific engineering problems. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several programs such as the Morphing Project under Breakthrough Vehicle Technologies Program (BVT). the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program (UEET), and the 21st Century Aircraft Technology Program (TCAT) is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research, as part of the fundamental NASA R and D (research and development) program. will be demonstrated as either bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight tests. Later they will be transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD (Department of Defense), and U.S. industry.

  17. Researching Contradictions: Cultural Historical Activity Theory Research (CHAT) in the English Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) is an appropriate theoretical and methodological framework for researchers in English interested in the social contexts of culture and its relationship with the formation of mind and activity in the English classroom. Two key concepts in Vygotsky's thought central to understanding…

  18. Exploring the use of Virtual Field Trips with elementary school teachers: A collaborative action research approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jeffrey Lance

    This research examines how elementary school teachers, when supported, use Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) to address the curricula in meaningful ways. I conducted a qualitative study with six teachers, in a collaborative action research context over a six month period. The teachers, five males and one female, all taught either grade five or six and utilized Virtual Field Trips within a variety of curricula areas including science, social studies, music and language arts. In addition, the thesis examines resulting integration of technology into the regular classroom program as a product of the utilization of Virtual Field Trips. The process of collaborative action research was applied as a means of personal and professional growth both for the participants and the researcher/facilitator. By the end of the research study, all participants had learned to integrate Virtual Field Trips into their classroom program, albeit with different levels of success and in different curricula areas. The development of attitudes, skills and knowledge for students and teachers alike was fostered through the participation in Virtual Field Trips. A common concern regarding the utilization of Virtual Field Trips was the time spent locating an appropriate site that met curricula expectations. Participation in the collaborative action research process allowed each teacher to grow professionally, personally and socially. Each participant strongly encouraged the utilization of a long term project with a common area of exploration as a means for positive professional development. Implications and recommendations for future research on the utilization of Virtual Field Trips, as well as the viability of collaborative action research to facilitate teacher development are presented.

  19. Phenomenography and Grounded Theory as Research Methods in Computing Education Research Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnunen, Paivi; Simon, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses two qualitative research methods, phenomenography and grounded theory. We introduce both methods' data collection and analysis processes and the type or results you may get at the end by using examples from computing education research. We highlight some of the similarities and differences between the aim, data collection and…

  20. Lessons from the Field: Participatory Action Research in a Family Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Dorothy; Krauss, Marty Wyngaarden

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes development of a study that includes participatory action research, specifically the establishment of a family advisory committee. The study involved a survey of Massachusetts families of children with disabilities. Suggestions for establishing and integrating the committee into the research enterprise are offered, as are…

  1. Teacher Preparation in Career and Technical Education: A Model for Developing and Researching Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retallick, Michael S.; Miller, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Leading educational researchers have called for a framework for implementing and researching early field experiences (EFE). Yet, a review of literature revealed that a comprehensive model focusing on the structure and content of EFE was an important element missing from the literature. The primary purpose of this study was to synthesize the…

  2. Research Protocol: Collections Related to Synthetic Turf Fields with Crumb Rubber Infill

    EPA Science Inventory

    The “Federal Research Action Plan on Recycled Tire Crumb Used on Playing Fields and Playgrounds” (referred to subsequently as the Federal Research Action Plan or FRAP) was finalized in February 2016. The U.S. EPA and CDC/ATSDR, in collaboration with CPSC, have prepare...

  3. Cross-Border Higher Education in China: How the Field of Research Has Developed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qin, Yunyun; Te, Alice Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate how the field of cross-border Chinese higher education has developed from 1990 to 2015. Ninety-five articles in international journals and 470 articles in national journals were collected and analyzed in terms of authorship pattern, thematic clusters, and research methods. Results show that cross-border…

  4. Early Environmental Field Research Career Exploration: An Analysis of Impacts on Precollege Apprentices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Susan K.; Beyer, Katherine M.; Pérez, Maria; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2016-01-01

    Research apprenticeships offer opportunities for deep understanding of scientific practice, transparency about research careers, and possible transformational effects on precollege youth. We examined two consecutive field-based environmental biology apprenticeship programs designed to deliver realistic career exploration and connections to…

  5. 2012 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2012 represented the third sequential year of research regarding the limited irrigation 12-200 corn production assessment study at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) with the yield results being improved from that of the 2011 season but less than of the 2010 season. The study's purpose was to ev...

  6. A Decade of Field Changing Atmospheric Aerosol Research: Outcomes of EPA’s STAR Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conference: Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry, July 28 – August 2, 2013, VermontPresentation Type: PosterTitle: An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric AerosolsAuthors: Kristina M. Wagstrom1,2, Sherri ...

  7. Research on the Field of Education Policy: Exploring Different Levels of Approach and Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainardes, Jefferson; Tello, César

    2016-01-01

    This paper, of theoretical nature, explores the levels of approach and abstraction of research in the field of education policy: description, analysis and understanding. Such categories were developed based on concepts of Bourdieu's theory and on the grounds of epistemological studies focused on education policy and meta-research. This paper…

  8. Elevating the Role of Race in Ethnographic Research: Navigating Race Relations in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Keffrelyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Little work in the social sciences or in the field of education has fully explored the methodological issues related to the study of race and racism, yet qualitative researchers acknowledge that race plays (and should play) a role in the research process. Indeed, race frames and informs the context, practices and perspectives of everyday lived…

  9. Codependency: a concomitant field of interest in research into the phenomenon caring.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, D

    1996-12-01

    The growing popularity of caring is evident throughout the nursing profession. Research into the phenomenon caring, however, necessitates that caring as an ethic be distinguished from pseudo caring actions and experiences. Codependence and codependency are proposed as being of a pseudo-caring nature. Research interest into this field of study needs to be kindled.

  10. Constituting the Field: An Essay on Harry Torrance's "Qualitative Research Methods in Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2011-01-01

    This article critically explores Harry Torrance's four-volume edited collection "Qualitative Research Methods in Education." The author argues that this text is an important intervention in the constitution of a meta-discourse on qualitative research today. Torrance pays particular attention to the field of education, providing much needed…

  11. Sustainability Education in Early Childhood: An Updated Review of Research in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret; Williams, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability education is increasingly practiced in early childhood, but a previous review of the literature suggests that there is little empirical research to provide the necessary foundation and critique. The current paper addresses the question of whether there has been an increase in empirical research in the field since this review, and if…

  12. Preparation research of Nano-SiC/Ni-P composite coating under a compound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Gu, Y. Q.; Liu, R.; Zhao, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the preparation process of Ni-P-SiC composite coatings on 45 steel surfaces with the assistance of magnetic and ultrasound fields was researched. The influence of external field on the surface morphology and performance of the composite layer is also discussed. Experimental results showed that when prepared under magnetic and ultrasonic fields, composite layers are significantly more dense and uniform than coatings made without external fields. Nano-SiC particles, dispersed uniformly in the layer, significantly improve the hardness of the composite layer, and the composite layer under the external field had the highest hardness at 680 HV The external fields can also accelerate deposition and increase the thickness of the layer. Compared to layers processed without the assistance of external fields, the thickness of the layers increased by nearly ten µm.

  13. Considerations for higher efficiency and productivity in research activities.

    PubMed

    Forero, Diego A; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    There are several factors that are known to affect research productivity; some of them imply the need for large financial investments and others are related to work styles. There are some articles that provide suggestions for early career scientists (PhD students and postdocs) but few publications are oriented to professors about scientific leadership. As academic mentoring might be useful at all levels of experience, in this note we suggest several key considerations for higher efficiency and productivity in academic and research activities. More research is needed into the main work style features that differentiate highly productive scientists and research groups, as some of them could be innate and others could be transferable. As funding agencies, universities and research centers invest large amounts of money in order to have a better scientific productivity, a deeper understanding of these factors will be of high academic and societal impact.

  14. Research activities on robotics at the Electrotechnical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakikura, M.

    Various robotics research activities carried out at the Electrotechnical Laboratory in Japan are discussed. The history of robotics research, which has been going on since the late 1960s as a part of artificial-intelligence research is described. Consideration is given to the full-scale robot system called ETL-ROBOT Mk. 1, to the carpenter robot, to the intelligent locomotive-handling robot, to the flexible finger, and to the hand-eye robot. The present aspect of the research in relation to past results is examined and includes the development of new robot systems such as a vision system based on a three-dimensional model, an interactive modeling system, a direct-drive manipulator, a robot vision language, and a language-aided robotic teleoperation system. Research themes planned for the near future include manipulation techniques, sensor techniques, autonomous robot control techniques, advanced teleoperation techniques, and system totalizing techniques.

  15. Active living research: creating and using evidence to support childhood obesity prevention.

    PubMed

    Sallis, James F; Cutter, Carmen L; Lou, Deborah; Spoon, Chad; Wilson, Amanda L; Ding, Ding; Ponkshe, Prabhu; Cervero, Robert; Patrick, Kevin; Schmid, Thomas L; Mignano, Alexandra; Orleans, C Tracy

    2014-02-01

    The second phase of Active Living Research (ALR-2, 2007-2012) focused on advancing the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)'s goal of reversing the childhood obesity epidemic. The mission was to stimulate and support research to identify environmental factors and policies that influence physical activity for children and families to inform effective childhood obesity prevention strategies, with an emphasis on the lower-income and racial/ethnic communities with highest childhood obesity prevalence. The present report describes ALR activities undertaken to accomplish three goals. The first goal-to build an evidence base-was furthered by funding 230 competitive grants to identify and evaluate promising environment and policy changes. More than 300 publications have been produced so far. The second goal-to build an interdisciplinary and diverse field of investigators-was supported through annual conferences and linked journal supplements, academic outreach to multiple disciplines, and grants targeting young investigators and those representing groups historically disadvantaged or underrepresented in RWJF-funded research. The third goal-to use research to inform policy and practice-was advanced through research briefs; webinars; research-translation grants supporting ALR grantees to design communications tailored to decision-maker audiences; active engagement of policymakers and other stakeholders in ALR program meetings and annual conferences; ALR presentations at policy-related meetings; and broad outreach through a widely used website, e-mailed newsletters, and social media. ALR-2 findings and products have contributed to a rapid increase in the evidence base and field of active living research, as documented by an independent program evaluation.

  16. DEEP VADOSE ZONE APPLIED FIELD RESEARCH CENTER: TRANSFORMATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Triplett, Mark B.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Gephart, Roy E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Chronister, Glen B.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Skip; Marble, Justin; Ramirez, Rosa

    2011-02-27

    DOE-EM, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation and DOE Richland, in collaboration with the Hanford site and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have established the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The DVZ-AFRC leverages DOE investments in basic science from the Office of Science, applied research from DOE EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development, and site operation (e.g., site contractors [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Contractor and Washington River Protection Solutions], DOE-EM RL and ORP) in a collaborative effort to address the complex region of the deep vadose zone. Although the aim, goal, motivation, and contractual obligation of each organization is different, the integration of these activities into the framework of the DVZ-AFRC brings the resources and creativity of many to provide sites with viable alternative remedial strategies to current baseline approaches for persistent contaminants and deep vadose zone contamination. This cooperative strategy removes stove pipes, prevents duplication of efforts, maximizes resources, and facilitates development of the scientific foundation needed to make sound and defensible remedial decisions that will successfully meet the target cleanup goals for one of DOE EM's most intractable problems, in a manner that is acceptable by regulators.

  17. Controllable optical activity of non-spherical Ag and Co SERS substrate with different magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chun-Zhen; Zhu, Shuang-Mei; Xin, Hao-Yi

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally fabricate a non-spherical Ag and Co surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, which not only retains the metallic plasmon resonant effect, but also possesses the magnetic field controllable characteristics. Raman detections are carried out with the test crystal violet (CV) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules with the initiation of different magnitudes of external magnetic field. Experimental results indicate that our prepared substrate shows a higher SERS activity and magnetic controllability, where non-spherical Ag nanoparticles are driven to aggregate effectively by the magnetized Co and plenty of hot-spots are built around the metallic Ag nanoparticles, thereby leading to the enhancement of local electromagnetic field. Moreover, when the external magnetic field is increased, our prepared substrate demonstrates excellent SERS enhancement. With the 2500 Gs and 3500 Gs (1 Gs = 10‑4 T) magnetic fields, SERS signal can also be obtained with the detection limit lowering down to 10‑9 M. These results indicate that our proposed magnetic field controlled substrate enables us to freely achieve the enhanced and controllable SERS effect, which can be widely used in the optical sensing, single molecule detection and bio-medical applications. Project supported by the Key Science and Technology Research Project of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 162102210164), the Natural Science Foundation of Henan Educational Committee, China (Grant No. 17A140002), the National Natural Science Foundations of China (Grant Nos. 11574276, 11404291, and 11604079), and the Program for Science & Technology Innovation Talents in Universities of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 17HASTIT0).

  18. Physical activity and pediatric multiple sclerosis: Developing a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E Ann; Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominique; Grover, Stephanie A; Motl, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Three-quarters of children with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience fatigue or depression, and progressive neurocognitive decline may be seen as early as two years after MS diagnosis. Furthermore, a higher magnetic resonance imaging disease burden is seen in pediatric-onset MS compared with adult-onset MS. To date, limited knowledge exists regarding behavioral methods for managing symptoms and disease progression in pediatric MS. To that end, this paper builds an evidence-based argument for the possible symptomatic and disease-modifying effects of exercise and physical activity in pediatric MS. This will be accomplished through: (a) a review of pediatric MS and its consequences; (b) a brief overview of physical activity and its consequences in children and adults with MS; and (c) a selective review of research on the neurological benefits of physical activity in pediatric populations. This topical review concludes with a list of 10 questions to guide future research on physical activity and pediatric MS. The objective of this paper is the provision of a research interest, focus and agenda involving pediatric MS and its lifelong management though exercise and physical activity behavior. Such an agenda is critical as the effects and maintenance of physical activity and exercise track across the lifespan, particularly when developed in the early stages of life.

  19. Field experiments on solar geoengineering: report of a workshop exploring a representative research portfolio

    PubMed Central

    Keith, David W.; Duren, Riley; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    We summarize a portfolio of possible field experiments on solar radiation management (SRM) and related technologies. The portfolio is intended to support analysis of potential field research related to SRM including discussions about the overall merit and risk of such research as well as mechanisms for governing such research and assessments of observational needs. The proposals were generated with contributions from leading researchers at a workshop held in March 2014 at which the proposals were critically reviewed. The proposed research dealt with three major classes of SRM proposals: marine cloud brightening, stratospheric aerosols and cirrus cloud manipulation. The proposals are summarized here along with an analysis exploring variables such as space and time scale, risk and radiative forcing. Possible gaps, biases and cross-cutting considerations are discussed. Finally, suggestions for plausible next steps in the development of a systematic research programme are presented. PMID:25404684

  20. Field experiments on solar geoengineering: report of a workshop exploring a representative research portfolio.

    PubMed

    Keith, David W; Duren, Riley; MacMartin, Douglas G

    2014-12-28

    We summarize a portfolio of possible field experiments on solar radiation management (SRM) and related technologies. The portfolio is intended to support analysis of potential field research related to SRM including discussions about the overall merit and risk of such research as well as mechanisms for governing such research and assessments of observational needs. The proposals were generated with contributions from leading researchers at a workshop held in March 2014 at which the proposals were critically reviewed. The proposed research dealt with three major classes of SRM proposals: marine cloud brightening, stratospheric aerosols and cirrus cloud manipulation. The proposals are summarized here along with an analysis exploring variables such as space and time scale, risk and radiative forcing. Possible gaps, biases and cross-cutting considerations are discussed. Finally, suggestions for plausible next steps in the development of a systematic research programme are presented.

  1. A Primer on Research Ethics in the Field of Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Tonya R.

    2011-01-01

    Most organizations (e.g., institutions of higher education, K-12 school systems) that engage in research with human subjects have institutional review boards (IRBs; also known as research committees) responsible for the oversight of research activities to ensure the ethical treatment of participants. Professional societies such as American…

  2. Influence of constant, alternating and cyclotron low-intensity electromagnetic fields on fibroblast proliferative activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Afinogenov, Gennadi; Afinogenova, Anna; Kalinin, Andrey

    2009-12-16

    Available data allow assuming the presence of stimulation of reparative processes under influence of low-intensity electromagnetic field, commensurable with a magnetic field of the Earth. Research of effects of low-intensity electromagnetic fields on fibroblast proliferative activity in human lungs in cell culture was performed.The influence of a constant electromagnetic field, an alternating electromagnetic field by frequency of 50 Hz and cyclotron electromagnetic field with identical intensity for all kinds of fields - 80 mcTl - on value of cellular mass and a correlation of live and dead cells in culture is investigated in three series of experiments. We used the universal electromagnetic radiator generating all three kinds of fields and supplied by a magnetometer which allows measuring the intensity of accurate within 0.1 mcTl including taking into account the Earth's magnetic field intensity.The peak value for stimulation cellular proliferation in the present experiences was two-hour influence by any of the specified kinds of electromagnetic fields. The irradiation by cyclotron electromagnetic field conducts positive dynamics in growth of live cells (up to 206+/-22%) and decreases the number of dead cells (down to 31+/-6%). Application of cyclotron magnetic fields promoted creation of optimum conditions for proliferation. As a result of researches we observed the reliable 30% increase of nitro-tetrazolium index (in nitro-tetrazolium blue test) after irradiation by cyclotron electromagnetic field in experience that testifies to strengthening of the cell breathing of living cells.In our opinion, it is necessary to pay attention not only to a pure gain of cells, but also to reduction of number dead cells that can be criterion of creation of optimum conditions for their specific development and valuable functioning.

  3. Participation in Field Learning and Teaching Opportunities: Avenues to Research and Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Donald; Strait, John; Fujimoto-Strait, Ava

    2016-01-01

    Field experiences continue to be a hallmark of a geographer's education and, for that matter, reeducation, as we all strive to remain current in the real world. Academic geographers beginning their ascent towards tenure and promotion might consider augmenting their portfolios with materials emerging from field teaching and learning activities.

  4. Embedding a Recovery Orientation into Neuroscience Research: Involving People with a Lived Experience in Research Activity.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Anthony; Brophy, Lisa; Castle, David; Harvey, Carol; Robertson, Joanne; Corlett, Philip; Davidson, Larry; Everall, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the importance and value of involving people with a lived experience of mental ill health and recovery in neuroscience research activity. In this era of recovery oriented service delivery, involving people with the lived experience of mental illness in neuroscience research extends beyond their participation as "subjects". The recovery paradigm reconceptualises people with the lived experience of mental ill health as experts by experience. To support this contribution, local policies and procedures, recovery-oriented training for neuroscience researchers, and dialogue about the practical applications of neuroscience research, are required.

  5. Field research on the spectral properties of crops and soils, volume 1. [Purdue Agronomy Farm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    The experiment design, data acquisition and preprocessing, data base management, analysis results and development of instrumentation for the AgRISTARS Supporting Research Project, Field Research task are described. Results of several investigations on the spectral reflectance of corn and soybean canopies as influenced by cultural practices, development stage and nitrogen nutrition are reported as well as results of analyses of the spectral properties of crop canopies as a function of canopy geometry, row orientation, sensor view angle and solar illumination angle are presented. The objectives, experiment designs and data acquired in 1980 for field research experiments are described. The development and performance characteristics of a prototype multiband radiometer, data logger, and aerial tower for field research are discussed.

  6. Immersion in a Hudson Valley Tidal Marsh and Climate Research Community - Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peteet, D. M.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.; Schlosser, P.; Corbett, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    A primary advantage of place-based research is the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that can be applied to a single locale, with a depth of continued study through time. Through the last decade, Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program (SSFRP) has promoted scientific inquiry, mostly among groups under-represented in STEM fields, in Piermont Marsh, a federally protected marsh in the Hudson estuary. At the same time, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) scientists have become more involved, through mentoring by researchers, postdocs and graduate students, often paired with high school teachers. The sustained engagement of high school students in a natural environment, experiencing the Hudson River and its tidal cycles, protection of coastline, water quality improvement, native and invasive plant communities, is fundamental to their understanding of the importance of wetlands with their many ecosystem services. In addition, the Program has come to see "place" as inclusive of the Observatory itself. The students' work at Lamont expands their understanding of educational opportunities and career possibilities. Immersing students in a research atmosphere brings a level of serious inquiry and study to their lives and provides them with concrete contributions that they make to team efforts. Students select existing projects ranging from water quality to Phragmites removal, read papers weekly, take field measurements, produce lab results, and present their research at the end of six weeks. Ongoing results build from year to year in studies of fish populations, nutrients, and carbon sequestration, and the students have presented at professional scientific meetings. Through the Program students gain a sense of ownership over both their natural and the academic environments. Challenges include sustained funding of the program; segmenting the research for reproducible, robust results; fitting the projects to PIs' research goals, time

  7. Correlation between dielectric property by dielectrophoretic levitation and growth activity of cells exposed to electric field.

    PubMed

    Hakoda, Masaru; Hirota, Yusuke

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system analyzing cell activity by the dielectrophoresis method. Our previous studies revealed a correlation between the growth activity and dielectric property (Re[K(ω)]) of mouse hybridoma 3-2H3 cells using dielectrophoretic levitation. Furthermore, it was clarified that the differentiation activity of many stem cells could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)] without differentiation induction. In this paper, 3-2H3 cells exposed to an alternating current (AC) electric field or a direct current (DC) electric field were cultivated, and the influence of damage by the electric field on the growth activity of the cells was examined. To evaluate the activity of the cells by measuring the Re[K(ω)], the correlation between the growth activity and the Re[K(ω)] of the cells exposed to the electric field was examined. The relations between the cell viability, growth activity, and Re[K(ω)] in the cells exposed to the AC electric field were obtained. The growth activity of the cells exposed to the AC electric field could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)]. Furthermore, it was found that the adverse effects of the electric field on the cell viability and the growth activity were smaller in the AC electric field than the DC electric field.

  8. Recent NRC research activities addressing valve and pump issues

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The mission of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is to ensure the safe design, construction, and operation of commercial nuclear power plants and other facilities in the U.S.A. One of the main roles that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) plays in achieving the NRC mission is to plan, recommend, and implement research programs that address safety and technical issues deemed important by the NRC. The results of the research activities provide the bases for developing NRC positions or decisions on these issues. Also, RES performs confirmatory research for developing the basis to evaluate industry responses and positions on various regulatory requirements. This presentation summarizes some recent RES supported research activities that have addressed safety and technical issues related to valves and pumps. These activities include the efforts on determining valve and motor-operator responses under dynamic loads and pressure locking events, evaluation of monitoring equipment, and methods for detecting and trending aging of check valves and pumps. The role that RES is expected to play in future years to fulfill the NRC mission is also discussed.

  9. Mode 2 and the Tension between Excellence and Utility: The Case of a Policy-Relevant Research Field in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Håkansta, Carin; Jacob, Merle

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of changing science policy doctrines on the development of an academic field, working life research. Working life research is an interdisciplinary field of study in which researchers and stakeholders collaborated to produce relevant knowledge. The development of the field, we argue, was both facilitated and…

  10. 48 CFR 927.408 - Cosponsored research and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cosponsored research and development activities. 927.408 Section 927.408 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Technical Data and Copyrights...

  11. 48 CFR 927.408 - Cosponsored research and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cosponsored research and development activities. 927.408 Section 927.408 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Technical Data and Copyrights...

  12. 48 CFR 27.408 - Cosponsored research and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cosponsored research and development activities. 27.408 Section 27.408 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Data and Copyrights...

  13. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  14. Physical activity parenting measurement and research: Challenges, explanations, and solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity (PA) parenting research has proliferated over the past decade, with findings verifying the influential role that parents play in children's emerging PA behaviors. This knowledge, however, has not translated into effective family-based PA interventions. During a preconference worksh...

  15. Magnetic fields suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance ciprofloxacin activity.

    PubMed

    Bandara, H M H N; Nguyen, D; Mogarala, S; Osiñski, M; Smyth, H D C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the refractory nature of pathogenic microbial biofilms, innovative biofilm eradication strategies are constantly being sought. Thus, this study addresses a novel approach to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and magnetic fields were systematically evaluated in vitro for their relative anti-biofilm contributions. Twenty-four-hour biofilms exposed to aerosolized MNPs, Cipro, or a combination of both, were assessed in the presence or absence of magnetic fields (Static one-sided, Static switched, Oscillating, Static + oscillating) using changes in bacterial metabolism, biofilm biomass, and biofilm imaging. The biofilms exposed to magnetic fields alone exhibited significant metabolic and biomass reductions (p < 0.05). When biofilms were treated with a MNP/Cipro combination, the most significant metabolic and biomass reductions were observed when exposed to static switched magnetic fields (p < 0.05). The exposure of P. aeruginosa biofilms to a static switched magnetic field alone, or co-administration with MNP/Cipro/MNP + Cipro appears to be a promising approach to eradicate biofilms of this bacterium.

  16. Regulations of 23 December 1986 for the implementation of the General Law on health, in the field of health research.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    This document presents the text of health legislation approved in Mexico on December 23, 1986, setting forth ethical issues and professional responsibilities in the area of health research. Health research is conceptualized as activities that contribute to knowledge regarding biological and physiological processes in humans; knowledge of the links between the causes of disease, medical practice, and social structures; prevention and control of health problems; evaluation of the harmful effects of the environment on health; the study of techniques recommended or used for the delivery of health services; and the production of goods for the health sector. Title 1 of these regulations outlines responsibilities of the Secretariat of Health and calls for the establishment of an Inter-Institutional Commission on Health Research. Title II defines ethical aspects of research on human subjects, with separate provisions for research involving minors, incompetent persons, women of childbearing age, pregnant women, women during labor or childbirth, nursing mothers, embryos, stillborn fetuses, and cadavers. In general, research is permissible on human subjects only if it confers health benefits and carries minimal risks. Title III sets forth regulations on research on new prophylactic, diagnostic, therapeutic, and rehabilitative methods, while Title IV concerns the biosafety of research. Clinical research in the field of pharmacology must include 4 phases preceded by full preclinical studies. Finally, Title V of this legislation defines the duties of internal committees in health institutions.

  17. Activity recognition using a mixture of vector fields.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Figueiredo, Mário A T; Marques, Jorge S

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of moving objects in image sequences (video) has been one of the major themes in computer vision. In this paper, we focus on video-surveillance tasks; more specifically, we consider pedestrian trajectories and propose modeling them through a small set of motion/vector fields together with a space-varying switching mechanism. Despite the diversity of motion patterns that can occur in a given scene, we show that it is often possible to find a relatively small number of typical behaviors, and model each of these behaviors by a "simple" motion field. We increase the expressiveness of the formulation by allowing the trajectories to switch from one motion field to another, in a space-dependent manner. We present an expectation-maximization algorithm to learn all the parameters of the model, and apply it to trajectory classification tasks. Experiments with both synthetic and real data support the claims about the performance of the proposed approach.

  18. The Research Assessment Exercise and Motivation: A Note on the Difference in the Impact on the Active Researchers and the Non-Active.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed British academics, hypothesizing that the effect of Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) on individual academics is dependent on their self-assessed level of research activity. Found that the RAE's effect does appear to be dependent on level of research activity, with moderately active researchers the most influenced to increase…

  19. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajan; Schürer, Stephan C.; Muskal, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR) data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB), WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note. PMID:27429748

  20. ECUT: Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies program - Biocatalysis research activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, R.

    1984-01-01

    The activities of the Biocatalysis Research Activity are organized into the Biocatalysis and Molecular Modeling work elements and a supporting planning and analysis function. In the Biocatalysis work element, progress is made in developing a method for stabilizing genetically engineered traits in microorganisms, refining a technique for monitoring cells that are genetically engineered, and identifying strains of fungi for highly efficient preprocessing of biomass for optimizing the efficiency of bioreactors. In the Molecular Modeling work element, a preliminary model of the behavior of enzymes is developed. A preliminary investigation of the potential for synthesizing enzymes for use in electrochemical processes is completed. Contact with industry and universities is made to define key biocatalysis technical issues and to broaden the range of potential participants in the activity. Analyses are conducted to identify and evaluate potential concepts for future research funding.

  1. ECUT: Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies program - Biocatalysis research activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R.

    1984-04-01

    The activities of the Biocatalysis Research Activity are organized into the Biocatalysis and Molecular Modeling work elements and a supporting planning and analysis function. In the Biocatalysis work element, progress is made in developing a method for stabilizing genetically engineered traits in microorganisms, refining a technique for monitoring cells that are genetically engineered, and identifying strains of fungi for highly efficient preprocessing of biomass for optimizing the efficiency of bioreactors. In the Molecular Modeling work element, a preliminary model of the behavior of enzymes is developed. A preliminary investigation of the potential for synthesizing enzymes for use in electrochemical processes is completed. Contact with industry and universities is made to define key biocatalysis technical issues and to broaden the range of potential participants in the activity. Analyses are conducted to identify and evaluate potential concepts for future research funding.

  2. Bringing Magnetic Field Data in Real-Time for Researchers on Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V. G.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetometer data from eight remote stations across Alaska have been collected continuously since the early 1980's by the Geophysical Institute Magnetometer Array (GIMA). These three-axis fluxgate magnetometers, with <1 nT precision, provide data at 1 Hz, which are used to determine the currents associated with auroral activity in the Alaska polar regions. A primary function of the GIMA is to supply magnetic field deflection data in real time to researchers so they can determine when to launch a sub-orbital sounding rocket from the Poker Flat Research Range into the proper auroral conditions. The aurora is a key coupling mechanism between the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere, and the magnetometers are used to remotely sense the ionospheric currents associated with aurora. The web-based interface to display the real-time magnetometer data has been upgraded to be fully functional on a wide range of platforms, from desktops to mobile devices. The incoming data stream from each station is recorded in a database and used to populate the real time graphical display. Improvements in data management increased the sampling rate from 5 seconds to 1 second for the display. The displays are highly configurable to allow researchers the flexibility to interpret the magnetic signature they need to make a successful launch decision. The use of Django and Java script technology enabled the system to be structured for rapid expansion when new stations come online and input streams are improved. Data are also available for download within 24 hours of collection. The existence of real-time data has been and will continue to be critical for successful rocket launches.

  3. One Health training and research activities in Western Europe

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Reina; Koopmans, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The increase in emerging human infectious diseases that have a zoonotic origin and the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antimicrobial drugs have shown the need for collaborations between the human, animal and environmental health sectors. The One Health concept increasingly receives recognition from policy makers and researchers all over the world. This overview compiled research and education activities in the area of One Health in Western Europe (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Iceland, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Netherlands, Portugal, Scandinavia, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom (UK), with a focus on infectious diseases. It can serve as a starting point for future initiatives and collaborations. Material and methods A literature search for ‘One Health’ was performed using National Center for Biotechnology Information and Google. Moreover, information from global and European policy documents was collected and a questionnaire was designed to gather current One Health research and training activities in Western Europe. Results This overview shows that there is considerable recognition for One Health in Europe, although most educational initiatives are recent. In Europe, the One Health approach is currently mainly advocated in relation to antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Many countries have incorporated the One Health approach in their policy to fight AMR, and funding possibilities for AMR research increased significantly. The number of national and international multidisciplinary research networks in the area of zoonotic diseases and One Health is increasing. Discussion Although One Health has gained recognition in Europe, often a One Health approach to research and education in the area of zoonotic diseases and AMR is not implemented. In many countries, collaboration between sectors is still lacking, and One Health activities are predominantly initiated by the veterinary sector. To facilitate the

  4. Antiproliferative activity of aroylacrylic acids. Structure-activity study based on molecular interaction fields.

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Branko J; Stanojković, Tatjana P; Zižak, Zeljko S; Dabović, Milan M

    2011-08-01

    Antiproliferative activity of 27 phenyl-substituted 4-aryl-4-oxo-2-butenoic acids (aroylacrylic acids) toward Human cervix carcinoma (HeLa), Human chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) and Human colon tumor (LS174) cell lines in vitro are reported. Compounds are active toward all examined cell lines. The most active compounds bear two or three branched alkyl or cycloalkyl substituents on phenyl moiety having potencies in low micromolar ranges. One of most potent derivatives arrests the cell cycle at S phase in HeLa cells. The 3D QSAR study, using molecular interaction fields (MIF) and derived alignment independent descriptors (GRIND-2), rationalize the structural characteristics correlated with potency of compounds. Covalent chemistry, most possibly involved in the mode of action of reported compounds, was quantitatively accounted using frontier molecular orbitals. Pharmacophoric pattern of most potent compounds are used as a template for virtual screening, to find similar ones in database of compounds screened against DTP-NCI 60 tumor cell lines. Potency of obtained hits is well predicted.

  5. SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES, CORONAL POTENTIAL FIELD MODELS AND ERUPTION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2013-05-10

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun vector spectro-magnetograph, the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from Stanford University's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Polar field changes are found to be well correlated with active fields over most of the period studied, except between 2003 and 2006 when the active fields did not produce significant polar field changes. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The tilt of the solar dipole is therefore almost entirely due to active-region fields. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking, Solar Eruptive Event Detection System, and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003 and 2012 than for those between 1997 and 2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  6. Research in the Field of Organic Photovoltaics at the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, Pavel A.

    2015-08-01

    In the present review we highlight the main research activities in the field of organic photonics and photovoltaics at the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (IPCP RAS). Extensive investigation of optical and electrical properties of π-conjugated organic compounds performed at IPCP RAS since 1960's resulted in design of many exciting materials representing organic semiconductors, metals and superconductors. Organic Schottky barrier and p/n junction photovoltaic devices constructed at IPCP RAS in 1960's and 1970's were among the first examples of reasonably efficient organic solar cells at that time. These early discoveries inspired younger generations of the researchers to continue the work of their mentors and explore the world of organic materials and photonic devices such as molecular photonic switches, organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, photodetectors, photoswitchable organic field-effect transistors and memory elements.

  7. Socialization into science: An ethnographic study in a field research station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calovini, Theresa Ann

    While the place of language in building the tasks and activities of the science classroom has received attention in the education literature, how students do the work of affiliation building through language remains poorly understood. This dissertation is based on ethnographic research in an apprenticeship learning situation at a biological field research station. I carried out this research with five undergraduates apprentices. I focus on how the language used in this apprenticeship situation positioned the apprentices with science. Issues of access and diversity in science education have motivated this research but this point can be missed because the five apprentices were all fairly successful in university science. They had all secured their job for the summer as paid research assistants. Yet, even with these successful students, science had a complicated place in their lives. I draw on Gee's (1999) notion of Discourse to understand this complexity. I focus on four Discourses--- Science, Knowing about the Animals, Senior Projects and RAships, and Relationships ---which were important in the apprentices' learning about and socialization with science. I try to understand the inter-workings of these four Discourses through a detailed analysis of three conversations involving one of the participants, Michelle. Michelle's use of narrative emerged as a linguistic resource which she used to explore dilemmas she experienced in the tensions between these four Discourses. Michelle was in many ways an ideal apprentice. She did her job well and she sought and received expert advice on her Senior project. Nonetheless, Michelle faced obstacles in her pursuit of a career in science and these obstacles related to language use and her use of narrative. I show how her use of narrative either facilitated or impeded her learning, depending on the context of the interaction. My analysis of Discourse points to important issues in language use by both students and teachers, with

  8. The magnetic fields at the surface of active single G-K giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurière, M.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Charbonnel, C.; Wade, G. A.; Tsvetkova, S.; Petit, P.; Dintrans, B.; Drake, N. A.; Decressin, T.; Lagarde, N.; Donati, J.-F.; Roudier, T.; Lignières, F.; Schröder, K.-P.; Landstreet, J. D.; Lèbre, A.; Weiss, W. W.; Zahn, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    . Our results show that the magnetic fields of these giants are produced by a dynamo, possibly of α-ω origin since Ro is in general smaller than unity. Four stars for which the magnetic field is measured to be outstandingly strong with respect to that expected from the rotational period/magnetic field relation or their evolutionary status are interpreted as being probable descendants of magnetic Ap stars. In addition to the weak-field giant Pollux, 4 bright giants (Aldebaran, Alphard, Arcturus, η Psc) are detected with magnetic field strength at the sub-Gauss level. Besides Arcturus, these stars were not considered to be active giants before this study and are very similar in other respects to ordinary giants, with S-index indicating consistency with basal chromospheric flux. Tables 6-8 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgBased on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (TBL) at Observatoire du Pic du Midi, CNRS/INSU and Université de Toulouse, France, and at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, CNRS/INSU and the University of Hawaii.

  9. Sleep-related memory consolidation in depression: an emerging field of research.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Orla Patricia; Regen, Francesca; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Heuser, Isabella; Anghelescu, Ion

    2008-01-01

    Sleep-related memory consolidation has received increasing attention in recent years. Because previous research has focused on healthy young adults, only very few studies have been conducted in patients with psychiatric disorders so far. The investigation of sleep-related memory consolidation in depression offers a wide range of future research opportunities and can therefore be regarded as an emerging field of research. This article gives a short overview of current knowledge of sleep-related memory consolidation in healthy young adults and builds a bridge to psychiatry and depression, where further research is urgently needed.

  10. Earth Science Big Data Activities at Research Data Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Baumann, Peter; Evans, Ben; Riedel, Morris

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation we introduce Earth science related activities of the Big Data Interest Group (BDIG) in Research Data Alliance (RDA). "RDA is an international organization focused on the development of infrastructure and community activities that reduce barriers to data sharing and exchange, and the acceleration of data driven innovation worldwide." The participation of researchers in RDA is voluntary. As the name implies, an Interest Group is a collection of participants sharing the same interest. The BDIG seeks to address community needs on all things having to do with Big Data. The ultimate goal of RDA Big Data Interest Group is to produce a set of recommendation documents to advise diverse research communities with respect to: • How to select an appropriate Big Data solution for a particular science application to realize optimal value? and • What are the best practices in dealing with various data and computing issues associated with such a solution? The primary means to reaching such recommendations is through the establishment and work of Working Groups, each of which focuses on a specific issue. Although BDIG is not specific to Earth science, its recent activities revolve mostly around it. We introduce some of these activities that are designed to advance our knowledge and to characterize Big Data in Earth science.

  11. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  12. UBVRI photoelectric photometry in the fields of fifteen active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuy, Mario; Maza, Jose

    1989-03-01

    UVBRI photoelectric sequences for fifteen AGNs were obtained with 0.6, 0.9, and 1-m telescopes. The data include 473 observations for 118 stars, giving an average of 4.0 observations per star, and 7.9 stars per sequence. Tables are presented of the fields observed, the magnitudes and colors of the sequence stars, and the mean differences between the results and those of other studies.

  13. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors <2 km. These events concentrated mainly below Tres Virgenes volcanoes, and the geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  14. Magnetic field configuration in a flaring active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Vieira, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) provides continuous monitoring of the Sun's vector magnetic field through full-disk photospheric data with both high cadence and high spatial resolution. Here we investigate the evolution of AR 11249 from March 6 to March 7, 2012. We make use of HMI Stokes imaging, SDO/SHARPs, the HMI magnetic field line-of-sight (LOS) maps and the transverse components of the magnetic field as well as LOS velocity maps in order to detect regions with significant flux emergence and/or cancellation. In addition, we apply the Local Correlation Tracking (LCT) technique to the total and signed magnetic flux data and derive maps of horizontal velocity. From this analysis, we were able to pinpoint localized shear regions (and a shear channel) where penumbrae and pore formation areas, with strong linear polarization signals, are stretched and squeezed, showing also important downflows and upflows. We have also utilized Hinode/SP data and compared them to the HMI-SHARPs and the HMI-Stokes spectrograms. The aforementioned shear channel seems to correspond well with the X-class flare main channel of March 7 2012, as observed in AIA/SDO 171, 304 and 1600 Å.

  15. Research Activities at Fermilab for Big Data Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Wu, Wenji; Kim, Hyun W; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Dykstra, Dave; Slyz, Marko; DeMar, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation of 100GE Networking Infrastructure is the next step towards management of Big Data. Being the US Tier-1 Center for the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the central data center for several other large-scale research collaborations, Fermilab has to constantly deal with the scaling and wide-area distribution challenges of the big data. In this paper, we will describe some of the challenges involved in the movement of big data over 100GE infrastructure and the research activities at Fermilab to address these challenges.

  16. Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

    2008-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

  17. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation.

  18. Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  19. Recent Activities at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Bannister, Mark E; Hale, Jerry W; Havener, C C; Krause, Herbert F; Vane, C Randy; Deng, Shihu; Draganic, Ilija N; Harris, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent activities at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) are summarized. A brief summary of the MIRF high voltage (HV) platform and floating beam line upgrade is provided. An expansion of our research program to the use of molecular ion beams in heavy-particle and electron collisions, as well as in ion-surface interactions is described, and a brief description is provided of the most recently added Ion Cooling and Characterization End-station (ICCE) trap. With the expansion to include molecular ion beams, the acronym MIRF for the facility, however, remains unchanged: M can now refer to either Multicharged or Molecular.

  20. Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  1. Report on activities and attitudes of organizations active in the clinical practice guidelines field.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, A O; Battista, R N; Hodge, M J; Lewis, S; Basinski, A; Davis, D

    1995-01-01

    The organizing committee of a workshop on clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) surveyed invited organizations on their attitudes and activities related to five topics to be covered during the workshop sessions: organizational roles, priority setting, guidelines implementation, guidelines evaluation and development of a network of those active in the CPG field. Organizational roles: The national specialty societies were felt to have the largest role to play; the smallest roles were assigned to consumers, who were seen to have a role mainly in priority setting, and to industry and government, both of which were seen to have primarily a funding role. Many barriers to collaboration were identified, the solutions to all of which appeared to be better communication, establishment of common principles and clear role definitions. Priority setting: There was considerable agreement on the criteria that should be used to set priorities for CPG activities: the burden of disease on population health, the state of scientific knowledge, the cost of treatment and the economic burden of disease on society were seen as important factors, whereas the costs of guidelines development and practitioner interest in guidelines development were seen as less important. Organizations were unable to give much information on how they set priorities. Guidelines implementation: Most of the organizations surveyed did not actively try to ensure the implementation of guidelines, although a considerable minority devoted resources to implementation. The 38% of organizations that implemented guidelines actively listed a wide variety of activities, including training, use of local opinion leaders, information technology, local consensus processes and counter detailing. Guidelines evaluation: Formal evaluation of guidelines was undertaken by fewer than 13% of the responding organizations. All the evaluations incorporated assessments before and after guideline implementation, and some used primary patient

  2. The neurosciences research program at MIT and the beginning of the modern field of neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Adelman, George

    2010-01-15

    The interdisciplinary field, "neuroscience," began at MIT in 1962 with the founding of the Neurosciences Research Program (NRP) by Francis O. Schmitt and a group of US and international scientists - physical, biological, medical, and behavioral - interested in understanding the brain basis of behavior and mind. They organized and held specialist meetings of basic topics in neuroscience, and the journal and book publications over the next 20 years, based on these meetings, helped establish the new field.

  3. FY 1991 environmental research programs for the DOE Field Office, Nevada: Work plan and quarterly reports, fourth quarter report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-10-01

    This research includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies, site mitigation plans, compliance activities, and historical research; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design, laboratory, field, and administrative activities. In addition to these, archaeological site characterization, flood hazards for rail transportation, and paleofaunal investigations will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which required DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, review and classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports, e.g., quarterly reports, not included in the requirements of the individual projects. A new set of programs funded by the Office of Technology Development will be in place by the third quarter of FY 1991. These projects will address environmental restoration and waste management concerns, among other related topics. In accordance with specific contract requirements for each activity, DRI will produce summary, status and final reports and, in some cases, journal articles which will present the results of specific research efforts. This document contains the work plan, including project descriptions, tasks, deliverables and quarterly progress reports on each project for FY 1991.

  4. Evaluation of the Physical Activity and Public Health Course for Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Dorn, Joan M.; Camplain, Ricky; Pate, Russell R.; Brown, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 1995, an 8-day Physical Activity and Public Health Course for Researchers has been offered yearly in the United States. Methods In 2013, an evaluation quantified time that fellows spent in different course offerings, surveyed fellows on course impact, documented grant funding, and identified fellow participation on leading physical activity-related journals. Results The number of fellows that attended the course ranged from 20–35/year. Fellows who participated in the web survey (n=322) agreed that the course: met their expectations (99%), had a positive impact on the physical activity research or practice work they did (98%), and helped increase their professional networking in the field (93%). Following the course, 73% of fellows had further contact with course faculty and 71% had further contact with other fellows. From the National Institutes of Health, 117 grants were awarded to 82 fellows (21% of eligible fellows). Out of 14 journals reviewed, 11 had at least one fellow on their staff as editor, associate editor, or editorial board member. Conclusion The Physical Activity and Public Health Course for Researchers helps address a training need by providing instruction and building capacity in the US and abroad for conducting research on physical activity and public health. PMID:25271475

  5. Infrared Detector Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Sulima, O. V.; Amzajerdian, F.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared detector development and characterization at NASA Langley Research Center will be reviewed. These detectors were intended for ground, airborne, and space borne remote sensing applications. Discussion will be focused on recently developed single-element infrared detector and future development of near-infrared focal plane arrays (FPA). The FPA will be applied to next generation space-based instruments. These activities are based on phototransistor and avalanche photodiode technologies, which offer high internal gain and relatively low noise-equivalent-power. These novel devices will improve the sensitivity of active remote sensing instruments while eliminating the need for a high power laser transmitter.

  6. Reflections by a student and a faculty member on student-faculty collaborative geophysical field research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, C.; Rotzien, J.

    2007-12-01

    More and more students and faculty engage in collaborative research. Field geophysics provides a fascinating venue, as it always contributes to interpersonal relations, usually involves off-campus work, and often allows us to meet new people and explore a different culture. Tackling an authentic research problem keeps a faculty member excited about her/his discipline, while allowing a student to engage in the process of science, follow a researcher's thoughts and contribute to a real project. The exchange of ideas and the generation of new knowledge is rewarding to the student as it facilitates her/his academic growth. Despite the obvious advantages of including students in field-based research, few students are allowed such an opportunity because of the institutional commitment in time and money that is necessary for success. Other challenges in field-based geophysical research include steep learning curves related to the use of equipment, unknown outcomes (data that is often difficult to interpret), and a true commitment to the project on the student's part. The faculty member on the other hand faces additional challenges because of the responsibility for students in the field, scheduling constraints, limited funding, and students' diverse academic goals. This presentation will be given by a faculty member and a student who have engaged in various authentic research projects. Projects ranged from afternoon lab exercises on campus (eg, microgravity survey over a tunnel on campus), course projects connected to field trips (eg, magnetic study and subsequent potential field analysis), summer research projects (eg, georadar survey of Deboullie Lake rock glacier), to year-long undergraduate thesis projects (eg, potential field studies at igneous centres of the Navajo Volcanic Field). We will present highlights of these projects, examine their pedagogical merits, and discuss the advantages and rewards we earned as well as the challenges we faced. Despite all challenges

  7. Undergraduate research experiences support science career decisions and active learning.

    PubMed

    Lopatto, David

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of student evaluations of summer undergraduate research experiences using the SURE (Survey of Undergraduate Research Experiences) and a follow-up survey disseminated 9 mo later. The survey further examines the hypothesis that undergraduate research enhances the educational experience of science undergraduates, attracts and retains talented students to careers in science, and acts as a pathway for minority students into science careers. Undergraduates participated in an online survey on the benefits of undergraduate research experiences. Participants indicated gains on 20 potential benefits and reported on career plans. Most of the participants began or continued to plan for postgraduate education in the sciences. A small group of students who discontinued their plans for postgraduate science education reported significantly lower gains than continuing students. Women and men reported similar levels of benefits and similar patterns of career plans. Undergraduate researchers from underrepresented groups reported higher learning gains than comparison students. The results replicated previously reported data from this survey. The follow-up survey indicated that students reported gains in independence, intrinsic motivation to learn, and active participation in courses taken after the summer undergraduate research experience.

  8. Undergraduate Research Experiences Support Science Career Decisions and Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of student evaluations of summer undergraduate research experiences using the SURE (Survey of Undergraduate Research Experiences) and a follow-up survey disseminated 9 mo later. The survey further examines the hypothesis that undergraduate research enhances the educational experience of science undergraduates, attracts and retains talented students to careers in science, and acts as a pathway for minority students into science careers. Undergraduates participated in an online survey on the benefits of undergraduate research experiences. Participants indicated gains on 20 potential benefits and reported on career plans. Most of the participants began or continued to plan for postgraduate education in the sciences. A small group of students who discontinued their plans for postgraduate science education reported significantly lower gains than continuing students. Women and men reported similar levels of benefits and similar patterns of career plans. Undergraduate researchers from underrepresented groups reported higher learning gains than comparison students. The results replicated previously reported data from this survey. The follow-up survey indicated that students reported gains in independence, intrinsic motivation to learn, and active participation in courses taken after the summer undergraduate research experience. PMID:18056301

  9. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: research activity in Arab countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic respiratory diseases, like bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are a worldwide health problem. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of asthma and COPD-related research from Arab countries has not been explored and there are few internationally published reports on such field. The main objectives of this study were to analyze research output originating from Arab countries in the field of bronchial asthma and COPD. Methods Original scientific articles or reviews published from the 22 Arab countries were screened using specific words pertaining to asthma and COPD using Scopus database and search engine. Research productivity was evaluated based on: (a) total and trends of contribution of each Arab country to asthma and COPD research and (b) journals in which researchers from Arab countries published their research. Results The total number of original research and review articles published globally about bronchial asthma and COPD was 163,964. The leading country in bronchial asthma and COPD research was United States of America (38,632; 23.56%). Worldwide, Turkey ranked 19th while Israel and Iran ranked 25th and 29th respectively. Among Arab countries, Egypt and Kingdom of Saudi Arabia came on positions 39th and 43rd, respectively. A total of 1,304 documents about bronchial asthma and COPD were published from Arab countries which represents 0.8% of the global research output. Research in bronchial asthma was almost double that in COPD. Research from Arab countries was low and showed a significant increase after 2000. Approximately 12% of research activity in asthma and COPD from Arab countries was published in Saudi Medical Journal, Annals of Saudi Medicine, Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal and Tunisie Medicale. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, with a total publication of 353 (27.07%) ranked first among the Arab countries while University of Kuwait was the most productive institution with a total of 123 (9

  10. Preschool Teaching Staff's Opinions on the Importance of Preschool Curricular Fields of Activities, Art Genres and Visual Arts Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupancic, Tomaž; Cagran, Branka; Mulej, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    This article presents preschool teachers' and assistant teachers' opinions on the importance of selected fields of educational work in kindergartens. The article first highlights the importance of activities expressing artistic creativity within modern curriculums. Then, it presents an empirical study that examines the preschool teachers' and…

  11. Neuroethics 1995–2012. A Bibliometric Analysis of the Guiding Themes of an Emerging Research Field

    PubMed Central

    Leefmann, Jon; Levallois, Clement; Hildt, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    In bioethics, the first decade of the twenty-first century was characterized by the emergence of interest in the ethical, legal, and social aspects of neuroscience research. At the same time an ongoing extension of the topics and phenomena addressed by neuroscientists was observed alongside its rise as one of the leading disciplines in the biomedical science. One of these phenomena addressed by neuroscientists and moral psychologists was the neural processes involved in moral decision-making. Today both strands of research are often addressed under the label of neuroethics. To understand this development we recalled literature from 1995 to 2012 stored in the Mainz Neuroethics Database (i) to investigate the quantitative development of scientific publications in neuroethics; (ii) to explore changes in the topics of neuroethics research within the defined time interval; (iii) to illustrate the interdependence of different research topics within the neuroethics literature; (iv) to show the development of the distribution of neuroethics research on peer-reviewed journals; and (v) to display the academic background and affiliations of neuroethics researchers. Our analysis exposes that there has been a demonstrative increase of neuroethics research while the issues addressed under this label had mostly been present before the establishment of the field. We show that the research on the ethical, legal and social aspects of neuroscience research is hardly related to neuroscience research on moral decision-making and that the academic backgrounds and affiliations of many neuroethics researchers speak for a very close entanglement of neuroscience and neuroethics. As our article suggests that after more than one decade there still is no dominant agenda for the future of neuroethics research, it calls for more reflection about the theoretical underpinnings and prospects to establish neuroethics as a marked-off research field distinct from neuroscience and the diverse branches

  12. Neuroethics 1995-2012. A Bibliometric Analysis of the Guiding Themes of an Emerging Research Field.

    PubMed

    Leefmann, Jon; Levallois, Clement; Hildt, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    In bioethics, the first decade of the twenty-first century was characterized by the emergence of interest in the ethical, legal, and social aspects of neuroscience research. At the same time an ongoing extension of the topics and phenomena addressed by neuroscientists was observed alongside its rise as one of the leading disciplines in the biomedical science. One of these phenomena addressed by neuroscientists and moral psychologists was the neural processes involved in moral decision-making. Today both strands of research are often addressed under the label of neuroethics. To understand this development we recalled literature from 1995 to 2012 stored in the Mainz Neuroethics Database (i) to investigate the quantitative development of scientific publications in neuroethics; (ii) to explore changes in the topics of neuroethics research within the defined time interval; (iii) to illustrate the interdependence of different research topics within the neuroethics literature; (iv) to show the development of the distribution of neuroethics research on peer-reviewed journals; and (v) to display the academic background and affiliations of neuroethics researchers. Our analysis exposes that there has been a demonstrative increase of neuroethics research while the issues addressed under this label had mostly been present before the establishment of the field. We show that the research on the ethical, legal and social aspects of neuroscience research is hardly related to neuroscience research on moral decision-making and that the academic backgrounds and affiliations of many neuroethics researchers speak for a very close entanglement of neuroscience and neuroethics. As our article suggests that after more than one decade there still is no dominant agenda for the future of neuroethics research, it calls for more reflection about the theoretical underpinnings and prospects to establish neuroethics as a marked-off research field distinct from neuroscience and the diverse branches

  13. Wow, My Science Teacher Does Real Research! Engaging and Motivating Students Using Experiences from the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, C.

    2013-12-01

    Students respond to personal connections. When K-12 science teachers are able to participate as field assistants on research projects, their students can benefit greatly from the stories, pictures, and video transmitted or brought back from the field. Teachers can translate and tailor their learning while in the field to the level of their students. Students are ';hooked' into science content by seeing their own teacher out there actually ';doing' science. The teacher is able to provide a direct content connection for the student, an avenue for understanding why ';learning this' is relevant and important. This presentation provides a case for why science teachers and researchers should collaborate as much as possible. The NSF funded PolarTREC program (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) is an excellent example of how to make this collaboration work. The presentation will also provide a look into how teachers can make an effective connection for their students between field science and classroom learning. Alaskan secondary science teacher Carol Scott spent a month at the Kevo Research Station in northern Finland in May/June 2013 as a PolarTREC teacher, and is translating this experience for students. She has also worked on an NSF Research Experience for Teachers grant in Prince William Sound, AK, and has successfully used this work to engage students in the classroom.

  14. [Cancer research program performed by surgeons invade the biology field - from dormancy to metastasis].

    PubMed

    Pocard, Marc; Eveno, Clarisse; Allaire, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Cancer research program was analyzed. This research was identified using the "master of science in surgery" performed by the majority of surgical resident and fellow. It was analyzed as three axes studying: (i) how to improve the technical practice; (ii) the contribution of surgical skills in basic research, in particular via orthotopic animal models as microenvironment; and (iii) the research in basic biology, testing hypotheses and strategies not confined to surgery but totally multidisciplinary. This research is active with more than half of the fellowships grant in urology sponsored via the French Urologist Association, for projects studying cancer and more than a third of subjects pertaining to the master oncology.

  15. The activities and prospect of planetary protection research in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Planetary protection is an important activities and responsibilities for space exploration. In Chinese manned missions, micro-organism research and protection has been developed in Shenzhou-9, Shenzhou-10 and Tiangong-2 missions. In the experiment facility of Lunar Palace-1, the micro-organism pollution and protection/control technology has been studied. In the lunar sample recovery mission and China Mars mission, the planetary protection has become an important issue. This paper introduced the research about planetary protection in China. The planetary protection activities, strategy and procedures have been suggested for future space exploration program to meet the requirement for planetary protection, such as cabin pollution isolation, pollutant detection, and so on.

  16. Active Laser Ranging Along with Lasercom: Field Emulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.; Birnbaum, K.; Hemmati, H.

    2011-01-01

    In summary, this work has: (1) Demonstrated the real-time active laser ranging using a method applicable to interplanetary distances (2) Sub-millimeter ranging accuracy has been achieved with the systems built from off-the-shelf commercial components, demonstrating the robustness of the scheme (3) The experimental results indicate that active laser ranging can be implemented for interplanetary distances to meet the goal of 1mm ranging accuracy, including the effects of the Earth's atmosphere (4) Paves the way for advances in the study of fundamental physics and solar system dynamics.

  17. KIC11560447: An Active Eclipsing Binary From the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozavci, Ibrahim; Hussain, Gaitee; Yılmaz, Mesut; O'Neal, Douglas; osman Selam, Selim; Şenavcı, Hakan Volkan

    2016-07-01

    We performed spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the detached eclipsing binary KIC11560447, in order to investigate the spot activity of the system. In this context, we reconstructed the surface maps with the help of the code DoTS, using time series spectra obtained at the 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory. We also analysed high precision Kepler light curves of the system simultaneously with the code DoTS to reveal the spot migration and activity behaviour.

  18. [Research in two-dimensional critical phenomena and conformal field theory]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    A very theoretical description is given of research in two- dimensional critical phenomena and conformal field theory. Major progress is reported in the field of fluctuating two-dimensional surfaces. A discretized representation of fluctuating geometry is used where surfaces are represented by triangulations; continuum surfaces are recovered by taking the size of the triangles to zero. One of the central goals of the theory of critical phenomena is to find all possible universality classes of n-dimensional critical phenomena; this goal has been translated into the problem of clasifying all possible scale-invariant euclidean quantum field theories. (RWR)

  19. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-04-01

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  20. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-01-01

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  1. Some Spatial Politics of Queer-Feminist Research: Personal Reflections From the Field.

    PubMed

    Misgav, Chen

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses methodological issues emerging from research conducted with Trans in the Center, an LGBT activist group in Tel Aviv, Israel. It addresses some complex issues related to the politics and ethics of applying queer and feminist methodology to qualitative research in a trans, queer, and feminist community space. The focus is on two issues: the researcher's positionality vis-à-vis the participants and selecting the appropriate methodology in relation to the characteristics of the group under study. Such issues demonstrate how queer and feminist principles are articulated and interwoven in geographical-spatial research in two different dimensions: in the research practice and methodology and in the practices and the spaces created by the activity of the researched group itself. I conclude with insights arising from the attempt to apply feminist and queer paradigms in both theory and research, and I call for their integration into geographical research.

  2. Research Data Management and Libraries: Relationships, Activities, Drivers and Influences

    PubMed Central

    Pinfield, Stephen; Cox, Andrew M.; Smith, Jen

    2014-01-01

    The management of research data is now a major challenge for research organisations. Vast quantities of born-digital data are being produced in a wide variety of forms at a rapid rate in universities. This paper analyses the contribution of academic libraries to research data management (RDM) in the wider institutional context. In particular it: examines the roles and relationships involved in RDM, identifies the main components of an RDM programme, evaluates the major drivers for RDM activities, and analyses the key factors influencing the shape of RDM developments. The study is written from the perspective of library professionals, analysing data from 26 semi-structured interviews of library staff from different UK institutions. This is an early qualitative contribution to the topic complementing existing quantitative and case study approaches. Results show that although libraries are playing a significant role in RDM, there is uncertainty and variation in the relationship with other stakeholders such as IT services and research support offices. Current emphases in RDM programmes are on developments of policies and guidelines, with some early work on technology infrastructures and support services. Drivers for developments include storage, security, quality, compliance, preservation, and sharing with libraries associated most closely with the last three. The paper also highlights a ‘jurisdictional’ driver in which libraries are claiming a role in this space. A wide range of factors, including governance, resourcing and skills, are identified as influencing ongoing developments. From the analysis, a model is constructed designed to capture the main aspects of an institutional RDM programme. This model helps to clarify the different issues involved in RDM, identifying layers of activity, multiple stakeholders and drivers, and a large number of factors influencing the implementation of any initiative. Institutions may usefully benchmark their activities against

  3. Research data management and libraries: relationships, activities, drivers and influences.

    PubMed

    Pinfield, Stephen; Cox, Andrew M; Smith, Jen

    2014-01-01

    The management of research data is now a major challenge for research organisations. Vast quantities of born-digital data are being produced in a wide variety of forms at a rapid rate in universities. This paper analyses the contribution of academic libraries to research data management (RDM) in the wider institutional context. In particular it: examines the roles and relationships involved in RDM, identifies the main components of an RDM programme, evaluates the major drivers for RDM activities, and analyses the key factors influencing the shape of RDM developments. The study is written from the perspective of library professionals, analysing data from 26 semi-structured interviews of library staff from different UK institutions. This is an early qualitative contribution to the topic complementing existing quantitative and case study approaches. Results show that although libraries are playing a significant role in RDM, there is uncertainty and variation in the relationship with other stakeholders such as IT services and research support offices. Current emphases in RDM programmes are on developments of policies and guidelines, with some early work on technology infrastructures and support services. Drivers for developments include storage, security, quality, compliance, preservation, and sharing with libraries associated most closely with the last three. The paper also highlights a 'jurisdictional' driver in which libraries are claiming a role in this space. A wide range of factors, including governance, resourcing and skills, are identified as influencing ongoing developments. From the analysis, a model is constructed designed to capture the main aspects of an institutional RDM programme. This model helps to clarify the different issues involved in RDM, identifying layers of activity, multiple stakeholders and drivers, and a large number of factors influencing the implementation of any initiative. Institutions may usefully benchmark their activities against the

  4. Field support activity aerospace manpower transfer to small business enterprises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    This report reiterates the major findings of the original study on the utilization of unemployed aerospace professionals in small businesses, and also provides a definition of three programs which, as a result of this study and other research into this problem, offer great potential in providing for better utilization of the nation's technically trained personal and technology resources. Details of these three programs are provided along with a recommended plan of action for their implementation.

  5. Wave field synthesis, adaptive wave field synthesis and ambisonics using decentralized transformed control: Potential applications to sound field reproduction and active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain; Woszczyk, Wieslaw

    2005-09-01

    Sound field reproduction finds applications in listening to prerecorded music or in synthesizing virtual acoustics. The objective is to recreate a sound field in a listening environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. Classical WFS, therefore, does not perform well in a real reproduction space such as room. Previous work has suggested that it is physically possible to reproduce a progressive wave field in-room situation using active control approaches. In this paper, a formulation of adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) introduces practical possibilities for an adaptive sound field reproduction combining WFS and active control (with WFS departure penalization) with a limited number of error sensors. AWFS includes WFS and closed-loop ``Ambisonics'' as limiting cases. This leads to the modification of the multichannel filtered-reference least-mean-square (FXLMS) and the filtered-error LMS (FELMS) adaptive algorithms for AWFS. Decentralization of AWFS for sound field reproduction is introduced on the basis of sources' and sensors' radiation modes. Such decoupling may lead to decentralized control of source strength distributions and may reduce computational burden of the FXLMS and the FELMS algorithms used for AWFS. [Work funded by NSERC, NATEQ, Université de Sherbrooke and VRQ.] Ultrasound/Bioresponse to

  6. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  7. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  8. Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant-Based Outdoor Air Preconditioning Systems, Final Report: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.

    2001-07-09

    This report summarizes an investigation of the performance of two active desiccant cooling systems that were installed as pilot systems in two locations--a college dormitory and a research laboratory--during the fall of 1999. The laboratory system was assembled in the field from commercially available Trane air-handling modules combined with a standard total energy recovery module and a customized active desiccant wheel, both produced by SEMCO. The dormitory system was a factory-built, integrated system produced by SEMCO that included both active desiccant and sensible-only recovery wheels, a direct-fired gas regeneration section, and a pre-piped Trane heat pump condensing section. Both systems were equipped with direct digital control systems, complete with full instrumentation and remote monitoring capabilities. This report includes detailed descriptions of these two systems, installation details, samples of actual performance, and estimations of the energy savings realized. These pilot sites represent a continuation of previous active desiccant product development research (Fischer, Hallstrom, and Sand 2000; Fischer 2000). Both systems performed as anticipated, were reliable, and required minimal maintenance. The dehumidification/total-energy-recovery hybrid approach was particularly effective in all respects. System performance showed remarkable improvement in latent load handling capability and operating efficiency compared with the original conventional cooling system and with the conventional system that remained in another, identical wing of the facility. The dehumidification capacity of the pilot systems was very high, the cost of operation was very low, and the system was cost-effective, offering a simple payback for these retrofit installations of approximately 5 to 6 years. Most important, the dormitory system resolved numerous indoor air quality problems in the dormitory by providing effective humidity control and increased, continuous ventilation air.

  9. Mobile application for field data collection and query: Example from wildlife research (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, H.; Lindquist, T.; Whitehouse, R.

    2013-12-01

    Field data collection is often used in many scientific disciplines and effective approaches rely on accurate data collection and recording. We designed a smartphone and tablet application (app) for field-collected data and tested it during a study on wildlife. The objective of our study was to determine the effectiveness of mobile applications in wildlife field research. Student software developers designed applications for mobile devices on the iOS and Android operating systems. Both platforms had similar user interactions via data entry on a touch screen using pre-programmed fields, checkboxes, drop-down menus, and keypad entry. The mobile application included features to insure collection of all measurements in the field through pop-up messages and could proof entries for valid formats. We used undergraduate student subjects to compare the duration of data recording and data entry, and the frequency of errors between the mobile application and traditional (paper) techniques. We field-tested the mobile application using an existing study on wildlife. From the field, technicians could query a database stored on a mobile device to view histories of previously captured animals. Overall, we found that because the mobile application allowed us to enter data in a digital format in the field we could eliminate timely steps to process handwritten data sheets and double-checking data entries. We estimated that, for a 2-month project, using the mobile application instead of traditional data entry and proofing reduced our total project time by 10%. To our knowledge, this is the first application developed for mobile devices for wildlife users interesting in viewing animal capture histories from the field and could be developed for use in other areas of field research.

  10. Recommendations for nanomedicine human subjects research oversight: an evolutionary approach for an emerging field.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Leili; Wolf, Susan M; McCullough, Jeffrey; Hall, Ralph; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P; Jones, Cortney; Campbell, Stephen A; Dresser, Rebecca S; Erdman, Arthur G; Haynes, Christy L; Hoerr, Robert A; Hogle, Linda F; Keane, Moira A; Khushf, George; King, Nancy M P; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Marchant, Gary; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Siegel, Ronald A; Wickline, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, "active," and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an occasion to think systematically about appropriate oversight, especially early in the evolution of a technology, when hazard and risk information may remain incomplete. This paper presents the consensus recommendations of a multidisciplinary, NIH-funded project group, to ensure a science-based and ethically informed approach to HSR issues in nanomedicine, and to integrate HSR analysis with analysis of occupational, bystander, and environmental concerns. We recommend creating two bodies, an interagency Human Subjects Research in Nanomedicine (HSR/N) Working Group and a Secretary's Advisory Committee on Nanomedicine (SAC/N). HSR/N and SAC/N should perform 3 primary functions: (1) analysis of the attributes and subsets of nanomedicine interventions that raise HSR challenges and current gaps in oversight; (2) providing advice to relevant agencies and institutional bodies on the HSR issues, as well as federal and federal-institutional coordination; and (3) gathering and analyzing information on HSR issues as they emerge in nanomedicine. HSR/N and SAC/N will create a home for HSR analysis and coordination in DHHS (the key agency for relevant HSR oversight), optimize federal and institutional approaches, and allow HSR review to evolve with greater knowledge about nanomedicine interventions and greater clarity about attributes of concern.

  11. Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Leili; Wolf, Susan M.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Hall, Ralph; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Cortney; Campbell, Stephen A.; Dresser, Rebecca S.; Erdman, Arthur G.; Haynes, Christy L.; Hoerr, Robert A.; Hogle, Linda F.; Keane, Moira A.; Khushf, George; King, Nancy M.P.; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Marchant, Gary; Maynard, Andrew D.; Philbert, Martin; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Siegel, Ronald A.; Wickline, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an occasion to think systematically about appropriate oversight, especially early in the evolution of a technology, when hazard and risk information may remain incomplete. This paper presents the consensus recommendations of a multidisciplinary, NIH-funded project group, to ensure a science-based and ethically informed approach to HSR issues in nanomedicine, and integrate HSR analysis with analysis of occupational, bystander, and environmental concerns. We recommend creating two bodies, an interagency Human Subjects Research in Nanomedicine (HSR/N) Working Group and a Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Nanomedicine (SAC/N). HSR/N and SAC/N should perform 3 primary functions: (1) analysis of the attributes and subsets of nanomedicine interventions that raise HSR challenges and current gaps in oversight; (2) providing advice to relevant agencies and institutional bodies on the HSR issues, as well as federal and federal-institutional coordination; and (3) gathering and analyzing information on HSR issues as they emerge in nanomedicine. HSR/N and SAC/N will create a home for HSR analysis and coordination in DHHS (the key agency for relevant HSR oversight), optimize federal and institutional approaches, and allow HSR review to evolve with greater knowledge about nanomedicine interventions and greater clarity about attributes of concern. PMID:23289677

  12. Model-Eliciting Activities (MEAs) as a Bridge between Engineering Education Research and Mathematics Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Eric; Lesh, Richard; Lester, Frank; Brilleslyper, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces Model-Eliciting Activities (MEAs) as a form of case study team problem-solving. MEA design focuses on eliciting from students conceptual models that they iteratively revise in problem-solving. Though developed by mathematics education researchers to study the evolution of mathematical problem-solving expertise in middle…

  13. Open access in the biomedical field: a unique opportunity for researchers (and research itself).

    PubMed

    Giglia, E

    2007-06-01

    Aim of this article is to offer an overview of the Open Access strategy and its innovative idea of a free scholarly communication. Following the worldwide debate on the crisis of the scholarly communication and the new opportunities of a networked environment, definitions, purposes and real advantages of the Open Access pathway are presented from a researcher's point of view. To maximize the impact and dissemination, by providing free access to the result of the research, two complementary roads are pointed out and explained self-archiving in open archives and publishing in Open Access journals. To let authors make their choice the most useful tools to find one's way in this new reality are shown: directories, search engines, citation tracking projects. The starting survey being done, the article deals in its conclusions with the Open Access challenges and most debated themes: impact and dissemination, new assessment measures alternative to the Impact Factor, new mandatory policies of the funding agencies, questions related to the copyright issue.

  14. Methodological Capacity within the Field of "Educational Technology" Research: An Initial Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulfin, Scott; Henderson, Michael; Johnson, Nicola F.; Selwyn, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The academic study of educational technology is often characterised by critics as methodologically limited. In order to test this assumption, the present paper reports on data collected from a survey of 462 "research active" academic researchers working in the broad areas of educational technology and educational media. The paper…

  15. Engaging High School Science Teachers in Field-Based Seismology Research: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Research experiences for secondary school science teachers have been shown to improve their students' test scores, and there is a substantial body of literature about the effectiveness of RET (Research Experience for Teachers) or SWEPT (Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers) programs. RET programs enjoy substantial support, and several opportunities for science teachers to engage in research currently exist. However, there are barriers to teacher participation in research projects; for example, laboratory-based projects can be time consuming and require extensive training before a participant can meaningfully engage in scientific inquiry. Field-based projects can be an effective avenue for involving teachers in research; at its best, earth science field work is a fun, highly immersive experience that meaningfully contributes to scientific research projects, and can provide a payoff that is out of proportion to a relatively small time commitment. In particular, broadband seismology deployments provide an excellent opportunity to provide teachers with field-based research experience. Such deployments are labor-intensive and require large teams, with field tasks that vary from digging holes and pouring concrete to constructing and configuring electronics systems and leveling and orienting seismometers. A recently established pilot program, known as FEST (Field Experiences for Science Teachers) is experimenting with providing one week of summer field experience for high school earth science teachers in Connecticut. Here I report on results and challenges from the first year of the program, which is funded by the NSF-CAREER program and is being run in conjunction with a temporary deployment of 15 seismometers in Connecticut, known as SEISConn (Seismic Experiment for Imaging Structure beneath Connecticut). A small group of teachers participated in a week of field work in August 2015 to deploy seismometers in northern CT; this experience followed a visit of the

  16. From the field to the classroom: Connecting climate research to classroom lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinker, R.; Steiner, S. M.; Coleman, L.

    2015-12-01

    Improving scientific literacy is a goal in the United States. Scientists from the United States are often expected to present research findings in ways that are meaningful and accessible to the general public, including K-12 students. PolarTREC - Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a program funded by the National Science Foundation, partners teachers with scientists in the Arctic and Antarctica. Teachers communicate the research to general audiences on a regular basis. After the field experience, they then create classroom-ready lessons to relay the science exploration into science curriculum. In this presentation, secondary level educators, will share their experiences with being part of field research teams in the Arctic and Antarctica, and their strategies for bringing current science research into the classroom and aligning lessons with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Topics include an overview on using polar science to teach about climate change, application of field research techniques to improve students' understanding of scientific investigation methodology, phenology observations, soil porosity and permeability, litter decomposition, effect of sunlight on release of carbon dioxide from thawing permafrost, and understanding early life on Earth by studying stromatolites in Antarctica.

  17. Technology-Enhanced Science: Using an Online Blog to Share a Collaborative Field Study for Research and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mccann, A. R.; Cardace, D.; Carnevale, D.

    2011-12-01

    The role of technology is an increasingly important resource in preparing students for the future. The Internet is a widely accessible tool. Technology has also made us more connected, allowing constant communication and instantaneous data sharing. Public utilities such as those found on the web, including blogs, are a means to convey scientific research in rapid, useful ways. This tool is ideal for newly emerging fields, allowing up-to-date collaboration and referencing of ongoing studies, as well as bringing students virtually into the field or laboratory through videos, pictures, and records of project work. Astrobiology is a high interest topic, integrating geology, chemistry, biology, and physics. Terrestrial Mars analog environments are compelling in that they shed light on unusual opportunities for diverse life in settings beyond Earth. For this study, the analog site locality is at the University of California-Davis McLaughlin Natural Reserve in the Coast Range Ophiolite, a portion of actively serpentinizing, uplifted oceanic material in northern California (see companion poster, McCann et al., Mineralogy of Surface Serpentinite Outcrops in the Coast Range Ophiolite: Implications for the Deep Biosphere and Astrobiology). Our research objective is to monitor the activity taking place within the subsurface biosphere through an interdisciplinary approach involving biogeochemists, microbiologists, organic geochemists, and geologists. The study of serpentinization with astrobiological ground-truthing is a relatively new and promising field. Scientific field procedures are constantly being modified as they are applied. In order to better collaborate study efforts, a daily field journal is being written, recording ideas, discussions, procedures, problems, solutions, and results. It serves as an informal report, including pictures and video clips of the field activity. The journal is maintained as an online blog for ease of use and accessibility, as well as public

  18. Survey on astrobiology research and teaching activities within the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Burchell, Mark J

    2009-10-01

    While astrobiology is apparently growing steadily around the world, in terms of the number of researchers drawn into this interdisciplinary area and teaching courses provided for new students, there have been very few studies conducted to chart this expansion quantitatively. To address this deficiency, the Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB) conducted a questionnaire survey of universities and research institutions nationwide to ascertain the current extent of astrobiology research and teaching in the UK. The aim was to provide compiled statistics and an information resource for those who seek research groups or courses of study, and to facilitate new interdisciplinary collaborations. The report here summarizes details gathered on 33 UK research groups, which involved 286 researchers (from undergraduate project students to faculty members). The survey indicates that around 880 students are taking university-level courses, with significant elements of astrobiology included, every year in the UK. Data are also presented on the composition of astrobiology students by their original academic field, which show a significant dominance of physics and astronomy students. This survey represents the first published systematic national assessment of astrobiological academic activity and indicates that this emerging field has already achieved a strong degree of penetration into the UK academic community.

  19. Comparison of determinants of research knowledge utilization by practitioners and administrators in the field of child and family social services

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important gap exists between research production and its utilization. Few studies have examined the factors affecting knowledge utilization in the field of child and family social services. Methods The objectives of the study are to describe knowledge utilization by child protection administrators and practitioners (N = 477) and to compare factors related to knowledge utilization by these two occupational groups. The study was conducted with an adapted version of the Questionnaire sur l'utilisation des connaissances (Knowledge Utilization Questionnaire). Factor analysis was used to collapse data collected on the questionnaire items. Factor score for each respondent served as independent variables in three separate multivariate regression analyses to explore variables likely to predict research-based knowledge utilization. Results A minority of respondents (18%) report using on a frequent basis research-based knowledge in their practice. Relational capital between researchers and users and perceived usefulness of research based knowledge were the two factors most strongly related to utilization. There was a specificity in the factors associated with knowledge utilization according to occupational groups in child protection organizations. Use of active knowledge transfer strategies was associated with knowledge utilization by practitioners, while knowledge dissemination efforts played a more significant role for administrators. Conclusion These results encourage both the use of strategies differentiated according to users and the intensification of interactions between users and researchers to foster research knowledge utilization. PMID:20525270

  20. Measuring emotion in advertising research: prefrontal brain activity.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Richard B; Nield, Geoffrey E

    2012-01-01

    With the current interest in the role of emotion in advertising and advertising research, there has been an increasing interest in the use of various brain activity measures to access nonverbal emotional responses. One such approach relies on measuring the difference between left and right hemisphere prefrontal cortical activity to assess like and dislike. This approach is based on electroencephalography (EEG) and neuroimaging work, suggesting that the approach/withdrawal (frequently but not always associated with like/dislike) dimension of emotion is indicated by the balance of activity between the left and right prefrontal cortex. Much of this work was initiated by Richard Davidson in the early 1990s. An early study by Davidson et al. measured brain electrical activity to assess patterns of activation during the experience of happiness and disgust. The authors reported that disgust was found to be associated with increased right-sided activation in the frontal and anterior temporal regions compared with happiness. In contrast, happiness was found to be accompanied by left-sided activation in the anterior temporal region compared with disgust. Early reports suggested that frontal laterality indexes motivational valence with positive emotions (happy, like) associated with left greater than the right frontal activity and vice versa. Although these findings appear to be consistent with personality traits (e.g., optimism pessimism), state changes in frontal laterality appears to index approach withdraw rather than emotional valence. Interestingly, the behavioral and motivational correlates of prefrontal asymmetric activity are not restricted to humans or even primates but have been observed in numerous species such as birds and fish (see [4]). Henceforth, we use the term motivational valence (MV) rather than the more cumbersome term approach withdraw.

  1. To Support Research Activities Under the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    2003-01-01

    The Alabama NASA EPSCoR Program is a collaborative venture of The Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama EPSCoR, and faculty and staff at 10 Alabama colleges and universities as well as the Alabama School of Math and Science in Mobile. There are two Research Clusters which include infrastructure-building and outreach elements embedded in their research activities. Each of the two Research Clusters is in an area of clear and demonstrable relevance to NASA's mission, to components of other Alabama EPSCoR projects, and to the State of Alabama's economic development. This Final Report summarizes and reports upon those additional activities occurring after the first report was submitted in March 2000 (included here as Appendix C). Since the nature of the activities and the manner in which they relate to one another differ by cluster, these clusters function independently and are summarized in parallel in this report. They do share a common administration by the Alabama Space Grant Consortium (ASGC) and by this means, good ideas from each group were communicated to the other, as appropriate. During the past year these research teams, involving 15 scientists, 16 graduate students, 16 undergraduates, and 7 high school students involving 10 Alabama universities had 14 peer reviewed scientific journal articles published, 21 others reviewed for publication or published in proceedings, gave 7 formal presentations and numerous informal presentations to well over 3000 people, received 3 patents and were awarded 14 research proposals for more than $213K dollars in additional research related to these investigations. Each cluster's activities are described and an Appendix summarizes these achievements.

  2. Clinical engineering in Italy: the activity of the National Research Council.

    PubMed

    Merletti, R; Bravar, D

    1990-11-01

    The results of a five-year effort to rationalise the process of acquisition and management of medical instrumentation in Italy are reported and discussed. The research programme, sponsored by the National Research Council of Italy, was completed in 1988 and focused on (1) acquisition of technology by hospitals; (2) assessment of performance evaluation and preventive maintenance procedures for biomedical equipment; (3) cost analysis of high-technology health services; (4) analysis of clinical engineering activities in Italy. The present situation and guidelines for the future are outlined. In Italy there are no official positions for clinical engineers in public hospitals; however seven health-delivery institutions have established some activity in the field and a total of 15 engineers are involved in it. Despite the obvious advantage shown by the experience of these pilot institutions, the field has serious difficulties in developing due to the policy of the Ministry of Health and the consequent lack of positions. To reach the level of service provided in other European or North American countries, Italy would need at least 500 clinical engineers and 2500 biomedical equipment technicians. However, the lack of professional opportunities does not encourage training activities in the field.

  3. Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science in West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustina, C.; Fajri, P. N.; Fathoni, F.; Gusti, T. P.; Harifa, A. C.; Hendra, Y.; Hertanti, D. R.; Lusiana, N.; Rohmat, F. I.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Pandjaitan, N.; Santoso, R.; Suharyanto, A.

    2013-12-01

    In hydrologic science and engineering, one challenge is establishing a common framework for discussion among workers from different disciplines. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, nine current or recent graduate students from four Indonesian universities participated in a week of training activities during June 2013. Students had backgrounds in agricultural engineering, civil and environmental engineering, water resources engineering, natural resources management, and soil science. Professors leading the training, which was based at Bogor Agricultural University (IPB) in west Java, included an agricultural engineer, civil engineers, and geologists. Activities in surface-water hydrology included geomorphic assessment of streams (measuring slope, cross-section, and bed-clast size) and gauging stream flow (wading with top-setting rods and a current meter for a large stream, and using a bucket and stopwatch for a small stream). Groundwater-hydrology activities included measuring depth to water in wells, conducting a pumping test with an observation well, and performing vertical electrical soundings to infer hydrostratigraphy. Students also performed relatively simple water-quality measurements (temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, and alkalinity) in streams, wells, and springs. The group analyzed data with commercially-available software such as AQTESOLV for well hydraulics, freeware such as the U.S. Geological Survey alkalinity calculator, and Excel spreadsheets. Results were discussed in the context of landscape position, lithology, and land use.

  4. The birthday card exercise: Replicating research as active learning.

    PubMed

    Sawchuk, Dana

    2016-10-14

    One means to uncover common attitudes toward aging and older adults is to perform content analyses of popular print media forms such as newspapers, magazines, and even greeting cards. This active learning activity involves small groups of undergraduate students replicating, in a limited way, elements of a published research study on the messages conveyed by age-related birthday cards. In the exercise, each group of students is asked to analyze a set of 15 different birthday cards and to share qualitative and quantitative findings with classmates before submitting a written "discussion section" on their results to the instructor. The author demonstrates how this exercise, because it is aligned with key course learning outcomes as well as with coursework preceding and following the activity, is integrated into the overall learning environment of the course. Comments on student findings, the potential benefits of and modifications to the exercise, and the transferability of the exercise to other course contexts are also provided.

  5. International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska: Experiencing Language, Culture, Environment, and Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Ivanov, B.; Izbekov, P.; Kasahara, M.; Melnikov, D.; Selyangin, O.; Vesna, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University of Education, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Hokkaido University are developing an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. An experimental first session was held on Mutnovsky and Gorely Volcanoes in Kamchatka during August 2003. Objectives of the school are to:(1) Acquaint students with the chemical and physical processes of explosive volcanism, through first-hand experience with some of the most spectacular volcanic features on Earth; (2) Expose students to different concepts and approaches to volcanology; (3) Expand students' ability to function in a harsh environment and to bridge barriers in language and culture; (4) Build long-lasting collaborations in research among students and in teaching and research among faculty in the North Pacific region. Both undergraduate and graduate students from Russia, the United States, and Japan participated. The school was based at a mountain hut situated between Gorely and Mutnovsky Volcanoes and accessible by all-terrain truck. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of both volcanoes, flank lava flows, fumarole fields, ignimbrite exposures, and a geothermal area and power plant. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. Although subjects were taught at the undergraduate level, lectures led to further discussion with more advanced students. Graduate students participated by describing their research activities to the undergraduates. A final session at a geophysical field station permitted demonstration of instrumentation and presentations requiring sophisticated graphics in more comfortable surroundings. Plans are underway to make this school an annual offering for academic credit in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska and in Kamchatka. The course will be targeted at undergraduates with a strong interest in and

  6. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1996 - December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-12-01

    This report is divided into the following areas: (1) experimental research program; (2) theoretical research program; (3) accelerator research and development; (4) divisional computing activities; (5) publications; (6) colloquia and conference talks; (7) high energy physics community activities; and (7) High Energy Physics Division research personnel. Summaries are given for individual research programs for activities (1), (2) and (3).

  7. Using sediment transport and river restoration to link research and education, and promote K-12 female involvement in STEM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, E. M.; Bradley-Eitel, K.

    2011-12-01

    The focus of this CAREER award is to better understand and predict the mechanics of sediment transport, to link research and education through courses and shared field sites, and to increase female interest in STEM fields. To accomplish the education component of this proposal we have focused on the following three activities: 1) a Keystone course on the scientific method, 2) a Women Outside with Science (WOWS) camp and 3) a permanent field site for research and education on river processes. In the Keystone Course, students investigated the impact of roughness addition, in sediment-starved river reaches (e.g. downstream of dams), on the retention of gravel used for spawning. They developed research questions and hypotheses, designed and conducted a set of scaled laboratory flume experiments, analyzed their data and wrote a draft manuscript of their results. Student feedback was overwhelmingly positive on the merits of this course, which included hands-on learning of the following: basic sediment transport and fluvial geomorphology, applied statistics, laboratory methods, and scientific writing skills. Students sometimes struggled when flume experiments did not progress as planned, and in the analysis and interpretation of complex data. Some of the students in the course have reanalyzed data, conducted additional experiments and are currently rewriting the manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. Such a course fundamentally links research and teaching, and provides an introduction to research for advanced undergraduates or beginning graduate students. We have also run one summer WOWS camp, which was a ten day camping and inquiry based research experience for 20 female junior-high and high-school students. The girls studied climate change and water related issues, worked on a restoration project on the Little Salmon River, met with a fish biologist and did fish habitat surveys and studied water quality along the North Fork of the Payette River while on a

  8. Response to Frede V. Nielsen's, "Didactology as a Field of Theory and Research in Music Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimonen, Marja

    2005-01-01

    A reply to Frede V. Nielsen's, "Didactology as a Field of Theory and Research in Music Education" is presented. According to Nielsen, the principal question concerning Didaktik is What is the essential content in music education? The author of this article, however, argues that this is a philosophical (as well as a legal) issue concerning the aims…

  9. 2011 North Plains research field 12-200 limited irrigation corn production study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North Plains Water Conservation District started a water conservation project in 2010 on corn irrigation aimed at using just 12 inches of irrigation and producing 200 bu/ac of corn. This report is for 2011, the second year of the study, conducted at the North Plains Research Field (NPRF) in Ett...

  10. Rethinking Research Supervision: Some Reflections from the Field of Employment Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Cecilie; Durán-Palma, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This essay offers some reflections for the theory and practice of research supervision drawn from the field of employment relations. It argues that rethinking supervision in terms of the employment relationship can advance dialogue and debate about supervision. This is twofold. (1) Reframing supervision in terms of the employment relationship can…

  11. Shaping the Reading Field: The Impact of Early Reading Pioneers, Scientific Research, and Progressive Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Susan E., Ed.; Monaghan, E. Jennifer, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Only by exploring the past of the reading field can the literacy leaders of today make informed decisions about reading education in the future. This indispensable resource offers new insight into the development of reading education by examining the groundbreaking contributions of the "early reading pioneers"--16 reading researchers, reading…

  12. Map of the Field--Higher Education Research at the State Level. AIR Forum 1982 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosson, Patricia H.; Adams, Charles S.

    A map of the field of higher education at the state level is presented that defines theoretical and conceptual frameworks, approaches to analysis, research designs, and methodologies that have been used in the study of the relationships between state governments and institutions of higher education or of state policy structures and processes.…

  13. The Visibility of Information Science and Library Science Research in Bibliometric Mapping of the LIS Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astrom, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    The relation between information science and library science has been debated for decades, and even attempts at utilizing methods generally acknowledged as robust for the purpose of mapping research fields have yielded results with large variations. Therefore, a set of citation analyses was performed, comparing the results of analyses on…

  14. Using Norm-Based Appeals to Increase Response Rates in Evaluation Research: A Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misra, Shalini; Stokols, Daniel; Marino, Anne Heberger

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to test the effectiveness of norm-based persuasive messages for increasing response rates in online survey research. Participants in an interdisciplinary conference were asked to complete two successive postconference surveys and randomly assigned to one of two groups at each time point. The experimental group…

  15. NADE Members Respond--Developmental Education Research Agenda: Survey of Field Professionals, Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxon, D. Patrick; Martirosyan, Nara M.; Wentworth, Rebecca A.; Boylan, Hunter R.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final of a two-part article that provides the results of a qualitative study designed to document ideas and beliefs that professionals have regarding an appropriate research agenda on which the field of developmental education should focus in the near future. The participants of the study were members of the National Association for…

  16. The "Metaphorical Collage" as a Research Tool in the Field of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo-Zimet, Gila

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a research tool in the field of education--the "metaphorical collage." This tool facilitates the understanding of concepts and processes in education through the analysis of metaphors in collage works that include pictorial images and verbal images. We believe the "metaphorical collage" to be…

  17. Researching Refugee and Forced Migration Studies: An Introduction to the Field and the Reference Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Elisa

    1999-01-01

    Describes the evolution of refugee and forced migration studies, identifies factors that render it a challenging field to research, and highlights a variety of Internet-based and other electronic resources that can be used to locate monographs, periodicals, grey literature, and current information. Provides a bibliography of reference materials in…

  18. Research in the Field of Inclusive Education: Time for a Rethink?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messiou, Kyriaki

    2017-01-01

    This paper sets out to challenge thinking and practice amongst researchers in the field of inclusive education. It does this based on an analysis of published articles in the "International Journal of Inclusive Education" between 2005 and 2015, which identified topics and methodologies used in studies of inclusive education. The analysis…

  19. Teaching Research through Field Studies: A Cumulative Opportunity for Teaching Methodology to Human Geography Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panelli, Ruth; Welch, Richard V.

    2005-01-01

    Notwithstanding its iconic status within geography, the debate continues about how fieldwork should be taught to undergraduate students. The authors engage with this debate and argue that field studies should follow the teaching of research methodology. In this paper they review relevant literature on the place of fieldwork in geography training,…

  20. A Framework to Explore the Knowledge Structure of Multidisciplinary Research Fields

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Shahadat; Khan, Arif; Baur, Louise A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding emerging areas of a multidisciplinary research field is crucial for researchers, policymakers and other stakeholders. For them a knowledge structure based on longitudinal bibliographic data can be an effective instrument. But with the vast amount of available online information it is often hard to understand the knowledge structure for data. In this paper, we present a novel approach for retrieving online bibliographic data and propose a framework for exploring knowledge structure. We also present several longitudinal analyses to interpret and visualize the last 20 years of published obesity research data. PMID:25915521