Science.gov

Sample records for active response gravity

  1. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  2. Active Response Gravity Offload and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, Larry K. (Inventor); Valle, Paul S. (Inventor); Bankieris, Derek R. (Inventor); Lieberman, Asher P. (Inventor); Redden, Lee (Inventor); Shy, Cecil (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A variable gravity field simulator can be utilized to provide three dimensional simulations for simulated gravity fields selectively ranging from Moon, Mars, and micro-gravity environments and/or other selectable gravity fields. The gravity field simulator utilizes a horizontally moveable carriage with a cable extending from a hoist. The cable can be attached to a load which experiences the effects of the simulated gravity environment. The load can be a human being or robot that makes movements that induce swinging of the cable whereby a horizontal control system reduces swinging energy. A vertical control system uses a non-linear feedback filter to remove noise from a load sensor that is in the same frequency range as signals from the load sensor.

  3. ISS Update: Active Response Gravity Offload System -- 08.24.12

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks to the Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) Project Manager Larry Dungan in the Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility at Johnson Space Center in Hou...

  4. Responses of Electromyogram Activity in Adductor Longus Muscle of Rats to the Altered Gravity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Takashi; Wang, Xiao Dong; Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Higo, Yoko; Nakai, Naoya; Ochiai, Toshimasa; Gyotoku, Jyunichirou; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Ogura, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Responses of electromyogram (EMG) activities in the rostral and caudal regions of adductor longus (AL) muscle to altered gravity levels during parabolic flight of a jet airplane, as well as hindlimb suspension, were investigated in adult rats. Tonic EMGs in both regions were noted when the rats were exposed to hyper-G, as well as 1-G. The hip joints were adducted and the sedental quadrupedal position was maintained at these G levels. However, the EMG activities in these regions decreased and became phasic, when the hip joints were abducted and extended backward in μ-G environment. Such changes of joint angles caused passive shortening of sarcomeres only in the caudal region of AL. Atrophy and shift toward fast-twitch type were noted in fibers of the caudal region after 16-day unloading. Although fiber transformation was also induced in the rostral region, no atrophy was seen in fast-twitch fibers. The data may suggest that the atrophy and shift of phenotype caused by gravitational unloading in fibers of the caudal region may be related to the decrease in the neural and mechanical activities. Fiber type transformation toward fast-twitch type may be also related to the change of muscle activity from tonic to phasic patterns, which are the typical characteristics of fast-twitch muscle. However, the responses to unloading in fibers of rostral region were not related to the reduction of mechanical load.

  5. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  6. Gravity receptors and responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Allan H.

    1989-01-01

    The overall process of gravity sensing and response processes in plants may be divided conveniently into at least four components or stages: Stimulus susception (a physical event, characteristically the input to the G receptor system of environmental information about the G force magnitude, its vector direction, or both); information perception (an influence of susception on some biological structure or process that can be described as the transformation of environmental information into a biologicallly meaningful change); information transport (the export, if required, of an influence (often chemical) to cells and organs other than those at the sensor location); and biological response (almost always (in plants) a growth change of some kind). Some analysts of the process identify, between information perception and information transport, an additional stage, transduction, which would emphasize the importance of a transformation from one form of information to another, for example from mechanical statolith displacement to an electric, chemical, or other alteration that was its indirect result. These four (or five) stages are temporally sequential. Even if all that occurs at each stage can not be confidently identified, it seems evident that during transduction and transport, matters dealt with are found relatively late in the information flow rather than at the perception stage. As more and more is learned about the roles played by plant hormones which condition the G responses, the mechanism(s) of perception which should be are not necessarily better understood. However, if by asking the right questions and being lucky with experiments perhaps the discovery of how some process (such as sedimentation of protoplasmic organelles) dictates what happens down stream in the information flow sequence may be made.

  7. Gravity Perception and Response in Shoots of Cereal Grasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, P. B.; Song, I.; Bluncson, C.

    1985-01-01

    Two components of the gravitropic curvature response in cereal grass pulvini are studied. These two components are gravity perception and mechanism of response following the transduction phase. The effects of gravity, time lag, protein synthesis and enzyme production are included.

  8. Actin Turnover-Mediated Gravity Response in Maize Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano; Barlow, Peter W; Volkmann, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be linked to gravity sensing in plants but the mechanistic understanding of these processes remains unknown. We have performed detailed pharmacological analyses of the role of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in gravibending of maize (Zea mays) root apices. Depolymerization of actin filaments with two drugs having different mode of their actions, cytochalasin D and latrunculin B, stimulated root gravibending. By contrast, drug-induced stimulation of actin polymerization and inhibition of actin turnover, using two different agents phalloidin and jasplakinolide, compromised the root gravibending. Importantly, all these actin drugs inhibited root growth to similar extents suggesting that high actin turnover is essential for the gravity-related growth responses rather than for the general growth process. Both latrunculin B and cytochalasin D treatments inhibited root growth but restored gravibending of the decapped root apices, indicating that there is a strong potential for effective actin-mediated gravity sensing outside the cap. This elusive gravity sensing outside the root cap is dependent not only on the high rate of actin turnover but also on weakening of myosin activities, as general inhibition of myosin ATPases induced stimulation of gravibending of the decapped root apices. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the actin turnover-mediated gravity sensing outside the root cap. PMID:19521476

  9. Cineradiographic Analysis of Mouse Postural Response to Alteration of Gravity and Jerk (Gravity Deceleration Rate)

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Katsuya; de Campos, Priscila S.; Zeredo, Jorge L.; Kumei, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The ability to maintain the body relative to the external environment is important for adaptation to altered gravity. However, the physiological limits for adaptation or the disruption of body orientation are not known. In this study, we analyzed postural changes in mice upon exposure to various low gravities. Male C57BL6/J mice (n = 6) were exposed to various gravity-deceleration conditions by customized parabolic flight-maneuvers targeting the partial-gravity levels of 0.60, 0.30, 0.15 and μ g (<0.001 g). Video recordings of postural responses were analyzed frame-by-frame by high-definition cineradiography and with exact instantaneous values of gravity and jerk. As a result, the coordinated extension of the neck, spine and hindlimbs was observed during the initial phase of gravity deceleration. Joint angles widened to 120%–200% of the reference g level, and the magnitude of the thoracic-curvature stretching was correlated with gravity and jerk, i.e., the gravity deceleration rate. A certain range of jerk facilitated mouse skeletal stretching efficiently, and a jerk of −0.3~−0.4 j (g/s) induced the maximum extension of the thoracic-curvature. The postural response of animals to low gravity may undergo differential regulation by gravity and jerk. PMID:25370191

  10. Cineradiographic analysis of mouse postural response to alteration of gravity and jerk (gravity deceleration rate).

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Katsuya; de Campos, Priscila S; Zeredo, Jorge L; Kumei, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The ability to maintain the body relative to the external environment is important for adaptation to altered gravity. However, the physiological limits for adaptation or the disruption of body orientation are not known. In this study, we analyzed postural changes in mice upon exposure to various low gravities. Male C57BL6/J mice (n = 6) were exposed to various gravity-deceleration conditions by customized parabolic flight-maneuvers targeting the partial-gravity levels of 0.60, 0.30, 0.15 and μ g (<0.001 g). Video recordings of postural responses were analyzed frame-by-frame by high-definition cineradiography and with exact instantaneous values of gravity and jerk. As a result, the coordinated extension of the neck, spine and hindlimbs was observed during the initial phase of gravity deceleration. Joint angles widened to 120%-200% of the reference g level, and the magnitude of the thoracic-curvature stretching was correlated with gravity and jerk, i.e., the gravity deceleration rate. A certain range of jerk facilitated mouse skeletal stretching efficiently, and a jerk of -0.3~-0.4 j (g/s) induced the maximum extension of the thoracic-curvature. The postural response of animals to low gravity may undergo differential regulation by gravity and jerk. PMID:25370191

  11. Key gravity-sensitive signaling pathways drive T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Boonyaratanakornkit, J B; Cogoli, A; Li, C-F; Schopper, T; Pippia, P; Galleri, G; Meloni, M A; Hughes-Fulford, M

    2005-12-01

    Returning astronauts have experienced altered immune function and increased vulnerability to infection during spaceflights dating back to Apollo and Skylab. Lack of immune response in microgravity occurs at the cellular level. We analyzed differential gene expression to find gravity-dependent genes and pathways. We found inhibited induction of 91 genes in the simulated freefall environment of the random positioning machine. Altered induction of 10 genes regulated by key signaling pathways was verified using real-time RT-PCR. We discovered that impaired induction of early genes regulated primarily by transcription factors NF-kappaB, CREB, ELK, AP-1, and STAT after crosslinking the T-cell receptor contributes to T-cell dysfunction in altered gravity environments. We have previously shown that PKA and PKC are key early regulators in T-cell activation. Since the majority of the genes were regulated by NF-kappaB, CREB, and AP-1, we studied the pathways that regulated these transcription factors. We found that the PKA pathway was down-regulated in vg. In contrast, PI3-K, PKC, and its upstream regulator pLAT were not significantly down-regulated by vectorless gravity. Since NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB are all regulated by PKA and are transcription factors predicted by microarray analysis to be involved in the altered gene expression in vectorless gravity, the data suggest that PKA is a key player in the loss of T-cell activation in altered gravity. PMID:16210397

  12. Behavioral responses to partial-gravity conditions in rats.

    PubMed

    Zeredo, Jorge L; Toda, Kazuo; Matsuura, Masaaki; Kumei, Yasuhiro

    2012-11-01

    The effects of microgravity or hypergravity on living organisms have been studied extensively; however, thus far no studies have addressed the effects of "partial-gravity", that is, the low-gravity levels between the unit gravity (1G) on Earth and zero gravity (0 G) in space. The purpose of the present study was to examine behavioral responses in rats under partial-gravity conditions. Rat behavior was monitored by video cameras during parabolic flights. The flight trajectory was customized in order to generate graded levels of partial gravity. Gravity-dependent behavior patterns were observed in rats. In the conditions of 0.4 G through 0.2G, rats showed startle and crouching. Hindlimb stretching emerged at 0.15 G and was more frequently observed toward 0.01 G. Different thresholds may exist for emotional and balance/posture-related behaviors. PMID:23036524

  13. Neuronal Activity in the Subthalamic Cerebrovasodilator Area under Partial-Gravity Conditions in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zeredo, Zeredo L; Toda, Kazuo; Kumei, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The reduced-gravity environment in space is known to cause an upward shift in body fluids and thus require cardiovascular adaptations in astronauts. In this study, we recorded in rats the neuronal activity in the subthalamic cerebrovasodilator area (SVA), a key area that controls cerebral blood flow (CBF), in response to partial gravity. "Partial gravity" is the term that defines the reduced-gravity levels between 1 g (the unit gravity acceleration on Earth) and 0 g (complete weightlessness in space). Neuronal activity was recorded telemetrically through chronically implanted microelectrodes in freely moving rats. Graded levels of partial gravity from 0.4 g to 0.01 g were generated by customized parabolic-flight maneuvers. Electrophysiological signals in each partial-gravity phase were compared to those of the preceding 1 g level-flight. As a result, SVA neuronal activity was significantly inhibited by the partial-gravity levels of 0.15 g and lower, but not by 0.2 g and higher. Gravity levels between 0.2-0.15 g could represent a critical threshold for the inhibition of neurons in the rat SVA. The lunar gravity (0.16 g) might thus trigger neurogenic mechanisms of CBF control. This is the first study to examine brain electrophysiology with partial gravity as an experimental parameter. PMID:25370031

  14. Neuronal Activity in the Subthalamic Cerebrovasodilator Area under Partial-Gravity Conditions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeredo, Jorge L.; Toda, Kazuo; Kumei, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The reduced-gravity environment in space is known to cause an upward shift in body fluids and thus require cardiovascular adaptations in astronauts. In this study, we recorded in rats the neuronal activity in the subthalamic cerebrovasodilator area (SVA), a key area that controls cerebral blood flow (CBF), in response to partial gravity. “Partial gravity” is the term that defines the reduced-gravity levels between 1 g (the unit gravity acceleration on Earth) and 0 g (complete weightlessness in space). Neuronal activity was recorded telemetrically through chronically implanted microelectrodes in freely moving rats. Graded levels of partial gravity from 0.4 g to 0.01 g were generated by customized parabolic-flight maneuvers. Electrophysiological signals in each partial-gravity phase were compared to those of the preceding 1 g level-flight. As a result, SVA neuronal activity was significantly inhibited by the partial-gravity levels of 0.15 g and lower, but not by 0.2 g and higher. Gravity levels between 0.2–0.15 g could represent a critical threshold for the inhibition of neurons in the rat SVA. The lunar gravity (0.16 g) might thus trigger neurogenic mechanisms of CBF control. This is the first study to examine brain electrophysiology with partial gravity as an experimental parameter. PMID:25370031

  15. Intraspecific differences in bacterial responses to modelled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, P. W.; Leff, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Bacteria are important residents of water systems, including those of space stations which feature specific environmental conditions, such as lowered effects of gravity. The purpose of this study was to compare responses with modelled reduced gravity of space station, water system bacterial isolates with other isolates of the same species. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bacterial isolates, Stenotrophomonas paucimobilis and Acinetobacter radioresistens, originally recovered from the water supply aboard the International Space Station (ISS) were grown in nutrient broth under modelled reduced gravity. Their growth was compared with type strains S. paucimobilis ATCC 10829 and A. radioresistens ATCC 49000. Acinetobacter radioresistens ATCC 49000 and the two ISS isolates showed similar growth profiles under modelled reduced gravity compared with normal gravity, whereas S. paucimobilis ATCC 10829 was negatively affected by modelled reduced gravity. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that microgravity might have selected for bacteria that were able to thrive under this unusual condition. These responses, coupled with impacts of other features (such as radiation resistance and ability to persist under very oligotrophic conditions), may contribute to the success of these water system bacteria. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: Water quality is a significant factor in many environments including the ISS. Efforts to remove microbial contaminants are likely to be complicated by the features of these bacteria which allow them to persist under the extreme conditions of the systems.

  16. Molecular Control of Cell Growth During Gravity Responses of Maize Seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Gravity influences plants in many ways via its physical effects on the convective flows of gases and liquids, the buoyancy and sedimentation of cellular organelles, and the distribution of mechanical stresses in weight-bearing structures. These physical effects lead to a variety of reactions and adaptive developmental responses in plants. Perhaps the best-studied plant gravity response is gravitropism - the "homing in" of growing organs towards a particular angle with respect to gravity. Most plants respond to gravity by gravitropic bending of roots downwards and stems upwards. Such gravitropic bending arises from differential cell growth on the two sides of the bending organ. For this project we hypothesized that such growth differences arise from differences in expansin activity, which come about because of organ-level asymmetries of H+ efflux and expansin export to the wall.

  17. Cellular Bases of Light-regulated Gravity Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the most significant research accomplished in our NAG2-1347 project on the cellular bases of light-regulated gravity responses, It elaborates mainly on our discovery of the role of calcium currents in gravity-directed polar development in single germinating spore cells of the fern Ceratopteris, our development of RNA silencing as a viable method of suppressing the expression of specific genes in Ceratopteris, and on the structure, expression and distribution of members of the annexin family in flowering plants, especially Arabidopsis.

  18. Ionic signaling in plant responses to gravity and touch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasano, Jeremiah M.; Massa, Gioia D.; Gilroy, Simon

    2002-01-01

    Touch and gravity are two of the many stimuli that plants must integrate to generate an appropriate growth response. Due to the mechanical nature of both of these signals, shared signal transduction elements could well form the basis of the cross-talk between these two sensory systems. However, touch stimulation must elicit signaling events across the plasma membrane whereas gravity sensing is thought to represent transformation of an internal force, amyloplast sedimentation, to signal transduction events. In addition, factors such as turgor pressure and presence of the cell wall may also place unique constraints on these plant mechanosensory systems. Even so, the candidate signal transduction elements in both plant touch and gravity sensing, changes in Ca2+, pH and membrane potential, do mirror the known ionic basis of signaling in animal mechanosensory cells. Distinct spatial and temporal signatures of Ca2+ ions may encode information about the different mechanosignaling stimuli. Signals such as Ca2+ waves or action potentials may also rapidly transfer information perceived in one cell throughout a tissue or organ leading to the systemic reactions characteristic of plant touch and gravity responses. Longer-term growth responses are likely sustained via changes in gene expression and asymmetries in compounds such as inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and calmodulin. Thus, it seems likely that plant mechanoperception involves both spatial and temporal encoding of information at all levels, from the cell to the whole plant. Defining this patterning will be a critical step towards understanding how plants integrate information from multiple mechanical stimuli to an appropriate growth response.

  19. Digital measurements of LF radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere and inferred gravity wave activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, J.; Boska, J.; Buresova, D.

    1993-10-01

    Low frequency (LF) radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere has been measured at Pruhonice (approximately 50 deg N) since 1957. A new digital computer-controlled measuring-recording-processing system was introduced in 1988. The A3 method of radio wave absorption measurement, the measuring equipment used for the digital measurements at 270 kHz, is briefly described. The digital nighttime LF A3 measurements allow the use of absorption data for studying and monitoring the gravity wave activity in the upper middle atmosphere in the period range 10 min-3(2) hours. The resulting gravity wave spectra are as expected even though their shapes vary. Individual period bands sometimes exhibit a similar general pattern of variability in gravity wave activity (winter 1990), while in other intervals we observe a shift of gravity wave energy from one period band to another (winter 1991). No strong, pronounced and consistent response to strong geomagnetic storms and midwinter stratospheric warming is found. An apparent seasonal variation with winter minima observed in shorter-period gravity wave activity is an artefact of the changing length of the night. There is no significant seasonal variation of gravity wave activity in the analysed data. The method is very cheap -- the results are a by-product of measurements made for ionospheric purposes.

  20. Ionic signaling in plant gravity and touch responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Fasano, Jeremiah M.; Gilroy, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Plant roots are optimized to exploit resources from the soil and as each root explores this environment it will encounter a range of biotic and abiotic stimuli to which it must respond. Therefore, each root must possess a sensory array capable of monitoring and integrating these diverse stimuli to direct the appropriate growth response. Touch and gravity represent two of the biophysical stimuli that plants must integrate. As sensing both of these signals requires mechano-transduction of biophysical forces to biochemical signaling events, it is likely that they share signal transduction elements. These common signaling components may allow for cross-talk and so integration of thigmotropic and gravitropic responses. Indeed, signal transduction events in both plant touch and gravity sensing are thought to include Ca(2+)- and pH-dependent events. Additionally, it seems clear that the systems responsible for root touch and gravity response interact to generate an integrated growth response. Thus, primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis respond to mechanical stimuli by eliciting tropic growth that is likely part of a growth strategy employed by the root to circumvent obstacles in the soil. Also, the mechano-signaling induced by encountering an obstacle apparently down-regulates the graviperception machinery to allow this kind of avoidance response. The challenge for future research will be to define how the cellular signaling events in the root cap facilitate this signal integration and growth regulation. In addition, whether other stimuli are likewise integrated with the graviresponse via signal transduction system cross-talk is an important question that remains to be answered.

  1. A Gravity-Responsive Time-Keeping Protein of the Plant and Animal Cell Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis under investigation was that a ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase protein of the cell surface with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (= NOX protein) is a plant and animal time-keeping ultradian (period of less than 24 h) driver of both cell enlargement and the biological clock that responds to gravity. Despite considerable work in a large number of laboratories spanning several decades, this is, to my knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a time-keeping biochemical reaction that is both gravity-responsive and growth-related and that has been shown to determine circadian periodicity. As such, the NOX protein may represent both the long-sought biological gravity receptor and the core oscillator of the cellular biological clock. Completed studies have resulted in 12 publications and two issued NASA-owned patents of the clock activity. The gravity response and autoentrainment were characterized in cultured mammalian cells and in two plant systems together with entrainment by light and small molecules (melatonin). The molecular basis of the oscillatory behavior was investigated using spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism) and high resolution electron microscopy. We have also applied these findings to an understanding of the response to hypergravity. Statistical methods for analysis of time series phenomena were developed (Foster et al., 2003).

  2. Responses across the gravity continuum: hypergravity to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    In response to hypergravity, it appears that the larger the animal, the greater the response, if present. Therefore, the response of a rat exceeds that of a mouse in the same hypergravity environment. When investigated in the microgravity environment of space flight, this appears to hold true. The lack of definitive data obtained in space for either species makes the extrapolation of the continuum to levels below Earth-gravity problematic. However, in systems where responses are detected for both space flight and acceleration by centrifugation, a gravitational continuum is present supporting the "principle of continuity". For those and similar systems, it appears that the use of hypergravity could be used to predict responses to space flight.

  3. Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric; Will, Clifford M.

    2014-05-01

    Preface; 1. Foundations of Newtonian gravity; 2. Structure of self-gravitating bodies; 3. Newtonian orbital dynamics; 4. Minkowski spacetime; 5. Curved spacetime; 6. Post-Minkowskian theory: formulation; 7. Post-Minkowskian theory: implementation; 8. Post-Newtonian theory: fundamentals; 9. Post-Newtonian theory: system of isolated bodies; 10. Post-Newtonian celestial mechanics, astrometry and navigation; 11. Gravitational waves; 12. Radiative losses and radiation reaction; 13. Alternative theories of gravity; References; Index.

  4. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, David B.; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L.

    2002-11-01

    The cylindrical liquid bridge of arbitrary size surrounded by air or vacuum is a fluid configuration that is essentially unique to the zero-gravity environment. An associated technology, which is enhanced in zero gravity, is the float-zone process of crystal growth, which involves a molten liquid bridge between a feed rod and the growing cylindrical crystal. There are several advantages to the crystal growth process in using long molten zones. Unfortunately, long liquid bridges are more susceptible to g-jitter. Also, a cylindrical liquid bridge in zero gravity is unstable if its length exceeds its circumference, or stated in another way, when the slenderness, defined as the length to diameter ratio, exceeds pi. This is the well-known Rayleigh-Plateau (RP) instability involving the growth of a varicose mode leading to breaking of the bridge. Stabilization of liquid bridges in air in the low-gravity environment of NASA's KC-135 aircraft has been demonstrated for slenderness values in excess of 4.0 using two techniques, passive acoustic stabilization (PAS) and active electrostatic stabilization (AES). The PAS method is theoretically capable of stabilizing a bridge of any length, provided a sound field of appropriate dimension is available. The AES method in its current form controls only the (2,0) mode of the bridge, which is the varicose mode that becomes unstable when the slenderness (S) exceeds pi. By controlling only the (2,0) mode, the current form of the AES method cannot stabilize cylindrical bridges beyond S=4.493 at which point the (3,0) mode becomes unstable. At present, the longest bridge stabilized on the KC-135 by the AES method had a slenderness of 4.4 3. The AES method has the advantage that it can be used to control both the frequency and damping of the (2,0) mode of the bridge. This would be useful in reducing the susceptibility of a long molten zone to g-jitter in that the (2,0) mode frequency could be shifted away from a particularly noisy vibration

  5. Continuous gravity observations at active volcanoes through superconducting gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Greco, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    Continuous gravity measurements at active volcanoes are usually taken through spring gravimeters that are easily portable and do not require much power to work. However, intrinsic limitations dictate that, when used in continuous, these instruments do not provide high-quality data over periods longer than some days. Superconducting gravimeters (SG), that feature a superconducting sphere in a magnetic field as the proof mass, provide better-quality data than spring gravimeters, but are bigger and need mains electricity to work, implying that they cannot be installed close to the active structures of high volcanoes. An iGrav SG was installed on Mt. Etna (Italy) in September 2014 and has worked almost continuously since then. It was installed about 6km from the active craters in the summit zone of the volcano. Such distance is normally too much to observe gravity changes due to relatively fast (minutes to days) volcanic processes. Indeed, mass redistributions in the shallowest part of the plumbing system induce short-wavelength gravity anomalies, centered below the summit craters. Nevertheless, thanks to the high precision and long-term stability of SGs, it was possible to observe low-amplitude changes over a wide range of timescales (minutes to months), likely driven by volcanic activity. Plans are in place for the implementation of a mini-array of SGs at Etna.

  6. Gravity affects the responsiveness of Runx2 to 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feima; Dai, Zhongquan; Wu, Feng; Liu, Zhaoxia; Tan, Yingjun; Wan, Yumin; Shang, Peng; Li, Yinghui

    2013-03-01

    Bone loss resulting from spaceflight is mainly caused by decreased bone formation, and decreased osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Transcription factor Runx2 plays an important role in osteoblast differentiation and function by responding to microenvironment changes including cytokine and mechanical factors. The effects of 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3) on Runx2 in terms of mechanical competence is far less clear. This study describes how gravity affects the response of Runx2 to VD3. A MC3T3-6OSE2-Luc osteoblast model was constructed in which the activity of Runx2 was reflected by reporter luciferase activity identifed by bone-related cytokines. The results showed that luciferase activity in MC3T3-6OSE2-Luc cells transfected with Runx2 was twice that of the vacant vector. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was increased in MC3T3-6OSE2-Luc cells by different concentrations of IGF-I and BMP2. MC3T3-6OSE2-Luc cells were cultured under simulated microgravity or centrifuge with or without VD3. In simulated microgravity, luciferase activity was decreased after 48 h of clinorotation culture, but increased in the centrifuge culture. Luciferase activity was increased after VD3 treatment in normal conditions and simulated microgravity, the increase in luciferase activity in simulated microgravity was lower than that in the 1 g condition when simultaneously treated with VD3 and higher than that in the centrifuge condition. Co-immunoprecipitation showed that the interaction between the VD3 receptor (VDR) and Runx2 was decreased by simulated microgravity, but increased by centrifugation. From these results, we conclude that gravity affects the response of Runx2 to VD3 which results from an alteration in the interaction between VDR and Runx2 under different gravity conditions.

  7. Response of amphibian egg cytoplasm to novel gravity orientation and centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, A. W.; Wakahara, M.; Jurand, A.; Malacinski, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of inversion and centrifugation on the compartmentalization of cytoplasm in Xenopus laevis eggs are investigated experimentally. The rearrangement of yolk-platelet compartments (YPC) characterized by morphology, density, and viscosity differences is studied in fertilized, unfertilized, and unfertilized electrically activated eggs in normal, and inverted positions and with and without centrifugation at 10-183 x g for 5 min. The eggs are fixed and embedded in plastic or paraffin prior to sagittal sectioning (0.5, 4, or 8 microns) and microscopic examination; the results are presented in a diagram and discussed. A density-compartment model combining both animal/vegetal and dorsal/ventral polarities is proposed: YPC determined without gravity orientation during oogenesis respond to both sperm entrance point and gravity after fertilization, and the response involves breaking of the radial symmetry of the egg. It is predicted that Xenopus eggs in a microgravity environment will encounter difficulties in establishing a primary embryonic axis.

  8. Plant response to gravity: towards a biosystems view of root gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palme, Klaus; Volkmann, Dieter; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Gausepohl, Heinrich

    2005-10-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that originated and evolved in Earth's environment. They monitor a wide range of disparate external and internal signals and compute appropriate developmental responses. How do plant cells process these myriad signals into an appropriate response? How do they integrate these signals to reach a finely balanced decision on how to grow, how to determine the direction of growth and how to develop their organs to exploit the environment? As plant responses are generally irreversible growth responses, their signalling systems must compute each developmental decision with extreme care. One stimulus to which plants are continuously exposed is the gravity vector. Gravity affects adaptive growth responses that reorient organs towards light and nutrient resources. The MAP team was established by ESA to study in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana the role of the hormone auxin in gravity-mediated growth control. Another goal was to dissect gravity perception and gravity signal transduction pathways.

  9. Passive and Active Stabilization of Liquid Bridges in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Niederhaus, Charles E.; Truong, Duc K.

    2001-01-01

    Tests are planned in the low gravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) of new methods for the suppression of the capillary instability of liquid bridges. Our suppression methods are unusual in that they are not limited to liquid bridges having very special properties and may impact a variety of low-gravity and earth-based technologies. There are two main approaches to be investigated: (1) Passive Acoustic Stabilization (PAS); and (2) Active Electrostatic Stabilization (AES). In PAS, the suppression of the mode growth is accomplished by placing the bridge in an acoustic field having the appropriate properties such that the acoustic radiation pressure automatically pulls outward on the thinnest portion of the bridge. In AES, the bridge deformation is sensed optically and counteracted by actively adjusting the electrostatic Maxwell stresses via two ring electrodes concentric with the slightly conducting bridge to offset the growth of the unstable mode. While the present work emphasizes cylindrical bridges, the methods need not be restricted to that case. The methods to be explored are relevant to the suppression of capillary instabilities in floating zone crystal growth, breakup of liquid jets and columns, bubbles, and annular films as well as the management of coolants or propellants in low-gravity.

  10. Insights on Volcanic Activity - Self-Potential and Gravity surveys of Masaya volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Jones, G.; Mauri, G.; Saracco, G.

    2006-12-01

    For more than ten years, the activity of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, has been surveyed annually in order to characterize the long term mass/density variations within the shallow magma chamber. However, the injection of new magma is a rapid process, requiring only several hours or days. Other cyclical short period phenomena may be present (e.g., hydrothermal systems) and responsible for noise in the measured signal during a typical dynamic gravity survey. In order to determine the origin and importance of this noise and fully characterize any short period variations, a continuous gravity survey was made from February 16, 2006 to March 12, 2006 in the summit crater of Masaya. During this period, a short term of gravity variation of 60 μGal was measured with a wavelength of 20 hours. Hydrothermal systems, which may or may not be well developed, are directly related to heat, gas and fluids coming from the shallow magma chamber and plumbing system. Others sources of fluids are rainfall and the local aquifer, notably at the caldera lake, Laguna Masaya. Movement of hydrothermal fluids, which will generate self-potential (SP) signals, are directly influenced by superficial dyke injection and fluctuations of magma in the shallow plumbing system. The depth and movement of large fluid cells can be localized by self- potential data when processed by continuous wavelet transform. To characterize the shape and position of the hydrothermal system on the Masaya volcano, several SP profiles were made in conjunction with the continuous gravity survey. The SP data from around the summit pit craters were processed by continuous wavelet transform to localize the main large cell of hydrothermal fluid and determine the effects of the hydrothermal fluids on the continuous gravity measurements. The combination of SP and continuous gravity can give insight into short and medium term variations in magmatic activity.

  11. Gravity Responsive NADH Oxidase of the Plasma Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing gravity using an NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane which has been found to respond to unit gravity and low centrifugal g forces. The oxidation rate of NADH supplied to the NADH oxidase is measured and translated to represent the relative gravitational force exerted on the protein. The NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane may be obtained from plant or animal sources or may be produced recombinantly.

  12. Density response of the mesospheric sodium layer to gravity wave perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, J. D.; Gardner, C. S.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Lidar observations of the mesospheric sodium layer often reveal wavelike features moving through the layer. It is often assumed that these features are a layer density response to gravity waves. Chiu and Ching (1978) described the approximate form of the linear response of atmospheric layers to gravity waves. In this paper, their results are used to predict the response of the sodium layer to gravity waves. These simulations are compared with experimental observations and a good correlation is found between the two. Because of the thickness of the sodium layer and the density gradients found in it, a linear model of the layer response is not always adequate to describe gravity wave-sodium layer interactions. Inclusion of nonlinearities in the layer response is briefly discussed. Experimental data is seen to contain features consistent with the predicted nonlinearities.

  13. Gravity anomalies of the active mud diapirs off southwest Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doo, Wen-Bin; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Lo, Chung-Liang; Chen, Song-Chuen; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Jing-Yi; Huang, Yuan-Ping; Huang, Yin-Sheng; Chiu, Shye-Donq; Ma, Yu-Fang

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure and buoyant effect of underlying sediments are generally used to account for the upward motion or formation of submarine mud volcanoes and mud diapirs. In this study, we process and interpret the gravity anomalies associated with the active mud diapirs off SW Taiwan. Geologically, the mud diapirs are just formed and are still very active, thus we can better understand the initial process of the mud diapirs formation through the gravity analysis. Our results show that the density contrasts of the submarine mud diapirs with respect to the surroundings are generally positive. Because the study area is in a tectonically compressive regime and the gas plume venting from the submarine mud volcanoes is very active, we thus infer that mechanically the mud diapirs off SW Taiwan have been formed mainly due to the tectonic compression on the underlying sediments of high pore-fluid pressure, instead of the buoyancy of the buried sediments. The overpressured sediments and fluid are compressed and pushed upwards to pierce the overlying sediments and form the more compacted mud diapirs. The relatively denser material of the mud diapirs probably constrains the flowing courses of the submarine canyons off SW Taiwan, especially for the upper reaches of the Kaoping and Fangliao submarine canyons.

  14. ALTERED RESPONSE TO GRAVITY Is a Peripheral Membrane Protein That Modulates Gravity-Induced Cytoplasmic Alkalinization and Lateral Auxin Transport in Plant Statocytes

    PubMed Central

    Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Sedbrook, John C.; Chen, Rujin; Gilroy, Simon; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    ARG1 (ALTERED RESPONSE TO GRAVITY) is required for normal root and hypocotyl gravitropism. Here, we show that targeting ARG1 to the gravity-perceiving cells of roots or hypocotyls is sufficient to rescue the gravitropic defects in the corresponding organs of arg1-2 null mutants. The cytosolic alkalinization of root cap columella cells that normally occurs very rapidly upon gravistimulation is lacking in arg1-2 mutants. Additionally, vertically grown arg1-2 roots appear to accumulate a greater amount of auxin in an expanded domain of the root cap compared with the wild type, and no detectable lateral auxin gradient develops across mutant root caps in response to gravistimulation. We also demonstrate that ARG1 is a peripheral membrane protein that may share some subcellular compartments in the vesicular trafficking pathway with PIN auxin efflux carriers. These data support our hypothesis that ARG1 is involved early in gravitropic signal transduction within the gravity-perceiving cells, where it influences pH changes and auxin distribution. We propose that ARG1 affects the localization and/or activity of PIN or other proteins involved in lateral auxin transport. PMID:14507996

  15. Gravity perception and gravitropic response of inflorescence stems in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaki, H.; Tasaka, M.

    1999-01-01

    Shoots of higher plants exhibit negative gravitropism. However, little is known about the site of gravity perception in shoots and the molecular mechanisms of shoot gravitropic responses. Our recent analysis using shoot gravitropism1(sgr1)/scarecrow(scr) and sgr7/short-root (shr) mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana indicated that the endodermis is essential for shoot gravitropism and strongly suggested that the endodermis functions as the gravity-sensing cell layer in dicotyledonous plant shoots. In this paper, we present our recent analysis and model of gravity perception and gravitropic response of inflorescence stems in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  16. Hydrostatic factors affect the gravity responses of algae and roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Wayne, Randy; Leopold, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis of Wayne et al. (1990) that plant cells perceive gravity by sensing a pressure differential between the top and the bottom of the cell was tested by subjecting rice roots and cells of Caracean algae to external solutions of various densities. It was found that increasing the density of the external medium had a profound effect on the polar ratio (PR, the ratio between velocities of the downwardly and upwardly streaming cytoplasm) of the Caracean algae cells. When these cells were placed in solutions of denser compound, the PR decreased to less than 1, as the density of the external medium became higher than that of the cell; thus, the normal gravity-induced polarity was reversed, indicating that the osmotic pressure of the medium affects the cell's ability to respond to gravity. In rice roots, an increase of the density of the solution inhibited the rate of gravitropism. These results agree with predictions of a hydrostatic model for graviperception.

  17. The response of single human cells to zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, P. O., Jr.; Cook, J. E.; Reynolds, R. C.; Paul, J. S.; Hayflick, L.; Stock, D.; Schulz, W. W.; Kimzey, S. L.; Thirolf, R. G.; Rogers, T.

    1974-01-01

    The SO15 experiment was designed to extend observations of the effects of zero-gravity to living human cells during and subsequent to a 59-day flight on Skylab 3. A strain of diploid human embryonic lung cells, WI-38, was chosen for this purpose. The studies were concerned with observations designed to detect the effects of zero-gravity on cell growth rates and on cell structure as observed by light microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy and histochemistry. Studies of the effects of zero-gravity on the cell function and the cell cycle were performed by time lapse motion picture photography and microspectrophotometry. Subsequent study of the returned living cells included karotyping, G- and C-banding, and analyses of the culture media used. Some of the living cells returned were banked by deep freeze techniques for possible future experiments.

  18. Reactive oxygen species in response of plants to gravity stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as second messengers can induce stress response of plants. Thioredoxins (Trx) and peroxiredoxins (Prx) can function as sensors and transmitters of the ROS in stress signaling and antioxidant response. 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana have been investigated. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 20 g during 30 and 90 min and than intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence (SChL/ROS content), Trx and Prx activities were determined. All experiments were repeated from 3 to 5 times and the obtained data were statistically treated. In the tissue culture under development of the stress there were an increase in intensity of SChL and Trx and Prx activities. Thus, under hypergravity stress in the plant occurred early increase in the ROS level and the ROS induced the increase in the Trx and Prx activities. Prx and Trx can also participate in the formation of stress respons as acceptors and transducers of the redox signals. Increase in the activity of these enzymes primarily aimed at increasing of the total antioxidant activity in the cells to prevent of the plant to development of oxidative degradation by ROS.

  19. The response of single human cells to zero-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, P. O., Jr.; Cook, J. E.; Reynolds, R. C.; Paul, J. S.; Hayflick, L.; Stock, D.; Shulz, W. W.; Kimzey, S. L.; Thirolf, R. G.; Rogers, T.

    1977-01-01

    Microscopic and histochemical evaluations of human embrionic lung cells after exposure to zero-gravity are reported. Growth curves, DNA microspectrophotometry, phase microscopy, and ultrastructural studies of fixed cells revealed no effects on the cultures. Minor unexplained differences have been found in biochemical constituents of the samples.

  20. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Wu, Dong L.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in research into the global morphology of gravity wave activity using UARS data is described for the period March-June, 1998. Highlights this quarter include further progress in the analysis and interpretation of CRISTA temperature variances; model-generated climatologies of mesospheric gravity wave activity using the HWM-93 wind and temperature model; and modeling of gravity wave detection from space-based platforms. Preliminary interpretations and recommended avenues for further analysis are also described.

  1. Supplementary active stabilization of nonrigid gravity gradient satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keat, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of active control for stability augmentation of passive gravity gradient satellites is investigated. The reaction jet method of control is the main interest. Satellite nonrigidity is emphasized. The reduction in the Hamiltonian H is used as a control criteria. The velocities, relative to local vertical, of the jets along their force axes are shown to be of fundamental significance. A basic control scheme which satisfies the H reduction criteria is developed. Each jet is fired when its velocity becomes appropriately large. The jet is de-energized when velocity reaches zero. Firing constraints to preclude orbit alteration may be needed. Control is continued until H has been minimized. This control policy is investigated using impulse and rectangular pulse models of the jet outputs.

  2. Plant perception and response to the signal in gravity resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Zhang, Yan; Otomi, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Takashi; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2012-07-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, distinct from gravitropism. Plants increase the rigidity of their cell walls in the final step of gravity resistance. We studied cellular events leading to or related to the cell wall changes under hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation and under microgravity conditions in space. The involvement of mechanosensitive ion channels (mechanoreceptors) in signal perception in gravity resistance has been suggested by experiments with inhibitors. As a candidate for the mechanoreceptor, we identified MCA1 and MCA2 in Arabidopsis. mca-null and MCA-overexpressing seedlings were normal in growth in the dark at 1 g. However, suppression by hypergravity of elongation growth was reduced in hypocotyls of mca-null seedlings. On the contrary, MCA-overexpressing seedlings were hypersensitive to hypergravity. These results suggest that MCAs act as the mechanoreceptor in signal perception of gravity resistance. Cortical microtubules play an essential role in maintenance of normal growth phenotype under hypergravity conditions. In Space Seed experiment in the Kibo Module (PI: S. Kamisaka), we examined the effects of microgravity on growth phenotypes of Arabidopsis tubulin mutant, tua6. Inflorescences of the mutant emerged earlier and elongated rapidly under microgravity conditions than under on-orbit or ground 1 g conditions. Also, the inflorescences grown under microgravity conditions showed higher cell wall extensibilities than the controls. The tubulin mutant thus grew and developed more or less normally under microgravity conditions, supporting the principal role of microtubules also in plant resistance to 1 g gravity. On the other hand, the cellular osmotic properties, as well as the cell wall properties, are important factors determining the rigidity of plant body. Azuki bean epicotyls were capable of maintaining osmoregulation even under hypergravity

  3. The response of single human cells to zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, P. O., Jr.; Cook, J. E.; Reynolds, R. C.; Paul, J. S.; Hayflick, L.; Schulz, W. W.; Stock, D.; Kinzey, S.; Rogers, T.; Campbell, D.

    1975-01-01

    Twenty separate cultures of Wistar-38 human embryonic lung cells were exposed to a zero-gravity environment on Skylab for periods of time ranging from one to 59 days. Duplicate cultures were run concurrently as ground controls. Ten cultures were fixed on board the satellite during the first 12 days of flight. Growth curves, DNA microspectrophotometry, phase microscopy, and ultrastructural studies of the fixed cells revealed no effects of a zero-gravity environment on the ten cultures. Two cultures were photographed with phase time lapse cinematography during the first 27 days of flight. No differences were found in mitotic index, cell cycle, and migration between the flight and control cells. Eight cultures were returned to earth in an incubated state. Karyotyping and chromosome banding tests show no differences between the flight and control cells.

  4. Your Students Can Be Rocket Scientists! A Galaxy of Great Activities about Astronauts, Gravity, and Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities for a springtime Space Day that can teach students about astronauts, gravity, and motion. Activities include creating a paper bag spacecraft to study liftoff and having students simulate gravity's effects by walking in various manners and recording pulse rates. A list of resources is included. (SM)

  5. Transcriptomes reveal alterations in gravity impact circadian clocks and activate mechanotransduction pathways with adaptation through epigenetic change.

    PubMed

    Casey, Theresa; Patel, Osman V; Plaut, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of alterations in gravity on mammalian transcriptomes. Here, we describe the impact of spaceflight on mammary transcriptome of late pregnant rats and the effect of hypergravity exposure on mammary, liver, and adipose transcriptomes in late pregnancy and at the onset of lactation. RNA was isolated from mammary collected on pregnancy day 20 from rats exposed to spaceflight from days 11 to 20 of gestation. To measure the impact of hypergravity on mammary, liver, and adipose transcriptomes we isolated RNA from tissues collected on P20 and lactation day 1 from rats exposed to hypergravity beginning on pregnancy day 9. Gene expression was measured with Affymetrix GeneChips. Microarray analysis of variance revealed alterations in gravity affected the expression of genes that regulate circadian clocks and activate mechanotransduction pathways. Changes in these systems may explain global gene expression changes in immune response, metabolism, and cell proliferation. Expression of genes that modify chromatin structure and methylation was affected, suggesting adaptation to gravity alterations may proceed through epigenetic change. Altered gravity experiments offer insights into the role of forces omnipresent on Earth that shape genomes in heritable ways. Our study is the first to analyze the impact of alterations in gravity on transcriptomes of pregnant and lactating mammals. Findings provide insight into systems that sense gravity and the way in which they affect phenotype, as well as the possibility of sustaining life beyond Earth's orbit. PMID:25649141

  6. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Wu, Dong L.

    1998-01-01

    This is the first quarter's report on research to extract global gravity-wave data from satellite data and to model those observations synoptically. Preliminary analysis of global maps of extracted middle atmospheric temperature variance from the CRISTA instrument is presented, which appear to contain gravity-wave information. Corresponding simulations of global gravity-wave and mountain-wave activity during this mission period are described using global ray-tracing and mountain-wave models, and interesting similarities among simulated data and CRISTA data are noted. Climatological simulations of mesospheric gravity-wave activity using the HWM-03 wind-temperature climatology are also reported, for comparison with UARS MLS data. Preparatory work on modeling of gravity wave observations from space-based platforms and subsequent interpretation of the MLS gravity-wave product are also described. Preliminary interpretation and relation to the research objectives are provided, and further action for the next quarter's research is recommended.

  7. Gravity: The Glue of the Universe. History and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Harry; Smith, Diana Gilbert

    This book presents a story of the history of gravity, the glue of the universe, and is based on two premises: (1) an understanding of mathematics is not required to grasp the concepts and implications of relativity; and (2) relativity has altered forever the perceptions of gravity, space, time, and how the universe works. A narrative text section…

  8. Response of Ambulatory Human Subjects to Artificial Gravity (Short Radius Centrifugation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Arya, Maneesh; Newby, Nathaniel; Tucker, Jon-Michael; Jarchow, Thomas; Young, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in significant adaptive changes, including cardiovascular deconditioning, muscle atrophy, bone loss, and sensorimotor reorganization, that place individuals at risk for performing physical activities after return to a gravitational environment. Planned missions to Mars include unprecedented hypogravity exposures that would likely result in unacceptable risks to crews. Artificial gravity (AG) paradigms may offer multisystem protection from the untoward effects of adaptation to the microgravity of space or the hypogravity of planetary surfaces. While the most effective AG designs would employ a rotating spacecraft, perceived issues may preclude their use. The questions of whether and how intermittent AG produced by a short radius centrifuge (SRC) could be employed have therefore sprung to the forefront of operational research. In preparing for a series of intermittent AG trials in subjects deconditioned by bed rest, we have examined the responses of several healthy, ambulatory subjects to SRC exposures.

  9. Changes in Muscle Activation after Reach Training with Gravity Compensation in Chronic Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prange, Gerdienke B.; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Ijzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation…

  10. Revisiting the correlation between stellar activity and planetary surface gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Oshagh, M.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Santos, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We re-evaluate the correlation between planetary surface gravity and stellar host activity as measured by the index log (R'HK). This correlation, previously identified by Hartman (2010, ApJ, 717, L138), is now analyzed in light of an extended measurement dataset, roughly three times larger than the original one. Methods: We calculated the Spearman rank correlation coefficient between the two quantities and its associated p-value. The correlation coefficient was calculated for both the full dataset and the star-planet pairs that follow the conditions proposed by Hartman (2010). To do so, we considered effective temperatures both as collected from the literature and from the SWEET-Cat catalog, which provides a more homogeneous and accurate effective temperature determination. Results: The analysis delivers significant correlation coefficients, but with a lower value than those obtained by Hartman (2010). The two datasets are compatible, and we show that a correlation coefficient as high as previously published can arise naturally from a small-number statistics analysis of the current dataset. The correlation is recovered for star-planet pairs selected using the different conditions proposed by Hartman (2010). Remarkably, the usage of SWEET-Cat temperatures led to higher correlation coefficient values. We highlight and discuss the role of the correlation betwen different parameters such as effective temperature and activity index. Several additional effects on top of those discussed previously were considered, but none fully explains the detected correlation. In light of the complex issue discussed here, we encourage the different follow-up teams to publish their activity index values in the form of a log (R'HK) index so that a comparison across stars and instruments can be pursued. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Suboptimal evolutionary novel environments promote singular altered gravity responses of transcriptome during Drosophila metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous experiments have shown that the reduced gravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS) causes important alterations in Drosophila gene expression. These changes were shown to be intimately linked to environmental space-flight related constraints. Results Here, we use an array of different techniques for ground-based simulation of microgravity effects to assess the effect of suboptimal environmental conditions on the gene expression of Drosophila in reduced gravity. A global and integrative analysis, using “gene expression dynamics inspector” (GEDI) self-organizing maps, reveals different degrees in the responses of the transcriptome when using different environmental conditions or microgravity/hypergravity simulation devices. Although the genes that are affected are different in each simulation technique, we find that the same gene ontology groups, including at least one large multigene family related with behavior, stress response or organogenesis, are over represented in each case. Conclusions These results suggest that the transcriptome as a whole can be finely tuned to gravity force. In optimum environmental conditions, the alteration of gravity has only mild effects on gene expression but when environmental conditions are far from optimal, the gene expression must be tuned greatly and effects become more robust, probably linked to the lack of experience of organisms exposed to evolutionary novel environments such as a gravitational free one. PMID:23806134

  12. Is water immersion useful for analyzing gravity resistance responses in terrestrial plants?

    PubMed

    Ooume, Kentaro; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hoson, Takayuki

    2004-11-01

    Water immersion has been used as a simulator of microgravity for analyzing gravity responses in semiaquatic plants such as rice. To examine whether or not water immersion for a short experimental period is a useful microgravity simulator even in terrestrial plants, we analyzed effects of water immersion on the cell wall rigidity and metabolisms of its constituents in azuki bean epicotyls. The cell wall rigidity of epicotyls grown underwater was significantly lower than that in the control. Water immersion also caused a decrease in molecular mass of xyloglucans as well as the thinning of the cell wall. Such changes in the mechanical and chemical properties of the cell wall underwater were similar to those observed in microgravity conditions in space. These results suggest that water immersion for a short period is a useful system for analyzing gravity resistance responses even in terrestrial plants. PMID:15858369

  13. Gender specific changes in cortical activation patterns during exposure to artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Stefan; Robinson, Ryan; Smith, Craig; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Goswami, Nandu

    2014-11-01

    Keeping astronauts healthy during long duration spaceflight remains a challenge. Artificial gravity (AG) generated by a short arm human centrifuges (SAHC) is proposed as the next generation of integrated countermeasure devices that will allow human beings to safely spend extended durations in space, although comparatively little is known about any psychological side effects of AG on brain function. 16 participants (8 male and 8 female, GENDER) were exposed to 10 min at a baseline gravitational load (G-Load) of +.03 Gz, then 10 min at +.6 Gz for females and +.8 Gz for males, before being exposed to increasing levels of AG in a stepped manner by increasing the acceleration by +.1 Gz every 3 min until showing signs of pre-syncope. EEG recordings were taken of brain activity during 2 min time periods at each AG level. Analysing the results of the mixed total population of participants by two way ANOVA, a significant effect of centrifugation on alpha and beta activity was found (p<.01). Furthermore results revealed a significant interaction between G-LOAD and GENDER alpha-activity (p<.01), but not for beta-activity. Although the increase in alpha and beta activity with G-LOAD does not reflect a general model of cortical arousal and therefore cannot support previous findings reporting that AG may be a cognitively arousing environment, the gender specific responses identified in this study may have wider implications for EEG and AG research.

  14. Mapping the functional roles of cap cells in the response of Arabidopsis primary roots to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Fasano, J. M.; Gilroy, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The cap is widely accepted to be the site of gravity sensing in roots because removal of the cap abolishes root curvature. Circumstantial evidence favors the columella cells as the gravisensory cells because amyloplasts (and often other cellular components) are polarized with respect to the gravity vector. However, there has been no functional confirmation of their role. To address this problem, we used laser ablation to remove defined cells in the cap of Arabidopsis primary roots and quantified the response of the roots to gravity using three parameters: time course of curvature, presentation time, and deviation from vertical growth. Ablation of the peripheral cap cells and tip cells did not alter root curvature. Ablation of the innermost columella cells caused the strongest inhibitory effect on root curvature without affecting growth rates. Many of these roots deviated significantly from vertical growth and had a presentation time 6-fold longer than the controls. Among the two inner columella stories, the central cells of story 2 contributed the most to root gravitropism. These cells also exhibited the largest amyloplast sedimentation velocities. Therefore, these results are consistent with the starch-statolith sedimentation hypothesis for gravity sensing.

  15. The response to gravity is correlated with the number of statoliths in Chara rhizoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to higher plants, Chara rhizoids have single membrane-bound compartments that appear to function as statoliths. Rhizoids were generated by germinating zygotes of Chara in either soil water (SW) medium or artificial pond water (APW) medium. Differential-interference-contrast microscopy demonstrated that rhizoids form SW-grown plants typically contain 50 to 60 statoliths per cell, whereas rhizoids from APW-grown plants contain 5 to 10 statoliths per cell. Rhizoids from SW are more responsive to gravity than rhizoids from APW because (a) SW rhizoids were oriented to gravity during vertical growth, whereas APW rhizoids were relatively disoriented, and (b) curvature of SW rhizoids was 3 to 4 times greater throughout the time course of curvature. The growth rate of APW rhizoids was significantly greater than that of SW-grown rhizoids. This latter result suggests that APW rhizoids are not limited in their ability for gravitropic curvature by growth and that these rhizoids are impaired in the early stages of gravitropism (i.e. gravity perception). Plants grown in APW appeared to be healthy because of their growth rate and the vigorous cytoplasmic streaming observed in the rhizoids. This study is comparable to earlier studies of gravitropism in starch-deficient mutants of higher plants and provides support for the role of statoliths in gravity perception.

  16. T Lymphocyte Activation Threshold is Increased in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley L.; Gonzalez, M.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    There have been substantial advances in molecular and cellular biology that have provided new insight into the biochemical and genetic basis of lymphocyte recognition, activation and expression of distinct functional phenotypes. It has now become evident that for both T and B cells, stimuli delivered through their receptors can result in either clonal expansion or apoptosis. In the case of T cells, clonal expansion of helper cells is accompanied by differentiation into two major functional subsets which regulate the immune response. The pathways between the membrane and the nucleus and their molecular components are an area of very active investigation. This meeting will draw together scientists working on diverse aspects of this problem, including receptor ligand interactions, intracellular pathways that transmit receptor mediated signals and the effect of such signal transduction pathways on gene regulation. The aim of this meeting is to integrate the information from these various experimental approaches into a new synthesis and molecular explanation of T cell activation, differentiation and death.

  17. Hydrological Modeling of Groundwater Disturbance to Gravity Signal for High-accuracy Monitoring of Volcanic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, T.; Okubo, S.

    2007-12-01

    Gravity observation is one of the effective methods to detect magma movements in volcanic eruptions [e.g., Furuya et al., J. Geoph. Res., 2003]. Groundwater-derived disturbances have to be corrected from gravity variations for highly accurate monitoring of volcanic activities. They have been corrected with empirical methods, such as tank models and regression curves [e.g., Imanishi et al., J. Geodyn., 2006]. These methods, however, are not based on hydrological background, and are very likely to eliminate volcanic signals excessively. The correction method of groundwater disturbance has to be developed with hydrological and quantitative approach. We thus estimate the gravity disturbance arising from groundwater as follows. (1) Groundwater distributions are simulated on a hydrological model, utilizing groundwater flow equations. (2) Groundwater-derived gravity value is estimated for each instant of time, by integrating groundwater distributions spatially. (3) The groundwater-derived gravity, as the correction value, is subtracted from observed gravity data. In this study, we simulated groundwater flow and groundwater-derived gravity value on the east part of the Asama volcano, central Japan. A simple hydrological model was supposed, consisting of homogeneous soil, lying on a flat impermeable basement. Hydraulic conductivity, which defines groundwater velocity, was set as 2.0×10-6[m/s], which is consistent with typical volcanic soils. We also observed time variations of watertable height, soil moisture and gravity simultaneously during the summer of 2006 at Asama volcano, and compared the observations with the theoretical values. Both simulated groundwater distributions and gravity changes agree fairly well with observed values. On variations of water level and moisture content, rapid increase at the time of rainfalls and exponential decrease after rainfalls were illustrated. Theoretical gravity changes explained 90% of the observed gravity increase (+20μgals) for

  18. Cellular responses to low-gravity: Pilot studies on suborbital rockets and orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1993-01-01

    The allocated funding supported, in part, experiments conducted on two Consort sounding rockets and five Shuttle flights. The primary parameters investigated were signal transduction in response to various mediators, cellular differentiation and metabolism in microgravity, and effect of microgravity on cytoskeletal morphology. Achievements include: demonstration of effect of spaceflight on the actin cytoskeleton in mouse osteoblasts and frog cells; confirmation that the T cell receptor-mediated signal transduction pathway in T lymphocytes is not affected by low-gravity compared to non-TCR-mediated stimulation (Con-A) which classically does not promote proliferative response; indication that microgravity may allow separation of proliferative signaling and secretory function in lymphocytes; demonstration that T lymphocytes and bone cells utilized less glucose indicating a shift in metabolism and confirming Spacelab results with WI-38 cells which used significantly less glucose, during spaceflight; confirmation that activation of human splenic B cells with a number of different mediators is not affected during spaceflight; demonstration of increased prostaglandin synthesis during reduced bone cell growth suggesting an effect of microgravity on prostaglandin-induced mitogenesis. The funding contributed significantly to the database described above and resulted in submission of six collaborative abstracts in 1993 (five to the ASGSB Annual Meeting and one to the ASCB Annual Meeting). Two abstracts were presented at the 1992 ASGSB Annual Meeting in Tucson. In addition, several peer reviewed papers are being generated and data will be included as background in preparation of future proposals, which hopefully will allow us to continue this type of extremely productive collaborative research.

  19. Gravity and deformation changes at two persistently active volcanoes: Insights into magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams-Jones, G.; Rymer, H.

    2004-05-01

    Insights on some of the mechanisms responsible for persistent volcanism can be best achieved through the synergy of temporal geophysical and geochemical data sets. Gravity changes combined with ground deformation have been shown to provide important information on magma reservoir mass changes while measurements of gas flux have been influential in determining the rate of magma emplacement. The integration of long-term micro-gravity and ground deformation data with SO2 flux and total sulphur budgets collected at Poás and Masaya volcanoes (since 1983 and 1993, respectively) now allows for the identification of significant cycles of activity. Recent eruptive activity at Poás volcano (Costa Rica) has been characterised by the disappearance and subsequent reappearance of the summit crater lake following intrusive episodes in 1980 and 1986-1989. Magma approached the surface on both occasions and was detected by the observation of concurrent increases in micro-gravity. These increases can be best modelled in terms of brittle fracturing of a shallow magma carapace allowing magma ascent through the conduit system to beneath the crater. This process allows for the vertical transfer of heat and gas and is driven by convection of buoyant, volatile-rich magma displacing colder, degassed magma. As magma pressure drops, the connection between the deeper magma reservoir and shallow conduit system is severed allowing the hydrothermal system to resume its role as a cooling mechanism. In contrast, recent activity at Masaya volcano (Nicaragua) has been characterised by repeated periods of significant passive degassing (>2000 t/d SO2) with the eruption of only negligible amounts of juvenile material. The resulting cycle gravity and gas flux variations is clearly not driven by intrusion of additional magma into the shallow system. Rather, it may be due in part to blocking and gas accumulation caused by restrictions in the shallow volcano substructure. However, as with Poás, this

  20. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses (NSBRI Neurovestibular Project 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark; Goldberg, Jefim; Minor, Lloyd B.; Paloski, William H.; Young, Laurence R.; Zee, David S.

    1999-01-01

    Impairment of gaze and head stabilization reflexes can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force (gif) environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive capabilities of these mechanisms. We wish to determine to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others, and to what extent gravity serves as a context cue for inhibiting such transfer. We use the general approach of adapting a response (saccades, vestibuloocular reflex: VOR, or vestibulocollic reflex: VCR) to a particular change in gain or phase in one gif condition, adapting to a different gain or phase in a second gif condition, and then seeing if gif itself - the context cue - can recall the previously-learned adapted responses. Previous evidence indicates that unless there is specific training to induce context-specificity, reflex adaptation is sequential rather than simultaneous. Various experiments in this project investigate the behavioral properties, neurophysiological basis, and anatomical substrate of context-specific learning, using otolith (gravity) signals as a context cue. In the following, we outline the methods for all experiments in this project, and provide details and results on selected experiments.

  1. Long-term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Jackman, C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An extensive body of research this quarter is documented. Further methodical analysis of temperature residuals in Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) Version 8 level 3AT data show signatures during December 1992 at middle and high northern latitudes that, when compared to Naval Research Laboratory/Mountain Wave Forecast Model (NRL)/(MWFM) mountain wave hindcasts, reveal evidence of long mountain waves in these data over Eurasia, Greenland, Scandinavia and North America. The explicit detection of gravity waves in limb-scanned Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) temperatures is modeled at length, to derive visibility functions. These insights are used to convert CRISTA gravity wave temperature residuals into data that more closely resemble gravity wave fluctuations detected in data from other satellite instruments, such as Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) and Global Positioning System/Meteorology (GPS)/(MET). Finally, newly issued mesospheric temperatures from inversion of CRISTA 15gin emissions are analyzed using a new method that uses separate Kalman fits to the ascending and descending node data. This allows us to study global gravity wave amplitudes at two local times, 12 hours apart. In the equatorial mesosphere, where a large diurnal tidal temperature signal exists, we see modulations of gravity wave activity that are consistent with gravity wave-tidal interactions produced by tidal temperature variability.

  2. The response of plasma density to breaking inertial gravity wave in the lower regions of ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wenbo Mahalov, Alex

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional numerical study for the E and lower F region ionosphere coupled with the neutral atmosphere dynamics. This model is developed based on a previous ionospheric model that examines the transport patterns of plasma density given a prescribed neutral atmospheric flow. Inclusion of neutral dynamics in the model allows us to examine the charge-neutral interactions over the full evolution cycle of an inertial gravity wave when the background flow spins up from rest, saturates and eventually breaks. Using Lagrangian analyses, we show the mixing patterns of the ionospheric responses and the formation of ionospheric layers. The corresponding plasma density in this flow develops complex wave structures and small-scale patches during the gravity wave breaking event.

  3. Mesospheric airglow and ionospheric responses to upward-propagating acoustic and gravity waves above tropospheric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of acoustic waves (periods ~1-5 minutes) and gravity waves (periods >4 minutes) in the ionosphere above active tropospheric convection has been appreciated for more than forty years [e.g., Georges, Rev. Geophys. and Space Phys., 11(3), 1973]. Likewise, gravity waves exhibiting cylindrical symmetry and curvature of phase fronts have been observed via imaging of the mesospheric airglow layers [e.g., Yue et al., JGR, 118(8), 2013], clearly associated with tropospheric convection; gravity wave signatures have also recently been detected above convection in ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements [Lay et al., GRL, 40, 2013]. We here investigate the observable features of acoustic waves, and their relationship to upward-propagating gravity waves generated by the same sources, as they arrive in the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Numerical simulations using a nonlinear, cylindrically-axisymmetric, compressible atmospheric dynamics model confirm that acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric sources may produce "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer that precede the arrival of gravity waves. As amplitudes increase with altitude and decreasing neutral density, the modeled acoustic waves achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of ~10s of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E- and F-region. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for low-latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system, we investigate acoustic wave perturbations to the ionosphere in the meridional direction. Resulting perturbations are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS TEC measurements, or via in situ instrumentation. Although transient and short-lived, the acoustic waves' airglow and ionospheric signatures are likely to in some cases be observable, and may provide important insight into the regional

  4. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Stabilization of the eyes and head during body movements is important for maintaining balance and keeping the images of objects stationary on our retinas. Impairment of this ability can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. In the absence of a normal earth gravity field, the dynamics of head stabilization, and the interpretation of vestibular signals that sense gravity and linear acceleration, are subject to change. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive mechanisms that maintain these reflexive abilities. It is vitally important to determine human adaptive capabilities in such a circumstance, so that we can know to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others. Our work lays the foundation for understanding these capabilities, and for determining how we can aid the processes of adaptation and readaptation. An integrated set of experiments addresses this issue. We use the general approach of adapting some type of reflexive eye movement (saccades, the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR), the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR)), or the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR), to a particular change in gain or phase in one condition of gravitoiner-tial force, and adapting to a different gain or phase (or asking for no change) in a second gravitoinertial force condition, and then seeing if the gravitoinertial force itself - the context cue - can recall the previously learned adapted responses. The majority of the experiments in the laboratory use the direction of vertical gaze or the direction of gravity (head tilt) as the context cue. This allows us to study context-specificity in a ground-based setting. One set of experiments, to be performed in parabolic flight, specifically uses the magnitude of gravitoinertial force as a context cue. This is a

  5. Heat flow and gravity responses over salt bodies: A comparative model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Corrigan, J.; Sweat, M.

    1995-07-01

    Two-dimensional numerical modeling of sea-floor heat flow and water-bottom gravity responses to systematic variations in simple subsurface salt body geometries provides insight on the relative usefulness of these two data types for extracting salt geometry information. For a given salt body geometry, diffusion of heat through overlying sediments results in a dramatic decrease in the amplitude of heat flow anomalies as the depth to the top of the salt body increases. For top-of-salt depths greater than about 1 km, the heat flow response is insensitive to the length of salt feeder stocks and to the thickness of salt tongues/sheets. This shallow depth-to-top-of-salt sensitivity range, in addition to a number of environmental factors that can adversely affect interpretation of heat flow anomalies in terms of heat refraction towards and through salt bodies, severely limits the usefulness of sea-floor heat flow data for constraining aspects of salt body geometry. For gravity data, the critical factor for addressing salt body geometry is the distribution of salt relative to the sediment-salt density crossover depth (above and below which salt is more and less dense, respectively, than the surrounding sediment). Except when ht relevant geometry information being sought (presence and/or length of feeder stock, thickness of salt tongue or sheet) is near the density crossover depth, the geometry-related information content of the gravity field is greater than that of the heat flow field. Based on these model results, measurement uncertainty considerations, and data limitations, the authors conclude that gravity data generally offer an order of magnitude greater resolution capability than sea-floor heat flow data for addressing salt body geometry issues of exploration interest.

  6. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema‘uma‘u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (<200 kg m−3) of a portion of the reservoir can produce the positive residual gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  7. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-09-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema`uma`u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema`uma`u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (<200 kg m-3) of a portion of the reservoir can produce the positive residual gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  8. Background gravity wave activity and its variability as determined from Dynasonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, C.; Zabotin, N. A.; Bullett, T. W.; Rietveld, M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of gravity waves for the dynamics of the thermosphere-ionosphere system is a well-known fact. Numerical models of the thermosphere-ionosphere must account for gravity wave effects by using various parameterization schemes with currently unknown levels of accuracy. There are several existing methods allowing for the detection of individual instances of gravity wave manifestations. However, little information exists regarding the background wave spectrum and its variability in the thermosphere. We employ Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID's) as tracers for gravity wave propagation, using results of Dynasonde data analysis as the starting point in our calculations. Data from the Wallops Island (VA), San Juan (Puerto Rico), Boulder (CO), Tromso and Svalbard (Norway) instruments are used. The interval between the sounding sessions is 2 minutes and the NeXtYZ inversion procedure (a part of the Dynasonde software package) allows us to obtain a vertical resolution for the parameters of ionospheric plasma in real height better than 1 km. The full output of the inversion procedure consists of height profiles of electron density, X (East-West) and Y (North-South) tilts of the constant plasma density contours and Doppler velocities, all of which showing persistent signs of gravity wave induced TID's. We demonstrate using a few examples that the characteristics of the observed TID's are in good agreement with the dispersion relation describing gravity waves. The ionospheric tilt measurements allow for determination of the direction of propagation for every wave mode. For each calendar month of 2013, the tilt spectra is obtained as a function of altitude using a Lomb-Scargle Welch implementation. The analysis is applied to all 6 stations proving unprecedented geographical coverage. The result is a complete picture of the altitude, temporal and location variability of gravity wave activity in the accessible thermospheric altitude interval with included

  9. Mesospheric, Thermospheric, and Ionospheric Responses to Acoustic and Gravity Waves Generated by Transient Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Strong acoustic waves with periods ~1-4 minutes have been confirmed to perturb the ionosphere following their generation by earthquakes [e.g., Garcia et al., GRL, 40(5), 2013] and volcanic eruption events [e.g., Heki, GRL, 33, L14303, 2006]. Clear acoustic and gravity wave signatures have also been reported in ionospheric data above strong tropospheric convection [Nishioka, GRL, 40(21), 2013], and prior modeling results suggest that convectively-generated acoustic waves with ~3-4 minute periods are readily detectable above their sources in TEC [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013]. These observations have provided quantitative insight into the coupling of processes occurring near Earth's surface with the upper atmosphere and ionosphere over short time-scales. Here, we investigate acoustic waves and short-period gravity waves generated by sources near ground level, and the observable responses of the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI) systems. Numerical simulations are performed using a nonlinear, compressible, atmospheric dynamics model, in cylindrically-axisymmetric coordinates, to investigate wave generation, upward propagation, steepening, and dissipation. Acoustic waves may produce observable signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer [e.g., Snively, GRL, 40(17), 2013], and can strongly perturb the lower-thermosphere and E- and F-region ionosphere, prior to the arrival of simultaneously-generated gravity waves. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for mid and low latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013], we investigate its response to realistic acoustic wave perturbations. In particular, we demonstrate that the MLT and ionospheric responses are significantly and nonlinearly determined by the acoustic wave source geometry, spectrum, and amplitude, in addition to the local ambient state of the

  10. Changing the Density of the External Medium can Modulate and Reverse the Gravity Response of Plant Cells and Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Kovacevic, Naila

    2013-02-01

    As an alternative to the statolith model, we have presented a model for plant gravity sensing in which the entire protoplast functions as the gravity sensor. This gravitational pressure model was developed as a result of experiments with the large, statolith-free, intermodal cells of Chara. The question remains whether the gravitational pressure model can explain the gravity responses of higher plants containing statocytes. We tested the gravitational pressure model by monitoring gravitropic curvature of statolith-containing roots in media of differing densities. The statolith model predicts that density of the external medium will have no effect on gravity sensing whereas the gravitational pressure model predicts that changing the density of the external medium will affect gravity sensing, and consequently the gravity response. We find that increasing the density of the external medium inhibits, and in some cases reverses the direction of gravitropic curvature of these roots. These data are consistent with the gravitational pressure model for plant gravity sensing and inconsistent with the statolith model.

  11. The Response of an Open Stratospheric Balloon to the Presence of Inertio-Gravity Waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.; Cornejo, J.; de La Torre, A.

    1996-01-01

    Analytic solutions for the vertical response of an open stratospheric balloon to the presence of inertio-gravity waves during its descent are obtained. Monochromatic waves with simultaneous variations in density, velocity, and temperature are considered. Two extreme cases for the thermal conductivity of the balloon are analyzed: perfect and null. In the first case the velocity variations of the wave dominate the balloon's behavior, but in the second one the air density oscillations also become significant. It is concluded that open stratospheric balloons may behave more adiabatic than perfect conducting.

  12. In-space technology flight experiments: Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) and Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venneri, Samuel L.

    1991-01-01

    The topics addressed are covered in viewgraph form. The objective of the Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) programs is to study gravity dependent nonlinearities associated with fluid slosh and truss structure dynamics. MODE provides a reusable facility for on-orbit dynamics testing of small scale test articles in the shirt sleeve environment on the Shuttle middeck. Flight program objective of Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is to study gravity effects on the performance and stability of controlled structures.

  13. Doppler sodar and radar wind-profiler observations of gravity-wave activity associated with a gravity current

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, F.M.; Venkateswaran, S.V. ); Mazaudier, C. ); Crochet, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Observations from two Doppler sodars and a radar wind profiler have been used in conjunction with data from a rawinsonde station and a mesoscale surface observation network to conduct a case study of a gravity current entering into an environment containing a nocturnal inversion and an elevated neutral layer. On the basis of synoptic and mesoscale analyses, it is concluded that the gravity current might have originated either as a scale-contracted cold front or as a gust front resulting from thunderstorm outflows observed very near the leading edge of a cold front. Despite this ambiguity, the detailed vertical structure of the gravity current itself is well resolved from the data. Moreover, the vertical velocity measurements provided by the sodars and the radar wind profiler at high time resolution have given unique information about the height structure of gravity waves excited by the gravity current. Although only wave periods, and not phase speeds or wavelengths, are directly measured, it is possible to make reasonable inferences about wave excitation mechanisms and about the influence and control of ambient stratification on wave-field characteristics. Both Kelvin-Helmholtz waves generated in the regions of high wind shear found in association with the gravity current and lee-type waves forced by the gravity current acting as an obstacle to opposing prefrontal flow are identified. It is also found that the propagation speed of the gravity current and the relative depths of the prefrontal inversion and the postfrontal cold air were not favorable for the formation of either internal bores or solitary waves at the time of day at which the gravity current was being observed. 42 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Gravity wave activities in the stratosphere and mesosphere during sudden stratospheric warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stuart; Riggin, Dennis; Fritts, Dave C.

    The gravity wave activities in the stratosphere and mesosphere of subtropics during the sudden stratospheric warming were studied using the temperature profiles measured by the Jet Propul-sion Laboratory (JPL) Rayleigh lidar at Mauna Loa Observatory (19.5N, 195.6W), Hawaii, and horizontal wind profiles measured by the MF radar at Kauai (22N, 200.2W), Hawaii. We found that the significant enhancement of gravity wave activities was observed before the sudden stratospheric warming in winter 2005/2006, followed by the decrease of activity during and after the warming. The significant change of GW activities during the warming will be dis-cussed together with the ECMWF wind in the stratosphere and MF radar mean wind in the mesosphere.

  15. Activation response of martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Forty, C.B.A.

    1997-09-01

    A hypothetical martensitic steel has been compositionally designed in order to optimize both metallurgical and reduced activation properties. When compared with two other martensitic steels, its activation characteristics are shown to be superior for all activation indices examined. However, these excellent properties are found to be due to the assumed absence of deleterious tramp impurities. When limiting impurity concentrations are determined for the hypothetical steel, they are found to be extremely stringent, and wholly unachievable using industrial scale production methods. It is concluded that only slight improvements can be made to currently available low activation martensitic steels to reduce residual activity responses further. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Activation Response of Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forty, C. B. A.

    1997-09-01

    A hypothetical martensitic steel has been compositionally designed in order to optimize both metallurgical and reduced activation properties. When compared with two other martensitic steels, its activation characteristics are shown to be superior for all activation indices examined. However, these excellent properties are found to be due to the assumed absence of deleterious tramp impurities. When limiting impurity concentrations are determined for the hypothetical steel, they are found to be extremely stringent, and wholly unachievable using industrial scale production methods. It is concluded that only slight improvements can be made to currently available low activation martensitic steels to reduce residual activity responses further.

  17. Neural activation during response competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazeltine, E.; Poldrack, R.; Gabrieli, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The flanker task, introduced by Eriksen and Eriksen [Eriksen, B. A., & Eriksen, C. W. (1974). Effects of noise letters upon the identification of a target letter in a nonsearch task. Perception & Psychophysics, 16, 143--149], provides a means to selectively manipulate the presence or absence of response competition while keeping other task demands constant. We measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance of the flanker task. In accordance with previous behavioral studies, trials in which the flanking stimuli indicated a different response than the central stimulus were performed significantly more slowly than trials in which all the stimuli indicated the same response. This reaction time effect was accompanied by increases in activity in four regions: the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the left superior parietal lobe, and the left anterior parietal cortex. The increases were not due to changes in stimulus complexity or the need to overcome previously learned associations between stimuli and responses. Correspondences between this study and other experiments manipulating response interference suggest that the frontal foci may be related to response inhibition processes whereas the posterior foci may be related to the activation of representations of the inappropriate responses.

  18. Extravehicular Activity Testing in Analog Environments: Evaluating the Effects of Center of Gravity and Environment on Human Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steve P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Center of gravity (CG) is likely to be an important variable in astronaut performance during partial gravity extravehicular activity (EVA). The Apollo Lunar EVA experience revealed challenges with suit stability and control. The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance Project (EPSP) in conjunction with the Constellation EVA Systems Project Office have developed plans to systematically understand the role of suit weight, CG and suit pressure on astronaut performance in partial gravity environments. This presentation based upon CG studies seeks to understand the impact of varied CG on human performance in lunar gravity.

  19. Summer surface layer thermal response to surface gravity waves in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Han, Guijun; Wang, Dongxiao; Deng, Zengan; Li, Wei

    2012-07-01

    The Princeton Ocean Model (POM) with generalized coordinate system (POMgcs) is used to study the summer surface-layer thermal response to surface gravity waves in the Yellow Sea (YS). The parameterization schemes of wave breaking developed by Mellor and Blumberg (J Phys Oceanogr 34:693-698, 2004) and Kantha and Clayson (Ocean Model 6:101-124, 2004), respectively, and Stokes production developed by Kantha and Clayson (Ocean Model 6:101-124, 2004) are both included in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence closure model Mellor and Yamada (Rev Geophys 20:851-875, 1982) of POMgcs. Numerical results show that surface gravity waves impact the depth of surface mixed layer of temperature in the YS in summer. The surface mixed layer in the YS cannot be reproduced well and has a visible difference from the observation if the parameterization schemes are not included. A diagnostic analysis of turbulent kinetic energy suggests that both Stokes production and wave breaking play key roles in enhancing the turbulent mixing near the sea surface in the YS. Stokes production seems to have a greater impact throughout the upper mixed layer in the YS in summer than that of wave breaking. In addition, a diagnostic analysis of the momentum balance shows that Coriolis-Stokes forcing has a significant effect on the momentum budget in the upper layer in the YS, and surface gravity waves are able to reduce the velocity of mean flow near the surface and make the mean flow near the surface more homogeneous vertically in the YS.

  20. Electric Current Activated Combustion Synthesis and Chemical Ovens Under Terrestrial and Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unuvar, C.; Fredrick, D.; Anselmi-Tamburini, U.; Manerbino, A.; Guigne, J. Y.; Munir, Z. A.; Shaw, B. D.

    2004-01-01

    Combustion synthesis (CS) generally involves mixing reactants together (e.g., metal powders) and igniting the mixture. Typically, a reaction wave will pass through the sample. In field activated combustion synthesis (FACS), the addition of an electric field has a marked effect on the dynamics of wave propagation and on the nature, composition, and homogeneity of the product as well as capillary flow, mass-transport in porous media, and Marangoni flows, which are influenced by gravity. The objective is to understand the role of an electric field in CS reactions under conditions where gravity-related effects are suppressed or altered. The systems being studied are Ti+Al and Ti+3Al. Two different ignition orientations have been used to observe effects of gravity when one of the reactants becomes molten. This consequentially influences the position and concentration of the electric current, which in turn influences the entire process. Experiments have also been performed in microgravity conditions. This process has been named Microgravity Field Activated Combustion Synthesis (MFACS). Effects of gravity have been demonstrated, where the reaction wave temperature and velocity demonstrate considerable differences besides the changes of combustion mechanisms with the different high currents applied. Also the threshold for the formation of a stable reaction wave is increased under zero gravity conditions. Electric current was also utilized with a chemical oven technique, where inserts of aluminum with minute amounts of tungsten and tantalum were used to allow observation of effects of settling of the higher density solid particles in liquid aluminum at the present temperature profile and wave velocity of the reaction.

  1. Capturing the fingerprint of Etna volcano activity in gravity and satellite radar data

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Ciro Del; Currenti, Gilda; Solaro, Giuseppe; Greco, Filippo; Pepe, Antonio; Napoli, Rosalba; Pepe, Susi; Casu, Francesco; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and high temporal resolution gravity and deformation data move us toward a better understanding of the behavior of Mt Etna during the June 1995 – December 2011 period in which the volcano exhibited magma charging phases, flank eruptions and summit crater activity. Monthly repeated gravity measurements were coupled with deformation time series using the Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) technique on two sequences of interferograms from ERS/ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed satellites. Combining spatiotemporal gravity and DInSAR observations provides the signature of three underlying processes at Etna: (i) magma accumulation in intermediate storage zones, (ii) magmatic intrusions at shallow depth in the South Rift area, and (iii) the seaward sliding of the volcano's eastern flank. Here we demonstrate the strength of the complementary gravity and DInSAR analysis in discerning among different processes and, thus, in detecting deep magma uprising in months to years before the onset of a new Etna eruption. PMID:24169569

  2. The brain in micro- and hypergravity: the effects of changing gravity on the brain electrocortical activity.

    PubMed

    Marušič, Uroš; Meeusen, Romain; Pišot, Rado; Kavcic, Voyko

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of increased and decreased gravity on central nervous system is essential for developing proper physical and cognitive countermeasures to assure safe and effective space missions and human survival in space. This short review covers the available literature on the brain electrocortical activity effects of decreased and increased gravitational force comparing to the 1g Earth conditions. Among all neuroimaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron-emission tomography (PET), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), the electroencephalography (EEG) was found to be suitable method to monitor brain electrocortical activity in the extreme environments. Due to complexity and high cost of space flight missions, ground-based models have been employed to simulate microgravity effects on human body. Surprisingly, there is very limited number of publications reporting gravity-dependent EEG spectral changes. With increased gravity there are initially increased EEG activity in higher frequencies and at around 4 g appears loss of consciousness with accompanying slowing of EEG due to hypoxia. In microgravity, the most prevalent changes in EEG are faster frequencies such as alpha and beta. The results from simulated microgravity (bed rest) are pointing to changes in theta and alpha, representing signs of cortical inhibition. The changes in EEG activity in space flight are attributed to a decreased sensorimotor input while in parabolic flights short and fast transitions from hyper to microgravity presumably reflect lower arousal levels and emotional processes in microgravity. Thus, based on limited research about gravity-related changes in EEG from different environments it is difficult to draw any unequivocal conclusions. Additional systematic studies about electrocortical activity in space and parabolic flights, as well as longer bed rest studies are needed in order to advance knowledge about brain functioning in extreme conditions

  3. Airborne Gravity Measurements using a Helicopter with Special Emphases on Delineating Local Gravity Anomalies Mainly for Detecting Active Seismic Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, J.

    2010-12-01

    The first aerial gravity measurement in Japan started in 1998 using a Japanese airborne gravimeter ‘ Segawa-TKeiki airborne gravimeter Model FGA-1’. We lay emphasis on the measurement of detailed gravity structures at the land-to-sea border areas and mountainous areas. This is the reason why we use a helicopter and make surveys at low altitude and low speed. We have so far made measurement at twelve sites and the total flight amounts to 20,000km. The accuracy of measurement is 1.5 mgal and half-wavelength resolution is 1.5 km. The Japanese type gravimeter consists of a servo-accelerometer type gravity sensor, a horizontal platform controlled by an optical fiber gyro, GPS positioning system, and a data processing system. Helicopter movement has to be precisely monitored three-dimensionally to calculate the vehicle’s acceleration noises. The necessary accuracy of positioning of the vehicle must be better than 10 cm in positioning error. Our helicopter gravity measurement has a special target in Japan to investigate active seismic faults located across land-to-sea borderlines. In Japan, it is generally thought that gravity over most of the country has already been measured by the governmental surveys, leaving the land-sea border lines and mountainous zones unsurveyed as difficult-to-access areas. In addition the use of airplane or helicopter in Japan appeared disadvantageous because of the narrowness of the Japanese Islands. Under such situations the author thought there still remained a particular as well as unique need for aerial gravity measurement in Japan, i.e. the need for detailed and seamless knowledge of gravity structures across land-to-sea border lines to elucidate complicated crustal structures of the Japanese Islands as well as distribution of active seismic faults for disaster prevention. The results of gravity measurements we have conducted so far include those of 12 sites. In the following the brief logs of our measurements are listed. 1)April

  4. Comparative Analysis of Gravity Wave Activity at Wallops Island and San Juan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, Catalin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terrence

    2014-05-01

    There are numerous gravity wave detection schemes currently in use, based on various data acquisition schemes and instrumentation types. We developed one such method based on dynasonde data, which include both electron density and electron density gradients. The results described in this work extend a range of 150-250 km in altitude, while being essentially continuous in time. In addition to this, we can fully diagnose the gravity wave field, simultaneously determining spatial and temporal characteristics. This paper describes a comparative analysis of wave activity at two locations: Wallops Island, Virginia, U.S.A. and San Juan, Puerto Rico. At both locations, we show cases of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID's) clearly caused by gravity wave activity. The dominant frequency is sometimes obvious, but generally we have a superposition of several waves, each with an associated bandwidth. We extract the frequency, amplitude, wavelength and direction of propagation for each mode detected, independent of all other modes present. The wave spectra can drastically change with altitude, time, season, geographical location, etc. The same is true for the other wave characteristics listed above, and this becomes even more complex when we consider waves propagating along the two horizontal axes separately. All these aspects are discussed in our work, separating effects due to these various factors. Finally, we describe how our work will be extended be adding several other stations to provide a global characterization of wave activity in the thermosphere-ionosphere system.

  5. Response of a confined gas to volumetric heating in the absence of gravity. I - Slow transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herczynski, A.; Kassoy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional model for bulk motion induced by a transient volumetric heat source in a confined gas at zero gravity is considered. Rational approximation methods are used to derive a quantitative theory for the gas response to a spatiallly distributed, time-dependent internal power deposition. The resulting low Mach number compressible flow equations are solved by using perturbation methods. Solutions are given for a conduction-free core and thin conductive boundary layers adjacent to the end walls. It is found that may any spatially nonuniform power deposition will cause fluid motion. Net mass transport in the closed container will occur for certain spatially distributed heating. The model mimics the thermal effects of an exothermic gas phase reaction in vapor transport experiments conducted in space. The solutions demonstrate that thermally induced mass transport can be as large as diffusive mass transport in a typical experiment.

  6. Linkage between gravity perception and response in the grass leaf-sheath pulvinus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayanandan, P.; Franklin, C. I.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    Cellulose synthesis inhibitors 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile and coumarin inhibit the normal gravitropic response of the leaf-sheath pulvini in several grasses. These inhibitors induce thickenings that are mostly distributed in the radial walls. Their distribution patterns follow a previously published equation that describes the geometry of asymmetric growth in the leaf-sheath pulvinus. It is proposed that radial transport of growth promotors may account for the observed asymmetric growth rather than the classical concept of lateral downward transport in an horizontally placed shoot. Electron microscopic observation of an interaction between the tonoplast membrane and statoliths suggests that such an interaction might be a basis for gravity perception in grass leaf-sheath pulvini.

  7. Gravity response mechanisms of lateral organs and the control of plant architecture in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, J.; Hangarter, R.

    Most research on gravity responses in plants has focused on primary roots and shoots, which typically grow in a vertical orientation. However, the patterns of lateral organ formation and their growth orientation, which typically are not vertical, govern plant architecture. For example, in Arabidopsis, when lateral roots emerge from the primary root, they grow at a nearly horizontal orientation. As they elongate, the roots slowly curve until they eventually reach a vertical orientation. The regulation of this lateral root orientation is an important component affecting the overall root system architecture. We have found that this change in orientation is not simply due to the onset of gravitropic competence, as non-vertical lateral roots are capable of both positive and negative gravitropism. Thus, the horizontal growth of the new lateral roots is determined by what is called the gravitropic set-point angle (GSA). In Arabidopsis shoots, rosette leaves and inflorescence branches also display GSA-dependent developmental changes in their orientation. The developmental control of the GSA of lateral organs in Arabidopsis provides us with a useful system for investigating the components involved in regulating directionality of tropistic responses. We have identified several Arabidopsis mutants that have either altered lateral root orientations, altered orientation of lateral organs in the shoot, or both, but maintain normal primary organ orientation. The mgsa ({m}odified {g}ravitropic {s}et-point {a}ngle) mutants with both altered lateral root and shoot orientation show that there are common components in the regulation of growth orientation in the different organs. Rosette leaves and lateral roots also have in common a regulation of positioning by red light. Further molecular and physiological analyses of the GSA mutants will provide insight into the basis of GSA regulation and, thus, a better understanding of how gravity controls plant architecture. [This work was

  8. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank.

  9. A modified oxic-settling-anaerobic activated sludge process using gravity thickening for excess sludge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Li, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Ke; Liu, Guang-Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Oxic-settling-anaerobic process (OSA) was known as a cost-effective way to reduce the excess sludge production with simple upgrade of conventional activated sludge process (CAS). A low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level was the key factor to sludge decay and lysis in the sludge holding tank of the OSA process. However, the ORP control with nitrogen purge or chemical dosing in the OSA process would induce extra expense and complicate the operation. Hence, in this study, a sludge holding tank using gravity thickening was applied to OSA process to reduce the excess sludge production without any ORP control. Results showed that the modified OSA process not only reduced the excess sludge production effectively but also improved the sludge settleability without affected the treatment capacity. The reduction of the excess sludge production in the modified OSA process resulted from interactions among lots of factors. The key element of the process was the gravity thickening sludge holding tank. PMID:26350761

  10. Theoretical and lidar studies of the density response of the mesospheric sodium layer to gravity wave perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, J. D.; Gardner, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The density response of atmospheric layers to gravity waves is developed in two forms, an exact solution and a perturbation series solution. The degree of nonlinearity in the layer density response is described by the series solution whereas the exact solution gives insight into the nature of the responses. Density perturbation in an atmospheric layer are shown to be substantially greater than the atmospheric density perturbation associated with the propagation of a gravity wave. Because of the density gradients present in atmospheric layers, interesting effects were observed such as a phase reversal in the linear layer response which occurs near the layer peak. Once the layer response is understood, the sodium layer can be used as a tracer of atmospheric wave motions. A two dimensional digital signal processing technique was developed. Both spatial and temporal filtering are utilized to enhance the resolution by decreasing shot noise by more han 10 dB. Many of the features associated with a layer density response to gravity waves were observed in high resolution density profiles of the mesospheric sodium layer. These include nonlinearities as well as the phase reversal in the linear layer response.

  11. Magnetic Field Is the Dominant Factor to Induce the Response of Streptomyces avermitilis in Altered Gravity Simulated by Diamagnetic Levitation

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Peng; Zhou, Xianlong; Ashforth, Elizabeth; Zhuo, Ying; Chen, Difei; Ren, Biao; Liu, Zhiheng; Zhang, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Background Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to simulate an altered gravity environment, as in space. In this study, using Streptomyces avermitilis as the test organism, we investigate whether changes in magnetic field and altered gravity induce changes in morphology and secondary metabolism. We find that a strong magnetic field (12T) inhibit the morphological development of S. avermitilis in solid culture, and increase the production of secondary metabolites. Methodology/Principal Findings S. avermitilis on solid medium was levitated at 0 g*, 1 g* and 2 g* in an altered gravity environment simulated by diamagnetic levitation and under a strong magnetic field, denoted by the asterix. The morphology was obtained by electromicroscopy. The production of the secondary metabolite, avermectin, was determined by OD245 nm. The results showed that diamagnetic levitation could induce a physiological response in S. avermitilis. The difference between 1 g* and the control group grown without the strong magnetic field (1 g), showed that the magnetic field was a more dominant factor influencing changes in morphology and secondary metabolite production, than altered gravity. Conclusion/Significance We have discovered that magnetic field, rather than altered gravity, is the dominant factor in altered gravity simulated by diamagnetic levitation, therefore care should to be taken in the interpretation of results when using diamagnetic levitation as a technique to simulate altered gravity. Hence, these results are significant, and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena. PMID:22039402

  12. Perception and response to gravity in higher fungi--a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Moore, D

    1991-01-01

    hymenophore (gill, tube or tooth) is positively gravitropic and responds independently of the stem. Bracket polypores do not show tropisms but exhibit gravimorphogenetic responses such that gross disturbance leads to renewal of growth to produce and entirely new fruiting structure suitably reoriented to the new spatial position. One experiment performed on an orbiting space station suggests that, in the absence of a light stimulus, gravity may be required for initiation of fruiting in Polyporus brumalis. Otherwise, the indications from both clinostat and space-borne experiments are that the basic form of the mushroom (overall tissue arrangement of stem, cap, gills, hymenium, veil) in agaric and polypore alike is established independently of the gravity vector. Abnormal stem growth has been observed in clinostat cultures of Panus (= Lentinus) tigrinus and Polyporus brumalis, but the morphogenetic event which seems most dependent on gravity is sporulation (in the broadest sense). Cultures of P. brumalis on orbiting space craft fail to produce the poroid hymenophore and in clinostat experiments on the ground even karyogamy was rare in similar cultures. Coprinus cinereus grown on the clinostat was able to produce apparently normal fruit body primordia which failed to produce spores and then aborted, forming a new flush of primordia on the old. Taken together with the clear association between observation of gravitropism and the onset of sporulation, the implication is that commitment to the meiosis-sporulation pathway both requires the gravity vector and couples it in some way to fruit-body growth. There is no convincing evidence for a graviperception mechanism in fungi. There is no evidence for any organised means of communicating the gravitropic stimulus once it has been perceived. Reports of three different experimental studies reveal the authors' conviction that the apparently coordinated expression of gravitropic response is in truth a common, but independent, response by

  13. Fucus as a Model System to Study the Role of Auxin Transport and the Actin Cytoskeleton in Gravity Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, Gloria K.

    2003-01-01

    The overarching goal of this proposal was to examine the mechanisms for the cellular asymmetry in auxin transport proteins. As auxin transport polarity changes in response to reorientation of algal and plant cells relative to the gravity vector, it was critical to ask how auxin transport polarity is established and how this transport polarity may change in response to gravity stimulation. The experiments conducted with this NASA grant fell into two categories. The first area of experimentation was to explore the biochemical interactions between an auxin transport protein and the actin cytoskeleton. These experiments used biochemical techniques, including actin affinity chromatography, to demonstrate that one auxin transport protein interacts with the actin cytoskeleton. The second line of experiments examined whether in the initially symmetrical single celled embryos of Fucus distichus, whether auxin regulates development and whether gravity is a cue to control the morphogenesis of these embryos and whether gravi-morphogenesis is auxin dependent. Results in these two areas are summarized separately below. As a result of this funding, in combination with results from other investigators, we have strong evidence for an important role for the actin cytoskeleton in both establishing and change auxin transport polarity. It is also clear that Fucus distichus embryos are auxin responsive and gravity controls their morphogenesis.

  14. Seismic response of 3D steel buildings considering the effect of PR connections and gravity frames.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Edén; Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system. PMID:24995357

  15. Seismic Response of 3D Steel Buildings considering the Effect of PR Connections and Gravity Frames

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J. Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system. PMID:24995357

  16. The effect of space missions on gravity-responsive torsional eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, S. G.; Markham, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    Three astronauts underwent preflight, inflight, and postflight testing of spontaneous ocular torsion and of ocular counterrolling (OCR), reflexes governed by the gravity-responsive otolith organs in the inner ear. One astronaut, A, had a 30-day space mission on Euromir '94 and was examined monocularly with SensoMotoric Instruments video-oculography (VOG). The other two astronauts, B and C, were studied with a binocular VOG and flew an 180-day mission on Euromir '95. In space, spontaneous eye torsion in the upright position was found to be substantially offset from baseline Earth-based recordings in all three subjects for the duration of the flights. In addition, the binocular studies showed a marked torsional disconjugacy. On return to Earth, offset and torsional disconjugacy persisted for many days. OCR in response to 30 degrees right and left tilt was examined preflight and postflight. Compared to preflight, Astronaut A showed reduced OCR immediately postflight, which increased over the next few days. Both Astronauts B and C had increased OCR postflight, which gradually approached but did not achieve the preflight values over 13 days postflight. The adaptation of ocular torsion in space in one astronaut and not in the other two, and slow adaptation postflight, may reflect the lack of visual feed-back and the open loop nature of the otolith-ocular torsion reflex.

  17. Enhanced internal gravity wave activity and breaking over the northeastern Pacific-eastern Asian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šácha, P.; Kuchař, A.; Jacobi, C.; Pišoft, P.

    2015-11-01

    We have found a stratospheric area of anomalously low annual cycle amplitude and specific dynamics in the stratosphere over the northeastern Pacific-eastern Asia coastal region. Using GPS radio occultation density profiles from the Formosat Satellite Mission 3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC), we have discovered an internal gravity wave (IGW) activity and breaking hotspot in this region. Conditions supporting orographic wave sourcing and propagation were found. Other possible sources of wave activity in this region are listed. The reasons why this particular IGW activity hotspot was not discovered before as well as why the specific dynamics of this region have not been pointed out are discussed together with the weaknesses of using the mean potential energy as a wave activity proxy. Possible consequences of the specific dynamics in this region on the middle atmospheric dynamics and transport are outlined.

  18. Observation of acoustic-gravity waves in the upper atmosphere during severe storm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    A nine-element continuum wave spectrum, high-frequency, Doppler sounder array has been used to detect upper atmospheric wave-like disturbances during periods with severe weather activity, particularly severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. Five events of severe weather activity, including extreme tornado outbreak of April 3, 1974, were chosen for the present study. The analysis of Doppler records shows that both infrasonic waves and gravity waves were excited when severe storms appeared in the north Alabama area. Primarily, in the case of tornado activity, S-shaped Doppler fluctuations or Doppler fold-backs are observed, while quasi-sinusoidal fluctuations are more common in the case of thunderstorm activity. A criterion for the production of Doppler fold-backs is derived and compared with possible tornado conditions.

  19. STS-45 crewmembers during zero gravity activities onboard KC-135 NASA 930

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, crewmembers and backup payload specialist participate in zero gravity activities onboard KC-135 NASA 930. The crewmembers, wearing flight suits, float and tumble around an inflated globe during the few seconds of microgravity created by parabolic flight. With his hand on the fuselage ceiling is Payload Specialist Dirk D. Frimout. Clockwise from his position are Mission Specialist (MS) C. Michael Foale, Pilot Brian Duffy, backup Payload Specialist Charles R. Chappell, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Kathryn D. Sullivan (with eye glasses), Commander Charles F. Bolden, and Payload Specialist Byron K. Lichtenberg.

  20. The Gravity Wave Response Above Deep Convection in a Squall Line Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Holton, J. R.; Durran, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    High-frequency gravity waves generated by convective storms likely play an important role in the general circulation of the middle atmosphere. Yet little is known about waves from this source. This work utilizes a fully compressible, nonlinear, numerical, two-dimensional simulation of a midlatitude squall line to study vertically propagating waves generated by deep convection. The model includes a deep stratosphere layer with high enough resolution to characterize the wave motions at these altitudes. A spectral analysis of the stratospheric waves provides an understanding of the necessary characteristics of the spectrum for future studies of their effects on the middle atmosphere in realistic mean wind scenarios. The wave spectrum also displays specific characteristics that point to the physical mechanisms within the storm responsible for their forcing. Understanding these forcing mechanisms and the properties of the storm and atmosphere that control them are crucial first steps toward developing a parameterization of waves from this source. The simulation also provides a description of some observable signatures of convectively generated waves, which may promote observational verification of these results and help tie any such observations to their convective source.

  1. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  2. The GRAVITY spectrometers: design report of the optomechanics and active cryogenic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiest, Michael; Yazici, Senol; Fischer, Sebastian; Thiel, Markus; Haug, Marcus; Araujo-Hauck, Constanza; Straubmeier, Christian; Wank, Imke; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Brandner, Wolfgang; Perraut, Karine; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    The work package of the University of Cologne within the GRAVITY consortium included the development and manufacturing of two spectrometers for the beam combiner instrument. Both spectrometers are optimized for different tasks. The science spectrometer provides 3 different spectral resolutions. In the highest resolution the length of the spectral lines is close to the borders of the imaging area of the detector. Also the integration time of these high resolution images is relative long. Therefor the optical pathes have to be controlled by the feedback of a faster spectrometer. The fringe tracking spectrometer has only one low resolution to allow much shorter integration times. This spectrometer provides a feedback for the control loops which stabilize the optical pathes of the light from the telescope to the instrument. This is a new key feature of the whole GRAVITY instrument. Based on the optical layout my work was the design of the mechanical structure, mountings, passive and active adjustment mechanisms. This paper gives a short review about the active mechanisms and the compliant lens mounts. They are used similarly in both spectrometers. Due to the observation and analysis of near-infrared light the mechanisms have to run at cryogenic temperatures and in a high vacuum. Except the linear stages, the motorized mechanisms will get used for several times per observation.

  3. Summer Surface Layer Thermal Response to Surface Gravity Waves in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Han, G.; Deng, Z.; Wang, X.

    2010-12-01

    A three-dimensional ocean model is applied to study the summer surface layer thermal response to surface gravity waves in the Yellow sea and the East China Sea(YES).The parameterization schemes of wave breaking developed by Mellor and Blumberg(2004) and Langmuir circulation developed by Kantha and Clayson(2004) are both included in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence closure model(Mellor and Yamada, 1982). Numerical results show that both surface wave breaking and Langmuir circulation determine the depth of surface boundary layer of temperature in the YES in summer. Langmuir circulation is able to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy injected by breaking waves near the surface and transport it downward to greater depths. A diagnostic analysis of the momentum balance shows that surface gravity waves can decrease the velocity near the surface and make the flow near the surface more homogeneous vertically in the YES. In addition, a diagnostic analysis of the temperature equation has been done for studying the heat budget. Diagnostic results show that more heat that is brought from surface in the YES can been transferred into the deeper layer owing to the surface gravity waves, which can induce local temperature there increase more rapidly. Besides, diagnostic results also suggest that surface gravity waves are likely to decrease upwelling near the bank in the region.

  4. Changes in root cap pH are required for the gravity response of the Arabidopsis root

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasano, J. M.; Swanson, S. J.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Dowd, P. E.; Kao, T. H.; Gilroy, S.

    2001-01-01

    Although the columella cells of the root cap have been identified as the site of gravity perception, the cellular events that mediate gravity signaling remain poorly understood. To determine if cytoplasmic and/or wall pH mediates the initial stages of root gravitropism, we combined a novel cell wall pH sensor (a cellulose binding domain peptide-Oregon green conjugate) and a cytoplasmic pH sensor (plants expressing pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein) to monitor pH dynamics throughout the graviresponding Arabidopsis root. The root cap apoplast acidified from pH 5.5 to 4.5 within 2 min of gravistimulation. Concomitantly, cytoplasmic pH increased in columella cells from 7.2 to 7.6 but was unchanged elsewhere in the root. These changes in cap pH preceded detectable tropic growth or growth-related pH changes in the elongation zone cell wall by 10 min. Altering the gravity-related columella cytoplasmic pH shift with caged protons delayed the gravitropic response. Together, these results suggest that alterations in root cap pH likely are involved in the initial events that mediate root gravity perception or signal transduction.

  5. Satellite observations of gravity wave activity and dissipation during sudden stratospheric warmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are a circulation anomaly that occurs mainly at high northern latitudes in boreal winter. During major SSWs the eastward directed polar jet reverses, and, for a certain period, the stratosphere is governed by anomalous westward winds. It is known that both planetary waves and gravity waves contribute to the formation and evolution of SSWs. However, the small horizontal scales of gravity waves (tens to a few thousand km) challenge both observations and modeling of gravity waves. Therefore, the role of gravity waves during SSWs is still not fully understood. In particular, gravity waves should play an important role during the recovery of the stratopause and of the eastward directed polar jet after major SSWs. This is indicated by several modeling efforts. However, validation by global observations of gravity waves is still an open issue. Gravity wave momentum fluxes and potential gravity wave drag were derived from HIRDLS and SABER satellite observations, and the role of gravity waves during recent SSWs in the boreal winters 2001/2002-2013/2014 is investigated. We find that gravity waves with slow horizontal phase speeds, likely mountain waves, play an important role during SSWs. Both gravity wave momentum fluxes and gravity wave drag are enhanced before the central date of major SSWs. After the central date, gravity wave momentum fluxes and gravity wave drag in the stratosphere are strongly reduced. Still, gravity wave drag contributes to the wind reversals related to the anomalous westward winds. Another finding is that, after major SSWs, the contribution of gravity wave drag at the bottom of re-established eastward directed polar jets is small. At the top of those jets, however, strong gravity wave drag is found, which indicates that gravity waves contribute to the downward propagation of newly formed polar jets and of elevated stratopauses to their "climatological" altitude. This confirms recent modeling work by, for example

  6. Neural response in vestibular organ of Helix aspersa to centrifugation and re-adaptation to normal gravity.

    PubMed

    Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Gravity plays a key role in shaping the vestibular sensitivity (VS) of terrestrial organisms. We studied VS changes in the statocyst of the gastropod Helix aspersa immediately after 4-, 16-, and 32-day exposures to a 1.4G hypergravic field or following a 7-day recovery period. In the same animals we measured latencies of behavioral "negative gravitaxis" responses to a head-down pitch before and after centrifugation and found significant delays after 16- and 32-day runs. In an isolated neural preparation we recorded the electrophysiological responses of the statocyst nerve to static tilt (±19°) and sinusoids (±12°; 0.1 Hz). Spike sorting software was used to separate individual sensory cells' patterns out of a common trace. In correspondence with behavior we observed a VS decrease in animals after 16- (p < 0.05) and 32-day (p < 0.01) centrifugations. These findings reveal the capability of statoreceptors to adjust their sensitivity in response to a prolonged change in the force of gravity. Interestingly, background discharge rate increased after 16 and 32 days in hypergravity and continued to rise through the recovery period. This result indicates that adaptive mechanisms to novel gravity levels were long lasting, and re-adaptation from hypergravity is a more complex process than just "return to normal". PMID:25801308

  7. Research on the Calculated Methods of Active Control Value for Antenna Panel Deformations under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, L.; Zhong, W. Y.; Qiao, H. H.; Liu, G. X.; Qian, H. L.

    2015-07-01

    The methods of ideal reflector surface, two-parameter, five-parameter, and six-parameter best-fit paraboloid are presented in this paper. Based on these methods, the adjustment values of gravity deformations are calculated for the main reflector of large-scale Cassegrain antenna. Accordingly, the positions of subreflector are corrected, and the effects of offset-focus on electric performance are also analyzed. Taking Shanghai 65 m antenna as a research object, the adjustment values of actuator and hexapod, the accuracy of the main reflector surface, and the pointing error after offsetting the focus are contrasted. As a result, the method of six-parameter best-fit paraboloid is ideal to calculate active control value for antenna panels after the effects of feed defocus have been adjusted and modified. The results offer data for the active control of antenna.

  8. Global gravity wave activity in the tropopause region from CHAMP radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; de la Torre, A.; Wickert, J.

    2008-08-01

    We discuss the global gravity wave (GW) activity expressed by the specific potential energy in the altitude range from 5 km below to 10 km above the tropopause, derived from GPS radio occultation data from CHAMP (2001-2008). The GW analysis is based on vertical detrending of the individual measured temperature profiles by applying a Gaussian filter in two different ways: (i) filtering of the complete temperature profiles and (ii) separate filtering of the profiles for the tropospheric and lower stratospheric parts. The separate filtering method significantly reduces the usually observed wave activity enhancement in the tropopause region which highly depends on the performance of the complete filtering method to reproduce the change in the temperature gradient at the tropopause. We only consider vertical wavelengths less than 10 km. The global mean potential energy in the tropopause region deduced with these different background temperatures will be analyzed, differences will be emphasized and possible error sources of the new method will be considered.

  9. Toll mediated infection response is altered by gravity and spaceflight in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Katherine; Kleinhesselink, Kurt; George, Michael D; Morgan, Rachel; Smallwood, Tangi; Hammonds, Ann S; Fuller, Patrick M; Saelao, Perot; Alley, Jeff; Gibbs, Allen G; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; von Kalm, Laurence; Fuller, Charles A; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Kimbrell, Deborah A

    2014-01-01

    Space travel presents unlimited opportunities for exploration and discovery, but requires better understanding of the biological consequences of long-term exposure to spaceflight. Immune function in particular is relevant for space travel. Human immune responses are weakened in space, with increased vulnerability to opportunistic infections and immune-related conditions. In addition, microorganisms can become more virulent in space, causing further challenges to health. To understand these issues better and to contribute to design of effective countermeasures, we used the Drosophila model of innate immunity to study immune responses in both hypergravity and spaceflight. Focusing on infections mediated through the conserved Toll and Imd signaling pathways, we found that hypergravity improves resistance to Toll-mediated fungal infections except in a known gravitaxis mutant of the yuri gagarin gene. These results led to the first spaceflight project on Drosophila immunity, in which flies that developed to adulthood in microgravity were assessed for immune responses by transcription profiling on return to Earth. Spaceflight alone altered transcription, producing activation of the heat shock stress system. Space flies subsequently infected by fungus failed to activate the Toll pathway. In contrast, bacterial infection produced normal activation of the Imd pathway. We speculate on possible linkage between functional Toll signaling and the heat shock chaperone system. Our major findings are that hypergravity and spaceflight have opposing effects, and that spaceflight produces stress-related transcriptional responses and results in a specific inability to mount a Toll-mediated infection response. PMID:24475130

  10. Toll Mediated Infection Response Is Altered by Gravity and Spaceflight in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Katherine; Kleinhesselink, Kurt; George, Michael D.; Morgan, Rachel; Smallwood, Tangi; Hammonds, Ann S.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Saelao, Perot; Alley, Jeff; Gibbs, Allen G.; Hoshizaki, Deborah K.; von Kalm, Laurence; Fuller, Charles A.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Kimbrell, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Space travel presents unlimited opportunities for exploration and discovery, but requires better understanding of the biological consequences of long-term exposure to spaceflight. Immune function in particular is relevant for space travel. Human immune responses are weakened in space, with increased vulnerability to opportunistic infections and immune-related conditions. In addition, microorganisms can become more virulent in space, causing further challenges to health. To understand these issues better and to contribute to design of effective countermeasures, we used the Drosophila model of innate immunity to study immune responses in both hypergravity and spaceflight. Focusing on infections mediated through the conserved Toll and Imd signaling pathways, we found that hypergravity improves resistance to Toll-mediated fungal infections except in a known gravitaxis mutant of the yuri gagarin gene. These results led to the first spaceflight project on Drosophila immunity, in which flies that developed to adulthood in microgravity were assessed for immune responses by transcription profiling on return to Earth. Spaceflight alone altered transcription, producing activation of the heat shock stress system. Space flies subsequently infected by fungus failed to activate the Toll pathway. In contrast, bacterial infection produced normal activation of the Imd pathway. We speculate on possible linkage between functional Toll signaling and the heat shock chaperone system. Our major findings are that hypergravity and spaceflight have opposing effects, and that spaceflight produces stress-related transcriptional responses and results in a specific inability to mount a Toll-mediated infection response. PMID:24475130

  11. Rayleigh lidar observations of gravity wave activity in the upper stratosphere at Urbana, Ill.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Miller, M. S.; Liu, C. H.

    1988-01-01

    During 13 nights of Rayleigh lidar measurements at Urbana, Ill. in 1984 to 1986, thirty-six quasi-monochromatic gravity waves were observed in the 35 to 50 km altitude region of the stratosphere. The characteristics of the waves are compared with other lidar and radar measurements of gravity waves and the theoretical models of wave saturation and dissipation phenomena. The measured vertical wavelengths ranged from 2 to 11.5 km and the measured vertical phase velocities ranged from 10 to 85 cm/s. The vertical wavelengths and vertical phase velocities were used to infer observed wave periods which ranged from 100 to 1000 min and horizontal wavelengths which ranged from 70 to 2000 km. Dominant wave activity was found at vertical wavelengths between 2 to 4 km and 7 to 10 km. No significant seasonal variations were evident in the observed parameters. Vertical and horizontal wavelengths showed a clear tendency to increase with wave periods, which is consistent with recent sodium lidar studies of quasi-monochromatic waves near the mesopause. An average amplitude growth length of 20.9 km for the rms wind perturbations was estimated from the data. Kinetic energy density associated with the waves decreased with height, suggesting that waves in this altitude region were subject to dissipation or saturation effects.

  12. Circumnutation and its dependence on the gravity response in rice, morning glory and pea plants: verification by spaceflight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Akie; Fujii, Nobuharu; Yano, Sachiko; Shimazu, Toru; Kim, Hyejeong; Tomita, Yuuta; Miyazawa, Yutaka

    Plant organs display helical growth movement known as circumnutation. This movement helps plant organs find suitable environmental cues. The amplitude, period and shape of the circumnutation differ depending on plant species or organs. Although the mechanism for circumnutation is unclear, it has long been argued whether circumnutation is involved with gravitropic response. Previously, we showed that shoots of weeping morning glory (we1 and we2) are impaired in not only the differentiation of endodermis (gravisensing cells) and gravitropic response, but also winding and circumnutation (Kitazawa et al., PNAS 102: 18742-18747, 2005). Here, we report a reduced circumnutation in the shoots of rice and the roots of pea mutants defective in gravitropic response. Coleoptiles of clinorotated rice seedlings and decapped roots of pea seedlings also showed a reduction of their circumnutational movement. These results suggest that circumnutation is tightly related with gravitropic response. In the proposed spaceflight experiments, “Plant Rotation”, we will verify the hypothesis that circumnutation requires gravity response, by using microgravity environment in KIBO module of the International Space Station. We will grow rice and morning glory plants under both muG and 1G conditions on orbit and monitor their growth by a camera. The downlinked images will be analyzed for the measurements of plant growth and nutational movements. This experiment will enable us to answer the question whether circumnutation depends on gravity response or not.

  13. Rat head direction cell responses in zero-gravity parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Taube, Jeffrey S; Stackman, Robert W; Calton, Jeffrey L; Oman, Charles M

    2004-11-01

    Astronauts working in zero-gravity (0-G) often experience visual reorientation illusions (VRIs). For example, when floating upside down, they commonly misperceive the spacecraft floor as a ceiling and have a reversed sense of direction. Previous studies have identified a population of neurons in the rat's brain that discharge as a function of the rat's head direction (HD) in a gravitationally horizontal plane and is dependent on an intact vestibular system. Our goal was to characterize HD cell discharge under conditions of acute weightlessness. Seven HD cells in the anterior dorsal thalamus were monitored from rats aboard an aircraft in 0-G parabolic flight. Unrestrained rats locomoted in a clear plexiglas rectangular chamber that had wire mesh covering the floor, ceiling, and one wall. The chamber and surrounding visual environment were relatively up-down symmetrical. Each HD cell was recorded across forty 20-s episodes of 0-G. All HD cells maintained a significant direction-specific discharge when the rat was on the chamber floor during the 0-G and also during the hypergravity pull-out periods. Three of five cells also showed direction-specific responses on the wall in 1-G. In contrast, direction-specific discharge was usually not maintained when the rat locomoted on the vertical wall or ceiling in 0-G. The loss of direction-specific firing was accompanied by an overall increase in background firing. However, while the rat was on the ceiling, some cells showed occasional bursts of firing when the rat's head was oriented in directions that were flipped relative to the long axis of symmetry of the chamber compared with the cell's preferred firing direction on the floor. This finding is consistent with what might be expected if the rat had experienced a VRI. These responses indicate that rats maintain a normal allocentric frame of reference in 0-G and 1-G when on the floor, but may lose their sense of directional heading when placed on a wall or ceiling during acute

  14. Exercise Responses to Gravity-Independent Flywheel Aerobic and Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Owerkowicz, Tomasz; Cotter, Joshua A.; Haddad, Fadia; Yu, Alvin M.; Camilon, Marinelle L.; Hoang, Theresa; Jimenez, Daniel; Kreitenberg, Arthur; Tesch, Per A.; Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Adams, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although a number of exercise systems have been developed to mitigate the physiological deconditioning that occurs in microgravity, few have the capacity to positively impact multiple physiological systems and still meet the volume/mass requirements needed for missions beyond low earth orbit. The purpose of this study was to test the gravity-independent Multi-Mode Exercise Device (M-MED) for both resistance (RE) and aerobic (AE) training stimuli. Methods Eight men and nine women (mean age 22.0±0.4 years) completed five weeks of training on the M-MED: RE 4×7 squats two days a week, and AE 4×4-min rowing bouts at ~90% VO2max three days a week. Pre- and post-training data collection included an aerobic capacity test, MR imaging, strength testing, and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy. Results VO2max increased 8%, 3RM strength 18%, and quadriceps femoris cross-sectional area (CSA) 10%. Knee extensor strength increased at all isokinetic speeds tested. Subjects also demonstrated improved resistance to fatigue in knee extension. At the cellular and molecular level, the biopsy revealed increases in mixed myofiber CSA (13%), citrate synthase activity (26%), total RNA concentration (24%), IGF-I mRNA (77%), Type IIa Myosin Heavy Chain (MHC) mRNA (8%), and concomitant decrease in Type IIx MHC mRNA (−23%). None of the changes were gender-specific. Discussion Both the functional outcomes and biomarker changes indicate that a very low volume of M-MED exercise results in robust adaptation in the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. The M-MED has the potential to provide a wide range of countermeasure exercises and should be considered for testing in ground-based spaceflight simulation. PMID:26802373

  15. Dynamical response of the summer MLT to tropospheric global warming: Results from a mechanistic GCM with resolved gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E.

    2009-04-01

    The sensitivity of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) to climate variability of the troposphere is largely controlled by the generation, propagation, and dissipation of gravity waves (GWs). Conventional climate models cannot fully describe this sensitivity since GWs must be parameterized by invoking strong assumptions. Since the Eliassen-Palm flux (EPF) of low-frequency inertia GWs is negligible, the main contribution to the EPF divergence at high latitudes of the MLT is due to mid- and high-frequency GWs with periods of a few hours or less. In order to resolve at least a good portion of these waves in a GCM, a high spatial resolution from the boundary layer to the lower thermosphere is required. Furthermore, both the generation and dissipation of resolved GWs is expected to depend strongly on the details of the parameterization of turbulence. The present study proposes a new formulation of the Kuehlungsborn mechanistic general circulation model (KMCM) with high spatial resolution and Smagorinsky-type horizontal and vertical diffusion coefficients that are both scaled by the Richardson criterion. This model version allows for an explicit and self-consistent simulation of the gravity-wave drag in the MLT. A sensitivity experiment is conducted in which the main changes associated with tropospheric global warming are imposed by the differential heating, i.e., reduced static stability in the lower troposphere along with a reduced equator-to-pole temperature difference and enhanced latent heating in the intertropical convergence zone. These changes result in both a stronger Lorenz energy cycle and enhanced gravity-wave activity in the upper troposphere at middle latitudes. The altered gravity-wave sources result in the following remote effects in the summer MLT: downward shift of the residual circulation, as well as lower temperatures and reduced easterlies below the mesopause. These changes are consistent with enhanced turbulent diffusion and dissipation below

  16. Rayleigh lidar observations of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. S.; Gardner, C. S.; Liu, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two monochromatic gravity wave events were observed in the 25 to 55 km altitude region during 16 nights of Rayleigh lidar measurements at Poker Flat, Alaska and Urbana, Illinois. The measured wave parameters were compared to previous radar and lidar measurements of gravity wave activity. Vertical wavelengths, lambda(z), between 2 and 11.5 km with vertical phase velocities, c(z), between 0.1 and 1 m/s were observed. Measured values of lambda(z) and c(z) were used to infer observed wave periods, T(ob), between 50 and 1000 minutes and horizontal wavelengths, lambda(x), from 25 to 2000 km. Dominant wave activity was found at vertical wavelengths between 2 to 4 km and 7 to 10 km. No seasonal variations were evident in the observed wave parameters. Vertical and horizontal wavelengths showed a clear tendency to increase with T(ob), which is consistent with recent sodium lidar studies of monochromatic wave events near the mesopause. Measured power law relationships between the wave parameters were lambda(z) varies as T(ob) sup 0.96, lambda(x) varies as T(ob) sup 1.8, and c(z) varies as T(ob) sup -0.85. The kinetic energy calculated for the monochromatic wave events varied as k(z) sup -2, k(x) sup -1, and f(ob) sup -1.7. The atmospheric scale heights calculated for each observation date range from 6.5 to 7.6 km with a mean value of 7 km. The increase of rms wind perturbations with altitude indicated an amplitude growth length of 20.9 km. The altitude profile of kinetic energy density decreased with height, suggesting that waves in this altitude region were subject to dissipation or saturation effects.

  17. On the interpretation of gravity variations in the presence of active hydrothermal systems: Insights from the Nisyros Caldera, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, J.; Rymer, H.; Wooller, L. K.

    2005-12-01

    We report on short-term (over tens of minutes) residual gravity changes recorded at the restless Nisyros caldera in Greece via a series of discrete measurements at benchmarks within or in proximity to a hydrothermal area located along the caldera floor. The obtained time series reveal sinusoidal gravity variations with amplitudes of up to 25 μGal and wavelengths of 40-50 min. Degassing of a magmatic source coupling into (shallow) hydrothermal systems including the ascent of steam pockets and transient pressure variations during steam/liquid interface propagation appear to be the most likely causative process for the observed short-term variations. We assess standard protocols of microgravity surveys for hazard assessment in volcanic areas in the light of these findings and propose additional techniques, such as continuous gravimetry, for the discrimination of hydrothermal signals from deeper-seated, i.e. magmatic, signals during gravity monitoring of restless volcanoes hosting active hydrothermal systems.

  18. TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappa B in human osteoblastic HOS-TE85 cells is repressed in vector-averaged gravity using clinostat rotation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Kambe, F; Kurokouchi, K; Sakai, T; Ishiguro, N; Iwata, H; Koga, K; Gruener, R; Seo, H

    2000-12-01

    Effects of vector-averaged gravity on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-dependent activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) in human osteoblastic HOS-TE85 cells were investigated by culturing the cells using clinostat rotation (clinorotation). Cell cultures were rotated for 72 h at 40 rpm in a clinostat. At the end of clinorotation, the cells were treated with TNF-alpha for 30 min under stationary conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappa B was markedly reduced in the clinorotated cells when compared with the cells in control stationary cultures or after horizontal rotation (motional controls). The NF-kappa B-dependent transactivation was also impaired in the clinorotated cells, as evidenced by a transient transfection assay with a reporter plasmid containing multimerized NF-kappa B sites. Consistent with these findings, the TNF-alpha-dependent induction of endogenous NF-kappa B-responsive genes p105, I kappa B-alpha, and IL-8, was significantly attenuate in clinorotated cells. These results demonstrate that vector-averaged gravity inhibits the responsiveness of osteoblasts to TNF-alpha by repressing NF-kappa B activation. PMID:11112449

  19. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^-23 Hz^-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  20. Investigation of gravity wave activity based on operational radiosonde data from 13 years (1997-2009): Climatology and possible induced variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Wüst, S.; Bittner, M.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves (GWs) are important for the dynamics of the atmosphere. The analysis of 13 years of routine radiosonde data from Prague (50.01°N, 14.27°E) with temporal highly resolved temperature, pressure and wind measurements is presented in order to derive a climatology of gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere. An annual cycle with a maximum during winter and a minimum during summer is identified. Gravity wave activity is twice as high during winter as during summer. Winter periods are investigated by wavelet analysis. They show similar periods in vertical flux of horizontal momentum and pressure variance time series. These features may be attributed to planetary waves. When analyzing individual years, maxima of gravity wave activity and vertical flux of horizontal momentum often appears together with minima in surface pressure. We speculate therefore that at least parts of the interannual variations of gravity wave activity may due to cyclones.

  1. Applied Doppler Imaging: Can The Magnetic Activity Of IM Pegasi Affect The Gravity Probe B Mission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, S. C.; Berdyugina, S. V.

    2006-08-01

    IM Pegasi is a single-lined spectroscopic RS CVn binary, with the primary being a rapidly-rotating (vsini = 27 km/s) early-K giant. Magnetic activity of the primary is evident as dark spot features covering 15% or more of the stellar surface. Since the system is bright in both optical and radio bands, IM Pegasi was chosen as a guide star for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite mission. The mission is designed to verify two predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity, the geodetic effect and "frame-dragging", based on measurements of mean gyroscope drift with respect to the optical centroid of IM Pegasi. The requested standard error of 0.5 milliarcseconds/year implies that even small contributions to the shift of the optical centroid of IM Pegasi due to surface magnetic activity must be determined. In support of the GP-B mission we are undertaking an intensive Doppler imaging survey of the primary component of IM Pegasi to determine the effect of spot features on the optical centroid of IM Pegasi. We present an overview of our role in GP-B and report initial results from this support project, including the first magnetic maps of the IM Pegasi primary, created using Least-Squares Deconvolution and Zeeman Doppler Imaging.

  2. Applied Doppler Imaging: Can Magnetic Activity of IM Pegasi Affect the Gravity Probe B Mission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.

    2006-12-01

    IM Peg is a single-lined, spectroscopic RS CVn binary, with a rapidly rotating (v sin i=27 km/s), early K-type, giant primary. Magnetic activity of the primary is indicated by dark spots covering > 15% of the surface. The system is bright in both optical and radio, and was chosen as a guide star for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite mission. The goal of GP-B is to verify two predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity (geodetic effect and ``frame dragging''), based on measurements of mean gyroscopic drift with respect to the optical centroid of IM Peg. The requested precision of 0.5×10-3 arcsec/yr implies that even small shifts of the optical centroid of IM Peg due to surface magnetic activity must be determined. In support of the GP-B mission, we are undertaking an intensive Doppler imaging survey of the primary component of IM Peg, to determine the effect of spot features on its optical centroid. We present an overview of our work for GP-B, and report initial results from this support project, including the first magnetic maps of the IM~Peg primary, created using Least-Squares Deconvolution and Zeeman Doppler Imaging.

  3. Rehabilitation Exercises to Induce Balanced Scapular Muscle Activity in an Anti-gravity Posture.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Tomonobu; Yamanaka, Masanori; Hirokawa, Motoki; Tai, Keita; Ezawa, Yuya; Samukawa, Mina; Tohyama, Harukazu; Sugawara, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the intramuscular balance ratios of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) and the lower trapezius muscle (LT), and the intermuscular balance ratios of the UT and the serratus anterior muscle (SA) among prone extension (ProExt), prone horizontal abduction with external rotation (ProHAbd), forward flexion in the side-lying position (SideFlex), side-lying external rotation (SideEr), shoulder flexion with glenohumeral horizontal abduction load (FlexBand), and shoulder flexion with glenohumeral horizontal adduction load (FlexBall) in the standing posture. [Methods] The electromyographic (EMG) activities of the UT, LT and SA were measured during the tasks. The percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was calculated for each muscle, and the UT/LT ratios and the UT/SA ratios were compared among the tasks. [Results] The UT/LT ratio with the FlexBand was not significantly different from those of the four exercises in the side-lying and prone postures. The UT/SA ratio with the FlexBall demonstrated appropriate balanced activity. [Conclusion] In an anti-gravity posture, we recommend the FlexBand and the FlexBall for inducing balanced UT/LT and UT/SA ratios, respectively. PMID:25540485

  4. Middle proterozoic tectonic activity in west Texas and eastern New Mexico and analysis of gravity and magnetic anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R. )

    1994-03-01

    The Precambrian history of west Texas and eastern New Mexico is complex, consisting of four events: Early Proterozoic orogenic activity (16309-1800 Ma), formation of the western granite-rhyolite province (WGRP) (1340-1410 Ma), Grenville age tectonics (1116-1232 Ma), and middle Proterozoic extension possibly related to mid-continent rifting (1086-1109 Ma). Pre-Grenville tectonics, Grenville tectonics, and mid-continent rifting are represented in this area by the Abilene gravity minimum (AGM) and bimodal igneous rocks, which are probably younger. We have used gravity modeling and the comparison of gravity and magnetic anomalies with rock types reported from wells penetrating Precambrian basement to study the AGM and middle Proterozoic extension in this area. The AGM is an east-northeast-trending, 600 km long, gravity low, which extends from the Texas-Oklahoma border through the central basin platform (CBP) to the Delaware basin. This feature appears to predate formation of the mafic body in the CBP (1163 Ma) and is most likely related to Pre-Grenville tectonics, possibly representing a continental margin arc batholith. Evidence of middle Proterozoic extension is found in the form of igneous bodies in the CBP, the Van Horn uplift, the Franklin Mountains, and the Sacramento Mountains. Analysis of gravity and magnetic anomalies shows that paired gravity and magnetic highs are related to mafic intrusions in the upper crust. Mapping of middle Proterozoic igneous rocks and the paired anomalies outlines a 530 km diameter area of distributed east-west-oriented extension. The Debaca-Swisher terrain of shallow marine and clastic sedimentary rocks is age correlative with middle Proterozoic extension. These rocks may represent the lithology of possible Proterozoic exploration targets. Proterozoic structures were reactivated during the Paleozoic, affecting both the structure and deposition in the Permian basin.

  5. Tectonic and gravity-induced deformation along the active Talas-Fergana Fault, Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, A.; Corazzato, C.; Rust, D.; Bonali, F. L.; Pasquarè Mariotto, F. A.; Korzhenkov, A. M.; Oppizzi, P.; Bonzanigo, L.

    2015-08-01

    This paper shows, by field palaeoseismological data, the Holocene activity of the central segment of the intracontinental Talas-Fergana Fault (TFF), and the relevance of possible future seismic shaking on slope stability around a large water reservoir. The fault, striking NW-SE, is marked by a continuous series of scarps, deflected streams and water divides, and prehistoric earthquakes that offset substrate and Holocene deposits. Fault movements are characterised by right-lateral strike-slip kinematics with a subordinate component of uplift of the NE block. Structural, geological and geomorphological field data indicate that shallow and deep landslides are aligned along the TFF, and some of them are active. Where the TFF runs close to the reservoir, the fault trace is obscured by a series of landslides, affecting rock and soil materials and ranging in size from small slope instabilities to deep-seated gravity-induced slope deformations (DGSDs). The largest of these, which does not show clear evidence of present-day activity, involves a volume of about 1 km3 and is associated with smaller but active landslides in its lower part, with volumes in the order of 2.5 × 104 m3 to 1 × 106 m3. Based on the spatial and temporal relations between landslides and faults, we argue that at least some of these slope failures may have a coseismic character. Stability analyses by means of limit equilibrium methods (LEMs), and stress-strain analysis by finite difference numerical modelling (FDM), were carried out to evaluate different hazard scenarios linked to these slope instabilities. The results indicate concern for the different threats posed, ranging from the possible disruption of the M-41 highway, the main transportation route in central Asia, to the possible collapse of huge rock masses into the reservoir, possibly generating a tsunami.

  6. Development of the dynamic motion simulator of 3D micro-gravity with a combined passive/active suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kazuya; Hirose, Shigeo; Ogawa, Tadashi

    1994-01-01

    The establishment of those in-orbit operations like 'Rendez-Vous/Docking' and 'Manipulator Berthing' with the assistance of robotics or autonomous control technology, is essential for the near future space programs. In order to study the control methods, develop the flight models, and verify how the system works, we need a tool or a testbed which enables us to simulate mechanically the micro-gravity environment. There have been many attempts to develop the micro-gravity testbeds, but once the simulation goes into the docking and berthing operation that involves mechanical contacts among multi bodies, the requirement becomes critical. A group at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has proposed a method that can simulate the 3D micro-gravity producing a smooth response to the impact phenomena with relatively simple apparatus. Recently the group carried out basic experiments successfully using a prototype hardware model of the testbed. This paper will present our idea of the 3D micro-gravity simulator and report the results of our initial experiments.

  7. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  8. Root cytoskeleton: its role in perception of and response to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baluska, F.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    We have critically evaluated the possible functions of the plant cytoskeleton in root gravisensing and graviresponse and discussed the evidence that microtubules (MTs) and actin microfilaments (MFs) do not control differential cell growth during bending of roots. On the other hand, MF and MT networks are envisaged to participate in gravisensing because of the mechanical properties of the cytoskeletal structures that interconnect plant cell organelles with the plasma membrane. In restrained gravisensing, forces are suggested to be transmitted to membranes because large-scale gravity-dependent repositioning of organelles is effectively prevented due to the cytoskeleton-mediated anchorage of their envelopes at the plasma membrane. From the cytoskeletal point of view, we can also envisage an unrestrained gravity sensing when cytoskeletal tethers are not strong enough to preserve the tight control over distribution of organelles and the latter, if heavy enough, are allowed to sediment towards the physical bottom of cells. This situation obviously occurs in root cap statocytes because these uniquely organized cells are depleted of prominent actin MF bundles, endoplasmic MT arrays, and ER elements in their internal cytoplasm. Nevertheless, indirect evidence clearly indicates that sedimented root cap statoliths are enmeshed within fine but dynamic MF networks and that their behaviour is obviously under, at least partial, cytoskeletal control. The actomyosin-enriched domain among and around amyloplasts is proposed to increase the perception of gravity due to the grouping effect of sedimenting statoliths. Cytoskeletal links between myosin-rich statoliths, and cell peripheries well equipped with dense cortical MTs, membrane-associated cytoskeleton, as well as with ER elements, would allow efficient restrained gravisensing only at the statocyte cell cortex. As a consequence of cytoskeletal depletion in the internal statocyte cytoplasm and bulk sedimentation of large

  9. Amphibian egg cytoplasm response to altered g-forces and gravity orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, A. W.; Smith, R. C.; Malacinski, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Elucidation of dorsal/ventral polarity and primary embryonic axis development in amphibian embryos requires an understanding of cytoplasmic rearrangements in fertile eggs at the biophysical, physiological, and biochemical levels. Evidence is presented that amphibian egg cytoplasmic components are compartmentalized. The effects of altered orientation to the gravitational vector (i.e., egg inversion) and alterations in gravity force ranging from hypergravity (centrifugation) to simulated microgravity (i.e., horizontal clinostat rotation) on cytoplasmic compartment rearrangements are reviewed. The behavior of yolk compartments as well as a newly defined (with monoclonal antibody) nonyolk cytoplasmic compartment, in inverted eggs and in eggs rotated on horizontal clinostats at their buoyant density, is discussed.

  10. Internal Gravity Wave Activity Hotspot and Implications for the Middle Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Petr; Pisoft, Petr; Lilienthal, Friederike; Jacobi, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    Internal gravity waves are widely recognized to contribute significantly to the energy and angular momentum transport. They play a significant role in affecting many of the middle atmospheric phenomena (like the QBO or Brewer-Dobson circulation). Using GPS RO density profiles, we have discovered a localized area of enhanced IGW activity and breaking in the lower stratosphere of Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region. With a 3D primitive equation model of the middle atmosphere we studied the effects of such a localized breaking region on large-scale dynamics and transport. Possible forcing and propagation directions of planetary waves caused by such a localized IGW forcing were investigated and consequences for the polar vortex stability and stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the tropical region were discussed. Finally, applying 3D EP flux and 3D residual circulation diagnostics, we investigated the possible role of this area in the longitudinal variability of the Brewer-Dobson circulation with a hypothesis of its enhanced downwelling branch in this region. In the proces, model results were compared with the ozone and tracer distribution data from GOME, GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY further confirming the importance of the Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region for middle atmospheric dynamics.

  11. A Pragmatic Bayesian Perspective on Correlation Analysis - The exoplanetary gravity - stellar activity case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Faria, J. P.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Oshagh, M.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-05-01

    We apply the Bayesian framework to assess the presence of a correlation between two quantities. To do so, we estimate the probability distribution of the parameter of interest, ρ, characterizing the strength of the correlation. We provide an implementation of these ideas and concepts using python programming language and the pyMC module in a very short (˜ 130 lines of code, heavily commented) and user-friendly program. We used this tool to assess the presence and properties of the correlation between planetary surface gravity and stellar activity level as measured by the log( R^' }_{{HK}}) indicator. The results of the Bayesian analysis are qualitatively similar to those obtained via p-value analysis, and support the presence of a correlation in the data. The results are more robust in their derivation and more informative, revealing interesting features such as asymmetric posterior distributions or markedly different credible intervals, and allowing for a deeper exploration. We encourage the reader interested in this kind of problem to apply our code to his/her own scientific problems. The full understanding of what the Bayesian framework is can only be gained through the insight that comes by handling priors, assessing the convergence of Monte Carlo runs, and a multitude of other practical problems. We hope to contribute so that Bayesian analysis becomes a tool in the toolkit of researchers, and they understand by experience its advantages and limitations.

  12. Diurnal Variation in Gravity Wave Activity at Low and Middle Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrioli, V. F.; Fritts, D. C.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.; Janches, Diego

    2013-01-01

    We employ a modified composite day extension of the Hocking (2005) analysis method to study gravity wave (GW) activity in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere using 4 meteor radars spanning latitudes from 7deg S to 53.6deg S. Diurnal and semidiurnal modulations were observed in GW variances over all sites. Semidiurnal modulation with downward phase propagation was observed at lower latitudes mainly near the equinoxes. Diurnal modulations occur mainly near solstice and, except for the zonal component at Cariri (7deg S), do not exhibit downward phase propagation. At a higher latitude (SAAMER, 53.6deg S) these modulations are only observed in the meridional component where we can observe diurnal variation from March to May, and semidiurnal, during January, February, October (above 88 km) and November. Some of these modulations with downward phase progression correlate well with wind shear. When the wind shear is well correlated with the maximum of the variances the diurnal tide has its largest amplitudes, i.e., near equinox. Correlations exhibiting variations with tidal phases suggest significant GW-tidal interactions that have different characters depending on the tidal components and possible mean wind shears. Modulations that do not exhibit phase variations could be indicative of diurnal variations in GW sources.

  13. Avalanche slope angles in low-gravity environments from active Martian sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood-Stone, Corwin; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2013-06-01

    The properties of granular material have an important effect on surface landforms and processes. Recently, it has been suggested that material properties called dynamic and static angle of repose vary with gravitational acceleration, which would have a significant effect on many planetary surface processes such as crater collapse and gully formation. In order to test that hypothesis, we measured lee slopes of active aeolian sand dunes on Mars using the High Resolution Imaging Experiment (HiRISE) DTMs (Digital Terrain Model). We examined dune fields in Nili Patera, Herschel Crater, and Gale Crater. Our measurements showed that the dynamic angles of repose for the sands in these areas are 33-34° in the first region and 30-31° in the other two. These results fall within the 30° to 35° window for the dynamic angles of repose for terrestrial dunes with similar flow depths and grain properties and thus show that this angle does not significantly vary with decreasing gravity.

  14. Relationship between the regional tectonic activity and crustal structure in the eastern Tibetan plateau discovered by gravity anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao; Gao, Rui; Guo, Xiaoyu

    2016-04-01

    The eastern Tibetan plateau has been getting more and more attention because it combines active faults, uplifting, and large earthquakes together in a high-population region. Based on the previous researches, the most of Cenozoic tectonic activities were related to the regional structure of the local blocks within the crustal scale. Thus, a better understanding of the crustal structure of the regional tectonic blocks is an important topic for further study. In this paper, we combined the simple Bouguer gravity anomaly with the Moho depths from previous studies to investigate the crustal structure in this area. To highlight the crustal structures, the gravity anomaly caused by the Moho relief has been reduced by forward modeling calculations. A total horizontal derivative (THD) had been applied on the gravity residuals. The results indicated that the crustal gravity residual is compatible with the topography and the geological settings of the regional blocks, including the Sichuan basin, the Chuxiong basin, the Xiaojiang fault, and the Jinhe fault, as well as the Longmenshan fault zone. The THD emphasized the west margin of Yangtze block, i.e., the Longriba fault zone and the Xiaojiang fault cut through the Yangtze block. The checkboard pattern of the gravity residual in the Songpan-Garze fold belt and Chuandian fragment shows that the crust is undergoing a southward and SE-directed extrusion, which is coincident with the flowing direction indicated from the GPS measurements. By integrating the interpretations, the stepwise extensional mechanism of the eastern Tibetan plateau is supported by the southeastward crustal deformation, and the extrusion of Chuandian fragment is achieved by Xianshuihe fault.

  15. Low Stretch Solid-Fuel Flame Transient Response to a Step Change in Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. B.; Olson, S. L.; T'ien, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a step change in gravity level on the stability of low stretch diffusion flames over a solid fuel is studied both numerically and experimentally. Drop tower experiments have been conducted in NASA Glenn Research Center's 5.2 Zero Gravity Facility. In the experiments burning PMMA cylinders, a dynamic transition is observed when the steadily burning 1g flame is dropped and becomes a 0g flame. To understand the physics behind this dynamic transition, a transient stagnation point model has been developed which includes gas-phase radiation and solid phase coupling to describe this dynamic process. In this paper, the experimental results are compared with the model predictions. Both model and experiment show that the interior of the solid phase does not have time to change significantly in the few seconds of drop time, so the experimental results are pseudo-steady in the gas-phase, but the solid is inherently unsteady over long time scales. The model is also used to examine the importance of fractional heat losses on extinction, which clearly demonstrates that as the feedback from the flame decreases, the importance of the ongoing heat losses becomes greater, and extinction is observed when these losses represent 80% or more of the flame feedback.

  16. Systems specificity in responsiveness to intermittent artificial gravity during simulated microgravity in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fan; Zhang, Shu

    2016-08-25

    It has been shown that the minimum gravity exposure requirements vary greatly among different physiological systems. A preliminary comparison between two extremes, vessels vs. bones, shows that not only the mechanostat at the tissue level differs greatly, but also the bone loss during weightlessness may also involve calcium deposition-resorption changes. It seems that the surprising efficacy of intermittent artificial gravity (IAG) is due to the vascular tissues possessing a strong resilience or "memory" function toward restoring their original pre-stress and tensegrity state at the 1 G environment. It appears that the bone tissue is related to a more complex tensegrity paradigm involving both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and a longer half time for calcium deposition-absorption. Cell-level models (CellML) for calcium dynamics is currently available. We hope that the Physiome Project can use this modeling framework to help interpret the resistance of bones to IAG and to evaluate whether the "intermittent" or "continuous" AG scheme should be adopted eventually for future exploration-class spaceflight. PMID:27546500

  17. Balance control and anti-gravity muscle activity during the experience of fear at heights.

    PubMed

    Wuehr, Max; Kugler, Guenter; Schniepp, Roman; Eckl, Maria; Pradhan, Cauchy; Jahn, Klaus; Huppert, Doreen; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Fear of heights occurs when a visual stimulus causes the apprehension of losing balance and falling. A moderate form of visual height intolerance (vHI) affects about one third of the general population and has relevant consequences for the quality of life. A quantitative evaluation of balance mechanisms in persons susceptible to vHI during height exposure is missing. VHI-related changes in postural control were assessed by center-of-pressure displacements and electromyographic recordings of selected leg, arm, and neck muscles in 16 subjects with vHI while standing at heights on an emergency balcony versus standing in the laboratory at ground level. Characteristics of open- and closed-loop postural control were analyzed. Body sway and muscle activity parameters were correlated with the subjective estimates of fear at heights. During height exposure, (1) open-loop control was disturbed by a higher diffusion activity (P < 0.001) and (2) the sensory feedback threshold for closed-loop control was lowered (P < 0.010). Altered postural control was predominantly associated with increased co-contraction of leg muscles. Body sway and leg and neck muscle co-contraction correlated with the severity of subjective anxiety (P < 0.050). Alterations in postural control diminished if there were nearby stationary contrasts in the visual surrounding or if subjects stood with eyes closed. The performance of a cognitive dual task also improved impaired balance. Visual heights have two behavioral effects in vHI subjects: A change occurs in (1) open- and closed-loop postural control strategy and (2) co-contraction of anti-gravity leg and neck muscles, both of which depend on the severity of evoked fear at heights. PMID:24744901

  18. Generating a Reduced Gravity Environment on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, Larry K.; Cunningham, Tom; Poncia, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1950s several reduced gravity simulators have been designed and utilized in preparing humans for spaceflight and in reduced gravity system development. The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is the newest and most realistic gravity offload simulator. ARGOS provides three degrees of motion within the test area and is scalable for full building deployment. The inertia of the overhead system is eliminated by an active motor and control system. This presentation will discuss what ARGOS is, how it functions, and the unique challenges of interfacing to the human. Test data and video for human and robotic systems will be presented. A major variable in the human machine interaction is the interface of ARGOS to the human. These challenges along with design solutions will be discussed.

  19. ARG1 (altered response to gravity) encodes a DnaJ-like protein that potentially interacts with the cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J. C.; Chen, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Gravitropism allows plant organs to direct their growth at a specific angle from the gravity vector, promoting upward growth for shoots and downward growth for roots. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying gravitropic signal transduction. We found that mutations in the ARG1 locus of Arabidopsis thaliana alter root and hypocotyl gravitropism without affecting phototropism, root growth responses to phytohormones or inhibitors of auxin transport, or starch accumulation. The positional cloning of ARG1 revealed a DnaJ-like protein containing a coiled-coil region homologous to coiled coils found in cytoskeleton-interacting proteins. These data suggest that ARG1 participates in a gravity-signaling process involving the cytoskeleton. A combination of Northern blot studies and analysis of ARG1-GUS fusion-reporter expression in transgenic plants demonstrated that ARG1 is expressed in all organs. Ubiquitous ARG1 expression in Arabidopsis and the identification of an ortholog in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that ARG1 is involved in other essential processes.

  20. The intracellular responses of frog eggs to novel orientations to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radice, G. P.; Neff, A. W.; Malacinski, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is found that multiple short doses of ultraviolet light are as effective as a single large dose in producing neural defects. In addition, 180 deg rotation (inversion) of irradiated eggs reduces the ultraviolet effect. Since yolk platelets may be the gravity sensing mechanism, their size, density, and distribution in normal and inverted eggs are investigated. Large platelets are denser and for the most part are in a distinct zone in the vegetal hemisphere, whereas small platelets are less dense and occur in the animal hemisphere. When inverted, the large platelets flow into the animal hemisphere as a coherent mass and partially displace the small platelets. Inversion is thought to rearrange cytoplasmic components necessary for later neural development into an appropriate configuration.

  1. Fluid migration in response to magmatic stress changes at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat (W.I.): Evidence from 4-D gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautmann, S.; Gottsmann, J.; Camacho, A.; Fournier, N.; Sparks, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    The eruption of Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV, Montserrat) has been ongoing for more than one decade, but routine monitoring of the activity did not include gravity surveillance for most of the time. In June/July 2006, we installed a new elevation controlled microgravity network, which we re-occupied in January/February 2007. Residual gravity changes between the two surveys allow us to infer a net mass change beneath the central part of the island documented by an up to 0.031 mGal gravity decrease. A non-linear inversion of the data reveals that mass reduction occurred in a prolate, NNW-SSE elongated structure, beneath the Centre Hills at a minimum depth of 2 km. We suggest the observed gravity decrease to be related with fracture opening along a hitherto not recognized fault, as decreased magmatic stressing at SHV led to a strain relief on the island.

  2. Comparison of upright LBPP and supine LBNP in terms of cardiovascular and biomechanical parameters to simulate 1/6-G (lunar gravity) and 3/8-G (Martian gravity) activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlabs, Thomas; Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Ruckstuhl, Heidi; Richardson, Sara E.; Hargens, Alan

    Background: Missions of astronauts to Moon and Mars may be planned in the future. From over 40 years of manned spaceflight it is known that the human body experiences cardiovascular and musculoskeletal losses and a decrease in aerobic fitness while exposed to reduced gravity. Because future missions will be much longer than before, further research is needed to improve Earth-based simulations of reduced gravity. Among others, two methods are capable of simu-lating fractional gravity on Earth: upright Lower Body Positive Pressure (LBPP) and supine Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP). No previous study has directly compared these two methods to determine which method is better suited to simulate both the biomechanical and cardiovascular responses of performing activity in lunar (1/6-G) and Martian (3/8-G) gravities. Taken previous studies into account and considering the fact that supine posture is closer to the established 10 head-up-tilt lunar simulation, we hypothesized that exercise performed in supine LBNP better simulates the cardiovascular conditions that occur in lunar and Martian gravities. Methods: 12 healthy normal subjects underwent a protocol consisting of resting and walking (0.25 Froude) with LBNP and LBPP. Each protocol was performed in simulated 1/6-G and 3/8-G. Heart-rate (HR), blood pressure, oxygen consumption (VO2), vertical component of the ground reaction force, comfort of the subject and perceived exertion of the subject (Borg Scale) were assessed. The obtained parameters were compared to predicted values for lunar and Martian gravity conditions in order to determine the method that shows the best level of agreement. Results: There was no difference in gait parameters between LBPP and LBNP simulation of lunar and Martian gravity (cadence: P=0.427, normalized stride length: P=0.373, duty fac-tor: P=0.302, and normalized vertical peak force (P=0.064). Mean blood pressure (P=0.398), comfort (P=0.832) and BORG rating (P=0.186) did not differ

  3. Physiological Response to Physical Activity in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    This is a report on research in the field of physical responses of children to strenuous activity. The paper is divided into three subtopics: (1) peak performance measure in children; (2) training effects on children; and (3) importance of physical activity for children. Measurements used are oxygen consumption, ventilation, heart rate, cardiac…

  4. Limb sounders tracking topographic gravity wave activity from the stratosphere to the ionosphere around midlatitude Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.; Torre, A.; Schmidt, T.; Llamedo, P.; Hierro, R.

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have shown that the surroundings of the highest Andes mountains at midlatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere exhibit gravity waves (GWs) generated by diverse sources which may traverse the troposphere and then penetrate the upper layers if conditions are favorable. There is a specific latitude band where that mountain range is nearly perfectly aligned with the north-south direction, which favors the generation of wavefronts parallel to this orientation. This fact may allow an optimization of procedures to identify topographic GW in some of the observations. We analyze data per season to the east and west of these Andes latitudes to find possible significant differences in GW activity between both sectors. GW effects generated by topography and convection are expected essentially on the eastern side. We use satellite data from two different limb sounding methods: the Global Positioning System radio occultation (RO) technique and the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument, which are complementary with respect to the height intervals, in order to study the effects of GW from the stratosphere to the ionosphere. Activity becomes quantified by the GW average potential energy in the stratosphere and mesosphere and by the electron density variance content in the ionosphere. Consistent larger GW activity on the eastern sector is observed from the stratosphere to the ionosphere (night values). However, this fact remains statistically significant at the 90% significance level only during winter, when GWs generated by topography dominate the eastern sector. On the contrary, it is usually assumed that orographic GWs have nearly zero horizontal phase speed and will therefore probably be filtered at some height in the neutral atmosphere. However, this scheme relies on the assumption that the wind is uniform and constant. Our results also suggest that it is advisable to separate night and day cases to study GWs in the ionosphere, as

  5. Does time differ from change? Philosophical appraisal of the problem of time in quantum gravity and in physics: A response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Julian

    2015-11-01

    In this paper I respond to the paper "Does time differ from change? Philosophical appraisal of the problem of time in quantum gravity and in physics" by Alexis de Saint-Ours, in which, among other things, he contrasts the views of Rovelli and myself. There are three main parts in my response. First, I consider Saint-Ours's question about the relationship between time and change and whether it is possible to have the latter without the former. Second, I go into somewhat more detail about the differences between Rovelli and myself concerning the nature of relationalism. Finally, I take the opportunity to discuss how my ideas about the nature of time have changed during the last decade as a result of examination of the role played by scale in the dynamics of the universe.

  6. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  7. Gravity wave activity observed in the mesosphere and ionosphere on September 16th 2015 by an all-sky imager and dTEC maps over Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Gobbi, Delano; Buriti, Ricardo; Bageston, José Valentin; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Cosme Alexandre Figueiredo, M.; Takahashi, Hisao; Azambuja, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    All-sky imager was used to observe the wave activity in the mesosphere and a ground network of GPS receivers were used to make detrended Total Electron Content (dTEC) maps to monitor the ionosphere. The wave activity was observed on September 16th 2015 over the southeast region in Brazil. The gravity wave characteristics and the atmospheric conditions for wave propagation will be presented and discussed. The gravity wave source was associated with strong tropospheric convection.

  8. Responses of heart rate and blood pressure to KC-135 hyper-gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satake, Hirotaka; Matsunami, Ken'ichi; Reschke, Millard F.

    1992-01-01

    Many investigators have clarified the effects of hyper gravitational-inertial forces (G) upon the cardiovascular system, using the centrifugal apparatus with short rotating radius. We investigated the cardiovascular responses to KC-135 hyper-G flight with negligibly small angular velocity. Six normal, healthy subjects 29 to 40 years old (5 males and 1 female) took part in this experiment. Hyper gravitational-inertial force was generated by the KC-135 hyper-G flight, flown in a spiral path with a very long radius of 1.5 miles. Hyper-G was sustained for 3 minutes with 1.8 +Gz in each session and was repeatedly exposed to very subject sitting on a chair 5 times. The preliminary results of blood pressure and R-R interval are discussed. An exposure of 1.8 +Gz stress resulted in a remarkable increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, while the pulse pressure did not change and remained equal to the control level regardless of an exposure of hyper-G. These results in blood pressure indicate an increase of resistance in the peripheral vessels, when an exposure of hyper-G was applied. The R-R interval was calculated from ECG. R-R interval in all subjects was changed but not systematically, and R-R interval became obviously shorter during the hyper-G period than during the 1 +Gz control period although R-R interval varied widely in some cases. The coefficient of variation of R-R interval was estimated to determine the autonomic nerve activity, but no significant change was detectable.

  9. Stress Reorganization and Response in Active Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Rhoda J.; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2014-07-01

    We present a microscopic model of a disordered viscoelastic active solid, i.e., an active material whose long time behavior is elastic as opposed to viscous. It is composed of filaments, passive cross-links, and molecular motors powered by stored chemical energy, e.g., actomyosin powered by adenosine triphosphate. Our model allows us to study the collective behavior of contractile active elements and how their interaction with each other and the passive elastic elements determines the macroscopic mechanical properties of the active material. As a result of the (un)binding dynamics of the active elements, we find that this system provides a highly responsive material with a dynamic mechanical response strongly dependent on the amount of deformation.

  10. Gravity Probe B: Examining Einstein's Spacetime with Gyroscopes. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Space Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Range, Shannon K'doah; Mullins, Jennifer

    This teaching guide introduces a relativity gyroscope experiment aiming to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. An introduction to the theory includes the following sections: (1) "Spacetime, Curved Spacetime, and Frame-Dragging"; (2) "'Seeing' Spacetime with Gyroscopes"; (3) "The Gravity Probe B…

  11. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Jackman, Charles H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report provides a broad outline of the total body of research conducted during the past three years. We report on detailed model studies of the precise way in which infrared limb scanning satellites explicitly detect gravity waves, and use these insights to resolve earlier discrepant zonal mean estimates of gravity wave variances from satellite limb scanners. Detailed analysis of CRISTA temperature fluctuations are outlined, which provide new global information on long-wavelength stratospheric gravity waves generated by mountains, tropical convection and the mid-latitude jet stream- vortex system, as well as interactions higher in the mesosphere with the diurnal tide. The detailed insights gained from analyzing CRISTA data are applied to provide a multi- year analysis of stratospheric mountain waves over the Andes evident in MLS limb-track data. We also demonstrate for the first time that stratospheric temperature data from the CLAES instrument on UARS resolved gravity waves, and we highlight mountain wave information in a subset of these data. Final conclusions and recommendations are set forth, and the present findings are directly related to the original goals of the research contract. A full list of publications that resulted from this research is provided.

  12. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides a broad outline of the total body of research conducted during the past three years. We report on detailed model studies of the precise way in which infrared limb scanning satellites explicitly detect gravity waves, and use these insights to resolve earlier discrepant zonal mean estimates of gravity wave variances from satellite limb scanners. Detailed analysis of CRISTA temperature fluctuations are outlined, which provide new global information on long-wavelength stratospheric gravity waves generated by mountains, tropical convection and the mid-latitude jet stream-vortex system, as well as interactions higher in the mesosphere with the diurnal tide. The detailed insights gained from analyzing CRISTA data are applied to provide a multiyear analysis of stratospheric mountain waves over the Andes evident in MLS limb-track data. We also demonstrate for the first time that stratospheric temperature data from the CLAES instrument on UARS resolved gravity waves, and we highlight mountain wave information in a subset of these data. Final conclusions and recommendations are set forth, and the present findings are directly related to the original goals of the research contract. A full list of publications that resulted from this research is provided.

  13. Active muscle response using feedback control of a finite element human arm model.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Brolin, Karin; Happee, Riender

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical human body models (HBMs) are important research tools that are used to study the human response in car crash situations. Development of automotive safety systems requires the implementation of active muscle response in HBM, as novel safety systems also interact with vehicle occupants in the pre-crash phase. In this study, active muscle response was implemented using feedback control of a nonlinear muscle model in the right upper extremity of a finite element (FE) HBM. Hill-type line muscle elements were added, and the active and passive properties were assessed. Volunteer tests with low impact loading resulting in elbow flexion motions were performed. Simulations of posture maintenance in a gravity field and the volunteer tests were successfully conducted. It was concluded that feedback control of a nonlinear musculoskeletal model can be used to obtain posture maintenance and human-like reflexive responses in an FE HBM. PMID:21294008

  14. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specified surface of the body. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes: (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature.

  15. Enhanced gravity-wave activity and interhemispheric coupling during the MaCWAVE/MIDAS northern summer program 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E.; Fritts, D. C.

    2006-07-01

    We present new sensitivity experiments that link observed anomalies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere at high latitudes during the MaCWAVE/MIDAS summer program 2002 to enhanced planetary Rossby-wave activity in the austral winter troposphere.

    We employ the same general concept of a GCM having simplified representations of radiative and latent heating as in a previous study by Becker et al. (2004). In the present version, however, the model includes no gravity wave (GW) parameterization. Instead we employ a high vertical and a moderate horizontal resolution in order to describe GW effects explicitly. This is supported by advanced, nonlinear momentum diffusion schemes that allow for a self-consistent generation of inertia and mid-frequency GWs in the lower atmosphere, their vertical propagation into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, and their subsequent dissipation which is induced by prescribed horizontal and vertical mixing lengths as functions of height.

    The main anomalies in northern summer 2002 consist of higher temperatures than usual above 82 km, an anomalous eastward mean zonal wind between 70 and 90 km, an altered meridional flow, enhanced turbulent dissipation below 80 km, and enhanced temperature variations associated with GWs. These signals are all reasonably described by differences between two long-integration perpetual model runs, one with normal July conditions, and another run with modified latent heating in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere to mimic conditions that correspond to the unusual austral winter 2002. The model response to the enhanced winter hemisphere Rossby-wave activity has resulted in both an interhemispheric coupling through a downward shift of the GW-driven branch of the residual circulation and an increased GW activity at high summer latitudes. Thus a quantitative explanation of the dynamical state of the northern mesosphere and lower thermosphere during

  16. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Snoek, Govert J; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V; Jannink, Michiel J A

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation); however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional explorative study to study these effects. Nine subjects with a CSCI performed two goal-directed arm movements (maximal reach, reach and retrieval) with and without gravity compensation. Angles at elbow and shoulder joints and muscle activation were measured and compared. Seven subjects reduced elbow extension (range 1.8°-4.5°) during the maximal reaching task with gravity compensation. In the reach and retrieval task with gravity compensation, all subjects decreased elbow extension (range 0.1°-11.0°). Eight subjects executed movement closer to the body. Regarding muscle activation, gravity compensation did not influence timing; however, the amplitude of activation decreased, especially in antigravity muscles, namely mean change +/- standard deviation of descending part of trapezius (18.2% +/- 37.5%), anterior part of deltoid (37.7% +/- 16.7%), posterior part of deltoid (32.0% +/- 13.9%), and long head biceps (49.6% +/- 20.0%). Clinical implications for the use of gravity compensation in rehabilitation (during activities of daily living or exercise therapy) should be further investigated with a larger population. PMID:21110258

  17. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  18. Transcriptome analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in space: implications for gravity-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Correll, Melanie J; Pyle, Tyler P; Millar, Katherine D L; Sun, Yijun; Yao, Jin; Edelmann, Richard E; Kiss, John Z

    2013-09-01

    The transcriptome of seedlings was analyzed from experiments performed on the International Space Station to study the interacting effects of light and gravity on plant tropisms (project named TROPI-2; Kiss et al. 2012). Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated in space, and seedlings were then grown in the European Modular Cultivation System for 4 days at ~1g followed by exposure to a range of gravitational accelerations (from microgravity to 1g) and two light treatments (blue light with or without a 1 h pretreatment with red). At the end of the experiments, the cassettes containing the seedlings were frozen in the minus eighty laboratory freezer and returned to Earth on space shuttle mission STS-131. The RNA was extracted from whole seedlings and used for the transcriptome analyses. A comparison of 1g spaceflight samples with 1g ground controls identified 230 genes that were differentially regulated at least twofold, emphasizing the need for "in situ" tissue fixation on a 1g centrifuge as an important control for spaceflight experiments. A further comparison of all spaceflight samples with ground controls identified approximately 280 genes that were differentially regulated at least twofold. Of these genes, several were involved in regulating cell polarity (i.e., auxin, calcium, lipid metabolism), cell-wall development, oxygen status, and cell defense or stress. However, when the transcriptome of the all g-treated spaceflight samples was compared with microgravity samples, only ~130 genes were identified as being differently regulated (P ≤ 0.01). Of this subset, only 27 genes were at least twofold differently regulated between microgravity and 1g space samples and included putative/pseudo/undefined genes (14), transposable elements (5), an expansin (ATEXP24; At1g21240), a cell-wall kinase (WAK3; At1g21240), a laccase-like flavonoid oxidase (TT10; At5g48100), among others. PMID:23771594

  19. Gravity wave activity during stratospheric sudden warmings in the 2007-2008 Northern Hemisphere winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Alexander, M. Joan

    2009-09-01

    We use temperature retrievals from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC)/Formosa Satellite Mission 3 (FORMOSAT-3) and Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) radio occultation profiles and independent temperature retrievals from the EOS satellite High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) aboard the TIMED satellite to investigate stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) events and the accompanying gravity wave (GW) temperature amplitudes in the 2007-2008 Northern Hemisphere winter. We identify four SSW events (including a major one) occurring from late January to late February in 2008. We detect enhanced GW amplitudes in the stratosphere and subdued GW amplitudes in the lower mesosphere during the warming events. The timing of GW enhancement/suppression and warming/cooling events was generally close (within a couple days). We also find that stratospheric GW amplitudes were generally larger at the polar vortex edge and smaller in the vortex core and outside of the vortex and that stratospheric GW amplitudes were generally small over the North Pacific. Using a simplified GW dispersion relation and a GW ray-tracing experiment, we demonstrate that the enhanced GW amplitudes in the stratosphere during SSWs could be explained largely by GW propagation considerations. The existence of GW critical levels (the level at which the background wind is the same as the GW phase speed) near the stratopause during SSWs would block propagation of GWs into the mesosphere and thus could lead to the observed subdued GW activity in the lower mesosphere. Since this is the first study to analyze the COSMIC and CHAMP GPS temperature retrievals up to 60 km in altitude, we compare the GPS analysis with those from HIRDLS and SABER measurements. We find that the temporal variability of zonal mean temperatures derived from the GPS data is

  20. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The use is studied of tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station. Particular emphasis is placed by the microgravity community on the achievement of high quality microgravity conditions. The tether capability is explored for active control of the center of gravity and the analysis of possible tethered configurations.

  1. Gravity wave activity in the thermosphere inferred from GOCE data, and its dependence on solar flux conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Bruinsma, Sean; Doornbos, Eelco; Massarweh, Lotfi

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on the effect of solar flux conditions on the dynamics of Gravity Waves (GW) in thermosphere. Air density and cross-wind in situ estimates from the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometers are analyzed for the whole mission duration. The analysis was performed in the Fourier spectral domain averaging spectral results over periods of 2 months close to solstices. First the Amplitude Spectral Density (ASD) and the Magnitude Squared Coherence (MSC) of physical parameters are linked to local gravity waves. Then, a new GW marker (called Cf3) was introduced here to constrain GWs activity under Low, Medium and High solar flux conditions, showing a clear solar dumping effect on GW activity. Most of GW signal has been found in a spectral range above 8 mHz in GOCE data, meaning a maximum horizontal wavelength around 1000 km. The level GW activity at GOCE altitude is strongly decreasing with increasing solar flux. Furthermore, a shift in the dominant frequency with solar flux conditions has been noted, leading to a larger horizontal wavelengths (from 200 to 500 km) during high solar flux conditions. The influence of correlated error sources, between air density and cross-winds, is discussed. Consistency of the spectral domain results has been verified in time-domain with a global mapping of high frequency perturbations along GOCE orbit. This analysis shows a clear dependence with geomagnetic latitude with strong perturbations at magnetic poles, and an extension to lower latitudes favoured by low solar activity conditions. Various possible causes of this spatial trend are discussed.

  2. Teaching Responsibility through Physical Activity. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellison, Don

    This book guides teachers in using physical activity to foster personal and social responsibility. Focusing on teaching in school settings, the book features comments from real students to motivate teachers to apply the concept; take-aways that summarize each chapter and help teachers consider their own situations; new chapters on the lesson plan…

  3. Rigor and Responsiveness in Classroom Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomspon, Jessica; Hagenah, Sara; Kang, Hosun; Stroupe, David; Braaten, Melissa; Colley, Carolyn; Windschitl, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: There are few examples from classrooms or the literature that provide a clear vision of teaching that simultaneously promotes rigorous disciplinary activity and is responsive to all students. Maintaining rigorous and equitable classroom discourse is a worthy goal, yet there is no clear consensus of how this actually works in a…

  4. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  5. Extravehicular Activity Testing in Analog Environments: Evaluating the Effects of Center of Gravity and Environment on Human Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, M.L.; Chappell, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance (EPSP) Project is performing tests in different analog environments to understand human performance during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) with the aim of developing more safe and efficient systems for lunar exploration missions and the Constellation Program. The project is characterizing human EVA performance in studies using several test beds, including the underwater NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) and Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) facilities, JSC fs Partial Gravity Simulator (POGO), and the NASA Reduced Gravity Office (RGO) parabolic flight aircraft. Using these varied testing environments, NASA can gain a more complete understanding of human performance issues related to EVA and the limitations of each testing environment. Tests are focused on identifying and understanding the EVA system factors that affect human performance such as center of gravity (CG), inertial mass, ground reaction forces (GRF), suit weight, and suit pressure. The test results will lead to the development of lunar EVA systems operations concepts and design requirements that optimize human performance and exploration capabilities. METHODS: Tests were conducted in the NBL and during NEEMO missions in the NOAA Aquarius Habitat. A reconfigurable back pack with repositionable mass was used to simulate Perfect, Low, Forward, High, Aft and NASA Baseline CG locations. Subjects performed simulated exploration tasks that included ambulation, kneel and recovery, rock pick-up, and shoveling. Testing using POGO, that simulates partial gravity via pneumatic weight offload system and a similar reconfigurable rig, is underway for a subset of the same tasks. Additionally, test trials are being performed on the RGO parabolic flight aircraft. Subject performance was assessed using a modified Cooper-Harper scale to assess operator compensation required to achieve desired performance. All CG locations are based on the assumption of a

  6. Multilayer stress from gravity and its tectonic implications in urban active fault zone: A case study in Shenzhen, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuang; Wang, Hai-hong; Luo, Zhi-cai; Ning, Jin-sheng; Liu, Hua-liang

    2015-03-01

    It is significant to identify urban active faults for human life and social sustainable development. The ordinary methods to detect active faults, such as geological survey, artificial seismic exploration, and electromagnetic exploration, are not convenient to be carried out in urban area with dense buildings. It is also difficult to supply information about vertical extension of the deeper faults by these methods. Gravity, reflecting the mass distribution of the Earth's interior, provides an alternative way to detect faults, which is more efficient and convenient for urban active fault detection than the aforementioned techniques. Based on the multi-scale decomposition of gravity anomalies, a novel method to invert multilayer horizontal tectonic stresses is proposed. The inverted multilayer stress fields are further used to infer the distribution and stability of the main faults. In order to validate our method, the multilayer stress fields in the Shenzhen fault zone are calculated as a case study. The calculated stress fields show that their distribution is controlled significantly by the strike of the main faults and can be used to derive depths of the faults. The main faults in Shenzhen may range from 4 km to 20 km in the depth. Each layer of the crust is nearly equipressure since the horizontal tectonic stress has small amplitude. It indicates that the main faults in Shenzhen are relatively stable and have no serious impact on planning and construction of the city.

  7. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  8. Measurements of thermospheric response to auroral activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okano, S.; Kim, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Joule heating produced by auroral electrojets and its thermospheric response can be studied by monitoring the thermospheric temperatures by optical methods; simultaneously, the concurrent auroral electrojet activities can be investigated by using geomagnetic records obtained from stations along a meridian close to the observation site of optical measurements. The measurements are reported of thermospheric response to auroral activities which were made at Albany (42.68 deg N, 73.82 deg W), New York on September 2, 1978 (UT) when an isolated substorm occured. The thermospheric temperatures were measured by using a high resolution Fabry-Perot interferometer that determines the line profiles of the (OI) 6300A line emission. The intensities and latitudinal positions of auroral electrojets were obtained by the analysis of magnetograms from the IMS Fort Churchill meridian chain stations.

  9. Cryogenic liquid hydrogen reorientation activated by constant reverse gravity acceleration of geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    A key objective for cryogenic fluid management in a spacecraft propulsion system is development of the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing a reverse gravity acceleration from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines which exceeds critical value for the initiation of a geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flow fields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted. These parameters hold near-constant values through the entire range of liquid filled levels, from 30 to 80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  10. Understanding Fluid Shifts in the Brain: Choroidal Regulation Involved in the Cerebral Fluid Response to Altered Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabrion, Jaqueline; Vasques, Marilyn; Aquilina, Rudy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fluid balance and regulation of body fluid production are critical aspects of life and survival on Earth. In space, without gravity exerting its usual downward pulling effect, the fluids of the human body shift in an unnatural, headward direction. After awhile, humans and other mammalian species adapt to the microgravity environment which leads to changes in the regulation and distribution of these body fluids. Previous spaceflight experiments have indicated that production of fluid in the brain and spinal cord, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), might be reduced in rats exposed to microgravity. In this experiment conducted by Dr. Jacqueline Gabrion (University of Pierre and Marie Curie, France), proteins important for CSF production, and several molecules that regulate water and mineral transport, will be investigated in rats flown on the Shuttle. Dr. Gabrion and her team will determine the amounts of these proteins and molecules present in the brain in order to evaluate whether any changes have taken place during the rats' adaptation to microgravity. The levels of different aquaporins (proteins that act as a channel for water transport in and out of cells) will also be investigated in other areas of the brain and body to better understand the regulatory responses affecting these important water channel proteins. In addition to producing essential and basic information about fluid production in the brain and body, this experiment will reveal fundamental information about the mechanisms involved in cerebral adaptation and fluid balance during spaceflight.

  11. Studying longterm effects of micro gravity on basic immune functions - The development of an application based on the measuring of phagocytosis activity of Blue Mussel hemocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Eckehardt

    The immunsystem of astronauts exposed to microgravity is declining. Whether this effect is caused by microgravity or in combination with cosmic radiation is so far not clear. The immune system of vertebrates has several defence strategies but the basic immune response (Phagocytosis) is present as well in invertebrates. Phagocytotic cells are drawn by chemotaxis to the origin of an infection. By adhesion, ingestion and phagosome formation foreign particles, bacteria etc are transported inside of a cell were they are destroyed by native powerful biocides. Related to this biocide production is the formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). ROS can be measured by luminescence. The effects of microgravity will be simultaneously tested by exposure of phagocytotic hemocytes on orbit under microgravity, artificial gravity and, on ground under natural gravity. To address this purpose defined pools of Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes will be launched frozen to the ISS. References for all batches will stay on ground. Shortly after arrival and then in three-month intervals batches of the same pool will be thawed and reconstituted. The phagocytosis related production of ROS will be stimulated with opsonized Zymosan. Luminescence will be measured and the data will be sent to ground. The experiment is scheduled for the Columbus Biolab early 2009. In preparation of this flight experiments the following procedures were investigated and the results will be presented: - a protocol for the cryoconservation and reconstituton of blue mussel hemocytes. - preliminary results of phagocytosis activity by reconstituted hemocytes after cryo-conservation and hemocytes without cryo-conservation treatment. The TRIPLELUX-B Experiment contributes to risk assessment concerning longterm immunotoxicity under space flight conditions. The immune system of invertebrates has not been studied so far in space. The choice of the phagocytes from invertebrates is justified by the claim to study the

  12. Research recommendations of the ESA Topical Team on Artificial Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Gilles; Bukley, Angie

    Many experts believe that artificial gravity will be required for an interplanetary mission. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient, multi-system countermeasure and its potential for simplifying operational activities, much still needs to be learned regarding the human response to rotating environments before artificial gravity can be successfully implemented. The European Space Agency (ESA) Topical Team on Artificial Gravity recommended a comprehensive program to determine the gravity threshold required to reverse or prevent the detrimental effects of microgravity and to evaluate the effects of centrifugation on various physiological functions. Part of the required research can be accomplished using animal models on a dedicated centrifuge in low Earth orbit. Studies of human responses to centrifugation could be performed during ambulatory, short- and long-duration bed rest, and in-flight studies. Artificial-gravity scenarios should not be a priori discarded in Moon and Mars mission designs. One major step is to determine the relationship between the artificial gravity dose level, duration, and frequency and the physiological responses of the major body functions affected by spaceflight. Once its regime characteristics are defined and a dose-response curve is established, artificial gravity should serve as the standard against which all other countermeasure candidates are evaluated, first on Earth and then in space.

  13. Plants and gravity. Special issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    This issue of the Journal of Plant Growth Regulation explores the effects of gravity on plant growth and development from several perspectives. Most of the review papers consider plants and gravity from the viewpoint of ground-based laboratory research, and several papers consider gravitropism, the directed growth in response to gravity, in some detail. However, another approach to study the effects of gravity on plant is to effectively remove the force due to gravity. A very dramatic way to accomplish this goal is through the free-fall conditions achieved by spacecraft in low Earth orbit, so some of the authors have reviewed recent advances in spaceflight research with plant systems.

  14. The role of calcium and calmodulin in the response of roots to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    There is general agreement that, in roots, the primary detection of the gravitropic signal occurs in the columella cells of the cap and that this results in the generation of a signal that moves into the elongation zone causing the asymmetric growth that leads to downward curvature. Recent work has generated considerable evidence that indicates that auxin is the ultimate mediator of differential growth during root (and shoot) gravitropism. Our studies of the time course of curvature, auxin redistribution and/or adaptation, and electrical potential changes in maize roots have led to the following generalizations: (1) downward curvature begins 18 to 32 min following gravistimulation; (2) asymmetric auxin redistribution across the root cap begins at about the same time as curvature or perhaps slight earlier; (3) there is a lag of approx. 15 min in the response of roots to applied auxin; and (4) gravi-induced changes in intracellular potentials of cortical cells within the elongation zone occur within 30 s following stimulation.

  15. Human Performance in Simulated Reduced Gravity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently designing a new space suit capable of working in deep space and on Mars. Designing a suit is very difficult and often requires trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. Our current understanding of human performance in reduced gravity in a planetary environment (the moon or Mars) is limited to lunar observations, studies from the Apollo program, and recent suit tests conducted at JSC using reduced gravity simulators. This study will look at our most recent reduced gravity simulations performed on the new Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) compared to the C-9 reduced gravity plane. Methods: Subjects ambulated in reduced gravity analogs to obtain a baseline for human performance. Subjects were tested in lunar gravity (1.6 m/sq s) and Earth gravity (9.8 m/sq s) in shirt-sleeves. Subjects ambulated over ground at prescribed speeds on the ARGOS, but ambulated at a self-selected speed on the C-9 due to time limitations. Subjects on the ARGOS were given over 3 minutes to acclimate to the different conditions before data was collected. Nine healthy subjects were tested in the ARGOS (6 males, 3 females, 79.5 +/- 15.7 kg), while six subjects were tested on the C-9 (6 males, 78.8 +/- 11.2 kg). Data was collected with an optical motion capture system (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and was analyzed using customized analysis scripts in BodyBuilder (Vicon, Oxford, UK) and MATLAB (MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). Results: In all offloaded conditions, variation between subjects increased compared to 1-g. Kinematics in the ARGOS at lunar gravity resembled earth gravity ambulation more closely than the C-9 ambulation. Toe-off occurred 10% earlier in both reduced gravity environments compared to earth gravity, shortening the stance phase. Likewise, ankle, knee, and hip angles remained consistently flexed and had reduced peaks compared to earth gravity. Ground reaction forces in lunar gravity (normalized to Earth body weight) were 0.4 +/- 0.2 on

  16. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  17. Bringing Gravity to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M.

    2016-01-01

    This panel will present NASA's plans for ongoing and future research to define the requirements for Artificial Gravity (AG) as a countermeasure against the negative health effects of long-duration weightlessness. AG could mitigate the gravity-sensitive effects of spaceflight across a host of physiological systems. Bringing gravity to space could mitigate the sensorimotor and neuro-vestibular disturbances induced by G-transitions upon reaching a planetary body, and the cardiovascular deconditioning and musculoskeletal weakness induced by weightlessness. Of particular interest for AG during deep-space missions is mitigation of the Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome that the majority of astronauts exhibit in space to varying degrees, and which presumably is associated with weightlessness-induced fluid shift from lower to upper body segments. AG could be very effective for reversing the fluid shift and thus help prevent VIIP. The first presentation by Dr. Charles will summarize some of the ground-based and (very little) space-based research that has been conducted on AG by the various space programs. Dr. Paloski will address the use of AG during deep-space exploration-class missions and describe the different AG scenarios such as intra-vehicular, part-of-vehicle, or whole-vehicle centrifugations. Dr. Clement will discuss currently planned NASA research as well as how to coordinate future activities among NASA's international partners. Dr. Barr will describe some possible future plans for using space- and ground-based partial-G analogs to define the relationship between physiological responses and G levels between 0 and 1. Finally, Dr. Stenger will summarize how the human cardiovascular system could benefit from intermittent short-radius centrifugations during long-duration missions.

  18. Satellite Detection of Orographic Gravity-wave Activity in the Winter Subtropical Stratosphere over Australia and Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, S. D.; Wu, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    Orographic gravity-wave (OGW) parameterizations in models produce waves over subtropical mountain ranges in Australia and Africa that propagate into the stratosphere during austral winter and deposit momentum, affecting weather and climate. Satellite sensors have measured stratospheric GWs for over a decade, yet find no evidence of these waves. So are parameterizations failing here? Here we argue that the short wavelengths of subtropical OGWs place them near or below the detection limits of satellite sensors. To test this hypothesis, we reanalyze nine years of stratospheric radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite during austral winter, applying new averaging techniques to maximize signal-to-noise and improve thresholds for OGW detection. Deep climatological enhancements in stratospheric OGW variance over specific mountain ranges in Australia and southern Africa are revealed for the first time, which exhibit temporal and vertical variations consistent with predicted OGW responses to varying background winds.

  19. Dynamic response of active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sang Joon; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2001-02-01

    Dynamic characteristics of active twist rotor (ATR) blades are investigated analytically and experimentally in this paper. The ATR system is intended for vibration and potentially for noise reductions in helicopters through individual blade control. An aeroelastic model is developed to identify frequency response characteristics of the ATR blade with integral, generally anisotropic, strain actuators embedded in its composite construction. An ATR prototype blade was designed and manufactured to experimentally study the vibration reduction capabilities of such systems. Several bench and hover tests were conducted and those results are presented and discussed here. Selected results on sensitivity of the ATR system to collective setting (i.e. blade loading), blade rpm (i.e. centrifugal force and blade station velocity), and media density (i.e. altitude) are presented. They indicated that the twist actuation authority of the ATR blade is independent of the collective setting up to approximately 10P, and dependent on rotational speed and altitude near the torsional resonance frequency due to its dependency on the aerodynamic damping. The proposed model captures very well the physics and sensitivities to selected test parameters of the ATR system. The numerical result of the blade torsional loads show an average error of 20% in magnitude and virtually no difference in phase for the blade frequency response. Overall, the active blade model is in very good agreement with the experiments and can be used to analyze and design future active helicopter blade systems.

  20. Generating a Reduced Gravity Environment on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, L. K.; Valle, P.; Shy, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is designed to simulate reduced gravity environments, such as Lunar, Martian, or microgravity using a vertical lifting hoist and horizontal motion system. Three directions of motion are provided over a 41 ft x 24 ft x 25 ft tall area. ARGOS supplies a continuous offload of a portion of a person's weight during dynamic motions such as walking, running, and jumping. The ARGOS system tracks the person's motion in the horizontal directions to maintain a vertical offload force directly above the person or payload by measuring the deflection of the cable and adjusting accordingly.

  1. Lower stratospheric gravity wave activity over Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) during the stratospheric sudden warming of 2009: Link with potential vorticity intrusion near Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, D.; Sridharan, S.; Sathishkumar, S.; Gurubaran, S.; Chen, W.

    2013-03-01

    The relation between intrusions of stratospheric air into the upper troposphere and deep convection at equator during the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) event of 2009 is examined using the ERA-interim reanalysis and NOAA outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data sets. There is an intrusion of potential vorticity (PV) equatorward and westward, when the amplitude of planetary wave of zonal wavenumber 2 at 10 hPa decreases drastically and polar stratospheric temperature increases simultaneously at 60°N. As a special case, the PV intrudes as narrow tongue at longitudes near 60°E (Indian ocean sector) even to latitudes less than 20°N during the SSW, whereas PV normally intrudes near 210°E (eastern Pacific) to equatorial latitudes. Decrease in OLR is observed east of these PV intrusions. Vertical velocity is largely upward at all pressure levels. As the PV intrusion can have profound influence on tropospheric convection and the latent heat release due to equatorial convection is an important source mechanism for the generation of gravity waves, we examined gravity wave activity in the daily radiosonde observations of winds and temperature at Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E). It is observed that the potential energy per unit mass, estimated from the gravity wave temperature perturbations has considerably enhanced in relation with the deep convection. The predominant direction of propagation of the gravity waves is westward prior to the SSW, as a response to the active convection over Indonesia, turns to eastward during and after the SSW, as a response to the PV intrusion induced convection over west of India.

  2. Response of the topography and gravity field on Venus to mantle upwelling beneath a chemical boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Parmentier, E. Marc

    1993-01-01

    The long wavelength correlation of the gravity and topography and the large apparent depths of compensation (approximately 150-300 km) for large highland regions on Venus require significant differences between the interior structure of Earth and Venus. The morphology, geologic history, and large apparent depths of compensation for many highlands have been interpreted to indicate areas of mantle upwelling. A large apparent depth of compensation at a mantle upwelling is generally interpreted to indicate the base of the thermal boundary layer of convection. A boundary layer thickness of 150-300 km implies that the interior of Venus is presently much colder than Earth and thus tectonically less active. The recent Magellan mission has provided contradictory evidence regarding the present level of tectonic activity on Venus, prompting considerable debate. In this study, we investigate the possibility that a chemical boundary layer acts together with a thermal boundary layer to produce large apparent depths of compensation, or equivalently, large geoid-to-topography-ratios (GTR's). The crust of a planet forms through partial melting of mantle materials. Both the melt and the residuum are lower in density than unmelted (or undepleted) mantle. In the absence of vigorous plate tectonics, a thick layer of buoyant residuum, or depleted mantle, may collect beneath the lithosphere. In this scenario, the thermal lithosphere does not need to be thick and cold to match the GTR's. Cooling of the depleted layer may lead to overturn of the upper mantle and episodic resurfacing with time scales on the order of 300-500 MY, consistent with the resurfacing age of Venus.

  3. Venus gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalous gravity field of Venus shows high correlation with surface features revealed by radar. We extract gravity models from the Doppler tracking data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) by means of a two-step process. In the first step, we solve the nonlinear spacecraft state estimation problem using a Kalman filter-smoother. The Kalman filter was evaluated through simulations. This evaluation and some unusual features of the filter are discussed. In the second step, we perform a geophysical inversion using a linear Bayesian estimator. To allow an unbiased comparison between gravity and topography, we use a simulation technique to smooth and distort the radar topographic data so as to yield maps having the same characteristics as our gravity maps. The maps presented cover 2/3 of the surface of Venus and display the strong topography-gravity correlation previously reported. The topography-gravity scatter plots show two distinct trends.

  4. Total water storage dynamics in response to climate variability and extremes: Inference from long-term terrestrial gravity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzfeldt, Benjamin; Ferré, Ty; Troch, Peter; Merz, Bruno; Wziontek, Hartmut; Güntner, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Terrestrial water storage is a basic element of the hydrological cycle and a key state variable for land surface-atmosphere interaction. However, measuring water storage in a comprehensive way for different storage compartments and beyond the point scale is a challenge. In this study, we explore a 10-year time series of total water storage changes derived from high-precision superconducting gravimeter observations in a headwater catchment in Southern Germany. In combination with hydro-meteorological data, we examine the relationship between gravity-derived water storage changes, climate, and river discharge. Distinct seasonal water storage dynamics observed by the gravimeter are strongly related to the meteorological forcing, in particular evapotranspiration. Intra-annual water storage variations demonstrate that the simplifying assumption of water storage averaging to zero at the annual scale is not valid for this catchment. At the event-scale, gravimeters provide a measure of the available subsurface water storage capacity, which can be useful for runoff prediction. During the Central European drought in 2003, the gravimeter data show a strong depletion of water storage and a long-term recovery that extended over a period of several years. In comparison to point measurements or different environmental indices, our findings suggest that depth-integrated gravimeter measurements give a more complete picture of the dynamics of a hydrologic system in response to climate variability and extremes. In view of the considerable costs of gravimeters concerning the infrastructure and measurements, we suggest the strategic deployment of gravimeters at selected sites of hydro-meteorological monitoring networks.

  5. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16220.001 PMID:27472900

  6. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  7. Gravity-induced cellular and molecular processes in plants studied under altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagt, Nicole; Braun, Markus

    With the ability to sense gravity plants possess a powerful tool to adapt to a great variety of environmental conditions and to respond to environmental changes in a most beneficial way. Gravity is the only constant factor that provides organisms with reliable information for their orientation since billions of years. Any deviation of the genetically determined set-point angle of the plants organs from the vector of gravity is sensed by specialized cells, the statocytes of roots and shoots in higher plants. Dense particles, so-called statoliths, sediment in the direction of gravity and activate membrane-bound gravireceptors. A physiological signalling-cascade is initiated that eventually results in the gravitropic curvature response, namely, the readjust-ment of the growth direction. Experiments under microgravity conditions have significantly contributed to our understanding of plant gravity-sensing and gravitropic reorientation. For a gravity-sensing lower plant cell type, the rhizoid of the green alga Chara, and for statocytes of higher plant roots, it was shown that the interactions between statoliths and the actomyosin system consisting of the actin cytoskeleton and motor proteins (myosins) are the basis for highly efficient gravity-sensing processes. In Chara rhizoids, the actomyosin represents a guid-ing system that directs sedimenting statoliths to a specific graviperception site. Parabolic flight experiments aboard the airbus A300 Zero-G have provided evidence that lower and higher plant cells use principally the same statolith-mediated gravireceptor-activation mechanism. Graviper-ception is not dependent on mechanical pressure mediated through the weight of the sedimented statoliths, but on direct interactions between the statoliths's surface and yet unknown gravire-ceptor molecules. In contrast to Chara rhizoids, in the gravity-sensing cells of higher plants, the actin cytoskeleton is not essentially involved in the early phases of gravity sensing. Dis

  8. How to detect when cells in space perceive gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoerkman, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    It is useful to be able to measure when and whether cells detect gravity during spaceflights. For studying gravitational physiology, gravity perception is the response the experimentalist needs to measure. Also, for growing plants in space, plant cells may have a non-directional requirement for gravity as a development cue. The main goals of spaceflight experiments in which gravity perception would be measured are to determine the properties of the gravity receptor and how it is activated, and to determine fundamental characteristics of the signal generated. The main practical difficulty with measuring gravity sensing in space is that gravity sensing cannot be measured with certainty on earth. Almost all experiments measure gravitropic curvature. Reciprocity and intermittent stimulation are measurements which were made to some degree on earth using clinostatting, but which would provide clearer results if done with microgravity rather than clinostatting. These would be important uses of the space laboratory for determining the nature of gravity sensing in plants. Those techniques which do not use gravitropic curvature to measure gravity sensing are electrophysiological. The vibrating probe would be somewhat easier to adapt to space conditions than the intracellular microelectrode because it can be positioned with less precision. Ideally, a non-invasive technique would be best suited if an appropriate measure could be developed. Thus, the effect of microgravity on cultured cells is more likely to be by large-scale physical events than gravity sensing in the culture cells. It is not expected that it will be necessary to determine whether individual cultured cells perceive gravity unless cells grow abnormally even after the obvious microgravity effects on the culture as a whole can be ruled out as the cause.

  9. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Jackman, C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity waves in satellite data from CRISTA and MLS are studied in depth this quarter. Results this quarter are somewhat limited due to the PI'S heavy involvement throughout this reporting period in on-site forecasting of mountain wave-induced turbulence for the NASA's ER-2 research aircraft at Kiruna, Sweden during the SAGE Ill Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). Results reported concentrate on further mesoscale modeling studies of mountain waves over the southern Andes, evident in CRISTA and MLS data. Two-dimensional mesoscale model simulations are extended through generalization of model equations to include both rotation and a first-order turbulence closure scheme. Results of three experiments are analyzed in depth and submitted for publication. We also commence simulations with a three-dimensional mesoscale model (MM5) and present preliminary results for the CRISTA 1 period near southern South America. Combination of ground-based temperature data at 87 km from two sites with global HRDl data was continued this quarter, showing stationary planetary wave structures. This work was also submitted for publication.

  10. Long-term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Jackman, C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This quarter was largely devoted to a detailed study of temperature data acquired by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) on UARS. Our analysis used the same sequence of methods that have been developed, tested and refined on a more limited subset of temperature data acquired by the CRISTA instrument. We focused on a limited subset of our reasoning that geographical and vertical trends in the small-scale temperature variability could be compared with similar trends observed in November 1994 by the CRISTA-SPAS satellite. Results, backed up with hindcasts from the Mountain Wave Forecast Model (MWFM), reveal strong evidence of mountain waves, most persuasively in the Himalayas on 16-17 November, 1992. These CLAES results are coherent over the 30-50 km range and compare well with MWFM hindcasts for the same period. This constitutes, we believe, the first clear evidence that CLAES explicitly resolved long wavelength gravity waves in its CO2 temperature channel. A series of other tasks, related to mesoscale modeling of mountain waves in CRISTA data and fitting of ground-based and HRDI data on global scales, were seen through to publication stage in peer-reviewed journals.

  11. Gravity investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.

    1983-12-31

    A large density contrast exists between the Paleozoic rocks (including the rocks of Climax stock) and less dense, Tertiary volcanic rocks and alluvium. This density contrast ranges widely, and herein for interpretive purposes, is assumed to average 0.85 Mg/m{sup 3} (megagrams per cubic meter). The large density contrast makes the gravity method a useful tool with which to study the interface between these rock types. However, little or no density contrast is discernible between the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks that surround the Climax stock and the intrusive rocks of the stock itself. Therefore the gravity method can not be used to define the configuration of the stock. Gravity highs coincide with outcrops of the dense Paleozoic rocks, and gravity lows overlie less-dense Tertiary volcanic rocks and Quaternary alluvium. The positions of three major faults (Boundary, Yucca, and Butte faults) are defined by steep gravity gradients. West of the Climax stock, the Tippinip fault has juxtaposed Paleozoic rocks of similar density, and consequently, has no expression in the gravity data in that area. The gravity station spacing, across Oak Spring Butte, is not sufficient to adequately define any gravity expression of the Tippinip fault. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Next-Generation Maneuvering System with Control-Moment Gyroscopes for Extravehicular Activities Near Low-Gravity Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Michele; Jackson, Kimberly; Cohanim, Babak; Duda, Kevin R.; Rize, Jared; Dopart, Celena; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Curiel, Pedro; Studak, Joseph; Ponica, Dina; RochlisZumbado, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Looking ahead to the human exploration of Mars, NASA is planning for exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the Martian moons. Performing tasks near the surface of such low-gravity objects will likely require the use of an updated version of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) since the surface gravity is not high enough to allow astronauts to walk, or have sufficient resistance to counter reaction forces and torques during movements. The extravehicular activity (EVA) Jetpack device currently under development is based on the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit and has maneuvering capabilities to assist EVA astronauts with their tasks. This maneuvering unit has gas thrusters for attitude control and translation. When EVA astronauts are performing tasks that require ne motor control such as sample collection and equipment placement, the current control system will re thrusters to compensate for the resulting changes in center-of-mass location and moments of inertia, adversely affecting task performance. The proposed design of a next-generation maneuvering and stability system incorporates control concepts optimized to support astronaut tasks and adds control-moment gyroscopes (CMGs) to the current Jetpack system. This design aims to reduce fuel consumption, as well as improve task performance for astronauts by providing a sti er work platform. The high-level control architecture for an EVA maneuvering system using both thrusters and CMGs considers an initial assessment of tasks to be performed by an astronaut and an evaluation of the corresponding human-system dynamics. For a scenario in which the astronaut orbits an asteroid, simulation results from the current EVA maneuvering system are compared to those from a simulation of the same system augmented with CMGs, demonstrating that the forces and torques on an astronaut can be significantly reduced with the new control system actuation while conserving onboard fuel.

  13. Model studies of time-dependent ducting for high-frequency gravity waves and associated airglow responses in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yonghui

    wave spectra and hence causes noticeable azimuthal variations at higher altitudes. In addition to the spectral analysis applied previously the wave action has been used to interpret the energy coupling between the waves and the mean flow among some atmospheric regions, where the waves are suspected to extract energy from the mean flow at some altitudes and release it to other altitudes. The fifth chapter is a concrete and substantial step connecting theoretical studies and realistic observations through nonlinearly coupling wave dynamic model with airglow chemical reactions. Simulated O (1S) (557.7 nm) airglow images are provided so that they can be compared with observational airglow images. These simulated airglow brightness variations response accordingly with minor species density fluctuations, which are due to propagating and ducting nonlinear gravity waves within related airglow layers. The thermal and wind structures plus the seasonal and geographical variabilities could significantly influence the observed airglow images. By control modeling studies the simulations can be used to collate with concurrent observed data, so that the incoherencies among them could be very useful to discover unknown physical processes behind the observed wave scenes.

  14. Sodium Lidar-observed Strong Inertia-gravity Wave Activities in the Mesopause Region over Fort Collins, Colorado (41 deg N, 105 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Tao; She, C. -Y.; Liu, Han-Li; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stuart

    2007-01-01

    In December 2004, the Colorado State University sodium lidar system at Fort Collins, Colorado (41 deg N, 105 deg W), conducted an approximately 80-hour continuous campaign for the simultaneous observations of mesopause region sodium density, temperature, and zonal and meridional winds. This data set reveals the significant inertia-gravity wave activities with a period of approximately 18 hours, which are strong in both wind components since UT day 338 (second day of the campaign), and weak in temperature and sodium density. The considerable variability of wave activities was observed with both wind amplitudes growing up to approximately 40 m/s at 95-100 km in day 339 and then decreasing dramatically in day 340. We also found that the sodium density wave perturbation is correlated in phase with temperature perturbation below 90 km, and approximately 180 deg out of phase above. Applying the linear wave theory, we estimated the wave horizontal propagation direction, horizontal wavelength, and apparent horizontal phase speed to be approximately 25 deg south of west, approximately 1800 +/- 150 km, and approximately 28 +/- 2 m/s, respectively of wave intrinsic period, intrinsic phase speed, and vertical wavelength were also estimated. While the onset of enhanced inertia-gravity wave amplitude in the night of 338 was observed to be in coincidence with short-period gravity wave breaking via convective instability, the decrease of inertia-gravity wave amplitude after noon of day 339 was also observed to coincide with the development of atmospheric dynamical instability layers with downward phase progression clearly correlated with the 18-hour inertia-gravity wave, suggesting likely breaking of this inertia-gravity wave via dynamical (shear) instability.

  15. On the response of a water surface to a surface pressure source moving at trans-critical gravity-capillary wave speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Cho, Yeunwoo; Duncan, James H.; Akylas, Triantaphyllos

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a pressure source moving at speeds near the minimum speed of linear gravity-capillary waves (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) is investigated with experiments and theory. In the experiments, waves are generated by a vertically oriented air-jet that moves at a constant speed over the water surface in a long tank. The 3-D surface shape behind the air-jet is measured using a cinematic refraction-based technique combined with an LIF technique. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady pattern is formed where localized depressions periodically appear in pairs and move away from the source along the arms of a downstream V-shaped pattern. This behavior is analogous to the periodic shedding of solitary waves upstream of a source moving at the maximum wave speed in shallow water. The gravity-capillary depressions are rapidly damped by viscosity and their speed-amplitude characteristics closely match those from inviscid calculations of gravity-capillary lumps. The shedding frequency of the lumps in the present experiments increases with both increasing towing speed and air-flow rate. Predictions of this behavior using a model equation that incorporates damping and a quadratic nonlinearity are in good agreement with the experiments. The partial support of the National Science Foundation under grant OCE0751853 is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John E.

    1997-03-01

    This book comprehensively describes all aspects of gravity flow, a physical process in the environment that is covered by many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, the earth sciences and industrial processes. The first edition was very well received, and the author has brought the new edition completely up to date, with much new material. Simpson describes gravity currents with a variety of laboratory experiments, many from his own work. Gravity Currents is a valuable supplementary textbook for undergraduates and a reference work for research workers. The general reader will also find much of interest, since the author clearly describes the physics of flows involved without advanced mathematics, and with numerous photographs and illustrations.

  17. Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John E.

    1999-11-01

    This book comprehensively describes all aspects of gravity flow, a physical process in the environment that is covered by many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, the earth sciences and industrial processes. The first edition was very well received, and the author has brought the new edition completely up to date, with much new material. Simpson describes gravity currents with a variety of laboratory experiments, many from his own work. Gravity Currents is a valuable supplementary textbook for undergraduates and a reference work for research workers. The general reader will also find much of interest, since the author clearly describes the physics of flows involved without advanced mathematics, and with numerous photographs and illustrations.

  18. How to Activate a Plant Gravireceptor. Early Mechanisms of Gravity Sensing Studied in Characean Rhizoids during Parabolic Flights1

    PubMed Central

    Limbach, Christoph; Hauslage, Jens; Schäfer, Claudia; Braun, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Early processes underlying plant gravity sensing were investigated in rhizoids of Chara globularis under microgravity conditions provided by parabolic flights of the A300-Zero-G aircraft and of sounding rockets. By applying centrifugal forces during the microgravity phases of sounding rocket flights, lateral accelerations of 0.14g, but not of 0.05g, resulted in a displacement of statoliths. Settling of statoliths onto the subapical plasma membrane initiated the gravitropic response. Since actin controls the positioning of statoliths and restricts sedimentation of statoliths in these cells, it can be calculated that lateral actomyosin forces in a range of 2 × 10−14 n act on statoliths to keep them in place. These forces represent the threshold value that has to be exceeded by any lateral acceleration stimulus for statolith sedimentation and gravisensing to occur. When rhizoids were gravistimulated during parabolic plane flights, the curvature angles of the flight samples, whose sedimented statoliths became weightless for 22 s during the 31 microgravity phases, were not different from those of in-flight 1g controls. However, in ground control experiments, curvature responses were drastically reduced when the contact of statoliths with the plasma membrane was intermittently interrupted by inverting gravistimulated cells for less than 10 s. Increasing the weight of sedimented statoliths by lateral centrifugation did not enhance the gravitropic response. These results provide evidence that graviperception in characean rhizoids requires contact of statoliths with membrane-bound receptor molecules rather than pressure or tension exerted by the weight of statoliths. PMID:16183834

  19. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  20. Analysis of changes in leg volume parameters, and orthostatic tolerance in response to lower body negative pressure during 59 days exposure to zero gravity Skylab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, R. D.; Gowen, R. J.; Carroll, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The cardiovascular responses of the Apollo crewmen associated with postflight evaluations indicate varying decrements of orthostatic tolerance. The postflight changes indicate a slightly diminished ability to the cardiovascular system to function effectively against gravity following exposure to weightlessness. The objective of the Skylab LBNP experiments (M092) was to provide information about the magnitude and time course of the cardiovascular changes associated with prolonged periods of exposure to weightlessness. This report details the equipment, signal processing and analysis of the leg volume data obtained from the M092 experiment of the Skylab 3 Mission.

  1. Gravity-induced PIN transcytosis for polarization of auxin fluxes in gravity-sensing root cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Ding, Zhaojun; Jones, Angharad R.; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.; Friml, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Auxin is an essential plant-specific regulator of patterning processes that also controls directional growth of roots and shoots. In response to gravity stimulation, the PIN3 auxin transporter polarizes to the bottom side of gravity-sensing root cells, presumably redirecting the auxin flux toward the lower side of the root and triggering gravitropic bending. By combining live-cell imaging techniques with pharmacological and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that PIN3 polarization does not require secretion of de novo synthesized proteins or protein degradation, but instead involves rapid, transient stimulation of PIN endocytosis, presumably via a clathrin-dependent pathway. Moreover, gravity-induced PIN3 polarization requires the activity of the guanine nucleotide exchange factors for ARF GTPases (ARF-GEF) GNOM-dependent polar-targeting pathways and might involve endosome-based PIN3 translocation from one cell side to another. Our data suggest that gravity perception acts at several instances of PIN3 trafficking, ultimately leading to the polarization of PIN3, which presumably aligns auxin fluxes with gravity vector and mediates downstream root gravitropic response. PMID:21135243

  2. Gravity brake

    DOEpatents

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  3. Mass variations in response to magmatic stress changes at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat (W.I.): Insights from 4-D gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautmann, Stefanie; Gottsmann, Joachim; Camacho, Antonio G.; Fournier, Nicolas; Sacks, I. Selwyn; Sparks, R. Stephen J.

    2010-02-01

    The eruption of Soufrière Hills Volcano (Montserrat, West Indies) has been ongoing for more than a decade, yet routine monitoring of the activity did not include gravity surveillance for most of the time. In June/July 2006, we installed a new elevation-controlled microgravity network, which we re-occupied in January/February 2007 and August/September 2008. Residual gravity changes of up to 74 µGal between the surveys allow us to infer net mass and/or density changes beneath the central part of the island. Data inversion for causative source parameters indicates mass changes along NW-SE elongated structures beneath the Centre Hills at a minimum depth of 700 m. We suggest the observed gravity variations to be related to poroelastic dynamics involving groundwater migration and/or fracture opening/closing along a hitherto unrecognized fault zone. The perturbations appear to be triggered by changes in the stress field of the shallow plumbing system of Soufrière Hills Volcano.

  4. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  5. Auxin efflux facilitator and auxin dynamism responsible for the gravity-regulated development of peg in cucumber seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Chiaki; Fujii, Nobuharu; Miyazawa, Yutaka

    Cucumber seedlings develop a protuberance, peg, by which seed coats are pulled out just af-ter germination. The peg is usually formed on the lower side of the transition zone between hypocotyl and root of the seedlings grown in a horizontal position. Our previous spaceflight experiment showed that unilateral positioning of a peg in cucumber seedlings occurred due to its suppression on the upper side of the transition zone because seedlings grown in microgravity developed a peg on each side of the transition zone. We also showed that auxin was a major factor responsible for peg development. There was a redistribution of auxin in the gravistimu-lated transition zone, decreasing IAA level on the upper side, and IAA application induced a peg on both lower and upper sides of the transition zone. In addition, peg was released from its suppression in the seedlings treated with inhibitors of auxin efflux. Namely, two pegs devel-oped in the TIBA-treated seedlings even when they were grown in a horizontal position. These results imply that a reduction of auxin level due to its efflux is required for the suppression of peg development on the upper side of the transition zone in a horizontal position. To under-stand molecular mechanism underlying the negative control of morphogenesis by graviresponse in cucumber seedlings, we isolated cDNAs of auxin efflux facilitators, CsPINs, from cucumber and examined the expressions of their proteins, in relation to the redistribution of endogenous auxin and peg development. We isolated six cDNAs of PIN homologues CsPIN1 to CsPIN6 from cucumber. By immunohistochemical study using some of their anti-bodies, we revealed that CsPIN1 was localized in endodermis, vascular tissue and pith around the transition zone of cucumber seedlings. In cucumber seedlings grown in a vertical position with radicles pointing down, CsPIN1 in endodermal cells was mainly localized on the plasma membrane neighboring vascular bundle but not on the plasma membrane

  6. Design and evaluation of a hybrid passive and active gravity neutral orthosis (GNO).

    PubMed

    Koo, Benjamin; Montes, Jacqueline; Gamarnik, Viktor; Yeager, Keith; Marra, Jonathan; Dunaway, Sally; Montgomery, Megan; De Vivo, Darryl C; Strauss, Nancy; Konofagou, Elisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD), including Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), result in progressive muscular weakness that often leaves patients functionally dependent on caregivers for many activities of daily living (ADL) such as eating, bathing, grooming (touching the face and head), reaching (grabbing for objects), and dressing. In severe cases, patients are unable to perform even the simplest of activities from exploring their 3D space to touching their own face. The ability to move and initiate age appropriate tasks, such as playing and exploration, are considered to be of vital importance to both their physical and cognitive development. Therefore, to improve quality of life and reduce dependence on caregivers in children and young adults with NMD, we designed, built and evaluated an assistive, active orthosis to support arm function. The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of a mechanical arm orthosis to both encourage and assist functional arm movement while providing the user a sense of independence and control over one's own body. PMID:19963513

  7. Calcium signaling in plant cells in altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E. L.

    2003-10-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca 2+ signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in 80 th, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2+ changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumebly specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2+ ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravisensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane surface

  8. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

  9. Gravity and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  10. Analysis of changes in leg volume parameters, and orthostatic tolerance in response to lower body negative pressure during 28-days exposure to zero gravity Skylab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, R. D.; Gowen, R. J.; Carroll, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The design of the leg volume measuring system employed for the M092 portion of the Skylab missions required the development of a system sensitive to large and small volume changes at the calf of the leg. These changes in volume were produced in response to the orthostatic stress of a Lower Body Negative Pressure Device (LBNPD) or by venous occlusion. The cardiovascular responses of the Apollo crewman associated with the postflight evaluations indicate varying decrements of orthostatic tolerance. The postflight changes indicate a slightly diminished ability of the cardiovascular system to function effectively against gravity following exposure to weightlessness. The objective of the Skylab LBNP experiments (M092) was to provide information about the magnitude and time course of the cardiovascular changes associated with prolonged periods of exposure to weightlessness. The equipment, signal processing, and analysis of the leg volume data obtained from the M092 experiment of the Skylab 2 Mission are described.

  11. 76 FR 19766 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... 1808.06; Environmental Impact Assessment of Nongovernmental Activities in Antarctica (Renewal); 40...

  12. [Biology of size and gravity].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Baba, Shoji A

    2004-03-01

    responsible for this feature, are subject we discuss in this article. Three major topics in gravitational and space biology are; how living systems have been adapted to terrestrial gravity and evolved, how living systems respond to exotic gravitational environment, and whether living systems could respond and adapt to microgravity. Biology of size can contribute to find a way to answer these question, and answer why gravity is important in biology, at explaining why gravity has been a dominant factor through the evolutional history on the earth. PMID:15173628

  13. Gravity data of the Norcia and Castelluccio basins (central Italy): insight for active faulting of the area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruano, P.; Rustichelli, A.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Piccardi, L.; Ruiz-Constán, A.; Tondi, E.; López-Garrido, A. C.; Sanz de Galdeano, C.

    2009-04-01

    The Norcia and Castelluccio basins are located in the central Apennines, the southeastern extension of the NE-vergent arcuate, Neogene, foreland fold and thrust belt of northern Italy. These intramontane depressions are infilled by Pleistocene-Holocene coarse continental fluvial and alluvial deposits, whereas the bedrock units are represented by limestone and pelagic marls of Jurassic to Miocene age. Several historical and instrumental highly destructive earthquakes have occurred in this area: January 14, 1703 (X MCS, M=6.6); September 19, 1979 (Ms= 5.9, focal depth of 6-8km). Fault data and earthquake focal mechanisms show a predominant NE-SW extension, but strike-slip and even reverse mechanisms have also been determined. The surface of the Norcia basin is flat, slightly inclined to the NW, with only an almost isolated basement hill in the middle. The basin has a predominant NNW-SSE elongation with very straight boundaries constituted by oblique-extensional faults. In addition, Castelluccio Depression is a hanging basin located eastwards of the Norcia area. In order to determine the distribution of the sedimentary infill, a gravity survey has been developed in the region, including several profiles orthogonal to the basin edges and additional scattered data that improve the map coverage. Measurements have been done in the basins and also in the basement in order to determine the regional anomalies. A Scintrex CG-5 gravitimeter with an accuracy of 0.001mGal, a barometric altimeter of 0.5 m of precision, and a Garmin e-trex GPS have been used during the acquisition of the 294 measurements. A density of 2.60 g/cm3 (mean density of the basement limestone) has been considered for calculating the Bouguer Anomalies. Terrain corrections have been determined using the SRTM90-m. The Foligno absolute gravity base station has been taking into account during this survey. The Bouguer Anomaly is negative in all the area, with a regional trend that decreases northeastwards

  14. Activity of metazoa governs biofilm structure formation and enhances permeate flux during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) filtration.

    PubMed

    Derlon, Nicolas; Koch, Nicolas; Eugster, Bettina; Posch, Thomas; Pernthaler, Jakob; Pronk, Wouter; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2013-04-15

    The impact of different feed waters in terms of eukaryotic populations and organic carbon content on the biofilm structure formation and permeate flux during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) filtration was investigated in this study. GDM filtration was performed at ultra-low pressure (65 mbar) in dead-end mode without control of the biofilm formation. Different feed waters were tested (River water, pre-treated river water, lake water, and tap water) and varied with regard to their organic substrate content and their predator community. River water was manipulated either by chemically inhibiting all eukaryotes or by filtering out macrozoobenthos (metazoan organisms). The structure of the biofilm was characterized at the meso- and micro-scale using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), respectively. Based on Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurements, the river waters provided the highest potential for bacterial growth whereas tap water had the lowest. An increasing content in soluble and particulate organic substrate resulted in increasing biofilm accumulation on membrane surface. However, enhanced biofilm accumulation did not result in lower flux values and permeate flux was mainly influenced by the structure of the biofilm. Metazoan organisms (in particular nematodes and oligochaetes) built-up protective habitats, which resulted in the formation of open and spatially heterogeneous biofilms composed of biomass patches. In the absence of predation by metazoan organisms, a flat and compact biofilm developed. It is concluded that the activity of metazoan organisms in natural river water and its impact on biofilm structure balances the detrimental effect of a high biofilm accumulation, thus allowing for a broader application of GDM filtration. Finally, our results suggest that for surface waters with high particulate organic carbon (POC) content, the use of worms is suitable to enhance POC removal before ultrafiltration units. PMID

  15. Gravity settling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Hyman R.; Long, R. H.; Simone, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Solids are separated from a liquid in a gravity settler provided with inclined solid intercepting surfaces to intercept the solid settling path to coalesce the solids and increase the settling rate. The intercepting surfaces are inverted V-shaped plates, each formed from first and second downwardly inclined upwardly curved intersecting conical sections having their apices at the vessel wall.

  16. OsGA2ox5, a Gibberellin Metabolism Enzyme, Is Involved in Plant Growth, the Root Gravity Response and Salt Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weiming; Shan, Chi

    Gibberellin (GA) 2-oxidases play an important role in the GA catabolic pathway through 2b-hydroxylation. There are two classes of GA2oxs, i.e., a larger class of C19-GA2oxs and a smaller class of C20-GA2oxs. In this study, the gene encoding a GA 2-oxidase of rice, Oryza sativa GA 2-oxidase 5 (OsGA2ox5), was cloned and characterized. BLASTP analysis showed that OsGA2ox5 belongs to the C20-GA2oxs subfamily, a subfamily of GA2oxs acting on C20-GAs (GA12, GA53). Subcellular localization of OsGA2ox5-YFP in transiently transformed onion epidermal cells revealed the presence of this protein in both of the nucleus and cytoplasm. Real-time PCR analysis, along with GUS staining, revealed that OsGA2ox5 is expressed in the roots, culms, leaves, sheaths and panicles of rice. Rice plants overexpressing OsGA2ox5 exhibited dominant dwarf and GAdeficient phenotypes, with shorter stems and later development of reproductive organs than the wild type. The dwarfism phenotype was partially rescued by the application of exogenous GA3 at a concentration of 10 mM. Ectopic expression of OsGA2ox5 cDNA in Arabidopsis resulted in a similar phenotype. Real-time PCR assays revealed that both GA synthesis-related genes and GA signaling genes were expressed at higher levels in transgenic rice plants than in wild-type rice; OsGA3ox1, which encodes a key enzyme in the last step of the bioactive GAs synthesis pathway, was highly expressed in transgenic rice. The roots of OsGA2ox5-ox plants exhibited increased starch granule accumulation and gravity responses, revealing a role for GA in root starch granule development and gravity responses. Furthermore, rice and Arabidopsis plants overexpressing OsGA2ox5 were more resistant to high-salinity stress than wild-type plants. These results suggest that OsGA2ox5 plays important roles in GAs homeostasis, development, gravity responses and stress tolerance in rice.

  17. OsGA2ox5, a gibberellin metabolism enzyme, is involved in plant growth, the root gravity response and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Shan, Chi; Mei, Zhiling; Duan, Jianli; Chen, Haiying; Feng, Huafeng; Cai, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Gibberellin (GA) 2-oxidases play an important role in the GA catabolic pathway through 2β-hydroxylation. There are two classes of GA2oxs, i.e., a larger class of C₁₉-GA2oxs and a smaller class of C₂₀-GA2oxs. In this study, the gene encoding a GA 2-oxidase of rice, Oryza sativa GA 2-oxidase 5 (OsGA2ox5), was cloned and characterized. BLASTP analysis showed that OsGA2ox5 belongs to the C₂₀-GA2oxs subfamily, a subfamily of GA2oxs acting on C₂₀-GAs (GA₁₂, GA₅₃). Subcellular localization of OsGA2ox5-YFP in transiently transformed onion epidermal cells revealed the presence of this protein in both of the nucleus and cytoplasm. Real-time PCR analysis, along with GUS staining, revealed that OsGA2ox5 is expressed in the roots, culms, leaves, sheaths and panicles of rice. Rice plants overexpressing OsGA2ox5 exhibited dominant dwarf and GA-deficient phenotypes, with shorter stems and later development of reproductive organs than the wild type. The dwarfism phenotype was partially rescued by the application of exogenous GA3 at a concentration of 10 µM. Ectopic expression of OsGA2ox5 cDNA in Arabidopsis resulted in a similar phenotype. Real-time PCR assays revealed that both GA synthesis-related genes and GA signaling genes were expressed at higher levels in transgenic rice plants than in wild-type rice; OsGA3ox1, which encodes a key enzyme in the last step of the bioactive GAs synthesis pathway, was highly expressed in transgenic rice. The roots of OsGA2ox5-ox plants exhibited increased starch granule accumulation and gravity responses, revealing a role for GA in root starch granule development and gravity responses. Furthermore, rice and Arabidopsis plants overexpressing OsGA2ox5 were more resistant to high-salinity stress than wild-type plants. These results suggest that OsGA2ox5 plays important roles in GAs homeostasis, development, gravity responses and stress tolerance in rice. PMID:24475234

  18. Assessment of precise surface-gravity measurements for monitoring the response of a geothermal reservoir to exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Grannell, R.B.; Whitcomb, J.H.; Aronstam, P.S.; Clover, R.C.

    1981-06-01

    Recommendations for carrying out surveys which achieve 15, 10 and 5 microgal precisions are presented. Achieving the smaller standard deviations will require more field effort and will be more costly. For a 60 station survey, at commercial rates in 1981, typical costs are estimated to be $20,000, $26,000 and $35,000 respectively, for data collection, reduction and interpretation. These figures exclude instrument purchase or rental. Twenty geothermal areas in the western United States which might be suitable for precise repetitive gravity monitoring were evaluated. The evaluation criteria included capability for subsidence on a geological basis, estimated electrical production, environmental impact, and anticipation of production in the near future. It is felt that the most promising areas in order of priority are: (1) the Salton Sea field, California; (2) Valles Caldera, New Mexico; (3) The Geysers-Clear Lake; and (4) Westmorland, California; (5) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; and (6) Heber; (7) Brawley; and (8) Long Valley, California.

  19. Gravity Functions of Circumnutation by Hypocotyls of Helianthus annuus in Simulated Hypogravity 12

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, David K.; Venditti, Allen L.; Brown, Allan H.

    1980-01-01

    For more than a decade research on the botanical mechanism responsible for circumnutation has centered on whether or not these nearly ubiquitous oscillations can be attributed to a hunting process whereby the plant organ continuously responds to the gravity force and, by overshooting each stimulus, initiates a sustained oscillation or, driven by a not yet defined autogenic mechanism, performs oscillatory activities that require no external reinforcement to maintain the observed rhythms of differential growth. We explore here the effects of altered gravity force on parameters of circumnutation. Following our earlier publication on circumnutation in hypergravity we report here an exploration of circumnutation in hypogravity. Parameters of circumnutation are recorded as functions of the axially imposed gravity force. The same method was used (two-axes clinostat rotation) to produce sustained gravity forces referred to as hypergravity (1 < g), hypogravity (0 [unk] g < 1), and negative gravity (−1 < g < 0). In these three regions of the g-parameter nutational frequency and nutational amplitude were influenced in different ways. The results of our tests describe the gravity dependence of circumnutation over the full range of real or simulated gravity levels that are available in an earth laboratory. Our results demonstrated that nutational parameters are indeed gravity-dependent but are not inconsistent with the postulate that circumnutation can proceed in the absence of a significant gravity force. PMID:16661229

  20. Seismic responses and controlling factors of Miocene deepwater gravity-flow deposits in Block A, Lower Congo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Wang, Zhenqi; Yu, Shui; Ngia, Ngong Roger

    2016-08-01

    The Miocene deepwater gravity-flow sedimentary system in Block A of the southwestern part of the Lower Congo Basin was identified and interpreted using high-resolution 3-D seismic, drilling and logging data to reveal development characteristics and main controlling factors. Five types of deepwater gravity-flow sedimentary units have been identified in the Miocene section of Block A, including mass transport, deepwater channel, levee, abandoned channel and sedimentary lobe deposits. Each type of sedimentary unit has distinct external features, internal structures and lateral characteristics in seismic profiles. Mass transport deposits (MTDs) in particular correspond to chaotic low-amplitude reflections in contact with mutants on both sides. The cross section of deepwater channel deposits in the seismic profile is in U- or V-shape. The channel deposits change in ascending order from low-amplitude, poor-continuity, chaotic filling reflections at the bottom, to high-amplitude, moderate to poor continuity, chaotic or sub-parallel reflections in the middle section and to moderate-weak amplitude, good continuity, parallel or sub-parallel reflections in the upper section. The sedimentary lobes are laterally lobate, which corresponds to high-amplitude, good-continuity, moundy reflection signatures in the seismic profile. Due to sediment flux, faults, and inherited terrain, few mass transport deposits occur in the northeastern part of the study area. The front of MTDs is mainly composed of channel-levee complex deposits, while abandoned-channel and lobe-deposits are usually developed in high-curvature channel sections and the channel terminals, respectively. The distribution of deepwater channel, levee, abandoned channel and sedimentary lobe deposits is predominantly controlled by relative sea level fluctuations and to a lesser extent by tectonism and inherited terrain.

  1. Improving Realism in Reduced Gravity Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Matthew; Harvil, Lauren; Clowers, Kurt; Clark, Timothy; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    Since man was first determined to walk on the moon, simulating the lunar environment became a priority. Providing an accurate reduced gravity environment is crucial for astronaut training and hardware testing. This presentation will follow the development of reduced gravity simulators to a final comparison of environments between the currently used systems. During the Apollo program era, multiple systems were built and tested, with several NASA centers having their own unique device. These systems ranged from marionette-like suspension devices where the subject laid on his side, to pneumatically driven offloading harnesses, to parabolic flights. However, only token comparisons, if any, were made between systems. Parabolic flight allows the entire body to fall at the same rate, giving an excellent simulation of reduced gravity as far as the biomechanics and physical perceptions are concerned. While the effects are accurate, there is limited workspace, limited time, and high cost associated with these tests. With all mechanical offload systems only the parts of the body that are actively offloaded feel any reduced gravity effects. The rest of the body still feels the full effect of gravity. The Partial Gravity System (Pogo) is the current ground-based offload system used to training and testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Pogo is a pneumatic type system that allows for offloaded motion in the z-axis and free movement in the x-axis, but has limited motion in the y-axis. The pneumatic system itself is limited by cylinder stroke length and response time. The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) is a next generation groundbased offload system, currently in development, that is based on modern robotic manufacturing lines. This system is projected to provide more z-axis travel and full freedom in both the x and y-axes. Current characterization tests are underway to determine how the ground-based offloading systems perform, how they compare to parabolic

  2. Solar activity, the QBO, and tropospheric responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, Brian A.; Brown, Geoffrey M.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    1989-01-01

    The suggestion that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) as modulated by the solar wind are the carriers of the component of solar variability that affects weather and climate has been discussed in the literature for 30 years, and there is now a considerable body of evidence that supports it. Variations of GCR occur with the 11 year solar cycle, matching the time scale of recent results for atmospheric variations, as modulated by the quasibiennial oscillation of equatorial stratospheric winds (the QBO). Variations in GCR occur on the time scale of centuries with a well defined peak in the coldest decade of the little ice age. New evidence is presented on the meteorological responses to GCR variations on the time scale of a few days. These responses include changes in the vertical temperature profile in the troposphere and lower stratosphere in the two days following solar flare related high speed plasma streams and associated GCR decreases, and in decreases in Vorticity Area Index (VAI) following Forbush decreases of GCR. The occurrence of correlations of GCR and meteorological responses on all three time scales strengthens the hypothesis of GCR as carriers of solar variability to the lower atmosphere. Both short and long term tropospheric responses are understandable as changes in the intensity of cyclonic storms initiated by mechanisms involving cloud microphysical and cloud electrification processes, due to changes in local ion production from changes in GCR fluxes and other high energy particles in the MeV to low GeV range. The nature of these mechanisms remains undetermined. Possible stratospheric wind (particularly QBO) effects on the transport of HNO3 and other constituents incorporated in cluster ions and possible condensation and freezing nuclei are considered as relevant to the long term variations.

  3. Prediction models discriminating between nonlocomotive and locomotive activities in children using a triaxial accelerometer with a gravity-removal physical activity classification algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hikihara, Yuki; Tanaka, Chiaki; Oshima, Yoshitake; Ohkawara, Kazunori; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Tanaka, Shigeho

    2014-01-01

    The aims of our study were to examine whether a gravity-removal physical activity classification algorithm (GRPACA) is applicable for discrimination between nonlocomotive and locomotive activities for various physical activities (PAs) of children and to prove that this approach improves the estimation accuracy of a prediction model for children using an accelerometer. Japanese children (42 boys and 26 girls) attending primary school were invited to participate in this study. We used a triaxial accelerometer with a sampling interval of 32 Hz and within a measurement range of ±6 G. Participants were asked to perform 6 nonlocomotive and 5 locomotive activities. We measured raw synthetic acceleration with the triaxial accelerometer and monitored oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production during each activity with the Douglas bag method. In addition, the resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured with the subject sitting on a chair to calculate metabolic equivalents (METs). When the ratio of unfiltered synthetic acceleration (USA) and filtered synthetic acceleration (FSA) was 1.12, the rate of correct discrimination between nonlocomotive and locomotive activities was excellent, at 99.1% on average. As a result, a strong linear relationship was found for both nonlocomotive (METs = 0.013×synthetic acceleration +1.220, R2 = 0.772) and locomotive (METs = 0.005×synthetic acceleration +0.944, R2 = 0.880) activities, except for climbing down and up. The mean differences between the values predicted by our model and measured METs were -0.50 to 0.23 for moderate to vigorous intensity (>3.5 METs) PAs like running, ball throwing and washing the floor, which were regarded as unpredictable PAs. In addition, the difference was within 0.25 METs for sedentary to mild moderate PAs (<3.5 METs). Our specific calibration model that discriminates between nonlocomotive and locomotive activities for children can be useful to evaluate the sedentary to vigorous PAs

  4. Oxidative stress and NO signalling in the root apex as an early response to changes in gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Mugnai, Sergio; Pandolfi, Camilla; Masi, Elisa; Azzarello, Elisa; Monetti, Emanuela; Comparini, Diego; Voigt, Boris; Volkmann, Dieter; Mancuso, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen influx showed an asymmetry in the transition zone of the root apex when roots were placed horizontally on ground. The influx increased only in the upper side, while no changes were detected in the division and in the elongation zone. Nitric oxide (NO) was also monitored after gravistimulation, revealing a sudden burst only in the transition zone. In order to confirm these results in real microgravity conditions, experiments have been set up by using parabolic flights and drop tower. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also monitored. Oxygen, NO, and ROS were continuously monitored during normal and hyper- and microgravity conditions in roots of maize seedlings. A distinct signal in oxygen and NO fluxes was clearly detected only in the apex zone during microgravity, with no significant changes in normal and in hypergravity conditions. The same results were obtained by ROS measurement. The detrimental effect of D'orenone, disrupting the polarised auxin transport, on the onset of the oxygen peaks during the microgravity period was also evaluated. Results indicates an active role of NO and ROS as messengers during the gravitropic response, with probable implications in the auxin redistribution. PMID:25197662

  5. Macroscopic response in active nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Gandhi; John, Sajeev; Li, Er Ping

    2013-09-15

    We derive macroscopic equations of motion for the slowly varying electric field amplitude in three-dimensional active nonlinear optical nanostructures. We show that the microscopic Maxwell equations and polarization dynamics can be simplified to a macroscopic one-dimensional problem in the direction of group velocity. For a three-level active material, we derive the steady-state equations for normal mode frequency, threshold pumping, nonlinear Bloch mode amplitude, and lasing in photonic crystals. Our analytical results accurately recapture the results of exact numerical methods. PMID:24104802

  6. Artificial Gravity Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamman, Michelle R.; Paloski, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term hypogravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity (AG), which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by a human centrifuge device within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient, multi-system countermeasure and its potential for improving the environment and simplifying operational activities (e.g., WCS, galley, etc.), much still needs to be learned regarding the human response to rotating environments before AG can be successfully implemented. This paper will describe our approach for developing and implementing a rigorous AG Research Project to address the key biomedical research questions that must be answered before developing effective AG countermeasure implementation strategies for exploration-class missions. The AG Research Project will be performed at JSC, ARC, extramural academic and government research venues, and international partner facilities maintained by DLR and IMBP. The Project includes three major ground-based human research subprojects that will lead to flight testing of intermittent short-radius AG in ISS crewmembers after 201 0, continuous long-radius AG in CEV crews transiting to and from the Moon, and intermittent short-radius AG plus exercise in lunar habitats. These human ground-based subprojects include: 1) a directed, managed international short-radius project to investigate the multi-system effectiveness of intermittent AG in human subjects deconditioned by bed rest, 2) a directed, managed long-radius project to investigate the capacity of humans to live and work for extended periods in rotating environments, and 3) a focused

  7. Rotor Flapping Response to Active Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Johnson, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    Rotor active control using higher harmonic blade pitch has been proposed as a means to reduce both rotor radiated noise and airframe vibration and to enhance rotor performance. The higher harmonic input, however, can affect rotor thrust and cyclic flapping - the basic trim characteristics of the rotor. Some of the trim changes can negate the active control benefits. For example, wind tunnel test results of a full scale BO-105 rotor with individual-blade control indicate some rotor performance improvements, accompanied with changes in rotor trim, using two-per-rev blade pitch input. The observed performance benefits could therefore be a simple manifestation of the trim change rather than an efficient redistribution of the rotor airloads. More recently, the flight test of the BO-105 helicopter equip,ped with individual-blade-control actuators also reported trim changes whenever the two-per-rev blade pitch for noise reduction was activated. The pilot had to adjust the trim control to maintain the aircraft under a constant flight path. These two cases highlight the, importance of trim considerations in the application of active control to rotorcraft.

  8. The unpredictability of prolonged activation of stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lamech, Lilian T.

    2015-01-01

    In response to stress, cellular compartments activate signaling pathways that mediate transcriptional programs to promote survival and reestablish homeostasis. Manipulation of the magnitude and duration of the activation of stress responses has been proposed as a strategy to prevent or repair the damage associated with aging or degenerative diseases. However, as these pathways likely evolved to respond specifically to transient perturbations, the unpredictability of prolonged activation should be considered. PMID:26101215

  9. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  10. The Grip of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondhalekar, Prabhakar

    2001-09-01

    Gravity is one of the most inexplicable forces of nature, controlling everything, from the expansion of the Universe to the ebb and flow of ocean tides. The search for the laws of motion and gravitation began more than two thousand years ago, a quest that Prabhakar Gondhalekar recounts in The Grip of Gravity. Beginning with Aristotle and concluding with Planck, Gondhalekar outlines a 'genealogy' of gravity and lucidly explains how previous explanations have shaped the most recent development in the field, string theory. In this work, physicist and astronomer Gondhalekar describes experiments, both planned and proposed, and clearly explains natural phenomena like ocean tides, seasons, ice ages, the formation of planets, stars, and exotic objects like black holes and neutron stars, which are all controlled by gravity. Including anecdotes and thumb-nail sketches of the personalities involved, The Grip of Gravity provides an introduction to the foundation of modern physics and shows how the current developments in string theory may lead to a new and radical interpretation of gravity. Prabhakar Gondhalekar is an Honorary Fellow in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College, London. Until his retirement in 1998, he was the head of the Space Astronomy Group at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where he had been a researcher for 18 years. His research has included a number of topics in galactic and extragalactic astronomy, with his major work focusing on the interstellar medium and active galactic nuclei. Gondhalekar has been awarded Royal Society, Leverhulme Trust, and NATO Research Fellowships to do research in universities in the United States and Israel.

  11. Expanding Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2005-04-01

    Newton's gravitational constant Gn and Laws of Gravity are based upon observations in our solar system. Mysteries appear when they are used far outside our solar system Apparently, Newton's gravitational constant can not be applied at large distances. Dark matter was needed to explain the observed flat rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies (Rubin), and of groups of remote galaxies (Zwicky). Our expansion of Newton's gravitational constant Gn as a power series in distance r, is sufficient to explain these observations without using dark matter. This is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom involving acceleration. Also, our Expanded Gravitational Constant (EGC) can show the correct use of the red shift. In addition to the Doppler contribution, there are three other contributions and these depend only upon gravity. Thus, velocity observations only based on the red shift can not be used to support the concept of the expanding universe, the accelerating expansion, or dark energy. Our expanded gravity constant can predict and explain Olbers' paradox (dark sky), and the temperature of the CMB (cosmic microwave background). Thus, CMB may not support the big bang and inflation.

  12. Gravity gradient study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the noise and drift test, and the comparison of the experimental simulation tests with the theoretical predictions, confirm that the rotating gravity gradiometer is capable of extracting information about mascon distributions from lunar orbit, and that the sensitivity of the sensor is adequate for lunar orbital selenodesy. The experimental work also verified analytical and computer models for the directional and time response of the sensor.

  13. Is nonrelativistic gravity possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharyan, A. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study nonrelativistic gravity using the Hamiltonian formalism. For the dynamics of general relativity (relativistic gravity) the formalism is well known and called the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We show that if the lapse function is constrained correctly, then nonrelativistic gravity is described by a consistent Hamiltonian system. Surprisingly, nonrelativistic gravity can have solutions identical to relativistic gravity ones. In particular, (anti-)de Sitter black holes of Einstein gravity and IR limit of Horava gravity are locally identical.

  14. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  15. The Mars Gravity Simulation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korienek, Gene

    1998-01-01

    Human beings who make abrupt transitions between one gravitational environment and another undergo severe disruptions of their visual perception and visual- motor coordination, frequently accompanied by "space sickness." Clearly, such immediate effects of exposure to a novel gravitational condition have significant implications for human performance. For example, when astronauts first arrive in Earth orbit their attempts to move about in the spacecraft and to perform their duties are uncoordinated, inaccurate, and inefficient. Other inter-gravitational transitions for which these difficulties can be expected include going from the 0 g of the spacecraft to the. 16 g of the Moon, from 0 g to the .38 g of Mars, and from 0 g back to the 1.0 g of Earth. However, after astronauts have actively interacted with their new gravitational environment for several days, these problems tend to disappear, evidence that some sort of adaptive process has taken place. It would be advantageous, therefore, if there were some way to minimize or perhaps even to eliminate this potentially hazardous adaptive transition period by allowing astronauts to adapt to the altered gravitational conditions before actually entering them. Simultaneous adaptations to both the altered and the normal gravitational environment as a result of repeatedly adapting to one and readapting to the other, a phenomenon known as dual adaptation. The objective of the Mars Gravity Simulator (MGS) Project is to construct a simulation of the visual and bodily effects of altered gravity. This perceptual-motor simulation is created through the use of: 1) differential body pressure to produce simulated hypo-gravity and 2) treadmill-controlled virtual reality to create a corresponding visual effect. It is expected that this combination will produce sensory motor perturbations in the subjects. Both the immediate and adaptive behavioral (postural and ambulatory) responses to these sensory perturbations will be assessed.

  16. The Mars Gravity Simulation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korienek, Gene

    1998-10-01

    Human beings who make abrupt transitions between one gravitational environment and another undergo severe disruptions of their visual perception and visual- motor coordination, frequently accompanied by "space sickness." Clearly, such immediate effects of exposure to a novel gravitational condition have significant implications for human performance. For example, when astronauts first arrive in Earth orbit their attempts to move about in the spacecraft and to perform their duties are uncoordinated, inaccurate, and inefficient. Other inter-gravitational transitions for which these difficulties can be expected include going from the 0 g of the spacecraft to the. 16 g of the Moon, from 0 g to the .38 g of Mars, and from 0 g back to the 1.0 g of Earth. However, after astronauts have actively interacted with their new gravitational environment for several days, these problems tend to disappear, evidence that some sort of adaptive process has taken place. It would be advantageous, therefore, if there were some way to minimize or perhaps even to eliminate this potentially hazardous adaptive transition period by allowing astronauts to adapt to the altered gravitational conditions before actually entering them. Simultaneous adaptations to both the altered and the normal gravitational environment as a result of repeatedly adapting to one and readapting to the other, a phenomenon known as dual adaptation. The objective of the Mars Gravity Simulator (MGS) Project is to construct a simulation of the visual and bodily effects of altered gravity. This perceptual-motor simulation is created through the use of: 1) differential body pressure to produce simulated hypo-gravity and 2) treadmill-controlled virtual reality to create a corresponding visual effect. It is expected that this combination will produce sensory motor perturbations in the subjects. Both the immediate and adaptive behavioral (postural and ambulatory) responses to these sensory perturbations will be assessed.

  17. [Research under reduced gravity. Part I: bases of gravitational biology].

    PubMed

    Volkmann, D; Sievers, A

    1992-02-01

    The orientation of organisms in space and their morphogenesis in relation to the gravitational field of the Earth are the main topics of research in the field of gravitational biology. For more than 100 years clinostats provided the only possibility to simulate physiological weightlessness. In contrast to animals, plants are characterized by intracellular gravireceptors. Nevertheless, there are some indications, e.g., the minimal energy of approx. 10(-18) J triggering a gravity-dependent response, for similar mechanisms of gravity perception. Stretch-activated ion channels might be the common structural basis. PMID:11536493

  18. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth’s evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in “functional weightlessness” were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and

  19. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  20. P-glycoprotein activity and biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Vaalburg, W. . E-mail: w.vaalburg@pet.umcg.nl; Hendrikse, N.H.; Elsinga, P.H.; Bart, J.; Waarde, A. van

    2005-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a transmembrane drug efflux pump encoded by the MDR-1 gene in humans. Most likely P-gp protects organs against endogenous and exogenous toxins by extruding toxic compounds such as chemotherapeutics and other drugs. Many drugs are substrates for P-gp. Since P-gp is also expressed in the blood-brain barrier, P-gp substrates reach lower concentrations in the brain than in P-gp-negative tissues. Failure of response to chemotherapy of malignancies can be due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Many tumors are multidrug resistant (MDR); resistant to several structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. Several mechanisms are involved in MDR of which P-gp is studied most extensively. P-gp extrudes drugs out of tumor cells resulting in decreased intracellular drug concentrations, leading to the MDR phenotype. Furthermore, the MDR-1 gene exhibits several single nucleotide polymorphisms, some of which result in different transport capabilities. P-gp functionality and the effect of P-gp modulation on the pharmacokinetics of novel and established drugs can be studied in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) using carbon-11 and fluorine-18-labeled P-gp substrates and modulators. PET may demonstrate the consequences of genetic differences on tissue pharmacokinetics. Inhibitors such as calcium-channel blockers (verapamil), cyclosporin A, ONT-093, and XR9576 can modulate the P-gp functionality. With PET the effect of P-gp modulation on the bioavailability of drugs can be investigated in humans in vivo. PET also allows the measurement of the efficacy of newly developed P-gp modulators.

  1. 77 FR 22776 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers...

  2. 78 FR 68053 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers...

  3. 75 FR 54626 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers...

  4. 75 FR 62383 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers...

  5. 77 FR 56200 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers...

  6. Gravity observations at Sinai Peninsula and its geophysical and geodetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Karem; Zahran, K. H.; Radwan, Anwar H.; Sabet, Hassan S.; Hamed, Diaa

    2013-12-01

    South Sinai is an interesting region from both tectonic and seismological settings. Tectonically, Sinai Peninsula is strongly dominated by its active boundaries due to its location at the triple junction among the Gulf of Suez rift, the Aqaba-Levant transform fault and the Red Sea Rift. Moreover, reported seismological activities along the three tectonic boundaries indicate its continuous activities. It is thus of great interest to delineate the subsurface geological structure responsible of its tectonic settings and its relation to the seismological activity. Therefore, terrestrial gravity observation has been carried out to figure out the sub-surface structure representing its tectonic settings. On the other hand, the location of Sinai Peninsula between Gulf of Suez, Gulf of Aqepa and Red Sea has made the satellite altimetry data an optimum tool to determine the Gravity sources on the marine regions bounding the Sinai region. Finally, temporal gravity variation of the GRACE satellite mission, launched in 2003 gives the opportunity to monitor its temporal gravity variation on regional scale. Temporal gravity variation from GRACE demonstrates any possible mass redistribution along the pounding tectonic settings and its relation to seismicity. Observed gravity map shows significant gravity anomalies attributed to tectonic and seismicity. Satellite altimetry and gravity data are considered to be a valuable source of data to determine the offshore subsurface structure. Temporal gravity variations from GRACE shows important zones of mass redistribution attributed to its new tectonics and its relation to the seismological activities. Integrating all available data sheds more light on the geodynamic behavior of the selected region and its relation to the seismic activities.

  7. Pythium infection activates conserved plant defense responses in mosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens (P. patens) is a useful model to study abiotic stress responses since it is highly tolerant to drought, salt and osmotic stress. However, little is known about the defense mechanisms activated in this moss after pathogen assault. Here the induction of defense responses...

  8. 78 FR 26772 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency.... Seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection... Information Collection Request (ICR) Number. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Responses to Agency...

  9. Does Paramecium sense gravity?

    PubMed

    Mogami, Y; Ishii, J; Baba, S A

    1995-03-01

    potential by the selective deformation of the anterior and posterior cell membrane responding to the orientation of the cell in the gravity field; i.e. negative- and positive-going shift of the potential due to the upward and downward orientation, respectively. The orientation dependent changes in membrane potential with respect to gravity, in combination with the close coupling of the membrane potential and the ciliary locomotor activity, may allow the changes in swimming direction along with those in the helical nature of the swimming path; upward shift of axis of helix by decreasing the pitch angle due to hyperpolarization in the upward-orienting cell, and also the upward shift by increasing the pitch angle due to depolarization in the downward-orienting cell. Computer simulation of the model demonstrated that the cell can swim upward along the "super-helical" trajectory consisting of a small helix winding helically an axis parallel to the gravity vector, after which the model was named as "Super-helix model". Three-dimensional recording of the trajectories of the swimming cells demonstrated that about a quarter of the cell population drew super-helical trajectory under the unbounded, thermal convection-free conditions. In addition, quantitative analysis of the orientation rate of the swimming cell indicated that gravity-dependent orientation of the swimming trajectory could not be explained solely by the physical static torque but complementarily by the physiological mechanism as proposed in the super-helix model. PMID:11541872

  10. Magnetospheric impulse response for many levels of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bargatze, L. F.; Baker, D. N.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the solar wind and magnetospheric activity has been studied using 34 intervals of high time resolution IMP 8 solar wind data and the corresponding AL auroral activity index. The median values of the AL index for each interval were utilized to rank the intervals according to geomagnetic activity level. The linear prediction filtering technique was then applied to model magnetospheric response as measured by the AL index to the solar wind input function VB(s). The linear prediction filtering routine produces a filter of time-lagged response coefficients which estimates the most general linear relationship between the chosen input and output parameters of the magnetospheric system. It is found that the filters are composed of two response pulses speaking at time lags of 20 and 60 min. The amplitude of the 60-min pulse is the larger for moderate activity levels, while the 20-min pulse is the larger for strong activity levels. A possible interpretation is that the 20-min pulse represents magnetospheric activity driven directly by solar wind coupling and that the 60-min pulse represents magnetospheric activity driven by the release of energy previously stored in the magnetotail. If this interpretation is correct, the linear filtering results suggest that both the driven and the unloading models of magnetospheric response are important facets of a more comprehensive response model.

  11. Requirement for the gravity-controlled transport of auxin for a negative gravitropic response of epicotyls in the early growth stage of etiolated pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Ueda, Junichi

    2006-11-01

    Gravity-controlled transport of auxin was studied for a negative gravitropic response in the early growth stage of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings, in which epicotyl bending was observed near the cotyledon nodes of the seedlings grown continuously from seeds germinated in a horizontal or an inclined position. Increased expression of an auxin-inducible gene, PsIAA4/5, was observed in the elongated side of epicotyls grown in a horizontal or an inclined position. Regardless of the conditions of seed germination, polar auxin transport in the proximal side of the first internodes of the seedlings was significantly higher than in the distal side. Polar auxin transport in the proximal side of epicotyls grown in an inclined position was significantly lower than in those grown in a horizontal position. In contrast, lateral auxin distribution from the proximal to distal sides in epicotyls grown in an inclined position was significantly higher than in epicotyls grown in a horizontal position. Accumulation of PsPIN1 mRNA encoding a putative auxin efflux facilitator, which was observed in vascular tissue, cortex and epidermis in the proximal and distal sides of epicotyls, was markedly influenced by gravistimulation. These results strongly suggest that gravistimulation induces changeable polar auxin transport and one-way lateral auxin distribution in epicotyls as well as asymmetric auxin accumulation in the proximal and distal sides of epicotyls, resulting in a negative gravitropic response of epicotyls in the early growth stage of pea seedlings. PMID:17008444

  12. Correlation between precision gravity and subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect

    Zelwer, R.; Grannell, R.B.

    1982-10-01

    Precision gravity measurements were made in the region of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field at yearly intervals from 1977 to 1981 to assess the feasibility of using gravity to determine subsurface reservoir changes with time. The extent of mass recharge in response to the continued production of fluids from this field was studied. Changes in gravity and ground elevation were observed throughout the region for the period of observation. Results indicate that the largest changes observed were the result of the Magnitude 6.1 (Caltech) Victoria earthquake of 8 June 1980. The epicenter of this earthquake was located 25 km southeast of the field on the Cerro Prieto Fault, which bounds the field on the southwest. Subsidence of up to 55 cm was measured east of the power plant, in the region between the northern end of the Cerro Prieto Fault and the southern end of the Imperial Fault. This area has been postulated to be the site of an active spreading center or pull-apart basin, and has been characterized by a high level of seismic activity during the last 10 years. Minor subsidence and small related gravity changes for the period preceeding the Victoria earthquake suggest that in spite of large fluid production rates, the reservoir is being almost completely recharged and that a measurable increase in subsurface density may be taking place. The results of measurements of horizontal ground motions made in this area are discussed in relation to the gravity and subsidence observations.

  13. Eustatic control of gravity tectonics: Concept, mechanism and limits

    SciTech Connect

    Raillard, S.; Allix, P.; Guerin, G.; Lecanu, H. )

    1996-01-01

    Gravity tectonics over a ductile decollement characterizes deformation of the Albian to Recent section in the West African margin, from Gabon to Angola. Largely studied during the past 20 years as a prolific petroleum play, it is now well known that three mains factors will control gravity driven deformation: the ductile layer, the slope as a response to the crustal activity and the overlying sedimentary loading. For the West African passive margin, the slope effect at the first glance can be considered as constant and gravity driven deformation as a result of salt layer distribution (in time and space) and sedimentary loading. If previous papers have already shown that the type and distribution of the deposits control the development of the classical structural domains : updip extensional to downdip contractional, this study will focused on the factor which control the sedimentary loading. Based on several natural examples combining seismic stratigraphy, sequential stratigraphy and structural studies and also analogical modelling, it is demonstrated that: (1) as sediment distribution and then sedimentary loading is controlled by relative sea level changes, thus sea level changes can be directly related to gravity driven deformation : large sea level fall will provide an important increase of clastics supply which will enhanced gravity gliding. On the contrary, relative sea level high will stop the deformation because of the decreasing amount of detritics and their homogeneous distribution. (2) the salt downdip withdrawal during extension will enhance the eustatic effect. (3) episodic crustal activity, materialized by westward tilting of the margin will interfere on this mechanism.

  14. Eustatic control of gravity tectonics: Concept, mechanism and limits

    SciTech Connect

    Raillard, S.; Allix, P.; Guerin, G.; Lecanu, H.

    1996-12-31

    Gravity tectonics over a ductile decollement characterizes deformation of the Albian to Recent section in the West African margin, from Gabon to Angola. Largely studied during the past 20 years as a prolific petroleum play, it is now well known that three mains factors will control gravity driven deformation: the ductile layer, the slope as a response to the crustal activity and the overlying sedimentary loading. For the West African passive margin, the slope effect at the first glance can be considered as constant and gravity driven deformation as a result of salt layer distribution (in time and space) and sedimentary loading. If previous papers have already shown that the type and distribution of the deposits control the development of the classical structural domains : updip extensional to downdip contractional, this study will focused on the factor which control the sedimentary loading. Based on several natural examples combining seismic stratigraphy, sequential stratigraphy and structural studies and also analogical modelling, it is demonstrated that: (1) as sediment distribution and then sedimentary loading is controlled by relative sea level changes, thus sea level changes can be directly related to gravity driven deformation : large sea level fall will provide an important increase of clastics supply which will enhanced gravity gliding. On the contrary, relative sea level high will stop the deformation because of the decreasing amount of detritics and their homogeneous distribution. (2) the salt downdip withdrawal during extension will enhance the eustatic effect. (3) episodic crustal activity, materialized by westward tilting of the margin will interfere on this mechanism.

  15. Activated oxygen alters cerebral microvascular responses in newborn pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Leffler, C.W.; Busiia, D.W.; Armstead, W.M.; Mirro, R.; Thelin, O. )

    1990-02-26

    In piglets, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion blocks prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilation to hypercapnia (CO{sub 2}) and hypotension but not prostanoid independent dilation to isoproterenol (Isu) or constriction to norepinephrine (NE). Ischemia/reperfusion increases activated-O{sub 2} production by piglet brains. Using cranial windows in piglets, the authors investigated the hypothesis that activated oxygen can block prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension without altering responses to Isu and NE. Exposure to an activated oxygen generating system of xanthine oxidase, hypoxanthine, and Fe that made about 3 times the activated-O{sub 2} on the brain surface as ischemia/reperfusion caused reversible pial arteriolar dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation was reduced to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but not to Isu. NE constrictor responses were also unaltered. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe caused constriction followed by reversible dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation in response to CO{sub 2} and hypotension was not altered. However, addition of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe totally eliminated pial arteriolar dilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but did not decrease dilation caused by Isu or constriction caused by NE. The authors conclude that activated oxygen could produce the altered prostanoid dependent pial arteriolar responses observed following ischemia in piglets.

  16. Light and gravity signals synergize in modulating plant development

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbrink, Joshua P.; Kiss, John Z.; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F. Javier

    2014-01-01

    Tropisms are growth-mediated plant movements that help plants to respond to changes in environmental stimuli. The availability of water and light, as well as the presence of a constant gravity vector, are all environmental stimuli that plants sense and respond to via directed growth movements (tropisms). The plant response to gravity (gravitropism) and the response to unidirectional light (phototropism) have long been shown to be interconnected growth phenomena. Here, we discuss the similarities in these two processes, as well as the known molecular mechanisms behind the tropistic responses. We also highlight research done in a microgravity environment in order to decouple two tropisms through experiments carried out in the absence of a significant unilateral gravity vector. In addition, alteration of gravity, especially the microgravity environment, and light irradiation produce important effects on meristematic cells, the undifferentiated, highly proliferating, totipotent cells which sustain plant development. Microgravity produces the disruption of meristematic competence, i.e., the decoupling of cell proliferation and cell growth, affecting the regulation of the cell cycle and ribosome biogenesis. Light irradiation, especially red light, mediated by phytochromes, has an activating effect on these processes. Phytohormones, particularly auxin, also are key mediators in these alterations. Upcoming experiments on the International Space Station will clarify some of the mechanisms and molecular players of the plant responses to these environmental signals involved in tropisms and the cell cycle. PMID:25389428

  17. Light and gravity signals synergize in modulating plant development.

    PubMed

    Vandenbrink, Joshua P; Kiss, John Z; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Tropisms are growth-mediated plant movements that help plants to respond to changes in environmental stimuli. The availability of water and light, as well as the presence of a constant gravity vector, are all environmental stimuli that plants sense and respond to via directed growth movements (tropisms). The plant response to gravity (gravitropism) and the response to unidirectional light (phototropism) have long been shown to be interconnected growth phenomena. Here, we discuss the similarities in these two processes, as well as the known molecular mechanisms behind the tropistic responses. We also highlight research done in a microgravity environment in order to decouple two tropisms through experiments carried out in the absence of a significant unilateral gravity vector. In addition, alteration of gravity, especially the microgravity environment, and light irradiation produce important effects on meristematic cells, the undifferentiated, highly proliferating, totipotent cells which sustain plant development. Microgravity produces the disruption of meristematic competence, i.e., the decoupling of cell proliferation and cell growth, affecting the regulation of the cell cycle and ribosome biogenesis. Light irradiation, especially red light, mediated by phytochromes, has an activating effect on these processes. Phytohormones, particularly auxin, also are key mediators in these alterations. Upcoming experiments on the International Space Station will clarify some of the mechanisms and molecular players of the plant responses to these environmental signals involved in tropisms and the cell cycle. PMID:25389428

  18. Threshold Gravity Determination and Artificial Gravity Studies Using Magnetic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F.

    2005-01-01

    What is the threshold gravity (minimum gravity level) required for the nominal functioning of the human system? What dosage is required (magnitude and duration)? Do human cell lines behave differently in microgravity in response to an external stimulus? The critical need for a variable gravity simulator is emphasized by recent experiments on human epithelial cells and lymphocytes on the Space Shuttle clearly showing that cell growth and function are markedly different from those observed terrestrially. Those differences are also dramatic between cells grown in space and those in Rotating Wall Vessels (RWV), or NASA bioreactor often used to simulate microgravity, indicating that although morphological growth patterns (three dimensional growth) can be successfully simulated using RWVs, cell function performance is not reproduced - a critical difference. If cell function is dramatically affected by gravity off-loading, then cell response to stimuli such as radiation, stress, etc. can be very different from terrestrial cell lines. Yet, we have no good gravity simulator for use in study of these phenomena. This represents a profound shortcoming for countermeasures research. We postulate that we can use magnetic levitation of cells and tissue, through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients, as a terrestrial microgravity model to study human cells. Specific objectives of the research are: 1. To develop a tried, tested and benchmarked terrestrial microgravity model for cell culture studies; 2. Gravity threshold determination; 3. Dosage (magnitude and duration) of g-level required for nominal functioning of cells; 4. Comparisons of magnetic levitation model to other models such as RWV, hind limb suspension, etc. and 5. Cellular response to reduced gravity levels of Moon and Mars.

  19. Participation in Peer Response as Activity: An Examination of Peer Response Stances from an Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Wei; Mitchell, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports a case study that examined English as a Second Language students' peer response stances from an activity theory perspective. More specifically, the study was guided by the constructs of activity and motive/object in Leont'ev's theory. Multiple sources of data were collected from two native Spanish-speaking students enrolled in…

  20. Reentry response of the light weight radioisotope heater unit resulting from a Venus-Earth-Earth Gravity Assist maneuver accident

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, J.C.

    1988-10-01

    Reentry analyses consisting of ablation response, thermal response and thermal stress response have been conducted on the Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit for Galileo/VEEGA reentry conditions. Sequential ablation analyses of the LWRHU aeroshell, the fuel clad, and the fuel pellet have been conducted in reentry regimes where the aeroshell has been deemed to fail. The failure criterion for ablation is assumed to be recession corresponding to 50% of the wall thickness (the design criterion recommended in the DOE Overall Safety Manual). Although the analyses have been carried far beyond this limit (as presented and discussed herein), JHU/APL endorses the position that failure may occur at the time that this recession is achieved or at lower altitudes within the heat pulse considering the uncertainties in the aerodynamic, thermodynamic, and thermo-structural analyses and modeling. These uncertainties result mainly because of the high energies involved in the VEEGA reentries compared to orbital decay reentries. Risk evaluations should consider the fact that for shallow flight paths the unit may disassemble at high-altitude as a result of ablation or may remain intact until it impacts with a clad that had been molten. 80 refs., 46 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. Reentry response of the lightweight radioisotope heater unit resulting from a Cassini Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter gravity assist maneuver accident

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Reentry analyses consisting of ablation response, thermal response and thermal stress response have been conducted on the Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) for Cassini/Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter-Gravity-Assist (VVEJGA) reentry conditions. Sequential ablation analyses of the LWRHU aeroshell, and the fuel pellet have been conducted in reentry regimes where the aeroshell has been deemed to fail. The failure criterion for ablation is generally assumed to be recession corresponding to 75% and 100% of the wall thickness. The 75% recession failure criteria allows for uncertainties that result mainly because of the high energies involved in the VVEJGA reentries compared to orbital decay reentries. Risk evaluations should consider the fact that for shallow flight paths the unit may disassemble at high-altitude as a result of ablation or may remain intact with a clad that had been molten. Within the limitations of the methodologies and assumptions of the analyses, the results indicate that: (1) For a side-on stable LWRHU reentry, aeroshell ablation failures occur for all reentry angles. (2)For a side-on spinning LWRHU reentry, aeroshell ablation failures are minimal. (3) For the tumbling LWRHU reentry, the aeroshell survives for most angles. (4) For the thermostructural analyses, using both a 1% and 5% allowable strain, all reentry angles and orientations examined resulted in small localized failures, but aeroshell breach is not predicted for any case. The analyses included in this report concentrate on VVEJGA reentry scenarios. Analyses reported previously have demonstrated that the LWRHU has adequate design margin to survive reentry from orbital decay scenarios and most injection scenarios at speeds up to escape speeds. The exception is a narrow range of flight path angles that produce multiple skip trajectories which may have excessive ablation.

  2. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  3. Mars mission gravity profile simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetz, Lawrence H.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment designed to determine the need for artificial gravity for Mars mission architectures at earlier stages of the design process is proposed. The Soviet Mir space station, the NASA Space Shuttle, and the resources of NASA Ames Research Center would be used to duplicate in the terrestrial environment the complete Mars-mission gravity profile in order to assess the need for artificial gravity. All mission phases of 1 G would be on earth; all mission phases of zero or micro G would be in space aboard Mir; and all launch, ascent, orbit, deorbit, approach, departure, and descent G loads would be provided by actual spacecraft in operations that could be designed to simulate the actual G loads, while the Mars stay time would be simulated on earth or in a variable-gravity research facility in space. Methods of simulating activities on the Martian surface are outlined along with data monitoring, countermeasures, and launch site and vehicle selection criteria.

  4. Avoiding degenerate coframes in an affine gauge approach to quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, E.W.; McCrea, J.D.; Ne`eman, Y.; Hehl, F.W.

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following concepts on quantum gravity: The affine gauge approach; affine gauge transformations versus active differomorphisms; affine gauge approach to quantum gravity with topology change.

  5. Baseline Brain Activity Predicts Response to Neuromodulatory Pain Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Sherlin, Leslie H.; Fregni, Felipe; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the associations between baseline electroencephalogram (EEG)-assessed brain oscillations and subsequent response to four neuromodulatory treatments. Based on available research, we hypothesized that baseline theta oscillations would prospectively predict response to hypnotic analgesia. Analyses involving other oscillations and the other treatments (meditation, neurofeedback, and both active and sham transcranial direct current stimulation) were viewed as exploratory, given the lack of previous research examining brain oscillations as predictors of response to these other treatments. Design Randomized controlled study of single sessions of four neuromodulatory pain treatments and a control procedure. Methods Thirty individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain had their EEG recorded before each session of four active treatments (hypnosis, meditation, EEG biofeedback, transcranial direct current stimulation) and a control procedure (sham transcranial direct stimulation). Results As hypothesized, more presession theta power was associated with greater response to hypnotic analgesia. In exploratory analyses, we found that less baseline alpha power predicted pain reduction with meditation. Conclusions The findings support the idea that different patients respond to different pain treatments and that between-person treatment response differences are related to brain states as measured by EEG. The results have implications for the possibility of enhancing pain treatment response by either 1) better patient/treatment matching or 2) influencing brain activity before treatment is initiated in order to prepare patients to respond. Research is needed to replicate and confirm the findings in additional samples of individuals with chronic pain. PMID:25287554

  6. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  7. Prefrontal Cortex Activity Related to Abstract Response Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Genovesio, Aldo; Brasted, Peter J.; Mitz, Andrew R.; Wise, Steven P.

    2005-01-01

    Overview In monkeys, foraging strategies depend not only on a context established by spatial or symbolic cues, but also on the relations among cues. Genovesio et al. recorded the activity of prefrontal cortex neurons while monkeys chose a strategy based on the relation between consecutive symbolic cues. For the same cues and actions, the monkeys also learned fixed responses to the same symbols. Many neurons had activity selective for a given strategy, others for whether the monkeys’ response choice depended on a symbol or the relation between symbols. These findings indicate that the primate prefrontal cortex contributes to implementing abstract strategies. PMID:16039571

  8. Use of high gradient magnetic fields to evaluate gravity perception and response mechanisms in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Hasenstein, Karl H

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic gradients have the valuable property of exerting a repulsive ponderomotive force onto diamagnetic compounds. A carefully designed gradient and proper positioning of biological material can be used to manipulate gravisensing organelles such as amyloplasts of higher plants and other statoliths such as the BaSO4-filled vesicles of Characean algae. This chapter describes the main considerations of magnetic gradients and their application as a localized force field to manipulate (sort) cellular organelles based on their magnetic properties. Many of the inferences from such activities have yet to be investigated. PMID:25981779

  9. Turning on gravity with the Higgs mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Stephon; Barrow, John D.; Magueijo, João

    2016-07-01

    We investigate how a Higgs mechanism could be responsible for the emergence of gravity in extensions of Einstein theory, with a suitable low energy limit. In this scenario, at high energies, symmetry restoration could ‘turn off’ gravity, with dramatic implications for cosmology and quantum gravity. The sense in which gravity is muted depends on the details of the implementation. In the most extreme case gravity’s dynamical degrees of freedom would only be unleashed after the Higgs field acquires a non-trivial vacuum expectation value, with gravity reduced to a topological field theory in the symmetric phase. We might also identify the Higgs and the Brans–Dicke fields in such a way that in the unbroken phase Newton’s constant vanishes, decoupling matter and gravity. We discuss the broad implications of these scenarios.

  10. Approaches to Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele

    2009-03-01

    Preface; Part I. Fundamental Ideas and General Formalisms: 1. Unfinished revolution C. Rovelli; 2. The fundamental nature of space and time G. 't Hooft; 3. Does locality fail at intermediate length scales R. Sorkin; 4. Prolegomena to any future quantum gravity J. Stachel; 5. Spacetime symmetries in histories canonical gravity N. Savvidou; 6. Categorical geometry and the mathematical foundations of quantum gravity L. Crane; 7. Emergent relativity O. Dreyer; 8. Asymptotic safety R. Percacci; 9. New directions in background independent quantum gravity F. Markopoulou; Questions and answers; Part II: 10. Gauge/gravity duality G. Horowitz and J. Polchinski; 11. String theory, holography and quantum gravity T. Banks; 12. String field theory W. Taylor; Questions and answers; Part III: 13. Loop Quantum Gravity T. Thiemann; 14. Covariant loop quantum gravity? E. LIvine; 15. The spin foam representation of loop quantum gravity A. Perez; 16. 3-dimensional spin foam quantum gravity L. Freidel; 17. The group field theory approach to quantum gravity D. Oriti; Questions and answers; Part IV. Discrete Quantum Gravity: 18. Quantum gravity: the art of building spacetime J. Ambjørn, J. Jurkiewicz and R. Loll; 19. Quantum Regge calculations R. Williams; 20. Consistent discretizations as a road to quantum gravity R. Gambini and J. Pullin; 21. The causal set approach to quantum gravity J. Henson; Questions and answers; Part V. Effective Models and Quantum Gravity Phenomenology: 22. Quantum gravity phenomenology G. Amelino-Camelia; 23. Quantum gravity and precision tests C. Burgess; 24. Algebraic approach to quantum gravity II: non-commutative spacetime F. Girelli; 25. Doubly special relativity J. Kowalski-Glikman; 26. From quantum reference frames to deformed special relativity F. Girelli; 27. Lorentz invariance violation and its role in quantum gravity phenomenology J. Collins, A. Perez and D. Sudarsky; 28. Generic predictions of quantum theories of gravity L. Smolin; Questions and

  11. Conformal gravity holography in four dimensions.

    PubMed

    Grumiller, Daniel; Irakleidou, Maria; Lovrekovic, Iva; McNees, Robert

    2014-03-21

    We formulate four-dimensional conformal gravity with (anti-)de Sitter boundary conditions that are weaker than Starobinsky boundary conditions, allowing for an asymptotically subleading Rindler term concurrent with a recent model for gravity at large distances. We prove the consistency of the variational principle and derive the holographic response functions. One of them is the conformal gravity version of the Brown-York stress tensor, the other is a "partially massless response". The on shell action and response functions are finite and do not require holographic renormalization. Finally, we discuss phenomenologically interesting examples, including the most general spherically symmetric solutions and rotating black hole solutions with partially massless hair. PMID:24702345

  12. New Views of Earth's Gravity Field from GRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Map 1Map 2

    Gravity and the Earth's Shape Gravity is the force that is responsible for the weight of an object and is determined by how the material that makes up the Earth is distributed throughout the Earth. Because gravity changes over the surface of the Earth, the weight of an object changes along with it. One can define standard gravity as the value of gravity for an perfectly smooth 'idealized' Earth, and the gravity 'anomaly' is a measure of how actual gravity deviates from this standard. Gravity reflects the Earth's surface topography to a high degree and is associated with features that most people are familiar with such as large mountains and deep ocean trenches.

    Progress in Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field Through GRACE Prior to GRACE, the Earth's gravity field was determined using measurements of varying quality from different satellites and of incomplete coverage. Consequently the accuracy and resolution of the gravity field were limited. As is shown in Figure 1, the long wavelength components of the gravity field determined from satellite tracking were limited to a resolution of approximately 700 km. At shorter wavelengths, the errors were too large to be useful. Only broad geophysical features of the Earth's structure could be detected (see map 1).

    In contrast, GRACE, by itself, has provided accurate gravity information with a resolution of 200 km. Now, much more detail is clearly evident in the Earth's geophysical features (see map 2). High resolution features detected by GRACE that are representative of geophysical phenomena include the Tonga/Kermadec region (a zone where one tectonic plate slides under another), the Himalayan/Tibetan Plateau region (an area of uplift due to colliding plates), and the mid-Atlantic ridge (an active spreading center in the middle of the Atlantic ocean where new crust is being created). Future GRACE gravity

  13. Ground-based experiments complement microgravity flight opportunities in the investigation of the effects of space flight on the immune response: is protein kinase C gravity sensitive?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews ground-based and flight experiments, discusses how those experiments complement each other, and details how those experiments lead us to speculate about the gravity-sensitive nature of protein kinase C.

  14. Gravity, light and plant form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hangarter, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    Plants have evolved highly sensitive and selective mechanisms that detect and respond to various aspects of their environment. As a plant develops, it integrates the environmental information perceived by all of its sensory systems and adapts its growth to the prevailing environmental conditions. Light is of critical importance because plants depend on it for energy and, thus, survival. The quantity, quality and direction of light are perceived by several different photosensory systems that together regulate nearly all stages of plant development, presumably in order to maintain photosynthetic efficiency. Gravity provides an almost constant stimulus that is the source of critical spatial information about its surroundings and provides important cues for orientating plant growth. Gravity plays a particularly important role during the early stages of seedling growth by stimulating a negative gravitropic response in the primary shoot that orientates it towards the source of light, and a positive gravitropic response in the primary root that causes it to grow down into the soil, providing support and nutrient acquisition. Gravity also influences plant form during later stages of development through its effect on lateral organs and supporting structures. Thus, the final form of a plant depends on the cumulative effects of light, gravity and other environmental sensory inputs on endogenous developmental programs. This article is focused on developmental interactions modulated by light and gravity.

  15. Educating for Political Activity: A Younger Generational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac an Ghaill, Mairtin

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a response to Professor Chitty's "Educational Review" Guest Lecture article, "Educating for political activity". I address the three sections of his paper: a global and national-based politics of war, corporate manipulation and parliamentary scandals. This provides a basis to draw upon empirical material from a recent critical…

  16. Dynamics of lung macrophage activation in response to helminth infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most of our understanding of the development and phenotype of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) has been obtained from studies investigating the response of bone marrow- and peritoneal-derived cells to IL-4 or IL-13 stimulation. Comparatively little is known about the development of the AAM...

  17. Sensorimotor-Independent Prefrontal Activity During Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weidong; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Gore, John C.; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    A network of brain regions involving the ventral inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula (vIFG/AI), presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and basal ganglia has been implicated in stopping impulsive, unwanted responses. However, whether this network plays an equal role in response inhibition under different sensorimotor contexts has not been tested systematically. Here, we conducted an fMRI experiment using the stop signal task, a sensorimotor task requiring occasional withholding of the planned response upon the presentation of a stop signal. We manipulated both the sensory modality of the stop signal (visual versus auditory) and the motor response modality (hand versus eye). Results showed that the vIFG/AI and the preSMA along with the right middle frontal gyrus were commonly activated in response inhibition across the various sensorimotor conditions. Our findings provide direct evidence for a common role of these frontal areas, but not striatal areas in response inhibition independent of the sensorimotor contexts. Nevertheless, these three frontal regions exhibited different activation patterns during successful and unsuccessful stopping. Together with the existing evidence, we suggest that the vIFG/AI is involved in the early stages of stopping such as triggering the stop process while the preSMA may play a role in regulating other cortical and subcortical regions involved in stopping. PMID:23798325

  18. Sensorimotor-independent prefrontal activity during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weidong; Cannistraci, Christopher J; Gore, John C; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2014-05-01

    A network of brain regions involving the ventral inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula (vIFG/AI), presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and basal ganglia has been implicated in stopping impulsive, unwanted responses. However, whether this network plays an equal role in response inhibition under different sensorimotor contexts has not been tested systematically. Here, we conducted an fMRI experiment using the stop signal task, a sensorimotor task requiring occasional withholding of the planned response upon the presentation of a stop signal. We manipulated both the sensory modality of the stop signal (visual versus auditory) and the motor response modality (hand versus eye). Results showed that the vIFG/AI and the preSMA along with the right middle frontal gyrus were commonly activated in response inhibition across the various sensorimotor conditions. Our findings provide direct evidence for a common role of these frontal areas, but not striatal areas in response inhibition independent of the sensorimotor contexts. Nevertheless, these three frontal regions exhibited different activation patterns during successful and unsuccessful stopping. Together with the existing evidence, we suggest that the vIFG/AI is involved in the early stages of stopping such as triggering the stop process while the preSMA may play a role in regulating other cortical and subcortical regions involved in stopping. PMID:23798325

  19. Health monitoring of Japanese payload specialist: Autonomic nervous and cardiovascular responses under reduced gravity condition (L-0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekiguchi, Chiharu

    1993-01-01

    In addition to health monitoring of the Japanese Payload Specialists (PS) during the flight, this investigation also focuses on the changes of cardiovascular hemodynamics during flight which will be conducted under the science collaboration with the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) Experiment of NASA. For the Japanese, this is an opportunity to examine firsthand the effects of microgravity of human physiology. We are particularly interested in the adaption process and how it relates to space motion sickness and cardiovascular deconditioning. By comparing data from our own experiment to data collected by others, we hope to understand the processes involved and find ways to avoid these problems for future Japanese astronauts onboard Space Station Freedom and other Japanese space ventures. The primary objective of this experiment is to monitor the health condition of Japanese Payload Specialists to maintain a good health status during and after space flight. The second purpose is to investigate the autonomic nervous system's response to space motion sickness. To achieve this, the function of the autonomic nervous system will be monitored using non-invasive techniques. Data obtained will be employed to evaluate the role of autonomic nervous system in space motion sickness and to predict susceptibility to space motion sickness. The third objective is evaluation of the adaption process of the cardiovascular system to microgravity. By observation of the hemodynamics using an echocardiogram we will gain insight on cardiovascular deconditioning. The last objective is to create a data base for use in the health care of Japanese astronauts by obtaining control data in experiment L-O in the SL-J mission.

  20. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  1. Method of Discriminant Gravity Tolerance using Heart Rate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Takada, Hiroki; Iwase, Satoshi

    When returning on the earth by the space flight, the space deconditioning may be developed. As this countermeasure, the artificial gravity load device using the centrifuge is proposed in the space station. But the gravity load might cause the faint, and safe gravity load is uncertainty. We proposed that discriminate strength of gravity tolerance using heart rate variability time series. Step function was inputted to AR model estimated from heart rate variability time series during rest or under light gravity load, and strength of the gravity tolerance was discriminated by the step response function. On the result, discriminant accuracy was 87.5% by using heart rate variability time series when gravity load of 1.0 G was added to the human lying on the supine. Therefore, possibility of discriminant of gravity tolerance was obtained by using heart rate variability time series when sympathetic hyperactivity. Discriminant of the gravity tolerance is expected before countermeasure of space deconditioning is executed.

  2. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  3. Phase response curves in the characterization of epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Galán, R. F.; Dominguez, L. Garcia; Leshchenko, Y.; Lo, S.; Belkas, J.; Erra, R. Guevara

    2007-12-01

    Coordinated cellular activity is a major characteristic of nervous system function. Coupled oscillator theory offers unique avenues to address cellular coordination phenomena. In this study, we focus on the characterization of the dynamics of epileptiform activity, based on some seizures that manifest themselves with very periodic rhythmic activity, termed absence seizures. Our approach consists in obtaining experimentally the phase response curves (PRCs) in the neocortex and thalamus, and incorporating these PRCs into a model of coupled oscillators. Phase preferences of the stationary states and their stability are determined, and these results from the model are compared with the experimental recordings, and interpreted in physiological terms.

  4. Bacterial lifestyle shapes the regulation of stringent response activation

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Cara C.; Crosson, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria inhabit enormously diverse niches and have a correspondingly large array of regulatory mechanisms to adapt to often inhospitable and variable environments. The stringent response allows bacteria to quickly reprogram transcription in response to changes in nutrient availability. Although the proteins controlling this response are conserved in almost all bacterial species, recent work has illuminated considerable diversity in the starvation cues and regulatory mechanisms that activate stringent signaling proteins in bacteria from different environments. In this review we describe the signals and genetic circuitries that control the stringent signaling systems of a copiotroph, a bacteriovore, an oligotroph and a mammalian pathogen – Escherichia coli, Myxococcus xanthus, Caulobacter crescentus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively – and discuss how control of the stringent response in these species is adapted to their particular lifestyles. PMID:23419217

  5. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses. PMID:26656575

  6. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    PubMed

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis. PMID:18173180

  7. Humpback Dolphin (Genus Sousa) Behavioural Responses to Human Activities.

    PubMed

    Piwetz, Sarah; Lundquist, David; Würsig, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Humpback dolphins (genus Sousa) use shallow, near-shore waters throughout their range. This coastal distribution makes them vulnerable to recreational and commercial disturbances, especially near heavily populated and industrialized areas. Most research focusing on Sousa and human activities has emphasized direct impacts and threats, involving injury and death, with relatively little focus on indirect effects on dolphins, such as changes in behaviour that may lead to deleterious effects. Understanding behaviour is important in resolving human-wildlife conflict and is an important component of conservation. This chapter gives an overview of animal behavioural responses to human activity with examples from diverse taxa; reviews the scientific literature on behavioural responses of humpback dolphins to human activity throughout their range, including marine vessel traffic, dolphin tourism, cetacean-fishery interactions, noise pollution, and habitat alteration; and highlights information and data gaps for future humpback dolphin research to better inform behaviour-based management decisions that contribute to conservation efforts. PMID:26555621

  8. CD83 Modulates B Cell Activation and Germinal Center Responses.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Urbat, Anne; Hutzler, Stefan; Ostalecki, Christian; Gläsner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André; Winkler, Thomas H; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Nitschke, Lars

    2016-05-01

    CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells. In the B cell lineage, CD83 is expressed especially on activated B cells and on light zone B cells during the germinal center (GC) reaction. The function of CD83 during GC responses is unclear. CD83(-/-) mice have a strong reduction of CD4(+) T cells, which makes it difficult to analyze a functional role of CD83 on B cells during GC responses. Therefore, in the present study we generated a B cell-specific CD83 conditional knockout (CD83 B-cKO) model. CD83 B-cKO B cells show defective upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 expression and impaired proliferation after different stimuli. Analyses of GC responses after immunization with various Ags revealed a characteristic shift in dark zone and light zone B cell numbers, with an increase of B cells in the dark zone of CD83 B-cKO mice. This effect was not accompanied by alterations in the level of IgG immune responses or by major differences in affinity maturation. However, an enhanced IgE response was observed in CD83 B-cKO mice. Additionally, we observed a strong competitive disadvantage of CD83-cKO B cells in GC responses in mixed bone marrow chimeras. Furthermore, infection of mice with Borrelia burgdorferi revealed a defect in bacterial clearance of CD83 B-cKO mice with a shift toward a Th2 response, indicated by a strong increase in IgE titers. Taken together, our results show that CD83 is important for B cell activation and modulates GC composition and IgE Ab responses in vivo. PMID:26983787

  9. Delphinid behavioral responses to incidental mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    Henderson, E Elizabeth; Smith, Michael H; Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Douglas, Annie B; Hildebrand, John A

    2014-10-01

    Opportunistic observations of behavioral responses by delphinids to incidental mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar were recorded in the Southern California Bight from 2004 through 2008 using visual focal follows, static hydrophones, and autonomous recorders. Sound pressure levels were calculated between 2 and 8 kHz. Surface behavioral responses were observed in 26 groups from at least three species of 46 groups out of five species encountered during MFA sonar incidents. Responses included changes in behavioral state or direction of travel, changes in vocalization rates and call intensity, or a lack of vocalizations while MFA sonar occurred. However, 46% of focal groups not exposed to sonar also changed their behavior, and 43% of focal groups exposed to sonar did not change their behavior. Mean peak sound pressure levels when a behavioral response occurred were around 122 dB re: 1 μPa. Acoustic localizations of dolphin groups exhibiting a response gave insight into nighttime movement patterns and provided evidence that impacts of sonar may be mediated by behavioral state. The lack of response in some cases may indicate a tolerance of or habituation to MFA sonar by local populations; however, the responses that occur at lower received levels may point to some sensitization as well. PMID:25324099

  10. Characterizing wind turbine system response to lightning activity

    SciTech Connect

    McNiff, B.; LaWhite, N.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01

    A lightning protection research program was instituted by National Renewable Energy Laboratory to minimize lightning damage to wind turbines and to further the understanding of effective damage mitigation techniques. To that end, a test program is under way to observe lightning activity, protection system response, and damage at a wind power plant in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Turbine Verification Program. The authors installed Lightning activated surveillance cameras along with a special storm tracking device to observe the activity in the wind plant area. They instrumented the turbines with lightning and ground current detection devices to log direct and indirect strike activity at each unit. They installed a surge monitor on the utility interface to track incoming activity from the transmission lines. Maintenance logs are used to verify damage and determine downtime and repair costs. Actual strikes to turbines were recorded on video and ancillary devices. The test setup and some results are discussed in this paper.

  11. Selecting Tasks for Evaluating Human Performance as a Function of Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J. R.; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    A challenge in understanding human performance as a function of gravity is determining which tasks to research. Initial studies began with treadmill walking, which was easy to quantify and control. However, with the development of pressurized rovers, it is less important to optimize human performance for ambulation as rovers will likely perform gross translation for them. Future crews are likely to spend much of their extravehicular activity (EVA) performing geology, construction and maintenance type tasks, for which it is difficult to measure steady-state-workloads. To evaluate human performance in reduced gravity, we have collected metabolic, biomechanical and subjective data for different tasks at varied gravity levels. Methods: Ten subjects completed 5 different tasks including weight transfer, shoveling, treadmill walking, treadmill running and treadmill incline walking. All tasks were performed shirt-sleeved at 1-g, 3/8-g and 1/6-g. Off-loaded conditions were achieved via the Active Response Gravity Offload System. Treadmill tasks were performed for 3 minutes with reported oxygen consumption (VO2) averaged over the last 2 minutes. Shoveling was performed for 3 minutes with metabolic cost reported as ml O2 consumed per kg material shoveled. Weight transfer reports metabolic cost as liters O2 consumed to complete the task. Statistical analysis was performed via repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Statistically significant metabolic differences were noted between all 3 gravity levels for treadmill running and incline walking. For the other 3 tasks, there were significant differences between 1-g and each reduced gravity, but not between 1/6-g and 3/8-g. For weight transfer, significant differences were seen between gravities in both trial-average VO2 and time-to-completion with noted differences in strategy for task completion. Conclusion: To determine if gravity has a metabolic effect on human performance, this research may indicate that tasks should be selected

  12. Gravity as a biochemical determinant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    The existence of obvious morphological and physiological changes in living systems exposed to altered gravity immediately informs us that prior changes have taken place in the chemistry of exposed cells, tissues and organs. These changes include transients that return more or less promptly to the norm when the system is restored to the terrestrial g-field. For example, altered serum hormone and electrolyte levels in man, which appear to reflect successful adaptation to the conditions of orbital weightlessness, disappear shortly after return to Earth. Other changes--in mineral and protein constituents of the skeletal system in man, and cell wall composition in plants--are more persistent or even permanent. Hypogravitational departures from the norm include not only "weightlessness" as achieved in orbit, but also experimental modes of compensation, on the clinostat or by flotation. These techniques are useful in the study of hypogravity but cannot replace fully the weightless environment. Plant ethylene and peroxidase both increase under orbital, clinostat and/or flotation conditions whereas 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde-dehydrogenase increases under orbital but not clinostat conditions; cytochrome reductase and malic dehydrogenase levels are affected by the clinostat, but not by actual weightless conditions. How do the altered organismal biochemistries induced by the centrifuge and the clinostat relate to one another? Does gravity operate on living systems as a continuous variable from 0 to superterrestrial values, or do deviations from g(earth) generate non-uniform, discontinuous stress responses, irrespective of sign? In plants, measurements of wall lignin content and peroxidase activity yield opposite answers. Given the limited data so far available we will consider the meaning of these contradictions.

  13. The prolactin responses to active and passive heating in man.

    PubMed

    Low, David; Purvis, Alison; Reilly, Thomas; Cable, N Tim

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prolactin and blood pressure responses at identical core temperatures during active and passive heat stresses, using prolactin as an indirect marker of central fatigue. Twelve male subjects cycled to exhaustion at 60% maximal oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in a room maintained at 33 degrees C (active). In a second trial they were passively heated (passive) in a water bath (41.56 +/- 1.65 degrees C) until core temperature was equal to the core temperature observed at exhaustion during the active trial. Blood samples were taken from an indwelling venous cannula for the determination of serum prolactin during active heating and at corresponding core temperatures during passive heating. Core temperature was not significantly different between the two methods of heating and averaged 38.81 +/- 0.53 and 38.82 +/- 0.70 degrees C (data expressed as means +/- s.d.) at exhaustion during active heating and at the end of passive heating, respectively (P > 0.05). Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly lower throughout passive heating (active, 73 +/- 9 mmHg; passive, 62 +/- 12 mmHg; P < 0.01). Despite the significantly reduced blood pressure responses during passive heating, during both forms of heating the prolactin response was the same (active, 14.9 +/- 12.6 ng ml(-1); passive, 13.3 +/- 9.6 ng ml(-1); n.s.). These results suggest that thermoregulatory, i.e. core temperature, and not cardiovascular afferents provide the key stimulus for the release of prolactin, an indirect marker of central fatigue, during exercise in the heat. PMID:16157657

  14. Chiral gravity, log gravity, and extremal CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, Alexander; Song Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We show that the linearization of all exact solutions of classical chiral gravity around the AdS{sub 3} vacuum have positive energy. Nonchiral and negative-energy solutions of the linearized equations are infrared divergent at second order, and so are removed from the spectrum. In other words, chirality is confined and the equations of motion have linearization instabilities. We prove that the only stationary, axially symmetric solutions of chiral gravity are BTZ black holes, which have positive energy. It is further shown that classical log gravity--the theory with logarithmically relaxed boundary conditions--has finite asymptotic symmetry generators but is not chiral and hence may be dual at the quantum level to a logarithmic conformal field theories (CFT). Moreover we show that log gravity contains chiral gravity within it as a decoupled charge superselection sector. We formally evaluate the Euclidean sum over geometries of chiral gravity and show that it gives precisely the holomorphic extremal CFT partition function. The modular invariance and integrality of the expansion coefficients of this partition function are consistent with the existence of an exact quantum theory of chiral gravity. We argue that the problem of quantizing chiral gravity is the holographic dual of the problem of constructing an extremal CFT, while quantizing log gravity is dual to the problem of constructing a logarithmic extremal CFT.

  15. Identifying buried segments of active faults in the northern Rio Grande Rift using aeromagnetic, LiDAR,and gravity data, south-central Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruleman, Cal; Grauch, V. J.

    2013-01-01

    Combined interpretation of aeromagnetic and LiDAR data builds on the strength of the aeromagnetic method to locate normal faults with significant offset under cover and the strength of LiDAR interpretation to identify the age and sense of motion of faults. Each data set helps resolve ambiguities in interpreting the other. In addition, gravity data can be used to infer the sense of motion for totally buried faults inferred solely from aeromagnetic data. Combined interpretation to identify active faults at the northern end of the San Luis Basin of the northern Rio Grande rift has confirmed general aspects of previous geologic mapping but has also provided significant improvements. The interpretation revises and extends mapped fault traces, confirms tectonic versus fluvial origins of steep stream banks, and gains additional information on the nature of active and potentially active partially and totally buried faults. Detailed morphology of surfaces mapped from the LiDAR data helps constrain ages of the faults that displace the deposits. The aeromagnetic data provide additional information about their extents in between discontinuous scarps and suggest that several totally buried, potentially active faults are present on both sides of the valley.

  16. Changes in thyroid peroxidase activity in response to various chemicals.

    PubMed

    Song, Mee; Kim, Youn-Jung; Park, Yong-Keun; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a large heme-containing glycoprotein that catalyzes the transfer of iodine to thyroglobulin during thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis. Previously, we established an in vitro assay for TPO activity based on human recombinant TPO (hrTPO) stably transfected into human follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC-238) cells. It is important to determine whether environmental chemicals can disrupt TPO activity because it is an important factor in the TH axis. In this study, we used our assay to examine the changes in TPO activity in response to various chemicals, including benzophenones (BPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Overall, BPs, PAHs, and POPs slightly altered TPO activity at low doses, as compared with the positive controls methimazole (MMI), genistein, and 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy BP. Benzophenone, benzhydrol, 3-methylchloranthracene, pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and heptachlor decreased TPO activity, while 2,4-dihydroxy BP, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxy BP, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene increased TPO activity. From these data, we can predict the disruption of TPO activity by various chemicals as a sensitive TH end point. TPO activity should be considered when enacting measures to regulate environmental exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals. PMID:22699773

  17. Feeling Gravity's Pull: Gravity Modeling. The Gravity Field of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Smith, David; Rowlands, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, G.; Chinn, Douglas; Pavlis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Most people take the constant presence of gravitys pull for granted. However, the Earth's gravitational strength actually varies from location to location. This variation occurs because mass, which influences an object's gravitational pull, is not evenly distributed within the planet. Changes in topography, such as glacial movement, an earthquake, or a rise in the ocean level, can subtly affect the gravity field. An accurate measurement of the Earth's gravity field helps us understand the distribution of mass beneath the surface. This insight can assist us in locating petroleum, mineral deposits, ground water, and other valuable substances. Gravity mapping can also help notice or verify changes in sea surface height and other ocean characteristics. Such changes may indicate climate change from polar ice melting and other phenomena. In addition, gravity mapping can indicate how land moves under the surface after earthquakes and other plate tectonic processes. Finally, changes in the Earth's gravity field might indicate a shift in water distribution that could affect agriculture, water supplies for population centers, and long-term weather prediction. Scientists can map out the Earth's gravity field by watching satellite orbits. When a satellite shifts in vertical position, it might be passing over an area where gravity changes in strength. Gravity is only one factor that may shape a satellite's orbital path. To derive a gravity measurement from satellite movement, scientists must remove other factors that might affect a satellite's position: 1. Drag from atmospheric friction. 2. Pressure from solar radiation as it heads toward Earth and. as it is reflected off the surface of the Earth 3. Gravitational pull from the Sun, the Moon, and other planets in the Solar System. 4. The effect of tides. 5. Relativistic effects. Scientists must also correct for the satellite tracking process. For example, the tracking signal must be corrected for refraction through the

  18. Response Activation in Overlapping Tasks and the Response-Selection Bottleneck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Torsten; Fischer, Rico; Stelzel, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact of response activation on dual-task performance by presenting a subliminal prime before the stimulus in Task 2 (S2) of a psychological refractory period (PRP) task. Congruence between prime and S2 modulated the reaction times in Task 2 at short stimulus onset asynchrony despite a PRP effect. This Task 2…

  19. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition. PMID:26888566

  20. Effects of three activities on annoyance responses to recorded flyovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.; Shepherd, W. T.; Fletcher, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Subjects participated in an experiment in which they were engaged in TV viewing, telephone listening, or reverie (no activity) for a 1/2-hour session. During the session, they were exposed to a series of recorded aircraft sounds at the rate of one flight every 2 minutes. Within each session, four levels of flyover noise, separated by 5dB increments, were presented several times in a Latin Square balanced sequence. The peak level of the noisiest flyover in any session was fixed at 95, 90, 85, 75, or 70 dBA. At the end of the test session, subjects recorded their responses to the aircraft sounds, using a bipolar scale which covered the range from 'very pleasant' to 'extremely annoying'. Responses to aircraft noises were found to be significantly affected by the particular activity in which the subjects were engaged. Furthermore, not all subjects found the aircraft sounds to be annoying.

  1. Activation and Regulation of DNA-Driven Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The innate immune system provides early defense against infections and also plays a key role in monitoring alterations of homeostasis in the body. DNA is highly immunostimulatory, and recent advances in this field have led to the identification of the innate immune sensors responsible for the recognition of DNA as well as the downstream pathways that are activated. Moreover, information on how cells regulate DNA-driven immune responses to avoid excessive inflammation is now emerging. Finally, several reports have demonstrated how defects in DNA sensing, signaling, and regulation are associated with susceptibility to infections or inflammatory diseases in humans and model organisms. In this review, the current literature on DNA-stimulated innate immune activation is discussed, and important new questions facing this field are proposed. PMID:25926682

  2. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for cancer and activation of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT for cancer due to the acute inflammatory response, exposure and presentation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins and other danger signals. Nevertheless effective, powerful tumor-specific immune response in both animal models and also in patients treated with PDT for cancer, is the exception rather than the rule. Research in our laboratory and also in others is geared towards identifying reasons for this sub-optimal immune response and discovering ways of maximizing it. Reasons why the immune response after PDT is less than optimal include the fact that tumor-antigens are considered to be self-like and poorly immunogenic, the tumor-mediated induction of CD4+CD25+foxP3+ regulatory T-cells (T-regs), that are able to inhibit both the priming and the effector phases of the cytotoxic CD8 T-cell anti-tumor response and the defects in dendritic cell maturation, activation and antigen-presentation that may also occur. Alternatively-activated macrophages (M2) have also been implicated. Strategies to overcome these immune escape mechanisms employed by different tumors include combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments such as products obtained from pathogenic microorganisms against which mammals have evolved recognition systems such as PAMPs and toll-like receptors (TLR). This paper will cover the use of CpG oligonucleotides (a TLR9 agonist found in bacterial DNA) to reverse dendritic cell dysfunction and methods to remove the immune suppressor effects of T-regs that are under active study.

  4. Zero-gravity venting of three refrigerants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.; Aydelott, J. C.; Amling, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation of venting cylindrical containers partially filled with initially saturated liquids under zero-gravity conditions was conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center 5-second zero-gravity facility. The effect of interfacial mass transfer on the ullage pressure response during venting was analytically determined, based on a conduction analysis applied to an infinitely planer (flat) liquid-vapor interface. This pressure response was compared with both the experimental results and an adiabatic decompression computation.

  5. Autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihua; Wang, Xiao Dan; Lapi, Eleonora; Sullivan, Alexandra; Jia, Wei; He, You-Wen; Ratnayaka, Indrika; Zhong, Shan; Goldin, Robert D.; Goemans, Christoph G.; Tolkovsky, Aviva M.; Lu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    RAS is frequently mutated in human cancers and has opposing effects on autophagy and tumorigenesis. Identifying determinants of the cellular responses to RAS is therefore vital in cancer research. Here, we show that autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS. N-terminal Apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2) mediates RAS-induced senescence and inhibits autophagy. Oncogenic RAS-expressing ASPP2(Δ3/Δ3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that escape senescence express a high level of ATG5/ATG12. Consistent with the notion that autophagy levels control the cellular response to oncogenic RAS, overexpressing ATG5, but not autophagy-deficient ATG5 mutant K130R, bypasses RAS-induced senescence, whereas ATG5 or ATG3 deficiency predisposes to it. Mechanistically, ASPP2 inhibits RAS-induced autophagy by competing with ATG16 to bind ATG5/ATG12 and preventing ATG16/ATG5/ATG12 formation. Hence, ASPP2 modulates oncogenic RAS-induced autophagic activity to dictate the cellular response to RAS: to proliferate or senesce. PMID:22847423

  6. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    PubMed

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response. PMID:18851081

  7. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  8. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Ellis L; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  9. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  10. Rheological variations across an active rift system -- results from lithosphere-scale 3D gravity and thermal models of the Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeßen, Christian; Sippel, Judith; Cacace, Mauro; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Fishwick, Stewart; Heine, Christian; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2015-04-01

    Due to its tectono-volcanic activity and economic (geothermal and petroleum) potential, the eastern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) is one of the best studied extensional systems worldwide and an important natural laboratory for the development of geodynamic concepts on rifting and nascent continental break-up. The Kenya Rift, an integral part of the eastern branch of the EARS, has formed in the area of weak Proterozoic crust of the Mozambique mobile belt adjacent to the rheologically stronger Archean Tanzania craton. To assess the variations in lithospheric strength between different tectonic domains and their influence on the tectonic evolution of the region, we developed a set of structural, density, thermal and rheological 3D models. For these models we integrated multi-disciplinary information, such as published geological field data, sediment thicknesses, well information, existing structural models, seismic refraction and reflection data, seismic tomography, gravity and heat-flow data. Our main approach focused on combined 3D isostatic and gravity modelling. The resulting lithosphere-scale 3D density model provides new insights into the depth distribution of the crust-mantle boundary and thickness variations of different crustal density domains. The latter further facilitate interpretations of variations of lithologies and related physical rock properties. By considering lithology-dependent heat production and thermal conductivity, we calculate the conductive thermal field across the region of the greater Kenya Rift. Finally, the assessed variations in lithology and temperature allow deriving differences in the integrated strength of the lithosphere across the different tectonic domains.

  11. Placebo-Activated Neural Systems are Linked to Antidepressant Responses

    PubMed Central

    Peciña, Marta; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Mickey, Brian J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2016-01-01

    Importance High placebo responses have been observed across a wide range of pathologies, severely impacting drug development. Objective Here we examined neurochemical mechanisms underlying the formation of placebo effects in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Participants Thirty-five medication-free MDD patients. Design and Intervention We performed a single-blinded two-week cross-over randomized controlled trial of two identical oral placebos (described as having either “active” or “inactive” fast-acting antidepressant-like effects) followed by a 10-week open-label treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or in some cases, another agent as clinically indicated. The volunteers were studied with PET and the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective radiotracer [11C]carfentanil after each 1-week “inactive” and “active” oral placebo treatment. In addition, 1 mL of isotonic saline was administered intravenously (i.v.) within sight of the volunteer during PET scanning every 4 min over 20 min only after the 1-week active placebo treatment, with instructions that the compound may be associated with the activation of brain systems involved in mood improvement. This challenge stimulus was utilized to test the individual capacity to acutely activate endogenous opioid neurotransmision under expectations of antidepressant effect. Setting A University Health System. Main Outcomes and Measures Changes in depressive symptoms in response to “active” placebo and antidepressant. Baseline and activation measures of MOR binding. Results Higher baseline MOR binding in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was associated with better response to antidepressant treatment (r=0.48; p=0.02). Reductions in depressive symptoms after 1-week of “active” placebo treatment, compared to the “inactive”, were associated with increased placebo-induced μ-opioid neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the

  12. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  13. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Olliver, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  14. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration of all chemical particles in the urine. ... changes to will tell the provider the specific gravity of your urine. The dipstick test gives only ...

  15. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Tethered gravity laboratories study is presented. The following subject areas are covered: variable gravity laboratory; attitude tether stabilizer; configuration analysis (AIT); dynamic analysis (SAO); and work planned for the next reporting period.

  16. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  17. The influence of simulated low-gravity environments on growth, development and metabolism of plants.

    PubMed

    Dedolph, R R

    1967-01-01

    Low-gravity environments may be simulated through appropriate horizontal clinostat rotation. This simulation is accomplished through a biological nullification of the directional component of gravitational force. Measuring biologically effective gravity force by organ response, it is readily demonstrated that biologically active gravitational force may be treated as a two-dimensional vector. Though the magnitude dimension of this vector remains virtually constant anywhere on earth, the biologically effective direction dimension may be quantitatively altered by clinostat rotation, provided appropriate angular velocities and angles of inclination of clinostat axes are employed. Using oat seedlings, a rotation rate of 2 rpm, and a horizontal axis clinostat, a 'zero g' environment may be simulated. This simulated 'zero g' condition is attested by the inability of plants to perceive unidirectional gravitational force of sufficient magnitude to elicit directional growth. Under such conditions, plants will grow in the direction imparted by the initial orientation of the plants in the system. Geotropic curvature responses to subsequent geostimulation are, however, greater in seedlings grown under these conditions, nullifying the direction dimension of gravitational force, than in seedlings grown with rotation but with normal unidirectional gravity loads. Root growth under simulated 'zero' gravity conditions is likewise enhanced as compared to plants grown with rotation but normal unidirectional gravity. These differences in magnitude of growth and response to subsequent geostimulation are inexplicable on bases of modified auxin economy or production. Respiration rates are, however, materially enhanced by the simulated 'zero g' environments. This enhancement of respiration, as well as growth, quantitatively diminishes as the unidirectional gravity load is increased. These results imply that the primary effect of low-gravity environments is likely that of modifying the

  18. Platelet activation and apoptosis modulate monocyte inflammatory responses in dengue

    PubMed Central

    Hottz, Eugenio D.; Medeiros-de-Moraes, Isabel M.; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; de Assis, Edson F.; Vals-de-Souza, Rogério; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Bozza, Patrícia T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease in the world. Dengue infection has a large spectrum of clinical manifestations from self-limited febrile illness to severe syndromes accompanied by bleeding and shock. Thrombocytopenia and vascular leak with altered cytokine profiles in plasma are features of severe dengue. Although monocytes have been recognized as important sources of cytokines in dengue, the contributions of platelet-monocyte interactions to inflammatory responses in dengue have not been addressed. Patients/Methods Patients with dengue were investigated for platelet-monocyte aggregate formation and markers of monocyte activation. Platelet-induced cytokine responses by monocytes and underlying mechanisms were also investigated in vitro. Results We observed increased levels of platelet-monocyte aggregates in blood samples from patients with dengue, especially patients with thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, the exposure of monocytes from healthy volunteers to platelets from patients with dengue induced the secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10 and MCP-1, while the exposure to platelets from healthy volunteers only induced the secretion of MCP-1. In addition to the well-established modulation of monocyte cytokine responses by activated platelets through P-selectin binding, we found that interaction of monocytes with apoptotic platelets mediate IL-10 secretion through phosphatidylserine recognition in platelet-monocyte aggregates. Moreover, IL-10 secretion required platelet-monocyte contact but not phagocytosis. Conclusions Together, our results demonstrate that activated and apoptotic platelets aggregate with monocytes during dengue infection and signal specific cytokine responses that may contribute to the pathogenesis of dengue. PMID:25015827

  19. Lysyl oxidase activity regulates oncogenic stress response and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wiel, C; Augert, A; Vincent, D F; Gitenay, D; Vindrieux, D; Le Calvé, B; Arfi, V; Lallet-Daher, H; Reynaud, C; Treilleux, I; Bartholin, L; Lelievre, E; Bernard, D

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a stable proliferation arrest, is induced in response to various stresses. Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) results in blocked proliferation and constitutes a fail-safe program counteracting tumorigenesis. The events that enable a tumor in a benign senescent state to escape from OIS and become malignant are largely unknown. We show that lysyl oxidase activity contributes to the decision to maintain senescence. Indeed, in human epithelial cell the constitutive expression of the LOX or LOXL2 protein favored OIS escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize OIS. The relevance of these in vitro observations is supported by in vivo findings: in a transgenic mouse model of aggressive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing lysyl oxidase activity accelerates senescence escape, whereas inhibition of lysyl oxidase activity was found to stabilize senescence, delay tumorigenesis, and increase survival. Mechanistically, we show that lysyl oxidase activity favors the escape of senescence by regulating the focal-adhesion kinase. Altogether, our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity participates in primary tumor growth by directly impacting the senescence stability. PMID:24113189

  20. The unfolded protein response selectively targets active smoothened mutants.

    PubMed

    Marada, Suresh; Stewart, Daniel P; Bodeen, William J; Han, Young-Goo; Ogden, Stacey K

    2013-06-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway, an essential regulator of developmental patterning, has been implicated in playing causative and survival roles in a range of human cancers. The signal-transducing component of the pathway, Smoothened, has revealed itself to be an efficacious therapeutic target in combating oncogenic signaling. However, therapeutic challenges remain in cases where tumors acquire resistance to Smoothened antagonists, and also in cases where signaling is driven by active Smoothened mutants that exhibit reduced sensitivity to these compounds. We previously demonstrated that active Smoothened mutants are subjected to prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention, likely due to their mutations triggering conformation shifts that are detected by ER quality control. We attempted to exploit this biology and demonstrate that deregulated Hedgehog signaling driven by active Smoothened mutants is specifically attenuated by ER stressors that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). Upon UPR induction, active Smoothened mutants are targeted by ER-associated degradation, resulting in attenuation of inappropriate pathway activity. Accordingly, we found that the UPR agonist thapsigargin attenuated mutant Smoothened-induced phenotypes in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster. Wild-type Smoothened and physiological Hedgehog patterning were not affected, suggesting that UPR modulation may provide a novel therapeutic window to be evaluated for targeting active Smoothened mutants in disease. PMID:23572559

  1. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  2. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  3. Challenging Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roveto, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    A recent proposal by Erik Verlinde claims that gravity should be viewed not as a fundamental force, but an emergent thermodynamic phenomenon due to some yet undetermined microscopic theory. We present a challenge to this reformulation of gravity. Our claim is that a detailed derivation using Verlinde's proposed theory fails to correctly give Newton's laws or Einstein gravity.

  4. A Paradox of Syntactic Priming: Why Response Tendencies Show Priming for Passives, and Response Latencies Show Priming for Actives

    PubMed Central

    Segaert, Katrien; Menenti, Laura; Weber, Kirsten; Hagoort, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Speakers tend to repeat syntactic structures across sentences, a phenomenon called syntactic priming. Although it has been suggested that repeating syntactic structures should result in speeded responses, previous research has focused on effects in response tendencies. We investigated syntactic priming effects simultaneously in response tendencies and response latencies for active and passive transitive sentences in a picture description task. In Experiment 1, there were priming effects in response tendencies for passives and in response latencies for actives. However, when participants' pre-existing preference for actives was altered in Experiment 2, syntactic priming occurred for both actives and passives in response tendencies as well as in response latencies. This is the first investigation of the effects of structure frequency on both response tendencies and latencies in syntactic priming. We discuss the implications of these data for current theories of syntactic processing. PMID:22022352

  5. Optimization of an Active Twist Rotor Blade Planform for Improved Active Response and Forward Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the optimum blade tip planform for a model-scale active twist rotor. The analysis identified blade tip design traits which simultaneously reduce rotor power of an unactuated rotor while leveraging aeromechanical couplings to tailor the active response of the blade. Optimizing the blade tip planform for minimum rotor power in forward flight provided a 5 percent improvement in performance compared to a rectangular blade tip, but reduced the vibration control authority of active twist actuation by 75 percent. Optimizing for maximum blade twist response increased the vibration control authority by 50 percent compared to the rectangular blade tip, with little effect on performance. Combined response and power optimization resulted in a blade tip design which provided similar vibration control authority to the rectangular blade tip, but with a 3.4 percent improvement in rotor performance in forward flight.

  6. Physiologic Responses Produced by Active and Passive Personal Cooling Vests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Luna, Bernadette

    2000-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide chest cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to document and compare the subjects' response to three cooling vests in their recommended configurations. The Life Enhancement Tech (LET) lightweight active cooling vest with cap, the MicroClimate Systems Change of Phase garment (MCS), and the Steele Vest were each used to cool the chest regions of 12 male and 8 female Healthy subjects (21 to 69 yr.) in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx. 22 C), were tested for 60 min. with one of the cooling garments. The LET active garment had an initial coolant fluid inlet temperature of 60 F, and was ramped down to 50 F. Oral, right and left ear canal temperatures were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; and respiration were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. For men, all three vests had similar, significant cooling effects. Decreases in the average rectal temperature, oral temperature, and ear canal temperatures were approximately 0.2 C, 0.2 C and 0.1 C, respectively. In contrast to the men, the female subjects wearing the MCS and Steel vests had similar cooling responses in which the core temperature remained elevated and oral and ear canal temperatures did not drop. The LET active garment cooled most of the female subjects in this study; rectal, oral and ear temperature decreased about 0.2 C, 0.3 C and 0.3 C, respectively. These results show that the garment configurations tested do not elicit a similar thermal response in all subjects. A gender difference is evident. The LET active garment configuration was most effective in decreasing temperatures of the female subjects; the MCS

  7. Thermosphere-ionosphere coupling in response to recurrent geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtarov, Plamen; Pancheva, Dora

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents the global thermosphere-ionosphere response to the high-speed solar wind streams and the subsequent recurrent geomagnetic variations with a period of 9 d during the period of time 1 October 2007-31 March 2009. The COSMIC electron density at fixed heights, as well as the ionospheric parameters foF2 and hmF2, and the two coefficients characterizing the top and bottom side vertical gradients of the electron density profile, are used for investigating the ionospheric 9-d (s=0) wave response. The SABER temperature data are utilized for studying the response of the lower thermosphere to the recurrent auroral heating. The COSMIC and SABER measurements are analyzed by one and the same method where the atmospheric tides and planetary waves which are present in the temperature and electron density measurements are simultaneously extracted from the data. The use of such data analysis approach brings to light additional features of the ionospheric response to a recurrent geomagnetic activity which have not been found before.

  8. Behavioral responses of north American Elk to recreational activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naylor, L.M.; Wisdom, M.J.; Anthony, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Off-road recreation on public lands in North America has increased dramatically in recent years. Wild ungulates are sensitive to human activities, but the effect of off-road recreation, both motorized and nonmotorized, is poorly understood. We measured responses of elk (Cervus elaphus) to recreational disturbance in northeast Oregon, USA, from April to October, 2003 and 2004. We subjected elk to 4 types of recreational disturbance: all-terrain vehicle (ATV) riding, mountain biking, hiking, and horseback riding. Motion sensors inside radiocollars worn by 13 female elk recorded resting, feeding, and travel activities at 5-minute intervals throughout disturbance and control periods. Elk fed and rested during control periods, with little time spent traveling. Travel time increased in response to all 4 disturbances and was highest in mornings. Elk travel time was highest during ATV exposure, followed by exposure to mountain biking, hiking, and horseback riding. Feeding time decreased during ATV exposure and resting decreased when we subjected elk to mountain biking and hiking disturbance in 2003. Our results demonstrated that activities of elk can be substantially affected by off-road recreation. Mitigating these effects may be appropriate where elk are a management priority. Balancing management of species like elk with off-road recreation will become increasingly important as off-road recreational uses continue to increase on public lands in North America.

  9. The visual accommodation response during concurrent mental activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malmstrom, F. V.; Randle, R. J.; Bendix, J. S.; Weber, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The direction and magnitude of the human visual accommodation response during concurrent mental activity are investigated. Subject focusing responses to targets at distances of 0.0 D, 3.0 D and an indeterminate distance were monitored by means of an optometer during the performance of a backwards counting task and a visual imagery task (thinking near and thinking far). In both experiments a shift in accommodation towards the visual far point is observed particularly for the near target, which increases with the duration of the task. The results can be interpreted in terms of both the capacity model of Kahneman (1973) and the autonomic arousal model of Hess and Polt (1964), and are not inconsistent with the possibility of an intermediate resting position.

  10. Planarian regeneration under micro- and hyper-gravity simulated contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gennaro; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Adell, Teresa; Salo, Emili

    Planarians are non-parasitic flatworms of the Turbellaria class, some of which show the striking ability to regenerate any part of their body, even the head, in few days. Planarians are common to many parts of the world, living in both saltwater and freshwater, as well as in terrestrial areas. Due to their plasticity Planarians have been a classical model for the study of the mechanisms of regeneration. Currently, their cheap and easy maintenance, as well as the establishment of robust genetic tools, have converted them into an essential system in the field of stem cells and regenerative medicine. The aim of our project is to study the effect that micro- and hyper- gravity could exert during the process of planarians regeneration. The reason for planarians extreme regenerative capability is the maintenance until adulthood of a population of totipotent stem cells as well as the continuous activation of the cell-cell communication molecular pathways. Our prediction is that the alteration of the forces could affect planarians regeneration at different levels: 1) To regenerate, planarians must activate both proliferative and apoptotic responses, in order to create new tissue and to remodel the pre-existing one, respectively. Both cellular processes have been reported to be altered in several models under differential gravitational forces; 2) In planarians, the main intercellular signalling pathways (Wnt, TGFb, BMP, Hh, EGF) must control the process of differentiation and determination of each cell. For instances, it has been demonstrated that the differential activity of the wnt/beta-catenin pathway specifies the posterior (tail) versus the anterior (head) identity. Those pathways rely on the distance that secreted molecules (morphogens) are able to reach. Either this mechanism consist in a passive diffusion or an active transport through phyllopodia, it could sense the magnitude of the gravitational force; 3) The epidermis of planarians is covered by cilia, which beat

  11. Auditory Cortex Basal Activity Modulates Cochlear Responses in Chinchillas

    PubMed Central

    León, Alex; Elgueda, Diego; Silva, María A.; Hamamé, Carlos M.; Delano, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. Methodology/Principal Findings Cochlear microphonics (CM), auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP) and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP) were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments) and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments). We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. Conclusions/Significance These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the obtained effects

  12. Plant sensing: gravity and touch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilroy, S.; Swanson, S.; Massa, G.

    Roots must integrate many stimuli in order to direct their growth as they explore the soil. Gravitropism leads to downward growth but other stimuli such as gradients in nutrients, water, biotic and abiotic stresses and physical obstacles such as rocks all act on the roots sensory systems to modify this gravitropic response. We have therefore investigated the interaction of gravity signaling and response to other stimuli such as a mechanical obstruction to downward growth. A gravitropically directed primary root of Arabidopsis thaliana (growing vertically) senses an obstacle such as a glass plate placed in its direction of growth and initiates an avoidance growth response upon contacting the barrier. This response appears to be caused by an interaction of gravitropic and thigmotropic sensory systems. The touch stimulation of the root cap leads to alteration in growth, initially in the central and later in the distal elongation zone of the root. These growth responses maintain the root tip at an angle of 136 degrees to the barrier as the root grows across the obstacle's surface. Removal of cells in the root cap by laser ablation indicate that all root cap cells are required for this growth response to the barrier. Once the end of the barrier is reached and the root can grow off the obstruciton, gravitropism appears to occur faster than in roots that did not interact with an obstacle, suggesting that the touch stimulation of the barrier may alter gravitropic signaling or response. Touch stimulation of the root cap inhibited the pH-dependent gravity signaling events that are known to be required for gravitropic response. These results imply a transient suppression of gravisensing or graviresponse by touch. Touch stimulation of root cap cells elicited an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ that appears to propagate from cell to cell throughout the cap, suggesting Ca2+ signaling may underlie the communication between gravity and touch sensing cells. Although the pgm1 -1 starch

  13. Activity enhances dopaminergic long-duration response in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Auinger, Peggy; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Mendis, Tilak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that dopamine-dependent motor learning mechanism underlies the long-duration response to levodopa in Parkinson disease (PD) based on our studies in a mouse model. By data-mining the motor task performance in dominant and nondominant hands of the subjects in a double-blind randomized trial of levodopa therapy, the effects of activity and dopamine therapy were examined. Methods: We data-mined the Earlier versus Later Levodopa Therapy in Parkinson's Disease (ELLDOPA) study published in 2005 and performed statistical analysis comparing the effects of levodopa and dominance of handedness over 42 weeks. Results: The mean change in finger-tapping counts from baseline before the initiation of therapy to predose at 9 weeks and 40 weeks increased more in the dominant compared to nondominant hand in levodopa-treated subjects in a dose-dependent fashion. There was no significant difference in dominant vs nondominant hands in the placebo group. The short-duration response assessed by the difference of postdose performance compared to predose performance at the same visit did not show any significant difference between dominant vs nondominant hands. Conclusions: Active use of the dominant hand and dopamine replacement therapy produces synergistic effect on long-lasting motor task performance during “off” medication state. Such effect was confined to dopamine-responsive symptoms and not seen in dopamine-resistant symptoms such as gait and balance. We propose that long-lasting motor learning facilitated by activity and dopamine is a form of disease modification that is often seen in trials of medications that have symptomatic effects. PMID:22459675

  14. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  15. Current radar responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, Kenneth W.; Ormesher, Richard C.

    2003-09-01

    Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking

  16. Active microwave responses - An aid in improved crop classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A study determined the feasibility of using visible, infrared, and active microwave data to classify agricultural crops such as corn, sorghum, alfalfa, wheat stubble, millet, shortgrass pasture and bare soil. Visible through microwave data were collected by instruments on board the NASA C-130 aircraft over 40 agricultural fields near Guymon, OK in 1978 and Dalhart, TX in 1980. Results from stepwise and discriminant analysis techniques indicated 4.75 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 0.4 GHz cross-polarized microwave frequencies were the microwave frequencies most sensitive to crop type differences. Inclusion of microwave data in visible and infrared classification models improved classification accuracy from 73 percent to 92 percent. Despite the results, further studies are needed during different growth stages to validate the visible, infrared, and active microwave responses to vegetation.

  17. Monitoring for volcano-hydrothermal activity using continuous gravity and local ground acceleration measurements: New deployments at Inferno Crater, Waimangu and White Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Fournier, Nico; Cole-Baker, Jeremy; Miller, Craig

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes with crater lakes are often characterised by shallow hydrothermal systems which display cyclic behaviour (temperature, lake level, chemistry, etc.) and shallow seismic tremor. Present monitoring programmes in New Zealand include routine collection of these observables, but the associated shallow sub-surface processes are still inadequately modelled and poorly understood. Models would be better constrained with the incorporation of additional geophysical parameters. To this end, we have established a new test programme to continuously monitor for micro-gravity variations at New Zealand volcanoes. We utilise a Micro-g-LaCoste gPhone relative gravity meter having 1 Hz sample rate and a measurement precision of 1 microgal to test the viability of gravity monitoring for volcano-hydrothermal systems. We have initially tested the new sensor in a short term deployment (~2 months) at Inferno Crater, Waimangu, New Zealand. Inferno shows dramatic variations in crater lake level (> 7 m range), temperature (>40o C range) and hydrothermally derived tremor, all over a period of ~5 weeks. The amplitude and period of these observables are ideal for testing gravity variations associated with a cycling hydrothermal system because several cycles can be obtained in a relatively short campaign. We have deployed the gravity sensor into a buried vault having a stable concrete base to minimise local environmental influences. This vault is located ~20 meters from Inferno Lake edge (at high stand) and offers sufficient noise reduction to measure the gravitational effects associated with lake level changes. We will show results for the new gravity meter including raw relative gravity measurements and first order corrections (earth-tide, ocean loading, sensor level, temperature, and barometric pressure) to obtain both residual gravity and overprinted local ground accelerations (earthquakes and local tremor). To examine the effects of local ground vibrations on the gravity meter, we

  18. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  19. Improved Airborne Gravity Results Using New Relative Gravity Sensor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, N.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gravity data has contributed greatly to our knowledge of subsurface geophysics particularly in rugged and otherwise inaccessible areas such as Antarctica. Reliable high quality GPS data has renewed interest in improving the accuracy of airborne gravity systems and recent improvements in the electronic control of the sensor have increased the accuracy and ability of the classic Lacoste and Romberg zero length spring gravity meters to operate in turbulent air conditions. Lacoste and Romberg type gravity meters provide increased sensitivity over other relative gravity meters by utilizing a mass attached to a horizontal beam which is balanced by a ';zero length spring'. This type of dynamic gravity sensor is capable of measuring gravity changes on the order of 0.05 milliGals in laboratory conditions but more commonly 0.7 to 1 milliGal in survey use. The sensor may have errors induced by the electronics used to read the beam position as well as noise induced by unwanted accelerations, commonly turbulence, which moves the beam away from its ideal balance position otherwise known as the reading line. The sensor relies on a measuring screw controlled by a computer which attempts to bring the beam back to the reading line position. The beam is also heavily damped so that it does not react to most unwanted high frequency accelerations. However this heavily damped system is slow to react, particularly in turns where there are very high Eotvos effects. New sensor technology utilizes magnetic damping of the beam coupled with an active feedback system which acts to effectively keep the beam locked at the reading line position. The feedback system operates over the entire range of the system so there is now no requirement for a measuring screw. The feedback system operates at very high speed so that even large turbulent events have minimal impact on data quality and very little, if any, survey line data is lost because of large beam displacement errors. Airborne testing

  20. Materials processing in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The final report of the Materials Processing in Low Gravity Program in which The University of Alabama in Huntsville designed, fabricated and performed various low gravity experiments in materials processing from November 7, 1989 through November 6, 1990 is presented. The facilities used in these short duration low gravity experiments include the Drop Tube and Drop Tower at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field. During the performance of this contract, the utilization of these ground-based low gravity facilities for materials processing experiments have been instrumental in providing the opportunity to determine the feasibility of performing a number of experiments in the microgravity of Space, without the expense of a space-based experiment. Since the KC-135 was out for repairs during the latter part of the reporting period, a number of the KC-135 activities concentrated on repair and maintenance of the equipment that normally is flown on the aircraft. A number of periodic reports were given to the TCOR during the course of this contract, hence this final report is meant only to summarize the many activities performed and not redundantly cover materials already submitted.

  1. Differences in wearer response to garments for outdoor activity.

    PubMed

    Laing, R M; Sims, S T; Wilson, C A; Niven, B E; Cruthers, N M

    2008-04-01

    The performance of garments for outdoor activity was compared. Three fabrics, each in garments for the upper body, matched garment/wearer dimensions, were worn by 10 athletically 'well-trained' males under controlled conditions (hot 32 +/- 2 degrees C, 20 +/- 2% relative humidity (RH); cold 8 +/- 2 degrees C, 40 +/- 2% RH) with physical (instrumental) and sensory responses obtained during the trials. Differences in human responses to the fabrics/garments included heart rate, core temperature during run (hot, cold), rest (hot) and walk (cold), heat content of the body, humidity under garments during rest and run and time to onset of sweating. No such differences were identified for change in body mass, core temperature during walk (hot) and rest (cold), skin temperature, temperature of skin covered by the garment, humidity under the garments during walk or for any perceptions (thermal sensations, thermal comfort of torso, exertion, wetness). The garment in single jersey wool fabric performed best in both hot and cold conditions. Effects of garments on wearers are often related to properties of the fabrics from which the garments are made. This study shows that only some differences in fabric properties result in measurable thermophysiological and perceptual responses of the garment wearers and underlines the difficulty in predicting performance of garments/persons from laboratory tests on fabrics. PMID:18357537

  2. Modeling of zero gravity venting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The venting of cylindrical containers partially filled with initially saturated liquids was conducted under zero gravity conditions and compared with an analytical model which determined the effect of interfacial mass transfer on the ullage pressure response during venting. A model is proposed to improve the estimation of the interfacial mass transfer. Duhammel's superposition integral is incorporated in this analysis to approximate the transient temperature response of the interface, treating the liquid as a semiinfinite solid with conduction heat transfer. This approach to estimating interfacial mass transfer gives improved response when compared to previous models. The model still predicts a pressure decrease greater than those in the experiments reported.

  3. Multiband Photometry of the Chromospherically Active & Spotted Binary System IM Peg—the Guide Star for the Gravity Probe B Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Guinan, Edward F.; Messina, Sergio; Lanza, Antonino F.; Wasatonic, Richard; McCook, George P.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the starspot properties of IM Pegasi—the guide star of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite. GP-B's mission is to measure two predicted consequences of general relativity—the frame-dragging and geodetic effects—via its extremely precise onboard gyroscopes. However, IM Peg is a chomospherically active binary system with a luminous K2 III primary star showing rotationally modulated (Prot ≈ 24.5 days) light variations from starspots. The starspots can potentially cause problems as GP-B can erroneously interpret a change in starspot coverage (and corresponding shifts in the light center) as the star's movement. This apparent shift can also be exacerbated by possible changes in the light center (photocenter) of the binary system arising from changes in the light balance with the fainter ~1 Msolar (main-sequence early G-type star) component. Since 2000, we have carried out multiband high-precision photoelectric photometry of IM Peg to determine its activity and starspot coverage. Our photometry uses Strömgren uvby intermediate-band filters, VRI filters, and TiO (720/750 nm) narrowband filter sets. Measurements were made relative to nearby comparison and check stars using 0.8 m and 0.25 m telescopes. Analysis of TiO and multiband continuum photometry constrains the starspot areas, temperatures, and surface distributions. The photometry has been modeled using the maximum entropy and Tikhonov regularizations to determine the properties of starspots and to evaluate the effects of changing starspot areas and distributions on the light center of the binary. Our results indicate that IM Peg's activity should not affect the GP-B mission. We also present a study of IM Peg's long-term starspot cycle, which shows evidence of being 20 yr long. Lastly, we have determined the intrinsic (unspotted) brightness of the star to be V mag = 5.62 ± 0.03.

  4. A supramolecular microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic with temperature responsive activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Lang, Chao; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-05-21

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protects cells from oxidative damage by scavenging surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS). Commonly, an appropriate amount of ROS acts as a signal molecule in the metabolism. A smart artificial GPx exhibits adjustable catalytic activity, which can potentially reduce the amount of ROS to an appropriate degree and maintain its important physiological functions in metabolism. To construct an optimum and excellent smart artificial GPx, a novel supramolecular microgel artificial GPx (SM-Te) was prepared based on the supramolecular host-guest interaction employing the tellurium-containing guest molecule (ADA-Te-ADA) and the cyclodextrin-containing host block copolymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-[polyacrylamides-co-poly(6-o-(triethylene glycol monoacrylate ether)-β-cyclodextrin)], PPAM-CD) as building blocks. Subsequently, based on these building blocks, SM-Te was constructed and the formation of its self-assembled structure was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM, TEM, etc. Typically, benefitting from the temperature responsive properties of the PNIPAM scaffold, SM-Te also exhibited similar temperature responsive behaviour. Importantly, the GPx catalytic rates of SM-Te displayed a noticeable temperature responsive characteristic. Moreover, SM-Te exhibited the typical saturation kinetics behaviour of a real enzyme catalyst. It was proved that the changes of the hydrophobic microenvironment and the pore size in the supramolecular microgel network of SM-Te played significant roles in altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of SM-Te not only overcomes the insurmountable disadvantages existing in previous covalent bond crosslinked microgel artificial GPx but also bodes well for the development of novel intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:24652520

  5. Affective Response to Physical Activity: Testing for Measurement Invariance of the Physical Activity Affect Scale across Active and Non-Active Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Laura C.; Tompkins, Sara Anne; Schmiege, Sarah J.; Nilsson, Renea; Bryan, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Affective responses to physical activity are assumed to play a role in exercise initiation and maintenance. The Physical Activity Affect Scale measures four dimensions of an individual's affective response to exercise. Group differences in the interpretation of scale items can impact the interpretability of mean differences, underscoring the need…

  6. GITR Activation Positively Regulates Immune Responses against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Frederico R. C.; Mota, Caroline M.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Marcela D.; Fonseca, Denise M.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite responsible for causing clinical diseases especially in pregnant and immunosuppressed individuals. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR), which is also known as TNFRS18 and belongs to the TNF receptor superfamily, is found to be expressed in various cell types of the immune system and provides an important costimulatory signal for T cells and myeloid cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the context of T. gondii infection remains elusive. Therefore, the current study investigated the role of GITR activation in the immunoregulation mechanisms induced during the experimental infection of mice with T. gondii. Our data show that T. gondii infection slightly upregulates GITR expression in Treg cells and B cells, but the most robust increment in expression was observed in macrophages and dendritic cells. Interestingly, mice infected and treated with an agonistic antibody anti-GITR (DTA-1) presented a robust increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production at preferential sites of parasite replication, which was associated with the decrease in latent brain parasitism of mice under treatment with DTA-1. Several in vivo and in vitro analysis were performed to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in GITR activation upon infection, however no clear alterations were detected in the phenotype/function of macrophages, Tregs and B cells under treatment with DTA-1. Therefore, GITR appears as a potential target for intervention during infection by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, even though further studies are still necessary to better characterize the immune response triggered by GITR activation during T. gondii infection. PMID:27027302

  7. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Tao, Shasha; Lian, Fangru; Chau, Binh T.; Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan; Fang, Deyu; Lantz, R. Clark; Zhang, Donna D.

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  8. Respiratory responses to passive and active recovery from exercise.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Niizeki, K; Miyamoto, Y

    1997-02-01

    To investigate the effect of the neural components associated with leg movements on the control of ventilation during recovery from exercise, we recorded the minute ventilation (VE), oxygen uptake (VO2), and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) of eight normal volunteers during recovery from moderate, steady-state cycle exercise (170 W). The recovery phases were undergone separately under two different conditions: 5 min of rest (passive recovery) on a bicycle ergometer and 3 min of pedaling at a work rate of 0W (active recovery) followed by 2 min of rest. The phase-1 responses were observed in all the variables studied at the transition of passive recovery but not in the active recovery phase. The kinetics of VCO2, during the off-transition were significantly faster than those of VE in both recoveries, indicating that the decreases in VCO2 could precede the decreases in VE. Although the levels of VE and VCO2 during active recovery were significantly higher than those during passive recovery, the decline in VE was closely proportional to that of VCO2 under both recovery conditions, with resultant indications of similar VE-VCO2 regression lines. These findings suggest that the flux of CO2 to the lungs is an important determinant of ventilatory drive during recovery, and that neither central command nor neural afferents from contracting muscles are requisite for the control of ventilation during recovery from exercise. PMID:9159643

  9. Transverse gravity versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J. E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂{sub μ}ξ{sup μ} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  10. Rotating gravity gradiometer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1982-04-01

    Two rotating gravity gradiometer (RGG) sensors, along with all the external electronics needed to operate them, and the fixtures and special test equipment needed to fill and align the bearings, were assembled in a laboratory, and inspected. The thermal noise threshold of the RGG can be lowered by replacing a damping resistor in the first stage electronics by an active artificial resistor that generates less random voltage noise per unit bandwidth than the Johnson noise from the resistor it replaces. The artificial resistor circuit consists of an operational amplifier, three resistors, and a small DC to DC floating power supply. These are small enough to be retrofitted to the present circuit boards inside the RGG rotor in place of the 3 Megohm resistor. Using the artificial resistor, the thermal noise of the RGG-2 sensor can be lowered from 0.3 Eotvos to 0.15 Eotvos for a 10 sec integration time.

  11. Transverse gravity versus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J. J.

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂μξμ = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  12. Rotating gravity gradiometer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Two rotating gravity gradiometer (RGG) sensors, along with all the external electronics needed to operate them, and the fixtures and special test equipment needed to fill and align the bearings, were assembled in a laboratory, and inspected. The thermal noise threshold of the RGG can be lowered by replacing a damping resistor in the first stage electronics by an active artificial resistor that generates less random voltage noise per unit bandwidth than the Johnson noise from the resistor it replaces. The artificial resistor circuit consists of an operational amplifier, three resistors, and a small DC to DC floating power supply. These are small enough to be retrofitted to the present circuit boards inside the RGG rotor in place of the 3 Megohm resistor. Using the artificial resistor, the thermal noise of the RGG-2 sensor can be lowered from 0.3 Eotvos to 0.15 Eotvos for a 10 sec integration time.

  13. Utilization of an Anti-Gravity Treadmill in a Physical Activity Program with Female Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    FAIRMAN, CIARAN M.; KENDALL, KRISTINA L.; HARRIS, BRANDONN S.; CRANDALL, KENNETH J.; MCMILLAN, JIM

    2016-01-01

    Breast Cancer survivors can experience a myriad of physical and psychological benefits as a result of regular exercise. This study aimed to build on previous research using lower impact exercise programs by using an antigravity (Alter-G®) treadmill to administer cardiovascular training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness a physical activity program, including an Alter-G® treadmill, for improving physiological and psychosocial measures in female breast cancer survivors. A 14-week intervention using an AB-AB study design was employed. Six female breast cancer survivors were recruited to participate in the study. Participants attended three 60-minute sessions per week, consisting of a combination of muscular strength/endurance, and cardiovascular endurance exercises. Consistent with current literature and guidelines, exercise interventions were individualized and tailored to suit individuals. Data was collected and analyzed in 2013. Visual inspection of results found improvements in cardiovascular endurance and measures of body composition. Quality of life was maintained and in some cases, improved. Finally, no adverse effects were reported from the participants, and adherence to the program for those who completed the study was 97%. The results of this study suggest that the use of a physical activity program in combination with an Alter-G® treadmill may provide practical and meaningful improvements in measures of cardiovascular endurance and body composition. PMID:27293508

  14. Dynamic shear of granular material under variable gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Klein, S. P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes some experiments with granular materials which recently have been conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft during variable gravity maneuvers. The main experimental apparatus consisted of a small drum containing granular material which was rotated slowly while the angle assumed by the slip surface with respect to the horizontal was observed and recorded photographically. Conventional wisdom has held that this 'dynamic angle of response' was a material constant, independent of (among other things) gravitational level. The results presented here are quite contrary, suggesting instead an angle that varies with the reciprocal of the square root of gravity. This finding may have important consequences on the understanding of many active processes in Planetary Geology involving granular materials and may provide qualitative confirmation of some of the theoretical predictions of modern models of granular shear flows.

  15. Activation of oxidative stress-responsive signaling pathways in early splenotoxic response of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-07-15

    Aniline exposure causes toxicity to the spleen, which leads to a variety of sarcomas, and fibrosis appears to be an important preneoplastic lesion. However, early molecular mechanisms in aniline-induced toxicity to the spleen are not known. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure results in iron overload and induction of oxidative stress in the spleen, which can cause transcriptional upregulation of fibrogenic/inflammatory cytokines via activation of oxidative stress (OS)-responsive signaling pathways. To test this mechanism, male SD rats were treated with aniline (1mmol/kg/day via gavage) for 7days, an experimental condition that precedes the appearance of fibrosis. Significant increases in both NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 binding activity was observed in the nuclear extracts of splenocytes from aniline-treated rats as determined by ELISAs, and supported by Western blot data showing increases in p-I{kappa}B{alpha}, p-p65 and p-c-Jun. To understand the upstream signaling events which could account for the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, phosphorylation patterns of I{kappa}B kinases (IKK{alpha} and IKK{beta}) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Our data showed remarkable increases in both p-IKK{alpha} and p-IKK{beta} in the splenocytes from aniline-treated rats, suggesting their role in the phosphorylation of both I{kappa}B{alpha} and p65 subunits. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to activation of all three classes of MAPKs, as evident from increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) and p38 MAPKs, which could potentially contribute to the observed activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B. Activation of upstream signaling molecules was also associated with simultaneous increases in gene transcription of cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha}. The observed sequence of events following aniline exposure could initiate a fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  16. Effectiveness of classroom response systems within an active learning environment.

    PubMed

    Welch, Susan

    2013-11-01

    In nursing education, the inclusion of pedagogical tools is necessary to transform Millennial classrooms. One such pedagogical tool currently offered is classroom response systems (CRS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CRS as a pedagogical tool in improving nursing students' examination performance within an active learning environment. A pretest-posttest design was used to determine whether there was a relationship between the use of CRS (independent variable) and nursing students' examination performance in a first-year Professional Practice course (dependent variable). Paired t tests revealed no greater improvement in posttest scores. Therefore, the use of CRS technology was not effective in increasing nursing students' examination scores in the Professional Practice course. Additional research is needed to provide adequate understanding of the effectiveness of CRS within the nursing education classroom. PMID:24127175

  17. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  18. Active Disaster Response System for a Smart Building

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Yen; Chu, Edward T.-H; Ku, Lun-Wei; Liu, Jane W. S.

    2014-01-01

    Disaster warning and surveillance systems have been widely applied to help the public be aware of an emergency. However, existing warning systems are unable to cooperate with household appliances or embedded controllers; that is, they cannot provide enough time for preparedness and evacuation, especially for disasters like earthquakes. In addition, the existing warning and surveillance systems are not responsible for collecting sufficient information inside a building for relief workers to conduct a proper rescue action after a disaster happens. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a proof of concept prototype, named the active disaster response system (ADRS), which automatically performs emergency tasks when an earthquake happens. ADRS can interpret Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) messages, published by an official agency, and actuate embedded controllers to perform emergency tasks to respond to the alerts. Examples of emergency tasks include opening doors and windows and cutting off power lines and gas valves. In addition, ADRS can maintain a temporary network by utilizing the embedded controllers; hence, victims trapped inside a building are still able to post emergency messages if the original network is disconnected. We conducted a field trial to evaluate the effectiveness of ADRS after an earthquake happened. Our results show that compared to manually operating emergency tasks, ADRS can reduce the operation time by up to 15 s, which is long enough for people to get under sturdy furniture, or to evacuate from the third floor to the first floor, or to run more than 100 m. PMID:25237897

  19. Design of Responsive and Active (Soft) Materials Using Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Bukusoglu, Emre; Bedolla Pantoja, Marco; Mushenheim, Peter C; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-06-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are widely known for their use in liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Indeed, LCDs represent one of the most successful technologies developed to date using a responsive soft material: An electric field is used to induce a change in ordering of the LC and thus a change in optical appearance. Over the past decade, however, research has revealed the fundamental underpinnings of potentially far broader and more pervasive uses of LCs for the design of responsive soft material systems. These systems involve a delicate interplay of the effects of surface-induced ordering, elastic strain of LCs, and formation of topological defects and are characterized by a chemical complexity and diversity of nano- and micrometer-scale geometry that goes well beyond that previously investigated. As a reflection of this evolution, the community investigating LC-based materials now relies heavily on concepts from colloid and interface science. In this context, this review describes recent advances in colloidal and interfacial phenomena involving LCs that are enabling the design of new classes of soft matter that respond to stimuli as broad as light, airborne pollutants, bacterial toxins in water, mechanical interactions with living cells, molecular chirality, and more. Ongoing efforts hint also that the collective properties of LCs (e.g., LC-dispersed colloids) will, over the coming decade, yield exciting new classes of driven or active soft material systems in which organization (and useful properties) emerges during the dissipation of energy. PMID:26979412

  20. Active disaster response system for a smart building.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yen; Chu, Edward T-H; Ku, Lun-Wei; Liu, Jane W S

    2014-01-01

    Disaster warning and surveillance systems have been widely applied to help the public be aware of an emergency. However, existing warning systems are unable to cooperate with household appliances or embedded controllers; that is, they cannot provide enough time for preparedness and evacuation, especially for disasters like earthquakes. In addition, the existing warning and surveillance systems are not responsible for collecting sufficient information inside a building for relief workers to conduct a proper rescue action after a disaster happens. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a proof of concept prototype, named the active disaster response system (ADRS), which automatically performs emergency tasks when an earthquake happens. ADRS can interpret Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) messages, published by an official agency, and actuate embedded controllers to perform emergency tasks to respond to the alerts. Examples of emergency tasks include opening doors and windows and cutting off power lines and gas valves. In addition, ADRS can maintain a temporary network by utilizing the embedded controllers; hence, victims trapped inside a building are still able to post emergency messages if the original network is disconnected. We conducted a field trial to evaluate the effectiveness of ADRS after an earthquake happened. Our results show that compared to manually operating emergency tasks, ADRS can reduce the operation time by up to 15 s, which is long enough for people to get under sturdy furniture, or to evacuate from the third floor to the first floor, or to run more than 100 m. PMID:25237897

  1. Canonical gravity with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Das, Rupam

    2008-09-15

    Canonical gravity in real Ashtekar-Barbero variables is generalized to allow for fermionic matter. The resulting torsion changes several expressions in Holst's original vacuum analysis, which are summarized here. This in turn requires adaptations to the known loop quantization of gravity coupled to fermions, which is discussed on the basis of the classical analysis. As a result, parity invariance is not manifestly realized in loop quantum gravity.

  2. Stress responses in flavivirus-infected cells: activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    The Flavivirus is a genus of RNA viruses that includes multiple long known human, animal, and zoonotic pathogens such as Dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, or Japanese encephalitis virus, as well as other less known viruses that represent potential threats for human and animal health such as Usutu or Zika viruses. Flavivirus replication is based on endoplasmic reticulum-derived structures. Membrane remodeling and accumulation of viral factors induce endoplasmic reticulum stress that results in activation of a cellular signaling response termed unfolded protein response (UPR), which can be modulated by the viruses for their own benefit. Concomitant with the activation of the UPR, an upregulation of the autophagic pathway in cells infected with different flaviviruses has also been described. This review addresses the current knowledge of the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum stress, UPR, and autophagy in flavivirus-infected cells and the growing evidences for an involvement of these cellular pathways in the replication and pathogenesis of these viruses. PMID:24917859

  3. Listening as a Perceived and Interactive Activity: Understanding the Impact of Verbal Listening Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Bradford

    2012-01-01

    This sequenced activity encourages active engagement with the idea that listening and speaking are not inherently separate or one-way activities. Listening involves both verbal, and nonverbal responses and perceptions of effective listening are tied to these patterns of response. These patterns of response impact both the immediate communication…

  4. Active Ageing in CIS Countries: Semantics, Challenges, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sidorenko, Alexandre; Zaidi, Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Although the CIS countries are connected together by the legacy of breaking away from the Soviet Union, they have had a distinctive transition course and are rather diverse in terms of the population ageing challenges and policy responses in place. The commonality is that a comprehensive national strategy on ageing is lacking, and many of necessary reforms were put aside owing to political uncertainties, lack of societal consensus, and financial instability. The notion of active ageing is associated with the term “accelerated ageing,” which is understood to be an individual living a life under harsh living conditions or a society experiencing rapid increases in the relative number of older persons, and therefore it carries a negative connotation. Yet, in the same spirit as the European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations 2012, the CIS countries have initiated sectoral programmes towards enhancing employment of older workers, social participation of older people in the society in a wider sense and also measures promoting health and independent living of older persons. PMID:23346109

  5. Physcomitrella patens Activates Defense Responses against the Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Reboledo, Guillermo; Del Campo, Raquel; Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Mara, Héctor; Ponce de León, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is a suitable model plant to analyze the activation of defense mechanisms after pathogen assault. In this study, we show that Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from symptomatic citrus fruit infects P. patens and cause disease symptoms evidenced by browning and maceration of tissues. After C. gloeosporioides infection, P. patens reinforces the cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and induces the expression of a Dirigent-protein-like encoding gene that could lead to the formation of lignin-like polymers. C. gloeosporioides-inoculated protonemal cells show cytoplasmic collapse, browning of chloroplasts and modifications of the cell wall. Chloroplasts relocate in cells of infected tissues toward the initially infected C. gloeosporioides cells. P. patens also induces the expression of the defense genes PAL and CHS after fungal colonization. P. patens reporter lines harboring the auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) fused to β-glucuronidase revealed an auxin response in protonemal tissues, cauloids and leaves of C. gloeosporioides-infected moss tissues, indicating the activation of auxin signaling. Thus, P. patens is an interesting plant to gain insight into defense mechanisms that have evolved in primitive land plants to cope with microbial pathogens. PMID:26389888

  6. Physcomitrella patens Activates Defense Responses against the Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Reboledo, Guillermo; del Campo, Raquel; Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Mara, Héctor; Ponce de León, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is a suitable model plant to analyze the activation of defense mechanisms after pathogen assault. In this study, we show that Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from symptomatic citrus fruit infects P. patens and cause disease symptoms evidenced by browning and maceration of tissues. After C. gloeosporioides infection, P. patens reinforces the cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and induces the expression of a Dirigent-protein-like encoding gene that could lead to the formation of lignin-like polymers. C. gloeosporioides-inoculated protonemal cells show cytoplasmic collapse, browning of chloroplasts and modifications of the cell wall. Chloroplasts relocate in cells of infected tissues toward the initially infected C. gloeosporioides cells. P. patens also induces the expression of the defense genes PAL and CHS after fungal colonization. P. patens reporter lines harboring the auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) fused to β-glucuronidase revealed an auxin response in protonemal tissues, cauloids and leaves of C. gloeosporioides-infected moss tissues, indicating the activation of auxin signaling. Thus, P. patens is an interesting plant to gain insight into defense mechanisms that have evolved in primitive land plants to cope with microbial pathogens. PMID:26389888

  7. Cardiovascular responses to active and passive cycling movements.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, A C; Williamson, J W; Friedman, D B; Araújo, C G; Mitchell, J H

    1994-06-01

    Ten healthy subjects were evaluated at rest and at 5 min of unloaded active (AC) and passive (PC) cycling. Passive limb movements were accomplished using a tandem bicycle with a second rider performing the movements. We measured heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), oxygen uptake (VO2), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and electrical activity (EMG) of lower limbs muscles. Values for stroke volume (SV) and peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) were calculated. EMG, RPE, and VO2 were higher during AC than during PC (P < 0.001). CO increased during both modes of cycling, but during AC it resulted from a HR acceleration (73 +/- 2 at rest to 82 +/- 2 beats.min-1 at 60 rpm; P < 0.001) with no change in SV whereas during PC, SV increased from rest (65 +/- 4 at rest to 71 +/- 3 ml at 60 rpm; P = 0.003) along with no change in HR. PVR remained constant during PC, but decreased by 13% during AC (P < 0.001) and MAP increased only during PC (93 +/- 2 at rest to 107 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 rpm). These results supports the concept that central command determines the HR response to dynamic exercise. The increase in SV and consequently in MAP during PC was probably due to increased venous return and/or to muscle mechanoreceptor-evoked increased myocardial contractility. PMID:8052111

  8. Dermatophytes Activate Skin Keratinocytes via Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling and Induce Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Achterman, Rebecca R.; Moyes, David L.; Thavaraj, Selvam; Smith, Adam R.; Blair, Kris M.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophytes cause superficial and cutaneous fungal infections in immunocompetent hosts and invasive disease in immunocompromised hosts. However, the host mechanisms that regulate innate immune responses against these fungi are largely unknown. Here, we utilized commercially available epidermal tissues and primary keratinocytes to assess (i) damage induction by anthropophilic, geophilic, and zoophilic dermatophyte strains and (ii) the keratinocyte signaling pathways, transcription factors, and proinflammatory responses induced by a representative dermatophyte, Trichophyton equinum. Initially, five dermatophyte species were tested for their ability to invade, cause tissue damage, and induce cytokines, with Microsporum gypseum inducing the greatest level of damage and cytokine release. Using T. equinum as a representative dermatophyte, we found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were predominantly affected, with increased levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) but decreased levels of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Notably, the NF-κB and PI3K pathways were largely unaffected. T. equinum also significantly increased expression of the AP-1-associated transcription factor, c-Fos, and the MAPK regulatory phosphatase, MKP1. Importantly, the ability of T. equinum to invade, cause tissue damage, activate signaling and transcription factors, and induce proinflammatory responses correlated with germination, indicating that germination may be important for dermatophyte virulence and host immune activation. PMID:25667269

  9. Activated human neutrophil response to perfluorocarbon nanobubbles: oxygen-dependent and -independent cytotoxic responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Li-Jia; Fang, Jia-You

    2011-06-10

    Nanobubbles, a type of nanoparticles with acoustically active properties, are being utilized as diagnostic and therapeutic nanoparticles to better understand, detect, and treat human diseases. The objective of this work was to prepare different nanobubble formulations and investigate their physicochemical characteristics and toxic responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-activated human neutrophils. The nanobubbles were prepared using perfluoropentane and coconut oil as the respective core and shell, with soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and/or cationic surfactants as the interfacial layers. The cytotoxic effect of the nanobubbles on neutrophils was determined by extracellular O₂(.)⁻ release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and elastase release. Particle sizes of the nanobubbles with different percentages of perfluorocarbon, oil, and surfactants in ranged 186-432 nm. The nanobubbles were demonstrated to inhibit the generation of superoxide and intracellular ROS. The cytotoxicity of nanobubbles may be mainly associated with membrane damage, as indicated by the high LDH leakage. Systems with Forestall (FE), a cationic surfactant, or higher SPC contents exhibited the greatest LDH release by 3-fold compared to the control. The further addition of an oil component reduced the cytotoxicity induced by the nanobubbles. Exposure to most of the nanobubble formulations upregulated elastase release by activated neutrophils. Contrary to this result, stearylamine (SA)-containing systems slightly but significantly suppressed elastase release. FE and SA in a free form caused stronger responses by neutrophils than when they were incorporated into nanobubbles. In summary, exposure to nanobubbles resulted in a formulation-dependent toxicity toward human neutrophils that was associated with both oxygen-dependent and -independent pathways. Clinicians should therefore exercise caution when using nanobubbles in patients

  10. Solid holography and massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberte, Lasma; Baggioli, Matteo; Khmelnitsky, Andrei; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    Momentum dissipation is an important ingredient in condensed matter physics that requires a translation breaking sector. In the bottom-up gauge/gravity duality, this implies that the gravity dual is massive. We start here a systematic analysis of holographic massive gravity (HMG) theories, which admit field theory dual interpretations and which, therefore, might store interesting condensed matter applications. We show that there are many phases of HMG that are fully consistent effective field theories and which have been left overlooked in the literature. The most important distinction between the different HMG phases is that they can be clearly separated into solids and fluids. This can be done both at the level of the unbroken spacetime symmetries as well as concerning the elastic properties of the dual materials. We extract the modulus of rigidity of the solid HMG black brane solutions and show how it relates to the graviton mass term. We also consider the implications of the different HMGs on the electric response. We show that the types of response that can be consistently described within this framework is much wider than what is captured by the narrow class of models mostly considered so far.

  11. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, Daniel R.; Hart, John E.; Weidman, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    We are beginning laboratory experiments using magnetically active ferrofluids to study surface waves in novel geometries. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics, and the magnetic body force felt by ferrofluid in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is used to create a geopotential field which is a section of or an entire sphere or cylinder. New optical, electromagnetic and ultrasonic diagnostic techniques are under development to initially study capillary-gravity wave propagation and interaction in such geometries.

  12. Satellite Observations of Atmospheric Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, D. L.; Waters, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite produced the first global maps of small-scale gravity wave variances in the middle atmosphere. Observations at 30-88 km altitudes show that the variances of 30-100 km horizontal scales are strongly correlated with surface topography and stratospheric jet streams. The several years of MLS data will provide a climatology of global gravity wave activity needed for modeling atmospheric circulations and mixing processes.

  13. CSR Gravity Field Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettadpur, Srinivas

    2014-05-01

    The joint NASA/DLR GRACE mission has successfully operated for nearly 12 years, and has provided a remarkable record of global mass flux due to a large variety of geophysical and climate processes at various spatio-temporal scales. The University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) hosts the mission PI, and is responsible for delivery of operational (presently denoted as Release-05 or RL05) gravity field data products. In addition, CSR generates and distributes a variety of other gravity field data products, including products generated from the use of satellite laser ranging data. This poster will provide an overview of all these data products, their relative quality, potential applications, and future plans for their development and delivery.

  14. Gravity referenced elevation encoder development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, R. E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent progress in the development of a gravity-sensor-based instrument for determining the elevation angle of DSN antennas is described. The benefits of such a system include the capability to locate the Gravity Referenced Elevation Encoder (GREE) directly on the primary reflector (thus bypassing structural flexure and deformation error sources), anticipated lower maintenance costs compared to the present gimbal encoders, direct replaceability, or supplementation of the present gimbal encoders and the utilization of off-the-shelf components to construct the GREE. This article includes a description of the nominal GREE design. Test results on a laboratory breadboard model are given. Rigid-body dynamics of the GREE are derived and the simulated performance in response to measured antenna vibrations is given.

  15. Gravity referenced elevation encoder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of a gravity-sensor-based instrument for determining the elevation angle of DSN antennas is described. The benefits of such a system include the capability to locate the Gravity Referenced Elevation Encoder (GREE) directly on the primary reflector (thus bypassing structural flexure and deformation error sources), anticipated lower maintenance costs compared to the present gimbal encoders, direct replaceability, or supplementation of the present gimbal encoders and the utilization of off-the-shelf components to construct the GREE. This article includes a description of the nominal GREE design. Test results on a laboratory breadboard model are given. Rigid-body dynamics of the GREE are derived and the simulated performance in response to measured antenna vibrations is given.

  16. Accommodative response and cortical activity during sustained attention.

    PubMed

    Poltavski, Dmitri V; Biberdorf, David; Petros, Thomas V

    2012-06-15

    Greater accommodative lag and vergence deficits have been linked to attentional deficits similar to those observed in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of accommodative-vergence stress on a measure of sustained attention (Conners CPT) used in the diagnosis of ADHD. Twenty-seven normal non-ADHD adults completed the Conners CPT twice: wearing -2.00 D lenses and normally (without the -2.00 D lenses) in a counterbalanced order with at least 24 h between the sessions. Simultaneous recording of participants' dynamic accommodative responses was performed from the right eye using the Grand Seiko WAM-5500 auto-refractor and electroencephalographic activity (EEG) in the left prefrontal region using the Neurosky Mindset headset. The results demonstrated a significantly greater accommodative lag in the -2.00 D stress condition and a significantly poorer performance on the Conners CPT as indexed by slower reaction time, greater standard error of hit reaction time, grater response variability, poorer stimulus detectability and a greater number of perseverations. No differences were observed on measures of EEG in the theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), and beta (12-20 Hz) bands. Moreover, when directly juxtaposed with each EEG band in multiple linear regression analyses, greater accommodative lag in the stress condition was significantly associated with a greater probability of clinical classification on the Conners CPT, and was also marginally predictive of the number of omissions recorded in the stress condition. The results demonstrated that sustained attention can be influenced by such factors as accommodative-vergence stress and suggest that bottom-up processes can contribute to and potentially exacerbate attentional problems in individuals with ADHD. The study also showed that cortical dysfunction (while sufficient) may not be a necessary condition for attentional deficits. PMID:22580016

  17. Gauge/Gravity Duality (Gauge Gravity Duality)

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2010-02-24

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  18. Electricity from Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Roy

    2007-03-01

    Einstein's cosmological constant as gravity, will unify quantum mechanics to general relativity and link gravity to electromagnetism. Then, an electromagnetic vacuum engine driven by the force that spins, moves, and sustains mass at the subatomic level, will do free, what generators cannot. Flowing outward-bound sinusoidally from its source, this gravity force assumes a three-dimensional spherical universe. Lines of force intersect, spinning into gyroscopic particles and passes as time-present, with a compression gravity of space-time curvature continuum unifying all mass. The spaces between approaching masses suffer a decrease of right-angled vacuum energy, increasing external pressures, pushing them together. Ubiquitous gravity now interacts electromagnetically with mass. Gravity's ``heat energy'' operates below absolute zero and squeezes mass into thermonuclear ignition of stars. Creation needs a gravity field for the propagation of light that will make sense of its wave/particle behavior. Creation from a white hole recycles down through a black one, into new beginnings of galaxies. ``Vacuum energy'' will light cities and factories; faster than light spacecraft will raise silently from the ground utilizing the very gravity it defies, propelling us to the stars.

  19. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlman, Howard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes the construction of the Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator, which can be used to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena, including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems behave. Presents experiments, appropriate for classroom use, to demonstrate how the behavior of common physical systems change when…

  20. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  1. Neural representation of orientation relative to gravity in the macaque cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Jean; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A fundamental challenge for maintaining spatial orientation and interacting with the world is knowledge of our orientation relative to gravity, i.e. tilt. Sensing gravity is complicated because of Einstein’s equivalence principle, where gravitational and translational accelerations are physically indistinguishable. Theory has proposed that this ambiguity is solved by tracking head tilt through multisensory integration. Here we identify a group of Purkinje cells in the caudal cerebellar vermis with responses that reflect an estimate of head tilt. These tilt-selective cells are complementary to translation-selective Purkinje cells, such that their population activities sum to the net gravito-inertial acceleration encoded by the otolith organs, as predicted by theory. These findings reflect the remarkable ability of the cerebellum for neural computation and provide novel quantitative evidence for a neural representation of gravity, whose calculation relies on long-postulated theoretical concepts such as internal models and Bayesian priors. PMID:24360549

  2. Anti-gravity device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palsingh, S. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An educational toy useful in demonstrating fundamental concepts regarding the laws of gravity is described. The device comprises a sphere 10 of radius r resting on top of sphere 12 of radius R. The center of gravity of sphere 10 is displaced from its geometrical center by distance D. The dimensions are so related that D((R+r)/r) is greater than r. With the center of gravity of sphere 10 lying on a vertical line, the device is in equilibrium. When sphere 10 is rolled on the surface of sphere 12 it will return to its equilibrium position upon release. This creates an illusion that sphere 10 is defying the laws of gravity. In reality, due to the above noted relationship of D, R, and r, the center of gravity of sphere 10 rises from its equilibrium position as it rolls a short distance up or down the surface of sphere 12.

  3. Application of constrained optimization to active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Mukhopadhyay, V.

    1981-01-01

    Active control of aeroelastic response is a complex in which the designer usually tries to satisfy many criteria which are often conflicting. To further complicate the design problem, the state space equations describing this type of control problem are usually of high order, involving a large number of states to represent the flexible structure and unsteady aerodynamics. Control laws based on the standard Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) method are of the same high order as the aeroelastic plant. To overcome this disadvantage of the LQG mode, an approach developed for designing low order optimal control laws which uses a nonlinear programming algorithm to search for the values of the control law variables that minimize a composite performance index, was extended to the constrained optimization problem. The method involves searching for the values of the control law variables that minimize a basic performance index while satisfying several inequality constraints that describe the design criteria. The method is applied to gust load alleviation of a drone aircraft.

  4. Lunar Scout Two spacecraft gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.

    1993-01-01

    Measurement of the gravity field of the Moon has a high science priority because of its implications for the internal structure and thermal history of the Moon, and it has a high priority for future exploration activities because of the influence of lunar gravity on spacecraft navigation and orbit maintenance. The current state of knowledge in the lunar gravity field (and the uncertainty in the knowledge) is based primarily on data accumulated from the Lunar Orbiter and Apollo programs. Data are sparse and emphasize the equatorial band (+/- 30 deg) on the near side of the Moon. There are no tracking data on the far side and only the Lunar Orbiter 5 provides a small amount of high inclination data. A host of gravity models developed from different combinations of tracking data have large discrepancies in their predictions of spacecraft motion and orbit lifetimes. There are also large disagreements in the Mercator projections of the gravity acceleration from each model, especially on the far side, where the contours tend to have no obvious relationship with the local topography. The science and engineering requirements for global gravity field mapping will be satisfied with continuous radio metric tracking of Lunar Scout 1 in a low polar orbit using the Deep Space Network and Lunar Scout 2 in a high elliptical orbit. The gravity field of the Moon will be mapped during the Scout Program using a two spacecraft concept. In the two spacecraft concept, one spacecraft is placed in a high altitude eccentric orbit while the second spacecraft is in a low altitude polar orbit. The gravity experiment requires a radio frequency that will permit two-way Doppler tracking between the spacecraft and the Deep Space Network (DSN). Both spacecraft carry NASA standard transponder systems for data transmission to Earth as well as for tracking and orbit determination. Data sufficient to produce a gravity field map could be acquired within one month with this system.

  5. Bengal Fan sediment transport activity and response to climate forcing inferred from sediment physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Wiedicke-Hombach, M.; Kudrass, H. R.; Erlenkeuser, H.

    2003-02-01

    We obtained sediment physical properties and geochemical data from 47 piston and gravity cores located in the Bay of Bengal, to study the complex history of the Late Pleistocene run-off from the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers and its imprint on the Bengal Fan. Grain-size parameters were predicted from core logs of density and velocity to infer sediment transport energy and to distinguish different environments along the 3000-km-long transport path from the delta platform to the lower fan. On the shelf, 27 cores indicate rapidly prograding delta foresets today that contain primarily mud, whereas outer shelf sediment has 25% higher silt contents, indicative of stronger and more stable transport regime, which prevent deposition and expose a Late Pleistocene relic surface. Deposition is currently directed towards the shelf canyon 'Swatch of No Ground', where turbidites are released to the only channel-levee system that is active on the fan during the Holocene. Active growth of the channel-levee system occurred throughout sea-level rise and highstand with a distinct growth phase at the end of the Younger Dryas. Coarse-grained material bypasses the upper fan and upper parts of the middle fan, where particle flow is enhanced as a result of flow-restriction in well-defined channels. Sandier material is deposited mainly as sheet-flow deposits on turbidite-dominated plains at the lower fan. The currently most active part of the fan with 10-40-cm-thick turbidites is documented for the central channel including inner levees (e.g., site 40). Site 47 from the lower fan far to the east of the active channel-levee system indicates the end of turbidite sedimentation at 300 ka for that location. That time corresponds to the sea-level lowering during late isotopic stage 9 when sediment supply to the fan increased and led to channel avulsion farther upstream, probably indicating a close relation of climate variability and fan activity. Pelagic deep-sea sites 22 and 28 contain a 630

  6. The Guiding Light: Vri/uvby & Tio Photometry Of The Chromospherically Active & Spotted Binary System Im Peg - The Guide-star For The Gravity Probe-b Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Guinan, E.; Messina, S.; Wasatonic, R.; McCook, G.

    2007-12-01

    We report on the starspot and chromospheric properties of IM Pegasi - the guide star of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite. GP-B's mission is to measure two predicted consequences of General Relativity - frame-dragging and geodetic effects, via its extremely precise onboard gyroscopes. IM Peg was selected as the mission's guide star as it is not only bright enough to be seen with GP-B's onboard optical telescope but it is also a bright radio source. Thus, ground-based radio telescope observations can easily and accurately correct for IM Peg's motions in space. However, IM Peg is a chomospherically active binary system with a luminous K2 III primary star showing rotationally modulated (Prot 24.5 days) light variations from starspots. The starspots can cause problems as GP-B can erroneously interpret a change in starspot coverage (and corresponding shifts in the light center) as the star's movement. This apparent shift can also be exacerbated by possible changes in the light-center of the binary system arising from changes in the light balance with the fainter dK component. Since 2000 we have carried out multi-band high-precision photoelectric photometry of IM Peg to determine its activity and starspot coverage. Our photometry uses Strömgren uvby filters, VRCIC filters and TiO (719/755 nm ) narrow-band filter sets. Measurements were made relative to neaby comparsion & check stars using a robotic 0.8-m telescope (located in AZ) and 0.25-m telescope (located in PA). The TiO- and multi-band continuum photometry constrains the starspot areas, temperatures and distributions. The photometry is being modeled to determine the effects of changing starspot areas and distributions on the light center of the binary. The results of our analysis and possible impacts on the GP-B Mission will be discussed. This research is supported by NSF/RUI Grants AST- 0507536 and AST- 0507542 which we gratefully acknowledge.

  7. Active control of a balanced two-stage pendulum vibration isolation system and its application to laser interferometric gravity wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Veitch, P.J.; Robertson, N.A.; Cantley, C.A.; Hough, J. )

    1993-05-01

    The investigation of the servo control of the position of the bottom mass in a balanced two-stage pendulum vibration isolation system is reported. Experimental results for a simple prototype system and predictions based on a model presented in this paper are in good agreement. The application of such a system to a high-sensitivity laser interferometric gravity wave detector is discussed.

  8. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  9. No Presentism in Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Christian

    This essay offers a reaction to the recent resurgence of presentism in the philosophy of time. What is of particular interest in this renaissance is that a number of recent arguments supporting presentism are crafted in an untypically naturalistic vein, breathing new life into a metaphysics of time with a bad track record of co-habitation with modern physics. Against this trend, the present essay argues that the pressure on presentism exerted by special relativity and its core lesson of Lorentz symmetry cannot easily be shirked. A categorization of presentist responses to this pressure is offered. As a case in point, I analyze a recent argument by Monton (Presentism and quantum gravity, 263-280, 2006) presenting a case for the compatibility of presentism with quantum gravity. Monton claims that this compatibility arises because there are quantum theories of gravity that use fixed foliations of spacetime and that such fixed foliations provide a natural home for a metaphysically robust notion of the present. A careful analysis leaves Monton's argument wanting. In sum, the prospects of presentism to be alleviated from the stress applied by fundamental physics are faint.

  10. Body Mass Changes Associated With Hyper-Gravity are Independent of Adrenal Derived Hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moran, Megan M.; Wang, Tommy J.; Baer, Lisa A.; Yuan, Fang; Fung, Cyra K.; Stein, T. Peter; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to hyper-gravity results in a number of metabolic changes associated with increases in catecholamines and corticosterone. These changes result in a loss of body and fat mass. To assess the role of hormones derived from the adrenal gland in the changes we studied sham operated (SO) and adrenalectomized (ADX) male rats exposed to hyper-gravity of 2 G for 14 days. Control groups at 1 G were also studied. Urinary epinephrine (EPI) and corticosterone (CORT) were reduced in ADX animals. In response to 2 G there was an increase in urinary EPI and CORT in SO rats, while levels were unchanged in ADX animals. Both groups of animals had similar increases in urinary norepinephrine levels. The reductions of body mass gain in response to 2 G were the same in both groups. The decrease in relative fat mass was greater in ADX. Energy intake and expenditure were not different between groups. In response of returning to 1 G for 24 hours and reexposure to hyper-gravity there were no differences between SO and ADX in the changes of food and water intake, body mass or activity. The changes in metabolism with exposure to hyper-gravity do not appear to require hormones derived from the adrenal gland. The increase in lypolysis and alterations body and fat mass appear to be modulated by sympathetically derived norepinehrine.

  11. World gravity standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uotila, U. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to use gravity anomalies in geodetic computations and geophysical interpretations, the observed gravity values from which anomalies are derived should be referred to one consistent world wide system. The International Gravity Standardization Net 1971 was adapted by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics at Moscow in 1971, the network was result of extensive cooperation by many organizations and individuals around the world. The network contains more than 1800 stations around the world. The data used in the adjustment included more than 25,000 gravimetry, pendulum and absolute measurements.

  12. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  13. Gravity and animal embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Lynn M.

    1989-01-01

    Out of more than 4,500 rat hours in space there was only one experimental attempt (Cosmos 1129) at mating with an apparent absence of fertilization, implantation and subsequent development to term and partuition. Portions of this process were successfully flown, however, including the major portion of organogenesis in the rat (Cosmos 1524). These observations show that the cellular and molecular events underlying morphogenesis and differentiation in a small mammal can proceed normally in-utero under microgravity and other conditions encountered during short-duration flight. However, it is not known whether this situation will hold for larger mammals over several generations during extended missions that venture outside of near Earth. Furthermore, it is not understood why the previous attempt at obtaining copulation, fertilization and implantation in orbit failed but may be related to limitations of the rat habitat for meeting the preconditions for reproductive behavior. With respect to mammalian development it is important to appreciate that fertilization and development occur internally within the female and take a long time to complete and their success will, therefore, be contingent upon the maternal response to the space environment. One process central to development (the establishment of cell lines) is initiated prior to implantation by environmental asymmetries preceived by progenitor cells. These asymmetries appear to result from the formation of asymmetric cell-cell contacts and the concommitant development of an electrical axis across the progenitor cells. Other asymmetries were also documented. It is not known whether any of the known asymmetries perceived by progenitor cells are influenced by gravity vectors and/or by the maternal response to microgravity and other conditions encountered in space.

  14. 20 CFR 665.320 - May other activities be undertaken as part of rapid response?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May other activities be undertaken as part of rapid response? 665.320 Section 665.320 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEWIDE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Rapid Response Activities § 665.320...

  15. Effects of background gravity stimuli on gravity-controlled behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Physiological and developmental effects of altered gravity were researched. The stimulus properties of gravity have been found to possess reinforcing and aversive properties. Experimental approaches taken, used animals placed into fields of artificial gravity, in the form of parabolic or spiral centrifuges. Gravity preferences were noted and it was concluded that the psychophysics of gravity and background factors which support these behaviors should be further explored.

  16. 77 FR 20887 - Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... solicits comments on the information needed to measure customer satisfaction with delivered products and... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey, VA Form 0863....

  17. 77 FR 38398 - Agency Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activities...) National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey, VA Form 0863. OMB Control Number: 2900-0676. Type of... customer's feedback and suggestions on delivered products and services administered by the...

  18. Light-Activated Rapid-Response Polyvinylidene-Fluoride-Based Flexible Films.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles; Yang, Zhenguo

    2016-06-01

    The design strategy and mechanical response mechanism of light-activated, rapid-response, flexible films are presented. Practical applications as a microrobot and a smart spring are demonstrated. PMID:27061392

  19. Reexamining Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.; Hurtak, James J.; Hurtak, Desire E.

    The authors propose that the structure of a micro-vacuum plenum acts as a driving mechanism of the universe, which determines what we observe as oscopic topological conditions on cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. The detailed structure of the vacuum plenum is based on a quantum gravity model. At the micro scale quantum is formulated in terms of non-abelian algebras. Through the pervasive vacuum structure, particle and atomic processes can be reconciled with the larger structures of cosmogenic evolution, that is, matter is continuously created throughout the universe. The constraints of a Schwarzschild-like criterion can also be applied at each point in the evolutionary process which appears not to be linear in all aspects. The source of new matter is considered to be the activity of and interaction through vacuum effects describable in terms of creation and destruction of operators in the Feynman graphical techniques. In the early stages of cosmogenic processes, an inflationary like or multi big bangs may have occurred and were driven by the vacuum plenum. In addition the vacuum effects occur where quantum gravitational processes were much more dominant. Our approach may lead to an understanding of the observed acceleration of distant High-z bright supernovas of over 6. The current Hubble expansion requires a modification in the model of the early universe conditions and may be more appropriate in current cosmological model considerations in local astrophysical phenomena.

  20. Teaching Science. A Lesson Centering on Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    Presents activities to teach students the science concept known variably as center of gravity, center of mass, center of balance, or balance point. Gives examples of activities for the exploration phase of study, concept introduction phase, and concept application phase. (TJQ)

  1. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  2. Introduction to Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rham, Claudia

    We review recent progress on massive gravity. We first show how extra dimensions prove to be a useful tool in building theories of modified gravity, including Galileon theories and their DBI extensions. DGP arises from an infinite size extra dimension, and we show how massive gravity arises from `deconstructing' the extra dimension in the vielbein formalism. We then explain how the ghost issue is resolved in that special theory of massive gravity. The viability of such models relies on the Vainshtein mechanism which is best described in terms of Galileons. While its implementation is successful in most of these models it also comes hand in hand with superluminalities and strong coupling which are reviewed and their real consequences are discussed.

  3. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Variable Gravity Laboratory studies are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) conceptual design and engineering analysis; (2) control strategies (fast crawling maneuvers, main perturbations and their effect upon the acceleration level); and (3) technology requirements.

  4. Rotating Gravity Gradiometer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a Rotating Gravity Gradiometer (RGG) system on board a Lunar Polar Orbiter (LPO) for the measurement of the Lunar gravity field was investigated. A data collection simulation study shows that a gradiometer will give significantly better gravity data than a doppler tracking system for the altitudes under consideration for the LOP, that the present demonstrated sensitivity of the RGG is adequate for measurement of the Lunar gravity gradient field, and that a single RGG instrument will provide almost as much data for geophysical interpretation as an orthogonal three axis RGG system. An engineering study of the RGG sensor/LPO spacecraft interface characteristics shows that the RGG systems under consideration are compatible with the present models of the LPO spacecraft.

  5. From gravity and the organism to gravity and the cell.

    PubMed

    Brown, A H

    1991-07-01

    This workshop on Gravity and the Cell was modeled on a 1968 conference on Gravity and the Organism. Each conference tried to identify the most salient scientific questions about how gravity is important to living systems. In the roughly two decades between the conferences there have been impressive advances in experimental methods, but the major scientific questions that have driven their applications to problems of gravitational biology, i.e., our broad research goals, remain much the same. In the case of plant research, improvements and extensions of biochemical techniques for investigating the ways organisms use environmental (g-force) information in salubrious ways has kept pace with progress in plant biochemistry. We now know much more about the roles of organic and inorganic substances that plants employ for information transfer and growth regulation and about the avenues and mechanisms for transport of those key substances within organisms. We have seen the acceptance of a "local control" concept that regulation of g-responses depends critically on plasmodesmata and gap junctions which allow plants and animals to throttle the transport of growth regulators across tissue boundaries often, especially in the case of plants, far removed from the morphological regions of concentration of statocytes that were once thought to be the exclusive bioaccelerometers used by plants. NASA's sponsorship of ground-based research in gravitational biology has served as important underpinning for orbital flight programs in space biology. The currently most noteworthy research area of ignorance is the mechanism by which the physical event of g-force susception becomes the biological process of g-force perception. Only rarely has it been possible to perform a definitive test of a theory of mechanism of gravity perception. Therefore, experimental research efforts in gravitational physiology still are essentially dependent on exploratory studies for which stimulus/response

  6. Marine gravity image available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The image below shows the gravity field from 30-72°S computed from Geosat geodetic mission (GM) and exact repeat mission (ERM) data. A color shaded-relief image of these gravity anomalies is available from NOAA in poster form (report MGG-8, [Marks et al., 1993] and also as a digital gridded data set on CD-ROM. To order, contact the National Geophysical Data Center, E/GC3, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303.

  7. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  8. What Is Gravity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, George

    2004-01-01

    Gravity is the name given to the phenomenon that any two masses, like you and the Earth, attract each other. One pulls on the Earth and the Earth pulls on one the same amount. And one does not have to be touching. Gravity acts over vast distances, like the 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) between the Earth and the Sun or the billions of…

  9. Classical Nuclear Hormone Receptor Activity as a Mediator of Complex Concentration Response Relationships for Endocrine Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cookman, Clifford J.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are frequently observed for endocrine active ligands that act via nuclear receptors. The curve of best fit for nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are often inverted U-shaped with effects at intermediate concentrations that are different from effects at higher or lower concentrations. Cytotoxicity is a major mode of action responsible for inverted U-shaped concentration response relationships. However, evidence suggests that ligand selectivity, activation of multiple molecular targets, concerted regulation of multiple opposing endpoints, and multiple ligand binding sites within nuclear receptors also contribute to nonmonotonic concentration response relationships of endocrine active ligands. This review reports the current understanding of mechanisms involved in classical nuclear receptor mediated nonmonotonic concentration response relationships with a focus on studies published between 2012 and 2014. PMID:25299165

  10. Gravity and geoid model for South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitzkow, Denizar; Oliveira Cancoro de Matos, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento Guimarães, Gabriel; Pacino, María Cristina; Andrés Lauría, Eduardo; Nunes, Marcelo; Castro Junior, Carlos Alberto Correia e.; Flores, Fredy; Orihuela Guevara, Nuris; Alvarez, Ruber; Napoleon Hernandez, José

    2016-04-01

    In the last 20 years, South America Gravity Studies (SAGS) project has undertaken an ongoing effort in establishing the fundamental gravity network (FGN); terrestrial, river and airborne relative gravity densifications; absolute gravity surveys and geoid (quasi-geoid) model computation for South America. The old FGN is being replaced progressively by new absolute measurements in different countries. In recent years, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay and Venezuela organizations participated with relative gravity surveys. Taking advantage of the large amount of data available, GEOID2015 model was developed for 15°N and 57°S latitude and 30 ° W and 95°W longitude based on EIGEN-6C4 until degree and order 200 as a reference field. The ocean area was completed with mean free air gravity anomalies derived from DTU10 model. The short wavelength component was estimated using FFT. The global gravity field models EIGEN-6C4, DIR_R5 were used for comparison with the new model. The new geoid model has been evaluated against 1,319 GPS/BM, in which 592 are located in Brazil and the reminder in other countries. The preliminary RMS difference between GPS/BM and GEOID2015 throughout South America and in Brazil is 46 cm and 17 cm, respectively. New activities are carrying out with the support of the IGC (Geographic and Cartographic Institute) under the coordination of EPUSP/LTG and CENEGEO (Centro de Estudos de Geodesia). The new project aims to establish new gravity points with the A-10 absolute gravimeter in South America. Recent such surveys occurred in São Paulo state, Argentina and Venezuela.

  11. Gravity and Magnetotelluric Modeling of the Santo Domingo Basin, Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio, K. D.; Keithline, N.; Blum, C.; Cunningham, E.; Fromont, A.; Jorgensen, M.; Lee, R.; McBride, K.; Saez Berrios, P.; Harper, C.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D.; Ferguson, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Santo Domingo Basin, one of a series of basins within the Rio Grande Rift, is located between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, NM, and has been the focus of research by the Summer of Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program since 2000. Gravity, magnetotelluric (MT), and seismic data have been collected throughout the region, although we are concentrating on gravity and MT data collected during SAGE 2014 and 2015. The study area is located in the center of the Santo Domingo basin, an extensional, Miocene age, rift basin, in an area that was minimally involved in the preceding local Laramide orogenic activity. Rift sediments (~3.5 km thick) are underlain by Eocene age sediments that were shed from adjacent uplifts. Up to 3 km of Mesozoic and Paleozoic sediments are preserved above the Precambrian basement. Geologic outcrop, borehole and seismic reflection data, and known density values were used in the construction of a ~100 km-long, generalized geologic cross section from which a gravity response was calculated. The modeled gravity response makes fairly definitive predictions about the geometry of the basin as well as the stratigraphy and faulting within and bounding the basin. MT data was collected at ten stations within the basin. The MT sounding curves exhibit one-dimensional behavior at short periods (<10 s), not surprisingly considering the relatively flat local structure in the area. Layered-earth MT models, without geologic constraints, show a conductive (<10 ohm-m) layer at ~1.5 km above a more resistive layer (>1000 ohm-m) at ~ 3.5-4 km. Conductivities of the major stratigraphic units have been determined from well logs and previous MT modeling. Forward and inverse MT models constrained by the gravity-modeled geologic cross section are used to develop a conductivity model consistent with the geology, and are a step towards a better unified treatment of MT, seismic and gravity data.

  12. Soleus H-reflex gain in humans walking and running under simulated reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, D. P.; Aagaard, P.; Simonsen, E. B.; Farley, C. T.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Hoffmann (H-) reflex is an electrical analogue of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, elicited by bypassing the muscle spindle and directly stimulating the afferent nerve. Studying H-reflex modulation provides insight into how the nervous system centrally modulates stretch reflex responses.A common measure of H-reflex gain is the slope of the relationship between H-reflex amplitude and EMG amplitude. To examine soleus H-reflex gain across a range of EMG levels during human locomotion, we used simulated reduced gravity to reduce muscle activity. We hypothesised that H-reflex gain would be independent of gravity level.We recorded EMG from eight subjects walking (1.25 m s-1) and running (3.0 m s-1) at four gravity levels (1.0, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 G (Earth gravity)). We normalised the stimulus M-wave and resulting H-reflex to the maximal M-wave amplitude (Mmax) elicited throughout the stride to correct for movement of stimulus and recording electrodes relative to nerve and muscle fibres. Peak soleus EMG amplitude decreased by 30% for walking and for running over the fourfold change in gravity. As hypothesised, slopes of linear regressions fitted to H-reflex versus EMG data were independent of gravity for walking and running (ANOVA, P > 0.8). The slopes were also independent of gait (P > 0.6), contrary to previous studies. Walking had a greater y-intercept (19.9% Mmax) than running (-2.5% Mmax; P < 0.001). At all levels of EMG, walking H-reflex amplitudes were higher than running H-reflex amplitudes by a constant amount. We conclude that the nervous system adjusts H-reflex threshold but not H-reflex gain between walking and running. These findings provide insight into potential neural mechanisms responsible for spinal modulation of the stretch reflex during human locomotion.

  13. Partial gravity habitat study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen; Lorandos, Jason; Akhidime, Eval; Bunch, Michael; Lund, Denise; Moore, Nathan; Murakawa, Kiosuke

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate comprehensive design requirements associated with designing habitats for humans in a partial gravity environment, then to apply them to a lunar base design. Other potential sites for application include planetary surfaces such as Mars, variable-gravity research facilities, and a rotating spacecraft. Design requirements for partial gravity environments include locomotion changes in less than normal earth gravity; facility design issues, such as interior configuration, module diameter, and geometry; and volumetric requirements based on the previous as well as psychological issues involved in prolonged isolation. For application to a lunar base, it is necessary to study the exterior architecture and configuration to insure optimum circulation patterns while providing dual egress; radiation protection issues are addressed to provide a safe and healthy environment for the crew; and finally, the overall site is studied to locate all associated facilities in context with the habitat. Mission planning is not the purpose of this study; therefore, a Lockheed scenario is used as an outline for the lunar base application, which is then modified to meet the project needs. The goal of this report is to formulate facts on human reactions to partial gravity environments, derive design requirements based on these facts, and apply the requirements to a partial gravity situation which, for this study, was a lunar base.

  14. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  15. Plasma membrane NADH oxidase of maize roots responds to gravity and imposed centrifugal forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, E.; Morre, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    NADH oxidase activities measured with excised roots of dark-grown maize (Zea mays) seedlings and with isolated plasma membrane vesicles from roots of dark-grown maize oscillated with a regular period length of 24 min and were inhibited by the synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic [correction of dichorophenoxyacetic] acid. The activities also responded to orientation with respect to gravity and to imposed centrifugal forces. Turning the roots upside down resulted in stimulation of the activity with a lag of about 10 min. Returning the sections to the normal upright position resulted in a return to initial rates. The activity was stimulated reversibly to a maximum of about 2-fold with isolated plasma membrane vesicles, when subjected to centrifugal forces of 25 to 250 x g for 1 to 4 min duration. These findings are the first report of a gravity-responsive enzymatic activity of plant roots inhibited by auxin and potentially related to the gravity-induced growth response. c2001 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.

  16. 77 FR 46752 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ...) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et... Control Technology Standards; 40 CFR part 63 subparts A and YY; was approved on 07/10/2012; OMB...

  17. 75 FR 17710 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ...) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et...; Approved without change. EPA ICR Number 1060.15; NSPS for Steel Plants: Electric Arc Furnaces and...

  18. Observation and analysis of time-variable gravity signal in China's Three Gorges Reservoir during the experimental water impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Chen, C.; Liang, Q.; Du, J.

    2012-12-01

    as underground water penetration and surface deformation. When the water level rose rapidly, the gravity field within 1 km of the river bank increase rapidly and the amplitude was relatively high. In the high water level stable period, gravity response was delayed in certain degree due to the huge water loads, the underground water penetration and the surface deformation. In addition, both water level and gravity curves represented the similar cycle responses of diurnal and semidiurnal features generated by local tides. During observations, the high-frequency signals of gravity variations between several water level stages were related to the sudden water level fluctuations and reservoir inflow. Moreover, these signals were also related to the surrounding earthquakes. Thus, the observation of time-variable gravity is potentially useful and especially important to monitor tectonic activities and geologic hazards surrounding the Three Gorges Reservoir. If combined with the natural seismic data, the relationship between gravity disturbances caused by water level changes and earthquakes will be investigated in the near future.

  19. Behavioral activation: a strategy to enhance treatment response.

    PubMed

    Sudak, Donna M; Majeed, Muhammad H; Youngman, Branden

    2014-07-01

    Behavioral activation is an empirically validated treatment for depression pioneered in 1973 by Ferster, based on B.F. Skinner's behavioral principles. After publication of Beck's work on cognitive therapy, the boundaries of behavioral and cognitive therapies were blurred and the two now overlap substantially. Behavioral activation is also used as a stand-alone treatment and can also be effective in conjunction with antidepressant medication. Case conceptualization in behavioral activation entails an assessment of the behaviors that the patient has stopped that produce pleasure or are of importance, as well as behaviors essential to self-care. Activity monitoring, which provides treatment targets and leads to the case conceptualization in behavioral activation, consists of using charts, forms, or other prompts to track the relationship between activities and other variables (e.g., mood, enjoyment). That technique is also used to target rumination, procrastination, and avoidance and may also be helpful for patients with psychosis. PMID:25036582

  20. The Effect of Tip Geometry on Active-Twist Rotor Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric examination of the effect of tip geometry on active-twist rotor system response is conducted. Tip geometry parameters considered include sweep, taper, anhedral, nonlinear twist, and the associated radial initiation location for each of these variables. A detailed study of the individual effect of each parameter on active-twist response is presented, and an assessment offered of the effect of combining multiple tip shape parameters. Tip sweep is shown to have the greatest affect on active-twist response, significantly decreasing the response available. Tip taper and anhedral are shown to increase moderately the active-twist response, while nonlinear twist is shown to have a minimal effect. A candidate tip shape that provides active-twist response equivalent to or greater than a rectangular planform blade is presented.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of gravity perception and signal transduction in plants.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Yaroslav S; Kretynin, Serhiy V; Volotovsky, Igor D; Kordyum, Elizabeth L; Ruelland, Eric; Kravets, Volodymyr S

    2016-07-01

    Gravity is one of the environmental cues that direct plant growth and development. Recent investigations of different gravity signalling pathways have added complexity to how we think gravity is perceived. Particular cells within specific organs or tissues perceive gravity stimulus. Many downstream signalling events transmit the perceived information into subcellular, biochemical, and genomic responses. They are rapid, non-genomic, regulatory, and cell-specific. The chain of events may pass by signalling lipids, the cytoskeleton, intracellular calcium levels, protein phosphorylation-dependent pathways, proteome changes, membrane transport, vacuolar biogenesis mechanisms, or nuclear events. These events culminate in changes in gene expression and auxin lateral redistribution in gravity response sites. The possible integration of these signalling events with amyloplast movements or with other perception mechanisms is discussed. Further investigation is needed to understand how plants coordinate mechanisms and signals to sense this important physical factor. PMID:26215561

  2. Non-Critical-Care Nurses' Perceptions of Facilitators and Barriers to Rapid Response Team Activation.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Sheryl Henry; Astroth, Kim Schafer; Woith, Wendy Mann

    2015-01-01

    Rapid response teams can save lives but are only effective when activated. We surveyed 50 nurses for their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to activation. Findings showed that participants need more education on their role and when to activate the rapid response team. Nurses who comprise the team need help building their communication skills. We recommend nursing professional development specialists increase the frequency of offerings and expand the focus on roles, activation criteria, and communication skills. PMID:26381336

  3. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Activates the Integrated Stress Response to Reprogram Transcription and Translation in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Norihito; Carlin, Aaron F.; Spann, Nathanael J.; Saijo, Kaoru; Morello, Christopher S.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Maurya, Mano R.; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Lam, Michael T.; Crotti, Andrea; Reichart, Donna; Fox, Jesse N.; Quehenberger, Oswald; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Sullards, M. Cameron; Murphy, Robert C.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Brown, H. Alex; Dennis, Edward A.; Fahy, Eoin; Subramaniam, Shankar; Cavener, Douglas R.; Spector, Deborah H.; Russell, David W.; Glass, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    25-Hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) is an enzymatically derived oxidation product of cholesterol that modulates lipid metabolism and immunity. 25OHC is synthesized in response to interferons and exerts broad antiviral activity by as yet poorly characterized mechanisms. To gain further insights into the basis for antiviral activity, we evaluated time-dependent responses of the macrophage lipidome and transcriptome to 25OHC treatment. In addition to altering specific aspects of cholesterol and sphingolipid metabolism, we found that 25OHC activates integrated stress response (ISR) genes and reprograms protein translation. Effects of 25OHC on ISR gene expression were independent of liver X receptors and sterol-response element-binding proteins and instead primarily resulted from activation of the GCN2/eIF2α/ATF4 branch of the ISR pathway. These studies reveal that 25OHC activates the integrated stress response, which may contribute to its antiviral activity. PMID:24189069

  4. Gravity Probe B Assembled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being assembled at the Sunnyvale, California location of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  5. WATER: Water Activities Teaching Environmental Responsibility: Teacher Resource, Environmental Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Ed, Ed.; And Others

    This activity book was developed as part of an effort to protect water quality of the Stillwater River, Ohio, through a Watershed Protection Project. It is designed to raise teachers' and students' awareness and trigger a sense of stewardship towards the preservation of water resources. The activities are generally appropriate for elementary age…

  6. How targets select activation or repression in response to Wnt.

    PubMed

    Murgan, Sabrina; Bertrand, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    In metazoans, the Wnt signaling pathway plays a key role in the regulation of binary decisions during development. During this process different sets of target genes are activated in cells where the Wnt pathway is active (classic target genes) versus cells where the pathway is inactive (opposite target genes). While the mechanism of transcriptional activation is well understood for classic target genes, how opposite target genes are activated in the absence of Wnt remains poorly characterized. Here we discuss how the key transcriptional mediator of the Wnt pathway, the TCF family member POP-1, regulates opposite target genes during C. elegans development. We examine recent findings suggesting that the direction of the transcriptional output (activation or repression) can be determined by the way TCF is recruited and physically interacts with its target gene. PMID:27123368

  7. Gravity and Zero Point Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, U. W.

    When Planck introduced the 1/2 hv term to his 1911 black body equation he showed that there is a residual energy remaining at zero degree K after all thermal energy ceased. Other investigators, including Lamb, Casimir, and Dirac added to this information. Today zero point energy (ZPE) is accepted as an established condition. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the density of the ZPE is given by the gravity constant (G) and the characteristics of its particles are revealed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Eddies of ZPE particles created by flow around mass bodies reduce the pressure normal to the eddy flow and are responsible for the force of gravity. Helium atoms resonate with ZPE particles at low temperature to produce superfluid helium. High velocity micro vortices of ZPE particles about a basic particle or particles are responsible for electromagnetic forces. The speed of light is the speed of the wave front in the ZPE and its value is a function of the temperature and density of the ZPE.

  8. Negative functional MRI response correlates with decreases in neuronal activity in monkey visual area V1.

    PubMed

    Shmuel, Amir; Augath, Mark; Oeltermann, Axel; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2006-04-01

    Most functional brain imaging studies use task-induced hemodynamic responses to infer underlying changes in neuronal activity. In addition to increases in cerebral blood flow and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, sustained negative responses are pervasive in functional imaging. The origin of negative responses and their relationship to neural activity remain poorly understood. Through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological recording, we demonstrate a negative BOLD response (NBR) beyond the stimulated regions of visual cortex, associated with local decreases in neuronal activity below spontaneous activity, detected 7.15 +/- 3.14 mm away from the closest positively responding region in V1. Trial-by-trial amplitude fluctuations revealed tight coupling between the NBR and neuronal activity decreases. The NBR was associated with comparable decreases in local field potentials and multiunit activity. Our findings indicate that a significant component of the NBR originates in neuronal activity decreases. PMID:16547508

  9. Early capillary flux homogenization in response to neural activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Boas, David A

    2016-02-01

    This Brief Communication reports early homogenization of capillary network flow during somatosensory activation in the rat cerebral cortex. We used optical coherence tomography and statistical intensity variation analysis for tracing changes in the red blood cell flux over hundreds of capillaries nearly at the same time with 1-s resolution. We observed that while the mean capillary flux exhibited a typical increase during activation, the standard deviation of the capillary flux exhibited an early decrease that happened before the mean flux increase. This network-level data is consistent with the theoretical hypothesis that capillary flow homogenizes during activation to improve oxygen delivery. PMID:26661145

  10. 78 FR 15720 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ...'s ENERGY STAR Product Labeling (Renewal); was approved on 02/25/2013; OMB Number 2060-0528; expires... of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for... Information Collection Request (ICR) Number. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Responses to Agency...

  11. Gravity and Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.

    1996-01-01

    Gravity has been the most constant environmental factor throughout the evolution of biological species on Earth. Organisms are rarely exposed to other gravity levels, either increased or decreased, for prolonged periods. Thus, evolution in a constant 1G field has historically prevented us from appreciating the potential biological consequences of a multi-G universe. To answer the question 'Can terrestrial life be sustained and thrive beyond our planet?' we need to understand the importance of gravity on living systems, and we need to develop a multi-G, rather than a 1G, mentality. The science of gravitational biology took a giant step with the advent of the space program, which provided the first opportunity to examine living organisms in gravity environments lower than could be sustained on Earth. Previously, virtually nothing was known about the effects of extremely low gravity on living organisms, and most of the initial expectations were proven wrong. All species that have flown in space survive in microgravity, although no higher organism has ever completed a life cycle in space. It has been found, however, that many systems change, transiently or permanently, as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity.

  12. n-DBI gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Hirano, Shinji; Sato, Yuki

    2011-12-01

    n-DBI gravity is a gravitational theory introduced in [C. Herdeiro and S. Hirano, arXiv:1109.1468.], motivated by Dirac-Born-Infeld type conformal scalar theory and designed to yield noneternal inflation spontaneously. It contains a foliation structure provided by an everywhere timelike vector field n, which couples to the gravitational sector of the theory, but decouples in the small curvature limit. We show that any solution of Einstein gravity with a particular curvature property is a solution of n-DBI gravity. Among them is a class of geometries isometric to a Reissner-Nordström-(anti)-de Sitter black hole, which is obtained within the spherically symmetric solutions of n-DBI gravity minimally coupled to the Maxwell field. These solutions have, however, two distinct features from their Einstein gravity counterparts: (1) the cosmological constant appears as an integration constant and can be positive, negative, or vanishing, making it a variable quantity of the theory; and (2) there is a nonuniqueness of solutions with the same total mass, charge, and effective cosmological constant. Such inequivalent solutions cannot be mapped to each other by a foliation preserving diffeomorphism. Physically they are distinguished by the expansion and shear of the congruence tangent to n, which define scalar invariants on each leaf of the foliation.

  13. Venus Gravity Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konopliv, Alexander S.; Sjogren, William L.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the Venus gravity methods and results to date (model MGNP90LSAAP). It is called a handbook in that it contains many useful plots (such as geometry and orbit behavior) that are useful in evaluating the tracking data. We discuss the models that are used in processing the Doppler data and the estimation method for determining the gravity field. With Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Magellan tracking data, the Venus gravity field was determined complete to degree and order 90 with the use of the JPL Cray T3D Supercomputer. The gravity field shows unprecedented high correlation with topography and resolution of features to the 2OOkm resolution. In the procedure for solving the gravity field, other information is gained as well, and, for example, we discuss results for the Venus ephemeris, Love number, pole orientation of Venus, and atmospheric densities. Of significance is the Love number solution which indicates a liquid core for Venus. The ephemeris of Venus is determined to an accuracy of 0.02 mm/s (tens of meters in position), and the rotation period to 243.0194 +/- 0.0002 days.

  14. Dynamic Docking Test System (DDTS) active table frequency response test results. [Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of the frequency response test performed on the dynamic docking test system (DDTS) active table. Sinusoidal displacement commands were applied to the table and the dynamic response determined from measured actuator responses and accelerometers mounted to the table and one actuator.

  15. Inhalation risk in low-gravity spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul; Sklar, Michael V.; Ramirez, W. Fred; Smith, Gerald J.; Morgenthaler, George W.; McKinnon, J. T.; Oberdörster, Günter; Schulz, Jon

    Inhalation risks on long-duration manned spaced flight include gasses chronically released by outgassing of materials, gasses released during spills, thermodegradation events (including fires) with their attendant particulates, and fire extinguishment. As an example, an event in which electronic insulation consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene undergoes thermodegradation on the Space Station Freedom was modeled experimentally and theoretically from the initial chemistry and convective transport through pulmonary deposition in humans. The low-gravity environment was found to impact various stages of event simulation. Critical unknowns were identified, and these include the extent of production of ultrafine particles and polymeric products at the source in low gravity, the transport of ultrafine particles in the spacecraft air quality control system, and the biological response of the lung, including alveolar macrophages, to this inhalation risk in low gravity.

  16. Gravity-induced stresses in finite slopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.

    1994-01-01

    An exact solution for gravity-induced stresses in finite elastic slopes is presented. This solution, which is applied for gravity-induced stresses in 15, 30, 45 and 90?? finite slopes, has application in pit-slope design, compares favorably with published finite element results for this problem and satisfies the conditions that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are compressive along the top of the slopes (zero in the case of the 90?? slope) and tensile away from the bottom of the slopes, effects which are caused by downward movement and near-surface horizontal extension in front of the slope in response to gravity loading caused by the additional material associated with the finite slope. ?? 1994.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, MEK-independent proliferation in response to CaR activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bilderback, Tim R.; Lee, Fred; Auersperg, Nelly; Rodland, Karin D.

    2002-07-02

    Although ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells are responsible for the majority of ovarian tumors, we know relatively little about the pathway(s) that are responsible for regulating their proliferation. We found that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is activated in OSE cells in response to elevated extracellular calcium, and the PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY29004 inhibited ERK activation by approximately 75%, similar to effects of the MEK2 inhibitor PD98059. However, in assays of proliferation we found that PD98059 inhibited proliferation by approximately 50%, while wortmannin inhibited greater than 90% of the proliferative response to elevated calcium. Expression of a dominant negative PI3K totally inhibited ERK activation in response to calcium. These results demonstrate that ERK activation cannot account for the full proliferative effect of elevated calcium in OSE cells, and suggest the presence of an ERK independent, PI3K dependant component in the proliferative response.

  18. Bald Eagle response to boating activity in northcentral Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, P.B.

    1999-01-01

    I examined the effects of weekend and weekday boating activity on Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) use of three lakes in northcentral Florida during 1988-89. On Lake Lochloosa, which had the highest number of boats of the three lakes, boating activity significantly reduced the numbers of all age classes of eagles using the lake (P < 0.025). Increased boating activity on Lake Wauberg was not related to use by eagles (P = 0.06) likely because boating activity was concentrated during midday while eagles typically foraged early and late in the day. On Newnan's Lake, the number of eagles observed also was not different between weekends and weekdays (P = 0.20). Weekend boating activity did not relate to perch use, habitat use, interactions or age distribution indicating no alteration of eagle behavior patterns. Flush distance did not vary between weekends and weekdays (P = 0.96), but did vary by month (P = 0.0001), with a greater flush distance during months with highest boating activity. Minimal flush distances (x?? = 53m) and lack of measurable effects on behavior suggested that eagles in my study area were tolerant of boat disturbance.

  19. IRE1α mediates PKR activation in response to Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Webster, Steve J; Ellis, Lou; O'Brien, Louise M; Tyrrell, Beatrice; Fitzmaurice, Timothy J; Elder, Matthew J; Clare, Simon; Chee, Ronnie; Gaston, J S Hill; Goodall, Jane C

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase RNA activated (PKR) is a crucial mediator of anti-viral responses but is reported to be activated by multiple non-viral stimuli. However, mechanisms underlying PKR activation, particularly in response to bacterial infection, remain poorly understood. We have investigated mechanisms of PKR activation in human primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells in response to infection by Chlamydia trachomatis. Infection resulted in potent activation of PKR that was dependent on TLR4 and MyD88 signalling. NADPH oxidase was dispensable for activation of PKR as cells from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients, or mice that lack NADPH oxidase activity, had equivalent or elevated PKR activation. Significantly, stimulation of cells with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing agents resulted in potent activation of PKR that was blocked by an inhibitor of IRE1α RNAse activity. Crucially, infection resulted in robust IRE1α RNAse activity that was dependent on TLR4 signalling and inhibition of IRE1α RNAse activity prevented PKR activation. Finally, we demonstrate that TLR4/IRE1α mediated PKR activation is required for the enhancement of interferon-β production following C. trachomatis infection. Thus, we provide evidence of a novel mechanism of PKR activation requiring ER stress signalling that occurs as a consequence of TLR4 stimulation during bacterial infection and contributes to inflammatory responses. PMID:27021640

  20. Artificial gravity - A countermeasure for zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Mccormack, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    Current knowledge on artificial gravity is presented with emphasis placed on the unique characteristics of such an environment and their effects on crew performance and vehicle habitability. A parametric optimization of the vehicle size and operation is performed. The following set of 'optimum' parameter values is obtained: a cost of 15.8 billion dollars, a radius of 80 feet, a rotation rate of 4.8 rpm, and a g-value of 0.62. Consideration is also given to the problems of adaptation, retention of adaptation, and simultaneous adaptation to both nonrotating and rotating environments.

  1. Enhancement of visual responsiveness by spontaneous local network activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Haider, Bilal; Duque, Alvaro; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; Yu, Yuguo; McCormick, David A

    2007-06-01

    Spontaneous activity within local circuits affects the integrative properties of neurons and networks. We have previously shown that neocortical network activity exhibits a balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic potentials, and such activity has significant effects on synaptic transmission, action potential generation, and spike timing. However, whether such activity facilitates or reduces sensory responses has yet to be clearly determined. We examined this hypothesis in the primary visual cortex in vivo during slow oscillations in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized cats. We measured network activity (Up states) with extracellular recording, while simultaneously recording postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) and action potentials in nearby cells. Stimulating the receptive field revealed that spiking responses of both simple and complex cells were significantly enhanced (>2-fold) during network activity, as were spiking responses to intracellular injection of varying amplitude artificial conductance stimuli. Visually evoked PSPs were not significantly different in amplitude during network activity or quiescence; instead, spontaneous depolarization caused by network activity brought these evoked PSPs closer to firing threshold. Further examination revealed that visual responsiveness was gradually enhanced by progressive membrane potential depolarization. These spontaneous depolarizations enhanced responsiveness to stimuli of varying contrasts, resulting in an upward (multiplicative) scaling of the contrast response function. Our results suggest that small increases in ongoing balanced network activity that result in depolarization may provide a rapid and generalized mechanism to control the responsiveness (gain) of cortical neurons, such as occurs during shifts in spatial attention. PMID:17409168

  2. The middeck 0-gravity dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Vanschoor, Marthinus C.; Bokhour, Edward B.

    1993-01-01

    The Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE), flown onboard the Shuttle STS-48 Mission, consists of three major elements: the Experiment Support Module, a dynamics test bed providing computer experiment control, analog signal conditioning, power conditioning, an operator interface consisting of a keypad and display, experiment electrical and thermal control, and archival data storage: the Fluid Test Article assembly, used to investigate the dynamics of fluid-structure interaction in 0-gravity; and the Structural Test Article for investigating the open-loop dynamics of structures in 0-gravity. Deployable, erectable, and rotary modules were assembled to form three one- and two-dimensional structures, in which variations in bracing wire and rotary joint preload could be introduced. Change in linear modal parameters as well as the change in nonlinear nature of the response is examined. Trends in modal parameters are presented as a function of force amplitude, joint preload, and ambient gravity. An experimental study of the lateral slosh behavior of contained fluids is also presented. A comparison of the measured earth and space results identifies and highlights the effects of gravity on the linear and nonlinear slosh behavior of these fluids.

  3. Genetic analysis of response regulator activation in bacterial chemotaxis suggests an intermolecular mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Re, Sandra Da; Tolstykh, Tatiana; Wolanin, Peter M.; Stock, Jeffry B.

    2002-01-01

    Response regulator proteins of two-component systems are usually activated by phosphorylation. The phosphorylated response regulator protein CheY∼P mediates the chemotaxis response in Escherichia coli. We performed random mutagenesis and selected CheY mutants that are constitutively active in the absence of phosphorylation. Although a single amino acid substitution can lead to constitutive activation, no single DNA base change can effect such a transition. Numerous different sets of mutations that activate in synergy were selected in several different combinations. These mutations were all located on the side of CheY defined by α4, β5, α5, and α1. Our findings argue against the two-state hypothesis for response regulator activation. We propose an alternative intermolecular mechanism that involves a dynamic interplay between response regulators and their effector targets. PMID:12381847

  4. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.; Will, C. M.; Ni, W.

    1971-01-01

    Metric theories of gravity are presented, including the definition of metric theory, evidence for its existence, and response of matter to gravity with test body trajectories, gravitational red shift, and stressed matter responses. Parametrized post-Newtonian framework and interpretations are reviewed. Gamma, beta and gamma, and varied other parameters were measured. Deflection of electromagnetic waves, radar time delay, geodetic gyroscope precession, perihelion shifts, and periodic effects in orbits are among various studies carried out for metric theory experimentation.

  5. 77 FR 61598 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et. seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  6. 75 FR 10249 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et. seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  7. 77 FR 14777 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  8. 78 FR 63180 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et. seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  9. 78 FR 73521 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et. Seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  10. 77 FR 40879 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  11. 75 FR 6654 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  12. 75 FR 25850 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et. Seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  13. 76 FR 26284 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...This document announces the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) responses to Agency Clearance requests, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are......

  14. Inflation without quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkanen, Tommi; Räsänen, Syksy; Wahlman, Pyry

    2015-04-01

    It is sometimes argued that observation of tensor modes from inflation would provide the first evidence for quantum gravity. However, in the usual inflationary formalism, also the scalar modes involve quantized metric perturbations. We consider the issue in a semiclassical setup in which only matter is quantized, and spacetime is classical. We assume that the state collapses on a spacelike hypersurface and find that the spectrum of scalar perturbations depends on the hypersurface. For reasonable choices, we can recover the usual inflationary predictions for scalar perturbations in minimally coupled single-field models. In models where nonminimal coupling to gravity is important and the field value is sub-Planckian, we do not get a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of scalar perturbations. As gravitational waves are only produced at second order, the tensor-to-scalar ratio is negligible. We conclude that detection of inflationary gravitational waves would indeed be needed to have observational evidence of quantization of gravity.

  15. Artificial gravity experiment satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tadashi

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual study of an artificial gravity experiment satellite based on the assumption of a launch by the H-2 launch vehicle with a target launch date in the Year 2000 is presented. While many satellites provided with artificial gravity have been reported in relation to a manned Mars exploration spacecraft mission, the review has been conducted on missions and test subjects only for experimental purposes. Mission requirements were determined based on the results of reviews on the mission, test subjects, and model missions. The system baseline and development plan were based on the results of a study on conceptual structure and scale of the system, including measures to generate artificial gravity. Approximate scale of the system and arm length, mission orbit, visibility of the operation orbit from ground stations in Japan, and satellite attitude on the mission orbit are outlined.

  16. Newberry Combined Gravity 2016

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kelly Rose

    2016-01-22

    Newberry combined gravity from Zonge Int'l, processed for the EGS stimulation project at well 55-29. Includes data from both Davenport 2006 collection and for OSU/4D EGS monitoring 2012 collection. Locations are NAD83, UTM Zone 10 North, meters. Elevation is NAVD88. Gravity in milligals. Free air and observed gravity are included, along with simple Bouguer anomaly and terrain corrected Bouguer anomaly. SBA230 means simple Bouguer anomaly computed at 2.30 g/cc. CBA230 means terrain corrected Bouguer anomaly at 2.30 g/cc. This suite of densities are included (g/cc): 2.00, 2.10, 2.20, 2.30, 2.40, 2.50, 2.67.

  17. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Kathryn M; Bergeron, Sadie A; Horstick, Eric J; Jordan, Diana C; Aho, Vilma; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Haspel, Gal; Burgess, Harold A

    2014-08-15

    Rapid escape swims in fish are initiated by the Mauthner cells, giant reticulospinal neurons with unique specializations for swift responses. The Mauthner cells directly activate motoneurons and facilitate predator detection by integrating acoustic, mechanosensory, and visual stimuli. In addition, larval fish show well-coordinated escape responses when exposed to electric field pulses (EFPs). Sensitization of the Mauthner cell by genetic overexpression of the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN5 increased EFP responsiveness, whereas Mauthner ablation with an engineered variant of nitroreductase with increased activity (epNTR) eliminated the response. The reaction time to EFPs is extremely short, with many responses initiated within 2 ms of the EFP. Large neurons, such as Mauthner cells, show heightened sensitivity to extracellular voltage gradients. We therefore tested whether the rapid response to EFPs was due to direct activation of the Mauthner cells, bypassing delays imposed by stimulus detection and transmission by sensory cells. Consistent with this, calcium imaging indicated that EFPs robustly activated the Mauthner cell but only rarely fired other reticulospinal neurons. Further supporting this idea, pharmacological blockade of synaptic transmission in zebrafish did not affect Mauthner cell activity in response to EFPs. Moreover, Mauthner cells transgenically expressing a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel retained responses to EFPs despite TTX suppression of action potentials in the rest of the brain. We propose that EFPs directly activate Mauthner cells because of their large size, thereby driving ultrarapid escape responses in fish. PMID:24848468

  18. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Kathryn M.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Aho, Vilma; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Haspel, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Rapid escape swims in fish are initiated by the Mauthner cells, giant reticulospinal neurons with unique specializations for swift responses. The Mauthner cells directly activate motoneurons and facilitate predator detection by integrating acoustic, mechanosensory, and visual stimuli. In addition, larval fish show well-coordinated escape responses when exposed to electric field pulses (EFPs). Sensitization of the Mauthner cell by genetic overexpression of the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN5 increased EFP responsiveness, whereas Mauthner ablation with an engineered variant of nitroreductase with increased activity (epNTR) eliminated the response. The reaction time to EFPs is extremely short, with many responses initiated within 2 ms of the EFP. Large neurons, such as Mauthner cells, show heightened sensitivity to extracellular voltage gradients. We therefore tested whether the rapid response to EFPs was due to direct activation of the Mauthner cells, bypassing delays imposed by stimulus detection and transmission by sensory cells. Consistent with this, calcium imaging indicated that EFPs robustly activated the Mauthner cell but only rarely fired other reticulospinal neurons. Further supporting this idea, pharmacological blockade of synaptic transmission in zebrafish did not affect Mauthner cell activity in response to EFPs. Moreover, Mauthner cells transgenically expressing a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel retained responses to EFPs despite TTX suppression of action potentials in the rest of the brain. We propose that EFPs directly activate Mauthner cells because of their large size, thereby driving ultrarapid escape responses in fish. PMID:24848468

  19. Brane-World Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maartens, Roy; Koyama, Kazuya

    2010-09-01

    The observable universe could be a 1+3-surface (the "brane") embedded in a 1+3+d-dimensional spacetime (the "bulk"), with Standard Model particles and fields trapped on the brane while gravity is free to access the bulk. At least one of the d extra spatial dimensions could be very large relative to the Planck scale, which lowers the fundamental gravity scale, possibly even down to the electroweak (˜TeV) level. This revolutionary picture arises in the framework of recent developments in M theory. The 1+10-dimensional M theory encompasses the known 1+9-dimensional superstring theories, and is widely considered to be a promising potential route to quantum gravity. At low energies, gravity is localized at the brane and general relativity is recovered, but at high energies gravity “leaks” into the bulk, behaving in a truly higher-dimensional way. This introduces significant changes to gravitational dynamics and perturbations, with interesting and potentially testable implications for high-energy astrophysics, black holes, and cosmology. Brane-world models offer a phenomenological way to test some of the novel predictions and corrections to general relativity that are implied by M theory. This review analyzes the geometry, dynamics and perturbations of simple brane-world models for cosmology and astrophysics, mainly focusing on warped 5-dimensional brane-worlds based on the Randall-Sundrum models. We also cover the simplest brane-world models in which 4-dimensional gravity on the brane is modified at low energies - the 5-dimensional Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati models. Then we discuss co-dimension two branes in 6-dimensional models.

  20. Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blencowe, Miles

    The emergence of the macroscopic classical world from the microscopic quantum world is commonly understood to be a consequence of the fact that any given quantum system is open, unavoidably interacting with unobserved environmental degrees of freedom that will cause initial quantum superposition states of the system to decohere, resulting in classical mixtures of either-or alternatives. A fundamental question concerns how large a macroscopic object can be placed in a manifest quantum state, such as a center of mass quantum superposition state, under conditions where the effects of the interacting environmental degrees of freedom are reduced (i.e. in ultrahigh vacuum and at ultralow temperatures). Recent experiments have in fact demonstrated manifest quantum behavior in nano-to-micron-scale mechanical systems. Gravity has been invoked in various ways as playing a possible fundamental role in enforcing classicality of matter systems beyond a certain scale. Adopting the viewpoint that the standard perturbative quantization of general relativity provides an effective description of quantum gravity that is valid at ordinary energies, we show that it is possible to describe quantitatively how gravity as an environment can induce the decoherence of matter superposition states. The justification for such an approach follows from the fact that we are considering laboratory scale systems, where the matter is localized to regions of small curvature. As with other low energy effects, such as the quantum gravity correction to the Newtonian potential between two ordinary masses, it should be possible to quantitatively evaluate gravitationally induced decoherence rates by employing standard perturbative quantum gravity as an effective field theory; whatever the final form the eventual correct quantum theory of gravity takes, it must converge in its predictions with the effective field theory description at low energies. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF

  1. Imaging subsurface density distribution beneath Montserrat (West Indies) from Bouguer gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautmann, S.; Camacho, A. G.; Gottsmann, J.; Odbert, H. M.; Syers, T.

    2012-12-01

    of the anomalous body, which matches as much as possible the observed gravity anomaly. Model results reveal high-density bodies beneath the centres of the extinct volcanic complexes (Silver Hills, Centre Hills). In contrast, the active Soufrière Hills and the flanks of the Silver Hills and Centre Hills are low-density zones. The high-density bodies are interpreted to represent the sub-surface extension of the exposed dome rocks of CH and SH, while the surrounding low-density regions may represent the volcano-clastic aprons around their flanks. The gravity field around the active SH may be influenced by melt aggregations in the subsurface, resulting in a low density anomaly beneath the volcanic edifice. Although our results agree well with observations from seismic tomography, due to the high spatial density of our survey we are able to additionally capture smaller tectonic features, such as the horst structure of Garibaldi Hill. Co-conducted spatio-temporal gravity surveys revealed that gravity changes are confined to low-density regions on Montserrat, while high-density regions are barely affected by dynamic changes. Observed gravity changes are inconsistent with expected variations due to in groundwater level changes induced by seasonal changes in precipitation. Future studies will investigate and quantify fluid dynamics on the island in response to stress changes at SHV.

  2. Seeking the Light: Gravity Without the Influence of Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Fred; Kern, Volker; Reed, Dave; Etheridge, Guy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All living things sense gravity like humans might sense light or sound. The Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC-14) experiment, explores how moss cells sense and respond to gravity and light. This experiment studies how gravity influences the internal structure of moss cells and seeks to understand the influences of the spaceflight environment on cell growth. This knowledge will help researchers understand the role of gravity in the evolution of cells and life on earth.

  3. Some experiences with active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Abel, I.

    1981-01-01

    Flight and wind tunnel tests were conducted and multidiscipline computer programs were developed as part of investigations of active control technology conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Unsteady aerodynamics approximation, optimal control theory, optimal controller design, and the Delta wing and DC-10 models are described. The drones for aerodynamics and structural testing (DAST program) for evaluating procedures for aerodynamic loads prediction and the design of active control systems on wings with significant aeroelastic effects is described as well as the DAST model used in the wind tunnel tests.

  4. Experiments on thermoacoustic convection heat transfer in gravity and zero-gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, Masood; Salah-Eddine, Adel

    1987-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of thermoacoustic convection (TAC) heat transfer in gravity and zero-gravity environments are presented. The experimental apparatus consisted of a cylinder containing air as the compressible fluid. The enclosed air was heated electrically at the top surface which consisted of a thin high-resistance steel foil connected to a power source. Thermocouples were used to measure the transient temperature of the air on the axis of the cylinder and the heated surface in the both zero-gravity and gravity environments. The zero-gravity tests were performed in the Zero-Gravity Drop Tower Facility of NASA-Lewis Research Center. The experimental results were corrected for the error due to radiation absorption by the thermocouples. A conduction-only numerical heat transfer model was developed to compute the transient air temperature in the cylindrical geometry. The results were compared to the experimental data to determine the significance of the thermoacoustic convection heat transfer mechanism. It is observed that the rate of heat transfer to the air measured during the experiments is consistently higher than that obtained by the conduction-only solution indicating a significant presence of the TAC heat transfer. Further experiments are planned to measure directly (1) the radiative heat transfer contribution to the rise in the air temperature, and (2) the air pressure oscillations within the cylinder that are responsible for the convective heat transfer mode.

  5. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    ScienceCinema

    Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

    2010-09-01

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  6. Continuous gravity gradient logging

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.L.; Lyle, W.D. Jr.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described for conducting a gravimetry survey of an earth formation, comprising the steps of: (a) continuously traversing the earth formation with a gravity logging tool having a column of fluid within the tool, (b) measuring a first pressure difference along a first interval within the column of fluid, (c) measuring a second pressure difference along a second interval within the column of fluid, (d) differencing the first and second pressure differences to determine the gravity gradient along the earth formation between the first and second intervals.

  7. Position from gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for obtaining position from surface gravity observations are reviewed and their relevance assessed in the context of the application of modern geodetic techniques to programs of Earth and ocean physics. Solutions based on the use of surface layer techniques, the discrete value approach, and the development from Green's theorem are stated in summary, the latter being extended to order e cubed in the height anomaly. The representation of the surface gravity field which is required in order that this accuracy may be achieved is discussed. Interim techniques which could be used in the absence of such a representation are also outlined.

  8. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2010-02-24

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  9. Artificial gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, Larry C.; Lindner, John F.

    Using computer algebra to run Einstein's equations "backward", from field to source rather than from source to field, we design an artificial gravity field for a space station or spaceship. Everywhere inside astronauts experience normal Earth gravity, while outside they float freely. The stress-energy that generates the field contains exotic matter of negative energy density but also relies importantly on pressures and shears, which we describe. The same techniques can be readily used to design other interesting spacetimes and thereby elucidate the connection between the source and field in general relativity.

  10. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  11. Airborne Gravity Gradiometry Resolves a Full Range of Gravity Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataragio, J.; Brewster, J.; Mims, J.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) was flown at high altitude coincident with Airborne Gravity (AG) flown in 2003 in West Arnhem Land, Australia. A preliminary analysis of two data sets indicates that the Air\\-FTGR system has the capability of resolving intermediate to long wavelengths features that may be associated with relatively deeper geological structures. A comparison of frequency filtered slices and power spectral density (PSD) for both data sets using the short (> 5 km), intermediate (10 km) and long (20 km) wavelengths reveals that high altitude Air\\-FTGR data show greater response in high frequency anomalies than a conventional Airborne Gravity and matches well with the AG even at the longest wavelengths anomalies. The effect of line spacing and target resolution was examined between the two data sets. Reprocessed gradient and AG data at 2, 4 and 6 km line spacing suggest that Air\\-FTGR could be effectively flown at a comparatively wider line spacing to resolve similar targets the AG would resolve with tighter line spacing. Introduction Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) data have been available to the mining industry since 2002 and their use for geologic applications is well established. However, Air\\-FTGR data has been mostly considered and used in mapping and delineation of near surface geological targets. This is due to the fact that gravity gradiometer measurements are well suited to capture the high frequency signal associated with near\\-surface targets ( Li, 2001). This is possible because the gradiometer signal strength falls off with the cube of the distance to the target. Nonetheless, in recent years there has been an increasing demand from the mining, oil, and gas industry in utilizing Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometer as a mapping tool for both regional and prospect level surveys. Air\\-FTGR as a Regional Mapping Tool Several, relatively low altitude surveys have been successfully flown in Brazil, Canada and Australia

  12. Evaluation of the new gravity control in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sękowski, M.; Dykowski, P.; Krynski, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The new gravity control in Poland is based on absolute gravity measurements. It consists of 28 fundamental stations and 168 base stations. Fundamental stations are located in laboratories; they are to be surveyed in 2014 with the FG5-230 of the Warsaw University of Technology. Base stations are monumented field stations; they were surveyed in 2012 and 2013 with the A10-020 gravimeter. They are the subject of the paper. Besides absolute gravity measurements the vertical gravity gradient was precisely determined at all 168 base stations. Inconsistency of the determined vertical gravity gradients with respect to the normal ones has been presented. 77 base stations are also the stations of the previous gravity (POGK98) established in 90. of 20 century. Differences between newly determined gravity at those stations with those of POGK98 were evaluated. Alongside the establishment of the base stations of the gravity control multiple additional activities were performed to assure and provide the proper gravity reference level. They concerned regular gravity measurements on monthly basis with the A10-020 at three sites in Borowa Gora Geodetic-Geophysical Observatory, calibrations of metrological parameters of the A10-020 gravimeter and scale factor calibrations of LCR gravimeters, participation with the A10-020 in the international (ECAG2011, ICAG2013) and regional comparison campaigns of absolute gravimeters, and local comparisons of the A10-020 with the FG5-230. The summary of the work performed during the establishment of the gravity control is best described by total uncertainty budget for the A10-020 gravimeter determined on each of the 168 gravity stations.

  13. Active microwave computed brain tomography: the response to a challenge.

    PubMed

    Almirall, H; Broquetas, A; Jofre, L

    1991-02-01

    The potential application of active microwave techniques to brain imaging is studied by numerical simulations and experimentally using a recently developed cylindrical microwave scanner. The potential advantages and limitations of this method in static and dynamic brain imaging are presented and compared with other imaging techniques. PMID:2062119

  14. Gang Activity on Campus: A Crisis Response Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mahauganee; Meaney, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This case study challenges readers to consider a contemporary issue for campus threat assessment and emergency preparedness: gang presence on college campuses. A body of research examining the presence of gangs and gang activity on college campuses has developed, revealing that gangs pose a viable threat for institutions of higher education. The…

  15. Manatee response to boating activity in a thermal refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckingham, C.A.; Lefebvre, L.W.; Schaefer, J.M.; Kochman, H.I.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal refuges are important for the endangered Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during winter cold periods in temperate latitudes. However, little research has examined impacts on manatees from human disturbance during these critical periods. We studied the effect of recreational boating activity on manatee use of established sanctuaries in the natural thermal refuge created by warm-water springs in Kings Bay, Crystal River, Florida. We examined the relationship among manatee use of the study area and sanctuaries, temperature, and level of boating activity. Manatees continued to use the Bay regardless of the number of boats present; however, their use of sanctuaries in the southern portion of the Bay increased (P<0.001) as number of boats increased. Temperature, as expected, was inversely related to manatee use of the study area. Human activity patterns were variable, with significantly greater numbers of boats in the study area on weekends (x??=32.7, SE=2.71) than on weekdays (x??=10.7, SE=1.23). We concluded that recreational boating influenced manatee distribution, sanctuaries are important to manatees in Kings Bay, and sanctuaries are an effective management tool to reduce the impact of boating activities on manatees.

  16. Convectively-generated gravity waves and clear-air turbulence (CAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharman, Robert; Lane, Todd; Trier, Stanley

    2013-04-01

    Upper-level turbulence is a well-known hazard to aviation that is responsible for numerous injuries each year, with occasional fatalities, and results in millions of dollars of operational costs to airlines each year. It has been widely accepted that aviation-scale turbulence that occurs in clear air (CAT) at upper levels (upper troposphere and lower stratosphere) has its origins in Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities induced by enhanced shears and reduced Richardson numbers associated with the jet stream and upper level fronts. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that gravity waves and gravity wave "breaking" also play a major role in instigating turbulence that affects aviation. Gravity waves and inertia-gravity waves may be produced by a variety of sources, but one major source that impacts aviation seems to be those produced by convection. The relation of convectively-induced gravity waves to turbulence outside the cloud (either above cloud or laterally away from cloud) is examined based on high resolution cloud-resolving simulations, both with and without cloud microphysics in the simulations. Results for both warm-season and cold-season cloud systems indicate that the turbulence in the clear air away from cloud is often caused by gravity wave production processes in or near the cloud which once initiated, are able to propagate away from the storm, and may eventually "break." Without microphysics of course this effect is absent and turbulence is not produced in the simulations. In some cases the convectively-induced turbulence may be many kilometers away from the active convection and can easily be misinterpreted as "clear-air turbulence" (CAT). This is a significant result, and may be cause for a reassessment of the working definition of CAT ("turbulence encountered outside of convective clouds", FAA Advisory Circular AC 00-30B, 1997).

  17. Inducing in situ, nonlinear soil response applying an active source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, P.A.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.; Pearce, F.; Lawrence, Z.; Menq, F.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    [1] It is well known that soil sites have a profound effect on ground motion during large earthquakes. The complex structure of soil deposits and the highly nonlinear constitutive behavior of soils largely control nonlinear site response at soil sites. Measurements of nonlinear soil response under natural conditions are critical to advancing our understanding of soil behavior during earthquakes. Many factors limit the use of earthquake observations to estimate nonlinear site response such that quantitative characterization of nonlinear behavior relies almost exclusively on laboratory experiments and modeling of wave propagation. Here we introduce a new method for in situ characterization of the nonlinear behavior of a natural soil formation using measurements obtained immediately adjacent to a large vibrator source. To our knowledge, we are the first group to propose and test such an approach. Employing a large, surface vibrator as a source, we measure the nonlinear behavior of the soil by incrementally increasing the source amplitude over a range of frequencies and monitoring changes in the output spectra. We apply a homodyne algorithm for measuring spectral amplitudes, which provides robust signal-to-noise ratios at the frequencies of interest. Spectral ratios are computed between the receivers and the source as well as receiver pairs located in an array adjacent to the source, providing the means to separate source and near-source nonlinearity from pervasive nonlinearity in the soil column. We find clear evidence of nonlinearity in significant decreases in the frequency of peak spectral ratios, corresponding to material softening with amplitude, observed across the array as the source amplitude is increased. The observed peak shifts are consistent with laboratory measurements of soil nonlinearity. Our results provide constraints for future numerical modeling studies of strong ground motion during earthquakes.

  18. The Gravity Model for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribble, Paul; Mitchell, William A.

    1977-01-01

    The authors suggest ways in which the gravity model can be used in high school geography classes. Based on Newton's Law of Molecular Gravitation, the law states that gravitation is in direct ratio to mass and inverse ratio to distance. One activity for students involves determination of zones of influence of cities of various sizes. (Author/AV)

  19. Zero gravity tissue-culture laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. E.; Montgomery, P. O., Jr.; Paul, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Hardware was developed for performing experiments to detect the effects that zero gravity may have on living human cells. The hardware is composed of a timelapse camera that photographs the activity of cell specimens and an experiment module in which a variety of living-cell experiments can be performed using interchangeable modules. The experiment is scheduled for the first manned Skylab mission.

  20. Our World: Gravity in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    What is gravity? Find out about the balance between gravity and inertia that keeps the International Space Station in orbit. Learn why astronauts "float" in space and how the space shuttle has to s...

  1. Physiological Considerations of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons for the development of artificial gravity environments on spacecraft are outlined. The physiological effects of weightlessness on the human cardiovascular skeletal, and vestibular systems are enumerated. Design options for creating artificial gravity environments are shown.

  2. Response of salivary markers of autonomic activity to elite competition.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M M; Bocanegra, O L; Teixeira, R R; Soares, S S; Espindola, F S

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the response of salivary total protein (TP), alpha-amylase (sAA) and chromogranin A (CgA) to sporting competition and their relation with positive and negative affect. 11 professional swimmers were examined during the first day of a national contest and on a recreated event that matched time-of-the-day and day-of-the-week assessments 2 weeks later. Total protein was determined by the Bradford method and sAA and CgA by Western blotting upon awakening, 30 and 60 min post awakening, immediately before warming up for competition and 5, 20 and 60 min after competition. Psychometric instruments included the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule-X. The concentrations of TP, sAA and CgA differed from controls only prior to and 5 min after the event. We observed positive correlations between higher negative affect scores with higher levels of TP, sAA and CgA prior to the event on the competition day. All 3 markers showed a similar reactivity to sporting competition, which may be attributed to the mechanisms responsible for protein secretion into saliva when collection is performed with no exogenous stimulation. TP is an attractive marker in sports psychology since its determination is faster and cheaper than traditional kinetic or immune assays. PMID:22581684

  3. Optical response and activity of ultrathin films of topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parhizgar, Fariborz; Moghaddam, Ali G.; Asgari, Reza

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the optical properties of ultrathin film of a topological insulator in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. We show that due to the combination of the overlap between the surface states of the two layers and the magnetic field, the optical conductivity can show strong anisotropy. This leads to the effective optical activity of the ultrathin film by influencing the circularly polarized incident light. Intriguingly, for a range of magnetic fields, the reflected and transmitted lights exhibit elliptic character. Even for certain values almost linear polarizations are obtained, indicating that the thin film can act as a polaroid in reflection. All these features are discussed in the context of the time-reversal symmetry breaking as one of the key ingredients for the optical activity.

  4. Effects of Activation Energy to Transient Response of Semiconductor Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akira; Ohtani, Tatsuki

    The smell classifiable gas sensor will be desired for many applications such as gas detection alarms, process controls for food production and so on. We have tried to realize the sensor using transient responses of semiconductor gas sensor consisting of tin dioxide and pointed out that the sensor gave us different transient responses for kinds of gas. Results of model calculation showed the activation energy of chemical reaction on the sensor surface strongly depended on the transient response. We tried to estimate the activation energies by molecular orbital calculation with SnO2 Cluster. The results show that there is a liner relationship between the gradient of the transient responses and activation energies for carboxylic and alcoholic gases. Transient response will be predicted from activation energy in the same kind of gas and the smell discrimination by single semiconductor gas sensor will be realized by this relationship.

  5. Neuropathic pain in aged rats: behavioral responses and astrocytic activation.

    PubMed

    Stuesse, S L; Crisp, T; McBurney, D L; Schechter, J B; Lovell, J A; Cruce, W L

    2001-03-01

    We used the Bennett and Xie (1988) model of chronic neuropathic pain to study the effect of age on thermal and tactile sensitivity and on astrocytic activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord after nerve injury. Fischer 344 FBNF1 hybrid rats in three age groups, 4-6, 14-16, and 24-26 months, were studied. Rats were either unligated (day 0, control) or the left sciatic nerve was loosely ligated to cause a chronic constriction injury (CCI). CCI causes a neuropathic pain condition characterized by tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Rats were behaviorally assessed for tactile and thermal sensitivity of their ligated and unligated hind paws up to 35 days postligation. Rats were sacrificed before or at various days postligation, and activated astrocytes were identified at the L4-L5 levels of their spinal cords by use of an antibody to glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP). The number of GFAP-ir astrocytes in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in the control, uninjured condition decreased with age (P < or = 0.001) but increased after CCI in all three age groups. After CCI, astrocytic activation in the cord was less robust in aged rats than in younger ones (P < or = 0.01). Not all the CCI rats displayed hyperalgesia to touch and to heat. Rats with an increased sensitivity to heat had increased levels of GFAP-ir in their cords; however, rats with decreased thermal sensitivity also displayed increased GFAP-ir. Thus the presence of activated astrocytes was not correlated with a single behavioral manifestation of neuropathic pain. PMID:11315551

  6. Longitudinal Variations of Low-Latitude Gravity Waves and Their Impacts on the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullens, C. Y.; England, S.; Immel, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The lower atmospheric forcing has important roles in the ionospheric variability. However, influences of lower atmospheric gravity waves on the ionospheric variability are still not clear due to the simplified gravity wave parameterizations and the limited knowledge of gravity wave distributions. In this study, we aim to study the longitudinal variations of gravity waves and their impacts of longitudinal variations of low-latitude gravity waves on the ionospheric variability. Our SABER results show that longitudinal variations of gravity waves at the lower boundary of TIME-GCM are the largest in June-August and January-February. We have implemented these low-latitude gravity wave variations from SABER instrument into TIME-GCM model. TIME-GCM simulation results of ionospheric responses to longitudinal variations of gravity waves and physical mechanisms will be discussed.

  7. Review of Gravity Probe B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In response to a request by the NASA Administrator, the National Research Council (NRC) has conducted an accelerated scientific review of NASA's Gravity Probe B (GP-B) mission. The review was carried out by the Task Group on Gravity Probe B, under the auspices of the NRC's Space Studies Board and Board on Physics and Astronomy. The specific charge to the task group was to review the GP-B mission with respect to the following terms of reference: (1) scientific importance - including a current assessment of the value of the project in the context of recent progress in gravitational physics and relevant technology; (2) technical feasibility - the technical approach will be evaluated for likelihood of success, both in terms of achievement of flight mission objectives but also in terms of scientific conclusiveness of the various possible outcomes for the measurements to be made; and (3) competitive value - if possible, GP-B science will be assessed qualitatively against the objectives and accomplishments of one or more fundamental physics projects of similar cost (e.g., the Cosmic Background Explorer, COBE).

  8. Measuring gravity currents in the Chicago River, Chicago, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.A.; Czuba, J.A.; Johnson, K.K.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of the Chicago River have determined that gravity currents are responsible for persistent bidirectional flows that have been observed in the river. A gravity current is the flow of one fluid within another caused by a density difference between the fluids. These studies demonstrated how acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) can be used to detect and characterize gravity currents in the field. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these gravity currents, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has installed ADCPs and other instruments to continuously measure gravity currents in the Chicago River and the North Branch Chicago River. These instruments include stage sensors, thermistor strings, and both upward-looking and horizontal ADCPs. Data loggers and computers installed at gaging stations along the river are used to collect data from these instruments and transmit them to USGS offices. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  9. An electric current associated with gravity sensing in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The study of gravisensing would be greatly enhanced if physiological events associated with gravity sensing could be detected separately from subsequent growth processes. This report presents a means to discriminate sensing from the growth processes. By using a vibrating probe, we have found an electric current generated by the gravity sensing region of the root cap of maize (Zea mays cv Merit) in response to gravistimulation. On the upper surface of the root cap, the change from the endogenous current has a density of 0.55 microampere per square centimeter away from gravity. The onset of the current shift has a characteristic of lag of three to four minutes after gravistimulation, which corresponds to the presentation time for gravity sensing in this tissue. A description of the current provides some information about the sensing mechanism, as well as being a valuable means to detect gravity sensing independently of differential growth.

  10. Boosting of activity enhancement of K(+)-responsive quadruplex hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Yamaoki, Yudai; Mashima, Tsukasa; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2015-04-01

    Two second-generation quadruplex hammerhead ribozymes, whose activity enhances in response to K(+)via quadruplex formation of embedded r(GGA)3GG, were developed. Different strategies were applied to suppress basal activity when K(+) is absent. As a result, the activity enhancement upon the addition of K(+) has reached as high as 21-fold. PMID:25727931

  11. Factors Predicting Behavioral Response to a Physical Activity Intervention among Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Schneider, Margaret; Cooper, Dan M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether individual factors influenced rates of physical activity change in response to a school-based intervention. Methods: Sedentary adolescent females (N = 63) participated in a 9-month physical activity program. Weekly levels of leisure-time physical activity were reported using an interactive website. Results: Change…

  12. Ischemic preconditioning reduces hemodynamic response during metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Mulliri, Gabriele; Sainas, Gianmarco; Magnani, Sara; Palazzolo, Girolamo; Milia, Nicola; Orrù, Andrea; Roberto, Silvana; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Milia, Raffaele; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been shown to improve exercise performance and to delay fatigue. However, the precise mechanisms through which IP operates remain elusive. It has been hypothesized that IP lowers the sensation of fatigue by reducing the discharge of group III and IV nerve endings, which also regulate hemodynamics during the metaboreflex. We hypothesized that IP reduces the blood pressure response during the metaboreflex. Fourteen healthy males (age between 25 and 48 yr) participated in this study. They underwent the following randomly assigned protocol: postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) test, during which the metaboreflex was elicited after dynamic handgrip; control exercise recovery session (CER) test; and PEMI after IP (IP-PEMI) test. IP was obtained by occluding forearm circulation for three cycles of 5 min spaced by 5 min of reperfusion. Hemodynamics were evaluated by echocardiography and impedance cardiography. The main results were that after IP the mean arterial pressure response was reduced compared with the PEMI test (means ± SD +3.37 ± 6.41 vs. +9.16 ± 7.09 mmHg, respectively). This was the consequence of an impaired venous return that impaired the stroke volume during the IP-PEMI more than during the PEMI test (-1.43 ± 15.35 vs. +10.28 ± 10.479 ml, respectively). It was concluded that during the metaboreflex, IP affects hemodynamics mainly because it impairs the capacity to augment venous return and to recruit the cardiac preload reserve. It was hypothesized that this is the consequence of an increased nitric oxide production, which reduces the possibility to constrict venous capacity vessels. PMID:26936782

  13. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  14. Low gravity phase separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Pope, W. L.; Smith, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for phase separating a gas-liquid mixture as might exist in a subcritical cryogenic helium vessel for cooling a superconducting magnet at low gravity such as in planetary orbit, permitting conservation of the liquid and extended service life of the superconducting magnet.

  15. Cosmological tests of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Khoury, Justin

    2010-07-15

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the universe. We review recent developments in modified gravity theories, focusing on higher-dimensional approaches and chameleon/f(R) theories. We classify these models in terms of the screening mechanisms that enable such theories to approach general relativity on small scales (and thus satisfy solar system constraints). We describe general features of the modified Friedman equation in such theories. The second half of this review describes experimental tests of gravity in light of the new theoretical approaches. We summarize the high precision tests of gravity on laboratory and solar system scales. We describe in some detail tests on astrophysical scales ranging from {approx} kpc (galaxy scales) to {approx} Gpc (large-scale structure). These tests rely on the growth and inter-relationship of perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields which can be measured using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining effective parameters, such as the ratio of the two metric potentials. Currently tests of gravity on astrophysical scales are in the early stages - we summarize these tests and discuss the interesting prospects for new tests in the coming decade.

  16. Hawaii Gravity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-12-15

    Gravity model for the state of Hawaii. Data is from the following source: Flinders, A.F., Ito, G., Garcia, M.O., Sinton, J.M., Kauahikaua, J.P., and Taylor, B., 2013, Intrusive dike complexes, cumulate cores, and the extrusive growth of Hawaiian volcanoes: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 40, p. 3367–3373, doi:10.1002/grl.50633.

  17. Time in quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, H. D.

    1988-01-01

    The intrinsic time concept of quantum gravity allows one to derive thermodynamical and quantum mechanical time arrows correlated with cosmic expansion only. Tube-like standing waves subject to a ``final'' condition may resemble unparametrised orbits of the universe, with ``quantum Poincaré cycles'' coinciding with its durations. A recent criticism by Qadir is answered.

  18. Gravity and crustal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowin, C. O.

    1976-01-01

    Lunar gravitational properties were analyzed along with the development of flat moon and curved moon computer models. Gravity anomalies and mascons were given particular attention. Geophysical and geological considerations were included, and comparisons were made between the gravitional fields of the Earth, Mars, and the Moon.

  19. Revamped braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Ruoyu; Park, Minjoon; Carena, Marcela; Santiago, Jose; Lykken, Joseph

    2006-03-15

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit straight gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e., the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP)-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.

  20. Revamped braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ruoyu; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the vDVZ discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit ''straight'' gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e. the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of DGP-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.