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Sample records for active retroviral therapy

  1. [Highly Active AntiRetroviral Therapy and opportunistic protozoan infections].

    PubMed

    Pozio, E

    2004-06-01

    Opportunistic parasite infections (OPIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in persons infected with HIV. In industrialised countries, the use of Highly Active AntiRetroviral Therapy (HAART) results to be effective in suppressing the HIV viral load, with a quantitative and qualitative improvement in the CD4+ T-cell count followed by a strong reduction of opportunistic infections including those caused by parasites. These successes have been mainly attributed to the reconstitution of the cell immunity, which play the most important role in controlling OPIs. However, there are many clinical reports and several laboratory results, which suggest that the control of OPIs in HIV-positive persons under HAART is also induced by the anti-HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), which inhibit the aspartyl proteases of the parasites. The non-conventional use of HIV-PIs seems to be an alternative way for the treatment of parasitic infections, which should be deeply investigated. Of five longitudinal studies carried out before and after the introduction of HAART, four studies showed a strong reduction of toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) in HIV-positive persons under HAART, whereas in another study, no difference was observed in the incidence rate of TE before and after the introduction of HAART. The influence of HAART in reducing TE has been also confirmed in a randomised, controlled clinical trial, which showed that there is no increase in the risk of developing TE after beginning HAART, even though HIV-infected persons with TE had a discontinuing prophylaxis for Toxoplasma gondii. Four HIV protease inhibitors were tested against the T. gondii virulent RH strain in vitro, alone or in association with pyrimethamine or sulfadiazine. Ritonavir and nelfinavir were highly inhibitory for the parasite growth. Furthermore, none of the antiviral drugs negatively affected the anti-Toxoplasma activity of pyrimethamine or sulfadiazine. In HIV-Leishmania co-infections, a changing pattern

  2. Ophthalmic manifestations of HIV in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, L

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related eye disease can be classified as retinal HIV microangiopathy, opportunistic infections, neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and unusual malignancies. There is a 52-100% lifetime accumulative risk of HIV patients developing eye problems. Seventy-seven per cent of patients with ocular manifestations of HIV had CD4 counts < 200 cells/μL. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most prevalent opportunistic infection, however, Africa has a low incidence of this, and more commonly squamous cell carcinoma, compared to the western hemisphere. Due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the anti-CMV therapy may be discontinued if the CD4+ T cell count is > 100 cells/μL for a minimum of three months. Despite HAART, patients with a CD4 count < 50 cells/μL have a similar risk of developing CMV retinitis as compared to the pre-HAART era. Opportunistic infections include CMV, herpetic retinopathy (progressive outer retinal necrosis - PORN), less commonly toxoplasmosis, pneumocystis and cryptococcus. Malignancies associated with HIV include Kaposi's sarcoma and conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. Cranial nerve palsies, optic disc swelling and atrophy are characteristic neuro-ophthalmic features. They usually occur secondary to meningitis/encephalitis (from cryptococcus and tuberculosis). With the advent of HAART, new complications have developed in CMV retinitis: immune recovery uveitis (IRU) and cystoid macula oedema (CMO). Immune recovery uveitis occurs in 71% of patients if HAART is started before the induction of the anti-CMV treatment. However, this is reduced to 31% if HAART is started after the induction treatment. Molluscum contagiosum and Kaposi's sarcoma can spontaneously resolve on HAART. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy has reduced the frequencies of opportunistic infections and improved the remission duration in HIV patients. PMID:24756590

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups influence lipoatrophy after Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Sher L.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Poole, Jason C.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Palella, Frank J.; Bream, Jay H.; Wallace, Douglas C.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Although highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) has been extremely effective in lowering AIDS incidence among patients infected with HIV, certain drugs included in HAART can cause serious mitochondrial toxicities. One of the most frequent adverse events is lipoatrophy, which is the loss of subcutaneous fat in the face, arms, buttocks and/or legs as an adverse reaction to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). The clinical symptoms of lipoatrophy resemble those of inherited mitochondrial diseases, which suggests that host mitochondrial genotype may play a role in susceptibility. We analyzed the association between mitochondrial haplogroup and severity of lipoatrophy in HIV-infected European American patients on HAART in the Multicenter AIDS cohort Study (MACS) and found that mitochondrial haplogroup H was strongly associated with increased atrophy (arms: p = 0.007, OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.17–2.69 legs: p = 0.037, OR = 1.54 95% CI = 1.03–2.31, and buttocks: p = 0.10, OR = 1.41 95% CI = 0.94–2.12). We also saw borderline significance for haplogroup T as protective against lipoatrophy (p = 0.05, OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.20–1.00). These data suggest that mitochondrial DNA haplogroup may influence the propensity for lipoatrophy in patients receiving NRTIs. PMID:19339895

  4. Identifying risk factors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Zheng, Yuhuang; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Guoqiang; Chen, Xia; Mamadou, Diallo; He, Yan; Zhou, Huaying; Chen, Zi

    2013-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome typically occurs within days after patients undergo highly active anti-retroviral therapy and is a big hurdle for effective treatment of AIDS patients. In this study, we monitored immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in 238 AIDS patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among them, immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurred in 47 cases (19.7%). Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients had significantly higher rate of opportunistic infection (p<0.001) and persistently lower CD4(+) cell count (p<0.001) compared to the non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients. In contrast, no significant differences in HIV RNA loads were observed between the immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group and non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group. These data suggest that a history of opportunistic infection and CD4(+) cell counts at baseline may function as risk factors for immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in AIDS patients as well as potential prognostic markers. These findings will improve the management of AIDS with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23434049

  5. Retroviral Integrations in Gene Therapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Biasco, Luca; Baricordi, Cristina; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    γ-Retroviral and lentiviral vectors allow the permanent integration of a therapeutic transgene in target cells and have provided in the last decade a delivery platform for several successful gene therapy (GT) clinical approaches. However, the occurrence of adverse events due to insertional mutagenesis in GT treated patients poses a strong challenge to the scientific community to identify the mechanisms at the basis of vector-driven genotoxicity. Along the last decade, the study of retroviral integration sites became a fundamental tool to monitor vector–host interaction in patients overtime. This review is aimed at critically revising the data derived from insertional profiling, with a particular focus on the evidences collected from GT clinical trials. We discuss the controversies and open issues associated to the interpretation of integration site analysis during patient's follow up, with an update on the latest results derived from the use of high-throughput technologies. Finally, we provide a perspective on the future technical development and on the application of these studies to address broader biological questions, from basic virology to human hematopoiesis. PMID:22252453

  6. Adherence to Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) During Muslim Ramadan Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Habib, A. G.; Shepherd, J. C.; Eng, M. K. L.; Babashani, M.; Jumare, J.; Yakubu, U.; Gebi, U. I.; Saad, M.; Ibrahim, H.; Blattner, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Annual fasting during the month of Ramadan is observed in Muslim countries, some of which have widespread HIV infection. We studied treatment adherence and customary practices among 142 fasting `FT' and 101 non-fasting `NFT' patients on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. Adherence on ART among FT and NFT patients was similar during Ramadan, 96% and 98%, and ever since commencement of ART, 80% and 88%, respectively. FT patients altered their typical daily behaviors by advancing morning and delaying evening doses thereby prolonging dosing intervals, eating heavier meals pre-dawn and on breakfast at sunset (78%), and changing or reducing their sleeping and waking times (40%). This preliminary study suggests that adherence and drug taking frequency appear uncompromised in FT HIV infected patients on ARVs. PMID:18521736

  7. The Development of Metabolic Risk Factors After the Initiation of the Second Line Anti- Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Apoorva; Achappa, Basavaprabhu; Madi, Deepak; Chowta, Mukta N; Ramapuram, John T; Rao, Satish; Unnikrishnan, B; Mahalingam, Soundarya

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective: A Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) is accompanied with several metabolic effects like adipose redistribution and insulin resistance. In this study, we evaluated the association between a HAART and lipodystrophy. Methods: A cross sectional study, whose subjects were Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected patients, was conducted at a tertiary care hospital in south India. Among these, 27 were on protease inhibitors for at-least 6 months and 13 were drug naive patients. The assessments of lipodystrophy, fasting blood sugar and the fasting lipid profile were done and these parameters were compared in the two groups. Results: The analysis of the data which was collected, showed an elevation in the total cholesterol levels in the individuals who were on the protease inhibitors versus the drug naive patients. There was a significant elevation in the Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and a decrease in High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels in the individuals who were on protease inhibitors. It was also observed that the HDL cholesterol levels decreased with an increase in the duration of the therapy. The LDL cholesterol levels increased with the duration of the therapy. Conclusion: The human immunodeficiency virus infection is itself related to the metabolic complications which are aggravated on the use of second line anti retroviral therapy. Therefore, after initiating the treatment with protease inhibitors, a periodic evaluation of the serum lipid levels and the blood sugar profile should be done as a standard care. PMID:23542168

  8. Spectrum of imaging appearances of intracranial cryptococcal infection in HIV/AIDS patients in the anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Offiah, Curtis E; Naseer, Aisha

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans infection is the most common fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) in advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, but remains a relatively uncommon CNS infection in both the immunocompromised and immunocompetent patient population, rendering it a somewhat elusive and frequently overlooked diagnosis. The morbidity and mortality associated with CNS cryptococcal infection can be significantly reduced by early recognition of the imaging appearances by the radiologist in order to focus and expedite clinical management and treatment. The emergence and evolution of anti-retroviral therapy have also impacted significantly on the imaging appearances, morbidity, and mortality of this neuro-infection. The constellation of varied imaging appearances associated with cryptococcal CNS infection in the HIV and AIDS population in the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) will be presented in this review. PMID:26564776

  9. Neonatal Gene Therapy With a Gamma Retroviral Vector in Mucopolysaccharidosis VI Cats

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Katherine P; O'Malley, Thomas M; Wang, Ping; O'Donnell, Patricia A; Traas, Anne M; Knox, Van W; Aguirre, Gustavo A; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Metcalf, Jason A; Wang, Bin; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J; Sleeper, Meg M; Brooks, Doug A; Hopwood, John J; Haskins, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VI is due to a deficiency in the activity of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (4S), also known as arylsulfatase B. Previously, retroviral vector (RV)-mediated neonatal gene therapy reduced the clinical manifestations of MPS I and MPS VII in mice and dogs. However, sulfatases require post-translational modification by sulfatase-modifying factors. MPS VI cats were injected intravenously (i.v.) with a gamma RV-expressing feline 4S, resulting in 5 ± 3 copies of RV per 100 cells in liver. Liver and serum 4S activity were 1,450 ± 1,720 U/mg (26-fold normal) and 107 ± 60 U/ml (13-fold normal), respectively, and were directly proportional to the liver 4S protein levels for individual cats. This study suggests that sulfatase-modifying factor (SUMF) activity in liver was sufficient to result in active enzyme despite overexpression of 4S. RV-treated MPS VI cats achieved higher body weights and longer appendicular skeleton lengths, had reduced articular cartilage erosion, and reduced aortic valve thickening and aortic dilatation compared with untreated MPS VI cats, although cervical vertebral bone lengths were not improved. This demonstrates that therapeutic expression of a functional sulfatase protein can be achieved with neonatal gene therapy using a gamma RV, but some aspects of bone disease remain difficult to treat. PMID:22395531

  10. Larger Mammalian Body Size Leads to Lower Retroviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Lim, Aaron G.; Gupta, Sunetra; Belshaw, Robert; Gifford, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have been infecting mammals for at least 100 million years, leaving descendants in host genomes known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). The abundance of ERVs is partly determined by their mode of replication, but it has also been suggested that host life history traits could enhance or suppress their activity. We show that larger bodied species have lower levels of ERV activity by reconstructing the rate of ERV integration across 38 mammalian species. Body size explains 37% of the variance in ERV integration rate over the last 10 million years, controlling for the effect of confounding due to other life history traits. Furthermore, 68% of the variance in the mean age of ERVs per genome can also be explained by body size. These results indicate that body size limits the number of recently replicating ERVs due to their detrimental effects on their host. To comprehend the possible mechanistic links between body size and ERV integration we built a mathematical model, which shows that ERV abundance is favored by lower body size and higher horizontal transmission rates. We argue that because retroviral integration is tumorigenic, the negative correlation between body size and ERV numbers results from the necessity to reduce the risk of cancer, under the assumption that this risk scales positively with body size. Our model also fits the empirical observation that the lifetime risk of cancer is relatively invariant among mammals regardless of their body size, known as Peto's paradox, and indicates that larger bodied mammals may have evolved mechanisms to limit ERV activity. PMID:25033295

  11. A phase I trial of retroviral BRCA1sv gene therapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tait, D L; Obermiller, P S; Redlin-Frazier, S; Jensen, R A; Welcsh, P; Dann, J; King, M C; Johnson, D H; Holt, J T

    1997-11-01

    Gene transfer of BRCA1sv (a normal splice variant of BRCA1) into ovarian cancer cells produces growth inhibition in vitro and tumor suppression in nude mouse xenografts. As an initial step toward gene replacement therapy for ovarian cancer, we conducted a Phase I trial to assess the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of i.p. BRCA1sv retroviral vector therapy. Following placement of an indwelling Port-a-Cath in patients, a dose escalation study was performed of four daily i.p. infusions spanning doses from 3 to 300 ml (i.e., 10(10) viral particles) at half-log intervals (23 cycles in 12 patients). Gene transfer and expression were documented by PCR, Southern blot, reverse transcription-PCR, and nuclease protection assays. Pharmacokinetics were assessed by PCR and Southern blots detecting vector DNA, and toxicity was evaluated by clinical exam and fluid analysis. Three of 12 patients developed an acute sterile peritonitis, which spontaneously resolved within 48 h. Plasma and peritoneal antibodies to the retroviral envelope protein were detected only in patients treated with the highest dose levels but not in others, despite repeat dosing for an interval of up to 4 months. Eight patients showed stable disease for 4-16 weeks, and three patients showed tumor reduction with diminished miliary tumor implants at reoperation (two patients) and radiographic shrinkage of measurable disease (one patient). The vector-related complication of peritonitis was observed in three patients but resolved quickly as in preclinical mouse studies. Ovarian cancer may provide an important model for retroviral gene therapy studies due to vector stability, minimal antibody response, and access to tumor by i.p. therapy. PMID:9815585

  12. Direct retroviral delivery of human cytochrome P450 2B6 for gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kan, O; Griffiths, L; Baban, D; Iqball, S; Uden, M; Spearman, H; Slingsby, J; Price, T; Esapa, M; Kingsman, S; Kingsman, A; Slade, A; Naylor, S

    2001-07-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) metabolizes the prodrug cyclophosphamide (CPA) to produce phosphoramide mustard that cross-links DNA leading to cell death. We have constructed a novel retroviral vector encoding CYP2B6 (designated "MetXia-P450") and used it to transduce the human tumor cell lines HT29 and T47D. MetXia-P450 transduction sensitised these cells to the cytotoxic effects of the prodrug CPA. Results from in vitro experiments demonstrated adverse effects on the clonogenic survival of cyclophosphamide-treated cells transduced with MetXia-P450. Cytotoxic activity accompanied by bystander effect was particularly evident in 3-D multicellular spheroid models suggesting that this in vitro system may be a more appropriate model for assessing the efficacy of gene directed-enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT). We have applied this approach in a clinically relevant gene therapy protocol on established subcutaneous tumor xenografts. These studies show for the first time the efficacy of a P450-based GDEPT strategy mediated by a direct retroviral gene transfer in vivo. PMID:11498768

  13. Murine Leukemias with Retroviral Insertions at Lmo2 Are Predictive of the Leukemias Induced in SCID-X1 Patients Following Retroviral Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Davé, Utpal P.; Akagi, Keiko; Tripathi, Rati; Cleveland, Susan M.; Thompson, Mary A.; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert; Downing, James R.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2009-01-01

    Five X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency patients (SCID-X1) successfully treated with autologous bone marrow stem cells infected ex vivo with an IL2RG-containing retrovirus subsequently developed T-cell leukemia and four contained insertional mutations at LMO2. Genetic evidence also suggests a role for IL2RG in tumor formation, although this remains controversial. Here, we show that the genes and signaling pathways deregulated in murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are similar to those deregulated in human leukemias with high LMO2 expression and are highly predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients. We also provide additional evidence supporting the notion that IL2RG and LMO2 cooperate in leukemia induction but are not sufficient and require additional cooperating mutations. The highly concordant nature of the genetic events giving rise to mouse and human leukemias with mutations at Lmo2 are an encouraging sign to those wanting to use mice to model human cancer and may help in designing safer methods for retroviral gene therapy. PMID:19461887

  14. Integration Site and Clonal Expansion in Human Chronic Retroviral Infection and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Heather A.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have been successfully used therapeutically to restore expression of genes in a range of single-gene diseases, including several primary immunodeficiency disorders. Although clinical trials have shown remarkable results, there have also been a number of severe adverse events involving malignant outgrowth of a transformed clonal population. This clonal expansion is influenced by the integration site profile of the viral integrase, the transgene expressed, and the effect of the viral promoters on the neighbouring host genome. Infection with the pathogenic human retrovirus HTLV-1 also causes clonal expansion of cells containing an integrated HTLV-1 provirus. Although the majority of HTLV-1-infected people remain asymptomatic, up to 5% develop an aggressive T cell malignancy. In this review we discuss recent findings on the role of the genomic integration site in determining the clonality and the potential for malignant transformation of cells carrying integrated HTLV-1 or gene therapy vectors, and how these results have contributed to the understanding of HTLV-1 pathogenesis and to improvements in gene therapy vector safety. PMID:25365582

  15. TRIM5 Retroviral Restriction Activity Correlates with the Ability To Induce Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lascano, Josefina; Uchil, Pradeep D.; Mothes, Walther

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Host restriction factor TRIM5 inhibits retroviral transduction in a species-specific manner by binding to and destabilizing the retroviral capsid lattice before reverse transcription is completed. However, the restriction mechanism may not be that simple since TRIM5 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, the proteasome, autophagy, and TAK1-dependent AP-1 signaling have been suggested to contribute to restriction. Here, we show that, among a panel of seven primate and Carnivora TRIM5 orthologues, each of which has potential for potent retroviral restriction activity, all activated AP-1 signaling. In contrast, TRIM family paralogues most closely related to TRIM5 did not. While each primate species has a single TRIM5 gene, mice have at least seven TRIM5 homologues that cluster into two groups, Trim12a, -b, and -c and Trim30a, -b, -c, and -d. The three Trim12 proteins activated innate immune signaling, while the Trim30 proteins did not, though none of the murine Trim5 homologues restricted any of a panel of cloned retroviruses. To determine if any mouse TRIM5 homologues had potential for restriction activity, each was fused to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CA binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA). The three Trim12-CypA fusions all activated AP-1 and restricted HIV-1 transduction, whereas the Trim30-CypA fusions did neither. AP-1 activation and HIV-1 restriction by the Trim12-CypA fusions were inhibited by disruption of TAK1. Overall then, these experiments demonstrate that there is a strong correlation between TRIM5 retroviral restriction activity and the ability to activate TAK1-dependent innate immune signaling. IMPORTANCE The importance of retroviruses for the evolution of susceptible host organisms cannot be overestimated. Eight percent of the human genome is retrovirus sequence, fixed in the germ line during past infection. Understanding how metazoa protect their genomes from mutagenic retrovirus infection is therefore of fundamental importance to

  16. Circulating Heat Shock Protein 60 Levels Are Elevated in HIV Patients and Are Reduced by Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anraku, Itaru; Rajasuriar, Reena; Dobbin, Caroline; Brown, Richard; Lewin, Sharon R.; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Circulating heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) and heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) have been associated with pro- and anti-inflammatory activity, respectively. To determine whether these heat shock proteins might be associated with the immune activation seen in HIV-infected patients, the plasma levels of Hsp60 and Hsp10 were determined in a cohort of 20 HIV-infected patients before and after effective combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). We show for the first time that circulating Hsp60 levels are elevated in HIV-infected patients, with levels significantly reduced after cART, but still higher than those in HIV-negative individuals. Hsp60 levels correlated significantly with viral load, CD4 counts, and circulating soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide levels. No differences or correlations were seen for Hsp10 levels. Elevated circulating Hsp60 may contribute to the immune dysfunction and non-AIDS clinical events seen in HIV-infected patients. PMID:23028910

  17. Retroviral Vector-mediated Gene Therapy to Mucopolysaccharidosis I Mice Improves Sensorimotor Impairments and Other Behavior Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Guilherme; Wozniak, David F.; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Zhang, Yanming; Giugliani, Roberto; Ponder, Katherine P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease due to α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) deficiency that results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Systemic gene therapy to MPS I mice can reduce lysosomal storage in the brain, but few data are available regarding the effect upon behavioral function. Here, we investigated the effect of gene therapy with a long-terminal repeat (LTR)-intact retroviral vector or a self-inactivating (SIN) vector on behavioral function in MPS I mice. The LTR vector was injected intravenously to 6 week-old MPS I mice, while the SIN vector was given to neonatal or 6 week-old mice. Adult-LTR, Neonatal-SIN, and Adult-SIN-treated mice achieved serum IDUA activity that was 235±20 (84-fold normal), 127±10, and 71±7 units/ml, respectively. All groups had reduction in histochemical evidence of lysosomal storage in the brain, with the Adult-LTR group showing the best response, while Adult-LTR mice had reductions in lysosomal storage in the cristae of the vestibular system. Behavioral evaluation was performed at 8 months. Untreated MPS I mice had a markedly reduced ability to hold onto an inverted screen or climb down a pole. LTR vector-treated mice had marked improvements on both of these tests, while Neonatal-SIN mice had improvements in the pole test. We conclude that both vectors can reduce brain disease in MPS I mice, with the LTR vector achieving higher serum IDUA levels and better correction. Vestibular abnormalities may contribute to mobility problems in patients with MPS I, and gene therapy may reduce symptoms. PMID:22983812

  18. Retroviral-vector-mediated gene therapy to mucopolysaccharidosis I mice improves sensorimotor impairments and other behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Guilherme; Wozniak, David F; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Zhang, Yanming; Giugliani, Roberto; Ponder, Katherine P

    2013-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disease due to α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) deficiency that results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Systemic gene therapy to MPS I mice can reduce lysosomal storage in the brain, but few data are available regarding the effect upon behavioral function. We investigated the effect of gene therapy with a long-terminal-repeat (LTR)-intact retroviral vector or a self-inactivating (SIN) vector on behavioral function in MPS I mice. The LTR vector was injected intravenously to 6-week-old MPS I mice, and the SIN vector was given to neonatal or 6-week-old mice. Adult-LTR, neonatal-SIN, and adult-SIN-treated mice achieved serum IDUA activity of 235 ± 20 (84-fold normal), 127 ± 10, and 71 ± 7 U/ml, respectively. All groups had reduction in histochemical evidence of lysosomal storage in the brain, with the adult-LTR group showing the best response, while adult-LTR mice had reductions in lysosomal storage in the cristae of the vestibular system. Behavioral evaluation was performed at 8 months. Untreated MPS I mice had a markedly reduced ability to hold onto an inverted screen or climb down a pole. LTR-vector-treated mice had marked improvements on both of these tests, whereas neonatal-SIN mice showed improvement in the pole test. We conclude that both vectors can reduce brain disease in MPS I mice, with the LTR vector achieving higher serum IDUA levels and better correction. Vestibular abnormalities may contribute to mobility problems in patients with MPS I, and gene therapy may reduce symptoms. PMID:22983812

  19. Cost-effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapy at a district hospital in southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bikilla, Asfaw Demissie; Jerene, Degu; Robberstad, Bjarne; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2009-01-01

    Background As the resource implications of expanding anti-retroviral therapy (ART) are likely to be large, there is a need to explore its cost-effectiveness. So far, there is no such information available from Ethiopia. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of ART for routine clinical practice in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. Methods We estimated the unit cost of HIV-related care from the 2004/5 fiscal year expenditure of Arba Minch Hospital in southern Ethiopia. We estimated outpatient and inpatient service use from HIV-infected patients who received care and treatment at the hospital between January 2003 and March 2006. We measured the health effect as life years gained (LYG) for patients receiving ART compared with those not receiving such treatment. The study adopted a health care provider perspective and included both direct and overhead costs. We used Markov model to estimate the lifetime costs, health benefits and cost-effectiveness of ART. Findings ART yielded an undiscounted 9.4 years expected survival, and resulted in 7.1 extra LYG compared to patients not receiving ART. The lifetime incremental cost is US$2,215 and the undiscounted incremental cost per LYG is US$314. When discounted at 3%, the additional LYG decreases to 5.5 years and the incremental cost per LYG increases to US$325. Conclusion The undiscounted and discounted incremental costs per LYG from introducing ART were less than the per capita GDP threshold at the base year. Thus, ART could be regarded as cost-effective in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. PMID:19615069

  20. T helper cell activation and human retroviral pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, K F; Heeney, J L

    1996-01-01

    T helper (Th) cells are of central importance in regulating many critical immune effector mechanisms. The profile of cytokines produced by Th cells correlates with the type of effector cells induced during the immune response to foreign antigen. Th1 cells induce the cell-mediated immune response, while Th2 cells drive antibody production. Th cells are the preferential targets of human retroviruses. Infections with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) result in the expansion of Th cells by the action of HTLV (adult T-cell leukemia) or the progressive loss of T cells by the action of HIV (AIDS). Both retrovirus infections impart a high-level activation state in the host immune cells as well as systemically. However, diverging responses to this activation state have contrasting effects on the Th-cell population. In HIV infection, Th-cell loss has been attributed to several mechanisms, including a selective elimination of cells by apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis in HIV infection is complex, with many different pathways able to induce cell death. In contrast, infection of Th cells with HTLV-1 affords the cell a protective advantage against apoptosis. This advantage may allow the cell to escape immune surveillance, providing the opportunity for the development of Th-cell cancer. In this review, we will discuss the impact of Th-cell activation and general immune activation on human retrovirus expression with a focus upon Th-cell function and the progression to disease. PMID:8987361

  1. Retroviral Retention Activates a Syk-Dependent HemITAM in Human Tetherin

    PubMed Central

    Galão, Rui Pedro; Pickering, Suzanne; Curnock, Rachel; Neil, Stuart J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tetherin (BST2/CD317) restricts the release of enveloped viral particles from infected cells. Coupled to this virion retention, hominid tetherins induce proinflammatory gene expression via activating NF-κB. We investigated the events initiating this tetherin-induced signaling and show that physical retention of retroviral particles induces the phosphorylation of conserved tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tails of tetherin dimers. This phosphorylation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), which is required for downstream NF-κB activation, indicating that the tetherin cytoplasmic tail resembles the hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (hemITAMs) found in C-type lectin pattern recognition receptors. Retroviral-induced tetherin signaling is coupled to the cortical actin cytoskeleton via the Rac-GAP-containing protein RICH2 (ARHGAP44), and a naturally occurring tetherin polymorphism with reduced RICH2 binding exhibits decreased phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Thus, upon virion retention, this linkage to the actin cytoskeleton likely triggers tetherin phosphorylation and subsequent signal transduction to induce an antiviral state. PMID:25211072

  2. Inhibition of CYP2B6 by Medicinal Plant Extracts: Implication for Use of Efavirenz and Nevirapine-Based Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) in Resource-Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Thomford, Nicholas E; Awortwe, Charles; Dzobo, Kevin; Adu, Faustina; Chopera, Denis; Wonkam, Ambroise; Skelton, Michelle; Blackhurst, Dee; Dandara, Collet

    2016-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has greatly improved health parameters of HIV infected individuals. However, there are several challenges associated with the chronic nature of HAART administration. For populations in health transition, dual use of medicinal plant extracts and conventional medicine poses a significant challenge. There is need to evaluate interactions between commonly used medicinal plant extracts and antiretroviral drugs used against HIV/AIDS. Efavirenz (EFV) and nevirapine (NVP) are the major components of HAART both metabolized by CYP2B6, an enzyme that can potentially be inhibited or induced by compounds found in medicinal plant extracts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of extracts of selected commonly used medicinal plants on CYP2B6 enzyme activity. Recombinant human CYP2B6 was used to evaluate inhibition, allowing the assessment of herb-drug interactions (HDI) of medicinal plants Hyptis suaveolens, Myrothamnus flabellifolius, Launaea taraxacifolia, Boerhavia diffusa and Newbouldia laevis. The potential of these medicinal extracts to cause HDI was ranked accordingly for reversible inhibition and also classified as potential time-dependent inhibitor (TDI) candidates. The most potent inhibitor for CYP2B6 was Hyptis suaveolens extract (IC50 = 19.09 ± 1.16 µg/mL), followed by Myrothamnus flabellifolius extract (IC50 = 23.66 ± 4.86 µg/mL), Launaea taraxacifolia extract (IC50 = 33.87 ± 1.54 µg/mL), and Boerhavia diffusa extract (IC50 = 34.93 ± 1.06 µg/mL). Newbouldia laevis extract, however, exhibited weak inhibitory effects (IC50 = 100 ± 8.71 µg/mL) on CYP2B6. Launaea taraxacifolia exhibited a TDI (3.17) effect on CYP2B6 and showed a high concentration of known CYP450 inhibitory phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid. The implication for these observations is that drugs that are metabolized by CYP2B6 when co-administered with these herbal medicines and when adequate amounts of the extracts

  3. Evaluating the Safety of Retroviral Vectors Based on Insertional Oncogene Activation and Blocked Differentiation in Cultured Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng; Fatima, Soghra; Ma, Zhijun; Wang, Yong-Dong; Lu, Taihe; Janke, Laura J; Du, Yang; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    Insertional oncogenesis due to retroviral (RV) vector integration has caused recurrent leukemia in multiple gene therapy trials, predominantly due to vector integration effects at the LMO2 locus. While currently available preclinical safety models have been used for evaluating vector safety, none have predicted or reproduced the recurrent LMO2 integrations seen in previous X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) and Wiskott–Aldrich clinical gene therapy trials. We now describe a new assay for assessing vector safety that recapitulates naturally occurring insertions into Lmo2 and other T-cell proto-oncogenes leading to a preleukemic developmental arrest in primary murine thymocytes cultured in vitro. This assay was used to compare the relative oncogenic potential of a variety of gamma-RV and lentiviral vectors and to assess the risk conferred by various transcriptional elements contained in these genomes. Gamma-RV vectors that contained full viral long-terminal repeats were most prone to causing double negative 2 (DN2) arrest and led to repeated cases of Lmo2 pathway activation, while lentiviral vectors containing these same elements were significantly less prone to activate proto-oncogenes or cause DN2 arrest. This work provides a new preclinical assay that is especially relevant for assessing safety in SCID disorders and provides a new tool for designing safer RV vectors. PMID:26957223

  4. Cognitive and Behavioural Correlates of Non-Adherence to HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy: Theoretical and Practical Insight for Clinical Psychology and Health Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begley, Kim; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Ross, Michael W.; Gold, Julian

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study identified variables associated with protease inhibitor (PI) non-adherence in 179 patients taking anti-retroviral therapy. Univariate analyses identified 11 variables associated with PI non-adherence. Multiple logistic regression modelling identified three predictors of PI non-adherence: low adherence self-efficacy and…

  5. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and autoimmune hepatitis during highly active anti-retroviral treatment: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The emergence of hepatic injury in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection during highly active therapy presents a diagnostic dilemma. It may represent treatment side effects or autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hepatitis, emerging during immune restoration. Case presentation We present the case of a 42-year-old African-American woman with human immunodeficiency virus infection who presented to our emergency department with severe abdominal pain and was found to have autoimmune hepatitis. A review of the literature revealed 12 reported cases of autoimmune hepatitis in adults with human immunodeficiency virus infection, only three of whom were diagnosed after highly active anti-retroviral treatment was initiated. All four cases (including our patient) were women, and one had a history of other autoimmune disorders. In our patient (the one patient case we are reporting), a liver biopsy revealed interface hepatitis, necrosis with lymphocytes and plasma cell infiltrates and variable degrees of fibrosis. All four cases required treatment with corticosteroids and/or other immune modulating agents and responded well. Conclusion Our review suggests that autoimmune hepatitis is a rare disorder which usually develops in women about six to eight months after commencing highly active anti-retroviral treatment during the recovery of CD4 lymphocytes. It represents either re-emergence of a pre-existing condition that was unrecognized or a de novo manifestation during immune reconstitution. PMID:21702972

  7. Pentecostalism and AIDS treatment in Mozambique: creating new approaches to HIV prevention through anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, James

    2011-01-01

    Pentecostal fervor has rapidly spread throughout central and southern Mozambique since the end of its protracted civil war in the early 1990s. In the peri-urban bairros and septic fringes of Mozambican cities African Independent Churches (AICs) with Pentecostal roots and mainstream Pentecostals can now claim over half the population as adherents. Over this same period another important phenomenon has coincided with this church expansion: the AIDS epidemic. Pentecostalism and HIV have travelled along similar vectors and been propelled by deepening inequality. Recognising this relationship has important implications for HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment strategies. The striking overlap between high HIV prevalence in peri-urban populations and high Pentecostal participation suggests that creative strategies, to include these movements in HIV/AIDS programming, may influence the long-term success of HIV care and the scale-up of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) across the region. The provision of ART has opened up new possibilities for engaging with local communities, especially Pentecostals and AICS, who are witnessing the immediate benefits of ARV therapy. Expanded treatment may be the key to successful prevention as advocates of a comprehensive approach to the epidemic have long argued. PMID:21892893

  8. IMMUNE RECONSTITUTION INFLAMMATORY SYNDROME (IRIS)-ASSOCIATED BURKITT LYMPHOMA FOLLOWING COMBINATION ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Dorer, Russell P.; Aboulafia, David M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is defined as a paradoxical worsening or unmasking of infections and autoimmune diseases, following initiation of combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). More recently, the case definition of IRIS has been broadened to include certain malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and less frequently Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Here in we describe 3 patients infected with HIV who began cART and within a median of 15 weeks each achieved non-detectable HIV viral loads, and yet within 6 months presented for medical attention with fevers, night sweats, weight loss and bulky lymphadenopathy. Laboratory studies included elevated lactate dehydrogenase and β-2 microglobulin levels and well preserved CD4+ lymphocyte counts in excess of 350 cells/µL. In each patient lymph node biopsies were diagnostic of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Patients were managed with multi-agent chemotherapy in conjunction with cART. We also survey the medical literature of other cases of IRIS-associated BL. Although the pathogenesis of IRIS-associated BL is not well elucidated, chronic antigenic stimulation coupled with immune deterioration, followed by subsequent restoration of the immune response and aberrant cytokine expression may be a pathway to lymphomagenesis. IRIS-associated BL should be suspected in patients with normal or near normal CD4+ lymphocyte counts who develop progressive lymphadenopathy post-initiation of cART. PMID:25458079

  9. Update on the safety and efficacy of retroviral gene therapy for immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cicalese, Maria Pia; Ferrua, Francesca; Castagnaro, Laura; Pajno, Roberta; Barzaghi, Federica; Giannelli, Stefania; Dionisio, Francesca; Brigida, Immacolata; Bonopane, Marco; Casiraghi, Miriam; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Grunebaum, Eyal; Adeli, Mehdi; Bredius, Robbert G; Puck, Jennifer M; Stepensky, Polina; Tezcan, Ilhan; Rolfe, Katie; De Boever, Erika; Reinhardt, Rickey R; Appleby, Jonathan; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, autosomal-recessive systemic metabolic disease characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). The treatment of choice for ADA-deficient SCID (ADA-SCID) is hematopoietic stem cell transplant from an HLA-matched sibling donor, although <25% of patients have such a donor available. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) partially and temporarily relieves immunodeficiency. We investigated the medium-term outcome of gene therapy (GT) in 18 patients with ADA-SCID for whom an HLA-identical family donor was not available; most were not responding well to ERT. Patients were treated with an autologous CD34(+)-enriched cell fraction that contained CD34(+) cells transduced with a retroviral vector encoding the human ADA complementary DNA sequence (GSK2696273) as part of single-arm, open-label studies or compassionate use programs. Overall survival was 100% over 2.3 to 13.4 years (median, 6.9 years). Gene-modified cells were stably present in multiple lineages throughout follow up. GT resulted in a sustained reduction in the severe infection rate from 1.17 events per person-year to 0.17 events per person-year (n = 17, patient 1 data not available). Immune reconstitution was demonstrated by normalization of T-cell subsets (CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+)), evidence of thymopoiesis, and sustained T-cell proliferative capacity. B-cell function was evidenced by immunoglobulin production, decreased intravenous immunoglobulin use, and antibody response after vaccination. All 18 patients reported infections as adverse events; infections of respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts were reported most frequently. No events indicative of leukemic transformation were reported. Trial details were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00598481. PMID:27129325

  10. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. PMID:26993168

  11. Prevalence and distribution of the GBV-C/HGV among HIV-1-infected patients under anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Rosana; Nishiya, Anna; Casseb, Jorge; Inocêncio, Lilian; Fonseca, Luiz A M; Duarte, Alberto J S

    2010-08-01

    Infection with GB virus C (GBV-C) or hepatitis G virus (HGV) is highly prevalent among HIV/AIDS patients. GBV-C/HGV viremia has not been associated with liver disease and seems to slow HIV disease progression. To study the GBV-C/HGV genotypes prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients and its association with HIV viral load (VL) and CD4+ lymphocyte counts. From February 2003 to February 2004, we analyzed 210 HIV-1-infected subjects who were on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). For 63 of them a PCR-nested to the non-coding 5' (5'NCR) region of the GBV-C/HGV was done, and for 49 a DNA direct sequencing was done. A phylogenetic analysis was performed by PHYLIP program. 63 (30%) of the HIV-1-infected patients were co-infected with GBV-C/HGV. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the following genotypes (and respective relative frequencies): 1 (10%), 2a (41%), 2b (43%), and 3 (6%). Co-infected patients presented lower HIV-1 VL and higher T CD4+ lymphocyte cells counts as compared with patients negative for GBV-C/HGV sequences (log=4.52 vs. 4.71, p=0.036), and T CD4+ lymphocyte counts (cells/mm(3)=322.6 vs. 273.5, p=0.081, respectively). T CD4+ cells counts equal to, or higher than, 200/mm(3) were significantly more common among co-infected patients than among HIV-infected-only patients (p=0.042). The lowest T CD4+ cells counts were associated with genotype 1 and the highest with genotype 2b (p=0.05). The GBV-C/HGV infection prevalence was 30% among HIV-1-infected subjects, and was associated with lower VL and higher CD4+ lymphocyte counts. GBV-C/HGV genotype 2b may be associated with better immunological response. PMID:20420864

  12. Examining the relationship between psychological distress and adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among Ugandan adolescents living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mutumba, Massy; Musiime, Victor; Lepkwoski, James M; Harper, Gary W; Snow, Rachel C; Resnicow, Ken; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress is common among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) worldwide, and has been associated with non-adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART), leading to poor virologic suppression, drug resistance, and increased risk for AIDS morbidity and mortality. However, only a few studies have explored the relationship between psychological distress and ART adherence among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. The paper examines the relationship between psychological distress and ART adherence, and effect of psychosocial resources on ART adherence. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 464 ALHIV (aged 12-19; 53% female) seeking HIV care at a large HIV treatment center in Kampala, Uganda. ALHIV were recruited during routine clinic visits. Three self-reported binary adherence measures were utilized: missed pills in the past three days, non-adherence to the prescribed medical regimen, and self-rated adherence assessed using a visual analog scale. Psychological distress was measured as a continuous variable, and computed as the mean score on a locally developed and validated 25-item symptom checklist for Ugandan ALHIV. Psychosocial resources included spirituality, religiosity, optimism, social support, and coping strategies. After adjusting for respondents' socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial resources, a unit increase in psychological distress was associated with increased odds of missing pills in past 3 days (Odds Ratio(OR) = 1.75; Confidence Interval (CI): 1.04-2.95), not following the prescribed regimen (OR = 1.63; CI: 1.08-2.46), and lower self-rated adherence (OR = 1.79; CI: 1.19-2.69). Psychosocial resources were associated with lower odds for non-adherence on all three self-report measures. There is a need to strengthen the psychosocial aspects of adolescent HIV care by developing interventions to identify and prevent psychological distress among Ugandan ALHIV. PMID:27294696

  13. Drug–drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. Areas covered This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. Expert opinion We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse. PMID:25539046

  14. Anti-Retroviral Therapy Increases the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in South African HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Joel A.; Levitt, Naomi S.; Ross, Ian L.; Lacerda, Miguel; Maartens, Gary; Blom, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Data on the prevalence of dyslipidaemia and associated risk factors in HIV-infected patients from sub-Saharan Africa is sparse. We performed a cross-sectional analysis in a cohort of HIV-infected South African adults. Methods We studied HIV-infected patients who were either antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive or receiving non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based or protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART. Evaluation included fasting lipograms, oral glucose tolerance tests and clinical anthropometry. Dyslipidemia was defined using the NCEP ATPIII guidelines. Results The median age of the participants was 34 years (range 19–68 years) and 78% were women. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in 406 ART-naive and 551 participants on ART was 90.0% and 85%, respectively. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDLC) was the most common abnormality [290/406 (71%) ART-naïve and 237/551 (43%) ART- participants]. Participants on ART had higher triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDLC) and HDLC than the ART-naïve group. Severe dyslipidaemia, (LDLC> 4.9 mmol/L or TG >5.0 mmol/L) was present in <5% of participants. In multivariate analyses there were complex associations between age, gender, type and duration of ART and body composition and LDLC, HDLC and TG, which differed between ART-naïve and ART-participants. Conclusion Participants on ART had higher TG, TC, LDLC and HDLC than those who were ART-naïve but severe lipid abnormalities requiring evaluation and treatment were uncommon. PMID:26986065

  15. Biological activities of a synthetic peptide composed of two unlinked domains from a retroviral transmembrane protein sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Wegemer, D E; Kabat, K G; Kloetzer, W S

    1990-01-01

    We report several biological activities of a synthetic peptide whose sequence contains the highly conserved region of feline leukemia virus transmembrane protein (TM) synthetically linked to another short TM-derived sequence particularly rich in polar positive residues. This 29-amino-acid peptide blocked [3H]thymidine uptake 30 to 50% by concanavalin A-stimulated CD4(+)--but not CD8(+)-enriched murine splenocytes. Maximal suppression was detected at 12.5 micrograms (3 microM) to 75 micrograms (19 microM) per ml of growth medium; stimulation of [3H]thymidine uptake was observed at higher peptide concentrations. The synthetic peptide inhibited but did not stimulate [3H]thymidine uptake by mitogen-activated thymocytes and antibody production by splenocytes as determined in a liquid hemolytic plaque assay. Similarities are reported between a consensus sequence of diverse retroviral TMs and a region of alpha interferons shown by others to be important for antiviral and cytostatic properties. The TM sequence-derived synthetic peptide blocked in a nontoxic and sequence-specific manner the release of murine leukemia virus from two chronically infected cell lines. We suggest that some of the biological effects of retroviral TM are mediated through a common pathway shared with alpha interferons. Images PMID:1969500

  16. Association of Blood Biomarkers of Bone Turnover in HIV-1 Infected Individuals Receiving Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART)

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Butch, Anthony W; Quint, Joshua J; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of bone turnover biomarkers with blood levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and other blood markers in HIV-1 infected men receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Advances in the treatment of HIV-1 infection have extended the life span of HIV-1 infected individuals. However, these advances may come at the price of metabolic side effects and bone disorders, including premature osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteonecrosis. Methods Analyses of Ostase BAP, osteocalcin, and TRAP in blood were measured in three groups of MACS participants: 35 HIV-1 infected men on ART (A); 35 HIV-1- infected men not on ART (B); and 34 HIV-1 uninfected men (C). Results The mean and standard deviation results for groups A, B, and C were 19.7 ± 6.56, 17.2 ± 3.96, and 16.9 ± 5.78 for ostase BAP; 7.9 ± 9.53, 8.5 ± 8.30, and 5.5 ± 1.65 for osteocalcin; and 3.9 ± 1.04, 3.1 ± 0.81, and 2.5 ± 0.59 for TRAP, respectively. Simple and multivariate analyses showed significant differences in mean TRAP and BAP concentrations between the three groups. In addition strong correlations between blood levels of Ostase BAP and TRAP (r=0.570, p=0.0004), and between blood levels of Ostase BAP and PTH (r=0.436, P=0.0098) for HIV-1 infected men on ART were observed. Conclusion New strategies for measurement of blood and urine biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption during bone turnover can be useful for clinical monitoring of treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Recently developed methods for measuring serum levels of TRAP and Ostase BAP represent superior laboratory tools for assessing the hyperactivity of osteoclasts, osteoblasts and bone loss in HIV-1 infected individuals receiving ART. Measurements of TRAP and BAP as bone turnover biomarkers are economical and are important for monitoring bone metabolism during ART and

  17. SIN Retroviral Vectors Expressing COL7A1 Under Human Promoters for Ex Vivo Gene Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal–epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal–epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector. PMID:20485266

  18. An activation domain within the walleye dermal sarcoma virus retroviral cyclin protein is essential for inhibition of the viral promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Rovnak, Joel; Hronek, Brett W.; Ryan, Sean O.; Cai, Sumin; Quackenbush, Sandra L. . E-mail: sandra.quackenbush@colostate.edu

    2005-11-25

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) is a complex retrovirus associated with seasonal dermal sarcomas. Developing tumors have low levels of accessory gene transcripts, A1 and B, and regressing tumors have high levels of full-length and spliced transcripts. Transcript A1 encodes a retroviral cyclin (rv-cyclin) with limited homology to host cyclins. The rv-cyclin is physically linked to components of the transcriptional co-activator complex, Mediator, and regulates transcription. In walleye fibroblasts, it inhibits the WDSV promoter independently of cis-acting DNA sequences. The rv-cyclin activates transcription from GAL4 promoters when fused to the GAL4 DNA binding domain. A 30 a.a. activation domain in the carboxy region can be inactivated by single point mutations, and these mutations diminish the ability of the rv-cyclin to inhibit the WDSV promoter. When fused to glutathione S-transferase, the rv-cyclin, its carboxy region, and the activation domain pull down components of transcription complexes from nuclear extracts, and pulldown is lost by mutation of the activation domain.

  19. Retroviral reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity in Thai herbs and spices: screening with Moloney murine leukemia viral enzyme.

    PubMed

    Suthienkul, O; Miyazaki, O; Chulasiri, M; Kositanont, U; Oishi, K

    1993-12-01

    Fifty-seven Thai herbs and spices were examined for their retroviral reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity. All herbs and spices were extracted with hot-water and methanol. Reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity of the extracts was determined by using Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus reverse transcriptase (M-MuLV-RT) reacted with 3H-dTTP and radioactivity measured with a scintillation counter. Eighty-one per cent (46/57) of hot-water extracts and 54% (31/57) of methanol extracts showed inhibitory activities. At a concentration of 125 micrograms/ml, 13% (6/46) of hot-water extracts, namely Eugenia caryophyllus Bullock et Harrison, Phyllanthus urinaria Linn., Terminalia belerica Roxb., Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn., Psidium guajava Linn. and Lawsonia inermis Linn., had a relative inhibitory ratio (IR) over 50%. They showed ratios of 100%, 91%, 75%, 74%, 61% and 60%, respectively. For methanol extracts, only 10% (3/31) had IR values over 50%. They were T. belerica, E. caryophyllus and N. nucifera which exhibited IR values of 83%, 54% and 54%, respectively. PMID:7524165

  20. An Optimized GD2-Targeting Retroviral Cassette for More Potent and Safer Cellular Therapy of Neuroblastoma and Other Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Simon; Straathof, Karin; Himoudi, Nourredine; Anderson, John; Pule, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the commonest extra cranial solid cancer of childhood. Despite escalation of treatment regimens, a significant minority of patients die of their disease. Disialoganglioside (GD2) is consistently expressed at high-levels in neuroblastoma tumors, which have been targeted with some success using therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. GD2 is also expressed in a range of other cancer but with the exception of some peripheral nerves is largely absent from non-transformed tissues. Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are artificial type I proteins which graft the specificity of a monoclonal antibody onto a T-cell. Clinical data with early CAR designs directed against GD2 have shown some promise in Neuroblastoma. Here, we describe a GD2-targeting CAR retroviral cassette, which has been optimized for CAR T-cell persistence, efficacy and safety. PMID:27030986

  1. Retroviral vector design for gene therapy of cancer: specific inhibition and tagging of BCR-ABLp190 cells.

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, B.; Sánchez-García, I.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main difficulty in providing effective treatment of patients with cancer is distinguishing between tumor and normal cells. The chimeric molecules created by cancer-associated chromosomal abnormalities (such as the BCR-ABL fusion protein) represent ideal therapeutic targets since they are unique to the disease state. A major challenge, however, is how to deliver the specific anti-tumor agent into every tumor cell. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this report we describe the use of a novel strategy to introduce specific anti-tumor reagents into every tumor cell. It uses retroviral vectors encoding both antisense transcripts specific for the BCR-ABLp190 fusion junction (the specific anti-tumor drug) and a truncated human CD5 cDNA, which allows selection of the infected cells. In order to coexpress the antisense molecule with the truncated human CD5 gene, the picornavirus internal ribosome-entry site was incorporated in the constructs. RESULTS: When the antisense transcripts in the CD5-retroviral vector were introduced into Ba/F3+p190 cells rendered interleukin 3 (IL-3) independent by expression of the BCR-ABL sequences, the cells died upon IL-3 withdrawal, as measured by the absence of CD5-positive cells. Control Ba/F3+p210 cells infected with the same virus did not die in the absence of IL-3. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest a novel strategy for cancer treatment which incorporates the use of a retrovirus coexpressing both a selectable surface marker and a tumor-specific agent. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:8900540

  2. Effects of T592 phosphomimetic mutations on tetramer stability and dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 can not explain the retroviral restriction defect.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Wang, Zhonghua; White, Tommy; Buffone, Cindy; Nguyen, Laura A; Shepard, Caitlin N; Kim, Baek; Demeler, Borries; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Ivanov, Dmitri N

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1, a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, contributes to interferon signaling and restriction of retroviral replication. SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction is thought to result from the depletion of cellular dNTP pools, but it remains controversial whether the dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 is sufficient for restriction. The restriction ability of SAMHD1 is regulated in cells by phosphorylation on T592. Phosphomimetic mutations of T592 are not restriction competent, but appear intact in their ability to deplete cellular dNTPs. Here we use analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence polarization and NMR-based enzymatic assays to investigate the impact of phosphomimetic mutations on SAMHD1 tetramerization and dNTPase activity in vitro. We find that phosphomimetic mutations affect kinetics of tetramer assembly and disassembly, but their effects on tetramerization equilibrium and dNTPase activity are insignificant. In contrast, the Y146S/Y154S dimerization-defective mutant displays a severe dNTPase defect in vitro, but is indistinguishable from WT in its ability to deplete cellular dNTP pools and to restrict HIV replication. Our data suggest that the effect of T592 phosphorylation on SAMHD1 tetramerization is not likely to explain the retroviral restriction defect, and we hypothesize that enzymatic activity of SAMHD1 is subject to additional cellular regulatory mechanisms that have not yet been recapitulated in vitro. PMID:27511536

  3. Effects of T592 phosphomimetic mutations on tetramer stability and dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 can not explain the retroviral restriction defect

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Wang, Zhonghua; White, Tommy; Buffone, Cindy; Nguyen, Laura A.; Shepard, Caitlin N.; Kim, Baek; Demeler, Borries; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Ivanov, Dmitri N.

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1, a dNTP triphosphohydrolase, contributes to interferon signaling and restriction of retroviral replication. SAMHD1-mediated retroviral restriction is thought to result from the depletion of cellular dNTP pools, but it remains controversial whether the dNTPase activity of SAMHD1 is sufficient for restriction. The restriction ability of SAMHD1 is regulated in cells by phosphorylation on T592. Phosphomimetic mutations of T592 are not restriction competent, but appear intact in their ability to deplete cellular dNTPs. Here we use analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence polarization and NMR-based enzymatic assays to investigate the impact of phosphomimetic mutations on SAMHD1 tetramerization and dNTPase activity in vitro. We find that phosphomimetic mutations affect kinetics of tetramer assembly and disassembly, but their effects on tetramerization equilibrium and dNTPase activity are insignificant. In contrast, the Y146S/Y154S dimerization-defective mutant displays a severe dNTPase defect in vitro, but is indistinguishable from WT in its ability to deplete cellular dNTP pools and to restrict HIV replication. Our data suggest that the effect of T592 phosphorylation on SAMHD1 tetramerization is not likely to explain the retroviral restriction defect, and we hypothesize that enzymatic activity of SAMHD1 is subject to additional cellular regulatory mechanisms that have not yet been recapitulated in vitro. PMID:27511536

  4. Retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene in a Marek's disease T-lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, E; Perbal, B

    1996-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an avian herpesvirus that causes, in chickens, a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by malignant transformation of T lymphocytes. The rapid onset of polyclonal tumors indicates the existence of MDV-encoded oncogenic products. However, the molecular basis of MDV-induced lymphoproliferative disease and latency remains largely unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that MDV and Rous-associated virus (RAV) might cooperate in the development of B-cell lymphomas induced by RAV. Our present results indicate for the first time that MDV and RAV might also act synergistically in the development of T-cell lymphomas. We report an example of an MDV-transformed T-lymphoblastoid cell line (T9) expressing high levels of a truncated C-MYB protein as a result of RAV integration within one c-myb allele. The chimeric RAV-c-myb mRNA species initiated in the 5' long terminal repeat of RAV are deprived of sequences corresponding to c-myb exons 1 to 3. The attenuation of MDV oncogenicity has been strongly related to structural changes in the MDV BamHI-D and BamHI-H DNA fragments. We have established that both DNA restriction fragments are rearranged in the T9 MDV-transformed cells. Our results suggest that retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene is a critical factor involved in the maintenance of the transformed phenotype and the tumorigenic potential of this T-lymphoma cell line. PMID:8892859

  5. Effects of PPARγ and RBP4 Gene Variants on Metabolic Syndrome in HIV-Infected Patients with Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Nan-Yao; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chang, Ho-Ching; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Wu, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Background PPARγ and RBP4 are known to regulate lipid and glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. The influences of PPARγ (C1431T and Pro12Ala) and RBP4 (−803GA) polymorphisms on metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients receiving anti-retroviral therapy were examined in this study. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study of HIV-1 infected adults with antiretroviral therapy for more than one year in the National Cheng Kung University Hospital was conducted. The gene polymorphisms were determined by quantitative PCR. Results Ninety-one patients were included in the study. Eighty-two (90.1%) patients were males with a mean age of 44.4 years. For the C1431T polymorphism in PPARγ, while patients with the T allele (48.4%) had trends toward lower rate of hypertriglyceridemia, the borderline significance together with insignificant power did not support the protective effect of the T allele against development of hypertriglyceridemia. For the Pro12Ala polymorphism in PPARγ, although patients with the Pro/Ala genotype (8.8%) had a higher level of serum LDL (138.0 vs. 111.5 mg/dl, P = 0.04) and trends toward higher rates of hypercholesterolemia and serum LDL>110 mg/dl, these variables were found to be independent of the Pro/Ala genotype in the multivariate analysis. For the −803GA polymorphism in RBP4, patients with the A allele (23.1%) more often had insulin resistance (HOMA>3.8; 33.3 vs. 8.7%, P = 0.01) and more often received anti-hypoglycemic drugs (14.3 vs. 1.4%, P = 0.04). The detrimental effect of the A allele in RBP4 −803GA polymorphism on development of insulin resistance was supported by the multivariate analysis adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The impacts of PPARγ C1431T and Pro12Ala polymorphisms on metabolism in HIV-infected patients are not significant. RBP4 −803GA polymorphism has increased risk of insulin resistance in HIV-infected patients with anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23145084

  6. Providing anti-retroviral therapy in the context of self-perceived stigma: a mixed methods study from Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Tarimo, Edith A M; George, John

    2014-04-01

    Adherence to anti-retroviral treatment (ART) has been a significant step towards improving quality of life among people living with HIV. However, stigma has been described to influence adherence to ART. A cross-sectional mixed methods study was conducted to explore factors related to stigma and perceived influence of stigma on adherence to treatment amongst ART-prescribed patients and health care providers, respectively in Tanzania. Stigma was assessed through interviewer administered survey among 295 patients. The results from patients showed that 279/295 (95%) were satisfied with the services provided at the Care and Treatment Centres (CTCs). The set up of CTCs 107/295 (36%), and queuing at the CTCs 88/295 (30%) were associated with stigma (P < 0.001). The perceived influence of stigma on adherence to ART was assessed using focus group discussions (FGDs) of 33 health care providers (HCPs). Through FGDs, HCPs perceived the set up of CTCs as friendly yet violated confidentiality. The HCPs reported that ART-prescribed patients hide identifiable cards to avoid being recognised by other people. Some patients were reported to rush to avoid familiar faces, and due to the rush they picked wrong medicines. Also some patients were reported to throw away manufacturers' box with dosage instructions written on the box, resulting in use of doses contrary to the prescriptions. We conclude that despite the fact that most patients were satisfied with the services provided at the CTCs, it is important that HCPs provide dosage instructions on another piece of paper or use disposable bags. A common dispensing window for all patients regardless of the diagnosis may be useful to minimize stigma. Also HCPs may introduce appointment system to avoid long queue at the CTCs. PMID:26875301

  7. Retention of HIV-Infected Children in the First 12 Months of Anti-Retroviral Therapy and Predictors of Attrition in Resource Limited Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christiana; McFarland, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Current UNAIDS goals aimed to end the AIDS epidemic set out to ensure that 90% of all people living with HIV know their status, 90% initiate and continue life-long anti-retroviral therapy (ART), and 90% achieve viral load suppression. In 2014 there were an estimated 2.6 million children under 15 years of age living with HIV, of which only one-third were receiving ART. Little literature exists describing retention of HIV-infected children in the first year on ART. We conducted a systematic search for English language publications reporting on retention of children with median age at ART initiation less than ten years in resource limited settings. The proportion of children retained in care on ART and predictors of attrition were identified. Twelve studies documented retention at one year ranging from 71–95% amongst 31877 African children. Among the 5558 children not retained, 4082 (73%) were reported as lost to follow up (LFU) and 1476 (27%) were confirmed to have died. No studies confirmed the outcomes of children LFU. Predictors of attrition included younger age, shorter duration of time on ART, and severe immunosuppression. In conclusion, significant attrition occurs in children in the first 12 months after ART initiation, the majority attributed to LFU, although true outcomes of children labeled as LFU are unknown. Focused efforts to ensure retention and minimize early mortality are needed as universal ART for children is scaled up. PMID:27280404

  8. Integration profile of retroviral vector in gene therapy treated patients is cell-specific according to gene expression and chromatin conformation of target cell

    PubMed Central

    Biasco, Luca; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Pellin, Danilo; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Brigida, Immacolata; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Di Serio, Clelia; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of genomic distribution of retroviral vectors is a powerful tool to monitor ‘vector-on-host’ effects in gene therapy (GT) trials but also provides crucial information about ‘host-on-vector’ influences based on the target cell genetic and epigenetic state. We had the unique occasion to compare the insertional profile of the same therapeutic moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) vector in the context of the adenosine deaminase-severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) genetic background in two GT trials based on infusions of transduced mature lymphocytes (peripheral blood lymphocytes, PBL) or a single infusion of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC). We found that vector insertions are cell-specific according to the differential expression profile of target cells, favouring, in PBL-GT, genes involved in immune system and T-cell functions/pathways as well as T-cell DNase hypersensitive sites, differently from HSC-GT. Chromatin conformations and histone modifications influenced integration preferences but we discovered that only H3K27me3 was cell-specifically disfavoured, thus representing a key epigenetic determinant of cell-type dependent insertion distribution. Our study shows that MLV vector insertional profile is cell-specific according to the genetic/chromatin state of the target cell both in vitro and in vivo in patients several years after GT. PMID:21243617

  9. Gene-Corrected Fibroblast Therapy for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa using a Self-Inactivating COL7A1 Retroviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Jacków, Joanna; Titeux, Matthias; Portier, Soizic; Charbonnier, Soëli; Ganier, Clarisse; Gaucher, Sonia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) lack type VII collagen and therefore have severely impaired dermal-epidermal stability causing recurrent skin and mucosal blistering. There is currently no specific approved treatment for RDEB. We present preclinical data showing that intradermal injections of genetically corrected patient-derived RDEB fibroblasts using a Good Manufacturing Practices grade self-inactivating COL7A1 retroviral vector reverse the disease phenotype in a xenograft model in nude mice. We obtained 50% transduction efficiency in primary human RDEB fibroblasts with an average low copy number (range = 1-2) of integrated provirus. Transduced fibroblasts showed strong type VII collagen re-expression, improved adhesion properties, normal proliferative capabilities, and viability in vitro. We show that a single intradermal injection of 3 × 10(6) genetically corrected RDEB fibroblasts beneath RDEB skin equivalents grafted onto mice allows type VII collagen deposition, anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction, and improved dermal-epidermal adherence 2 months after treatment, supporting functional correction in vivo. Gene-corrected fibroblasts previously showed no tumorigenicity. These data show the efficacy and safety of gene-corrected fibroblast therapy using a self-inactivating vector that has now been good manufacturing grade-certified and pave the way for clinical translation to treat nonhealing wounds in RDEB patients. PMID:26994967

  10. Why do Patients in Pre-Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) Care Default: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Kansal, Sangeeta; Tiwary, Narendra; Sundar, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Approximately, 40% of the patients registered in the National AIDS Control Program in India are not on antiretroviral therapy (ART), i.e., are in pre-ART care. However, there are scarce data regarding the retention of pre-ART patients under routine program conditions. The main objective of this study was to find out the reasons for default among patients in pre-ART care. Materials and Methods: Patients enrolled in the ART Centre, Banaras Hindu University (BHU) between January and December 2009 and in pre-ART care were included in the study. Defaulters were those pre-ART patients who missed their last appointment of CD4 count by more than 1 month. Defaulters were traced telephonically in 2011 and those who returned and gave their consent for the study were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Results: Out of 620 patients in pre-ART care, 384 (68.2%) were defaulters. One hundred forty-four of the defaulters were traced and only 83 reached the ART center for interview. Among defaulters who did not reach the ART center, illiterate and unmarried were significantly more and mean duration from registration to default was also significantly less as compared to those who came back for the interview. Most defaulters gave more than one reason for defaulting that were as follows: Inconvenient clinic timings (98%), need for multiple mode of transport (92%), perceived improved health (65%), distance of center from home (61%), lack of social support (62%), and financial difficulty (59%). Interpretation and Conclusion: Active tracing of pre-ART patients through outreach and strengthening of the Link ART centers will improve the retention of patients in the program. PMID:27385880

  11. Retroviral vectors for the transduction of autoregulated, bidirectional expression cassettes.

    PubMed

    Unsinger, J; Kröger, A; Hauser, H; Wirth, D

    2001-11-01

    Regulated transgene expression is increasingly used in research but is also needed for certain therapies. Regulatory systems are usually composed of two expression units, one bearing the gene of interest under control of a regulatable promoter and the other, a constitutively expressed transactivator that modulates the activity of the regulatable promoter. Because the cotransfer of two independent elements is not efficient in primary cells, single transduction step vectors conferring regulatable gene expression cassettes would be helpful. We have developed retroviral vectors containing an autoregulatory bidirectional expression cassette that encodes all components necessary for regulated expression of a gene of interest. The influence of the orientation of the reporter gene with respect to the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) and the effect of transcriptionally inactive LTRs were investigated using mouse leukemia virus (MLV) and self-inactivating (SIN)-based retroviral vectors. Strict regulation was observed when the reporter was inserted in antisense orientation with respect to the LTR, whereas a sense arrangement of the reporter resulted in a loss of regulation capacity. Expression and regulation of the antisense-orientated reporter gene were homogenous in infected cell pools and investigated cell clones. Long-term observations of infected cells over a period of 30 passages revealed stable expression and regulation. These autoregulated, bidirectional retroviral vectors combine the advantages of single-step transduction with strict regulation of the gene of interest in the infected target cells. PMID:11708885

  12. Delayed initiation of anti-retroviral therapy in TB/HIV co-infected patients, Sanyati District, Zimbabwe, 2011-2012

    PubMed Central

    Maponga, Brian Abel; Chirundu, Daniel; Gombe, Notion Tafara; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Bangure, Donewell; Takundwa, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem and is driven by HIV. Recent studies indicate that anti-retroviral therapy (ART) initiated during the first two months of anti-TB treatment (ATT) reduces risk of HIV morbidity and mortality. In Sanyati district, 14% of TB/HIV co-infected patients were initiated on ART during TB treatment, in 2010. The study was conducted to determine the magnitude and determinants of delay in ART initiation, in TB/HIV co-infected patients. Methods An analytic cross sectional study was conducted at three study sites in Sanyati district. The outcome was delayed ART initiation, being failure to be initiated on ART during the first two months of ATT. Respondents were interviewed using pre-tested questionnaires. Epi-Info™ was used to generate frequencies, means, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Stratified and logistic regression analysis was done. Results Of the 186 respondents, 63% had delayed ART initiation. Median delay from initiation of ATT to ART was 48 days (Q1=20; Q3=82). Risk factors for delayed ART initiation were: being treated for TB first time, AOR=2.23 (p=0.03); initially registered for HIV care outside Sanyati, AOR=3.08 (p<0.01); staying more than 5km from a clinic, AOR=3.29 (p<0.01). Enabling factors for early ART initiation was having a family member on ART, AOR=0.23 (p<0.01). Conclusion Significant delay and barriers to ART initiation were identified. Decentralization of ART initiation should be expedited. ART initiation should be expedited in patients with identified risk factors for delaying ART initiation. Peer support should be strengthened in families and community. Periodic evaluation of magnitude of delay and impact of early ART initiation in TB/HIV patients is recommended. PMID:26401222

  13. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  14. Mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus: prospects for novel anti-retroviral therapies in human

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Nicolas; Florins, Arnaud; Boxus, Mathieu; Burteau, Catherine; Nigro, Annamaria; Vandermeers, Fabian; Balon, Hervé; Bouzar, Amel-Baya; Defoiche, Julien; Burny, Arsène; Reichert, Michal; Kettmann, Richard; Willems, Luc

    2007-01-01

    In 1871, the observation of yellowish nodules in the enlarged spleen of a cow was considered to be the first reported case of bovine leukemia. The etiological agent of this lymphoproliferative disease, bovine leukemia virus (BLV), belongs to the deltaretrovirus genus which also includes the related human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). This review summarizes current knowledge of this viral system, which is important as a model for leukemogenesis. Recently, the BLV model has also cast light onto novel prospects for therapies of HTLV induced diseases, for which no satisfactory treatment exists so far. PMID:17362524

  15. Intestinal Parasitosis in Relation to Anti-Retroviral Therapy, CD4+ T-cell Count and Diarrhea in HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Sinha, Sanjeev; Panda, Ashutosh; Singh, Yogita; Joseph, Anju; Deb, Manorama

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are one of the major causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive individuals. Antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of many opportunistic infections, but parasite-related diarrhea still remains frequent and often underestimated especially in developing countries. The present hospital-based study was conducted to determine the spectrum of intestinal parasitosis in adult HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) patients with or without diarrhea with the levels of CD4+ T-cell counts. A total of 400 individuals were enrolled and were screened for intestinal parasitosis. Of these study population, 200 were HIV seropositives, and the remaining 200 were HIV uninfected individuals with or without diarrhea. Intestinal parasites were identified by using microscopy as well as PCR assay. A total of 130 (32.5%) out of 400 patients were positive for any kinds of intestinal parasites. The cumulative number of parasite positive patients was 152 due to multiple infections. A significant association of Cryptosporidium (P<0.001) was detected among individuals with CD4+ T-cell counts less than 200 cells/μl. PMID:26797437

  16. Cancellers - Exploring the Possibility of Receptor Decoy Traps As a Superior Anti-Retroviral Strategy.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, Sundararaj Stanley; Ohba, Kenji; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The global Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) pandemic is still spreading due to the lack of ideal anti-retroviral measures and their availability. Till date, all attempts to produce an efficient vaccine have ended with unsatisfactory results. The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) is the only effective weapon currently available and is widely being used for curtailing the HIV pandemic. However, the HAART is also expected to fail in the near future due to the emergence and dissemination of antiviral resistance. This review sheds light on the reasons for the failure of the conventional anti-viral measures against HIV and the novel anti-retroviral strategies currently being developed. The various principles to be considered for the success of a novel anti-retroviral strategy are elaborately emphasized and an innovative concept is proposed on these lines. The proposed concept intends to use receptor decoy traps (RDT) called cancellers which are erythrocytes expressing the HIV entry receptors on their surface. If successfully developed, the cancellers would be capable of active targeting of the free HIV particles leading to the trapping of the viruses within the canceller, resulting in the neutralization of infectivity of the trapped virus. The possible ways of translating this concept into reality and the probable hurdles that can be encountered in the process are subsequently discussed. Also, the scope of cancellers in therapeutic and/or preventive strategies against HIV infection is envisaged upon their successful development. PMID:25882216

  17. Activity Therapy: An Alternative Therapy for Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of activity therapy for preteens and adolescents, where the client is engaged in nonverbal modes of relationship--games, free play, movement, drama, music, art or other activities, as the chief therapeutic media in which conflicts are resolved and intellectual and emotional energies freed. Reviews the literature, describes…

  18. Expression of human. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin in dogs after autologous transplantation of retroviral transduced hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.A.; Baley, P.; Rothenberg, S.; Leland, F; Fleming, L.; Ponder, K.P.; Liu, Tajen; Finegold, M.; Darlington, G.; Pokorny, W.; Woo, S.L.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The liver represents an excellent organ for gene therapy since many genetic disorders result from the deficiency of liver-specific gene products. The authors have previously demonstrated that transgenic mouse hepatocytes can be heterologously transplanted into congenic recipients where they survived indefinitely and continued to function as hepatocytes. Here they demonstrate the autologous transplantation of retrovirally transduced canine hepatocytes. In two animals they have transplanted hepatocytes transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin cDNA under transcriptional control of the cytomegalovirus promotor. Both animals had significant human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin in the serum for 1 month. The results suggest that gene therapy of hepatic deficiencies may be achieved by hepatocellular transplantation after genetic reconstruction with the use of promoters of cellular genes that are active in the normal liver.

  19. Immune Protection of Retroviral Vectors Upon Molecular Painting with the Complement Regulatory Protein CD59.

    PubMed

    Heider, Susanne; Kleinberger, Sandra; Kochan, Feliks; Dangerfield, John A; Metzner, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchoring is a type of post-translational modification that allows proteins to be presented on the exterior side of the cell membrane. Purified glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein can spontaneously re-insert into lipid bilayer membranes in a process termed Molecular Painting. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of inserting purified, recombinant CD59 into virus particles produced from a murine retroviral producer cell line. CD59 is a regulator of the complement system that helps protect healthy cells from the lytic activity of the complement cascade. In this study, we could show that Molecular Painting confers protection from complement activity upon murine retroviral vector particles. Indeed, increased infectivity of CD59-modified virus particles was observed upon challenge with human serum, indicating that Molecular Painting is suitable for modulating the immune system in gene therapy or vaccination applications. PMID:27170144

  20. Retroviral vectors encoding ADA regulatory locus control region provide enhanced T-cell-specific transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Murine retroviral vectors have been used in several hundred gene therapy clinical trials, but have fallen out of favor for a number of reasons. One issue is that gene expression from viral or internal promoters is highly variable and essentially unregulated. Moreover, with retroviral vectors, gene expression is usually silenced over time. Mammalian genes, in contrast, are characterized by highly regulated, precise levels of expression in both a temporal and a cell-specific manner. To ascertain if recapitulation of endogenous adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression can be achieved in a vector construct we created a new series of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) based retroviral vector that carry human regulatory elements including combinations of the ADA promoter, the ADA locus control region (LCR), ADA introns and human polyadenylation sequences in a self-inactivating vector backbone. Methods A MuLV-based retroviral vector with a self-inactivating (SIN) backbone, the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter (PGK) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), as a reporter gene, was generated. Subsequent vectors were constructed from this basic vector by deletion or addition of certain elements. The added elements that were assessed are the human ADA promoter, human ADA locus control region (LCR), introns 7, 8, and 11 from the human ADA gene, and human growth hormone polyadenylation signal. Retroviral vector particles were produced by transient three-plasmid transfection of 293T cells. Retroviral vectors encoding eGFP were titered by transducing 293A cells, and then the proportion of GFP-positive cells was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Non T-cell and T-cell lines were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1 and the yield of eGFP transgene expression was evaluated by FACS analysis using mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) detection. Results Vectors that contained the ADA LCR were preferentially expressed in T

  1. Griscelli syndrome: characterization of a new mutation and rescue of T-cytotoxic activity by retroviral transfer of RAB27A gene.

    PubMed

    Bizario, João C S; Feldmann, Jérôme; Castro, Fabíola A; Ménasché, Gaël; Jacob, Cristina M A; Cristofani, L; Casella, Erasmo B; Voltarelli, Júlio C; de Saint-Basile, Geneviève; Espreafico, Enilza M

    2004-07-01

    Griscelli syndrome (GS) is caused by mutations in the MYO5A (GS1), RAB27A (GS2), or MLPH (GS3) genes, all of which lead to a similar pigmentary dilution. In addition, GS1 patients show primary neurological impairment, whereas GS2 patients present immunodeficiency and periods of lymphocyte proliferation and activation, leading to their infiltration in many organs, such as the nervous system, causing secondary neurological damage. We report the diagnosis of GS2 in a 4-year-old child with haemophagocytic syndrome, immunodeficiency, and secondary neurological disorders. Typical melanosome accumulation was found in skin melanocytes and pigment clumps were observed in hair shafts. Two heterozygous mutant alleles of the RAB27A gene were found, a C-T transition (C352T) that leads to Q118stop and a G-C transversion on the exon 5 splicing donor site (G467+1C). Functional assays showed increased cellular activation and decreased cytotoxic activity of NK and CD8+ T cells, associated with defective lytic granules release. Myosin-Va expression and localization in the patient lymphocytes were also analyzed. Most importantly, we show that cytotoxic activity of the patient's CD8+ T lymphocytes can be rescued in vitro by RAB27A gene transfer mediated by a recombinant retroviral vector, a first step towards a potential treatment of the acute phase of GS2 by RAB27A transduced lymphocytes. PMID:15163896

  2. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  3. CAGE profiling of ncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma reveals widespread activation of retroviral LTR promoters in virus-induced tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kosuke; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Dos Santos, Alexandre; Desterke, Christophe; Collino, Agnese; Ghisletti, Serena; Braun, Emilie; Bonetti, Alessandro; Fort, Alexandre; Qin, Xian-Yang; Radaelli, Enrico; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kojima, Soichi; Samuel, Didier; Natoli, Gioacchino; Buendia, Marie Annick; Faivre, Jamila; Carninci, Piero

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been implicated in various human diseases including cancer; however, the ncRNA transcriptome of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is largely unexplored. We used CAGE to map transcription start sites across various types of human and mouse HCCs with emphasis on ncRNAs distant from protein-coding genes. Here, we report that retroviral LTR promoters, expressed in healthy tissues such as testis and placenta but not liver, are widely activated in liver tumors. Despite HCC heterogeneity, a subset of LTR-derived ncRNAs were more than 10-fold up-regulated in the vast majority of samples. HCCs with a high LTR activity mostly had a viral etiology, were less differentiated, and showed higher risk of recurrence. ChIP-seq data show that MYC and MAX are associated with ncRNA deregulation. Globally, CAGE enabled us to build a mammalian promoter map for HCC, which uncovers a new layer of complexity in HCC genomics. PMID:26510915

  4. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization) in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21752277

  5. Efficient conditional gene expression following transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jie-Yu; Mackay, Fabienne; Alderuccio, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral gene therapy combined with bone marrow stem cell transplantation can be used to generate mice with ectopic gene expression in the bone marrow compartment in a quick and cost effective manner when compared to generating and maintaining transgenic mouse lines. However a limitation of this procedure is the lack of cell specificity in gene expression that is associated with the use of endogenous retroviral promoters. Restricting gene expression to specific cell subsets utilising tissue-specific promoter driven retroviral vectors is a challenge. Here we describe the generation of conditional expression of retrovirally encoded genes in specific bone marrow derived cell lineages utilising a Cre-dependent retroviral vector. By utilising Lck and CD19 restricted Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells, we generate chimeric animals with T or B lymphocyte restricted gene expression respectively. The design of the Cre-dependent retroviral vector enables expression of encoded MOG and GFP genes only in association with Cre mediated DNA inversion. Importantly this strategy does not significantly increase the size of the retroviral vector; as such we are able to generate bone marrow chimeric animals with significantly higher chimerism levels than previous studies utilising Cre-dependent retroviral vectors and Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells. This demonstrates that the use of Cre-dependent retroviral vectors is able to yield high chimerism levels for experimental use and represent a viable alternative to generating transgenic animals. PMID:25445328

  6. An Efficient Large-Scale Retroviral Transduction Method Involving Preloading the Vector into a RetroNectin-Coated Bag with Low-Temperature Shaking

    PubMed Central

    Dodo, Katsuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Saito, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Tahara, Kenichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, transduction efficiency can be hampered by inhibitory molecules derived from the culture fluid of virus producer cell lines. To remove these inhibitory molecules to enable better gene transduction, we had previously developed a transduction method using a fibronectin fragment-coated vessel (i.e., the RetroNectin-bound virus transduction method). In the present study, we developed a method that combined RetroNectin-bound virus transduction with low-temperature shaking and applied this method in manufacturing autologous retroviral-engineered T cells for adoptive transfer gene therapy in a large-scale closed system. Retroviral vector was preloaded into a RetroNectin-coated bag and incubated at 4°C for 16 h on a reciprocating shaker at 50 rounds per minute. After the supernatant was removed, activated T cells were added to the bag. The bag transduction method has the advantage of increasing transduction efficiency, as simply flipping over the bag during gene transduction facilitates more efficient utilization of the retroviral vector adsorbed on the top and bottom surfaces of the bag. Finally, we performed validation runs of endoribonuclease MazF-modified CD4+ T cell manufacturing for HIV-1 gene therapy and T cell receptor-modified T cell manufacturing for MAGE-A4 antigen-expressing cancer gene therapy and achieved over 200-fold (≥1010) and 100-fold (≥5×109) expansion, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the large-scale closed transduction system is highly efficient for retroviral vector-based T cell manufacturing for adoptive transfer gene therapy, and this technology is expected to be amenable to automation and improve current clinical gene therapy protocols. PMID:24454964

  7. ISOLATION OF AN ACTIVE LV1 GENE FROM CATTLE INDICATES THAT TRIPARTITE MOTIF PROTEIN-MEDIATED INNATE IMMUNITY TO RETROVIRAL INFECTION IS WIDESPREAD AMONG MAMMALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lv1/TRIM5alpha (tripartite motif 5alpha) has recently emerged as an important factor influencing species-specific permissivity to retroviral infection in a range of primates, including humans. Old World monkey TRIM5alpha blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectivity, and the human a...

  8. Impact of HIV Infection and Anti-Retroviral Therapy on the Immune Profile of and Microbial Translocation in HIV-Infected Children in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiuqiong; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Lam Van; Matsuda, Kazunori; Pham, Hung Viet; Phan, Chung Thi Thu; Ogata, Kiyohito; Giang, Thuy Thi Thanh; Phung, Thuy Thi Bich; Nguyen, Tuyen Thi; Tokoro, Masaharu; Pham, An Nhat; Khu, Dung Thi Khanh; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    CD4⁺ T-lymphocyte destruction, microbial translocation, and systemic immune activation are the main mechanisms of the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection. To investigate the impact of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the immune profile of and microbial translocation in HIV-infected children, 60 HIV vertically infected children (31 without ART: HIV(+) and 29 with ART: ART(+)) and 20 HIV-uninfected children (HIV(-)) aged 2-12 years were recruited in Vietnam, and their blood samples were immunologically and bacteriologically analyzed. Among the HIV(+) children, the total CD4⁺-cell and their subset (type 1 helper T-cell (Th1)/Th2/Th17) counts were inversely correlated with age (all p < 0.05), whereas regulatory T-cell (Treg) counts and CD4/CD8 ratios had become lower, and the CD38⁺HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-DR⁺CD8⁺- (activated CD8⁺) cell percentage and plasma soluble CD14 (sCD14, a monocyte activation marker) levels had become higher than those of HIV(-) children by the age of 2 years; the CD4/CD8 ratio was inversely correlated with the plasma HIV RNA load and CD8⁺-cell activation status. Among the ART(+) children, the total CD4⁺-cell and Th2/Th17/Treg-subset counts and the CD4/CD8 ratio gradually increased, with estimated ART periods of normalization being 4.8-8.3 years, whereas Th1 counts and the CD8⁺-cell activation status normalized within 1 year of ART initiation. sCD14 levels remained high even after ART initiation. The detection frequency of bacterial 16S/23S ribosomal DNA/RNA in blood did not differ between HIV-infected and -uninfected children. Thus, in children, HIV infection caused a rapid decrease in Treg counts and the early activation of CD8⁺ cells and monocytes, and ART induced rapid Th1 recovery and early CD8⁺-cell activation normalization but had little effect on monocyte activation. The CD4/CD8 ratio could therefore be an additional marker for ART monitoring. PMID:27490536

  9. Impact of HIV Infection and Anti-Retroviral Therapy on the Immune Profile of and Microbial Translocation in HIV-Infected Children in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xiuqiong; Ishizaki, Azumi; Nguyen, Lam Van; Matsuda, Kazunori; Pham, Hung Viet; Phan, Chung Thi Thu; Ogata, Kiyohito; Giang, Thuy Thi Thanh; Phung, Thuy Thi Bich; Nguyen, Tuyen Thi; Tokoro, Masaharu; Pham, An Nhat; Khu, Dung Thi Khanh; Ichimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T-lymphocyte destruction, microbial translocation, and systemic immune activation are the main mechanisms of the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection. To investigate the impact of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the immune profile of and microbial translocation in HIV-infected children, 60 HIV vertically infected children (31 without ART: HIV(+) and 29 with ART: ART(+)) and 20 HIV-uninfected children (HIV(−)) aged 2–12 years were recruited in Vietnam, and their blood samples were immunologically and bacteriologically analyzed. Among the HIV(+) children, the total CD4+-cell and their subset (type 1 helper T-cell (Th1)/Th2/Th17) counts were inversely correlated with age (all p < 0.05), whereas regulatory T-cell (Treg) counts and CD4/CD8 ratios had become lower, and the CD38+HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-DR+CD8+- (activated CD8+) cell percentage and plasma soluble CD14 (sCD14, a monocyte activation marker) levels had become higher than those of HIV(−) children by the age of 2 years; the CD4/CD8 ratio was inversely correlated with the plasma HIV RNA load and CD8+-cell activation status. Among the ART(+) children, the total CD4+-cell and Th2/Th17/Treg-subset counts and the CD4/CD8 ratio gradually increased, with estimated ART periods of normalization being 4.8–8.3 years, whereas Th1 counts and the CD8+-cell activation status normalized within 1 year of ART initiation. sCD14 levels remained high even after ART initiation. The detection frequency of bacterial 16S/23S ribosomal DNA/RNA in blood did not differ between HIV-infected and -uninfected children. Thus, in children, HIV infection caused a rapid decrease in Treg counts and the early activation of CD8+ cells and monocytes, and ART induced rapid Th1 recovery and early CD8+-cell activation normalization but had little effect on monocyte activation. The CD4/CD8 ratio could therefore be an additional marker for ART monitoring. PMID:27490536

  10. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  11. Acceptance of Anti-Retroviral Therapy among Patients Infected with HIV and Tuberculosis in Rural Malawi Is Low and Associated with Cost of Transport

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Anthony David; Manzi, Marcel; Gomani, Patrick; Teck, Roger; Phillips, Mit; Firmenich, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background A study was conducted among newly registered HIV-positive tuberculosis (TB) patients systematically offered anti-retroviral treatment (ART) in a district hospital in rural Malawi in order to a) determine the acceptance of ART b) conduct a geographic mapping of those placed on ART and c) examine the association between “cost of transport” and ART acceptance. Methodology/Principal Findings A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was performed on routine program data for the period of February 2003 to July 2004. Standardized registers and patient cards were used to gather data. The place of residence was used to determine road distances to the Thyolo district hospital. Cost of transport from different parts of the district was based on the known cost for public transport to the road-stop closest to the patient's residence. Of 1,290 newly registered TB patients, 1,003(78%) underwent HIV-testing of whom 770 (77%) were HIV-positive. 742 of these individuals (pulmonary TB = 607; extra-pulmonary TB = 135) were considered eligible for ART of whom only 101(13.6%) accepted ART. Cost of transport to the hospital ART site was significantly associated with ART acceptance and there was a linear trend in association between cost and ART acceptance (X2 for trend = 25.4, P<0.001). Individuals who had to pay 50 Malawi Kwacha (1 United States Dollar = 100 Malawi Kwacha, MW) or less for a one-way trip to the Thyolo hospital were four times more likely to accept ART than those who had to pay over 100 MW (Adjusted Odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval: 2.0–8.1, P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance ART acceptance among TB patients in a rural district in Malawi is low and associated with cost of transport to the centralized hospital based ART site. Decentralizing the ART offer from the hospital to health centers that are closer to home communities would be an essential step towards reducing the overall cost and burden of travel. PMID:17205125

  12. Generation of high-titer pseudotyped retroviral vectors with very broad host range.

    PubMed

    Yee, J K; Friedmann, T; Burns, J C

    1994-01-01

    Encapsidation of the VSV G protein into the virions of MoMLV-derived retroviral vectors in the absence of other VSV-encoded proteins is shown to be an efficient process, although the exact mechanism for this process is currently unclear. Unlike the conventional retroviral vectors bearing the amphotropic envelope protein, the pseudotyped virus has the ability to withstand the shearing forces encountered during ultracentrifugation. This property of the pseudotyped virus enables the generation of high-titer retroviral vector stocks and has potential application for in vivo gene therapy studies. We have found as many as four copies of a pseudotyped vector to integrate into the genome of a single cell when a high multiplicity of infection was used to infect the cells. Multiple integration events were not observed with amphotropic retroviral vectors, probably because of their low virus titers. In addition, when retroviral vectors are pseudotyped with the VSV G protein, they acquire the host range of VSV and are able to infect nonmammalian cells derived from fish, Xenopus, mosquito, and Lepidoptera. Since techniques for efficient gene transfer in some of these nonmammalian systems are not currently available, retrovirus-mediated gene transfer described here should be useful for transgenic and other genetic studies in lower vertebrate species. The inability to establish a stable cell line expressing the VSV G protein, however, limits large-scale production of the pseudotyped retroviral vectors. Generation of stable packaging cell lines for the pseudotyped retroviral vectors is a major challenge for the future. PMID:7823872

  13. RETROVIRAL INTEGRASE: THEN AND NOW

    PubMed Central

    Andrake, Mark D.; Skalka, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    The retroviral integrases are virally encoded, specialized recombinases that catalyze the insertion of viral DNA into the host cell’s DNA, a process that is essential for virus propagation. We have learned a great deal since the existence of an integrated form of retroviral DNA (the provirus) was first proposed by Howard Temin in 1964. Initial studies focused on the genetics and biochemistry of avian and murine virus DNA integration, but the pace of discovery increased substantially with advances in technology, and an influx of investigators focused on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We begin with a brief account of the scientific landscape in which some of the earliest discoveries were made, and summarize research that led to our current understanding of the biochemistry of integration. A more detailed account of recent analyses of integrase structure follows, as they have provided valuable insights into enzyme function and raised important new questions. PMID:26958915

  14. TRIM5 acts as more than a retroviral restriction factor.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Suresh; Wu, Li

    2011-07-01

    The retrovirus restriction factor TRIM5α blocks post-entry infection of retroviruses in a species-specific manner. As a cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM5α binds to the retroviral capsid lattice in the cytoplasm of an infected cell and accelerates the uncoating process of retroviral capsid, thus providing a potent restriction to HIV-1 and other retrovirus infections. The precise mechanism by which this restriction is imposed remains under scrutiny, and evidence is lacking to link the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of TRIM5α to its ability to restrict retrovirus infection. In a recent study, Pertel and colleagues have uncovered the link between the two, providing compelling evidence to suggest that following the interaction with the retroviral capsid, TRIM5 triggers an antiviral innate immune response by functioning as a pattern recognition receptor. This unique function of TRIM5 is dependent on its association with the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme complex UBC13-UEV1A and subsequent activation of the TAK1 kinase complex and downstream genes involved in innate immune responses. These findings have defined a novel function for TRIM5 as a pattern recognition receptor in innate immune recognition and provided valuable mechanistic insight into its role as a retroviral restriction factor. Here we discuss the significance of these new findings in understanding TRIM5-mediated HIV restriction. PMID:21866272

  15. A case of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension associated with anti-retroviral therapy in a Japanese patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Keishiro; Uehira, Tomoko; Otera, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Yusuke; Watanabe, Dai; Kodama, Yoshinori; Kuzushita, Noriyoshi; Nishida, Yasuharu; Mita, Eiji; Mano, Masayuki; Shirasaka, Takuma

    2014-09-01

    The diagnosis of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH), a rare but potentially life-threatening complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals, often occurs only after the emergence of fatal manifestations such as bleeding of esophageal varices. We herein report a female Japanese HIV patient who developed NCPH approximately 4 years after discontinuation of 65 months of didanosine (ddI) administration. The patient presented with severe ascites, bloody bowel discharge, extreme abdominal swelling, and symptoms of portal hypertension but no sign of liver cirrhosis. Examination revealed esophageal varices, oozing-like bleeding from a wide part of the colon, significant atrophy of the right lobe of the liver, and arterio-portal shunting and recanalization from the left medial segment branch of the portal vein to a paraumbilical vein, but no visible obstruction of the main trunk of the portal vein. Treatment for esophageal varices consisted of coagulation therapy with argon plasma after enforcement by endoscopic sclerotherapy and oral administration of β-blockers for elevated portal blood pressure. The patient has not experienced gastrointestinal bleeding in the approximately 5 years since the diagnosis of NCPH. Reviewing this case suggests the importance of suspecting NCPH in HIV patients with liver dysfunction of unknown etiology with a history of ddI and other purine analogs use, as well as the importance of controlling portal hypertension and esophageal varices in the treatment of NCPH. PMID:25034388

  16. Associated oral lesions in human immunodefeciency virus infected children of age 1 to 14 years in anti retroviral therapy centers in Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R Krishna; Mohan, G; Reddy, N Venugopal; Rao, V Arun Prasad; Shameer, M; Christopher, Ananthi

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of oral lesions status in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected children of age 1 to 14 years in Anti Retro viral therapy (ART) centres in Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A of total 326 HIV infected children, age 1 to 14 years of which 174 male children and 152 female children were examined for Oral lesions in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Rajah Muthiah Dental College and Hospital, Annamalai University in association with the ART centers in Villupuram, Vellore and HIV Homes in Thiruvannamalai, Trichy and Salem in Tamil Nadu towns. Statistical Analysis: Statistical Package for Social Science for Windows (version 11 code: 3000135939012345). Result: Of the total 326 children, 201 (61.65%) had oral lesions. (68 [20.86%] with Oral Candidiasis [OC], 54 [16.56%] with Angular Cheilitis, 27 [8.28%] with Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis [NUG], 25 [7.66%] with Necrotizing Ulcerative Periodontitis [NUP], 18 [5.53%] with Linear Gingival Erythema [LGE] and 9 [2.76%] with Apthous Ulcer.) Conclusion Among the oral lesions in HIV infected children, OC 20.86% was the predominant oral lesion followed by Angular Chelitis 16.56%, NUG 8.28%, NUP 7.66%, LGE5.53% and Apthous Ulcer 2.76%. PMID:24403790

  17. PEGylated Cationic Serum Albumin for Boosting Retroviral Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Palesch, David; Boldt, Felix; Müller, Janis A; Eisele, Klaus; Stürzel, Christina M; Wu, Yuzhou; Münch, Jan; Weil, Tanja

    2016-08-17

    Retroviral vectors are common tools for introducing genes into the genome of a cell. However, low transduction rates are a major limitation in retroviral gene transfer, especially in clinical applications. We generated cationic human serum albumin (cHSA) protected by a shell of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG); this significantly enhanced retroviral gene transduction with potentially attractive pharmacokinetics and low immunogenicity. By screening a panel of chemically optimized HSA compounds, we identified a very potent enhancer that boosted the transduction rates of viral vectors. Confocal microscopy revealed a drastically increased number of viral particles attached to the surfaces of target cells. In accordance with the positive net charge of cationic and PEGylated HSA, this suggests a mechanism of action in which the repulsion of the negatively charged cellular and viral vector membranes is neutralized, thereby promoting attachment and ultimately transduction. Importantly, the transduction-enhancing PEGylated HSA derivative evaded recognition by HSA-specific antibodies and macrophage activation. Our findings hold great promise for facilitating improved retroviral gene transfer. PMID:27239020

  18. SINGLE DOSE NEVIRAPINE EXPOSURE DOES NOT AFFECT RESPONSE TO ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN HIV-INFECTED AFRICAN CHILDREN AGED <3 YEARS

    PubMed Central

    MUSIIME, Victor; NATHOO, Kusum; NAHIRYA-NTEGE, Patricia; MUTASA, Kuda; WILLIAMS, David Eram; PRENDERGAST, Andrew J.; SPYER, Moira; WALKER, A Sarah; GIBB, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of exposure to single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP) on virological response in young Ugandan/Zimbabwean children (<3 years) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), and investigate other predictors of response. Design Observational analysis within the ARROW randomised trial. Methods sdNVP exposure was ascertained by caregiver’s self-report when the child initiated NNRTI based ART. Viral load (VL) was assayed retrospectively over median 4.1 years follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify independent predictors of VL <80 copies/ml 48 and 144 weeks after ART initiation (backwards elimination, exit p=0.1). Results Median (IQR) age at ART initiation was 17 (10-23) months in 78 sdNVP exposed children versus 21 (14-27) months in 289 non-exposed children (36% vs 20% <12 months). At week 48, 49/73 (67%) sdNVP exposed and 154/272 (57%) non-exposed children had VL<80 copies/ml (adjusted (a)OR=2.34 [1.26-4.34] p=0.007); 79% and 77% had VL<400copies/ml. Suppression was significantly lower in males (p=0.009), those with higher pre-ART VL (p=0.001), taking syrups (p=0.05) and with lower self-reported adherence (p=0.04). At week 144, 55/73 (75%) exposed and 188/272 (69%) non-exposed had <80 copies/ml (aOR=1.75 [0.93-3.29] p=0.08). There was no difference between children with and without previous sdNVP exposure in intermediate/high-level resistance to NRTIs (p>0.3) or NNRTIs (p>0.1) (n=88) at week 144. Conclusion Given the limited global availability of lopinavir/ritonavir, its significant formulation challenges in young children, and the significant paediatric treatment gap, tablet fixed-dose-combination nevirapine-based ART remains a good alternative to syrup lopinavir-based ART for children, particularly those over one year and even if exposed to sdNVP. PMID:26193705

  19. Retroviral vector performance in defined chromosomal Loci of modular packaging cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gama-Norton, L; Herrmann, S; Schucht, R; Coroadinha, A S; Löw, R; Alves, P M; Bartholomae, C C; Schmidt, M; Baum, C; Schambach, A; Hauser, H; Wirth, D

    2010-08-01

    The improvement of safety and titer of retroviral vectors produced in standard retroviral packaging cell lines is hampered because production relies on uncontrollable vector integration events. The influences of chromosomal surroundings make it difficult to dissect the performance of a specific vector from the chromosomal surroundings of the respective integration site. Taking advantage of a technology that relies on the use of packaging cell lines with predefined integration sites, we have systematically evaluated the performance of several retroviral vectors. In two previously established modular packaging cell lines (Flp293A and 293 FLEX) with single, defined chromosomal integration sites, retroviral vectors were integrated by means of Flp-mediated site-specific recombination. Vectors that are distinguished by different long terminal repeat promoters were introduced in either the sense or reverse orientation. The results show that the promoter, viral vector orientation, and integration site are the main determinants of the titer. Furthermore, we exploited the viral production systems to evaluate read-through activity. Read-through is thought to be caused by inefficient termination of vector transcription and is inherent to the nature of retroviral vectors. We assessed the frequency of transduction of sequences flanking the retroviral vectors from both integration sites. The approach presented here provides a platform for systematic design and evaluation of the efficiency and safety of retroviral vectors optimized for a given producer cell line. PMID:20222806

  20. An XMRV Derived Retroviral Vector as a Tool for Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retroviral vectors are widely used tools for gene delivery and gene therapy. They are useful for gene expression studies and genetic manipulation in vitro and in vivo. Many retroviral vectors are derived from the mouse gammaretrovirus, murine leukemia virus (MLV). These vectors have been widely used in gene therapy clinical trials. XMRV, initially found in prostate cancer tissue, was the first human gammaretrovirus described. Findings We developed a new retroviral vector based on XMRV called pXC. It was developed for gene transfer to human cells and is produced by transient cotransfection of LNCaP cells with pXC and XMRV-packaging plasmids. Conclusions We demonstrated that pXC mediates expression of inserted transgenes in cell lines. This new vector will be a useful tool for gene transfer in human and non-human cell lines, including gene therapy studies. PMID:21651801

  1. Continuum Theory of Retroviral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Bruinsma, R. F.; Gelbart, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    We present a self-assembly phase diagram for the shape of retroviral capsids, based on continuum elasticity theory. The spontaneous curvature of the capsid proteins drives a weakly first-order transition from spherical to spherocylindrical shapes. The conical capsid shape which characterizes the HIV-1 retrovirus is never stable under unconstrained energy minimization. Only under conditions of fixed volume and/or fixed spanning length can the conical shape be a minimum energy structure. Our results indicate that, unlike the capsids of small viruses, retrovirus capsids are not uniquely determined by the molecular structure of the constituent proteins but depend in an essential way on physical constraints present during assembly.

  2. Combined Alloreactive CTL Cellular Therapy with Prodrug Activator Gene Therapy in a Model of Breast Cancer Metastatic to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Malone, Colin C.; Erickson, Kate L.; Lin, Amy; Soto, Horacio; Ha, Edward T.; Kamijima, Shuichi; Inagaki, Akihito; Takahashi, Masamichi; Kato, Yuki; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Mueller, Barbara M.; Kruse, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Individual or combined strategies of cellular therapy with alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (alloCTL) and gene therapy employing retroviral replicating vectors (RRV) encoding a suicide prodrug activating gene were explored for the treatment of breast tumors metastatic to the brain. Experimental Design AlloCTL, sensitized to the human leukocyte antigens of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, were examined in vitro for anti-tumor functionality toward breast cancer targets. RRV encoding the yeast cytosine deaminase (CD) gene was tested in vivo for virus spread, ability to infect, and kill breast cancer targets when exposed to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Individual and combination treatments were tested in subcutaneous and intracranial xenograft models with 231BR, a brain tropic variant. Results AlloCTL preparations were cytotoxic, proliferated and produced interferon-gamma when coincubated with target cells displaying relevant HLA. In vivo, intratumorally-placed alloCTL trafficked through one established intracranial 231BR focus to another in contralateral brain and induced tumor cell apoptosis. RRV-CD efficiently spread in vivo, infected 231BR and induced their apoptosis upon 5-FC exposure. Subcutaneous tumor volumes were significantly reduced in alloCTL and/or gene therapy treated groups compared to control groups. Mice with established intracranial 231BR tumors treated with combined alloCTL and RRV-CD had a median survival of 97.5 days compared with single modalities (50–83 days); all experimental treatment groups survived significantly longer than sham-treated groups (median survivals 31.5 or 40 days) and exhibited good safety/toxicity profiles. Conclusion The results indicate combining cellular and suicide gene therapies is a viable strategy for the treatment of established breast tumors in the brain. PMID:23780889

  3. Activity Therapy Services and Chemical Dependency Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mark R.; Townsley, Robin K.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how music, occupational, and recreation therapies can contribute to comprehensive treatment programs for chemical dependency. Sees prime contribution of activity therapy as lying in nature of experiential education, applying insight gained in counseling sessions and discussion groups to practical real-life situations. (Author/NB)

  4. Repair of gaps in retroviral DNA integration intermediates.

    PubMed

    Yoder, K E; Bushman, F D

    2000-12-01

    Diverse mobile DNA elements are believed to pirate host cell enzymes to complete DNA transfer. Prominent examples are provided by retroviral cDNA integration and transposon insertion. These reactions initially involve the attachment of each element 3' DNA end to staggered sites in the host DNA by element-encoded integrase or transposase enzymes. Unfolding of such intermediates yields DNA gaps at each junction. It has been widely assumed that host DNA repair enzymes complete attachment of the remaining DNA ends, but the enzymes involved have not been identified for any system. We have synthesized DNA substrates containing the expected gap and 5' two-base flap structure present in retroviral integration intermediates and tested candidate enzymes for the ability to support repair in vitro. We find three required activities, two of which can be satisfied by multiple enzymes. These are a polymerase (polymerase beta, polymerase delta and its cofactor PCNA, or reverse transcriptase), a nuclease (flap endonuclease), and a ligase (ligase I, III, or IV and its cofactor XRCC4). A proposed pathway involving retroviral integrase and reverse transcriptase did not carry out repair under the conditions tested. In addition, prebinding of integrase protein to gapped DNA inhibited repair reactions, indicating that gap repair in vivo may require active disassembly of the integrase complex. PMID:11070016

  5. Innovative Approaches to Plasminogen Activator Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Edgar; Quertermous, Thomas; Matsueda, Gary R.; Runge, Marschall S.

    1989-01-01

    Plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction has become standard medical practice. Bleeding complications, however, limit the utility of the currently available agents. This article reviews how the tools of molecular biology and protein engineering are being used to develop safer and more effective plasminogen activators.

  6. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airhart, Douglas L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University's Program of Special Education sponsors a "Super Saturday" of enrichment activities for gifted and talented students as well as students with learning disabilities. A session on horticulture was planned and arranged by students in a class on horticultural therapy who designed learning activities of two types:…

  7. p53 activated by AND gate genetic circuit under radiation and hypoxia for targeted cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Miao; Li, Rong; He, Rong; Wang, Xingyong; Yi, Qijian; Wang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Radio-activated gene therapy has been developed as a novel therapeutic strategy against cancer; however, expression of therapeutic gene in peritumoral tissues will result in unacceptable toxicity to normal cells. To restrict gene expression in targeted tumor mass, we used hypoxia and radiation tolerance features of tumor cells to develop a synthetic AND gate genetic circuit through connecting radiation sensitivity promoter cArG6, heat shock response elements SNF1, HSF1 and HSE4 with retroviral vector plxsn. Their construction and dynamic activity process were identified through downstream enhanced green fluorescent protein and wtp53 expression in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells and in a nude mice model. The result showed that AND gate genetic circuit could be activated by lower required radiation dose (6 Gy) and after activated, AND gate could induce significant apoptosis effects and growth inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The radiation- and hypoxia-activated AND gate genetic circuit, which could lead to more powerful target tumoricidal activity represented a promising strategy for both targeted and effective gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma and low dose activation character of the AND gate genetic circuit implied that this model could be further exploited to decrease side-effects of clinical radiation therapy. PMID:26177264

  8. Intrinsic retroviral reactivation in human preimplantation embryos and pluripotent cells.

    PubMed

    Grow, Edward J; Flynn, Ryan A; Chavez, Shawn L; Bayless, Nicholas L; Wossidlo, Mark; Wesche, Daniel J; Martin, Lance; Ware, Carol B; Blish, Catherine A; Chang, Howard Y; Pera, Renee A Reijo; Wysocka, Joanna

    2015-06-11

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections, and comprise nearly 8% of the human genome. The most recently acquired human ERV is HERVK(HML-2), which repeatedly infected the primate lineage both before and after the divergence of the human and chimpanzee common ancestor. Unlike most other human ERVs, HERVK retained multiple copies of intact open reading frames encoding retroviral proteins. However, HERVK is transcriptionally silenced by the host, with the exception of in certain pathological contexts such as germ-cell tumours, melanoma or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Here we demonstrate that DNA hypomethylation at long terminal repeat elements representing the most recent genomic integrations, together with transactivation by OCT4 (also known as POU5F1), synergistically facilitate HERVK expression. Consequently, HERVK is transcribed during normal human embryogenesis, beginning with embryonic genome activation at the eight-cell stage, continuing through the emergence of epiblast cells in preimplantation blastocysts, and ceasing during human embryonic stem cell derivation from blastocyst outgrowths. Remarkably, we detected HERVK viral-like particles and Gag proteins in human blastocysts, indicating that early human development proceeds in the presence of retroviral products. We further show that overexpression of one such product, the HERVK accessory protein Rec, in a pluripotent cell line is sufficient to increase IFITM1 levels on the cell surface and inhibit viral infection, suggesting at least one mechanism through which HERVK can induce viral restriction pathways in early embryonic cells. Moreover, Rec directly binds a subset of cellular RNAs and modulates their ribosome occupancy, indicating that complex interactions between retroviral proteins and host factors can fine-tune pathways of early human development. PMID:25896322

  9. Improved retroviral suicide gene transfer in colon cancer cell lines after cell synchronization with methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer gene therapy by retroviral vectors is mainly limited by the level of transduction. Retroviral gene transfer requires target cell division. Cell synchronization, obtained by drugs inducing a reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, could therefore be proposed to precondition target cells to retroviral gene transfer. We tested whether drug-mediated cell synchronization could enhance the transfer efficiency of a retroviral-mediated gene encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) in two colon cancer cell lines, DHDK12 and HT29. Methods Synchronization was induced by methotrexate (MTX), aracytin (ara-C) or aphidicolin. Gene transfer efficiency was assessed by the level of HSV-TK expression. Transduced cells were driven by ganciclovir (GCV) towards apoptosis that was assessed using annexin V labeling by quantitative flow cytometry. Results DHDK12 and HT29 cells were synchronized in S phase with MTX but not ara-C or aphidicolin. In synchronized DHDK12 and HT29 cells, the HSV-TK transduction rates were 2 and 1.5-fold higher than those obtained in control cells, respectively. Furthermore, the rate of apoptosis was increased two-fold in MTX-treated DHDK12 cells after treatment with GCV. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MTX-mediated synchronization of target cells allowed a significant improvement of retroviral HSV-tk gene transfer, resulting in an increased cell apoptosis in response to GCV. Pharmacological control of cell cycle may thus be a useful strategy to optimize the efficiency of retroviral-mediated cancer gene therapy. PMID:21970612

  10. Split-Intron Retroviral Vectors: Enhanced Expression with Improved Safety

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Said I.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Kingsman, Alan J.; Uden, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The inclusion of retrovirus-derived introns within retrovirus-based expression vectors leads to a fraction of the resulting transcripts being spliced. Such splicing has been shown to markedly improve expression (W. J. Krall et al., Gene Ther. 3:37–48, 1996). One way to improve upon this still further might involve the use of more efficient introns instead of those from the provirus. Currently, however, incorporation of such introns remains self-defeating since they are removed in the nucleus of the producer cell. In the past, elaborate ways to overcome this problem have included the use of alphaviruses to make the vector transcripts within the cytoplasm, thus avoiding the nuclear splicing machinery during vector production (K. J. Li and H. Garoff, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:3650–3654, 1998). We now present a novel design for the inclusion of introns within a retroviral vector. In essence, this is achieved by exploiting the retroviral replication process to copy not only the U3 promoter but also a synthetic splice donor to the 5′-long-terminal-repeat position during reverse transcription. Once copied, synthesized transcripts then contain a splice donor at their 5′ end capable of interacting with a consensus splice acceptor engineered downstream of the packaging signal. Upon transduction, we demonstrate these vectors to produce enhanced expression from near fully spliced (and thus packaging signal minus) transcripts. The unique design of these high titer and high-expression retroviral vectors may be of use in a number of gene therapy applications. PMID:10666267

  11. Split-intron retroviral vectors: enhanced expression with improved safety.

    PubMed

    Ismail, S I; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Uden, M

    2000-03-01

    The inclusion of retrovirus-derived introns within retrovirus-based expression vectors leads to a fraction of the resulting transcripts being spliced. Such splicing has been shown to markedly improve expression (W. J. Krall et al., Gene Ther. 3:37-48, 1996). One way to improve upon this still further might involve the use of more efficient introns instead of those from the provirus. Currently, however, incorporation of such introns remains self-defeating since they are removed in the nucleus of the producer cell. In the past, elaborate ways to overcome this problem have included the use of alphaviruses to make the vector transcripts within the cytoplasm, thus avoiding the nuclear splicing machinery during vector production (K. J. Li and H. Garoff, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:3650-3654, 1998). We now present a novel design for the inclusion of introns within a retroviral vector. In essence, this is achieved by exploiting the retroviral replication process to copy not only the U3 promoter but also a synthetic splice donor to the 5'-long-terminal-repeat position during reverse transcription. Once copied, synthesized transcripts then contain a splice donor at their 5' end capable of interacting with a consensus splice acceptor engineered downstream of the packaging signal. Upon transduction, we demonstrate these vectors to produce enhanced expression from near fully spliced (and thus packaging signal minus) transcripts. The unique design of these high titer and high-expression retroviral vectors may be of use in a number of gene therapy applications. PMID:10666267

  12. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  13. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  14. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Matthew D.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2015-01-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research. PMID:25680625

  15. Ultrasound-Targeted Retroviral Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sarah L.; Rahim, Ahad A.; Bush, Nigel L.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Porter, Colin D.

    2007-05-01

    This study demonstrates the ability of focused ultrasound to target retroviral gene delivery. Key to our experiments was the use of non-infectious virus particles lacking the envelope protein required for receptor-mediated entry. The novelty of our approach is that spatial control at a distance is exerted upon viral delivery by subsequent exposure to ultrasound, leading to stable gene delivery. The technology is ideally suited to controlling gene delivery in vivo following systemic vector administration. Our data provide a solution to the critical issue of obtaining tissue specificity with retroviral vectors and impart stability of expression to ultrasound-mediated gene delivery.

  16. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  17. Evidence for integration of retroviral vectors in a novel human repeat sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdi-Haidar, B.; Friedmann, T.

    1994-09-01

    Retroviruses have become attractive vehicles for the introduction of foreign genes into mammalian cells not only for gene therapy but also to serve as anchor points for long-range mapping purposes. The information relating to retroviral integration in mammalian cells is derived mostly from studies of rodent genomes. The absence of information regarding integration sites of murine-based retroviral vectors in human cells has prompted us to investigate the characteristics of integration sites in the human genome. We have constructed a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector that carries the pUC8 origin of replication and the chloramphenicol resistance gene to allow the rescue of the flanking genomic sequences in plasmid form. We have infected human primary fibroblasts and myoblasts with this retroviral vector and isolated independently transduced clones. Genomic DNA was obtained from independent clones and the genomic fragment carrying the provirus-host sequence boundary was isolated after digestion of the genomic DNA, circularization, and transformation by electroporation of E. coli C cells to chloramphenicol resistance. Restriction map and nucleotide sequence analysis of the rescued plasmids showed that a number of the clones shared the same integration site within the human genome. We have used the nucleotide sequence information about the human DNA adjacent to the 3{prime}LTR to design a PCR-based assay diagnostic for this common integration site. Analysis revealed the presence of the same integration site in four out of twelve human primary fibroblast clones infected with this specific retroviral vector, and in one out of twelve human primary myoblast clones infected with a second retroviral vector. Further analysis revealed the common integration site to be a previously unreported primate repeat present in monkey and human genomes and absent from rodent, bovine and avian genomes.

  18. Factors Determining the Risk of Inadvertent Retroviral Transduction of Male Germ Cells After In Utero Gene Transfer in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul J.; Colletti, Evan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Wood, Josh A.; Tellez, Joe; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The possibility of permanent genetic changes to the germline is central to the bioethics of in utero gene therapy (IUGT) because of the concern of inadvertent potentially deleterious alterations to the gene pool. Despite presumed protection of the male germline due to early germ cell (GC) compartmentalization, we reported that GCs within the developing ovine testes are transduced at low levels after retrovirus-mediated IUGT, thus underscoring the need for a thorough understanding of GC development in clinically predictive models to determine the optimal time to perform IUGT and avoid germline modification. In the present studies, we used the fetal sheep model to analyze GCs for phenotype, location, proliferation, and incidence of transduction after IUGT at various fetal ages to learn when during development the nascent germline is likely to be at greatest risk of retrovirus-mediated alteration. Our studies show that although GCs were transduced at all injection ages, the levels of transduction varied by nearly 700-fold as a function of the age at transfer. After remaining largely quiescent as they migrated to/settled within nascent sex cords, GCs began active cycling before cord closure was complete, suggesting this is likely the point at which they would be most susceptible to retroviral transduction. Furthermore, we observed that compartmentalization of GCs continued into early postnatal life, suggesting the male germline may be vulnerable to low-level inadvertent retroviral vector modification throughout fetal life, but that this risk can be minimized by performing IUGT later in gestation. PMID:19301473

  19. Factors determining the risk of inadvertent retroviral transduction of male germ cells after in utero gene transfer in sheep.

    PubMed

    Park, Paul J; Colletti, Evan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Wood, Josh A; Tellez, Joe; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Porada, Christopher

    2009-03-01

    The possibility of permanent genetic changes to the germline is central to the bioethics of in utero gene therapy (IUGT) because of the concern of inadvertent potentially deleterious alterations to the gene pool. Despite presumed protection of the male germline due to early germ cell (GC) compartmentalization, we reported that GCs within the developing ovine testes are transduced at low levels after retrovirus-mediated IUGT, thus underscoring the need for a thorough understanding of GC development in clinically predictive models to determine the optimal time to perform IUGT and avoid germline modification. In the present studies, we used the fetal sheep model to analyze GCs for phenotype, location, proliferation, and incidence of transduction after IUGT at various fetal ages to learn when during development the nascent germline is likely to be at greatest risk of retrovirus-mediated alteration. Our studies show that although GCs were transduced at all injection ages, the levels of transduction varied by nearly 700-fold as a function of the age at transfer. After remaining largely quiescent as they migrated to/settled within nascent sex cords, GCs began active cycling before cord closure was complete, suggesting this is likely the point at which they would be most susceptible to retroviral transduction.Furthermore, we observed that compartmentalization of GCs continued into early postnatal life, suggesting the male germline may be vulnerable to low-level inadvertent retroviral vector modification throughout fetal life, but that this risk can be minimized by performing IUGT later in gestation. PMID:19301473

  20. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AND CYTOKINE DIRECTED THERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is an episode of overwhelming inflammation that occurs most commonly in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is characterized by expansion and activation of T lymphocytes and hemophagocytic macrophages, and bears great similarity to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). This disorder has substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is frequently a delay in recognition and initiation of treatment. Here, we will review what is known about the pathogenesis of MAS and in particular its similarities to HLH. The development of MAS is characterized by a cytokine storm, with the elaboration of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. We will examine the evidence for various cytokines in the initiation and pathogenesis of MAS, and discuss how new biologic therapies may alter the risk of MAS. Finally we will review current treatment options for MAS, and examine how cytokine-directed therapy could serve as novel treatment modalities. PMID:24974063

  1. Medical Therapy of Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Martin; Schmidt, Carsten; Teich, Niels; Stallmach, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Medical therapy of mild and moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) of any extent is evidence-based and standardized by national and international guidelines. However, patients with steroid-refractory UC still represent a challenge. Methods A literature search using PubMed (search terms: ulcerative colitis, therapy, new, 1-2008-2015) resulted in 821 publications. For the current article, 88 citations were extracted including 36 randomized controlled studies, 18 reviews, and 8 meta-analyses. Results In steroid-refractory UC, early intensive therapy using anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies or the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine and tacrolimus is indicated in any case to prevent progression to a toxic megacolon and/or to avoid proctocolectomy. In patients with chronic disease activity, treatment with anti-TNF antibodies has a higher level of evidence than azathioprine therapy and should therefore be preferred. However, there is a subgroup of UC patients who may achieve prolonged steroid-free remission on azathioprine monotherapy. The importance of vedolizumab, a newly registered inhibiting antibody against integrin, has not yet been fully clarified since direct comparison studies are lacking, in particular in relation to anti-TNF antibodies. Conclusion There is a great need for additional innovative therapies, especially in cases of primary non-response or secondary loss of response to anti-TNF antibodies. New small molecules (Janus kinase inhibitors) are promising with an acceptable safety profile and efficacy in UC. Further, strategies that target the intestinal microbiome are currently considered for patients with active or relapsing UC, and may in the future open up new therapeutic options. PMID:26557831

  2. Active music therapy and Parkinson's disease: methods.

    PubMed

    Pacchetti, C; Aglieri, R; Mancini, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G

    1998-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is an unconventional, multisensorial therapy poorly assessed in medical care but widely used to different ends in a variety of settings. MT has two branches: active and passive. In active MT the utilisation of instruments is structured to correspond to all sensory organs so as to obtain suitable motor and emotional responses. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effects of MT in the neurorehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), a common degenerative disorder involving movement and emotional impairment. Sixteen PD patients took part in 13 weekly sessions of MT each lasting 2 hours. At the beginning and at the end of the session, every 2 weeks, the patients were evaluated by a neurologist, who assessed PD severity with UPDRS, emotional functions with Happiness Measures (HM) and quality of life using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL). After every session a significant improvement in motor function, particularly in relation to hypokinesia, was observed both in the overall and in the pre-post session evaluations. HM, UPDRS-ADL and PDQL changes confirmed an improving effect of MT on emotional functions, activities of daily living and quality of life. In conclusion, active MT, operating at a multisensorial level, stimulates motor, affective and behavioural functions. Finally, we propose active MT as new method to include in PD rehabilitation programmes. This article describes the methods adopted during MT sessions with PD patients. PMID:9584875

  3. Activation of endogenous human stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs) and therapy-resistant phenotypes of malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-07-01

    Recent reports revealed consistent activation of specific endogenous retroviral elements in human preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cells. Activity of stem cell associated retroviruses (SCARs) has been implicated in seeding thousands of human-specific regulatory sequences in the hESC genome. Activation of specific SCARs has been demonstrated in patients diagnosed with multiple types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders, and appears associated with clinically lethal therapy resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes in a sub-set of cancer patients diagnosed with different types of malignant tumors. A hallmark feature of human-specific SCAR integration sites is deletions of ancestral DNA. Analysis of human-specific genetic loci of SCARs' stemness networks in tumor samples of TCGA cohorts representing 29 cancer types suggests that this approach may facilitate identification of pan-cancer genomic signatures of clinically-lethal disease defined by the presence of somatic non-silent mutations, gene-level copy number changes, and transcripts and proteins' expression of SCAR-regulated host genes. Present analyses indicate that multiple lines of strong circumstantial evidence support the hypothesis that activation of SCARs' networks may play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, perhaps contributing to the emergence of clinically-lethal therapy-resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes. PMID:27084523

  4. Use of intron-disrupted polyadenylation sites to enhance expression and safety of retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Ismail, S I; Rohll, J B; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Uden, M

    2001-01-01

    Normal mRNA polyadenylation signals are composed of an AAUAAA motif and G/U box spaced 20 to 30 bp apart. If this spacing is increased further, then polyadenylation is disrupted. Previously it has been demonstrated that insertion of an intron will similarly disrupt this signal even though such introns are removed during a nuclear splicing reaction (X. Liu and J. Mertz, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:5256-5263, 1993). This observation has led to the suggestion that polyadenylation site selection is undertaken prior to intron excision. We now present results that both support and extend these observations and in doing so create a novel class of retroviral expression vector with improved qualities. We found that when an intron-disrupted polyadenylation signal is inserted within a retroviral expression vector, such a signal, although reformed in the producer cell, remains benign until transduction, where it is then preferentially used. Thus, we demonstrate that upon transduction these vectors now produce a majority of shortened subgenomic species and as a consequence have a reduced tendency for subsequent mobilization from transduced cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the use of this internal signal leads to enhanced expression from such vectors and that this is achieved without any loss in titer. Therefore, split polyadenylation signals confer enhanced performance and improved safety upon retroviral expression vectors into which they are inserted. Such split signals may prove useful for the future optimization of retroviral vectors in gene therapy. PMID:11119589

  5. Use of Intron-Disrupted Polyadenylation Sites To Enhance Expression and Safety of Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Said I.; Rohll, Jonathan B.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Kingsman, Alan J.; Uden, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Normal mRNA polyadenylation signals are composed of an AAUAAA motif and G/U box spaced 20 to 30 bp apart. If this spacing is increased further, then polyadenylation is disrupted. Previously it has been demonstrated that insertion of an intron will similarly disrupt this signal even though such introns are removed during a nuclear splicing reaction (X. Liu and J. Mertz, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:5256–5263, 1993). This observation has led to the suggestion that polyadenylation site selection is undertaken prior to intron excision. We now present results that both support and extend these observations and in doing so create a novel class of retroviral expression vector with improved qualities. We found that when an intron-disrupted polyadenylation signal is inserted within a retroviral expression vector, such a signal, although reformed in the producer cell, remains benign until transduction, where it is then preferentially used. Thus, we demonstrate that upon transduction these vectors now produce a majority of shortened subgenomic species and as a consequence have a reduced tendency for subsequent mobilization from transduced cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the use of this internal signal leads to enhanced expression from such vectors and that this is achieved without any loss in titer. Therefore, split polyadenylation signals confer enhanced performance and improved safety upon retroviral expression vectors into which they are inserted. Such split signals may prove useful for the future optimization of retroviral vectors in gene therapy. PMID:11119589

  6. Workshop on photon activation therapy: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-04-18

    This Workshop was held concurrently with an IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on Exploration of the Possibility of High-LET Radiation for Non-conventional Radiotherapy in Cancer. The Workshop on Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) was given as a special session on April 18, as it was thoght PAT might eventually be found to be attractive to developing countries, which is a major concern of the IAEA. An effort was made to bring together representatives of the various groups known to be actively working on PAT; these included investigators from Sweden and Japan as well as the US. It is hoped that this compendium of papers will be of use to those currently active in this developing field, as well as to those who might join this area of endeavor in the future.

  7. Biochemical Basis of Immunological and Retroviral Responses to DNA-targeted Cytosine Deamination by Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase and APOBEC3G*

    PubMed Central

    Chelico, Linda; Pham, Phuong; Petruska, John; Goodman, Myron F.

    2009-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and APOBEC3G catalyze deamination of cytosine to uracil on single-stranded DNA, thereby setting in motion a regulated hypermutagenic process essential for human well-being. However, if regulation fails, havoc ensues. AID plays a central role in the synthesis of high affinity antibodies, and APOBEC3G inactivates human immunodeficiency virus-1. This minireview highlights biochemical and structural properties of AID and APOBEC3G, showing how studies using the purified enzymes provide valuable insight into the considerably more complex biology governing antibody generation and human immunodeficiency virus inactivation. PMID:19684020

  8. Retroviral RNA identified in the cerebrospinal fluids and brains of individuals with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Håkan; Bachmann, Silke; Schröder, Johannes; McArthur, Justin; Torrey, E. Fuller; Yolken, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious brain disease of uncertain etiology. A role for retroviruses in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of schizophrenia has been postulated on the basis of clinical and epidemiological observations. We found sequences homologous to retroviral pol genes in the cell-free cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs) of 10 of 35 (29%) individuals with recent-onset schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Retroviral sequences also were identified in the CSFs of 1 of 20 individuals with chronic schizophrenia. However, retroviral sequences were not identified in any of the CSFs obtained from 22 individuals with noninflammatory neurological diseases or from 30 individuals without evidence of neurological or psychiatric diseases (χ2 = 19.25, P < 0.001). The nucleotide sequences identified in the CSFs of the individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were related to those of the human endogenous retroviral (HERV)-W family of endogenous retroviruses and to other retroviruses in the murine leukemia virus genus. Transcription of RNA homologous to members of the HERV-W family of retroviruses also was found to be up-regulated differentially in the frontal cortex regions of brains obtained postmortem from individuals with schizophrenia, as compared with corresponding tissue from individuals without psychiatric diseases. The transcriptional activation of certain retroviral elements within the central nervous system may be associated with the development of schizophrenia in at least some individuals. The further characterization of retroviral elements within the central nervous system of individuals with schizophrenia might lead to improved methods for the diagnosis and management of this disorder. PMID:11296294

  9. Molecular Architecture of the Retroviral Capsid.

    PubMed

    Perilla, Juan R; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-05-01

    Retroviral capsid cores are proteinaceous containers that self-assemble to encase the viral genome and a handful of proteins that promote infection. Their function is to protect and aid in the delivery of viral genes to the nucleus of the host, and, in many cases, infection pathways are influenced by capsid-cellular interactions. From a mathematical perspective, capsid cores are polyhedral cages and, as such, follow well-defined geometric rules. However, marked morphological differences in shapes exist, depending on virus type. Given the specific roles of capsid in the viral life cycle, the availability of detailed molecular structures, particularly at assembly interfaces, opens novel avenues for targeted drug development against these pathogens. Here, we summarize recent advances in the structure and understanding of retroviral capsid, with particular emphasis on assemblies and the capsid cores. PMID:27039020

  10. HIV-Associated Lung Cancer in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    Pakkala, Suchita; Chen, Zhengjia; Rimland, David; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Gunthel, Clifford; Brandes, Johann R.; Saba, Nabil R.; Shin, Dong M.; Curran, Walter J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) defining malignancies. Since highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has improved survival for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients, we evaluated lung cancer outcomes in the HAART era. Methods HIV-positive patients diagnosed with lung cancer in our institution during the HAART era (1995-2008) were analyzed. Patient charts were reviewed for clinical and laboratory data. CD4 count at diagnosis was treated as a continuous variable and subcategorized into distinct variables with 3 cut-off points (50, 200, & 500 μl). Pearson’s correlation coefficients were estimated for each covariate studied. Survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Out of 80 patients, 73 had non-small cell lung cancer. Baseline characteristics were: median age-52 yrs; male-80%; African American-84%; injection drug use-25%; smokers-100%; and prior exposure to antiretroviral agents-55%. Mean CD4 count and viral load were 304 μL and 82,420 copies/ml, respectively at cancer diagnosis. The latency between diagnosis of HIV and lung cancer was significantly shorter in women (4.1 yrs vs. 7.7 yrs, P=0.02) and 71% of the patients received anti-cancer therapy. The 1- and 3-year survival rates were 31% and 4% overall. Grade 3/4 toxicities occurred in 60% with chemo-radiation vs. 36% with chemotherapy. Cancer-related survival was better for patients with CD4 count >200 (P=0.0298) and >500 (P=0.0076). Conclusions The latency from diagnosis of HIV to lung cancer was significantly shorter for women. Although outcomes for lung cancer patients with HIV remain poor, high CD4 count is associated with an improved lung cancer-related survival. PMID:21713759

  11. The design of artificial retroviral restriction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Melvyn W.; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Taylor, Ian A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.

    2007-09-01

    In addition to the ability to bind the retroviral capsid protein, the retroviral restriction factors Fv1, Trim5{alpha} and Trim5-CypA share the common property of containing sequences that promote self-association. Otherwise Fv1 and Trim5{alpha} appear unrelated. Mutational analyses showed that restriction was invariably lost when changes designed to disrupt the sequences responsible for multimerization were introduced. A novel restriction protein could be obtained by substituting sequences from the self-associating domain of Fv1 for the Trim5 sequences in Trim5-CypA. Similarly, a fusion protein containing cyclophilin A joined to arfaptin2, a protein known to form extended dimers, was also shown to restrict HIV-1. Hence, multimerization of a capsid-binding domain could be the common minimum design feature for capsid-dependent retroviral restriction factors. However, not all domains that promote multimerization can substitute for the N-terminal domains of Fv1 and Trim5{alpha}. Moreover, only CypA can provide a capsid-binding site with different N-terminal domains. It is suggested that the spatial relationship between the multiple target binding sites may be important for restriction.

  12. Retroviral DNA Transposition: Themes and Variations

    PubMed Central

    Skalka, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons are transposable elements that encapsidate the RNAs that are intermediates in the transposition of DNA copies of their genomes (proviruses), from one cell (or one locus) to another. Mechanistic similarities in DNA transposase enzymes and retroviral/retrotransposon integrases underscore the close evolutionary relationship among these elements. The retroviruses are very ancient infectious agents, presumed to have evolved from Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons (1), and DNA copies of their sequences can be found embedded in the genomes of most, if not all, members of the tree of life. All retroviruses share a specific gene arrangement and similar replication strategies. However, given their ancestries and occupation of diverse evolutionary niches, it should not be surprising that unique sequences have been acquired in some retroviral genomes and that the details of the mechanism by which their transposition is accomplished can vary. While every step in the retrovirus lifecycle is, in some sense, relevant to transposition, this Chapter focuses mainly on the early phase of retroviral replication, during which viral DNA is synthesized and integrated into its host genome. Some of the initial studies that set the stage for current understanding are highlighted, as well as more recent findings obtained through use of an ever-expanding technological toolbox including genomics, proteomics, and siRNA screening. Persistence in the area of structural biology has provided new insight into conserved mechanisms as well as variations in detail among retroviruses, which can also be instructive. PMID:25844274

  13. Exploring Group Activity Therapy with Ethnically Diverse Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paone, Tina R.; Malott, Krista M.; Maldonado, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    Group activity therapy has been promoted as an effective means of providing growth opportunities for adolescents through the use of structured, developmentally appropriate activities in a group setting. This article qualitatively explores outcomes of 12 sessions of group activity therapy with ethnically diverse adolescents in a school setting. The…

  14. XPB mediated retroviral cDNA degradation coincides with entry to the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, Kristine E.; Roddick, William; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Fishel, Richard

    2011-02-20

    Retroviruses must integrate their cDNA to a host chromosome, but a significant fraction of retroviral cDNA is degraded before integration. XPB and XPD are part of the TFIIH complex which mediates basal transcription and DNA nucleotide excision repair. Retroviral infection increases when XPB or XPD are mutant. Here we show that inhibition of mRNA or protein synthesis does not affect HIV cDNA accumulation suggesting that TFIIH transcription activity is not required for degradation. Other host factors implicated in the stability of cDNA are not components of the XPB and XPD degradation pathway. Although an increase of retroviral cDNA in XPB or XPD mutant cells correlates with an increase of integrated provirus, the integration efficiency of pre-integration complexes is unaffected. Finally, HIV and MMLV cDNA degradation appears to coincide with nuclear import. These results suggest that TFIIH mediated cDNA degradation is a nuclear host defense against retroviral infection.

  15. Spinal Manipulative Therapy and Somatosensory Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Joel G; Bolton, Philip S

    2012-01-01

    Manually-applied movement and mobilisation of body parts as a healing activity has been used for centuries. A relatively high velocity, low amplitude force applied to the vertebral column with therapeutic intent, referred to as spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), is one such activity. It is most commonly used by chiropractors, but other healthcare practitioners including osteopaths and physiotherapists also perform SMT. The mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effects of SMT remain unclear. Early theories proposed that the nervous system mediates the effects of SMT. The goal of this article is to briefly update our knowledge regarding several physical characteristics of an applied SMT, and review what is known about the signalling characteristics of sensory neurons innervating the vertebral column in response to spinal manipulation. Based upon the experimental literature, we propose that SMT may produce a sustained change in the synaptic efficacy of central neurons by evoking a high frequency, bursting discharge from several types of dynamically-sensitive, mechanosensitive paraspinal primary afferent neurons. PMID:22349622

  16. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Gilski, Miroslaw; Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Krzywda, Szymon; Zábranská, Helena; Cooper, Seth; Popović, Zoran; Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Pichová, Iva; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2011-11-01

    The crystal structure of Mason–Pfizer monkey virus protease folded as a monomer has been solved by molecular replacement using a model generated by players of the online game Foldit. The structure shows at high resolution the details of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer which can guide rational design of protease dimerization inhibitors as retroviral drugs. Mason–Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), a D-type retrovirus assembling in the cytoplasm, causes simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus monkeys. Its pepsin-like aspartic protease (retropepsin) is an integral part of the expressed retroviral polyproteins. As in all retroviral life cycles, release and dimerization of the protease (PR) is strictly required for polyprotein processing and virion maturation. Biophysical and NMR studies have indicated that in the absence of substrates or inhibitors M-PMV PR should fold into a stable monomer, but the crystal structure of this protein could not be solved by molecular replacement despite countless attempts. Ultimately, a solution was obtained in mr-rosetta using a model constructed by players of the online protein-folding game Foldit. The structure indeed shows a monomeric protein, with the N- and C-termini completely disordered. On the other hand, the flap loop, which normally gates access to the active site of homodimeric retropepsins, is clearly traceable in the electron density. The flap has an unusual curled shape and a different orientation from both the open and closed states known from dimeric retropepsins. The overall fold of the protein follows the retropepsin canon, but the C{sup α} deviations are large and the active-site ‘DTG’ loop (here NTG) deviates up to 2.7 Å from the standard conformation. This structure of a monomeric retropepsin determined at high resolution (1.6 Å) provides important extra information for the design of dimerization inhibitors that might be developed as drugs for the treatment of retroviral infections

  17. Retroviral interleukin 1alpha gene transfer in bone marrow stromal cells in a primate model: induction of myelopoiesis stimulation.

    PubMed

    de Revel, Thierry; Becard, Nicolas; Sorg, Tania; Rousseau, Sandrine; Spano, Jean Philippe; Thiebot, Hugues; Methali, Magid; Gras, Gabriel; Le Grand, Roger; Dormont, Dominique

    2002-09-01

    Effects of interleukin 1-alpha (IL-1alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic activity, in the myelopoietic setting, is mainly linked to its ability to increase haematopoietic growth factor production by bone marrow stromal cells. In order to minimize systemic effects of IL-1alpha therapy, we proposed a model of retroviral IL-1alpha gene transfer within bone marrow stromal cells in the macaque cynomolgus. Invitro, 10-15% of bone marrow stromal cells was effectively transduced by retroviral vector (murine Moloney leukaemia virus-derived) expressing IL-1alpha/LacZ, or LacZ alone as control marker, as assessed by betaGal staining. IL-1alpha gene expression was upregulated [semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)] within the transduced cells and the cell supernatant showed an increased production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and an increased clonogenic activity (colony-forming cell assay). Ex vivo autologous expanded IL-1alpha/LacZ transduced bone marrow stromal cells were reinfused in two macaques (and two control animals for LacZ alone as controls), without clinical systemic toxicity; LacZ expression by RT-PCR was detected in one animal of each group between d 4 and 9. A slight increase of the peripheral blood leucocyte counts (both polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes) of the two animals transduced with IL-1alpha/LacZ was observed within 10 d, indicating stimulation of myelopoiesis. PMID:12181061

  18. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk. PMID:21871974

  19. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    PubMed

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand recombination (strand displacement/assimilation model), and shift plus-strand recombination towards the 3' end of the genome. However, we found that while gamma irradiation of virions reduced the amount of recoverable viral RNA, it did not primarily cause breaks. Thus, the frequency of selected recombinants was not significantly altered with greater doses of radiation. In spite of this, the irradiation did decrease the number of recombinants with only one internal template switch. As a result, the average number of additional internal template switches in the recombinant proviruses increased from 0.7 to 1.4 as infectivity decreased to 6%. The unselected internal template switches tended to be 5' of the selected crossover even in the recombinants from irradiated viruses, inconsistent with a plus-strand recombination mechanism. PMID:1602553

  20. Passive Immunotherapy for Retroviral Disease: Influence of Major Histocompatibility Complex Type and T-Cell Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Brooks, Diane M.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1995-11-01

    Administration of virus-specific antibodies is known to be an effective early treatment for some viral infections. Such immunotherapy probably acts by antibody-mediated neutralization of viral infectivity and is often thought to function independently of T-cell-mediated immune responses. In the present experiments, we studied passive antibody therapy using Friend murine leukemia virus complex as a model for an immunosuppressive retroviral disease in adult mice. The results showed that antibody therapy could induce recovery from a well-established retroviral infection. However, the success of therapy was dependent on the presence of both CD4^+ and CD8^+ T lymphocytes. Thus, cell-mediated responses were required for recovery from infection even in the presence of therapeutic levels of antibody. The major histocompatibility type of the mice was also an important factor determining the relative success of antibody therapy in this system, but it was less critical for low-dose than for high-dose infections. Our results imply that limited T-cell responsiveness as dictated by major histocompatibility genes and/or stage of disease may have contributed to previous immunotherapy failures in AIDS patients. Possible strategies to improve the efficacy of future therapies are discussed.

  1. The Effect of Life History on Retroviral Genome Invasions

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Ravinder K.; Coulson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERV), or the remnants of past retroviral infections that are no longer active, are found in the genomes of most vertebrates, typically constituting approximately 10% of the genome. In some vertebrates, particularly in shorter-lived species like rodents, it is not unusual to find active endogenous retroviruses. In longer-lived species, including humans where substantial effort has been invested in searching for active ERVs, it is unusual to find them; to date none have been found in humans. Presumably the chance of detecting an active ERV infection is a function of the length of an ERV epidemic. Intuitively, given that ERVs or signatures of past ERV infections are passed from parents to offspring, we might expect to detect more active ERVs in species with longer generation times, as it should take more years for an infection to run its course in longer than in shorter lived species. This means the observation of more active ERV infections in shorter compared to longer-lived species is paradoxical. We explore this paradox using a modeling approach to investigate factors that influence ERV epidemic length. Our simple epidemiological model may explain why we find evidence of active ERV infections in shorter rather than longer-lived species. PMID:25692467

  2. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  3. Efavirenz does not cause false-positive urine cannabis test in HIV-infected patients on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Koh, K C; Lee, W Y; Eh, Z W; Nor Julaika, I; Tee, P S; Azizon, O; Thilageswary, M

    2013-06-01

    Efavirenz is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used in combination with other drugs for the treatment of patients with HIV infection. Efavirenz has been reported to cause a positive urine cannabis test reaction which may create problems between HIV-infected patients on Efavirenz and law enforcement agencies. Doctors are at loss whether to issue documents certifying the potential false positive urine cannabis test with Efavirenz to patients. We investigated if the urine of HIV-infected patients on Efavirenz caused a positive urine cannabis test using the AxSYM Cannabinoids Assay®. Urine samples from 51 eligible patients on Efavirenz were tested for cannabis. All tested negative except for one who had used cannabis the day before. Efavirenz does not cause false positive urine cannabis test with the AxSYM Cannabinoids Assay®. Certification documents from doctors are therefore unnecessary. PMID:23749016

  4. Membrane interaction of retroviral Gag proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Robert A.; Vogt, Volker M.

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of an infectious retroviral particle relies on multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The three domains of Gag common to all retroviruses – MA, CA, and NC – provide the signals for membrane binding, assembly, and viral RNA packaging, respectively. These signals do not function independently of one another. For example, Gag multimerization enhances membrane binding and is more efficient when NC is interacting with RNA. MA binding to the plasma membrane is governed by several principles, including electrostatics, recognition of specific lipid head groups, hydrophobic interactions, and membrane order. HIV-1 uses many of these principles while Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) appears to use fewer. This review describes the principles that govern Gag interactions with membranes, focusing on RSV and HIV-1 Gag. The review also defines lipid and membrane behavior, and discusses the complexities in determining how lipid and membrane behavior impact Gag membrane binding. PMID:24808894

  5. Retroviral infections transmitted by blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, S. G.; Fang, C.; Williams, A.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications in donor screening and the introduction of laboratory testing of donated blood for anti-HIV-1 and anti-HTLV-I have resulted in a significant reduction in the risks of retroviral infections from blood transfusion. Presently, the American Red Cross detects an average of eight carriers of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) per 100,000 otherwise acceptable blood donors (0.008 percent), compared with an average of 35 per 100,000 (0.035 percent) when testing for HIV-1 antibodies began in 1985. Surveillance studies in the United States indicate a small likelihood that HIV-2 carriers will pass current screening procedures and be accepted as blood donors. Even if an HIV-2-infected person were to be accepted as a blood donor, there is a 42-92 percent likelihood that this person's blood would be detected as infective for HIV-2 and excluded because of serological cross-reactions that occur in the EIA for HIV-1 antibodies. During 1989, which was the first year that donated blood was routinely tested for antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus, type I (HTLV-I) in the United States, approximately nine in 100,000 donors (0.009 percent) were confirmed positive for antibodies to HTLV-I, and their donated blood was excluded. Subsequent testing has revealed that a significant number of these persons whose sera was reactive by the HTLV-I EIA were, in fact, infected by HTLV-II. Epidemiological studies of human retroviral infections (HIV-1, HIV-2, HTLV-I, and HTLV-II) continue to provide important data and direction for improving criteria for qualifying blood donors. PMID:1981409

  6. Hypoxia- and radiation-inducible, breast cell-specific targeting of retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnik, Karoline; Greco, Olga; Scott, Simon; Knapp, Elzbieta; Mayrhofer, Elisabeth; Rosenfellner, Doris; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Hohenadl, Christine . E-mail: christine.hohenadl@vu-wien.ac.at

    2006-05-25

    To facilitate a more efficient radiation and chemotherapy of mammary tumours, synthetic enhancer elements responsive to hypoxia and ionizing radiation were coupled to the mammary-specific minimal promoter of the murine whey acidic protein (WAP) encoding gene. The modified WAP promoter was introduced into a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon) vector. Expression of a transduced reporter gene in response to hypoxia and radiation was analysed in stably infected mammary cancer cell lines and an up to 9-fold increase in gene expression demonstrated in comparison to the respective basic vector. Expression analyses in vitro, moreover, demonstrated a widely preserved mammary cell-specific promoter activity. For in vivo analyses, xenograft tumours consisting of infected human mammary adenocarcinoma cells were established in SCID/beige mice. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a hypoxia-specific, markedly increased WAP promoter-driven expression in these tumours. Thus, this retroviral vector will facilitate a targeted gene therapeutic approach exploiting the unique environmental condition in solid tumours.

  7. Targeted transgene insertion into the CHO cell genome using Cre recombinase-incorporating integrase-defective retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Shimomura, Takuya; Huang, Shuohao; Imanishi, Suguru; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2016-07-01

    Retroviral vectors have served as efficient gene delivery tools in various biotechnology fields. However, viral DNA is randomly inserted into the genome, which can cause problems, such as insertional mutagenesis and gene silencing. Previously, we reported a site-specific gene integration system, in which a transgene is integrated into a predetermined chromosomal locus of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using integrase-defective retroviral vectors (IDRVs) and Cre recombinase. In this system, a Cre expression plasmid is transfected into founder cells before retroviral transduction. In practical applications of site-specific gene modification such as for hard-to-transfect cells or for in vivo gene delivery, both the transgene and the Cre protein into retroviral virions should be encapsulate. Here, we generated novel hybrid IDRVs in which viral genome and enzymatically active Cre can be delivered (Cre-IDRVs). Cre-IDRVs encoding marker genes, neomycin resistance and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), flanked by wild-type and mutated loxP sites were produced using an expression plasmid for a chimeric protein of Cre and retroviral gag-pol. After analyzing the incorporation of the Cre protein into retroviral virions by Western blotting, the Cre-IDRV was infected into founder CHO cells, in which marker genes (hygromycin resistance and red fluorescent protein) flanked with corresponding loxP sites are introduced into the genome. G418-resistant colonies expressing GFP appeared and the site-specific integration of the transgene into the expected chromosomal site was confirmed by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Moreover, when Cre-IDRV carried a gene expression unit for a recombinant antibody, the recombinant cells in which the antibody expression cassette was integrated in a site-specific manner were generated and the cells produced the recombinant antibody. This method may provide a promising tool to perform site-specific gene modification according to Cre

  8. Retroviral induction of GSK-3β expression blocks the stimulatory action of physical exercise on the maturation of newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Martín, María; Teixeira, Catia M; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Soya, Hideaki; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is a key process for certain types of hippocampal-dependent learning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by memory deficits related to alterations in AHN. Given that the increased activity of GSK-3β has been related to alterations in the population of hippocampal granule neurons in AD patients, we designed a novel methodology by which to induce selective GSK-3β overexpression exclusively in newborn granule neurons. To this end, we injected an rtTA-IRES-EGFP-expressing retrovirus into the hippocampus of tTO-GSK-3β mice. Using this novel retroviral strategy, we found that GSK-3β caused a cell-autonomous impairment of the morphological and synaptic maturation of newborn neurons. In addition, we examined whether GSK-3β overexpression in newborn neurons limits the effects of physical activity. While physical exercise increased the number of dendritic spines, the percentage of mushroom spines, and the head diameter of the same in tet-OFF cells, these effects were not triggered in tet-ON cells. This observation suggests that GSK-3β blocks the stimulatory actions of exercise. Given that the activity of GSK-3β is increased in the brains of individuals with AD, these data may be relevant for non-pharmacological therapies for AD. PMID:27010990

  9. A longitudinal evaluation of the impact of a polylactic acid injection therapy on health related quality of life amongst HIV patients treated with anti-retroviral agents under real conditions of use

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many HIV patients receiving antiretroviral treatment develop lipodystrophy. NEW-FILL® is a polylactic acid injected to treat facial lipoatrophy. The objectives of this study were to describe (1) change in quality of life (QoL) of HIV patients treated with NEW-FILL® in the management of facial lipoatrophy; (2) efficacy of NEW-FILL® using facial photographs and (3) a patient-reported “Overall Treatment Effect” (OTE) scale; and (4) safety of NEW-FILL®. Methods Doctors from 13 treatment centres recruited 230 HIV patients to receive up to 5 sessions of NEW-FILL® injections. Patients self-reported QoL with the ABCD questionnaire before the first set of injections, at 2 months and at 12 to 18 months after the last session of injections. Efficacy was evaluated at each interval through photographs and OTE scale. Safety was evaluated via Case Report Form (CRF) data. Results 64.4% of patients reported QoL improvements of >10% at 2 months, and 58.8% at 12–18 months. Lipoatrophy grades improved at each visit (“no lipoatrophy” or “limited lipoatrophy”: 20.3% at inclusion, 77.4% at 2 months, 58.4% at 12–18 months). Average OTE scores of 5.3 and 5.0 at 2 and 12–18 months indicated “moderate improvement”. Minimum Important Difference (MID) in QoL score was 7.1 points at 2 months; 7.4 points at 12–18 months. For 911 injection sessions performed, 3.4% resulted in “immediate” adverse events, 7% in “non-immediate” events, and 1.7% in “other” events. Conclusions Improvements to quality of life and diminished lipoatrophy visibility were observed in the months immediately following NEW-FILL® treatment and were maintained 12–18 months post-treatment. Most adverse events were mild and transient. ABCD MID thresholds provide clinicians with means to assess the impact of lipoatrophy therapies on QoL. PMID:23425246

  10. Genetic variation of the HIV-1 integrase region in newly diagnosed anti-retroviral drug-naïve patients with HIV/AIDS in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-Y; Kim, E-J; Choi, J-Y; Kwon, O-K; Kim, G J; Choi, S Y; Kim, S S

    2011-08-01

    The survival time of HIV/AIDS patients in Korea has increased since HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy) was introduced. However, the occurrence of drug-resistant strains requires new anti-retroviral drugs, one of which, an integrase inhibitor (INI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2007. INIs have been used for therapy in many countries and are about to be employed in Korea. Therefore, it is important to identify basic mutant variants prior to the introduction of INIs in order to estimate their efficacy. To monitor potential drug-resistant INI mutations in Korean HIV/AIDS patients, the polymorphism of the int gene was investigated together with the pol gene using a genotypic assay for 75 randomly selected Korean HIV-1 patients newly diagnosed in 2007. The drug-resistant mutation sequences were analysed using the Stanford HIV DB and the International AIDS Society resistance testing-USA panel (IAS-USA). Seventy strains of Korean subtype B were compared with foreign subtype-B strains, and there were no significantly different variants of the int gene region in the study population. Major mutation sites in the integrase (E92Q, F121Y, G140A/S, Y143C/R, Q148H/R/K and N155H) were not detected, and only a few minor mutation sites (L74M, V151I, E157Q, V165I, I203M, S230N and D232N) were identified in 21 strains (28%). Resistance due to mutations in the pol gene was observed in a single strain (1.3%) resistant to protease inhibitors (PIs) and in four strains (5.3%) resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs). In summary, this demonstrates that INIs will be susceptible to drug naïve HIV/AIDS patients in Korea. PMID:20946407

  11. Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Carradec, Quentin; Souquere, Sylvie; Mulot, Baptiste; Catzeflis, François; Nilsson, Maria A; Menzies, Brandon R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Pierron, Gérard; Zeller, Ulrich; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Syncytins are genes of retroviral origin captured by eutherian mammals, with a role in placentation. Here we show that some marsupials-which are the closest living relatives to eutherian mammals, although they diverged from the latter ∼190 Mya-also possess a syncytin gene. The gene identified in the South American marsupial opossum and dubbed syncytin-Opo1 has all of the characteristic features of a bona fide syncytin gene: It is fusogenic in an ex vivo cell-cell fusion assay; it is specifically expressed in the short-lived placenta at the level of the syncytial feto-maternal interface; and it is conserved in a functional state in a series of Monodelphis species. We further identify a nonfusogenic retroviral envelope gene that has been conserved for >80 My of evolution among all marsupials (including the opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby), with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of a canonical immunosuppressive domain, but with only limited expression in the placenta. This unusual captured gene, together with a third class of envelope genes from recently endogenized retroviruses-displaying strong expression in the uterine glands where retroviral particles can be detected-plausibly correspond to the different evolutionary statuses of a captured retroviral envelope gene, with only syncytin-Opo1 being the present-day bona fide syncytin active in the opossum and related species. This study would accordingly recapitulate the natural history of syncytin exaptation and evolution in a single species, and definitely extends the presence of such genes to all major placental mammalian clades. PMID:25605903

  12. Retroviral envelope gene captures and syncytin exaptation for placentation in marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Carradec, Quentin; Souquere, Sylvie; Mulot, Baptiste; Catzeflis, François; Nilsson, Maria A.; Menzies, Brandon R.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Pierron, Gérard; Zeller, Ulrich; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Syncytins are genes of retroviral origin captured by eutherian mammals, with a role in placentation. Here we show that some marsupials—which are the closest living relatives to eutherian mammals, although they diverged from the latter ∼190 Mya—also possess a syncytin gene. The gene identified in the South American marsupial opossum and dubbed syncytin-Opo1 has all of the characteristic features of a bona fide syncytin gene: It is fusogenic in an ex vivo cell–cell fusion assay; it is specifically expressed in the short-lived placenta at the level of the syncytial feto–maternal interface; and it is conserved in a functional state in a series of Monodelphis species. We further identify a nonfusogenic retroviral envelope gene that has been conserved for >80 My of evolution among all marsupials (including the opossum and the Australian tammar wallaby), with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of a canonical immunosuppressive domain, but with only limited expression in the placenta. This unusual captured gene, together with a third class of envelope genes from recently endogenized retroviruses—displaying strong expression in the uterine glands where retroviral particles can be detected—plausibly correspond to the different evolutionary statuses of a captured retroviral envelope gene, with only syncytin-Opo1 being the present-day bona fide syncytin active in the opossum and related species. This study would accordingly recapitulate the natural history of syncytin exaptation and evolution in a single species, and definitely extends the presence of such genes to all major placental mammalian clades. PMID:25605903

  13. Cryo-EM reveals a novel octameric integrase structure for β-retroviral intasome function

    PubMed Central

    Ballandras-Colas, Allison; Brown, Monica; Cook, Nicola J.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Demeler, Borries; Cherepanov, Peter; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of viral DNA (vDNA) into host target (tDNA), which is an essential step in the lifecycle of all retroviruses1. Prior structural characterization of IN-vDNA complexes, or intasomes, from the spumavirus prototype foamy virus (PFV) revealed a functional IN tetramer2–5, and it is generally believed that intasomes derived from other retroviral genera will employ tetrameric IN6–9. However, the intasomes of orthoretroviruses, which include all known pathogenic species, have not been characterized structurally. Using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallography, we determine here an unexpected octameric IN architecture for the β-retrovirus mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) intasome. The structure is composed of two core IN dimers, which interact with the vDNA ends and structurally mimic the PFV IN tetramer, and two flanking IN dimers that engage the core structure via their IN C-terminal domains (CTDs). Contrary to the belief that tetrameric IN components are sufficient to catalyze integration, the flanking IN dimers were necessary for MMTV IN activity. The IN octamer solves a conundrum for the β- as well as α-retroviruses by providing critical CTDs to the intasome core that cannot be provided in cis due to evolutionarily restrictive catalytic core domain (CCD)-CTD linker regions. The octameric architecture of the MMTV intasome provides a new paradigm for the structural basis of retroviral DNA integration. PMID:26887496

  14. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doutt, Kathleen M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University offers an enrichment program (consisting of a summer session and three Saturdays) in which gifted children and children with learning disabilities are grouped together for activities. Horticulture is one of the few enrichment activities adaptable to both groups. Children are allowed to engage in the same…

  15. Successful therapy of macrophage activation syndrome with dexamethasone palmitate.

    PubMed

    Nakagishi, Yasuo; Shimizu, Masaki; Kasai, Kazuko; Miyoshi, Mari; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potential life-threatening complication of childhood systemic inflammatory disorders. Corticosteroids are commonly used as the first-line therapy for MAS. We report four patients with MAS who were successfully treated with dexamethasone palmitate (DexP), a liposome-incorporated dexamethasone, much more efficient than free corticosteroids. DexP effectively inhibited inflammation in MAS patients in whom the response to pulse methylprednisolone was not sufficient to manage their diseases. DexP was also effective as the first-line therapy for MAS. Based on these findings, DexP is an effective therapy in treating MAS patients. PMID:24754272

  16. Membrane-mediated interaction between retroviral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2012-02-01

    A retrovirus is an RNA virus that is replicated through a unique strategy of reverse transcription. Unlike regular enveloped viruses which are assembled inside the host cells, the assembly of retroviral capsids happens right on the cell membrane. During the assembly process, the partially formed capsids deform the membrane, giving rise to an elastic energy. When two such partial capsids approach each other, this elastic energy changes. Or in other words, the two partial capsids interact with each other via the membrane. This membrane mediated interaction between partial capsids plays an important role in the kinetics of the assembly process. In this work, this membrane mediated interaction is calculated both analytically and numerically. It is worth noting that the diferential equation determining the membrane shape in general nonlinear and cannot be solved analytically,except in the linear region of small deformations. And it is exactly the nonlinear regime that is important for the assembly kinetics of retroviruses as it provides a large energy barrier. The theory developed here is applicable to more generic cases of membrane mediated interactions between two membrane-embedded proteins.

  17. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Maskell, Daniel P.; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N.; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integration is catalyzed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome1,2. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (EM) reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location (SHL) ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration. PMID:26061770

  18. Positive selection of Iris, a retroviral envelope-derived host gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Malik, Harmit S; Henikoff, Steven

    2005-10-01

    Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris) was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B). Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana), a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene outside vertebrates

  19. Bioluminescence-Activated Deep-Tissue Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Rang; Kim, Seonghoon; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Homin; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Koh, Gou Young; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical energy can trigger a variety of photochemical processes useful for therapies. Owing to the shallow penetration of light in tissues, however, the clinical applications of light-activated therapies have been limited. Bioluminescence resonant energy transfer (BRET) may provide a new way of inducing photochemical activation. Here, we show that efficient bioluminescence energy-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of macroscopic tumors and metastases in deep tissue. For monolayer cell culture in vitro incubated with Chlorin e6, BRET energy of about 1 nJ per cell generated as strong cytotoxicity as red laser light irradiation at 2.2 mW/cm2 for 180 s. Regional delivery of bioluminescence agents via draining lymphatic vessels killed tumor cells spread to the sentinel and secondary lymph nodes, reduced distant metastases in the lung and improved animal survival. Our results show the promising potential of novel bioluminescence-activated PDT. PMID:26000054

  20. Use of creative activities in occupational therapy practice in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Ivarsson, Ann Britt

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of creative activities in occupational therapy in Sweden and how often Swedish occupational therapists use creative activities as a means of intervention. A web-mail survey was sent to 2975 Swedish occupational therapists working in health care at regional, county council or primary health care level, and those working in vocational rehabilitation. A total of 1867 (63%) answered the questionnaire and showed that 44% did use creative activities as a means of intervention and most often by practitioners working in psychiatric health care. The most commonly used form of creative activity was arts and crafts followed by gardening. This web-mail survey was based on a limited amount of items regarding creative activities. Further research should focus on in-depth inquiries about how occupational therapists and their patients perceive the use of creative activities as a means of treatment in occupational therapy. PMID:22489029

  1. Persistence of endometrial activity after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, D.; Heller, P.; Dames, J.; Hoskins, W.; Gallup, D.; Park, R.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation therapy is a proved treatment for cervical carcinoma; however, it destroys ovarian function and has been thought to ablate the endometrium. Estrogen replacement therapy is often prescribed for patients with cervical carcinoma after radiation therapy. A review of records of six teaching hospitals revealed 16 patients who had endometrial sampling for uterine bleeding after standard radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Fifteen patients underwent dilatation and curettage, and one patient underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy when a dilatation and curettage was unsuccessful. Six patients had fibrosis and inflammation of the endometrial cavity, seven had proliferative endometrium, one had cystic hyperplasia, one had atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, and one had adenocarcinoma. Although the number of patients who have an active endometrium after radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma is not known, this report demonstrates that proliferative endometrium may persist, and these patients may develop endometrial hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma. Studies have indicated that patients with normal endometrial glands have an increased risk of developing endometrial adenocarcinoma if they are treated with unopposed estrogen. Patients who have had radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma should be treated with estrogen and a progestational agent to avoid endometrial stimulation from unopposed estrogen therapy.

  2. Lipodystrophy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Sunil; Shashibhushan, J.; Venugopal, K.; Vishwanatha, Huggi; Menon, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, abnormal lipid deposition (both lipoatrophy and fat redistribution) and its related complications have changed from an anecdotal issue into a major problem for HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infected patients on HAART (Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy). Lipoatrophy and fat redistribution are potentially stigmatizing complications of HAART and leads to poor adherence among patients. Hence we conducted this study to determine the pattern and to assess various risk factors for maldeposition of lipids in HIV patients. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional case series study was conducted in ART PLUS centre, Bellary over a period of 8 months from January to August 2014 in HIV patients on ART to determine risk factors associated with and epidemiological pattern of fat redistribution or atrophy. Results A total of 50 patients with LD {lipodystrophy} (26 with fat redestribution and 24 with lipoatrophy {LA} were diagnosed in this period. Most of them belonged to younger age and was commonly seen in females (76%). Patients with LA had a significantly lower BMI (18.73 ± 7.4), {the p-value being 0.19} compared to LH group (21.54 ± 7.62). The duration of disease was comparable among both groups (6.96 years in LH and 5.79 years in LA group) {p-value is 0.29}. There was a relatively good immunity among these patients with mean CD4 count was 509.23 in LH and 545.91 in LA group {single CD4 count was taken and the p-value was 0.001}. Most of the patients were in TLN (Tenofovir, Lamivudine, Nevirapine) regimen (58%).The duration that patient was on ART before commencement of study varied from patient to patient, but the mean duration was approximately five years in fat redistribution group and 4.5 years in LA group. There were no derangements in lipid and sugar levels among them. Conclusion This study shows the need to identify and impact of LD with respect to treatment adherence in young patients especially female patients. Early community

  3. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles

    PubMed Central

    Telesnitsky, Alice; Wolin, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA) are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA), some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs’ packaging determinants differ from the viral genome’s, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA) species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs—if any—have remained elusive. PMID:27548206

  4. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles.

    PubMed

    Telesnitsky, Alice; Wolin, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA) are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA), some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs' packaging determinants differ from the viral genome's, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA) species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs-if any-have remained elusive. PMID:27548206

  5. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated high-efficiency, transient expression of the murine cationic amino acid transporter (ecotropic retroviral receptor) permits stable transduction of human HeLa cells by ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bertran, J; Miller, J L; Yang, Y; Fenimore-Justman, A; Rueda, F; Vanin, E F; Nienhuis, A W

    1996-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus has a broad host range, is nonpathogenic, and integrates into a preferred location on chromosome 19, features that have fostered development of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) as gene transfer vectors for therapeutic applications. We have used an rAAV to transfer and express the murine cationic amino acid transporter which functions as the ecotropic retroviral receptor, thereby rendering human cells conditionally susceptible to infection by an ecotropic retroviral vector. The proportion of human HeLa cells expressing the receptor at 60 h varied as a function of the multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the rAAV. Cells expressing the ecotropic receptor were efficiently transduced with an ecotropic retroviral vector encoding a nucleus-localized form of beta-galactosidase. Cells coexpressing the ecotropic receptor and nucleus-localized beta-galactosidase were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and cell lines were recovered by cloning at limiting dilution. After growth in culture, all clones contained the retroviral vector genome, but fewer than 10% (3 of 47) contained the rAAV genome and continued to express the ecotropic receptor. The ecotropic receptor coding sequences in the rAAV genome were under the control of a tetracycline-modulated promoter. In the presence of tetracycline, receptor expression was low and the proportion of cells transduced by the ecotropic retroviral vector was decreased. Modulation of receptor expression was achieved with both an episomal and an integrated form of the rAAV genome. These data establish that functional gene expression from an rAAV genome can occur transiently without genome integration. PMID:8794313

  6. Family Therapy: A Phenomenological and Active Directive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1978-01-01

    A "third force" in family therapy is outlined in this paper, which combines a phenomenological-humanistic approach with a highly active-directive attempt to help family members surrender their misperceptions of themselves and others and to make profound philosophic changes in their intrapersonal and interpersonal attitudes and behaviors. (Author)

  7. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  8. Sporadic ALS/MND: a global neurodegeneration with retroviral involvement?

    PubMed

    Westarp, M E; Ferrante, P; Perron, H; Bartmann, P; Kornhuber, H H

    1995-05-01

    Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may be an aetiologically heterogenous disease. We confirmed elevated circulating IgG immune complexes, and altered IgG seroreactivities against human retroviral antigens (HIV-2 and HTLV immunoblots) in overlapping subgroups of patients. Together with preliminary findings of a positive polymerase chain reactivity for human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV.tax/rex) in blood leukocytes of 5 out of 14 sALS patients, we interpret this as evidence for a retroviral involvement in this relentlessly progressive, often asymmetrically spreading neurodegeneration. The possibility of a secondary phenomenon seems unlikely, yet cannot be completely ruled out. PMID:7595609

  9. IL-12-conditioning improves retrovirally-mediated transduction efficiency of CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrijauskaite, Kristina; Suriano, Samantha; Cloud, Colleen A.; Li, Mingli; Kesarwani, Pravin; Stefanik, Leah S.; Moxley, Kelly M.; Salem, Mohamed L; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Kochenderfer, James N.; Cole, David J.; Rubinstein, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to genetically modify T cells is a critical component to many immunotherapeutic strategies and research studies. However, the success of these approaches is often limited by transduction efficiency. Since retroviral vectors require cell division for integration, transduction efficiency is dependent on the appropriate activation and culture conditions for T cells. Naïve CD8+ T cells which are quiescent must be first activated to induce cell division to allow genetic modification. To optimize this process, we activated mouse T cells with a panel of different cytokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-23, known to act on T cells. After activation, cytokines were removed, and activated T cells were retrovirally transduced. We found that IL-12 pre-conditioning of mouse T cells greatly enhanced transduction efficiency while preserving function and expansion potential. We also observed a similar transduction enhancing effect of IL-12 pre-conditioning on human T cells. These findings provide a simple method to improve the transduction efficiencies of CD8+ T cells. PMID:26182912

  10. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C.; Konger, Raymond L.; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R.; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  11. Radiation therapy generates platelet-activating factor agonists.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Harrison, Kathleen A; Weyerbacher, Jonathan; Murphy, Robert C; Konger, Raymond L; Garrett, Joy Elizabeth; Chin-Sinex, Helen Jan; Johnston, Michael Edward; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Mendonca, Marc; McMullen, Kevin; Li, Gengxin; Spandau, Dan F; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-04-12

    Pro-oxidative stressors can suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor-receptor (PAF-R). As radiation therapy also induces reactive oxygen species, the present studies were designed to define whether ionizing radiation could generate PAF-R agonists and if these lipids could subvert host immunity. We demonstrate that radiation exposure of multiple tumor cell lines in-vitro, tumors in-vivo, and human subjects undergoing radiation therapy for skin tumors all generate PAF-R agonists. Structural characterization of radiation-induced PAF-R agonistic activity revealed PAF and multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are produced non-enzymatically. In a murine melanoma tumor model, irradiation of one tumor augmented the growth of the other (non-treated) tumor in a PAF-R-dependent process blocked by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor. These results indicate a novel pathway by which PAF-R agonists produced as a byproduct of radiation therapy could result in tumor treatment failure, and offer important insights into potential therapeutic strategies that could improve the overall antitumor effectiveness of radiation therapy regimens. PMID:26959112

  12. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer.

    PubMed

    Gilski, Miroslaw; Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Krzywda, Szymon; Zábranská, Helena; Cooper, Seth; Popović, Zoran; Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Pichová, Iva; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2011-11-01

    Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), a D-type retrovirus assembling in the cytoplasm, causes simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus monkeys. Its pepsin-like aspartic protease (retropepsin) is an integral part of the expressed retroviral polyproteins. As in all retroviral life cycles, release and dimerization of the protease (PR) is strictly required for polyprotein processing and virion maturation. Biophysical and NMR studies have indicated that in the absence of substrates or inhibitors M-PMV PR should fold into a stable monomer, but the crystal structure of this protein could not be solved by molecular replacement despite countless attempts. Ultimately, a solution was obtained in mr-rosetta using a model constructed by players of the online protein-folding game Foldit. The structure indeed shows a monomeric protein, with the N- and C-termini completely disordered. On the other hand, the flap loop, which normally gates access to the active site of homodimeric retropepsins, is clearly traceable in the electron density. The flap has an unusual curled shape and a different orientation from both the open and closed states known from dimeric retropepsins. The overall fold of the protein follows the retropepsin canon, but the C(α) deviations are large and the active-site 'DTG' loop (here NTG) deviates up to 2.7 Å from the standard conformation. This structure of a monomeric retropepsin determined at high resolution (1.6 Å) provides important extra information for the design of dimerization inhibitors that might be developed as drugs for the treatment of retroviral infections, including AIDS. PMID:22101816

  13. Mechanism of Nucleic Acid Chaperone Function of Retroviral Nuceleocapsid (NC) Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzina, Ioulia; Vo, My-Nuong; Stewart, Kristen; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Cruceanu, Margareta; Williams, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted two main activities of HIV-1 NC protein contributing to its function as a universal nucleic acid chaperone. Firstly, it is the ability of NC to weakly destabilize all nucleic acid,(NA), secondary structures, thus resolving the kinetic traps for NA refolding, while leaving the annealed state stable. Secondly, it is the ability of NC to aggregate NA, facilitating the nucleation step of bi-molecular annealing by increasing the local NA concentration. In this work we use single molecule DNA stretching and gel-based annealing assays to characterize these two chaperone activities of NC by using various HIV-1 NC mutants and several other retroviral NC proteins. Our results suggest that two NC functions are associated with its zinc fingers and cationic residues, respectively. NC proteins from other retroviruses have similar activities, although expressed to a different degree. Thus, NA aggregating ability improves, and NA duplex destabilizing activity decreases in the sequence: MLV NC, HIV NC, RSV NC. In contrast, HTLV NC protein works very differently from other NC proteins, and similarly to typical single stranded NA binding proteins. These features of retroviral NCs co-evolved with the structure of their genomes.

  14. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    2007-05-01

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R&D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R&D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC.

  15. The syndrome of continuous muscle fibre activity following gold therapy.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Mamoli, B

    1984-01-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from arthritis received a total dose of 500 mg sodium aurothiomalate during a period of 5 months. His clinical state then deteriorated and he had to be hospitalized. Upon admission he was bedridden, his level of consciousness was slightly impaired, he was confused and respiration was laboured. Continuous muscle activity was noted on all extremities and at first, erroneously, fasciculations were diagnosed. The EMG exhibited continuous muscle fibre activity consisting of duplets, triplets and multiplets. The discharges occurred in an irregular pattern; when various muscles were examined at the same time no synchronicity could be observed between muscle discharges. In the left m. deltoideus an increased percentage of polyphasic potentials was found, whereas mean duration of motor unit potentials was normal. Spontaneous activity remained unchanged during sleep and administration of intravenous diazepam or phenytoin. Blocking of ulnar nerve at either elbow or wrist level did not stop spontaneous activity in m. abductor digiti quinti. Ischaemia increased the amount of discharges after 7 min. Within 4 months after termination of gold therapy the patient's condition improved and he was discharged from hospital. Regular EMG follow-up after 8 months showed complete cessation of abnormal spontaneous activities. Nerve conduction velocities were normal except for markedly reduced compound action potential in peroneal nerves. Continuous muscle fibre activity as a side-effect of gold therapy is described. PMID:6440953

  16. Combination therapies improve the anticancer activities of retinoids in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Belamy B

    2015-01-01

    Most therapeutic protocols for child cancers use cytotoxic agents which have a narrow therapeutic index, and resulting in severe acute and chronic toxicities to normal tissues. Despite the fact that most child cancer patients achieve complete remission after chemotherapy, death still occurs due to relapse of persistent minimal residual disease (MRD) which remaining after initial cytotoxic chemotherapy. Advanced neuroblastoma (NB) is a leading cause of cancer deaths in young children. Retinoids are an important component of advanced NB therapy at the stage of MRD, yet half of all patients treated with 13-cis-retinoic acid still relapse and die. More effective combination therapies, with a lower side-effect profile, are required to improve outcomes for NB. Fenretinide or N-4-hydroxyphenyl retinamide is a synthetic derivative of retinoic acid which works on cancer cells through nuclear receptor-dependent and -independent signalling mechanisms. Moreover, several histone deacetylase inhibitors have entered early phase trials, and, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid has been approved for use in adult cutaneous T cell lymphoma. A number of studies suggest that retinoid signal activation is necessary for histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. A better understanding of their mechanism of actions will lead to more evidence-based retinoid combination therapies. PMID:26677433

  17. Rescue baroreflex activation therapy after Stanford B aortic dissection due to therapy-refractory hypertension.

    PubMed

    Weipert, Kay F; Most, Astrid; Dörr, Oliver; Helmig, Inga; Elzien, Meshal; Krombach, Gabriele; Hamm, Christian W; Erkapic, Damir; Schmitt, Joern

    2016-06-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated significant and durable reduction in arterial pressure from baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension. There is a lack of data, however, concerning the use of BAT in a rescue approach during therapy-refractory hypertensive crisis resulting in life-threatening end-organ damage. Here, we describe the first case in which BAT was applied as a rescue procedure in an intensive care setting after ineffective maximum medical treatment. A 34-year-old male patient presented with Stanford B aortic dissection and hypertensive crisis. The dissection membrane extended from the left subclavian artery down to the right common iliac artery, resulting in a total arterial occlusion of the right leg. After emergency thoracic endovascular aortic repair and femorofemoral crossover bypass, the patient developed a compartment syndrome of the right lower limb, ultimately leading to amputation of the right leg above the knee. Even under deep sedation recurrent hypertensive crises of up to 220 mm Hg occurred that could not be controlled by eight antihypertensive drugs of different classes. Screening for secondary hypertension was negative. Eventually, rescue implantation of right-sided BAT was performed as a bailout procedure, followed by immediate activation of the device. After a hospital stay of a total of 8 weeks, the patient was discharged 2 weeks after BAT initiation with satisfactory blood pressure levels. After 1-year follow-up, the patient has not had a hypertensive crisis since the onset of BAT and is currently on fourfold oral antihypertensive therapy. The previously described bailout procedures for the treatment of life-threatening hypertensive conditions that are refractory to drug treatment have mainly comprised the interventional denervation of renal arteries. The utilization of BAT is new in this emergency context and showed a significant, immediate, and sustained reduction of blood pressure

  18. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies. PMID:27009539

  19. The redox-active nanomaterial toolbox for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Irene L; Notcovich, Cintia; Catalano, Paolo N; Bellino, Martín G; Durán, Hebe

    2015-04-01

    Advances in nanomaterials science contributed in recent years to develop new devices and systems in the micro and nanoscale for improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Substantial evidences associate cancer cells and tumor microenvironment with reactive oxygen species (ROS), while conventional cancer treatments and particularly radiotherapy, are often mediated by ROS increase. However, the poor selectivity and the toxicity of these therapies encourage researchers to focus efforts in order to enhance delivery and to decrease side effects. Thus, the development of redox-active nanomaterials is an interesting approach to improve selectivity and outcome of cancer treatments. Herein, we describe an overview of recent advances in redox nanomaterials in the context of current and emerging strategies for cancer therapy based on ROS modulation. PMID:25597786

  20. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Iliana; de Vries, Helga E; Hol, Elly M; van Strien, Miriam E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic neurological disability. A promising perspective for future therapy of MS is the regeneration of lesions with replacement of the damaged oligodendrocytes or neurons. Therapies targeting to the enhancement of endogenous remyelination, aim to promote the activation of either the parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or the subventricular zone-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Less studied but highly potent, is the strategy of neuronal regeneration with endogenous NSCs that although being linked to numerous limitations, is anticipated to ameliorate cognitive disability in MS. Focusing on the forebrain, this review highlights the role of NSCs in the regeneration of MS lesions. PMID:25653584

  1. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Iliana; de Vries, Helga E.; Hol, Elly M.; van Strien, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic neurological disability. A promising perspective for future therapy of MS is the regeneration of lesions with replacement of the damaged oligodendrocytes or neurons. Therapies targeting to the enhancement of endogenous remyelination, aim to promote the activation of either the parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or the subventricular zone-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Less studied but highly potent, is the strategy of neuronal regeneration with endogenous NSCs that although being linked to numerous limitations, is anticipated to ameliorate cognitive disability in MS. Focusing on the forebrain, this review highlights the role of NSCs in the regeneration of MS lesions. PMID:25653584

  2. Sites of Retroviral DNA Integration: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of the viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with HIV-1 can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or AIDS patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency. PMID:26508664

  3. Sites of retroviral DNA integration: From basic research to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Erik; Engelman, Alan N

    2016-01-01

    One of the most crucial steps in the life cycle of a retrovirus is the integration of the viral DNA (vDNA) copy of the RNA genome into the genome of an infected host cell. Integration provides for efficient viral gene expression as well as for the segregation of viral genomes to daughter cells upon cell division. Some integrated viruses are not well expressed, and cells latently infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can resist the action of potent antiretroviral drugs and remain dormant for decades. Intensive research has been dedicated to understanding the catalytic mechanism of integration, as well as the viral and cellular determinants that influence integration site distribution throughout the host genome. In this review, we summarize the evolution of techniques that have been used to recover and map retroviral integration sites, from the early days that first indicated that integration could occur in multiple cellular DNA locations, to current technologies that map upwards of millions of unique integration sites from single in vitro integration reactions or cell culture infections. We further review important insights gained from the use of such mapping techniques, including the monitoring of cell clonal expansion in patients treated with retrovirus-based gene therapy vectors, or patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). These insights span from integrase (IN) enzyme sequence preferences within target DNA (tDNA) at the sites of integration, to the roles of host cellular proteins in mediating global integration distribution, to the potential relationship between genomic location of vDNA integration site and retroviral latency. PMID:26508664

  4. Factor XI and Contact Activation as Targets for Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gailani, David; Bane, Charles E.; Gruber, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Summary The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa, or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and factor X. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally-induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on factor XII, the zymogen of a protease (factor XIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces; and factor XI, the zymogen of the protease factor XIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of factor XI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of factor XI may be more effective than low-molecular-weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here we review data on the role of factor XI and factor XII in thrombosis, and results of pre-clinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins. PMID:25976012

  5. ISOLATION OF THE FIRST NON-PRIMATE TRIM5-ALPHA FROM CATTLE INDICATES THAT TRIM5-ALPHA MEDIATED INNATE IMMUNITY TO RETROVIRAL INFECTION MAY BE WIDESPREAD AMONG MAMMALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TRIM5-alpha has recently emerged as an important factor influencing species-specific permissivity to retroviral infection in a range of primates including humans. Old World monkey TRIM5-alpha blocks HIV-1 infectivity and human or New World TRIM5-alpha proteins are inactive against HIV-1 but active a...

  6. Convergent capture of retroviral superantigens by mammalian herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Aswad, Amr; Katzourakis, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer from retroviruses to mammals is well documented and extensive, but is rare between unrelated viruses with distinct genome types. Three herpesviruses encode a gene with similarity to a retroviral superantigen gene (sag) of the unrelated mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV). We uncover ancient retroviral sags in over 20 mammals to reconstruct their shared history with herpesviral sags, revealing that the acquisition is a convergent evolutionary event. A retrovirus circulating in South American primates over 10 million years ago was the source of sag in two monkey herpesviruses, and a different retrovirus was the source of sag in a Peruvian rodent herpesvirus. We further show through a timescaled phylogenetic analysis that a cross-species transmission of monkey herpesviruses occurred after the acquisition of sag. These results reveal that a diverse range of ancient sag-containing retroviruses independently donated sag twice from two separate lineages that are distinct from MMTV. PMID:26400439

  7. Convergent capture of retroviral superantigens by mammalian herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Aswad, Amr; Katzourakis, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer from retroviruses to mammals is well documented and extensive, but is rare between unrelated viruses with distinct genome types. Three herpesviruses encode a gene with similarity to a retroviral superantigen gene (sag) of the unrelated mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV). We uncover ancient retroviral sags in over 20 mammals to reconstruct their shared history with herpesviral sags, revealing that the acquisition is a convergent evolutionary event. A retrovirus circulating in South American primates over 10 million years ago was the source of sag in two monkey herpesviruses, and a different retrovirus was the source of sag in a Peruvian rodent herpesvirus. We further show through a timescaled phylogenetic analysis that a cross-species transmission of monkey herpesviruses occurred after the acquisition of sag. These results reveal that a diverse range of ancient sag-containing retroviruses independently donated sag twice from two separate lineages that are distinct from MMTV. PMID:26400439

  8. Retroviral Transduction of T Cells and T Cell Precursors.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Amie; Alberola-Ila, José

    2016-01-01

    Transduction of lymphoid progenitors with retroviral or lentiviral vectors is a powerful experimental strategy to tease out the role of a gene or pathway in T cell development via gain-of-function or loss-of-function strategies. Here we discuss different approaches to use this powerful technology, and present some protocols that we use to transduce murine HSCs, thymocytes, and lymphoid cell lines with these viral vectors. PMID:26294401

  9. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-Engineered Lymphocytes for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Carlos A.; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) usually combine the antigen binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the signal activating machinery of a T cell, freeing antigen recognition from major histocompatibility complex restriction and thus breaking one of the barriers to more widespread application of cellular therapy. Similar to treatment strategies employing monoclonal antibodies, T cells expressing CARs are highly targeted, but additionally offer the potential benefits of active trafficking to tumor sites, in vivo expansion and long term persistence. Furthermore, gene transfer allows the introduction of countermeasures to tumor immune evasion and of safety mechanisms. Areas covered The authors review the basic structure of so-called first and later generation CARs and their potential advantages over other immune therapy systems. It is described how these molecules can be grafted into immune cells (including retroviral and non-retroviral transduction methods) and strategies to improve the in vivo persistence and function of immune cells expressing CARs are discussed. Examples of tumor associated antigens that have been targeted in preclinical models are presented and clinical experience with these modified cells is summarized. Finally, a discussion on safety issues surrounding CAR gene transfer into T cells and potential solutions to them, are presented. Expert opinion Because of recent advances in immunology, genetics and cell processing, CAR-modified T cells will likely play an increasing role in the cellular therapy of cancer, chronic infections and autoimmune disorders. PMID:21463133

  10. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  11. Structural and functional studies of murine Mbo I repeat LTR (MRL) retroviral genes on the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Hoyt, P.R.; Wang, T.H.; Kanagala, R.; Henley, D.C.; Yang, D.M.; Yang, W.K. )

    1991-03-15

    The mouse genome harbors approximately 200 copies of MRL retroviral elements (or MuRRs) that are preferentially expressed in the reproductive system. The MRL retroviral gene family is wildly distributed in the genus Mus. About 10% of the elements are located on the Y chromosome and the abundance is probably due to gene amplification. Multiple copies of Y chromosome-specific MRL retroviral sequences are present only in the genome of M spretus and M. musculus. Structural and sequence analyses revealed a truncation of the male-specific MRL elements isolated from a BALB/c mouse DNA library. Consequently, two-thirds of an intact LTR was retained at the 5{prime} end and the 3{prime} structure was disrupted immediately downstream of the pol gene with a concomitant loss of the 3{prime} LTR. Southern analysis of male and female mouse DNA confirmed that sequences adjacent to the 3{prime} breakpoint were Y chromosome specific. These sequences are length polymorphic in nature and appear to be co-amplified with MRL retroviral genes on the Y chromosome. A collinear cDNA of 9.5 kb containing fused MRL and Y chromosome sequences was also isolated from a testis library. The LTR of male-specific MRL elements was unable to drive the expression of the bacterial CAT gene in cultured mouse NIH/3T3 and mink CCL64 cells. However, when its enhancer domain was linked to an SV40 promoter, the CAT gene was expressed at a significant level. Differential binding activities to male-specific MRL were found in nuclear extracts of the liver, kidney, and testis.

  12. Virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Gahm, Gregory A

    2008-08-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy is a promising treatment for a variety of anxiety disorders and has recently been extended to the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, the authors briefly review the rationale for VRE and its key processes. They illustrate the treatment with an active-duty Army soldier diagnosed with combat-related PTSD. Six sessions of VRE were provided using an immersive simulation of a military convoy in Iraq. Self-reported PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were reduced at posttreatment relative to pretreatment reports, as assessed by the PTSD Checklist-Military Version and the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24. The case outcomes parallel those reported in the research with other disorders and suggest the applicability of VRE in treating active duty soldiers with combat-related PTSD. PMID:18612993

  13. [Practice of Behavioral Activation in Cognitive-behavioral Therapy].

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Nobuki

    2015-01-01

    An approach focusing on behavioral activation (BA) was adopted in the cognitive therapy of A. T. Beck, and it came to be considered that BA can play an important role in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. Therefore, in recent years, BA based on clinical behavior analysis has been developed as a new treatment (Martell, et al.). The core characteristics are as follows: 1) focusing attention on context in daily life to promote the behavior control of patients and avoidance of a hatred experience ; 2) breaking the vicious circle; 3) promoting the behavior according to the purpose that the patients originally expect; 4) recognizing a relationship between behavior and the situation (contingency), thereby recovering self-efficacy tied to the long-term results that one originally expects. This does not increase pleasant activity at random when the patient is inactive, or give a sense of accomplishment. We know that depression is maintained by conducting functional analysis of detailed life behavior, and encourage the patients to have healthy behavior according to individual values. We help them to complete schedules regardless of mood and reflect on the results patiently. It is considered that those processes are important. BA may be easy to apply in clinical practice and effective for the chronic cases, or the patients in a convalescent stage. Also, in principle in the CBT for major depression, it may be effective that behavioral activation is provided in an early stage, and cognitive reconstruction in a latter stage. However, an approach to carry out functional analysis by small steps with careful activity monitoring is essential when the symptoms are severe. Furthermore, it should be considered that the way of psychoeducation requires caution because we encourage rest in the treatment of depression in our country. In particular, we must be careful not to take an attitude that an inactive behavior pattern is unproductive only based model cases. PMID

  14. Simulated Medication Therapy Management Activities in a Pharmacotherapy Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Trapskin, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To measure the impact of medication therapy management (MTM) learning activities on students’ confidence and intention to provide MTM using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design. An MTM curriculum combining lecture instruction and active-learning strategies was incorporated into a required pharmacotherapy laboratory course. Assessment. A validated survey instrument was developed to evaluate student confidence and intent to engage in MTM services using the domains comprising the Theory of Planned Behavior. Confidence scores improved significantly from baseline for all items (p < 0.00), including identification of billable services, documentation, and electronic billing. Mean scores improved significantly for all Theory of Planned Behavior items within the constructs of perceived behavioral control and subjective norms (p < 0.05). At baseline, 42% of students agreed or strongly agreed that they had knowledge and skills to provide MTM. This percentage increased to 82% following completion of the laboratory activities. Conclusion. Implementation of simulated MTM activities in a pharmacotherapy laboratory significantly increased knowledge scores, confidence measures, and scores on Theory of Planned Behavior constructs related to perceived behavioral control and subjective norms. Despite these improvements, intention to engage in future MTM services remained unchanged. PMID:21829269

  15. X-Ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT).

    PubMed

    Oldham, Mark; Yoon, Paul; Fathi, Zak; Beyer, Wayne F; Adamson, Justus; Liu, Leihua; Alcorta, David; Xia, Wenle; Osada, Takuya; Liu, Congxiao; Yang, Xiao Y; Dodd, Rebecca D; Herndon, James E; Meng, Boyu; Kirsch, David G; Lyerly, H Kim; Dewhirst, Mark W; Fecci, Peter; Walder, Harold; Spector, Neil L

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates X-PACT (X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy): a new approach for the treatment of solid cancer. X-PACT utilizes psoralen, a potent anti-cancer therapeutic with current application to proliferative disease and extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) of cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma. An immunogenic role for light-activated psoralen has been reported, contributing to long-term clinical responses. Psoralen therapies have to-date been limited to superficial or extracorporeal scenarios due to the requirement for psoralen activation by UVA light, which has limited penetration in tissue. X-PACT solves this challenge by activating psoralen with UV light emitted from novel non-tethered phosphors (co-incubated with psoralen) that absorb x-rays and re-radiate (phosphoresce) at UV wavelengths. The efficacy of X-PACT was evaluated in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. In-vitro studies utilized breast (4T1), glioma (CT2A) and sarcoma (KP-B) cell lines. Cells were exposed to X-PACT treatments where the concentrations of drug (psoralen and phosphor) and radiation parameters (energy, dose, and dose rate) were varied. Efficacy was evaluated primarily using flow cell cytometry in combination with complimentary assays, and the in-vivo mouse study. In an in-vitro study, we show that X-PACT induces significant tumor cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity, unlike psoralen or phosphor alone (p<0.0001). We also show that apoptosis increases as doses of phosphor, psoralen, or radiation increase. Finally, in an in-vivo pilot study of BALBc mice with syngeneic 4T1 tumors, we show that the rate of tumor growth is slower with X-PACT than with saline or AMT + X-ray (p<0.0001). Overall these studies demonstrate a potential therapeutic effect for X-PACT, and provide a foundation and rationale for future studies. In summary, X-PACT represents a novel treatment approach in which well-tolerated low doses of x-ray radiation are delivered to a specific tumor site to generate UVA light which

  16. Nuclear Import of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus DNA Mediated by Adenovirus Preterminal Protein Is Not Sufficient for Efficient Retroviral Transduction in Nondividing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, André; Kay, Mark A.; Li, Zong-Yi

    2000-01-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-derived vectors require cell division for efficient transduction, which may be related to an inability of the viral DNA-protein complex to cross the nuclear membrane. In contrast, adenoviruses (Ad) can efficiently infect nondividing cells. This property may be due to the presence of multiple nuclear translocation signals in a number of Ad proteins, which are associated with the incoming viral genomes. Of particular interest is the Ad preterminal protein (pTP), which binds alone or in complex with the Ad polymerase to specific sequences in the Ad inverted terminal repeat. The goal of this study was to test whether coexpression of pTP with retroviral DNA carrying pTP-binding sites would facilitate nuclear import of the viral preintegration complex and transduction of quiescent cells. In preliminary experiments, we demonstrated that the karyophylic pTP can coimport plasmid DNA into the nuclei of growth-arrested cells. Retroviral transduction studies were performed with G1/S-arrested LTA cells or stationary-phase human primary fibroblasts. These studies demonstrated that pTP or pTP-Ad polymerase conferred nuclear import of retroviral DNA upon arrested cells when the retrovirus vector contained the corresponding binding motifs. However, pTP-mediated nuclear translocation of MoMLV DNA in nondividing cells was not sufficient for stable transduction. Additional cellular factors activated during S phase or DNA repair synthesis were required for efficient retroviral integration. PMID:10623734

  17. Viruses, stemness, embryogenesis, and cancer: a miracle leap toward molecular definition of novel oncotargets for therapy-resistant malignant tumors?

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2015-01-01

    Recent breakthrough studies documented consistent activation of specific endogenous retroviruses in human embryonic stem cells and preimplantation human embryos and demonstrated the essential role of the sustained retroviral activities for maintenance of pluripotency and embryonic stem cell identity. Present analysis has led to the hypothesis that activation of the human stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs), namely LTR7/HERVH and LTR5_Hs/HERVK, is likely associated with the emergence of clinically lethal therapy resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes in a sub-set of cancer patients diagnosed with different types of malignant tumors. PMID:26501080

  18. Subgenual cingulate cortical activity predicts the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Argyelan, M; Lencz, T; Kaliora, S; Sarpal, D K; Weissman, N; Kingsley, P B; Malhotra, A K; Petrides, G

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for depression, yet its mechanism of action is unknown. Our goal was to investigate the neurobiological underpinnings of ECT response using longitudinally collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in 16 patients with treatment-resistant depression and 10 healthy controls. Patients received bifrontal ECT 3 times a week under general anesthesia. We acquired rs-fMRI at three time points: at baseline, after the 1st ECT administration and after the course of the ECT treatment; depression was assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The primary measure derived from rs-fMRI was fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF), which provides an unbiased voxel-wise estimation of brain activity. We also conducted seed-based functional connectivity analysis based on our primary findings. We compared treatment-related changes in HAM-D scores with pre- and post-treatment fALFF and connectivity measures. Subcallosal cingulate cortex (SCC) demonstrated higher BOLD signal fluctuations (fALFF) at baseline in depressed patients, and SCC fALFF decreased over the course of treatment. The baseline level of fALFF of SCC predicted response to ECT. In addition, connectivity of SCC with bilateral hippocampus, bilateral temporal pole, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly reduced over the course of treatment. These results suggest that the antidepressant effect of ECT may be mediated by downregulation of SCC activity and connectivity. SCC function may serve as an important biomarker of target engagement in the development of novel therapies for depression that is resistant to treatment with standard medications. PMID:27115120

  19. Subgenual cingulate cortical activity predicts the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Argyelan, M; Lencz, T; Kaliora, S; Sarpal, D K; Weissman, N; Kingsley, P B; Malhotra, A K; Petrides, G

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for depression, yet its mechanism of action is unknown. Our goal was to investigate the neurobiological underpinnings of ECT response using longitudinally collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in 16 patients with treatment-resistant depression and 10 healthy controls. Patients received bifrontal ECT 3 times a week under general anesthesia. We acquired rs-fMRI at three time points: at baseline, after the 1st ECT administration and after the course of the ECT treatment; depression was assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The primary measure derived from rs-fMRI was fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF), which provides an unbiased voxel-wise estimation of brain activity. We also conducted seed-based functional connectivity analysis based on our primary findings. We compared treatment-related changes in HAM-D scores with pre- and post-treatment fALFF and connectivity measures. Subcallosal cingulate cortex (SCC) demonstrated higher BOLD signal fluctuations (fALFF) at baseline in depressed patients, and SCC fALFF decreased over the course of treatment. The baseline level of fALFF of SCC predicted response to ECT. In addition, connectivity of SCC with bilateral hippocampus, bilateral temporal pole, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly reduced over the course of treatment. These results suggest that the antidepressant effect of ECT may be mediated by downregulation of SCC activity and connectivity. SCC function may serve as an important biomarker of target engagement in the development of novel therapies for depression that is resistant to treatment with standard medications. PMID:27115120

  20. Selecting patients with severe sepsis for drotrecogin alfa (activated) therapy.

    PubMed

    Sollet, Jean-Pierre; Garber, Gary E

    2002-12-01

    Selecting patients for drotrecogin alfa (activated) (Xigris; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) therapy outside of a clinical trial setting requires knowledge of the rationale that led the Protein C Worldwide Evaluation in Severe Sepsis (PROWESS) investigators to select the various entry criteria for the trial. Enrollment criteria for the study included a known or suspected infection, presence of at least 3 systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and dysfunction of > or =1 organ or system. The infection criteria used in PROWESS were designed to be straightforward and were based on common clinical and radiological data. Although previous definitions of sepsis required only 2 SIRS criteria, the PROWESS trial investigators required the presence of > or =3 SIRS criteria to improve the sensitivity and specificity of these criteria for the diagnosis of sepsis. Acute organ dysfunction, the diagnostic criterion for severe sepsis, was used to define the study population because it identifies patients at significant risk of death. Characteristics of drotrecogin alfa (activated)-treated patients, including infection, modified SIRS criteria, and organ dysfunction, were similar to those of the placebo group and the general sepsis population. Proper clinical judgment and use of the these inclusion criteria as a guide will help clinicians select and treat sepsis patients with drotrecogin alfa (activated). PMID:12521613

  1. Monte Carlo modelling of daylight activated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. L.; Wood, K.; Valentine, R. M.; Brown, C. T. A.; Moseley, H.

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of superficial skin lesions via daylight activated photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been explored theoretically with three dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo radiation transfer simulations. For similar parameters and conditions, daylight activated PDT was compared to conventional PDT using a commercially available light source. Under reasonable assumptions for the optical properties of the tissue, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) concentration and a treatment dose of 75 J cm-2, it was found that during a clear summer day an effective treatment depth of over 2 mm can be achieved after 30 min of daylight illumination at a latitude of 56 degrees North. The same light dose would require 2.5 h of daylight illumination during an overcast summer day where a treatment depth of about 2 mm can be achieved. For conventional PDT the developed model suggests that 15 min of illumination is required to deliver a light dose of 75 J cm-2, which would result in an effective treatment depth of about 3 mm. The model developed here allows for the determination of photo-toxicity in skin tissue as a function of depth for different weather conditions as well as for conventional light sources. Our theoretical investigation supports clinical studies and shows that daylight activated PDT has the potential for treating superficial skin lesions during different weather conditions.

  2. Regulation of human heme oxygenase in endothelial cells by using sense and antisense retroviral constructs.

    PubMed

    Quan, S; Yang, L; Abraham, N G; Kappas, A

    2001-10-01

    Our objective was to determine whether overexpression and underexpression of human heme oxygenase (HHO)-1 could be controlled on a long-term basis by introduction of the HO-1 gene in sense (S) and antisense (AS) orientation with an appropriate vector into endothelial cells. Retroviral vector (LXSN) containing viral long terminal repeat promoter-driven human HO-1 S (LSN-HHO-1) and LXSN vectors containing HHO-1 promoter (HOP)-controlled HHO-1 S and AS (LSN-HOP-HHO-1 and LSN-HOP-HHO-1-AS) sequences were constructed and used to transfect rat lung microvessel endothelial cells (RLMV cells) and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC-1 cells). RLMV cells transduced with HHO-1 S expressed human HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein associated with elevation in total HO activity compared with nontransduced cells. Vector-mediated expression of HHO-1 S or AS under control of HOP resulted in effective production of HO-1 or blocked induction of endogenous human HO-1 in HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Overexpression of HO-1 AS was associated with a long-term decrease (45%) of endogenous HO-1 protein and an increase (167%) in unmetabolized exogenous heme in HMEC-1 cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) production in HO-1 S- or AS-transduced HMEC-1 cells after heme treatment was increased (159%) or decreased (50%), respectively, compared with nontransduced cells. HO-2 protein levels did not change. These findings demonstrate that HHO-1 S and AS retroviral constructs are functional in enhancing and reducing HO activity, respectively, and thus can be used to regulate cellular heme levels, the activity of heme-dependent enzymes, and the rate of heme catabolism to CO and bilirubin. PMID:11593038

  3. Heterogeneity in Retroviral Nucleocapsid Protein Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landes, Christy

    2009-03-01

    Time-resolved single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) chaperone activity as compared to that of the HIV-1 NC protein. HTLV-1 NC contains two zinc fingers with each having a CCHC binding motif similar to HIV-1 NC. HIV-1 NC is required for recognition and packaging of the viral RNA and is also a nucleic acid chaperone protein that facilitates nucleic acid restructuring during reverse transcription. Because of similarities in structures between the two retroviruses, we have used single-molecule fluorescence energy transfer to investigate the chaperoning activity of HTLV-1 NC protein. The results indicate that HTLV-1 NC protein induces structural changes by opening the transactivation response (TAR)-DNA hairpin to an even greater extent than HIV-1 NC. However, unlike HIV-1 NC, HTLV-1 NC does not chaperone the strand-transfer reaction involving TAR-DNA. These results suggest that despite its effective destabilization capability, HTLV-1 NC is not as effective at overall chaperone function as is its HIV-1 counterpart.

  4. Gene therapy of MPL deficiency: challenging balance between leukemia and pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Wicke, Daniel C; Meyer, Johann; Buesche, Guntram; Heckl, Dirk; Kreipe, Hans; Li, Zhixiong; Welte, Karl H; Ballmaier, Matthias; Baum, Christopher; Modlich, Ute

    2010-02-01

    Signaling of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL is critical for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and megakaryocytic differentiation. Inherited loss-of-function mutations of MPL cause severe thrombocytopenia and aplastic anemia, a syndrome called congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (CAMT). With the aim to assess the toxicity of retroviral expression of Mpl as a basis for further development of a gene therapy for this disorder, we expressed Mpl in a murine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model. Treated mice developed a profound yet transient elevation of multilineage hematopoiesis, which showed morphologic features of a chronic myeloproliferative disorder (CMPD) with progressive pancytopenia. Ten percent of mice (3/27) developed erythroleukemia, associated with insertional activation of Sfpi1 and Fli1. The majority of transplanted mice developed a progressive pancytopenia with histopathological features of a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-like disorder. To avoid these adverse reactions, improved retroviral vectors were designed that mediate reduced and more physiological Mpl expression. Self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vectors were constructed that expressed Mpl from the phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) or the murine Mpl promoter. Mice that received BM cells expressing Mpl from the Mpl promoter were free of any previously observed adverse reactions. PMID:19844195

  5. The role of ubiquitin in retroviral egress.

    PubMed

    Martin-Serrano, Juan

    2007-10-01

    HIV and many other enveloped viruses encode a late budding domain (L-domain) that recruits the cellular machinery that mediates the separation of the nascent virion from the infected cell. The ubiquitin-proteasome system has been implicated in the L-domain activity, but the exact role of ubiquitin transfer and ubiquitin-binding proteins in the last step of viral replication remains elusive. It is now widely accepted that the class E vacuolar protein sorting pathway mediates both viral budding and vesicle budding into the multivesicular bodies and, remarkably, both budding events share the same topology and similar requirements for ubiquitin. In this review, the role of ubiquitin in viral budding is discussed in the light of recent advances in the understanding of the cellular mechanisms that assist the last step of HIV-1 release. PMID:17645437

  6. Laser light triggered-activated carbon nanosystem for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Maoquan; Peng, Jinliang; Zhao, Jiajia; Liang, Shanlu; Shao, Yuxiang; Wu, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Among carbon-based nanomaterials, activated carbon (AC) may be an ideal candidate as a carrier for tumor therapeutic agents. Here we found a new property of nanoscale activated carbon (NAC) with narrow size distribution, namely the rapid conversion of light to thermal energy both in vitro and in vivo. An aqueous suspension of 200 μL of NAC (1 mg/mL) exhibited a rapid temperature increase of more than 35 °C after irradiation for 20 min with a 655-nm laser; this was within the temperature range for effective tumor treatment. We demonstrated that lung cancer cells (H-1299) incubated with bamboo nano-AC (BNAC) were killed with high efficiency after laser irradiation. In addition, mouse tumors with sizes smaller than the laser spot that had been injected with BNAC disappeared after irradiation. For tumors larger than the laser spot area, the incorporation of the photosensitizer ZnPc obviously increased the tumor growth inhibition efficiency of BNAC. BNAC-ZnPc was found to exhibit a synergistic effect when photothermal and photodynamic therapies were administered in combination. These results indicated that NAC can be used for high efficiency cancer phototherapy. PMID:23228422

  7. Active immunization therapies for Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Achim; Tierney, Lanay; Mandler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Vaccination is increasingly being investigated as a potential treatment for synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and dementia with Lewy bodies associated with α-synuclein pathology. All lack a causal therapy. Development of novel, disease-altering treatment strategies is urgently needed. Vaccination has positioned itself as a prime strategy for addressing these diseases because it is broadly applicable, requires infrequent administration, and maintains low production costs for treating a large population or as a preventive measure. Current evidence points to a causal role of misfolded α-synuclein in the development and progression of synucleinopathies. In the past decade, significant progress in active immunization against α-synuclein has been shown both in preclinical animal models and in early clinical development. In this review, we describe the state-of-the-art in active immunization approaches to synucleinopathies, with a focus on advances in Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple-system atrophy (MSA). We first review preclinical animal models, highlighting their progress in translation to the clinical setting. We then discuss current clinical applications, stressing different approaches taken to address α-synuclein pathology. Finally, we address challenges, trends, and future perspectives of current vaccination programs. PMID:26260853

  8. Retroviral Transcriptional Regulation and Embryonic Stem Cells: War and Peace

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps “noisy” control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks. PMID:25547290

  9. Cationic Liposomes Enhance the Rate of Transduction by a Recombinant Retroviral Vector In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Colin D.; Lukacs, Katalin V.; Box, Gary; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Collins, Mary K. L.

    1998-01-01

    Cationic liposomes enhanced the rate of transduction of target cells with retroviral vectors. The greatest effect was seen with the formulation DC-Chol/DOPE, which gave a 20-fold increase in initial transduction rate. This allowed an efficiency of transduction after brief exposure of target cells to virus plus liposome that could be achieved only after extensive exposure to virus alone. Enhancement with DC-Chol/DOPE was optimal when stable virion-liposome complexes were preformed. The transduction rate for complexed virus, as for virus used alone or with the polycation Polybrene, showed first-order dependence on virus concentration. Cationic liposomes, but not Polybrene, were able to mediate envelope-independent transduction, but optimal efficiency required envelope-receptor interaction. When virus complexed with DC-Chol/DOPE was used to transduce human mesothelioma xenografts, transduction was enhanced four- to fivefold compared to that for virus alone. Since the efficacy of gene therapy is dependent on the number of cells modified, which is in turn dependent upon the balance between transduction and biological clearance of the vector, the ability of cationic liposomes to form stable complexes with retroviral vectors and enhance their rate of infection is likely to be important for in vivo application. PMID:9573249

  10. Infection by retroviral vectors outside of their host range in the presence of replication-defective adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R M; Wang, M; Steffen, D; Ledley, F D

    1995-01-01

    Retrovirus infection is normally limited to cells within a specific host range which express a cognate receptor that is recognized by the product of the env gene. We describe retrovirus infection of cells outside of their normal host range when the infection is performed in the presence of a replication-defective adenovirus (dl312). In the presence of adenovirus, several different ecotropic vectors are shown to infect human cell lines (HeLa and PLC/PRF), and a xenotropic vector is shown to infect murine cells (NIH 3T3). Infectivity is demonstrated by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) staining, selection with G418 for neomycin resistance, and PCR identification of the provirus in infected cells. Infectivity is quantitatively dependent upon both the concentration of adenovirus (10(6) to 10(8) PFU/ml) and the concentration of retrovirus. Infection requires the simultaneous presence of adenovirus in the retrovirus infection medium and is not stimulated by preincubation and removal of adenovirus from the cells before retrovirus infection. The presence of adenovirus is shown to enhance the uptake of fluorescently labeled retrovirus particles into cells outside of their normal host range, demonstrating that the adenovirus enhances viral entry into cells in the absence of the recognized cognate receptor. This observation suggests new opportunities for developing safe retroviral vectors for gene therapy and new mechanisms for the pathogenesis of retroviral disease. PMID:7853530

  11. Integrating Therapy Dog Teams in a Physical Activity Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obrusnikova, Iva; Bibik, Janice M.; Cavalier, Albert R.; Manley, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    The use of therapy-dog teams in programs for children with disabilities is becoming increasingly popular in school and therapeutic settings and has been shown to provide physical, social, and emotional benefits for the children. This article describes the basic steps for implementing therapy dog-assisted activities in physical activity programs…

  12. High-efficiency gene transfer into CD34+ cells with a human immunodeficiency virus type 1-based retroviral vector pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein G.

    PubMed Central

    Akkina, R K; Walton, R M; Chen, M L; Li, Q X; Planelles, V; Chen, I S

    1996-01-01

    Currently, amphotropic retroviral vectors are widely used for gene transfer into CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. The relatively low levels of transduction efficiency associated with these vectors in human cells is due to low viral titers and limitations in concentrating the virus because of the inherent fragility of retroviral envelopes. Here we show that a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based retroviral vector containing the firefly luciferase reporter gene can be pseudotyped with a broad-host-range vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein G (VSV-G). Higher-efficiency gene transfer into CD34+ cells was achieved with a VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 vector than with a vector packaged in an amphotropic envelope. Concentration of virus without loss of viral infectivity permitted a higher multiplicity of infection, with a consequent higher efficiency of gene transfer, reaching 2.8 copies per cell. These vectors also showed remarkable stability during storage at 4 degrees C for a week. In addition, there was no significant loss of titer after freezing and thawing of the stock virus. The ability of VSV-G-pseudotyped retroviral vectors to achieve a severalfold increase in levels of transduction into CD34+ cells will allow high-efficiency gene transfer into hematopoietic progenitor cells for gene therapy purposes. Furthermore, since it has now become possible to infect CD34+ cells with pseudotyped HIV-1 with a high level of efficiency in vitro, many important questions regarding the effect of HIV-1 on lineage-specific differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors can now be addressed. PMID:8642689

  13. Retroviral vectors for homologous recombination provide efficient cloning and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nagai, Terumi; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-14

    Homologous recombination technologies enable high-throughput cloning and the seamless insertion of any DNA fragment into expression vectors. Additionally, retroviral vectors offer a fast and efficient method for transducing and expressing genes in mammalian cells, including lymphocytes. However, homologous recombination cannot be used to insert DNA fragments into retroviral vectors; retroviral vectors contain two homologous regions, the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats, between which homologous recombination occurs preferentially. In this study, we have modified a retroviral vector to enable the cloning of DNA fragments through homologous recombination. To this end, we inserted a bacterial selection marker in a region adjacent to the gene insertion site. We used the modified retroviral vector and homologous recombination to clone T-cell receptors (TCRs) from single Epstein Barr virus-specific human T cells in a high-throughput and comprehensive manner and to efficiently evaluate their function by transducing the TCRs into a murine T-cell line through retroviral infection. In conclusion, the modified retroviral vectors, in combination with the homologous recombination method, are powerful tools for the high-throughput cloning of cDNAs and their efficient functional analysis. PMID:24462869

  14. Critical Variables affecting clinical-grade production of the self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vector for the treatment of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    van der Loo, JCM; Swaney, WP; Grassman, E; Terwilliger, A; Higashimoto, T; Schambach, A; Hacein-Bey-Abina, S; Nordling, DL; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Thrasher, AJ; Williams, DA; Reeves, L; Malik, P

    2014-01-01

    Patients with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) were successfully cured following gene therapy with a gamma-retroviral vector (gRV) expressing the common gamma chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL2RG). However, 5 of 20 patients developed leukemia from activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by viral enhancers in the long-terminal repeats (LTR) of the integrated vector. These events prompted the design of a gRV vector with self-inactivating (SIN) LTRs to enhance vector safety. Herein we report on the production of a clinical-grade SIN IL2RG gRV pseudotyped with the Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus envelope for a new gene therapy trial for SCID-X1, and highlight variables that were found to be critical for transfection-based large-scale SIN gRV production. Successful clinical production required careful selection of culture medium without pre-added glutamine, reduced exposure of packaging cells to cell-dissociation enzyme, and presence of cations in wash buffer. The clinical vector was high titer; transduced 68–70% normal human CD34 + cells, as determined by colony-forming unit assays and by xenotransplantation in immunodeficient NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J (nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID)) and NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NOD/SCID gamma (NSG))) mice; and resulted in the production of T cells in vitro from human SCID-X1 CD34 + cells. The vector was certified and released for the treatment of SCID-X1 in a multi-center international phase I/II trial. PMID:22551777

  15. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  16. Active Negative Pressure Peritoneal Therapy After Abbreviated Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Derek J.; Faris, Peter D.; Ball, Chad G.; Kubes, Paul; Tiruta, Corina; Xiao, Zhengwen; Holodinsky, Jessalyn K.; McBeth, Paul B.; Doig, Christopher J.; Jenne, Craig N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether active negative pressure peritoneal therapy with the ABThera temporary abdominal closure device reduces systemic inflammation after abbreviated laparotomy. Background: Excessive systemic inflammation after abdominal injury or intra-abdominal sepsis is associated with poor outcomes. Methods: We conducted a single-center, randomized controlled trial. Forty-five adults with abdominal injury (46.7%) or intra-abdominal sepsis (52.3%) were randomly allocated to the ABThera (n = 23) or Barker's vacuum pack (n = 22). On study days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 28, blood and peritoneal fluid were collected. The primary endpoint was the difference in the plasma concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) 24 and 48 hours after temporary abdominal closure application. Results: There was a significantly lower peritoneal fluid drainage from the ABThera at 48 hours after randomization. Despite this, there was no difference in plasma concentration of IL-6 at baseline versus 24 (P = 0.52) or 48 hours (P = 0.82) between the groups. There was also no significant intergroup difference in the plasma concentrations of IL-1β, −8, −10, or −12 p70 or tumor necrosis factor α between these time points. The cumulative incidence of primary fascial closure at 90 days was similar between groups (hazard ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.82–3.0; P = 0.17). However, 90-day mortality was improved in the ABThera group (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.11–0.93; P = 0.04). Conclusions: This trial observed a survival difference between patients randomized to the ABThera versus Barker's vacuum pack that did not seem to be mediated by an improvement in peritoneal fluid drainage, fascial closure rates, or markers of systemic inflammation. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01355094. PMID:25536308

  17. Mechanisms and Factors that Influence High Frequency Retroviral Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista; Galli, Andrea; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Mens, Helene; Pathak, Vinay K.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2011-01-01

    With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity of the recombination process, and evaluates the subsequent viral diversity and fitness of the progeny recombinant. Specifically, the high mutation rates and high recombination frequencies of HIV-1 will be analyzed for their roles in influencing HIV-1 global diversity, as well as HIV-1 diagnosis, drug treatment, and vaccine development. PMID:21994801

  18. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available Data and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Marcel; Fritz, Thorsten; Madershahian, Navid; Pfister, Roman; Reuter, Hannes

    2016-04-01

    Progression of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is promoted by sympathovagal imbalance. Baroreflex activation therapy, i.e., electrical stimulation of baroreceptors at the carotid sinus, can restore sympathovagal balance. Large animal studies of baroreflex activation therapy revealed improvements in cardiac function, susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, and a survival benefit as compared to untreated controls. Recently, the first randomized and controlled trial of optimal medical and device therapy alone or plus baroreflex activation therapy in patients suffering from HFrEF was published. It demonstrated a reasonable safety profile in this severely ill patient population. Moreover, the study found significant improvements in New York Heart Association class, quality of life, 6-min walk distance, and NT-proBNP levels. This review provides an overview on baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of HFrEF-from the concept and preclinical findings to most recent clinical data and upcoming trials. PMID:26879389

  19. Biomaterial-Mediated Retroviral Gene Transfer Using Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Gersbach, Charles A.; Coyer, Sean R.; Le Doux, Joseph M.; García, Andrés J.

    2007-01-01

    Biomaterial-mediated gene delivery has recently emerged as a promising alternative to conventional gene transfer technologies that focus on direct delivery of viral vectors or DNA-polymer/matrix complexes. However, biomaterial-based strategies have primarily targeted transient gene expression vehicles, including plasmid DNA and adenovirus particles. This study expands on this work by characterizing biomaterial properties conducive to the surface immobilization of retroviral particles and subsequent transduction of mammalian cells at the cell-material interface. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of functionally-terminated alkanethiols on gold were used to establish biomaterial surfaces of defined chemical composition. Gene transfer was observed to be greater than 90% on NH2-terminated surfaces, approximately 50% on COOH-functionalized surfaces, and undetectable on CH3-terminated SAMs, similar to controls of tissue culture-treated polystyrene. Gene delivery via the NH2-SAM was further characterized as a function of coating time, virus concentration, and cell seeding density. Finally, SAM-mediated gene delivery was comparable to fibronectin- and poly-L-lysine-based methods for gene transfer. This work is significant to establishing safe and effective gene therapy strategies, developing efficient methods for gene delivery, and supporting recent progress in the field of biomaterial-mediated gene transfer. PMID:17698189

  20. Effects of Hormonal Contraception on Anti-Retroviral Drug Metabolism, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Andrea Ries; Anderson, Sharon; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2014-01-01

    Among women, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is most prevalent in those of reproductive age. These women are also at risk of unintended or mistimed pregnancies. Hormonal contraceptives (HCs) are one of the most commonly used methods of family planning world-wide. Therefore concurrent use of HC among women on anti-retroviral medications (ARVs) is increasingly common. ARVs are being investigated and have been approved for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and therefore drug-drug interactions must also be considered in HIV-1 negative women who want to prevent both unintended pregnancy and HIV-1 infection. This article will review four main interactions: (1) the effect of HCs on ARV pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) during therapy, (2) the effect of ARVs on HC PK and PD, (3) the role of drug transporters on drug-drug interactions and (4) ongoing research into the effect of HCs on pre-exposure prophylaxis PK and PD. PMID:24521428

  1. Serial bone marrow transplantation reveals in vivo expression of the pCLPG retroviral vector

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene therapy in the hematopoietic system remains promising, though certain aspects of vector design, such as transcriptional control elements, continue to be studied. Our group has developed a retroviral vector where transgene expression is controlled by p53 with the intention of harnessing the dynamic and inducible nature of this tumor suppressor and transcription factor. We present here a test of in vivo expression provided by the p53-responsive vector, pCLPG. For this, we used a model of serial transplantation of transduced bone marrow cells. Results We observed, by flow cytometry, that the eGFP transgene was expressed at higher levels when the pCLPG vector was used as compared to the parental pCL retrovirus, where expression is directed by the native MoMLV LTR. Expression from the pCLPG vector was longer lasting, but did decay along with each sequential transplant. The detection of eGFP-positive cells containing either vector was successful only in the bone marrow compartment and was not observed in peripheral blood, spleen or thymus. Conclusions These findings indicate that the p53-responsive pCLPG retrovirus did offer expression in vivo and at a level that surpassed the non-modified, parental pCL vector. Our results indicate that the pCLPG platform may provide some advantages when applied in the hematopoietic system. PMID:20096105

  2. Long-Term Expression of Human Adenosine Deaminase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats: A Model for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Carmel M.; Clowes, Monika M.; Osborne, William R. A.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Dusty Miller, A.

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli β-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  3. PAATCH: Program of Auditory Articulation Therapy for Children. Expanded Version. New Carryover Home Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Diane Pagnotto

    This program of auditory articulation therapy de-emphasizes production-oriented therapy in working with unintelligible 3-to-6-year-old children. It proposes auditory training activities, which train the child's ears on all sounds in error in order to facilitate readiness for correct production of sounds. Production training is then suggested for…

  4. Neuropathic and neurocongnitive complications of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Suvada, Jose

    2013-09-01

    The neurologic events related to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected ART-naive patients are relatively common. Side effects of ART and complications of HIV infection may overlap significantly. Establishing etiology of neurologic (neuropathy and neuropathic pain, changes in cognition, dementia, and myelopathy) and psychiatric (neurocognitive disorders, depression, anxiety, substance abuse and dependence, and others) complications can present a significant challenge. It has long been documented that neurologic and psychological side effects can occur with many of the agents used to treat HIV infection. Particularly, efavirenz from the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) has been associated with neurologic and psychological complaints that may be difficult to differentiate from pre-existing mental illness, substance abuse, and HIV-related neuropsychiatric symptoms. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) of at least 6 different types is a well-known adverse effect of treatment with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in HIV-infected patients. Lack of dealing with early stages of neurologic and psychological side effects of HIV infection and Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy (HAART) are observed in daily practice. The purpose of this article is to identify the neurologic, neuropsychiatric and psychiatric complications related to HIV and anti-retroviral therapy, to discuss current knowledge about these disorders, and to suggest strategies for their diagnosis and management. PMID:24013599

  5. Modulation of retroviral restriction and proteasome inhibitor-resistant turnover by changes in the TRIM5alpha B-box 2 domain.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kar, Alak; Perron, Michel; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Javanbakht, Hassan; Li, Xing; Sodroski, Joseph

    2007-10-01

    An intact B-box 2 domain is essential for the antiretroviral activity of TRIM5alpha. We modeled the structure of the B-box 2 domain of TRIM5alpha based on the existing three-dimensional structure of the B-box 2 domain of human TRIM29. Using this model, we altered the residues predicted to be exposed on the surface of this globular structure. Most of the alanine substitutions in these residues exerted little effect on the antiretroviral activity of human TRIM5alphahu or rhesus monkey TRIM5alpharh. However, alteration of arginine 119 of TRIM5alphahu or the corresponding arginine 121 of TRIM5alpharh diminished the abilities of the proteins to restrict retroviral infection without affecting trimerization or recognition of the viral capsid. The abilities of these functionally defective TRIM5alpha proteins to accelerate the uncoating of the targeted retroviral capsid were abolished. Removal of the positively charged side chain from B-box 2 arginines 119/120/121 resulted in diminished proteasome-independent turnover of TRIM5alpha and the related restriction factor TRIMCyp. However, testing of an array of mutants revealed that the rapid turnover and retroviral restriction functions of this B-box 2 region are separable. PMID:17626085

  6. Onco-exaptation of an endogenous retroviral LTR drives IRF5 expression in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Babaian, A; Romanish, M T; Gagnier, L; Kuo, L Y; Karimi, M M; Steidl, C; Mager, D L

    2016-05-12

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is upregulated in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and is a key regulator of the aberrant transcriptome characteristic of this disease. Here we show that IRF5 upregulation in HL is driven by transcriptional activation of a normally dormant endogenous retroviral LOR1a long terminal repeat (LTR) upstream of IRF5. Specifically, through screening of RNA-sequencing libraries, we detected LTR-IRF5 chimeric transcripts in multiple HL cell lines but not in normal B-cell controls. In HL, the LTR was in an open and hypomethylated epigenetic state, and we further show the LTR is the site of transcriptional initiation. Among HL cell lines, usage of the LTR promoter strongly correlates with overall levels of IRF5 mRNA and protein, indicating that LTR transcriptional awakening is a major contributor to IRF5 upregulation in HL. Taken together, oncogenic IRF5 overexpression in HL is the result of a specific LTR transcriptional activation. We propose that such LTR derepression is a distinct mechanism of oncogene activation ('onco-exaptation'), and that such a mechanism warrants further investigation in molecular and cancer research. PMID:26279299

  7. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  8. The Effects of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy on Activities Important to Independent School Participation of Children with Hemiparesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy) on activities important to school participation in children with hemiparesis. Four children, ages 4-0 to 7-10 participated in an intensive CI therapy program in a clinical setting. Constraining casts were worn 24 hours daily. Therapy was delivered 6 hours…

  9. Retroviral envelope syncytin capture in an ancestrally diverged mammalian clade for placentation in the primitive Afrotherian tenrecs

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Malicorne, Sébastien; Souquere, Sylvie; Tzika, Athanasia C.; Goodman, Steven M.; Catzeflis, François; Robinson, Terence J.; Milinkovitch, Michel C.; Pierron, Gérard; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Syncytins are fusogenic envelope (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Syncytins have been identified in Euarchontoglires (primates, rodents, Leporidae) and Laurasiatheria (Carnivora, ruminants) placental mammals. Here, we searched for similar genes in species that retained characteristic features of primitive mammals, namely the Malagasy and mainland African Tenrecidae. They belong to the superorder Afrotheria, an early lineage that diverged from Euarchotonglires and Laurasiatheria 100 Mya, during the Cretaceous terrestrial revolution. An in silico search for env genes with full coding capacity within a Tenrecidae genome identified several candidates, with one displaying placenta-specific expression as revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a large panel of Setifer setosus tissues. Cloning of this endogenous retroviral env gene demonstrated fusogenicity in an ex vivo cell–cell fusion assay on a panel of mammalian cells. Refined analysis of placental architecture and ultrastructure combined with in situ hybridization demonstrated specific expression of the gene in multinucleate cellular masses and layers at the materno–fetal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. This gene, which we named “syncytin-Ten1,” is conserved among Tenrecidae, with evidence of purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. To our knowledge, it is the first syncytin identified to date within the ancestrally diverged Afrotheria superorder. PMID:25267646

  10. Biologic therapy improves psoriasis by decreasing the activity of monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Keiichi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Yamagiwa, Akisa; Saeki, Hidehisa; Kondo, Makoto; Gabazza, Esteban C; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Therapy with monoclonal antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the interleukin (IL)-12/23 p40 subunit has significantly improved the clinical outcome of patients with psoriasis. These antibodies inhibit the effects of the target cytokines and thus the major concern during their use is the induction of excessive immunosuppression. Recent studies evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of biologic therapy in psoriasis have shown no significant appearance of serious adverse effects including infections and malignancies. However, the immunological consequence and the mechanism by which the blockade of a single cytokine by biologics can successfully control the activity of psoriasis remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effect of biologic therapy on cytokine production of various lymphocytes and on the activity of monocytes and neutrophils in psoriatic patients. Neutrophils, monocytes and T cells were purified from heparinized peripheral venous blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and γ-interferon, TNF-α and IL-17 production from lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometer. The activation maker of neutrophils and the activated subsets of monocytes were also analyzed. Biologic therapy induced no significant changes in the cytokine production by lymphocytes from the skin and gut-homing T cells. However, neutrophil activity and the ratio of activated monocyte population increased in severely psoriatic patients were normalized in psoriatic patients receiving biologic therapy. The present study showed that biologic therapy ameliorates clinical symptoms and controls the immune response in patients with psoriasis. PMID:25099154

  11. Immune activation by combination human lymphokine-activated killer and dendritic cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    West, E J; Scott, K J; Jennings, V A; Melcher, A A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Optimal cellular immunotherapy for cancer should ideally harness both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. Lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAKs) can trigger early innate killing of tumour targets, whereas long-term adaptive-specific tumour control requires priming of CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) following acquisition of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). As DCs stimulate both innate and adaptive effectors, combination cell therapy using LAKs and DCs has the potential to maximise anti-tumour immune priming. Methods: Reciprocal activation between human clinical grade LAKs and DCs on co-culture, and its immune consequences, was monitored by cell phenotype, cytokine release and priming of both innate and adaptive cytotoxicity against melanoma targets. Results: Co-culture of DCs and LAKs led to phenotypic activation of natural killer (NK) cells within the LAK population, which was associated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines and enhanced innate cytotoxicity against tumour cell targets. The LAKs reciprocally matured DCs, and the combination of LAKs and DCs, on addition of melanoma cells, supported priming of specific anti-tumour CTLs better than DCs alone. Conclusion: Clinical-grade LAKs/DCs represents a practical, effective combination cell immunotherapy for stimulation of both innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity in cancer patients. PMID:21847125

  12. MuLV IN Mutants Responsive to HDAC Inhibitors Enhance Transcription from Unintegrated Retroviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, William M.; Wu, Dai-tze; Amin, Vaibhav; Aiyer, Sriram; Roth, Monica J.

    2012-01-01

    For Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV), sustained viral infections require expression from an integrated provirus. For many applications, non-integrating retroviral vectors have been utilized to avoid the unwanted effects of integration, however, the level of expression from unintegrated DNA is significantly less than that of integrated provirus. We find that unintegrated DNA expression can be increased in the presence of HDAC inhibitors, such as TSA, when applied in combination with integrase (IN) mutations. These mutants include an active site mutation as well as catalytically active INs bearing mutations of K376 in the MuLV C-terminal domain of IN. MuLV IN K376 is homologous to K266 in HIV-1 IN, a known substrate for acetylation. The MuLV IN protein is acetylated by p300 in vitro, however, the effect of HDAC inhibitors on gene expression from unintegrated DNA is not dependent on the acetylation state of MuLV IN K376. PMID:22365328

  13. B′-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Goedele N.

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B′ family of the regulatory subunits. B′-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B′ subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein–protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B′, which when mutated render B′ incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  14. B'-protein phosphatase 2A is a functional binding partner of delta-retroviral integrase.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Goedele N

    2016-01-01

    To establish infection, a retrovirus must insert a DNA copy of its RNA genome into host chromatin. This reaction is catalysed by the virally encoded enzyme integrase (IN) and is facilitated by viral genus-specific host factors. Herein, cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is identified as a functional IN binding partner exclusive to δ-retroviruses, including human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). PP2A is a heterotrimer composed of a scaffold, catalytic and one of any of four families of regulatory subunits, and the interaction is specific to the B' family of the regulatory subunits. B'-PP2A and HTLV-1 IN display nuclear co-localization, and the B' subunit stimulates concerted strand transfer activity of δ-retroviral INs in vitro. The protein-protein interaction interface maps to a patch of highly conserved residues on B', which when mutated render B' incapable of binding to and stimulating HTLV-1 and -2 IN strand transfer activity. PMID:26657642

  15. Effects of stoichiometry of retroviral components on virus production.

    PubMed

    Yap, M W; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    2000-09-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of increasing the amount of each retroviral component on vector production. It was found that, while the components of both amphotropic and ecotropic vectors were expressed independently of each other in a transient transfection system, increasing the amount of the gag/gag-pol component resulted in a decrease in virus titres for the amphotropic particles but not ecotropic particles. Analyses of the virus stocks produced indicated that the negative effect on titres was closely linked to the availability of envelope proteins for virion incorporation. The negative effect was not observed for ecotropic particle production in 293T cells, where the ecotropic receptor was absent, but was manifested when production was conducted in 293/12 cells expressing the ecotropic receptor. This suggested that the premature interaction between envelope and receptor in producer cells could limit the amount of envelope available for virion incorporation. In designing optimal vector production systems it is essential, therefore, to balance the concentration of the vector components and to ensure that there is never an excess of Gag/Gag-Pol. PMID:10950977

  16. Retroviral DNA Integration Directed by HIV Integration Protein in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Fujiwara, Tamio; Craigie, Robert

    1990-09-01

    Efficient retroviral growth requires integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. As a first step in analyzing the mechanism of integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA, a cell-free system was established that models the integration reaction. The in vitro system depends on the HIV integration (IN) protein, which was partially purified from insect cells engineered to express IN protein in large quantities. Integration was detected in a biological assay that scores the insertion of a linear DNA containing HIV terminal sequences into a λ DNA target. Some integration products generated in this assay contained five-base pair duplications of the target DNA at the recombination junctions, a characteristic of HIV integration in vivo; the remaining products contained aberrant junctional sequences that may have been produced in a variation of the normal reaction. These results indicate that HIV IN protein is the only viral protein required to insert model HIV DNA sequences into a target DNA in vitro.

  17. Retroviral Vectors for Analysis of Viral Mutagenesis and Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Jonathan M.O.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved. PMID:25254386

  18. Epigenetics, drugs of abuse, and the retroviral promoter

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Jasmine; Shah, Sonia; Sagar, Divya; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K.; Jain, Pooja

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse alone has been shown to cause epigenetic changes in brain tissue that have been shown to play roles in addictive behaviors. In conjunction with HIV-1 infection, it can cause epigenetic changes at the viral promoter that can result in altered gene expression, and exacerbate disease progression overall. This review entails an in-depth look at research conducted on the epigenetic effects of three of the most widely abused drugs (cannabinoids, opioids, and cocaine), with a particular focus on the mechanisms through which these drugs interact with HIV-1 infection at the viral promoter. Here we discuss the impact of this interplay on disease progression from the point of view of the nature of gene regulation at the level of chromatin accessibility, chromatin remodeling, and nucleosome repositioning. Given the importance of chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation in controlling the retroviral promoter, and the high susceptibility of the drug abusing population of individuals to HIV infection, it would be beneficial to understand the way in which the host genome is modified and regulated by drugs of abuse. PMID:24218017

  19. A revised nomenclature for transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and ERV-like sequences comprise 8% of the human genome. A hitherto unknown proportion of ERV loci are transcribed and thus contribute to the human transcriptome. A small proportion of these loci encode functional proteins. As the role of ERVs in normal and diseased biological processes is not yet established, transcribed ERV loci are of particular interest. As more transcribed ERV loci are likely to be identified in the near future, the development of a systematic nomenclature is important to ensure that all information on each locus can be easily retrieved. Results Here we present a revised nomenclature of transcribed human endogenous retroviral loci that sorts loci into groups based on Repbase classifications. Each symbol is of the format ERV + group symbol + unique number. Group symbols are based on a mixture of Repbase designations and well-supported symbols used in the literature. The presented guidelines will allow newly identified loci to be easily incorporated into the scheme. Conclusions The naming system will be employed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for naming transcribed human ERV loci. We hope that the system will contribute to clarifying a certain aspect of a sometimes confusing nomenclature for human endogenous retroviruses. The presented system may also be employed for naming transcribed loci of human non-ERV repeat loci. PMID:21542922

  20. Evaluation of retroviral vector design in defined chromosomal loci by Flp-mediated cassette replacement.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, E; Hauser, H; Wirth, D

    2001-05-20

    Successful retroviral vector construction is still empirical. Test systems for vector efficiency are based on statistical comparison of numerous infectants with single proviral integrates, since their expression depends on the chromosomal surroundings. More reliable data would be obtained if different vector constructs were studied in an identical chromosomal context. Here, we demonstrate the use of a new method, in which chromosomal sites are provirally tagged in such a way that they can be targeted with other expression cassettes. The original tagging integrate is replaced in one step by the targeting element. This permits a reliable comparison of different retroviral vector configurations, eliminating the influence of neighboring chromosomal elements. We compared different retroviral vector types for coexpression of two genes: a vector containing an internal promoter and a vector with an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. In contrast to bicistronic retroviral vectors, dual-promoter proviruses exhibited rapid inactivation of the long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven gene expression. Targeted exchange of the dual-promoter provirus with a bicistronic retroviral cassette resulted in gain of expression stability. The reverse experiment confirmed this promoter interaction phenomenon since initial expression stability from a single-promoter bicistronic provirus was lost by targeted exchange with a dual-promoter cassette. In addition, targeting exchange of the dual-promoter provirus, replacing the LTR with an artificial (Tet) promoter restored expression stability. These observations, valid for various integration sites, prove the strong interaction between the LTR and the internal promoter. Our results have implications for retroviral vector design and suggest that retroviral coexpression of two genes is more predictable in the bicistronic configuration. PMID:11387058

  1. Aptamers: Active Targeting Ligands for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment. PMID:25699094

  2. Reduction of salivary tissue factor (thromboplastin) activity by warfarin therapy.

    PubMed

    Zacharski, L R; Rosenstein, R

    1979-03-01

    The coagulant of normal human saliva has been identified as tissue factor (thromboplastin, TF) by virtue of its ability to cause rapid coagulation in plasmas deficient in first-stage coagulation factors and to activate factor x in the presence of factor VII and by virtue of the fact that its activity is expressed only in the presence of factor VII and is inhibited by an antibody to TF. The TF is related to cells and cell fragments in saliva. Salivary TF activity has been found to be significantly reduced in patients taking warfarin. The decline in TF activity during induction of warfarin anticoagulation occurs during the warfarin-induced decline in vitamin-K-dependent clotting factor activity, as judged by the prothrombin time. The decrease in TF activity is not related to a reduction in salivary cell count or total protein content or to a direct effect of warfarin on the assay. It is hypothesized that the mechanism by which warfarin inhibits TF activity may be related to the mechanism by which it inhibits expression of the activity of the vitamin-K-dependent clotting factors. Inhibition of the TF activity may be involved in the antithrombotic effect of warfarin. PMID:760859

  3. [Therapy of activated gonarthrosis with etofenamate cream (Rheumon cream)].

    PubMed

    Gross, W

    1983-11-17

    In a multicenter single-blind study on 60 patients with unilateral gonarthrosis the efficacy and tolerance of etofenamate cream were compared to a commonly used ointment containing salicylic acid and other ingredients. With respect to therapeutic success etofenamate was superior to the control medication. Mobility and circumference of the knee joint as well as pain parameters improved more rapidly in the etofenamate group, whereby the difference between both groups frequently was statistically significant. With the control medication therapy failed in three cases, with etofenamate cream clinical symptoms improved in all patients. With the exception of a transient local reddening of the skin in one patient of the etofenamate group no adverse drug reactions were observed. PMID:6654301

  4. Peptide nanofibrils boost retroviral gene transfer and provide a rapid means for concentrating viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolamanova, Maral; Meier, Christoph; Shaytan, Alexey K.; Vas, Virag; Bertoncini, Carlos W.; Arnold, Franziska; Zirafi, Onofrio; Usmani, Shariq M.; Müller, Janis A.; Sauter, Daniel; Goffinet, Christine; Palesch, David; Walther, Paul; Roan, Nadia R.; Geiger, Hartmut; Lunov, Oleg; Simmet, Thomas; Bohne, Jens; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Schwarz, Klaus; Ständker, Ludger; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Salvatella, Xavier; Khalatur, Pavel G.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Weil, Tanja; Kirchhoff, Frank; Münch, Jan

    2013-02-01

    Inefficient gene transfer and low virion concentrations are common limitations of retroviral transduction. We and others have previously shown that peptides derived from human semen form amyloid fibrils that boost retroviral gene delivery by promoting virion attachment to the target cells. However, application of these natural fibril-forming peptides is limited by moderate efficiencies, the high costs of peptide synthesis, and variability in fibril size and formation kinetics. Here, we report the development of nanofibrils that self-assemble in aqueous solution from a 12-residue peptide, termed enhancing factor C (EF-C). These artificial nanofibrils enhance retroviral gene transfer substantially more efficiently than semen-derived fibrils or other transduction enhancers. Moreover, EF-C nanofibrils allow the concentration of retroviral vectors by conventional low-speed centrifugation, and are safe and effective, as assessed in an ex vivo gene transfer study. Our results show that EF-C fibrils comprise a highly versatile, convenient and broadly applicable nanomaterial that holds the potential to significantly facilitate retroviral gene transfer in basic research and clinical applications.

  5. Growth factor enhanced retroviral gene transfer to the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    King, L A; Mitrophanous, K A; Clark, L A; Kim, V N; Rohll, J B; Kingsman, A J; Colello, R J

    2000-07-01

    The use of viral vectors for gene delivery into mammalian cells provides a new approach in the treatment of many human diseases. The first viral vector approved for human clinical trials was murine leukemia virus (MLV), which remains the most commonly used vector in clinical trials to date. However, the application of MLV vectors is limited since MLV requires cells to be actively dividing in order for transduction and therefore gene delivery to occur. This limitation precludes the use of MLV for delivering genes to the adult CNS, where very little cell division is occurring. However, we speculated that this inherent limitation of ML V may be overcome by utilizing the known mitogenic effect of growth factors on cells of the CNS. Specifically, an in vivo application of growth factor to the adult brain, if able to induce cell division, could enhance MLV-based gene transfer to the adult brain. We now show that an exogenous application of basic fibroblast growth factor induces cell division in vivo. Under these conditions, where cells of the adult brain are stimulated to divide, MLV-based gene transfer is significantly enhanced. This novel approach precludes any vector modifications and provides a simple and effective way of delivering genes to cells of the adult brain utilizing MLV-based retroviral vectors. PMID:10918476

  6. Retroviral infection of non-dividing cells: Old and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Masahiro; Emerman, Michael . E-mail: memerman@fhcrc.org

    2006-01-05

    The dependence of retroviral replication on cell proliferation was described as early as 1958, although different classes of retroviruses are able to infect non-dividing cells with different efficiencies. For example, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other lentiviruses infect most non-dividing cells nearly as well as dividing cells, while the gammaretroviruses such as the murine leukemia virus (MLV) cannot infect non-dividing cells, and other retroviruses have intermediate phenotypes. One exception to the ability of HIV to infect non-dividing cells involves resting CD4+ T cells in vitro where there are multiple restrictions. However, recent data show that there is massive infection of non-activated CD4+ T cell during acute infection which suggests that the situation is different in vivo. Finally, much work trying to explain the difference between HIV and MLV in non-dividing cells has focused on describing the ability of HIV to enter the nucleus during interphase. However, we suggest that events in the viral lifecycle other than nuclear import may be more important in determining the ability of a given retrovirus to infect non-dividing cells.

  7. Isolation, characterization, and genetic complementation of a cellular mutant resistant to retroviral infection

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sumit; Harada, Josephine; Schreifels, Jeffrey; Lech, Patrycja; Nikolai, Bryan; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Chanda, Sumit K.; Somia, Nikunj V.

    2006-01-01

    By using a genetic screen, we have isolated a mammalian cell line that is resistant to infection by retroviruses that are derived from the murine leukemia virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and feline immunodeficiency virus. We demonstrate that the cell line is genetically recessive for the resistance, and hence it is lacking a factor enabling infection by retroviruses. The block to infection is early in the life cycle, at the poorly understood uncoating stage. We implicate the proteasome at uncoating by completely rescuing the resistant phenotype with the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132. We further report on the complementation cloning of a gene (MRI, modulator of retrovirus infection) that can also act to reverse the inhibition of infection in the mutant cell line. These data implicate a role for the proteasome during uncoating, and they suggest that MRI is a regulator of this activity. Finally, we reconcile our findings and other published data to suggest a model for the involvement of the proteasome in the early phase of the retroviral life cycle. PMID:17043244

  8. Outer domains of integrase within retroviral intasomes are dispensible for catalysis of DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Lin, Shiqiang; Craigie, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Retroviral DNA integration is mediated by nucleoprotein complexes (intasomes) comprising a pair of viral DNA ends synapsed by a tetramer of integrase. Current integrase inhibitors act on intasomes rather than free integrase protein. Structural and functional studies of intasomes are essential to understand their mechanism of action and how the virus can escape by mutation. To date, prototype foamy virus (PFV) is the only retrovirus for which high-resolution structures of intasomes have been determined. In the PFV intasome structure, only the core domains of the outer subunits are ordered; the N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain, and N-terminal extension domain are disordered. Are these "missing domains" required for function or are they dispensable? We have devised a strategy to assemble "hetero-intasomes" in which the outer domains are not present as a tool to assess the functional role of the missing domains for catalysis of integration. We find that the disordered domains of outer subunits are not required for intasome assembly or catalytic activity as catalytic core domains can substitute for the outer subunits in the case of both PFV and HIV-1 intasomes. PMID:26537415

  9. Host factors in retroviral integration and the selection of integration target sites

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to replicate, a retrovirus must integrate a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host cell. The study of retroviral integration has advanced considerably in the last few years. Here we focus on host factor interactions and the linked area of integration targeting. Genome-wide screens for cellular factors affecting HIV replication have identified a series of host cell proteins that may mediate subcellular trafficking of integration complexes, nuclear import, and integration target site selection. The cell transcriptional co-activator protein LEDGF/p75 has been identified as a tethering factor important for HIV integration, and recently, BET proteins (Brd2, 4, and 4) have been identified as tethering factors for the gammaretroviruses. A new class of HIV inhibitors has been developed targeting the HIV-1 IN-LEDGF binding site, though surprisingly these inhibitors appear to block assembly late during replication and do not act at the integration step. Going forward, genome-wide studies of HIV-host interactions offer many new starting points to investigate HIV replication and identify potential new inhibitor targets. PMID:26104434

  10. Occupational, Physical, and Speech Therapy Treatment Activities during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Horn, Susan D.; Giuffrida, Clare G.; Timpson, Misti L.; Carroll, Deborah M.; Smout, Randy J.; Hammond, Flora M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe use of Occupational Therapy (OT), Physical Therapy (PT) and Speech Therapy (ST) treatment activities throughout the acute rehabilitation stay of patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Design Multi-site prospective observational cohort study. Setting 9 U.S. and 1 Canadian inpatient rehabilitation settings. Participants 2130 patients admitted for initial acute rehabilitation following TBI. Patients were categorized based on admission FIM cognitive scores, resulting in 5 fairly homogenous groups. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Percentage of patients engaged in specific activities and mean time patients engaged in the activities, per 10-hour block of time for OT, PT, and ST combined. Results Therapy activities in OT, PT, and ST across all 5 cognitive groups had a primary focus on basic activities. While advanced activities occurred in each discipline and within each cognitive group, these advanced activities occurred with fewer patients and usually only toward the end of the rehabilitation stay. Conclusions The pattern of activities engaged in was both similar to and different from patterns seen in previous PBE studies with different rehabilitation diagnostic groups. PMID:26212399

  11. Selection of Novel Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein Variants from a Peptide Insertion Library for Enhanced Purification of Retroviral and Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Julie H.; Schaffer, David V.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of new features or functions that are not present in an original protein is a significant challenge in protein engineering. For example, modifications to vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G), which is commonly used to pseudotype retroviral and lentiviral vectors for gene delivery, have been hindered by a lack of structural knowledge of the protein. We have developed a transposon-based approach that randomly incorporates designed polypeptides throughout a protein to generate saturated insertion libraries and a subsequent high-throughput selection process in mammalian cells that enables the identification of optimal insertion sites for a novel designed functionality. This method was applied to VSV-G in order to construct a comprehensive library of mutants whose combined members have a His6 tag inserted at likely every site in the original protein sequence. Selecting the library via iterative retroviral infections of mammalian cells led to the identification of several VSV-G-His6 variants that were able to package high-titer viral vectors and could be purified by Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Column purification of vectors reduced protein and DNA impurities more than 5,000-fold and 14,000-fold, respectively, from the viral supernatant. This substantially improved purity elicited a weaker immune response in the brain, without altering the infectivity or tropism from wild-type VSV-G-pseudotyped vectors. This work applies a powerful new tool for protein engineering to construct novel viral envelope variants that can greatly improve the safety and use of retroviral and lentiviral vectors for clinical gene therapy. Furthermore, this approach of library generation and selection can readily be extended to other challenges in protein engineering. PMID:16537595

  12. A transient three-plasmid expression system for the production of high titer retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Soneoka, Y; Cannon, P M; Ramsdale, E E; Griffiths, J C; Romano, G; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1995-02-25

    We have constructed a series of MLV-based retroviral vectors and packaging components expressed from the CMV promoter and carried on plasmids containing SV40 origins of replication. These two features greatly enhanced retroviral gene expression when introduced into cell lines carrying the SV40 large T antigen. The two packaging components, gag-pol and env, were placed on separate plasmids to reduce helper virus formation. Using a highly transfectable human cell line and sodium butyrate to further increase expression of each component, we achieved helper-free viral stocks of approximately 10(7) infectious units/ml by 48 h after transient co-transfection with the three plasmid components. This system can be used both for the generation of high titer retroviral stocks for transduction and for the rapid screening of a large number of MLV gag-pol or env mutants. PMID:7899083

  13. Effectiveness of virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers in a military mental health clinic.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Holloway, Kevin M; Candy, Colette; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Difede, JoAnn; Rizzo, Albert A; Gahm, Gregory A

    2011-02-01

    Exposure therapy is an evidence-based treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but research evaluating its effectiveness with active duty service members is limited. This report examines the effectiveness of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRE) for active duty soldiers (N = 24) seeking treatment following a deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. Relative to their pretreatment self-reported symptoms on the PTSD Checklist, Military Version (M = 60.92; SD = 11.03), patients reported a significant reduction at posttreatment (M = 47.08; SD = 12.70; p < .001). Sixty-two percent of patients (n = 15) reported a reliable change of 11 points or more. This study supports the effectiveness of exposure therapy for active duty soldiers and extends previous research on VRE to this population. PMID:21294166

  14. Human miR223 Promoter as a Novel Myelo-Specific Promoter for Chronic Granulomatous Disease Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brendel, Christian; Hänseler, Walther; Wohlgensinger, Vital; Bianchi, Matteo; Tokmak, Serap; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Kuzmenko, Elena; Cesarovic, Nikola; Nicholls, Flora; Reichenbach, Janine; Seger, Reinhard; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Targeting transgene expression to specific hematopoietic cell lineages could contribute to the safety of retroviral vectors in gene therapeutic applications. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a defect of phagocytic cells, can be managed by gene therapy, using retroviral vectors with targeted expression to myeloid cells. In this context, we analyzed the myelospecificity of the human miR223 promoter, which is known to be strongly upregulated during myeloid differentiation, to drive myeloid-restricted expression of p47phox and gp91phox in mouse models of CGD and in primary patient-derived cells. The miR223 promoter restricted the expression of p47phox, gp91phox, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) within self-inactivating (SIN) gamma- and lentiviral vectors to granulocytes and macrophages, with only marginal expression in lymphocytes or hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Furthermore, gene transfer into primary CD34+ cells derived from a p47phox patient followed by ex vivo differentiation to neutrophils resulted in restoration of Escherichia coli killing activity by miR223 promoter–mediated p47phox expression. These results indicate that the miR223 promoter as an internal promoter within SIN gene therapy vectors is able to efficiently correct the CGD phenotype with negligible activity in hematopoietic progenitors, thereby limiting the risk of insertional oncogenesis and development of clonal dominance. PMID:23489116

  15. Quantum chemical modelling of reactivity and selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topol, Igor A.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.; Burt, Stanley K.

    Interactions of 1,2-dithiolane species with zinc-containing sites, which mimic the zinc finger domains of retroviral and the cellular zinc finger proteins, have been investigated by quantum chemistry tools. According to the calculations, the immediate domains of zinc binding sites in the cellular and retroviral zinc fingers interact differently with such agents of the disulphide family. Thus, when approaching the model cellular-type domains, the molecules of 1,2-dithiolanes experience considerable potential barriers along the reaction path. However, these species react practically barrier-less with the model retroviral-type domains at the correlated DFT level. The results of the quantum chemical modelling provide firm support to the selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers. This can be of great practical importance for the design of therapeutics that accomplish functional inactivation of the zinc fingers of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) retroviral type nucleocapsid protein NCp7.

  16. [Evaluating influence of Captopril therapy on occupational activity of engine operators with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Serikov, V V; Kolyagin, V Ya; Bogdanova, V E

    2016-01-01

    The article covers results of study concerning influence of Captopril (25 mg) therapy on occupational activity of locomotive crew workers in real night travels model on training complex "EP1M locomotive operator cabin". Findings are that single use of Captopril (25 mg) in modelled railway activity enabled to increase reliability of occupational activity, that manifested in lower number of errors in locomotive operators' actions at night, and in psychophysiologic regulation of various psychic acts. PMID:27396147

  17. Identification of Phe187 as a crucial dimerization determinant facilitates crystallization of a monomeric retroviral integrase core domain.

    PubMed

    Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2014-10-01

    Retroviral DNA integration into the host genome is mediated by nucleoprotein assemblies containing tetramers of viral integrase (IN). Whereas the fully active form of IN comprises a dimer of dimers, the molecular basis of IN multimerization has not been fully characterized. IN has consistently been crystallized in an analogous dimeric form in all crystallographic structures and experimental evidence as to the level of similarity between IN monomeric and dimeric conformations is missing because of the lack of IN monomeric structures. Here we identify Phe187 as a critical dimerization determinant of IN from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus that causes AIDS in the natural host, and report, in addition to a canonical dimeric structure of the FIV IN core-domain, a monomeric structure revealing the preservation of the backbone structure between the two multimeric forms and suggest a role for Phe187 in "hinging" the flexible IN dimer. PMID:25199694

  18. Retroviral Cyclin Controls Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 8-Mediated Transcription Elongation and Reinitiation

    PubMed Central

    Birkenheuer, Claire H.; Brewster, Connie D.; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) infection is associated with the seasonal development and regression of walleye dermal sarcoma. Previous work showed that the retroviral cyclin (RV-cyclin), encoded by WDSV, has separable cyclin box and transcription activation domains. It binds to cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and enhances its kinase activity. CDK8 is evolutionarily conserved and is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. It is normally activated by cyclin C and is required for transcription elongation of the serum response genes (immediate early genes [IEGs]) FOS, EGR1, and cJUN. The IEGs drive cell proliferation, and their expression is brief and highly regulated. Here we show that constitutive expression of RV-cyclin in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line significantly increases the level of IEG expression in response to serum stimulation. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and nuclear run-on assays provide evidence that RV-cyclin does not alter the initiation of IEG transcription but does enhance the overall rate of transcription elongation and maintains transcription reinitiation. RV-cyclin does not increase activating phosphorylation events in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and does not inhibit decay of IEG mRNAs. At the EGR1 gene locus, RV-cyclin increases and maintains RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy after serum stimulation, in conjunction with increased and extended EGR1 gene expression. The RV-cyclin increases CDK8 occupancy at the EGR1 gene locus before and after serum stimulation. Both of RV-cyclin's functional domains, i.e., the cyclin box and the activation domain, are necessary for the overall enhancement of IEG expression. RV-cyclin presents a novel and ancient mechanism of retrovirus-induced oncogenesis. IMPORTANCE The data reported here are important to both virology and cancer biology. The novel mechanism pinpoints CDK8 in the development of walleye dermal sarcoma and sheds light on CDK8's role in

  19. [Ergotism due to simultaneous use of ergot alkaloids and high activity antiretroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes M, Daniel; Blanco L, Sergio; Ramírez F, Camila

    2016-06-01

    High activity antiretroviral therapy may exacerbate the activity of ergot alkaloids due to an inhibition of cytochrome P450. We report a 57 years old female with AIDS treated with lamivudine, zidovudine, atazanavir, ritonavir and cotrimoxazole presenting with ischemic signs in the four limbs. There was acrocyanosis and weak radial and ulnar pulses. A family member referred that the patient used ergot alkaloids for headaches. An ergotism due to the simultaneous use of ergot alkaloids and antiretroviral therapy was suspected. The latter was discontinued and intravenous nitroglycerin, nifedipine and pentoxifyline were started with good results. PMID:27598502

  20. Cytochrome P450-based cancer gene therapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Kan, On; Kingsman, Susan; Naylor, Stuart

    2002-12-01

    Results from a number of preclinical studies have demonstrated that a P450-based gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) strategy for the treatment of cancer is both safe and efficacious. This strategy has now moved forward into the clinic. At least two different approaches using different delivery methods (retroviral vector MetXia [Oxford BioMedica] and encapsulated P450 expressing cells), different cytochrome P450 isoforms (human CYP2B6 versus rat CYP2B1) and different prodrugs (cyclophosphamide [CPA] versus ifosfamide [IFA]) have concluded Phase I/II clinical trial with encouraging results. In the future, P450-based GDEPT can potentially be further enhanced by improved vectors for P450 gene delivery and disease-targeted promoters for focused gene expression at the target site. In addition, there is scope for developing synthetic P450s and their respective prodrugs to improve both enzyme kinetics and the profile of the active moiety. PMID:12517265

  1. Safety testing for replication-competent retrovirus associated with gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Reeves, L; Cornetta, K

    2001-01-01

    The potential pathogenicity of replication-competent retroviruses (RCR) requires vigilant testing to exclude inadvertent contamination of clinical gene therapy vector products with RCR. Pseudotyped vectors using the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) envelope have entered into clinical trials but specific recommendations regarding methods for screening of vector product and analysis of clinical samples have not been set forth. Unfortunately, current screening assays used for detecting amphotropic RCR are not suitable for GALV-pseudotyped RCR. We modified the extended S+/L- assay for RCR detection by using human 293 cells for virus amplification. Of five cell lines tested, 293 cells were selected because they combined a high transduction efficiency and an ability to generate RCR at high titer. After optimizing the amplification assay, a dilution of GALV virus could consistently be detected at a dilution of 10(-6). In coculture experiments, one GALV-infected cell could be consistently detected in 10(6) uninfected cells. A PCR-based assay was developed that was capable of detecting 100 copies of a GALV envelope containing plasmid diluted in 1 microg of DNA obtained from uninfected cells. PCR was also able to detect one GALV-infected cell in 10(6) uninfected cells. These assays will be suitable for testing of vector preparations and for monitoring of clinical samples from patients treated in clinical gene therapy protocols. The assays developed are similar in methodology and sensitivity to those currently used for certification of amphotropic retroviral vectors. PMID:11177543

  2. Unilateral baroreceptor activation therapy: the beauty of asymmetry.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    With respect to paired internal organs, we commonly think that these are symmetrical and have identical physiological functions. This, however, appears not to be the case. A particular organ where asymmetry comes to expression is the baroreceptor system. Clinical data in patients with resistant hypertension who are treated with device-based baroreceptor activation clearly show that there are functional differences between the left and the right baroreceptor systems. This has implications for our understanding of certain diseases. PMID:26106932

  3. Asymmetric thoracic metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) activity due to prior radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xia; Yang, Hua; Zhuang, Hongming

    2015-06-01

    A 5-year-old patient suffered Horner syndrome, which was caused by a neuroblastoma in the left apex of the lung shown on the initial I-MIBG scan. After the surgical resection and external radiation to the left lung field, a follow-up I-MIBG scan revealed significantly less MIBG activity in the left upper chest compared to the contralateral right upper chest. PMID:25742240

  4. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  5. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living. PMID:27065534

  6. Bicalutamide-activated oncolytic adenovirus for the adjuvant therapy of high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T J; Höti, N; Liu, C; Chowdhury, W H; Li, Y; Zhang, Y; Lupold, S E; Deweese, T; Rodriguez, R

    2013-07-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue-specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer (PCa) gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate-specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen-suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate-specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A and AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and nonsteroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR-responsive genes and E1A-responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of high-risk PCas. PMID:23764901

  7. Bicalutamide Activated Oncolytic Adenovirus for the Adjuvant Therapy of High Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara Jane; Hoti, Naser Uddin; Liu, Chunyan; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yonggang; Lupold, Shawn E.; DeWeese, Theodore; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A & AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and non-steroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR responsive genes and E1A responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens, and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of high-risk prostate cancers. PMID:23764901

  8. Photodynamic therapy for cancer and activation of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT for cancer due to the acute inflammatory response, exposure and presentation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins and other danger signals. Nevertheless effective, powerful tumor-specific immune response in both animal models and also in patients treated with PDT for cancer, is the exception rather than the rule. Research in our laboratory and also in others is geared towards identifying reasons for this sub-optimal immune response and discovering ways of maximizing it. Reasons why the immune response after PDT is less than optimal include the fact that tumor-antigens are considered to be self-like and poorly immunogenic, the tumor-mediated induction of CD4+CD25+foxP3+ regulatory T-cells (T-regs), that are able to inhibit both the priming and the effector phases of the cytotoxic CD8 T-cell anti-tumor response and the defects in dendritic cell maturation, activation and antigen-presentation that may also occur. Alternatively-activated macrophages (M2) have also been implicated. Strategies to overcome these immune escape mechanisms employed by different tumors include combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments such as products obtained from pathogenic microorganisms against which mammals have evolved recognition systems such as PAMPs and toll-like receptors (TLR). This paper will cover the use of CpG oligonucleotides (a TLR9 agonist found in bacterial DNA) to reverse dendritic cell dysfunction and methods to remove the immune suppressor effects of T-regs that are under active study.

  9. Chlorotoxin: Structure, activity, and potential uses in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Paola G; Wang, Conan K; Craik, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chlorotoxin is a disulfide-rich stable peptide from the venom of the Israeli scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus, which has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of cancer. Its ability to preferentially bind to tumor cells has been harnessed to develop an imaging agent to help visualize tumors during surgical resection. In addition, chlorotoxin has attracted interest as a vehicle to deliver anti-cancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. Given its interesting structural and biological properties, chlorotoxin also has the potential to be used in a variety of other biotechnology and biomedical applications. Here, we review the structure, activity and potential applications of chlorotoxin as a drug design scaffold. PMID:26418522

  10. Unciaphenol, an Oxygenated Analogue of the Bergman Cyclization Product of Uncialamycin Exhibits Anti-HIV Activity.

    PubMed

    Williams, David E; Bottriell, Helen; Davies, Julian; Tietjen, Ian; Brockman, Mark A; Andersen, Raymond J

    2015-11-01

    Unciaphenol (2), an oxygenated analogue of the Bergman cyclization product of the enediyne uncialamycin (1), has been isolated along with 1 from cultures of the actinomycete Streptomyces uncialis. It is proposed that the C-22 OH substituent in 2 might arise from the attack of a nucleophilic oxygen species on the p-benzyne diradical intermediate IA in the Bergman cyclization of 1. 2 shows in vitro anti-HIV activity against viral strains that are resistant to clinically utilized anti-retroviral therapies. PMID:26465962

  11. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy. PMID:26606454

  12. Local Sequence Targeting in the AID/APOBEC Family Differentially Impacts Retroviral Restriction and Antibody Diversification*

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Rahul M.; Maul, Robert W.; Guminski, Amy F.; McClure, Rhonda L.; Gajula, Kiran S.; Saribasak, Huseyin; McMahon, Moira A.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Stivers, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleic acid cytidine deaminases of the activation-induced deaminase (AID)/APOBEC family are critical players in active and innate immune responses, playing roles as target-directed, purposeful mutators. AID specifically deaminates the host immunoglobulin (Ig) locus to evolve antibody specificity, whereas its close relative, APOBEC3G (A3G), lethally mutates the genomes of retroviral pathogens such as HIV. Understanding the basis for the target-specific action of these enzymes is essential, as mistargeting poses significant risks, potentially promoting oncogenesis (AID) or fostering drug resistance (A3G). AID prefers to deaminate cytosine in WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs, whereas A3G favors deamination of CCC motifs. This specificity is largely dictated by a single, divergent protein loop in the enzyme family that recognizes the DNA sequence. Through grafting of this substrate-recognition loop, we have created enzyme variants of A3G and AID with altered local targeting to directly evaluate the role of sequence specificity on immune function. We find that grafted loops placed in the A3G scaffold all produced efficient restriction of HIV but that foreign loops in the AID scaffold compromised hypermutation and class switch recombination. Local targeting, therefore, appears alterable for innate defense against retroviruses by A3G but important for adaptive antibody maturation catalyzed by AID. Notably, AID targeting within the Ig locus is proportionally correlated to its in vitro ability to target WRC sequences rather than non-WRC sequences. Although other mechanisms may also contribute, our results suggest that local sequence targeting by AID/APOBEC3 enzymes represents an elegant example of co-evolution of enzyme specificity with its target DNA sequence. PMID:20929867

  13. Histone H3.3 is required for endogenous retroviral element silencing in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Elsässer, Simon J; Noh, Kyung-Min; Diaz, Nichole; Allis, C David; Banaszynski, Laura A

    2015-06-11

    Transposable elements comprise roughly 40% of mammalian genomes. They have an active role in genetic variation, adaptation and evolution through the duplication or deletion of genes or their regulatory elements, and transposable elements themselves can act as alternative promoters for nearby genes, resulting in non-canonical regulation of transcription. However, transposable element activity can lead to detrimental genome instability, and hosts have evolved mechanisms to silence transposable element mobility appropriately. Recent studies have demonstrated that a subset of transposable elements, endogenous retroviral elements (ERVs) containing long terminal repeats (LTRs), are silenced through trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9me3) by ESET (also known as SETDB1 or KMT1E) and a co-repressor complex containing KRAB-associated protein 1 (KAP1; also known as TRIM28) in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here we show that the replacement histone variant H3.3 is enriched at class I and class II ERVs, notably those of the early transposon (ETn)/MusD family and intracisternal A-type particles (IAPs). Deposition at a subset of these elements is dependent upon the H3.3 chaperone complex containing α-thalassaemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) and death-domain-associated protein (DAXX). We demonstrate that recruitment of DAXX, H3.3 and KAP1 to ERVs is co-dependent and occurs upstream of ESET, linking H3.3 to ERV-associated H3K9me3. Importantly, H3K9me3 is reduced at ERVs upon H3.3 deletion, resulting in derepression and dysregulation of adjacent, endogenous genes, along with increased retrotransposition of IAPs. Our study identifies a unique heterochromatin state marked by the presence of both H3.3 and H3K9me3, and establishes an important role for H3.3 in control of ERV retrotransposition in embryonic stem cells. PMID:25938714

  14. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer in the United kingdom: a review of activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual meeting 2015.

    PubMed

    Gilham, David Edward; Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-05-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  15. Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Cancer in the United Kingdom: A Review of Activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy Annual Meeting 2015

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  16. Community-based treatment of advanced HIV disease: introducing DOT-HAART (directly observed therapy with highly active antiretroviral therapy).

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, P.; Léandre, F.; Mukherjee, J.; Gupta, R.; Tarter, L.; Kim, J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) overtook tuberculosis (TB) as the world's leading infectious cause of adult deaths. In affluent countries, however, AIDS mortality has dropped sharply, largely because of the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Antiretroviral agents are not yet considered essential medications by international public health experts and are not widely used in the poor countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) takes its greatest toll. Arguments against the use of HAART have mainly been based on the high cost of medications and the lack of the infrastructure necessary for using them wisely. We re- examine these arguments in the setting of rising AIDS mortality in developing countries and falling drug prices, and describe a small community-based treatment programme based on lessons gained in TB control. With the collaboration of Haitian community health workers experienced in the delivery of home-based and directly observed treatment for TB, an AIDS-prevention project was expanded to deliver HAART to a subset of HIV patients deemed most likely to benefit. The inclusion criteria and preliminary results are presented. We conclude that directly observed therapy (DOT) with HAART, "DOT-HAART", can be delivered effectively in poor settings if there is an uninterrupted supply of high-quality drugs. PMID:11799447

  17. Selective photodetection and photodynamic therapy for prostate cancer through targeting of proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zuluaga, Maria-Fernanda; Sekkat, Nawal; Gabriel, Doris; van den Bergh, Hubert; Lange, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Frequent side effects of radical treatment modalities and the availability of novel diagnostics have raised the interest in focal therapies for localized prostate cancer. To improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficacy of such therapies, we developed a minimally invasive procedure based on a novel polymeric photosensitizer prodrug sensitive to urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). The compound is inactive in its prodrug form and accumulates passively at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. There, the prodrug is selectively converted to its photoactive form by uPA, which is overexpressed by prostate cancer cells. Irradiation of the activated photosensitizer exerts a tumor-selective phototoxic effect. The prodrug alone (8 μmol/L) showed no toxic effect on PC-3 cells, but upon irradiation the cell viability was reduced by 90%. In vivo, after systemic administration of the prodrug, PC-3 xenografts became selectively fluorescent. This is indicative of the prodrug accumulation in the tumor and selective local enzymatic activation. Qualitative analysis of the activated compound confirmed that the enzymatic cleavage occurred selectively in the tumor, with only trace amounts in the neighboring skin or muscle. Subsequent photodynamic therapy studies showed complete tumor eradication of animals treated with light (150 J/cm(2) at 665 nm) 16 hours after the injection of the prodrug (7.5 mg/kg). These promising results evidence the excellent selectivity of our prodrug with the potential to be used for both imaging and therapy for localized prostate cancer. PMID:23270928

  18. Health Occupations--Respiration Therapy Technician. Kit No. 66. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Janette

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on respiration therapy technician are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of health occupations. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture,…

  19. Mirror therapy in a patient with a fractured wrist and no active wrist extension.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Eric L; Hu, Jeong

    2008-01-01

    We report a patient in whom mirror therapy, training moving both hands while watching the reflection of the present or good hand in a parasaggital mirror - a method used for phantom limb and stroke patients - was extremely useful after a fractured wrist with good passive, but no active, extension. PMID:18335358

  20. Real-Time Assessment of Autonomic Nerve Activity During Adaptive Servo-Ventilation Support or Waon Therapy.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Komuro, Issei

    2016-07-27

    Adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy are recently developed non-pharmacological and noninvasive therapies for patients with heart failure refractory to guideline-directed medical therapy. These therapies decrease both preload and afterload, increase cardiac output, and appear to ameliorate autonomic nerve activity. However, the time course of autonomic nerve activity during these therapies remains unclear. We performed heart rate variability analysis using the MemCalc power spectral density method (MemCalc system; Suwa Trust Co, Tokyo) to assess autonomic nerve activity during adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy in two different cases and determined the time course of autonomic nerve activity during these therapies. During both therapies, we found a drastic increase in parasympathetic nerve activity and continuous suppression of sympathetic nerve activity. Heart rate variability analysis using the MemCalc method may be promising for the assessment of the efficacy of various treatments, including adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy, from the viewpoint of autonomic nerve activity. PMID:27385607

  1. Inhibition of Marek's disease virus replication by retroviral vector-based RNA interference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising antiviral methodology. We recently demonstrated that retroviral vectors expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNA-mirs) in the context of a modified endogenous micro-RNA (miRNA) can be effective in reducing replication of other retroviruses in chicken cells. In thi...

  2. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Fredrik K.; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  3. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Fredrik K; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-08-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  4. Identification, Phylogeny, and Evolution of Retroviral Elements Based on Their Envelope Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bénit, Laurence; Dessen, Philippe; Heidmann, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of retroviral elements, including endogenous retroviruses, have relied essentially on the retroviral pol gene expressing the highly conserved reverse transcriptase. This enzyme is essential for the life cycle of all retroid elements, but other genes are also endowed with conserved essential functions. Among them, the transmembrane (TM) subunit of the envelope gene is involved in virus entry through membrane fusion. It has also been reported to contain a domain, named the immunosuppressive domain, that has immunosuppressive properties most probably essential for virus spread within the host. This domain is conserved among a large series of retroviral elements, and we have therefore attempted to generate phylogenetic links between retroviral elements identified from databases following tentative alignments of the immunosuppressive domain and adjacent sequences. This allowed us to unravel a conserved organization among TM domains, also found in the Ebola and Marburg filoviruses, and to identify a large number of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) from sequence databases. The latter elements are part of previously identified families of HERVs, and some of them define new families. A general phylogenetic analysis based on the TM proteins of retroelements, and including those with no clearly identified immunosuppressive domain, could then be derived and compared with pol-based phylogenetic trees, providing a comprehensive survey of retroelements and definitive evidence for recombination events in the generation of both the endogenous and the present-day infectious retroviruses. PMID:11689652

  5. Genome adaptations of a tripartite motif protein for retroviral defense in cattle and sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) genes encode proteins composed of RING, B-box, and coiled coil motif domains. Primate TRIM5' has been shown to be a primary determinant of retroviral host cell range restriction in primates. TRIM5 restriction was originally thought to be a primate-specific defense mechanism...

  6. Outcome From a Randomized Controlled Trial of Group Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder: Comparing Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for Binge Eating to an Active Comparison Group Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Debra L.; Robinson, Athena Hagler; Jo, Booil

    2011-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder (DBT-BED) aims to reduce binge eating by improving adaptive emotion-regulation skills. Preliminary findings have been promising but have only compared DBT-BED to a wait-list. To control for the hypothesized specific effects of DBT-BED, the present study compared DBT-BED to an active comparison group therapy (ACGT). Men and women (n = 101) meeting DSM-IV BED research criteria were randomly assigned to 20 group sessions of DBT-BED (n = 50) or ACGT (n = 51). DBT-BED had a significantly lower dropout rate (4%) than ACGT (33.3%). Linear Mixed Models revealed that posttreatment binge abstinence and reductions in binge frequency were achieved more quickly for DBT-BED than for ACGT (posttreatment abstinence rate = 64% for DBT-BED vs. 36% for ACGT) though differences did not persist over the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up assessments (e.g., 12-month follow-up abstinence rate = 64% for DBT-BED vs. 56% for ACGT). Secondary outcome measures revealed no sustained impact on emotion regulation. Although both DBT-BED and ACGT reduced binge eating, DBT-BED showed significantly fewer dropouts and greater initial efficacy (e.g., at posttreatment) than ACGT. The lack of differential findings over follow-up suggests that the hypothesized specific effects of DBT-BED do not show long-term impact beyond those attributable to nonspecific common therapeutic factors. PMID:20171332

  7. An endogenous retroviral long terminal repeat is the dominant promoter for human beta1,3-galactosyltransferase 5 in the colon.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Catherine A; Medstrand, Patrik; Mager, Dixie L

    2003-10-28

    LTRs of endogenous retroviruses are known to affect expression of several human genes, typically as a relatively minor alternative promoter. Here, we report that an endogenous retrovirus LTR acts as one of at least two alternative promoters for the human beta1,3-galactosyltransferase 5 gene, involved in type 1 Lewis antigen synthesis, and show that the LTR promoter is most active in the gastrointestinal tract and mammary gland. Indeed, the LTR is the dominant promoter in the colon, indicating that this ancient retroviral element has a major impact on gene expression. Using colorectal cancer cell lines and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays, we found that hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) binds a site within the retroviral promoter and that expression of HNF-1 and interaction with its binding site correlated with promoter activation. We conclude that HNF-1 is at least partially responsible for the tissue-specific activation of the LTR promoter of human beta 1,3-galactosyltransferase 5. We demonstrate that this tissue-specific transcription factor is implicated in the activation of an LTR gene promoter. PMID:14534330

  8. Effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy on the survival of HIV-infected adult patients in urban slums of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muhula, Samuel Opondo; Peter, Memiah; Sibhatu, Biadgilign; Meshack, Ndirangu; Lennie, Kyomuhangi

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in access to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) have radically reduced hospitalizations and deaths associated with HIV infection in both developed countries and sub-Saharan Africa. Not much is known about survival of patients on ART in slums. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with mortality among adult patients on ART in resource poor, urban, sub-Saharan African setting. A prospective open cohort study was conducted with adult patients on ART at a clinic in Kibera slums, Nairobi, Kenya. The patients' enrollment to care was between March 2005 and November 2011. Descriptive statistics were computed and Kaplan-Meier (KM) methods used to estimate survival time while Cox's proportional hazards (CPH) model fitted to determine mortality predictors. A total of 2,011 adult patients were studied, 69% being female. Female gender (p=0.0016), zidovudine-based regimen patients (p<0.0001), CD4 count>351 patients (p<0.0001), WHO stage I patients (p<0.0001) and "Working" functional status patients recorded better survival probability on ART. In CPH analysis, the hazard of dying was higher in patients on Stavudine-based regimen(hazard ratio (HR)=.8; 95% CI, 1.5-2.2; p<0.0001),CD4 count<50 cells/µl (HR=1.6; 95% CI, 1.5-1.7;p<0.0001), WHO Stage IV at ART initiation (HR=1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6; p=0.016) and bedridden patients (HR=2.7; 95% CI, 1.7-4.4;p<0.0001). There was increased mortality among the males, those with advanced Immunosuppression, late WHO stage and bedridden patients. The findings further justify the need to switch patients on Stavudine-based regimen as per the WHO recommendations. PMID:26090021

  9. Widespread Endogenization of Genome Sequences of Non-Retroviral RNA Viruses into Plant Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Saisho, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Wataru; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Non-retroviral RNA virus sequences (NRVSs) have been found in the chromosomes of vertebrates and fungi, but not plants. Here we report similarly endogenized NRVSs derived from plus-, negative-, and double-stranded RNA viruses in plant chromosomes. These sequences were found by searching public genomic sequence databases, and, importantly, most NRVSs were subsequently detected by direct molecular analyses of plant DNAs. The most widespread NRVSs were related to the coat protein (CP) genes of the family Partitiviridae which have bisegmented dsRNA genomes, and included plant- and fungus-infecting members. The CP of a novel fungal virus (Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 2, RnPV2) had the greatest sequence similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana ILR2, which is thought to regulate the activities of the phytohormone auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Furthermore, partitivirus CP-like sequences much more closely related to plant partitiviruses than to RnPV2 were identified in a wide range of plant species. In addition, the nucleocapsid protein genes of cytorhabdoviruses and varicosaviruses were found in species of over 9 plant families, including Brassicaceae and Solanaceae. A replicase-like sequence of a betaflexivirus was identified in the cucumber genome. The pattern of occurrence of NRVSs and the phylogenetic analyses of NRVSs and related viruses indicate that multiple independent integrations into many plant lineages may have occurred. For example, one of the NRVSs was retained in Ar. thaliana but not in Ar. lyrata or other related Camelina species, whereas another NRVS displayed the reverse pattern. Our study has shown that single- and double-stranded RNA viral sequences are widespread in plant genomes, and shows the potential of genome integrated NRVSs to contribute to resolve unclear phylogenetic relationships of plant species. PMID:21779172

  10. [Automated kinetic assay of plasmatic L-asparaginase activity undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orsonneau, J-L; Brassart, E A; Lecame, M; Thomare, P; Delaroche, O; Dudouet, D

    2004-01-01

    The L-asparaginase is a critical drug for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, that achieves blood L-asparagin depletion. However, such a therapy is associated with a high rate of negative side effects, particularly antibody synthesis against L-asparaginase. This therefore decreases therapy efficiency requiring the monitoring of L-asparaginase activity since L-asparagin determination is not easy. We compared here the results obtained with an automated kinetic enzymatic method to those obtained with the most commonly used Nessler reagent method. The correlation coefficient, r = 0,992, obtained was very good, and the allometric regression line was y = 1,038x - 0,37 microkat/L. We also showed that the specificity and the precision were better with the enzymatic method than the Nessler one. Moreover, the enzymatic method was easier and required less time to perform. Finally, the method appears able to perform real time monitoring of the therapy. PMID:15355807

  11. Activation of photodynamic therapy in vitro with Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Brad A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R.

    2016-03-01

    Translation of photodynamic therapy to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases where traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov luminescence, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively in order to overcome this depth limitation. We report on the use of Cerenkov luminescence generated from Yttrium-90 as a means to active the photodynamic therapy process in monolayer tumor cell cultures. The current study investigates the utility of Cerenkov luminescence for activating both the clinically relevant aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mM and also the more efficient photosensitizer TPPS2a at 1.2 µM. Cells were incubated with aminolevulinic acid for 6 hours prior to radionuclide addition, as well as additional daily treatments for three days. TPPS2a was delivered as a single treatment with an 18 hour incubation time before radionuclide addition. Experiments were completed for both C6 glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells. Although aminolevulinic acid proved ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at any activity for either cell line, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 cell line. Current results demonstrate that it may be possible to generate a therapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov luminescence to activate the photodynamic therapy process with clinically relevant photosensitizers.

  12. Interdisciplinary therapy changes superoxide dismutase activity and adiponectin in obese adolescents: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nunes, João Elias Dias; Cunha, Heitor Santos; Freitas, Zulmária Rezende; Nogueira, Ana Maria Caixeta; Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda; Espindola, Foued Salmen; Cheik, Nadia Carla

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of interdisciplinary therapy in the parameters of the oxidative stress and the anti-inflammatory responses of obese adolescents. We selected 57 participants, who were randomly divided into 2 groups: interdisciplinary therapy group and a control group. After 6 months of intervention, 17 participants of the interdisciplinary therapy group and 8 of the control group returned for re-evaluation. The interdisciplinary therapy group participated in a treatment with 4 weekly sessions of exercise, a weekly group therapy session and a weekly nutritional education session. Blood parameters of oxidative stress and anti-inflammatory response were evaluated. The results demonstrated that there were significant increases in the interdisciplinary therapy group for superoxide dismutase activity (6.56 ± 3.22 to 11.40 ± 7.49) and ferric-reducing antioxidant potential concentration (532.91 ± 106.48 to 573.25 ± 112.57), although adiponectin levels did not reduce (40.9 ± 29.34 to 49.05 ± 41.22). A significant decrease in nitrite levels was also found (14.23 ± 8.48 to 11.45 ± 6.05). In the control group, significant reduction was found in adiponectin (31.56 ± 18.88 to 18.01 ± 11.66). This study suggests that interdisciplinary therapy for 6 months was effective in improving the anti-inflammatory responses and the antioxidant defences in obese adolescents. PMID:26367325

  13. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects. PMID:26413996

  14. The influence of statin therapy on platelet activity markers in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Henryk; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Baj, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been reported to increase platelet activation. Reducing the level of LDL-C with statins induces important pleiotropic effects such as platelet inhibition. This association between platelet activity and statin therapy may be clinically important in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke. We investigated the effect of simvastatin therapy on platelet activation markers (platelet CD62P, sP-selectin, and platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs)) in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke. Material and methods The study group consisted of 21 hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke confirmed by CT, and 20 healthy subjects served as controls. We assessed the CD62P expression on resting and thrombin-activated blood platelets. CD62P and PDMPs were analyzed by the use of monoclonal antibodies anti-CD61 and anti-CD62 on a flow cytometer. The level of sP-selectin in serum was measured by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. All markers were re-analyzed after 6 months of treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day). Results Hyperlipidemic patients presented a significantly higher percentage of CD62+ platelets and higher reactivity to thrombin compared to control subjects. After simvastatin therapy hyperlipidemic patients showed a reduction of the percentage of resting CD62P(+) platelets (p = 0.005) and a reduction of expression and percentage of CD62P(+) platelets after activation by thrombin (median p < 0.05; percentage: p = 0.001). A decrease of sP-selectin levels (p = 0.001) and percentage of PDMPs (p < 0.05) in this group was also observed. Conclusions HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in stroke patients with hyperlipidemia may be useful not only due to the lipid-lowering effect but also because of a significant role in reduction of platelet activation and reactivity. PMID:25861297

  15. HIV-infected patients' adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Yekta, Zohre Parsa; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Ali R

    2010-12-01

    Adherence to the treatment regimen is essential to the success of highly active antiretroviral therapy for patients who are infected with HIV. The evidence suggests that poor adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy is a major problem that has the potential to diminish effective viral suppression, promote viral resistance, and place patients at risk for hospitalization, opportunistic infections, and an increased risk of HIV transmission. The primary aim of this study was to understand patients' experiences regarding their adherence to antiretroviral drug therapy. Thus, 19 participants were recruited for in-depth interviews regarding their adherence to drug regimens. All the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by using Benner's phenomenological analysis approach. Four main themes emerged from the data: (i) choosing to live and the decision to start taking medications; (ii) strategies for adhering to the regimen and managing the side-effects; (iii) relationships with healthcare providers; and (iv) advantages of the medications as a motivator to continue one's adherence to the regimen. Studying and understanding the experiences of patients can provide new insights and strategies in order to enhance patients' adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:21210925

  16. Human-specific endogenous retroviral insert serves as an enhancer for the schizophrenia-linked gene PRODH

    PubMed Central

    Suntsova, Maria; Gogvadze, Elena V.; Salozhin, Sergey; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Eroshkin, Fedor; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Martynova, Natalia; Kulikov, Kirill; Malakhova, Galina; Tukhbatova, Gulnur; Bolshakov, Alexey P.; Ghilarov, Dmitry; Garazha, Andrew; Aliper, Alexander; Cantor, Charles R.; Solokhin, Yuri; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Balaban, Pavel; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Using a systematic, whole-genome analysis of enhancer activity of human-specific endogenous retroviral inserts (hsERVs), we identified an element, hsERVPRODH, that acts as a tissue-specific enhancer for the PRODH gene, which is required for proper CNS functioning. PRODH is one of the candidate genes for susceptibility to schizophrenia and other neurological disorders. It codes for a proline dehydrogenase enzyme, which catalyses the first step of proline catabolism and most likely is involved in neuromediator synthesis in the CNS. We investigated the mechanisms that regulate hsERVPRODH enhancer activity. We showed that the hsERVPRODH enhancer and the internal CpG island of PRODH synergistically activate its promoter. The enhancer activity of hsERVPRODH is regulated by methylation, and in an undermethylated state it can up-regulate PRODH expression in the hippocampus. The mechanism of hsERVPRODH enhancer activity involves the binding of the transcription factor SOX2, whch is preferentially expressed in hippocampus. We propose that the interaction of hsERVPRODH and PRODH may have contributed to human CNS evolution. PMID:24218577

  17. The relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate ('self'-directed) complement activation.

    PubMed

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Adjei, Jonathan Kofi; Aryeh, Claudia; Kpentey, George

    2016-12-01

    The complement system is an enzyme cascade that helps defend against infection. Many complement proteins occur in serum as inactive enzyme precursors or reside on cell surfaces. Complement components have many biologic functions and their activation can eventually damage the plasma membranes of cells and some bacteria. Although a direct link between complement activation and autoimmune diseases has not been found, there is increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases that may have autoimmune linkage. The inhibition of complement may therefore be very important in a variety of autoimmune diseases since their activation may be detrimental to the individual involved. However, a complete and long-term inhibition of complement may have some contra side effects such as increased susceptibility to infection. The site of complement activation will, however, determine the type of inhibitor to be used, its route of application and dosage level. Compared with conventional drugs, complement inhibitors may be the best option for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The review takes a critical look at the relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate complement activation that are likely to result in sporadic autoimmune diseases or worsen already existing one. It covers the complement system, general aspects of complement inhibition therapy, therapeutic strategies and examples of complement inhibitors. It concludes by highlighting on the possibility that a better inhibitor of complement activation when found will help provide a formidable treatment for autoimmune diseases as well as preventing one. PMID:26935316

  18. Monocyte Activation in Immunopathology: Cellular Test for Development of Diagnostics and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Several highly prevalent human diseases are associated with immunopathology. Alterations in the immune system are found in such life-threatening disorders as cancer and atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation followed by macrophage polarization is an important step in normal immune response to pathogens and other relevant stimuli. Depending on the nature of the activation signal, macrophages can acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes that are characterized by the expression of distinct patterns of secreted cytokines and surface antigens. This process is disturbed in immunopathologies resulting in abnormal monocyte activation and/or bias of macrophage polarization towards one or the other phenotype. Such alterations could be used as important diagnostic markers and also as possible targets for the development of immunomodulating therapy. Recently developed cellular tests are designed to analyze the phenotype and activity of living cells circulating in patient's bloodstream. Monocyte/macrophage activation test is a successful example of cellular test relevant for atherosclerosis and oncopathology. This test demonstrated changes in macrophage activation in subclinical atherosclerosis and breast cancer and could also be used for screening a panel of natural agents with immunomodulatory activity. Further development of cellular tests will allow broadening the scope of their clinical implication. Such tests may become useful tools for drug research and therapy optimization. PMID:26885534

  19. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a fusogenic endogenous retroviral envelope gene involved in placentation in the Rodentia squirrel-related clade.

    PubMed

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Heidmann, Thierry; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-07-01

    Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. Importance: Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the features of a

  20. Capture of syncytin-Mar1, a Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene Involved in Placentation in the Rodentia Squirrel-Related Clade

    PubMed Central

    Redelsperger, François; Cornelis, Guillaume; Vernochet, Cécile; Tennant, Bud C.; Catzeflis, François; Mulot, Baptiste; Heidmann, Odile; Dupressoir, Anne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope protein (env) genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes have previously been identified in the mouse-related clade, allowing a demonstration of their essential role via knockout mice. Here, we searched for similar genes in a second major clade of the Rodentia order, the squirrel-related clade, taking advantage of the complete sequencing of the ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus genome. In silico search for env genes with full coding capacity identified several candidate genes with one displaying placenta-specific expression, as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with recognizable hallmarks of an integrated provirus. Cloning of the gene in an expression vector for ex vivo cell-cell fusion and pseudotype assays demonstrated fusogenicity on a large panel of mammalian cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections showed specific expression in domains where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast at the fetomaternal interface, consistent with a role in syncytium formation. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among the tribe Marmotini, thus dating its capture back to about at least 25 million years ago, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. This gene that we named syncytin-Mar1 is distinct from all seven Syncytin genes identified to date in eutherian mammals and is likely to be a major effector of placentation in its related clade. IMPORTANCE Syncytin genes are fusogenic envelope genes of retroviral origin, ancestrally captured for a function in placentation. Within rodents, two such genes had been previously identified in the mouse-related clade. Here, in the squirrel-related rodent clade, we identified the envelope gene of an endogenous retrovirus with all the

  1. Pharmacodynamic monitoring of immunosuppressive effects indicates reduced cyclosporine activity during telaprevir therapy.

    PubMed

    Roos, Katja; Gotthardt, Daniel; Giese, Thomas; Schnitzler, Paul; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Czock, David; Eisenbach, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Drug interactions with immunosuppressive drugs are a major problem associated with protease inhibitor-based antiviral triple therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection after liver transplantation. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed biomarkers of the immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporine A (CSA) by quantifying nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-regulated gene expression during telaprevir (TVR) therapy in 5 liver transplant patients. Furthermore, dose adjustments and blood concentrations of CSA as well as the clinical course were analyzed. We observed a clear impact of TVR not only on doses and blood concentrations but also on the immunosuppressive effects of CSA. Despite apparently adequate CSA trough concentrations, the CSA peak concentration decreased to 68% (range = 44%-90%). This was associated with a 1.9-fold (1.6- to 4.1-fold) increase in the residual gene activity of NFAT-regulated genes, which indicated reduced immunosuppressive activity of CSA with TVR co-medication. The median dose of CSA was reduced to 25% (range = 16%-48%) and 31% (range = 22%-64%) after 1 and 2 weeks, respectively. The CSA drug clearance was reduced to 38.7% (range = 31.0%-49.4%). We report excellent antiviral efficacy. At the end of the observation period, all patients were HCV RNA-negative (1 patient at 18 weeks, 1 patient at 12 weeks, and 3 patients at 4 weeks after the end of therapy). Safety was acceptable, with mild acute rejection and reactivation of cytomegalovirus being the most serious adverse events. One patient with histologically proven recurrent cholestatic hepatitis before therapy underwent retransplantation during the course of antiviral therapy. In conclusion, the immunomonitoring of NFAT-regulated gene expression indicated reduced immunosuppressive activity of CSA during antiviral therapy with TVR in our cohort of liver transplant patients. Thus, the immunosuppressive effects of CSA may be overestimated if one is looking

  2. Enhanced antitumoral efficacy by intratumoral perfusion of activated macrophages associated with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Laky, Dezideriu; Ionescu, Paul; Dima, Stefan V.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on five batches of Wistar inbred rats with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma receiving photodynamic therapy (PDT), rMuIFN-gamma activated macrophages (AM(Phi) ) or associated therapy (PDT-AM(Phi) -A; PDT-AM(Phi) -B); the control batch (HBSS) consisted of animals with untreated Walker-256 tumors. The results were as follows: the sole treatment (PDT, AM(Phi) ) gave survival rates between 57.2 and 57.7% and cure rates ranging from 23.1 to 34.3%. The 'combined' therapy in multiple doses increased significantly (87.9%) the survival rate of tumor bearing rats as well as the rate of complete tumor regression (72.7%). Cell-mediated immunity test values in batches III and IV exposed to multiple doses of PDT-AM(Phi) showed higher values as compared to the values noticed in batches I - II and the control batch V, performed at 12 and 21 days post-treatment. Summing up, these results demonstrate that 'combined' photodynamic treatment and biotherapy with interferon activated macrophages stimulate cell-mediated antitumoral activity, increase survival rates and reduce incidence of Walker-256 carcinosarcoma in rat model.

  3. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene therapies. In particular, we found that these engineered AD-MSCs retained their innate ability to proliferate, differentiate, and, most importantly, home to tumors, making them ideal cellular carriers. Moreover, exposure of the engineered AD-MSCS to mild magnetic hyperthermia resulted in the selective expression of TRAIL from the engineered AD-MSCs and, as a result, induced significant ovarian cancer cell death in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26720500

  4. Design and selection of Toca 511 for clinical use: modified retroviral replicating vector with improved stability and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Perez, Omar D; Logg, Christopher R; Hiraoka, Kei; Diago, Oscar; Burnett, Ryan; Inagaki, Akihito; Jolson, Dawn; Amundson, Karin; Buckley, Taylor; Lohse, Dan; Lin, Amy; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Gruber, Harry E; Jolly, Douglas J

    2012-09-01

    Retroviral replicating vectors (RRVs) are a nonlytic alternative to oncolytic replicating viruses as anticancer agents, being selective both for dividing cells and for cells that have defects in innate immunity and interferon responsiveness. Tumor cells fit both these descriptions. Previous publications have described a prototype based on an amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV), encoding yeast cytosine deaminase (CD) that converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the potent anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in an infected tumor. We report here the selection of one lead clinical candidate based on a general design goal to optimize the genetic stability of the virus and the CD activity produced by the delivered transgene. Vectors were tested for titer, genetic stability, CD protein and enzyme activity, ability to confer susceptibility to 5-FC, and preliminary in vivo antitumor activity and stability. One vector, Toca 511, (aka T5.0002) encoding an optimized CD, shows a threefold increased specific activity in infected cells over infection with the prototype RRV and shows markedly higher genetic stability. Animal testing demonstrated that Toca 511 replicates stably in human tumor xenografts and, after 5-FC administration, causes complete regression of such xenografts. Toca 511 (vocimagene amiretrorepvec) has been taken forward to preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:22547150

  5. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Hacein-Bey Abina, S; Touzot, F; Cavazzana, M

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy has effectively entered Medicine via the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Because hematopoietic stem cells are accessible and because it was understood that genetic correction of lymphocyte progenitor cells carrying a genetic defect impairing differentiation, could result in the production of long-lived T lymphocytes, it was reasoned that ex vivo gene transfer in hematopoietic cells could lead to disease phenotype correction. Retroviral vectors were designed to ex vivo transduce such cells. This has indeed been shown to lead to sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiency associated with two forms of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) for now more than ten years. Occurrence in some patients of genotoxicity related to retroviral vectors integration close to and transactivation of oncogenes has led to the development of retroviral vectors devoid of its enhancer element. Results of recent trials performed for several forms of PID indeed suggest that their use is both safe and efficacious. It is thus anticipated that their application to the treatment of many more life threatening PID will be developed over the coming years. PMID:25708106

  6. Activity of matrix metalloproteinases during antimycobacterial therapy in mice with simulated tuberculous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sumenkova, D V; Russkikh, G S; Poteryaeva, O N; Polyakov, L M; Panin, L E

    2013-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis inflammation. In the early stages of BCG-granuloma formation in mouse liver and lungs, the serum levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 7 increased by 4.5 times and remained unchanged while the pathology developed. Antimycobacterial therapy with isoniazid reduced enzyme activity almost to the level of intact control. The decrease in activity of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 7 that play the most prominent role in the development of destructive forms of tuberculosis is of great therapeutic importance. PMID:23667866

  7. Active theater as a complementary therapy for Parkinson's disease rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Nicola; Iaconelli, Sara; Fiorlli, Mariagrazia; Lena, Francesco; Kusch, Imogen; Mirabella, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Most medical treatments of Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at the reduction of motor symptoms. However, even when motor improvements are evident, patients often report a deterioration of their daily lives. Thus, to achieve a global improvement in personal well-being, not only drugs, but also complementary therapies, such as physical exercise, occupational and speech therapy, and active music therapy, have been used. We hypothesized that theater could reduce clinical disability and improve the quality of life of PD patients (primary end points) more efficiently than other complementary therapies because (1) in order to impersonate a character, patients are forced to regain the control of their bodies; and (2) while being part of a group, patients have a high degree of social interaction. The need to regain the control of their bodies and their social functioning is very likely to deeply motivate patients. To assess this hypothesis, we ran a randomized, controlled, and single-blinded study that lasted 3 years, on 20 subjects affected by a moderate form of idiopathic PD, in stable treatment with L-dopa and L-dopa agonists, and without severe sensory deficits. Ten patients were randomly assigned to an active theater program (in which patients were required to participate), while the others underwent physiotherapy (control group), the most common nonpharmacological treatment for PD rehabilitation. Patients of both groups were evaluated at the beginning of each year, using five clinical rating scales (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS], Schwab and England Scale, Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life [PDQ39] Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). The theater patients showed progressive improvements and, at the end of the third year, they showed significant improvements in all clinical scales. Conversely, the control patients did not exhibit significant ameliorations with time. Thus, the present study provides the first

  8. Green Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Retroviral Envelope Protein for Analysis of Virus-Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Dirk; Dittmar, Kurt E. J.; Rohde, Manfred; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent retroviral envelope (Env) proteins were developed for direct visualization of viral particles. By fusing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) to the N terminus of the amphotropic 4070A envelope protein, extracellular presentation of eGFP was achieved. Viruses incorporated the modified Env protein and efficiently infected cells. We used the GFP-tagged viruses for staining retrovirus receptor-positive cells, thereby circumventing indirect labeling techniques. By generating cells which conditionally expressed the GFP-tagged Env protein, we could confirm an inverse correlation between retroviral Env expression and infectivity (superinfection). eGFP-tagged virus particles are suitable for monitoring the dynamics of virus-cell interactions. PMID:12719600

  9. STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY. Conformational plasticity of a native retroviral capsid revealed by x-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Obal, G; Trajtenberg, F; Carrión, F; Tomé, L; Larrieux, N; Zhang, X; Pritsch, O; Buschiazzo, A

    2015-07-01

    Retroviruses depend on self-assembly of their capsid proteins (core particle) to yield infectious mature virions. Despite the essential role of the retroviral core, its high polymorphism has hindered high-resolution structural analyses. Here, we report the x-ray structure of the native capsid (CA) protein from bovine leukemia virus. CA is organized as hexamers that deviate substantially from sixfold symmetry, yet adjust to make two-dimensional pseudohexagonal arrays that mimic mature retroviral cores. Intra- and interhexameric quasi-equivalent contacts are uncovered, with flexible trimeric lateral contacts among hexamers, yet preserving very similar dimeric interfaces making the lattice. The conformation of each capsid subunit in the hexamer is therefore dictated by long-range interactions, revealing how the hexamers can also assemble into closed core particles, a relevant feature of retrovirus biology. PMID:26044299

  10. Domesticated retroviral GAG gene in Drosophila: new functions for an old gene.

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Kuzmin, I V; Makhnovskii, P A; Kim, A I

    2014-02-01

    The domestication of foreign genes is a powerful mechanism for new gene formation and genome evolution. It is known that domesticated retroviral gag genes in mammals not only take part in protecting against viral infection but also control cell division, apoptosis, function of the placenta, and other biological processes. In this study, we focused on the domesticated retroviral gag gene homolog (Grp) in the Drosophila melanogaster genome. According to the results of a bioinformatic analysis, the Grp gene product is primarily under purifying selection in Drosophilidae family. The Grp protein has been shown to be transmembrane. The Grp gene is expressed at the adult stage of D. melanogaster in gender-specific and tissue-specific manner. Also the Grp gene expression is increased in response to the gypsy retrovirus. A function of the protein as a component of the endosomic membrane is considered. PMID:24503082

  11. Monitoring the autonomic nervous activity as the objective evaluation of music therapy for severely and multiply disabled children.

    PubMed

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Shinkawa, Tetsuko; Kudo, Takashi; Koga, Mikitoshi; Togo, Michita; Katayama, Sotetsu; Hiramatsu, Kozaburo; Mori, Shunsuke; Takamura, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    Severely and multiply disabled children (SMDC) are frequently affected in more than one area of development, resulting in multiple disabilities. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of music therapy in SMDC using monitoring changes in the autonomic nervous system, by the frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability. We studied six patients with SMDC (3 patients with cerebral palsy, 1 patient with posttraumatic syndrome after head injury, 1 patient with herpes encephalitis sequelae, and 1 patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome characterized by frequent seizures, developmental delay and psychological and behavioral problems), aged 18-26 (mean 22.5 ± 3.5). By frequency domain method using electrocardiography, we measured the high frequency (HF; with a frequency ranging from 0.15 to 0.4 Hz), which represents parasympathetic activity, the low frequency/high frequency ratio, which represents sympathetic activity between the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities, and heart rate. A music therapist performed therapy to all patients through the piano playing for 50 min. We monitored each study participant for 150 min before therapy, 50 min during therapy, and 10 min after therapy. Interestingly, four of 6 patients showed significantly lower HF components during music therapy than before therapy, suggesting that these four patients might react to music therapy through the suppression of parasympathetic nervous activities. Thus, music therapy can suppress parasympathetic nervous activities in some patients with SMDC. The monitoring changes in the autonomic nervous activities could be a powerful tool for the objective evaluation of music therapy in patients with SMDC. PMID:22729251

  12. The effect of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects were each assigned to a mirror therapy group and a sham therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment and the Box and Block Test were performed to compare paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities. The functional independence measurement was conducted to compare abilities to perform activities of daily living. [Results] Paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities were significantly different between the mirror therapy and sham therapy groups. Intervention in the mirror therapy group was more effective than in the sham therapy group for improving the ability to perform activities of daily living. Self-care showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy is effective in improving paretic upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26180297

  13. Analysis of 4070A envelope levels in retroviral preparations and effect on target cell transduction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, J H; Baban, D; Sutton, J; Esapa, M; Price, T; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; Slade, A

    2000-07-01

    A number of stable producer cell lines for high-titer Mo-MuLV vectors have been constructed. Development has previously centered on increasing end-point titers by producing maximal levels of Mo-MuLV Gag/Pol, envelope glycoproteins, and retroviral RNA genomes. We describe the production yields and transduction efficiency characteristics of two Mo-MuLV packaging cell lines, FLYA13 and TEFLYA. Although they both produce 4070A-pseudotyped retroviral vectors reproducibly at >1 x 10(6) LFU ml(-1), the transduction efficiency of unconcentrated and concentrated virus from FLYA13 lines is poor compared with vector preparations from TEFLYA lines. A powerful inhibitor of retroviral transduction is secreted by FLYA13 packaging cells. We show that the inhibitory factor does not affect transduction of target cells by RD114-pseudotyped vectors. This suggests that the inhibitory factor functions at the level of envelope-receptor interactions. Phosphate starvation of target cells shows a two-fold increase in Pit2 receptor mRNA and causes some improvement in FLYA13 virus transduction efficiency. Western blots show that FLYA13 viral samples contain an eight-fold higher ratio of 4070A envelope to p30gag than that of virus produced by TEFLYA producer cell lines. This study correlates overexpression of 4070A envelope glycoprotein in retroviral preparations with a reduction of transduction efficiency at high multiplicities of infection. We suggest that TEFLYA packaging cells express preferable levels of 4070A compared with FLYA13, which not only enables high-titer stocks to be generated, but also facilitates a high efficiency of transduction of target cells. PMID:10910141

  14. Thyroid epithelial cell transformation by a retroviral vector expressing SV40 large T.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, J. S.; Lemoine, L.; Lemoine, N. R.; Williams, E. D.; Wynford-Thomas, D.

    1989-01-01

    A recombinant murine retroviral vector encoding the SV40 virus large T antigen was used to infect stably an immortal line of differentiated rat thyroid epithelial cells, FRTL-5. Expression of SV40 T transformed these cells to anchorage independence and tumorigenicity but did not alter morphology or abolish tissue-specific functions and growth factor requirements. The resulting phenotype provides a model of well-differentiated human thyroid cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:2544221

  15. Crystal structure of a monomeric retroviral protease solved by protein folding game players.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Cooper, Seth; Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Gilski, Miroslaw; Krzywda, Szymon; Zabranska, Helena; Pichova, Iva; Thompson, James; Popović, Zoran; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Baker, David

    2011-10-01

    Following the failure of a wide range of attempts to solve the crystal structure of M-PMV retroviral protease by molecular replacement, we challenged players of the protein folding game Foldit to produce accurate models of the protein. Remarkably, Foldit players were able to generate models of sufficient quality for successful molecular replacement and subsequent structure determination. The refined structure provides new insights for the design of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:21926992

  16. PML/TRIM19-Dependent Inhibition of Retroviral Reverse-Transcription by Daxx

    PubMed Central

    Portilho, Débora M.; Arhel, Nathalie J.; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K.; Nisole, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    PML (Promyelocytic Leukemia protein), also known as TRIM19, belongs to the family of tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins. PML is mainly expressed in the nucleus, where it forms dynamic structures known as PML nuclear bodies that recruit many other proteins, such as Sp100 and Daxx. While the role of PML/TRIM19 in antiviral defense is well documented, its effect on HIV-1 infection remains unclear. Here we show that infection by HIV-1 and other retroviruses triggers the formation of PML cytoplasmic bodies, as early as 30 minutes post-infection. Quantification of the number and size of PML cytoplasmic bodies revealed that they last approximately 8 h, with a peak at 2 h post-infection. PML re-localization is blocked by reverse-transcription inhibitors and is not observed following infection with unrelated viruses, suggesting it is specifically triggered by retroviral reverse-transcription. Furthermore, we show that PML interferes with an early step of retroviral infection since PML knockdown dramatically increases reverse-transcription efficiency. We demonstrate that PML does not inhibit directly retroviral infection but acts through the stabilization of one of its well-characterized partners, Daxx. In the presence of PML, cytoplasmic Daxx is found in the vicinity of incoming HIV-1 capsids and inhibits reverse-transcription. Interestingly, Daxx not only interferes with exogenous retroviral infections but can also inhibit retrotransposition of endogenous retroviruses, thus identifying Daxx as a broad cellular inhibitor of reverse-transcription. Altogether, these findings unravel a novel antiviral function for PML and PML nuclear body-associated protein Daxx. PMID:26566030

  17. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected inmates.

    PubMed

    Inés, Sandra M; Moralejo, Leticia; Marcos, Miguel; Fuertes, Aurelio; Luna, Guillermo

    2008-03-01

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been scarcely studied in correctional settings. Our study aims to evaluate the relationship between adherence and virological outcome and to determine factors related to adherence in correctional settings. A cross-sectional retrospective study was performed in Topas prison (Salamanca, Spain). 50 inmates starting HAART were studied. Adherence was estimated through a self-report questionnaire and variables related to adherence (covering individual factors, the illness itself and the therapeutic regimen) were recorded. HIV-RNA levels and CD4 lymphocyte count were measured before starting therapy and six months after. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and multivariate methods. 21 inmates (42%) were considered adherent and 29 (58%) were non-adherent. Adherence to treatment, as measured by our questionnaire, was the only significant and independent factor associated with an undetectable viral load at six months of therapy. Five variables were significantly associated with adherence to treatment, four of them as predictor factors for good adherence: an active occupation inside prison, the absence of HIV-related symptoms, a good or average acceptance of treatment, and a higher academic background; previous injection drug use as a risk factor for HIV transmission was associated with non-adherence. A simple self-report questionnaire may be useful for assessing adherence in prison inmates. Recognizing variables associated with adherence is essential to identify prisoners at high risk of being non-adherents in order to develop strategies for improving compliance. PMID:18336264

  18. Regulation of complement and modulation of its activity in monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Saskia; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Boross, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is a powerful tool of the innate immune system to eradicate pathogens. Both in vitro and in vivo evidence indicates that therapeutic anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can activate the complement system by the classical pathway. However, the contribution of complement to the efficacy of mAbs is still debated, mainly due to the lack of convincing data in patients. A beneficial role for complement during mAb therapy is supported by the fact that cancer cells often upregulate complement-regulatory proteins (CRPs). Polymorphisms in various CRPs were previously associated with complement-mediated disorders. In this review the role of complement in anti-tumor mAb therapy will be discussed with special emphasis on strategies aiming at modifying complement activity. In the future, clinical efficacy of mAbs with enhanced effector functions together with comprehensive analysis of polymorphisms in CRPs in mAb-treated patients will further clarify the role of complement in mAb therapy. PMID:25517299

  19. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  20. Plasminogen Activator System and Breast Cancer: Potential Role in Therapy Decision Making and Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gouri, Adel; Dekaken, Aoulia; El Bairi, Khalid; Aissaoui, Arifa; Laabed, Nihad; Chefrour, Mohamed; Ciccolini, Joseph; Milano, Gérard; Benharkat, Sadek

    2016-01-01

    Shifting from the historical TNM paradigm to the determination of molecular and genetic subtypes of tumors has been a major improvement to better picture cancerous diseases. The sharper the picture is, the better will be the possibility to develop subsequent strategies, thus achieving higher efficacy and prolonged survival eventually. Recent studies suggest that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA Receptor (uPAR), and plasmino-gen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. Consistent with their role in cancer dissemination, high levels of uPA, PAI-1, and uPAR in multiple cancer types correlate with dismal prognosis. In this respect, upfront determination of uPA and PAI-1 as invasion markers has further opened up the possibilities for individualized therapy of breast cancer. Indeed, uPA and PAI-1 could help to classify patients on their risk for metastatic spreading and subsequent relapse, thus helping clinicians in their decision-making process to propose, or not propose, adjuvant therapy. This review covers the implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of uPA and PAI-1, and therefore how they could be major actors in the development of a precision medicine in breast cancer. PMID:27578963

  1. Structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a C-terminal motif from γ-retroviral integrases reveals a conserved mechanism of interaction

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Brandon L.; Larue, Ross C.; Yuan, Chunhua; Hess, Sonja; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Foster, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family are promising therapeutic targets for a range of diseases linked to transcriptional activation, cancer, viral latency, and viral integration. Tandem bromodomains selectively tether BET proteins to chromatin by engaging cognate acetylated histone marks, and the extraterminal (ET) domain is the focal point for recruiting a range of cellular and viral proteins. BET proteins guide γ-retroviral integration to transcription start sites and enhancers through bimodal interaction with chromatin and the γ-retroviral integrase (IN). We report the NMR-derived solution structure of the Brd4 ET domain bound to a conserved peptide sequence from the C terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) IN. The complex reveals a protein–protein interaction governed by the binding-coupled folding of disordered regions in both interacting partners to form a well-structured intermolecular three-stranded β sheet. In addition, we show that a peptide comprising the ET binding motif (EBM) of MLV IN can disrupt the cognate interaction of Brd4 with NSD3, and that substitutions of Brd4 ET residues essential for binding MLV IN also impair interaction of Brd4 with a number of cellular partners involved in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. This suggests that γ-retroviruses have evolved the EBM to mimic a cognate interaction motif to achieve effective integration in host chromatin. Collectively, our findings identify key structural features of the ET domain of Brd4 that allow for interactions with both cellular and viral proteins. PMID:26858406

  2. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Helen H.W.; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui; Guo, How-Ran; Lee, Wen-Ying; Su, Wu-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of

  3. Expression of the extracellular domain of OB-cadherin as an Fc fusion protein using bicistronic retroviral expression vector

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Cristina B. B.; Chu, Khoi; Lee, Yu-Chen; Hu, Mickey C-T.; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Osteoblast cadherin (OB-cadherin, also known as cadherin-11) is a Ca2+-dependent homophilic cell adhesion molecule that is expressed mainly in osteoblasts. OB-cadherin is expressed in prostate cancer and may be involved in the homing of metastatic prostate cancer cells to bone. The extracellular domain of OB-cadherin may be used to inhibit the adhesion between prostate cancer cells and osteoblasts. In this report, we describe the expression of the extracellular domain of OB-cadherin as an Fc fusion protein (OB-CAD-Fc) in human embryonic kidney 293FT cells using a bicistronic retroviral vector. Coexpression of GFP and OB-CAD-Fc through the bicistronic vector permitted enrichment of OB-CAD-Fc–expressing cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Recombinant OB-CAD-Fc proteins were secreted into cell medium, and about 0.85 mg of purified OB-CAD-Fc protein was purified from 1 liter of the conditioned medium using immobilized protein A-affinity chromatography. The purified OB-CAD-Fc was biologically active because it supported the adhesion of PC3 cells and L cells transduced with OB-cadherin. The availability of OB-CAD-Fc offers opportunities to test whether OB-CAD-Fc can be used to inhibit OB-cadherin–mediated prostate cancer bone metastasis in vivo or to generate antibodies for inhibiting the adhesion between prostate cancer cells and osteoblasts. PMID:18620062

  4. Cognitive-behavioral therapy with simultaneous nutritional and physical activity education in obese patients with binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Fossati, M; Amati, F; Painot, D; Reiner, M; Haenni, C; Golay, A

    2004-06-01

    An important problem with obese patients suffering from binge eating disorders (BED) is to treat their dysfunctional eating patterns while initiating a weight loss. We propose to assess a cognitive-behavioral therapy combined with a nutritional and a physical activity program. Our purpose is to verify that the addition of a nutritional and a physical program leads to a significant weight loss and enables psychological improvement. The patients (n=61) participated in a 12 weekly sessions group treatment of either a purely cognitive-behavioral therapy, or a cognitive-behavioral therapy associated to a nutritional approach mainly focused on fat restriction, or to a cognitive-behavioral therapy combined with a nutritional and a physical activity approach. The mean weight loss is significant (p<0.01) after the association of the cognitive-behavioral therapy and the nutritional education, but is even more significant (p<0.001) after the combination of a cognitive-behavioral therapy with a nutritional education and a physical activity program. Depression scores decrease in the three approaches, anxiety (p<0.05) results improve only in the combined nutritional, physical activity and cognitive-behavioral approach. Eating disorders improved significantly in all three approaches even if improvements in subscales seem more important in the combined approach. Finally, exercise seems to be a positive addition to the nutritional cognitive-behavioral therapy since it decreases negative mood, improves eating disorders and leads to an effective body weight loss. PMID:15330081

  5. TRIM5α Degradation via Autophagy Is Not Required for Retroviral Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Sabrina; Talley, Sarah; Nelson, Rachel S.; Dharan, Adarsh; O'Connor, Christopher; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT TRIM5α is an interferon-inducible retroviral restriction factor that prevents infection by inducing the abortive disassembly of capsid cores recognized by its C-terminal PRY/SPRY domain. The mechanism by which TRIM5α mediates the disassembly of viral cores is poorly understood. Previous studies demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors abrogate the ability of TRIM5α to induce premature core disassembly and prevent reverse transcription; however, viral infection is still inhibited, indicating that the proteasome is partially involved in the restriction process. Alternatively, we and others have observed that TRIM5α associates with proteins involved in autophagic degradation pathways, and one recent study found that autophagic degradation is required for the restriction of retroviruses by TRIM5α. Here, we show that TRIM5α is basally degraded via autophagy in the absence of restriction-sensitive virus. We observe that the autophagy markers LC3b and lysosome-associated membrane protein 2A (LAMP2A) localize to a subset of TRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies, and inhibition of lysosomal degradation with bafilomycin A1 increases this association. To test the requirement for macroautophagy in restriction, we examined the ability of TRIM5α to restrict retroviral infection in cells depleted of the autophagic mediators ATG5, Beclin1, and p62. In all cases, restriction of retroviruses by human TRIM5α, rhesus macaque TRIM5α, and owl monkey TRIM-Cyp remained potent in cells depleted of these autophagic effectors by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 genome editing. Collectively, these results are consistent with observations that the turnover of TRIM5α proteins is sensitive to autophagy inhibition; however, the data presented here do not support observations that the inhibition of autophagy abrogates retroviral restriction by TRIM5 proteins. IMPORTANCE Restriction factors are a class of

  6. Activities in connection with quality assurance in radiation therapy performed in Argentina: physical aspects.

    PubMed

    González, R O

    1984-06-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy is performed in different ways in Argentina than in other countries. A part of this program is carried out by the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL-WHO/IAEA), which is a part of the Atomic Energy Commission. This laboratory organizes TLD postal intercomparison; calibrates and checks radiotherapy units and dosimeters; gives education in the physics of radiotherapy; has collaborated in the production of rules for the operation of radiation therapy units and maintains the application of these rules. Other activities in connection with quality assurance, such as personnel, dosimetry, radiation surveys or those related to treatment planning are performed by other groups of the Atomic Energy Commission, by other institutions or by people working in radiotherapy centers. A description of the activities of the SSDL and a brief explanation about the other activities, the present situation and future plans are discussed. PMID:6735801

  7. Highly active antiretroviral therapy and tuberculosis control in Africa: synergies and potential.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Hargreaves, Nicola J.; Chimzizi, Rehab; Salaniponi, Felix M.

    2002-01-01

    HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and TB (tuberculosis) are two of the world's major pandemics, the brunt of which falls on sub-Saharan Africa. Efforts aimed at controlling HIV/AIDS have largely focused on prevention, little attention having been paid to care. Work on TB control has concentrated on case detection and treatment. HIV infection has complicated the control of tuberculosis. There is unlikely to be a decline in the number of cases of TB unless additional strategies are developed to control both this disease and HIV simultaneously. Such strategies would include active case-finding in situations where TB transmission is high, the provision of a package of care for HIV-related illness, and the application of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The latter is likely to have the greatest impact, but for this therapy to become more accessible in Africa the drugs would have to be made available through international support and a programme structure would have to be developed for its administration. It could be delivered by means of a structure based on the five-point strategy called DOTS, which has been adopted for TB control. However, it may be unrealistic to give TB control programmes the responsibility for running such a programme. A better approach might be to deliver highly active antiretroviral therapy within a comprehensive HIV/AIDS management strategy complementing the preventive work already being undertaken by AIDS control programmes. TB programmes could contribute towards the development and implementation of this strategy. PMID:12132003

  8. TLR3 agonist and Sorafenib combinatorial therapy promotes immune activation and controls hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ho, Victor; Lim, Tong Seng; Lee, Justin; Steinberg, Jeffrey; Szmyd, Radoslaw; Tham, Muly; Yaligar, Jadegoud; Kaldis, Philipp; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Chew, Valerie

    2015-09-29

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with high mortality and the current therapy for advanced HCC, Sorafenib, offers limited survival benefits. Here we assessed whether combining the TLR3 agonist: lysine-stabilized polyinosinic-polycytidylic-acid (poly-ICLC) with Sorafenib could enhance tumor control in HCC. Combinatorial therapy with poly-ICLC and Sorafenib increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of HCC cell lines in vitro, in association with impaired phosphorylation of AKT, MEK and ERK. In vivo, the combinatorial treatment enhanced control of tumor growth in two mouse models: one transplanted with Hepa 1-6 cells, and the other with liver tumors induced using the Sleeping beauty transposon. Tumor cell apoptosis and host immune responses in the tumor microenvironment were enhanced. Particularly, the activation of local NK cells, T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells was enhanced. Decreased expression of the inhibitory signaling molecules PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells and tumor cells, respectively. Tumor infiltration by monocytic-myeloid derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSC) was also reduced indicating the reversion of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Our data demonstrated that the combinatorial therapy with poly-ICLC and Sorafenib enhances tumor control and local immune response hence providing a rationale for future clinical studies. PMID:26287667

  9. Hypericin-based photodynamic therapy: antitumor activity, accumulation potential, and induced cell death pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luksiene, Zivile; Vaitkuviene, Aurelija

    2004-09-01

    In this study the main interest was focused on the to investigation the photodynamic efficacy of hypericin, three other photosensitizers and 5 aminolevulinic acid-induced protopofirin IX in their ability to block the growth of rather aggressive tumor - Ehrlich ascite carcinoma in mice as well as Reh cells in humans (B-leukemia). Hypericin was found to exhibit the highest phototoxicity and antitumor activity in treating Ehrlich ascite carcinoma. The different photosensitizers were ranked as follows: Hypericin > hematoporphyrin dimethyl ether > Photofrin II > meso-tetra (para-sulfophenyl)porphin > 5-aminolevulinic acid. The most important is that just after Hyp-based photodynamic therapy 75% of mice survived a 4 month-period, and no recurrence of tumor within this period was detected in 25% of the treated mice. The clear cut correlation observed between intracellular dye concentration in the tumor cells and efficiency of photodynamic therapy, supports the idea that the intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer is one of the most important factors in determining the benefit of photodynamic therapy. Hence, the accumulation of the photosensitizer in the tumor cells should be considered as one of the prognostic factors for the determination of the therapeutic outcome. Eventually, one of the most significant result is that hypericin is effective photosensitizer for human B-leukemia cells and induces apoptosis after photosensitization.

  10. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mou, K.H.; Han, D.; Liu, W.L.; Li, P.

    2016-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  11. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mou, K H; Han, D; Liu, W L; Li, P

    2016-07-25

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  12. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Congestive Heart Failure: Novel Findings and Future Insights.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Brambilla, GianMaria; Pizzalla, Daniela Prata; Seravalle, Gino

    2016-08-01

    Congestive heart failure is characterized by hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic abnormalities, the latter including an activation of the sympathetic influences to the heart and peripheral circulation coupled with an impairment of baroreceptor control of autonomic function. Evidence has been provided that both these alterations are hallmark features of the disease with a specific relevance for the disease progression as well as for the development of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a number of studies have documented in heart failure the adverse prognostic role of the sympathetic and baroreflex alterations, which both are regarded as major independent determinants of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This represents the pathophysiological and clinical background for the use of carotid baroreceptor activation therapy in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Promising data collected in experimental animal models of heart failure have supported the recent performance of pilot small-scale clinical studies, aimed at providing initial information in this area. The results of these studies demonstrated the clinical safety and efficacy of the intervention which has been tested in large-scale clinical studies. The present paper will critically review the background and main results of the published studies designed at defining the clinical impact of baroreflex activation therapy in congestive heart failure patients. Emphasis will be given to the strengths and limitations of such studies, which represent the background for the ongoing clinical trials testing the long-term effects of the device in heart failure patients. PMID:27334011

  13. Successful Interferon Therapy Reverses Enhanced Hepatic Progenitor Cell Activation in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Hidenao; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Ooba, Yukimasa; Matsunaga, Erika; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Shimoyama, Shin; Yamazaki, Satoru; Chida, Takeshi; Kawata, Kazuhito; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    The enhanced accumulation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) is related to the risk of progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interferon (IFN) treatment reduces HCC risk in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of IFN treatment on HPC activation in HCV patients. Immunohistochemical detection and computer-assisted quantitative image analyses of cytokeratin 7 (CK7) were performed to evaluate HPC activation in paired pre- and post-treatment liver biopsies from 18 HCV patients with sustained virological response (SVR) to IFN-based therapy and from 23 patients without SVR, as well as normal liver tissues obtained from surgical resection specimens of 10 patients. Pretreatment HCV livers showed increased CK7 immunoreactivity, compared with normal livers (HCV: median, 1.38%; normal: median, 0.69%, P=0.006). IFN treatment reduced hepatic CK7 immunoreactivity (median, 1.57% pre-IFN vs. 0.69% post-IFN, P=0.006) in SVR patients, but not in non-SVR patients. The development of HCC following IFN treatment was encountered in 3 non-SVR patients who showed high post-IFN treatment CK7 immunoreactivity (>4%). Successful IFN therapy can reverse enhanced HPC activation in HCV patients, which may contribute to the reduced risk of HCC development in these patients. PMID:26308703

  14. Adenoviral vectors for prodrug activation-based gene therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Doloff, Joshua C.; Waxman, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is a common feature - both between patients diagnosed with the same cancer and within an individual patient’s tumor - and leads to widely different response rates to cancer therapies and the potential for the emergence of drug resistance. Diverse therapeutic approaches have been developed to combat the complexity of cancer, including individual treatment modalities designed to target tumor heterogeneity. This review discusses adenoviral vectors and how they can be modified to replicate in a cancer-specific manner and deliver therapeutic genes under multi-tiered regulation to target tumor heterogeneity, including heterogeneity associated with cancer stem cell-like subpopulations. Strategies that allow for combination of prodrug-activation gene therapy with a novel replication-conditional, heterogeneous tumor-targeting adenovirus are discussed, as are the benefits of using adenoviral vectors as tumor-targeting oncolytic vectors. While the anticancer activity of many adenoviral vectors has been well established in preclinical studies, only limited successes have been achieved in the clinic, indicating a need for further improvements in activity, specificity, tumor cell delivery and avoidance of immunogenicity. PMID:23869779

  15. Occupational therapy for patients with problems in personal activities of daily living after stroke: systematic review of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Avril; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; Gladman, J R F; Donkervoort, Mireille; Edmans, Judi; Gilbertson, Louise; Jongbloed, Lyn; Logan, Pip; Sackley, Catherine; Walker, Marion; Langhorne, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine whether occupational therapy focused specifically on personal activities of daily living improves recovery for patients after stroke. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources The Cochrane stroke group trials register, the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycLIT, AMED, Wilson Social Sciences Abstracts, Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation, Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Dissertations Abstracts register, Occupational Therapy Research Index, scanning reference lists, personal communication with authors, and hand searching. Review methods Trials were included if they evaluated the effect of occupational therapy focused on practice of personal activities of daily living or where performance in such activities was the target of the occupational therapy intervention in a stroke population. Original data were sought from trialists. Two reviewers independently reviewed each trial for methodological quality. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results Nine randomised controlled trials including 1258 participants met the inclusion criteria. Occupational therapy delivered to patients after stroke and targeted towards personal activities of daily living increased performance scores (standardised mean difference 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.32, P=0.01) and reduced the risk of poor outcome (death, deterioration or dependency in personal activities of daily living) (odds ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.51 to 0.87, P=0.003). For every 100 people who received occupational therapy focused on personal activities of daily living, 11 (95% confidence interval 7 to 30) would be spared a poor outcome. Conclusions Occupational therapy focused on improving personal activities of daily living after stroke can improve performance and reduce the risk of deterioration in these abilities. Focused occupational therapy should be available to everyone who has had a stroke. PMID

  16. Nerve Growth Factor Gene Therapy Activates Neuronal Responses in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, Mark H.; Yang, Jennifer H.; Barba, David; U, H S.; Bakay, Roy; Pay, Mary M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Conner, James M.; Kobalka, Peter; Roy, Subhojit; Nagahara, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, and lacks effective disease modifying therapies. In 2001 we initiated a clinical trial of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) gene therapy in AD, the first effort at gene delivery in an adult neurodegenerative disorder. This program aimed to determine whether a nervous system growth factor prevents or reduces cholinergic neuronal degeneration in AD patients. We present post-mortem findings in 10 subjects with survival times ranging from 1 to 10 years post-treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine whether degenerating neurons in AD retain an ability to respond to a nervous system growth factor delivered after disease onset. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS 10 patients with early AD underwent NGF gene therapy using either ex vivo or in vivo gene transfer. The brains of all eight patients in the first Phase 1 ex vivo trial and two patients in a subsequent Phase 1 in vivo trial were examined. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Brains were immunolabeled to evaluate in vivo gene expression, cholinergic neuronal responses to NGF, and activation of NGF-related cell signaling. In two cases, NGF protein levels were measured by ELISA. RESULTS Degenerating neurons in the AD brain respond to NGF. All patients exhibited a trophic response to NGF, in the form of axonal sprouting toward the NGF source. Comparing treated and non-treated sides of the brain in three patients that underwent unilateral gene transfer, cholinergic neuronal hypertrophy occurred on the NGF-treated side (P>0.05). Activation of cellular signaling and functional markers were present in two patients that underwent AAV2-mediated NGF gene transfer. Neurons exhibiting tau pathology as well as neurons free of tau expressed NGF, indicating that degenerating cells can be infected with therapeutic genes with resulting activation of cell signaling. No adverse pathological effects related to NGF were observed. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings indicate that

  17. Calibration of low activity caesium tubes and needles traceable to the therapy level standard.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, N A; Wilkinson, J M

    1994-02-01

    A technique for deriving the reference air kerma rate for low activity brachytherapy sources that is traceable to the therapy level standard at the National Physical Laboratory is presented. Correction factors have been generated to account for the finite source and detector size. The air kerma rate calibration of the secondary standard for caesium quality has been derived by polynomial curve fitting. The reference air kerma rates for several caesium tubes and needles have been determined and the results compared with the manufacturers' source test reports. For all the source types used the agreement between methods was within 2%. PMID:8130983

  18. Production of human factor VIII-FL in 293T cells using the bicistronic MGMT(P140K)-retroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Fontes, A M; Melo, F U F; Greene, L J; Faça, V M; Lin, Y; Gerson, S L; Covas, D T

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is the most common X-linked bleeding disorder; it is caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Replacement therapy with rFVIII produced from human cell line is a major goal for treating hemophilia patients. We prepared a full-length recombinant FVIII (FVIII-FL), using the pMFG-P140K retroviral vector. The IRES DNA fragment was cloned upstream to the P140K gene, providing a 9.34-kb bicistronic vector. FVIII-FL cDNA was then cloned upstream to IRES, resulting in a 16.6-kb construct. In parallel, an eGFP control vector was generated, resulting in a 10.1- kb construct. The 293T cells were transfected with these constructs, generating the 293T-FVIII-FL/P140K and 293T-eGFP/P140K cell lines. In 293T-FVIII-FL/P140K cells, FVIII and P140K mRNAs levels were 4,410 (±931.7)- and 295,400 (±75,769)-fold higher than in virgin cells. In 293T-eGFP/P140K cells, the eGFP and P140K mRNAs levels were 1,501,000 (±493,700)- and 308,000 (±139,300)-fold higher than in virgin cells. The amount of FVIII-FL was 0.2 IU/mL and 45 ng/mL FVIII cells or 4.4 IU/μg protein. These data demonstrate the efficacy of the bicistronic retroviral vector expressing FVIII-FL and MGMT(P140K), showing that it could be used for producing the FVIII-FL protein in a human cell line. PMID:22576836

  19. Correction of murine hemophilia A following nonmyeloablative transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells engineered to encode an enhanced human factor VIII variant using a safety-augmented retroviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis by retroviral vectors is a major impediment to the clinical application of hematopoietic stem cell gene transfer for the treatment of hematologic disorders. We recently developed an insulated self-inactivating gammaretroviral vector, RMSinOFB, which uses a novel enhancer-blocking element that significantly decreases genotoxicity of retroviral integration. In this study, we used the RMSinOFB vector to evaluate the efficacy of a newly bioengineered factor VIII (fVIII) variant (efVIII)—containing a combination of A1 domain point mutations (L303E/F309S) and an extended partial B domain for improved secretion plus A2 domain mutations (R484A/R489A/P492A) for reduced immunogenicity—toward successful treatment of murine hemophilia A. In cell lines, efVIII was secreted at up to 6-fold higher levels than an L303E/F309S A1 domain–only fVIII variant (sfVIIIΔB). Most important, when compared with a conventional gammaretroviral vector expressing sfVIIIΔB, lower doses of RMSin-efVIII-OFB–transduced hematopoietic stem cells were needed to generate comparable curative fVIII levels in hemophilia A BALB/c mice after reduced-intensity total body irradiation or nonmyeloablative chemotherapy conditioning regimens. These data suggest that the safety-augmented RMSin-efVIII-OFB platform represents an encouraging step in the development of a clinically appropriate gene addition therapy for hemophilia A. PMID:19470695

  20. SAMHD1, the Aicardi-Goutières syndrome gene and retroviral restriction factor, is a phosphorolytic ribonuclease rather than a hydrolytic ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Jeongmin; Hwang, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Jongsu; Oh, Changhoon; Ahn, Kwangseog

    2016-09-01

    SAMHD1 plays diverse roles in innate immunity, autoimmune diseases and HIV restriction, but the mechanisms involved are still unclear. SAMHD1 has been reported to have both dNTPase and RNase activities. However, whether SAMHD1 possesses RNase activity remains highly controversial. Here, we found that, unlike conventional hydrolytic exoribonucleases, SAMHD1 requires inorganic phosphate to degrade RNA substrates and produces nucleotide diphosphates rather than nucleoside monophosphates, which indicated that SAMHD1 is a phosphorolytic but not hydrolytic 3'-5' exoribonuclease. Furthermore, SAMHD1 preferentially cleaved single-stranded RNAs comprising A20 or U20, whereas neither C20 nor G20 was susceptible to SAMHD1-mediated degradation. Our findings will facilitate more advanced studies into the role of the SAMHD1 RNase function in the cellular pathogenesis implicated in nucleic acid-triggered inflammatory responses and the anti-retroviral function of SAMHD1. PMID:27387229

  1. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  2. Murine malignant cells synthesize a 19,000-dalton protein that is physicochemically and antigenically related to the immunosuppressive retroviral protein, P15E.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, G J; Lostrom, M E; Tam, M; Snyderman, R

    1983-09-01

    Murine tumors contain low molecular weight factors that inhibit macrophage accumulation at inflammatory foci. Certain oncogenic murine leukemia viruses contain similar inhibitory activity and the active component of the retroviruses was shown to be the envelope protein P15E. A number of murine malignant and nonmalignant cell lines, as well as primary tumors, have now been examined to determine whether production of retroviral P15E or a related protein is characteristic of neoplastic cells. Tumor lines examined included the Hep 129 hepatocarcinoma, BP8 fibrosarcoma, RL1 lymphoma, and three variants of the B16 melanoma. Tumor lines were virus negative by electron microscopy. Nonmalignant cells examined included ST0, 3T3/BALB, and 3T3/L1 fibroblasts and unstimulated, as well as mitogen-stimulated murine splenocytes. Cells were pulse-labeled with [35S]methionine, proteins immunoprecipitated with two monoclonal antibodies to P15E and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel fluorography. All tumor lines synthesized a approximately 19,000-dalton protein that co-migrated with retroviral P15E on SDS-PAGE. None of the nonmalignant cells synthesized this protein. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of the proteins precipitated from two B16 melanoma lines by monoclonal anti-P15E showed them to be physicochemically similar to P15E from Rauscher leukemia virus. A competition ELISA assay for P15E was developed and confirmed the results obtained by metabolic labeling and demonstrated P15E-related antigens in the tumor cell lines and also in the ascites fluid of mice injected with Hep 129 cells. More importantly, P15E antigens were expressed in both a spontaneous mammary adenocarcinoma and in a primary methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma. Nonmalignant tissues from animals bearing these tumors contained no detectable P15E antigen. Extracts from the primary fibrosarcomas, when injected into the thighs of mice, inhibited the intraperitoneal accumulation of inflammatory macrophages. The

  3. Human gene transfer: Characterization of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes as vehicles for retroviral-mediated gene transfer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kasid, A.; Morecki, S.; Aebersold, P.; Cornetta, K.; Culver, K.; Freeman, S.; Director, E.; Lotze, M.T.; Blaese, R.M.; Anderson, W.F.; Rosenberg, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are cells generated from tumor suspensions cultured in interleukin 2 that can mediate cancer regression when adoptively transferred into mice or humans. Since TILs proliferate rapidly in vitro, recirculate, and preferentially localize at the tumor site in vivo, they provide an attractive model for delivery of exogenous genetic material into man. To determine whether efficient gene transfer into TILs is feasible. The authors transduced human TILs with the bacterial gene for neomycin-resistance (Neo{sup R}) using the retroviral vector N2. The transduced TIL populations were stable and polyclonal with respect to the intact Neo{sup R} gene integration and expressed high levels of neomycin phosphotransferase activity. The Neo{sup R} gene insertion did not alter the in vitro growth pattern and interleukin 2 dependence of the transduced TILs. Analyses of T-cell receptor gene rearrangement for {beta}- and {gamma}-chain genes revealed the oligoclonal nature of the TIL populations with no major change in the DNA rearrangement patterns or the levels of mRNA expression of the {beta} and {gamma} chains following transduction and selection of TILs in the neomycin analog G418. Human TILs expressed mRNA for tumor necrosis factors ({alpha} and {beta}) and interleukin 2 receptor P55. This pattern of cytokine-mRNA expression was not significantly altered following the transduction of TILs. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of TILs as suitable cellular vehicles for the introduction of therapeutic genes into patients receiving autologous TILs.

  4. Mutual regulation between deubiquitinase CYLD and retroviral oncoprotein Tax

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oncoprotein Tax, encoded by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV1), persistently induces NF-κB activation, which contributes to HTLV1-mediated T-cell transformation. Recent studies suggest that the signaling function of Tax requires its ubiquitination, although how the Tax ubiquitination is regulated remains unclear. Results We show here that the deubiquitinase CYLD physically interacts with Tax and negatively regulates the ubiquitination of this viral protein. This function of CYLD is associated with inhibition of Tax-mediated activation of IKK although not that of Tak1. Interestingly, CYLD undergoes constitutive phosphorylation in HTLV1-transformed T cells, a mechanism known to inactivate the catalytic activity of CYLD. Consistently, a phospho-mimetic CYLD mutant fails to inhibit Tax ubiquitination. Conclusion These findings suggest that CYLD negatively regulates the signaling function of Tax through inhibition of Tax ubiquitination. Conversely, induction of CYLD phosphorylation may serve as a mechanism by which HTLV1 overrides the inhibitory function of CYLD, leading to the persistent activation of NF-κB. PMID:21824392

  5. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India: barriers, facilitators and identification of target groups.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Mark S; Douglas, G W; Sabitha Rani, G P; Chakraborty, Apurba

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the barriers and facilitators to highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and determined their prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients in Hyderabad, India. We conducted a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults prescribed highly active antiretroviral therapy and receiving care from nine clinics. Depression was screened using Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and facilitators of HIV medication adherence were assessed using an 11-item scale which yielded a total positive attitude to disease score. Prevalence ratios of non-adherence between different categories of potential risk factors were calculated. We compared mean 'facilitators to adherence' scores between the adherent and non-adherent population. Multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify independent risk factors. Among the 211 respondents, nearly 20% were non-adherent, approximately 8% had either moderately severe or severe depression and mean score for combined facilitators to medication adherence was 33.35 (±7.88) out of a possible 44 points. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included older age, female sex worker, moderate-to-severe depression and the combined facilitators to medication adherence score. These data from a broad range of clinical settings in Hyderabad reveal that key groups to focus on for adherence intervention are female sex workers, older persons and those with depression. PMID:25801316

  6. An implantable active-targeting micelle-in-nanofiber device for efficient and safe cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yi; Li, Long; Guo, Xing; Zhou, Shaobing

    2015-02-24

    Nanocarriers have attracted broad attention in cancer therapy because of their ability to carry drugs preferentially into cancer tissue, but their application is still limited due to the systemic toxicity and low delivery efficacy of intravenously delivered chemotherapeutics. In this study, we develop a localized drug delivery device with combination of an active-targeting micellar system and implantable polymeric nanofibers. This device is achieved first by the formation of hydrophobic doxorubicin (Dox)-encapsulated active-targeting micelles assembled from a folate-conjugated PCL-PEG copolymer. Then, fabrication of the core-shell polymeric nanofibers is achieved with coaxial electrospinning in which the core region consists of a mixture of poly(vinyl alcohol) and the micelles and the outer shell layer consists of cross-linked gelatin. In contrast to the systematic administration of therapeutics via repeatedly intravenous injections of micelles, this implantable device has these capacities of greatly reducing the drug dose, the frequency of administration and side effect of chemotherapeutic agents while maintaining highly therapeutic efficacy against artificial solid tumors. This micelle-based nanofiber device can be developed toward the next generation of nanomedicine for efficient and safe cancer therapy. PMID:25602381

  7. Systematic review of occupational therapy-related interventions for people with multiple sclerosis: part 1. Activity and participation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chih-Huang; Mathiowetz, Virgil

    2014-01-01

    This article is the first part of a systematic review of studies on occupational therapy-related intervention for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this systematic review was to critically appraise and synthesize the applicable findings to address the following focused question: What is the evidence for the effectiveness of interventions within the scope of occupational therapy practice for people with multiple sclerosis? This article focuses on occupational therapy interventions aimed at activity and participation, including programs (e.g., inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation) in which an occupational therapy practitioner was one member of the team. Part 2 (Yu & Mathiowetz, 2014) focuses on interventions within the scope of occupational therapy to remediate impairment (e.g., exercise, cognition, emotional regulation). PMID:24367952

  8. A novel approach to the antimicrobial activity of maggot debridement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Anders S.; Sandvang, Dorthe; Schnorr, Kirk M.; Kruse, Thomas; Neve, Søren; Joergensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Commercially produced sterile green bottle fly Lucilia sericata maggots are successfully employed by practitioners worldwide to clean a multitude of chronic necrotic wounds and reduce wound bacterial burdens during maggot debridement therapy (MDT). Secretions from the maggots exhibit antimicrobial activity along with other activities beneficial for wound healing. With the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria, new approaches to identifying the active compounds responsible for the antimicrobial activity within this treatment are imperative. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a novel approach to investigate the output of secreted proteins from the maggots under conditions mimicking clinical treatments. Methods cDNA libraries constructed from microdissected salivary glands and whole maggots, respectively, were treated with transposon-assisted signal trapping (TAST), a technique selecting for the identification of secreted proteins. Several putative secreted components of insect immunity were identified, including a defensin named lucifensin, which was produced recombinantly as a Trx-fusion protein in Escherichia coli, purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC, and tested in vitro against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Results Lucifensin was active against Staphylococcus carnosus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC 2 mg/L), as well as Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 16 mg/L). The peptide did not show antimicrobial activity towards Gram-negative bacteria. The MIC of lucifensin for the methicillin-resistant S. aureus and glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus isolates tested ranged from 8 to >128 mg/L. Conclusions The TAST results did not reveal any highly secreted compounds with putative antimicrobial activity, implying an alternative antimicrobial activity of MDT. Lucifensin showed antimicrobial activities comparable to other defensins and could have potential as a future drug

  9. Radioiodine therapy in patients with hyperthyroid disorder: standard versus dosimetric activity application.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, P; Zimny, M; Schaefer, W; Mueller, B; Buell, U; Sabri, O

    2003-12-01

    Due to its high success rate and non-invasive character, an increasing demand for radioiodine therapy can be seen. This study was conducted to determine whether standardized 131I activities can be used to facilitate management of patients with hyperthyroid disorder or whether a pre-therapeutic radioiodine test is advisable to determine an adequate therapeutic activity. The therapeutic uptake of 218 patients with benign thyroid disorders were determined and compared with 24 h and 48 h test uptake measurements as well as with calculated standard uptake values. Since there is a linear relationship between iodine uptake and delivered radiation dose, the effect of the different therapeutic approaches on the latter parameter was analysed. Special care was taken to assess possible differences between the various thyroid disorders. A mean deviation between pre-therapeutic test uptake and actual therapeutic uptake of 14.7% was observed in contrast to one of 29.1% when using disease specific standard values per millilitre of thyroid tissue. Furthermore, the proportion of patients with large deviations of more than 40% increased drastically when using standard uptake values (with radioiodine test, 4.1%; with standard values, 18.8%). In conclusion, the dosimetric approach with a pre-therapeutic radioiodine test proved to be the most accurate therapeutic procedure. Both the 24 h and 48 h test uptake measurements gave analogous results and yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.91 when compared with the therapeutic uptake. While it may be tempting to use standard activities to facilitate patient management, the findings of this study confirm that, for precise therapy planning, a pre-therapeutic radioiodine test is advised. Since no significant difference could be found between the 24 h and 48 h test uptake values, an early measurement 24 h after administration of the test activity is recommended. PMID:14627852

  10. TRIM family proteins: retroviral restriction and antiviral defence.

    PubMed

    Nisole, Sébastien; Stoye, Jonathan P; Saïb, Ali

    2005-10-01

    Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family are involved in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, development, oncogenesis and apoptosis. Some TRIM proteins display antiviral properties, targeting retroviruses in particular. The potential activity of TRIM19, better known as promyelocytic leukaemia protein, against several viruses has been well documented and, recently, TRIM5alpha has been identified as the factor responsible for the previously described Lv1 and Ref1 antiretroviral activities. There is also evidence indicating that other TRIM proteins can influence viral replication. These findings are reviewed here, and the possibility that TRIMs represent a new and widespread class of antiviral proteins involved in innate immunity is also considered. PMID:16175175

  11. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  12. A new method to evaluate the residual activity in patients undergoing (131)I thyroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Ostinelli, A; Duchini, M; Conti, V; Bonfanti, P; Rossi, S; Cacciatori, M

    2015-12-01

    The radioiodine administration is a standard therapeutic approach to both benign thyroid diseases, such as hyperthyroidism, and carcinomas. The high administered (131)I activities are of radiation protection concern, due to relevant patient residual contamination. The aim of this work was to develop a new procedure based on external radiometric surveys and on a mathematical model in order to estimate the (131)I activity in patients undergoing hyperthyroidism radioiodine therapy. In the first stage of this study, a suitable detector was chosen and its response vs. activity was characterized. The experimental verification was performed measuring the ambient dose equivalent rate from patients receiving radioiodine administration. The results confirm the reliability of the proposed method, as shown by the slight differences between the administered activities and the ones calculated from external measurements. Furthermore, the same procedure was applied to detect the percentage residual activity in patients at two preset time intervals: 4 hours and 4 days after the radioiodine administration. The obtained results clearly highlight that the method can ensure a level of reliability compatible with the radiation protection purposes. PMID:26429386

  13. Hybrid-Actuating Macrophage-Based Microrobots for Active Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiwon; Zhen, Jin; Du Nguyen, Van; Go, Gwangjun; Choi, Youngjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-01-01

    Using macrophage recruitment in tumors, we develop active, transportable, cancer theragnostic macrophage-based microrobots as vector to deliver therapeutic agents to tumor regions. The macrophage-based microrobots contain docetaxel (DTX)-loaded poly-lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for chemotherapy and Fe3O4 magnetic NPs (MNPs) for active targeting using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system. And, the macrophage-based microrobots are synthesized through the phagocytosis of the drug NPs and MNPs in the macrophages. The anticancer effects of the microrobots on tumor cell lines (CT-26 and 4T1) are evaluated in vitro by cytotoxic assay. In addition, the active tumor targeting by the EMA system and macrophage recruitment, and the chemotherapeutic effect of the microrobots are evaluated using three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids. The microrobots exhibited clear cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, with a low survivability rate (<50%). The 3D tumor spheroid assay showed that the microrobots demonstrated hybrid actuation through active tumor targeting by the EMA system and infiltration into the tumor spheroid by macrophage recruitment, resulting in tumor cell death caused by the delivered antitumor drug. Thus, the active, transportable, macrophage-based theragnostic microrobots can be considered to be biocompatible vectors for cancer therapy. PMID:27346486

  14. Photodynamic Quenched Cathepsin Activity Based Probes for Cancer Detection and Macrophage Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Nun, Yael; Merquiol, Emmanuelle; Brandis, Alexander; Turk, Boris; Scherz, Avigdor; Blum, Galia

    2015-01-01

    Elevated cathepsins levels and activities are found in several types of human cancer, making them valuable biomarkers for detection and targeting therapeutics. We designed small molecule quenched activity-based probes (qABPs) that fluoresce upon activity-dependent covalent modification, yielding cell killing by Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). These novel molecules are highly selective theranostic probes that enable both detection and treatment of cancer with minimal side effects. Our qABPs carry a photosensitizer (PS), which is activated by light, resulting in oxidative stress and subsequent cell ablation, and a quencher that when removed by active cathepsins allow the PS to fluoresce and demonstrate PD properties. Our most powerful and stable PS-qABP, YBN14, consists of a selective cathepsin recognition sequence, a QC-1 quencher and a new bacteriochlorin derivative as a PS. YBN14 allowed rapid and selective non-invasive in vivo imaging of subcutaneous tumors and induced specific tumor macrophage apoptosis by light treatment, resulting in a substantial tumor shrinkage in an aggressive breast cancer mouse model. These results demonstrate for the first time that the PS-qABPs technology offers a functional theranostic tool, which can be applied to numerous tumor types and other inflammation-associated diseases. PMID:26000057

  15. Clinical features of active tuberculosis that developed during anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Wook; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kang, Sang Bum; Koo, Ja Seol; Kim, Young-Ho; Kim, You Sun; Joo, Young Eun; Chang, Sae Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for active ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased risks of tuberculosis (TB) infection. We analyzed the incidence and clinical features of Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who developed active TB during anti-TNF therapy. Methods Ten cases of active TB developed in patients treated with infliximab (n=592) or adalimumab (n=229) for UC (n=160) or CD (n=661) were reviewed. We analyzed demographics, interval between start of anti-TNF therapy and active TB development, tests for latent TB infection (LTBI), concomitant medications, and the details of diagnosis and treatments for TB. Results The incidence of active TB was 1.2% (10/821): 1.5% (9/592) and 0.4% (1/229) in patients receiving infliximab and adalimumab, respectively. The median time to the development of active TB after initiation of anti-TNF therapy was three months (range: 2–36). Three patients had past histories of treatment for TB. Positive findings in a TB skin test (TST) and/or interferon gamma releasing assay (IGRA) were observed in three patients, and two of them received anti-TB prophylaxis. Two patients were negative by both TST and IGRA. The most common site of active TB was the lungs, and the active TB was cured in all patients. Conclusions Active TB can develop during anti-TNF therapy in IBD patients without LTBI, and even in those with histories of TB treatment or LTBI prophylaxis. Physicians should be aware of the potential for TB development during anti-TNF therapy, especially in countries with a high prevalence of TB. PMID:27175115

  16. VlincRNAs controlled by retroviral elements are a hallmark of pluripotency and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The function of the non-coding portion of the human genome remains one of the most important questions of our time. Its vast complexity is exemplified by the recent identification of an unusual and notable component of the transcriptome - very long intergenic non-coding RNAs, termed vlincRNAs. Results Here we identify 2,147 vlincRNAs covering 10 percent of our genome. We show they are present not only in cancerous cells, but also in primary cells and normal human tissues, and are controlled by canonical promoters. Furthermore, vlincRNA promoters frequently originate from within endogenous retroviral sequences. Strikingly, the number of vlincRNAs expressed from endogenous retroviral promoters strongly correlates with pluripotency or the degree of malignant transformation. These results suggest a previously unknown connection between the pluripotent state and cancer via retroviral repeat-driven expression of vlincRNAs. Finally, we show that vlincRNAs can be syntenically conserved in humans and mouse and their depletion using RNAi can cause apoptosis in cancerous cells. Conclusions These intriguing observations suggest that vlincRNAs could create a framework that combines many existing short ESTs and lincRNAs into a landscape of very long transcripts functioning in the regulation of gene expression in the nucleus. Certain types of vlincRNAs participate at specific stages of normal development and, based on analysis of a limited set of cancerous and primary cell lines, they appear to be co-opted by cancer-associated transcriptional programs. This provides additional understanding of transcriptome regulation during the malignant state, and could lead to additional targets and options for its reversal. PMID:23876380

  17. Large-scale Clinical-grade Retroviral Vector Production in a Fixed-Bed Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice–grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks’ yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase. PMID:25751502

  18. Large-scale clinical-grade retroviral vector production in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel; Rivière, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice-grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks' yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase. PMID:25751502

  19. Resistance of Cancer Cells to Targeted Therapies Through the Activation of Compensating Signaling Loops.

    PubMed

    von Manstein, Viktoria; Yang, Chul Min; Richter, Diane; Delis, Natalia; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of low molecular weight kinase inhibitors as "targeted" drugs has led to remarkable advances in the treatment of cancer patients. The clinical benefits of these tumor therapies, however, vary widely in patient populations and with duration of treatment. Intrinsic and acquired resistance against such drugs limits their efficacy. In addition to the well studied mechanisms of resistance based upon drug transport and metabolism, genetic alterations in drug target structures and the activation of compensatory cell signaling have received recent attention. Adaptive responses can be triggered which counteract the initial dependence of tumor cells upon a particular signaling molecule and allow only a transient inhibition of tumor cell growth. These compensating signaling mechanisms are often based upon the relief of repression of regulatory feedback loops. They might involve cell autonomous, intracellular events or they can be mediated via the secretion of growth factor receptor ligands into the tumor microenvironment and signal induction in an auto- or paracrine fashion. The transcription factors Stat3 and Stat5 mediate the biological functions of cytokines, interleukins and growth factors and can be considered as endpoints of multiple signaling pathways. In normal cells this activation is transient and the Stat molecules return to their non-phosphorylated state within a short time period. In tumor cells the balance between activating and de-activating signals is disturbed resulting in the persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5. The constant activation of Stat3 induces the expression of target genes, which cause the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, as well as their migration and invasive behavior. Activating components of the Jak-Stat pathway have been recognized as potentially valuable drug targets and important principles of compensatory signaling circuit induction during targeted drug treatment have been discovered in the context of kinase

  20. Introduction of new genetic material into human myeloid leukemic blast stem cells by retroviral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.J.; Benchimol, S.

    1988-02-01

    An amphotropic retroviral vector containing the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) was used to infect blast cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. The infected cells acquired a G418-resistant phenotype that was stable as measured in a clonogenic assay and in long-term suspension culture. Thus, gene transfer into stem cells was accomplished by this procedure. This approach for manipulating gene expression in blast stem cells provides a means to assess the roles of a variety of genes in self-renewal, differentiation, and leukemogenesis.

  1. Production of retroviral constructs for effective transfer and expression of T-cell receptor genes using Golden Gate cloning.

    PubMed

    Coren, Lori V; Jain, Sumiti; Trivett, Matthew T; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an improved strategy for producing T-cell receptor (TCR)-expressing retroviral vectors using a Golden Gate cloning strategy. This method takes advantage of the modular nature of TCR genes by directly amplifying TCR α and β variable regions from RNA or cDNA, then cloning and fusing them with their respective constant region genes resident in a retroviral TCR expression vector. Our one-step approach greatly streamlines the TCR vector production process in comparison to the traditional three-step procedure that typically involves cloning whole TCR genes, producing a TCR expression cassette, and constructing a retroviral construct. To date, we have generated TCR vectors that transferred seven functional human/rhesus macaque TCRs into primary T cells. The approach also holds promise for the assembly of other genes with defined variable regions, such as immunoglobulins. PMID:25757546

  2. Plasminogen activation system in oral cancer: Relevance in prognosis and therapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Wyganowska-Świątkowska, Marzena; Jankun, Jerzy

    2015-07-01

    Research on carcinogenesis and progress in cancer treatment have reduced mortality of cancer patients. Mortality rates decreased by 1.5% per year from 2001 through 2010 for most types of cancer in men and women. However, oral cancer is still a significant global health problem since incidence and mortality rates are increasing. Oral cavity cancer is ranked the 8th in men and the 14th in women based on data collected between 2006 and 2010 by the National Institute of Health. Furthermore, an increasing incidence of head and neck neoplasms, particularly the tongue cancer among young adults has been reported recently. It is most likely due to increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) infection or the early start of tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment of oral cancer patients is mainly surgical and often leads to esthetic and functional deformities, with severe impact on the quality of life. Thus, novel form of treatments and selection of patients with high and low risk of mortality is of high priority for clinical studies. The expression of proteolytic enzymes in tumor and stromal tissues has been shown to have prognostic significance in many human cancers and inhibiting proteolysis can reduce tumor growth in many in vivo and in vitro models. Plasmin, with its activators and inhibitors are of great importance in many human malignances and collectively are called plasminogen activation system (PAS). In this comprehensive review we examine expression, possible prognostic markers and importance for therapy of the PAS members in oral cancer. Literature review suggests that overexpression of urokinase and its receptor are markers of poor outcome, thus, their inhibition can be explored in oral cancer therapy. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) is complex and depends on its concentration. Overexpression of PAI-1 favors angiogenesis, metastasis and poor prognosis, although when applied in very high concentrations it inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth, the

  3. ROS-Responsive Activatable Photosensitizing Agent for Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy of Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Youngmi; Kim, In-Hoo; Kim, Kyungtae; Choi, Yongdoo

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of macrophage-targeted theranostic nanoparticles (MacTNP) prepared from a Chlorin e6 (Ce6)-hyaluronic acid (HA) conjugate can be activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophage cells. MacTNP are nonfluorescent and nonphototoxic in their native state. However, when treated with ROS, especially peroxynitrite, they become highly fluorescent and phototoxic. In vitro cell studies show that MacTNP emit near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence inside activated macrophages. The NIR fluorescence is quenched in the extracellular environment. MacTNP are nontoxic in macrophages up to a Ce6 concentration of 10 μM in the absence of light. However, MacTNP become phototoxic upon illumination in a light dose-dependent manner. In particular, significantly higher phototoxic effect is observed in the activated macrophage cells compared to human dermal fibroblasts and non-activated macrophages. The ROS-responsive MacTNP, with their high target-to-background ratio, may have a significant potential in selective NIR fluorescence imaging and in subsequent photodynamic therapy of atherosclerosis with minimum side effects. PMID:24396511

  4. Activity-Based Restorative Therapies after Spinal Cord Injury: Inter-institutional conceptions and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Dolbow, David R; Gorgey, Ashraf S; Recio, Albert C; Stiens, Steven A; Curry, Amanda C; Sadowsky, Cristina L; Gater, David R; Martin, Rebecca; McDonald, John W

    2015-08-01

    This manuscript is a review of the theoretical and clinical concepts provided during an inter-institutional training program on Activity-Based Restorative Therapies (ABRT) and the perceptions of those in attendance. ABRT is a relatively recent high volume and intensity approach toward the restoration of neurological deficits and decreasing the risk of secondary conditions associated with paralysis after spinal cord injury (SCI). ABRT is guided by the principle of neuroplasticity and the belief that even those with chronic SCI can benefit from repeated activation of the spinal cord pathways located both above and below the level of injury. ABRT can be defined as repetitive-task specific training using weight-bearing and external facilitation of neuromuscular activation. The five key components of ABRT are weight-bearing activities, functional electrical stimulation, task-specific practice, massed practice and locomotor training which includes body weight supported treadmill walking and water treadmill training. The various components of ABRT have been shown to improve functional mobility, and reverse negative body composition changes after SCI leading to the reduction of cardiovascular and other metabolic disease risk factors. The consensus of those who received the ABRT training was that ABRT has much potential for enhancement of recovery of those with SCI. Although various institutions have their own strengths and challenges, each institution was able to initiate a modified ABRT program. PMID:26236547

  5. Activity-Based Restorative Therapies after Spinal Cord Injury: Inter-institutional conceptions and perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Dolbow, David R.; Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Recio, Albert C.; Stiens, Steven A.; Curry, Amanda C.; Sadowsky, Cristina L.; Gater, David R.; Martin, Rebecca; McDonald, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript is a review of the theoretical and clinical concepts provided during an inter-institutional training program on Activity-Based Restorative Therapies (ABRT) and the perceptions of those in attendance. ABRT is a relatively recent high volume and intensity approach toward the restoration of neurological deficits and decreasing the risk of secondary conditions associated with paralysis after spinal cord injury (SCI). ABRT is guided by the principle of neuroplasticity and the belief that even those with chronic SCI can benefit from repeated activation of the spinal cord pathways located both above and below the level of injury. ABRT can be defined as repetitive-task specific training using weight-bearing and external facilitation of neuromuscular activation. The five key components of ABRT are weight-bearing activities, functional electrical stimulation, task-specific practice, massed practice and locomotor training which includes body weight supported treadmill walking and water treadmill training. The various components of ABRT have been shown to improve functional mobility, and reverse negative body composition changes after SCI leading to the reduction of cardiovascular and other metabolic disease risk factors. The consensus of those who received the ABRT training was that ABRT has much potential for enhancement of recovery of those with SCI. Although various institutions have their own strengths and challenges, each institution was able to initiate a modified ABRT program. PMID:26236547

  6. Activating Photodynamic Therapy in vitro with Cerenkov Radiation Generated from Yttrium-90.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Brad A; Hirschberg, Henry; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    The translation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to the clinical setting has primarily been limited to easily accessible and/or superficial diseases, for which traditional light delivery can be performed noninvasively. Cerenkov radiation, as generated from medically relevant radionuclides, has been suggested as a means to deliver light to deeper tissues noninvasively to overcome this depth limitation. This article investigates the utility of Cerenkov radiation, as generated from the radionuclide yttrium-90, for activating the PDT process using clinically approved aminolevulinic acid at 1.0 mm and also the more efficient porphyrin-based photosensitizer mesotetraphenylporphine with two sulfonate groups on adjacent phenyl rings (TPPS2a) at 1.2 µm. Experiments were conducted with monolayer cultured glioma and breast tumor cell lines. Although aminolevulinic acid proved to be ineffective for generating a therapeutic effect at all but the highest activity levels, TPPS2a produced at least a 20% therapeutic effect at activities ranging from 6 to 60 µCi/well for the C6 glioma cell line. Importantly, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Cerenkov radiation generated from a radionuclide can be used to activate PDT using clinically relevant photosensitizers. These results therefore provide evidence that it may be possible to generate a phototherapeutic effect in vivo using Cerenkov radiation and clinically relevant photosensitizers. PMID:27481495

  7. SU-E-J-49: Distal Edge Activity Fall Off Of Proton Therapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L; Butuceanu, C; Zhu, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify the distal edge activity fall off, created in a phantom by a proton therapy beam Method and Materials: A 30x30x10cm polymethylmethacrylate phantom was irradiated with a proton therapy beam using different ranges and beams. The irradiation volume is approximated by a right circular cylinder of diameter 7.6cm and varying lengths. After irradiation, the phantom was scanned via a Philips Gemini Big Bore™ PET-CT for isotope activation. Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system as well as ImageJ™ were used to analyze the resulting PET and CT scans. The region of activity within the phantom was longitudinally measured as a function of PET slice number. Dose estimations were made via Monte Carlo (GATE) simulation. Results: For both the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and the mono-energetic pristine Bragg peak proton beams, the proximal activation rise was steep: average slope −0.735 (average intensity/slice number) ± 0.091 (standard deviation) for the pristine beams and −1.149 ± 0.117 for the SOBP beams. In contrast, the distal fall offs were dissimilar. The distal fall off in activity for the pristine beams was fit well by a linear curve: R{sup 2} (Pierson Product) was 0.9968, 0.9955 and 0.9909 for the 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm range beams respectively. The good fit allows for a slope comparison between the different ranges. The slope varied as a function of range from 1.021 for the 13.5cm beam to 0.8407 (average intensity/slice number) for the 21.0cm beam. This dependence can be characterized: −0.0234(average intensity/slice number/cm range). For the SOBP beams, the slopes were significantly less and were also less linear: average slope 0.2628 ± 0.0474, average R{sup 2}=0.9236. Conclusion: The distal activation fall off edge for pristine proton beams was linear and steep. The corresponding quantities for SOBP beams were shallower and less linear. Philips has provided support for this work.

  8. Sympathetic Activation in Chronic Heart Failure: Potential Benefits of Interventional Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lachowska, Kamila; Gruchała, Marcin; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Hering, Dagmara

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major and growing public health problem. This condition is associated with poor prognosis, a high rate of mortality, frequent hospitalization and increasing costs to health care systems. Pharmacological approaches aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality in HF have primarily focused on inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), both of which have been associated with disease development, progression and adverse cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. The increasing number of hospitalizations for HF decompensation suggests the failure of available treatment options, indicating the necessity for alternative therapeutic approaches. Alongside pharmacological and cardiac resynchronization therapies in selected patients with arrhythmia, recent advancements in the management of HF have been directed at inhibiting relevant neurogenic pathways underlying disease development and progression. Initial evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of interventional procedures suggests that HF patients may benefit from novel adjunctive therapies. Here we review the critical role of sympathetic activation in HF and the rationale for therapeutic interventions including device-based and interventional approaches aimed at restoring autonomic neural balance in this condition. PMID:27193773

  9. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy. PMID:26513754

  10. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis) is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection. PMID:22168333

  11. VR PTSD exposure therapy results with active duty OIF/OEF combatants.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Albert A; Difede, Joann; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Johnston, Scott; McLay, Robert N; Reger, Greg; Gahm, Greg; Parsons, Thomas; Graap, Ken; Pair, Jarrell

    2009-01-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is reported to be caused by traumatic events that are outside the range of usual human experience including military combat, violent personal assault, being kidnapped or taken hostage and terrorist attacks. Reports indicate that at least 1 out of 6 Iraq War veterans are exhibiting symptoms of depression, anxiety and PTSD. Virtual Reality exposure therapy has been previously used for PTSD with reports of positive outcomes. This paper will present a brief description of the USC/ICT Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan PTSD therapy application and present clinical outcome data from active duty patients treated at the Naval Medical Center-San Diego (NMCSD) as of October 2009. Initial outcomes from the first twenty patients to complete treatment indicate that 16 no longer meet diagnostic criteria for PTSD at post treatment. Research and clinical tests using the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan software are also currently underway at Weill Cornell Medical College, Emory University, Fort Lewis and WRAMC along with 20 other test sites. PMID:19377167

  12. In Vitro Culture During Retroviral Transduction Improves Thymic Repopulation and Output After Total Body Irradiation and Autologous Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Loré, Karin; Seggewiss, Ruth; Guenaga, F. Javier; Pittaluga, Stefania; Donahue, Robert E.; Krouse, Allen; Metzger, Mark E.; Koup, Richard A.; Reilly, Cavan; Douek, Daniel C.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2008-01-01

    Immunodeficiency after peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation may be influenced by graft composition, underlying disease, and/or pre-treatment. These factors are difficult to study independently in humans. Ex vivo culture and genetic manipulation of PBPC grafts may also affect immune reconstitution, with relevance to gene therapy applications. We directly compared the effects of three clinically relevant autologous graft compositions on immune reconstitution after myeloblative total body irradiation in rhesus macaques, the first time these studies have been performed in a large animal model with direct clinical relevance. Animals received CD34+ cell dose-matched grafts of either peripheral blood mononuclear cells, purified CD34+ PBPCs, or purified CD34+ PBPCs expanded in vitro and retrovirally transduced. We evaluated the reconstitution of T, B, natural killer, dendritic cells, and monocytes in blood and lymph nodes for up to 1 year post-transplantation. Animals receiving selected-transduced CD34+ cells had the fastest recovery of T-cell numbers, along with the highest T-cell-receptor gene rearrangement excision circles levels, the fewest proliferating Ki-67+ T-cells in the blood, and the best-preserved thymic architecture. Selected-transduced CD34+ cells may therefore repopulate the thymus more efficiently and promote a higher output of naïve T-cells. These results have implications for the design of gene therapy trials, as well as for the use of expanded PBPCs for improved T-cell immune reconstitution after transplantation. PMID:16497945

  13. Brief Report: Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Mitigates Liver Disease in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seaberg, Eric C.; Phair, John P.; Witt, Mallory D.; Koletar, Susan L.; Thio, Chloe L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: To determine the impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on liver disease, we analyzed changes in the aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) pre- and post-HAART initiation among 441 HIV-monoinfected and 53 HIV-viral hepatitis–coinfected men. Before HAART, APRI increased 17% and 34% among the HIV-monoinfected and coinfected men, respectively. With HAART initiation, APRI decreased significantly in men who achieved HIV RNA of <500 copies per milliliter: 16% for HIV-monoinfected and 22% for coinfected men. Decreases in APRI were dependent on HIV suppression. This protective effect of HAART decreased after 2 years, particularly in the HIV-monoinfected men. PMID:26945179

  14. Assessing disease activity in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: impact on management and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Vinod; Maharaj, Ajesh B

    2016-05-01

    The management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis has undergone major advancements over the last decade. This has been made possible, in part, due to the introduction of new therapies for their management, as well as global collaboration in the development of outcome measures and "treat- to- target" paradigms. In this review article, we discuss how disease activity is measured and the outcome measures that have been recently developed for the management of PsA. The importance of assessing the individual domains as well as global assessments both from the physician and patient perspective, and the development of composite measures are discussed. The newer PsA specific measures are expected to be more commonly used in clinical trials as well as clinical practice. PMID:26807494

  15. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients. PMID:15255240

  16. Maggot debridement therapy promotes diabetic foot wound healing by up-regulating endothelial cell activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinjuan; Chen, Jin'an; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Wei; Sun, Jinshan; Wang, Aiping

    2016-03-01

    To determine the role of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) on diabetic foot wound healing, we compared growth related factors in wounds before and after treatment. Furthermore, we utilized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to explore responses to maggot excretions/secretions on markers of angiogenesis and proliferation. The results showed that there was neo-granulation and angiogenesis in diabetic foot wounds after MDT. Moreover, significant elevation in CD34 and CD68 levels was also observed in treated wounds. In vitro, ES increased HUVEC proliferation, improved tube formation, and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in a dose dependent manner. These results demonstrate that MDT and maggot ES can promote diabetic foot wound healing by up-regulating endothelial cell activity. PMID:26782021

  17. Perceptions of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies by Parents and Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Danielle; Rothwell, Erin; Newcomb, Tara M.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the physical and psychosocial effects of equine assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) on children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) from the perspective of the child and their parents. Methods The families of all eligible children with SMA, who reported participation in EAAT, from a western metropolitan academic center were contacted and invited to participate. This study implemented qualitative, semi-structured interviews of children with SMA and their parents. Results Three themes emerged from the qualitative content analysis: physical/psychosocial benefits; relationship development with the horses, instructors, and children; and barriers to continued EAAT engagement. Conclusions The data suggest the overall EAAT experience was a source of enjoyment, self-confidence, and normalcy for the children with SMA. The results of this study provide preliminary support for the use of EAAT among children with SMA. PMID:24675128

  18. Brief Report: Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Mitigates Liver Disease in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Price, Jennifer C; Seaberg, Eric C; Phair, John P; Witt, Mallory D; Koletar, Susan L; Thio, Chloe L

    2016-07-01

    To determine the impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on liver disease, we analyzed changes in the aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) pre- and post-HAART initiation among 441 HIV-monoinfected and 53 HIV-viral hepatitis-coinfected men. Before HAART, APRI increased 17% and 34% among the HIV-monoinfected and coinfected men, respectively. With HAART initiation, APRI decreased significantly in men who achieved HIV RNA of <500 copies per milliliter: 16% for HIV-monoinfected and 22% for coinfected men. Decreases in APRI were dependent on HIV suppression. This protective effect of HAART decreased after 2 years, particularly in the HIV-monoinfected men. PMID:26945179

  19. Complement activation and choriocapillaris loss in early AMD: Implications for pathophysiology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S.Scott; Sohn, Elliott H.; Chirco, Kathleen R.; Drack, Arlene V.; Stone, Edwin M.; Tucker, Budd A.; Mullins, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common and devastating disease that can result in severe visual dysfunction. Over the last decade, great progress has been made in identifying genetic variants that contribute to AMD, many of which lie in genes involved in the complement cascade. In this review we discuss the significance of complement activation in AMD, particularly with respect to the formation of the membrane attack complex in the aging choriocapillaris. We review the clinical, histological and biochemical data that indicate that vascular loss in the choroid occurs very early in the pathogenesis of AMD, and discuss the potential impact of vascular dropout on the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane and the photoreceptor cells. Finally, we present a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of early AMD and consider the implications of this model on the development of new therapies. PMID:25486088

  20. Highly active antiretroviral therapy-related mechanisms of endothelial and platelet function alterations.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Momi, Stefania; Francisci, Daniela; Baldelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic condition, which has allowed the infected population to age and become prone to chronic degenerative diseases common to the general population, including atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Possible causative mechanisms of HIV-associated CAD are related to classic cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and fat redistribution, which may be due to either HIV infection or to HAART-associated toxicity. However, other mechanisms are emerging as crucial for the cardiovascular complication of HIV and HAART. This article analyzes the effects of HIV and HAART on endothelial function, endothelium-leukocyte interactions, and platelets as possible mechanisms of enhanced cardiovascular risk. PMID:24987863

  1. Hybrid data capture for monitoring patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in urban Botswana.

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Hermann; Wester, C. William; Ndwapi, Ndwapi; Vanderwarker, Chris; Gaolathe, Tendani; Tirelo, Geoffrey; Avalos, Ava; Moffat, Howard; Marlink, Richard G.

    2006-01-01

    Individual patient care and programme evaluation are pivotal for the success of antiretroviral treatment programmes in resource-limited countries. While computer-aided documentation and data storage are indispensable for any large programme, several important issues need to be addressed including which data are to be collected, who collects it and how it is entered into an electronic database. We describe a patient-monitoring approach, which uses patient encounter forms (in hybrid paper + electronic format) based on optical character recognition, piloted at Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana's first public highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) outpatient clinic. Our novel data capture approach collects "key" data for tracking patient and programme outcomes. It saves physician time and does not detract from clinical care. PMID:16501730

  2. Exploring Sudden Gains in Behavioral Activation Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hunnicutt-Ferguson, Kallio; Hoxha, Denada; Gollan, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the onset and course of sudden gains in treatment provides clinical information to the patient and clinician, and encourages clinicians to strive for these sudden clinical gains with their patients. This study characterizes the occurrence of sudden gains with Behavioral Activation (BA; Martell, Addis, & Jacobson, 2001), and the extent to which pre-treatment dysfunctional depressive thinking predicts sudden gains during treatment. We enrolled a sample of adults (n = 42) between ages 18–65 diagnosed with primary Major Depressive Disorder. All participants completed a 16-week course of BA, with clinical and self-report assessments at pre-, mid- and post-treatment. Results indicated that sudden gain and non-sudden gain participants showed differential improvement across treatment. No significant effects emerged for the dysfunctional cognitive style as a predictor of sudden gain status. Sudden gains may result from interaction of non-specific factors with the BA techniques implemented during early phases of therapy. PMID:22336434

  3. Isolation, structure, and HIV-1-integrase inhibitory activity of structurally diverse fungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Dewey, Raymond; Polishook, Jon D; Dombrowski, Anne W; Zink, Deborah L; Guan, Ziqiang; Collado, Javier; Platas, Gonzalo; Pelaez, Fernando; Felock, Peter J; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-12-01

    HIV-1 integrase is a critical enzyme for replication of HIV, and its inhibition is one of the most promising new drug strategies for anti-retroviral therapy, with potentially significant advantages over existing therapies. In this report, a series of HIV-1 inhibitors isolated from the organic extract of fermentations from terrestrial fungi is described. These fungal species, belonging to a variety of genera, were collected from throughout the world following the strict guidelines of Rio Convention on Biodiversity. The polyketide- and terpenoid-derived inhibitors are represented by two naphthoquinones, a biphenyl and two triphenyls, a benzophenone, four aromatics with or without catechol units, a linear aliphatic terpenoid, a diterpenoid, and a sesterterpenoid. These compounds inhibited the coupled and strand-transfer reaction of HIV-1 integrase with an IC(50) value of 0.5-120 micro M. The bioassay-directed isolation, structure elucidation, and HIV-1 inhibitory activity of these compounds are described. PMID:14714192

  4. Impediments to Enhancement of CPT-11 Anticancer Activity by E. coli Directed Beta-Glucuronidase Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Roffler, Steve R.

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is a camptothecin analog used for the clinical treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. CPT-11 is converted into the therapeutic anti-cancer agent SN-38 by liver enzymes and can be further metabolized to a non-toxic glucuronide SN-38G, resulting in low SN-38 but high SN-38G concentrations in the circulation. We previously demonstrated that adenoviral expression of membrane-anchored beta-glucuronidase could promote conversion of SN-38G to SN-38 in tumors and increase the anticancer activity of CPT-11. Here, we identified impediments to effective tumor therapy with E. coli that were engineered to constitutively express highly active E. coli beta-glucuronidase intracellularly to enhance the anticancer activity of CPT-11. The engineered bacteria, E. coli (lux/βG), could hydrolyze SN-38G to SN-38, increased the sensitivity of cultured tumor cells to SN-38G by about 100 fold and selectively accumulated in tumors. However, E. coli (lux/βG) did not more effectively increase CPT-11 anticancer activity in human tumor xenografts as compared to non-engineered E. coli. SN-38G conversion to SN-38 by E. coli (lux/βG) appeared to be limited by slow uptake into bacteria as well as by segregation of E. coli in necrotic regions of tumors that may be relatively inaccessible to systemically-administered drug molecules. Studies using a fluorescent glucuronide probe showed that significantly greater glucuronide hydrolysis could be achieved in mice pretreated with E. coli (lux/βG) by direct intratumoral injection of the glucuronide probe or by intratumoral lysis of bacteria to release intracellular beta-glucuronidase. Our study suggests that the distribution of beta-glucuronidase, and possibly other therapeutic proteins, in the tumor microenvironment might be an important barrier for effective bacterial-based tumor therapy. Expression of secreted therapeutic proteins or induction of therapeutic protein release from bacteria might therefore be a promising strategy to enhance anti

  5. Impediments to enhancement of CPT-11 anticancer activity by E. coli directed beta-glucuronidase therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Roffler, Steve R

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is a camptothecin analog used for the clinical treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. CPT-11 is converted into the therapeutic anti-cancer agent SN-38 by liver enzymes and can be further metabolized to a non-toxic glucuronide SN-38G, resulting in low SN-38 but high SN-38G concentrations in the circulation. We previously demonstrated that adenoviral expression of membrane-anchored beta-glucuronidase could promote conversion of SN-38G to SN-38 in tumors and increase the anticancer activity of CPT-11. Here, we identified impediments to effective tumor therapy with E. coli that were engineered to constitutively express highly active E. coli beta-glucuronidase intracellularly to enhance the anticancer activity of CPT-11. The engineered bacteria, E. coli (lux/βG), could hydrolyze SN-38G to SN-38, increased the sensitivity of cultured tumor cells to SN-38G by about 100 fold and selectively accumulated in tumors. However, E. coli (lux/βG) did not more effectively increase CPT-11 anticancer activity in human tumor xenografts as compared to non-engineered E. coli. SN-38G conversion to SN-38 by E. coli (lux/βG) appeared to be limited by slow uptake into bacteria as well as by segregation of E. coli in necrotic regions of tumors that may be relatively inaccessible to systemically-administered drug molecules. Studies using a fluorescent glucuronide probe showed that significantly greater glucuronide hydrolysis could be achieved in mice pretreated with E. coli (lux/βG) by direct intratumoral injection of the glucuronide probe or by intratumoral lysis of bacteria to release intracellular beta-glucuronidase. Our study suggests that the distribution of beta-glucuronidase, and possibly other therapeutic proteins, in the tumor microenvironment might be an important barrier for effective bacterial-based tumor therapy. Expression of secreted therapeutic proteins or induction of therapeutic protein release from bacteria might therefore be a promising strategy to enhance anti

  6. Monitoring for potential adverse effects of prenatal gene therapy: genotoxicity analysis in vitro and on small animal models ex vivo and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Themis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Gene delivery by integrating vectors has the potential to cause genotoxicity in the host by insertional mutagenesis (IM). Previously, the risk of IM by replication incompetent retroviral vectors was believed to be small. However, the recent observation of leukaemic events due to gamma retroviral vector insertion and activation of the LMO-2 proto-oncogene in patients enrolled in the French and British gene therapy trials for X-SCID demonstrates the need to understand vector associated genotoxicity in greater detail. These findings have led to the development of in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo assays designed to predict genotoxic risk and to further our mechanistic understanding of this process at the molecular level. In vitro assays include transformation of murine haematopoietic stem cells by integrating retroviral (RV) or lentiviral (LV) vectors and measurement of cell survival resulting from transformation due to integration mainly into the Evi1 oncogene. Ex vivo assays involve harvesting haematopoietic stem cells from mice followed by gene transfer and re-infusion of RV or LV infected cells to reconstitute the immune system. Insertional mutagenesis is then determined by analysis of clonally dominant populations of cells. The latter model has also been made highly sensitive using cells from mice predisposed to oncogenesis by lack of the P53 and Rb pathways. Our investigations on fetal gene therapy discovered a high incidence of liver tumour development that appears to be associated with vector insertions into cancer-related genes. Many genes involved in growth and differentiation are actively transcribed in early developmental and are therefore in an open chromatin configuration, which favours provirus insertion. Some of these genes are known oncogenes or anti-oncogenes and are not usually active during adulthood. We found that in utero injection of primate HIV-1, HR'SIN-cPPT-S-FIX-W does not result in oncogenesis as opposed to administration of non-primate equine

  7. Antitumor activity of photodynamic therapy performed with nanospheres containing zinc-phthalocyanine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing incidence of cancer and the search for more effective therapies with minimal collateral effects have prompted studies to find alternative new treatments. Among these, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proposed as a very promising new modality in cancer treatment with the lowest rates of side effects, revealing itself to be particularly successful when the photosensitizer is associated with nanoscaled carriers. This study aimed to design and develop a new formulation based on albumin nanospheres containing zinc-phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (ZnPcS4-AN) for use in the PDT protocol and to investigate its antitumor activity in Swiss albino mice using the Ehrlich solid tumor as an experimental model for breast cancer. Methods Ehrlich tumor’s volume, histopathology and morphometry were used to assess the efficacy of intratumoral injection of ZnPcS4-AN in containing tumor aggressiveness and promoting its regression, while the toxicity of possible treatments was assessed by animal weight, morphological analysis of the liver and kidneys, hemogram, and serum levels of total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase, creatinine and urea. In order to evaluate the efficacy of PDT, groups of animals treated with intratumoral injection of doxorubicin (Dox) were also investigated. Results Intratumoral injection of ZnPcS4-AN was found to be efficient in mediating PDT to refrain tumor aggressiveness and to induce its regression. Although tumor volume reduction was not significant, PDT induced a remarkable increase in the necrosis area seen in the tumor’s central region, as in other experimental groups, including tumor and Dox treated groups, but also in the tumor’s peripheral region. Further, PDT showed minimal adverse effects. Indeed, the use of ZnPcS4-AN in mediating PDT revealed anti-neoplastic activity similar to that

  8. Long-term outcome of patients after a single interruption of antiretroviral therapy: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To describe the long term outcome of patients who interrupted highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) once, identify the variables associated with earlier need to re-start HAART, and the response when therapy was resumed. A retrospective observational cohort of 66 adult patients with HIV-1 infection who interrupted HAART with a CD4+cell count ≥350 cells/μL and undetectable viral load (VL) was performed. The pre-established CD4+ cell count for restarting therapy was 300cells/μL. Cox regression was used to analyse the variables associated with earlier HAART reinitiation. Results The median follow-up was 209 weeks (range, 64–395). Rates of HIV-related or possible HIV-related events were 0.37 (one case of acute retroviral syndrome) and 1.49 per 100 patient-years, respectively. Two patients died after re-starting therapy and having reached undetectable VL. Three patients suffered a sexually transmitted disease while off therapy. Fifty patients (76%) resumed therapy after a median of 97 weeks (range, 17–267). Age, a nadir of CD4+ <250 cells/μL, and a mean VL during interruption of >10,000 copies/ml were independent predictors for earlier re-start. The intention-to-treat success rate of the first HAART resumed regimen was 85.4%. There were no differences by regimen used, nor between regimens that were the same as or different from the one that had been interrupted. Conclusions Our data suggest highly active antiretroviral therapy may be interrupted in selected patients because in these patients, when the HAART is restarted, the viral and clinical response may be achieved. PMID:23095460

  9. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.D.; Abbott, M.A.; Hurwitz, B.J.; Waldmann, T.A.; Poiesz, B.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3{prime} gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis.

  10. Retroviral intasomes search for a target DNA by 1D diffusion which rarely results in integration

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nathan D.; Lopez Jr, Miguel A.; Hanne, Jeungphill; Peake, Mitchell B.; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard; Yoder, Kristine E.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses must integrate their linear viral cDNA into the host genome for a productive infection. Integration is catalysed by the retrovirus-encoded integrase (IN), which forms a tetramer or octamer complex with the viral cDNA long terminal repeat (LTR) ends termed an intasome. IN removes two 3′-nucleotides from both LTR ends and catalyses strand transfer of the recessed 3′-hydroxyls into the target DNA separated by 4–6 bp. Host DNA repair restores the resulting 5′-Flap and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gap. Here we have used multiple single molecule imaging tools to determine that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) retroviral intasome searches for an integration site by one-dimensional (1D) rotation-coupled diffusion along DNA. Once a target site is identified, the time between PFV strand transfer events is 470 ms. The majority of PFV intasome search events were non-productive. These observations identify new dynamic IN functions and suggest that target site-selection limits retroviral integration. PMID:27108531

  11. 3'-end processing and kinetics of 5'-end joining during retroviral integration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Roe, T; Chow, S A; Brown, P O

    1997-01-01

    Retroviral replication depends on integration of viral DNA into a host cell chromosome. Integration proceeds in three steps: 3'-end processing, the endonucleolytic removal of the two terminal nucleotides from each 3' end of the viral DNA; strand transfer, the joining of the 3' ends of viral DNA to host DNA; and 5'-end joining (or gap repair), the joining of the 5' ends of viral DNA to host DNA. The 5'-end joining step has never been investigated, either for retroviral integration or for any other transposition process. We have developed an assay for 5'-end joining in vivo and have examined the kinetics of 5'-end joining for Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV). The interval between 3'-end and 5'-end joining is estimated to be less than 1 h. This assay will be a useful tool for examining whether viral or host components mediate 5'-end joining. MLV integrates its DNA only after its host cell has completed mitosis. We show that the extent of 3'-end processing is the same in unsynchronized and aphidicolin-arrested cells. 3'-end processing therefore does not depend on mitosis. PMID:8995657

  12. High Expression of Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene in the Equine Fetal Part of the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Katia; Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Coletti, Mauro; Capomaccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have co-evolved with vertebrate genomes for millions of years. Previous studies have identified the envelope (env) protein genes of retroviral origin preferentially expressed in the placenta which suggests a role in placentation based on their membrane fusogenic capacity and therefore they have been named syncytins. Until now, all the characterized syncytins have been associated with three invasive placentation types: the endotheliochorial (Carnivora), the synepitheliochorial (Ruminantia), and the hemochorial placentation (human, mouse) where they play a role in the syncytiotrophoblast formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether EqERV env RNA is expressed in horse tissues as well and investigate if the horse, possessing an epitheliochorial placenta, has “captured” a common retroviral env gene with syncytin-like properties in placental tissues. Interestingly, although in the equine placenta there is no syncytiotrophoblast layer at the maternal-fetal interface, our results showed that EqERV env RNA is highly expressed at that level, as expected for a candidate syncytin-like gene but with reduced abundance in the other somatic tissues (nearly 30-fold lower) thus suggesting a possible role in the placental tissue. Although the horse is one of the few domestic animals with a sequenced genome, few studies have been conducted about the EqERV and their expression in placental tissue has never been investigated. PMID:27176223

  13. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  14. Retroviral intasomes search for a target DNA by 1D diffusion which rarely results in integration.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nathan D; Lopez, Miguel A; Hanne, Jeungphill; Peake, Mitchell B; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard; Yoder, Kristine E

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses must integrate their linear viral cDNA into the host genome for a productive infection. Integration is catalysed by the retrovirus-encoded integrase (IN), which forms a tetramer or octamer complex with the viral cDNA long terminal repeat (LTR) ends termed an intasome. IN removes two 3'-nucleotides from both LTR ends and catalyses strand transfer of the recessed 3'-hydroxyls into the target DNA separated by 4-6 bp. Host DNA repair restores the resulting 5'-Flap and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gap. Here we have used multiple single molecule imaging tools to determine that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) retroviral intasome searches for an integration site by one-dimensional (1D) rotation-coupled diffusion along DNA. Once a target site is identified, the time between PFV strand transfer events is 470 ms. The majority of PFV intasome search events were non-productive. These observations identify new dynamic IN functions and suggest that target site-selection limits retroviral integration. PMID:27108531

  15. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements evidence a novel type of antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate genomes contain many virus-related sequences derived from both retroviruses and non-retroviral RNA and DNA viruses. Such non-retroviral RNA sequences are possibly produced by reverse-transcription and integration of viral mRNAs of ancient RNA viruses using retrotransposon machineries. We refer to this process as transcript reversion. During an ancient bornavirus infection, transcript reversion may have left bornavirus-related sequences, known as endogenous bornavirus-like nucleoproteins (EBLNs), in the genome. We have recently demonstrated that all Homo sapiens EBLNs are expressed in at least one tissue. Because species with EBLNs appear relatively protected against infection by a current bornavirus, Borna disease virus, it is speculated that EBLNs play some roles in antiviral immunity, as seen with some endogenous retroviruses. EBLNs can function as dominant negative forms of viral proteins, small RNAs targeting viral sequences, or DNA or RNA elements modulating the gene expression. Growing evidence reveals that various RNA viruses are reverse-transcribed and integrated into the genome of infected cells, suggesting transcript reversion generally occurs during ongoing infection. Considering this, transcript reversion-mediated interference with related viruses may be a novel type of antiviral immunity in vertebrates. Understanding the biological significance of transcript reversion will provide novel insights into host defenses against viral infections. PMID:27510928

  16. Endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats within the HLA-DQ locus.

    PubMed Central

    Kambhu, S; Falldorf, P; Lee, J S

    1990-01-01

    Two endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats (LTRs) were found in the human major histocompatibility complex locus HLA-DQ. The solo LTRs, unlinked to retrovirus structural genes, are located approximately 5 kilobases apart from each other and in the same transcriptional orientation, which is opposite to that for the HLA-DQB1 gene. These elements exhibit greater than 90% homology to the LTRs of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K10. The conservation of putative regulatory elements found within the LTRs and their position relative to the HLA-DQB1 gene suggest that these elements may confer distinct regulatory properties on genes in the HLA-DQ region. Polymorphic variation between different HLA haplotypes for the presence of the LTRs at this location and of the molecular architecture within this subregion is supported by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Comparisons of chromosomes with and without the LTRs in this region will provide a unique opportunity in the human genome to analyze transposition or integration of retroviral sequences. Images PMID:2114643

  17. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements evidence a novel type of antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vertebrate genomes contain many virus-related sequences derived from both retroviruses and non-retroviral RNA and DNA viruses. Such non-retroviral RNA sequences are possibly produced by reverse-transcription and integration of viral mRNAs of ancient RNA viruses using retrotransposon machineries. We refer to this process as transcript reversion. During an ancient bornavirus infection, transcript reversion may have left bornavirus-related sequences, known as endogenous bornavirus-like nucleoproteins (EBLNs), in the genome. We have recently demonstrated that all Homo sapiens EBLNs are expressed in at least one tissue. Because species with EBLNs appear relatively protected against infection by a current bornavirus, Borna disease virus, it is speculated that EBLNs play some roles in antiviral immunity, as seen with some endogenous retroviruses. EBLNs can function as dominant negative forms of viral proteins, small RNAs targeting viral sequences, or DNA or RNA elements modulating the gene expression. Growing evidence reveals that various RNA viruses are reverse-transcribed and integrated into the genome of infected cells, suggesting transcript reversion generally occurs during ongoing infection. Considering this, transcript reversion-mediated interference with related viruses may be a novel type of antiviral immunity in vertebrates. Understanding the biological significance of transcript reversion will provide novel insights into host defenses against viral infections. PMID:27510928

  18. Murine hematopoietic reconstitution after tagging and selection of retrovirally transduced bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, B.; Castellanos, A.; López, A.; Orfao, A.; Sánchez-García, I.

    1997-01-01

    A major problem facing the effective treatment of patients with cancer is how to get the specific antitumor agent into every tumor cell. In this report we describe the use of a strategy that, by using retroviral vectors encoding a truncated human CD5 cDNA, allows the selection of only the infected cells, and we show the ability to obtain, before bone marrow transplantation, a population of 5-fluouraci-treated murine bone marrow cells that are 100% marked. This marked population of bone marrow cells is able to reconstitute the hematopoietic system in lethally irradiated mice, indicating that the surface marker lacks deleterious effects on the functionality of bone marrow cells. No gross abnormalities in hematopoiesis were detected in mice repopulated with CD5-expressing cells. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of the hematopoietic cells no longer expresses the surface marker CD5 in the 9-month-old recipient mice. This transcriptional inactivity of the proviral long terminal repeat (LTR) was accompanied by de novo methylation of the proviral sequences. Our results show that the use of the CD5 as a retrovirally encoded marker enables the rapid, efficient, and nontoxic selection in vitro of infected primary cells, which can entirely reconstitute the hematopoietic system in mice. These results should now greatly enhance the power of studies aimed at addressing questions such as generation of cancer-negative hematopoiesis. PMID:9371830

  19. Pantropic retroviral vectors integrate and express in cells of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, T; Beeman, R W; Shike, H; Besansky, N J; Mukabayire, O; Higgs, S; James, A A; Burns, J C

    1996-01-01

    The lack of efficient mechanisms for stable genetic transformation of medically important insects, such as anopheline mosquitoes, is the single most important impediment to progress in identifying novel control strategies. Currently available techniques for foreign gene expression in insect cells in culture lack the benefit of stable inheritance conferred by integration. To overcome this problem, a new class of pantropic retroviral vectors has been developed in which the amphotropic envelope is completely replaced by the G glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus. The broadened host cell range of these particles allowed successful entry, integration, and expression of heterologous genes in cultured cells of Anopheles gambiae, the principle mosquito vector responsible for the transmission of over 100 million cases of malaria each year. Mosquito cells in culture infected with a pantropic vector expressing hygromycin phosphotransferase from the Drosophila hsp70 promoter were resistant to the antibiotic hygromycin B. Integrated provirus was detected in infected mosquito cell clones grown in selective media. Thus, pantropic retroviral vectors hold promise as a transformation system for mosquitoes in vivo. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8650240

  20. Detection of retroviral super-infection from non-invasive samples.

    PubMed

    Goffe, Adeelia S; Blasse, Anja; Mundry, Roger; Leendertz, Fabian H; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    While much attention has been focused on the molecular epidemiology of retroviruses in wild primate populations, the correlated question of the frequency and nature of super-infection events, i.e., the simultaneous infection of the same individual host with several strains of the same virus, has remained largely neglected. In particular, methods possibly allowing the investigation of super-infection from samples collected non-invasively (such as faeces) have never been properly compared. Here, we fill in this gap by assessing the costs and benefits of end-point dilution PCR (EPD-PCR) and multiple bulk-PCR cloning, as applied to a case study focusing on simian foamy virus super-infection in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We show that, although considered to be the gold standard, EPD-PCR can lead to massive consumption of biological material when only low copy numbers of the target are expected. This constitutes a serious drawback in a field in which rarity of biological material is a fundamental constraint. In addition, we demonstrate that EPD-PCR results (single/multiple infection; founder strains) can be well predicted from multiple bulk-PCR clone experiments, by applying simple statistical and network analyses to sequence alignments. We therefore recommend the implementation of the latter method when the focus is put on retroviral super-infection and only low retroviral loads are encountered. PMID:22590569

  1. New insights into retroviral Gag–Gag and Gag–membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, José O.; Martin, Jessica L.; Mueller, Joachim D.; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    A critical aspect of viral replication is the assembly of virus particles, which are subsequently released as progeny virus. While a great deal of attention has been focused on better understanding this phase of the viral life cycle, many aspects of the molecular details remain poorly understood. This is certainly true for retroviruses, including that of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1; a lentivirus) as well as for human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1; a deltaretrovirus). This review discusses the retroviral Gag protein and its interactions with itself, the plasma membrane and the role of lipids in targeting Gag to virus assembly sites. Recent progress using sophisticated biophysical approaches to investigate – in a comparative manner – retroviral Gag–Gag and Gag–membrane interactions are discussed. Differences among retroviruses in Gag–Gag and Gag–membrane interactions imply dissimilar molecular aspects of the viral assembly pathway, including the interactions of Gag with lipids at the membrane. PMID:25009535

  2. Improved self-inactivating retroviral vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, P; Nelson, S; Dornburg, R

    1994-01-01

    Self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors contain a deletion spanning most of the right long terminal repeat's (LTR's) U3 region. Reverse transcription copies this deletion to both LTRs. As a result, there is no transcription from the 5' LTR, preventing further replication. Many previously developed SIN vectors, however, had reduced titers or were genetically unstable. Earlier, we reported that certain SIN vectors derived from spleen necrosis virus (SNV) experienced reconstitution of the U3-deleted LTR at high frequencies. This reconstitution occurred on the DNA level and appeared to be dependent on defined vector sequences. To study this phenomenon in more detail, we developed an almost completely U3-free retroviral vector. The promoter and enhancer of the left LTR were replaced with those of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early genes. This promoter swap did not impair the level of transcription or alter its start site. Our data indicate that SNV contains a strong initiator which resembles that of human immunodeficiency virus. We show that the vectors replicate with efficiencies similar to those of vectors possessing two wild-type LTRs. U3-deleted vectors carrying the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene did not observably undergo LTR reconstitution, even when replicated in helper cells containing SNV-LTR sequences. However, vectors carrying the neomycin resistance gene did undergo LTR reconstitution with the use of homologous helper cell LTR sequences as template. This supports our earlier finding that sequences within the neomycin resistance gene can trigger recombination. Images PMID:7933088

  3. High Expression of Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene in the Equine Fetal Part of the Placenta.

    PubMed

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Katia; Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Coletti, Mauro; Capomaccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have co-evolved with vertebrate genomes for millions of years. Previous studies have identified the envelope (env) protein genes of retroviral origin preferentially expressed in the placenta which suggests a role in placentation based on their membrane fusogenic capacity and therefore they have been named syncytins. Until now, all the characterized syncytins have been associated with three invasive placentation types: the endotheliochorial (Carnivora), the synepitheliochorial (Ruminantia), and the hemochorial placentation (human, mouse) where they play a role in the syncytiotrophoblast formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether EqERV env RNA is expressed in horse tissues as well and investigate if the horse, possessing an epitheliochorial placenta, has "captured" a common retroviral env gene with syncytin-like properties in placental tissues. Interestingly, although in the equine placenta there is no syncytiotrophoblast layer at the maternal-fetal interface, our results showed that EqERV env RNA is highly expressed at that level, as expected for a candidate syncytin-like gene but with reduced abundance in the other somatic tissues (nearly 30-fold lower) thus suggesting a possible role in the placental tissue. Although the horse is one of the few domestic animals with a sequenced genome, few studies have been conducted about the EqERV and their expression in placental tissue has never been investigated. PMID:27176223

  4. Real-time active MR-tracking of metallic stylets in MR-guided radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Tse, Zion T. H.; Mehrtash, Alireza; Loew, Wolfgang; Norton, Isaiah; Tokuda, Junichi; Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Kapur, Tina; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Schmidt, Ehud J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop an active MR-tracking system to guide placement of metallic devices for radiation therapy. Methods An actively tracked metallic stylet for brachytherapy was constructed by adding printed-circuit micro-coils to a commercial stylet. The coil design was optimized by electromagnetic simulation, and has a radio-frequency lobe pattern extending ~5 mm beyond the strong B0 inhomogeneity region near the metal surface. An MR-tracking sequence with phase-field dithering was used to overcome residual effects of B0 and B1 inhomogeneities caused by the metal, as well as from inductive coupling to surrounding metallic stylets. The tracking system was integrated with a graphical workstation for real-time visualization. 3T MRI catheter-insertion procedures were tested in phantoms and ex-vivo animal tissue, and then performed in three patients during interstitial brachytherapy. Results The tracking system provided high-resolution (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6 mm3) and rapid (16 to 40 frames per second, with three to one phase-field dithering directions) catheter localization in phantoms, animals, and three gynecologic cancer patients. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of active tracking of the shaft of metallic stylet in MR-guided brachytherapy. It holds the promise of assisting physicians to achieve better targeting and improving outcomes in interstitial brachytherapy. PMID:24903165

  5. Targeting Microglial Activation in Stroke Therapy: Pharmacological Tools and Gender Effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Won, S.J.; Xu, Y.; Swanson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is caused by critical reductions in blood flow to brain or spinal cord. Microglia are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, and they respond to stroke by assuming an activated phenotype that releases cytotoxic cytokines, reactive oxygen species, proteases, and other factors. This acute, innate immune response may be teleologically adapted to limit infection, but in stroke this response can exacerbate injury by further damaging or killing nearby neurons and other cell types, and by recruiting infiltration of circulating cytotoxic immune cells. The microglial response requires hours to days to fully develop, and this time interval presents a clinically accessible time window for initiating therapy. Because of redundancy in cytotoxic microglial responses, the most effective therapeutic approach may be to target the global gene expression changes involved in microglial activation. Several classes of drugs can do this, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, minocycline and other PARP inhibitors, corticosteroids, and inhibitors of TNFα and scavenger receptor signaling. Here we review the pre-clinical studies in which these drugs have been used to suppress microglial activation after stroke. We also review recent advances in the understanding of sex differences in the CNS inflammatory response, as these differences are likely to influence the efficacy of drugs targeting post-stroke brain inflammation. PMID:24372213

  6. Activation of mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 normalizes tumor vasculature and improves cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Adapala, R K; Thoppil, R J; Ghosh, K; Cappelli, H C; Dudley, A C; Paruchuri, S; Keshamouni, V; Klagsbrun, M; Meszaros, J G; Chilian, W M; Ingber, D E; Thodeti, C K

    2016-01-21

    Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormal morphology and hyperpermeability that together cause inefficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Although vascular endothelial growth factor has been established as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis, the role of mechanical signaling in the regulation of tumor vasculature or tumor endothelial cell (TEC) function is not known. Here we show that the mechanosensitive ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor vessel maturation via modulation of TEC mechanosensitivity. We found that TECs exhibit reduced TRPV4 expression and function, which is correlated with aberrant mechanosensitivity towards extracellular matrix stiffness, increased migration and abnormal angiogenesis by TEC. Further, syngeneic tumor experiments revealed that the absence of TRPV4 induced increased vascular density, vessel diameter and reduced pericyte coverage resulting in enhanced tumor growth in TRPV4 knockout mice. Importantly, overexpression or pharmacological activation of TRPV4 restored aberrant TEC mechanosensitivity, migration and normalized abnormal angiogenesis in vitro by modulating Rho activity. Finally, a small molecule activator of TRPV4, GSK1016790A, in combination with anticancer drug cisplatin, significantly reduced tumor growth in wild-type mice by inducing vessel maturation. Our findings demonstrate TRPV4 channels to be critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis and represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic and vascular normalization therapies. PMID:25867067

  7. Activation of mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 normalizes tumor vasculature and improves cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Ravi K.; Thoppil, Roslin J.; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Cappelli, Holly; Dudley, Andrew C.; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar; Klagsbrun, Michael; Meszaros, J. Gary; Chilian, William M.; Ingber, Donald E.; Thodeti, Charles K.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormal morphology and hyper-permeability that together cause inefficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Although VEGF has been established as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis, the role of mechanical signaling in the regulation of tumor vasculature or tumor endothelial cell (TEC) function is not known. Here, we show that the mechanosensitive ion channel TRPV4 regulates tumor angiogenesis and tumor vessel maturation via modulation of TEC mechanosensitivity. We found that TEC exhibit reduced TRPV4 expression and function, which is correlated with aberrant mechanosensitivity towards ECM stiffness, increased migration and abnormal angiogenesis by TEC. Further, syngeneic tumor experiments revealed that the absence of TRPV4 induced increased vascular density, vessel diameter and reduced pericyte coverage resulting in enhanced tumor growth in TRPV4 KO mice. Importantly, overexpression or pharmacological activation of TRPV4 restored aberrant TEC mechanosensitivity, migration and normalized abnormal angiogenesis in vitro by modulating Rho activity. Finally, a small molecule activator of TRPV4, GSK1016790A, in combination with anti-cancer drug Cisplatin, significantly reduced tumor growth in WT mice by inducing vessel maturation. Our findings demonstrate TRPV4 channels to be critical regulators of tumor angiogenesis and represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic and vascular normalization therapies. PMID:25867067

  8. Activity dependent therapies modulate the spinal changes that motoneurons suffer after a peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; Torres-Espín, Abel; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Injury of a peripheral nerve not only leads to target denervation, but also induces massive stripping of spinal synapses on axotomized motoneurons, with disruption of spinal circuits. Even when regeneration is successful, unspecific reinnervation and the limited reconnection of the spinal circuits impair functional recovery. The aim of this study was to describe the changes that axotomized motoneurons suffer after peripheral nerve injury and how activity-dependent therapies and neurotrophic factors can modulate these events. We observed a marked decrease in glutamatergic synapses, with a maximum peak at two weeks post-axotomy, which was only partially reversed with time. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in gephyrin immunoreactivity and a disintegration of perineuronal nets (PNNs) surrounding the motoneurons. Direct application of neurotrophins at the proximal stump was not able to reverse these effects. In contrast, activity-dependent treatment, in the form of treadmill running, reduced the observed destructuring of perineuronal nets and the loss of glutamatergic synapses two weeks after injury. These changes were proportional to the intensity of the exercise protocol. Blockade of sensory inputs from the homolateral hindlimb also reduced PNN immunoreactivity around intact motoneurons, and in that case treadmill running did not reverse that loss, suggesting that the effects of exercise on motoneuron PNN depend on increased sensory activity. Preservation of motoneuron PNN and reduction of synaptic stripping by exercise could facilitate the maintenance of the spinal circuitry and benefit functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:25448160

  9. Effects of active music therapy on the normal brain: fMRI based evidence.

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo; Galandra, Caterina; Sibilla, Luisella; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gaeta, Francesca; Di Salle, Francesco; Moro, Luca; Carne, Irene; Bastianello, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological bases of Active Music Therapy (AMT) and its effects on the normal brain. Twelve right-handed, healthy, non-musician volunteers were recruited. The subjects underwent 2 AMT sessions based on the free sonorous-music improvisation using rhythmic and melodic instruments. After these sessions, each subject underwent 2 fMRI scan acquisitions while listening to a Syntonic (SP) and an A-Syntonic (AP) Production from the AMT sessions. A 3 T Discovery MR750 scanner with a 16-channel phased array head coil was used, and the image analysis was performed with Brain Voyager QX 2.8. The listening to SP vs AP excerpts mainly activated: (1) the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus, (2) the right middle frontal gyrus and in particular the right precentral gyrus, (3) the bilateral precuneus, (4) the left superior temporal sulcus and (5) the left middle temporal gyrus. These results are consistent with the psychological bases of the AMT approach and with the activation of brain areas involved in memory and autobiographical processes, and also in personal or interpersonal significant experiences. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and to explain possible effects of AMT in clinical settings. PMID:25847861

  10. Allopurinol enhances the activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in inflammatory bowel disease patients during low-dose thiopurine therapy: preliminary data of an ongoing series.

    PubMed

    Seinen, Margien L; de Boer, Nanne K H; Smid, Kees; van Asseldonk, Dirk P; Bouma, Gerd; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-12-01

    Thiopurines are crucial in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The phenotype of pivotal metabolic enzymes determines whether thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) are generated in clinically sufficiently high levels. The first step in activation of thiopurine prodrugs to 6-TGN is catalysis by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Often, patients exhibit a clinically unfavorable metabolism, leading to discontinuation of conventional thiopurine therapy. The combination of allopurinol and low-dose thiopurine therapy may optimize this variant metabolism, presumably by affecting enzyme activities. We performed a prospective pharmacodynamic study to determine the effect of combination therapy on the activity of HGPRT. The activity of HGPRT and 6-TGN concentrations was measured in red blood cells during thiopurine monotherapy and after 4 weeks of combination therapy. The activity of HGPRT was also measured after 12 weeks of combination therapy. From the results, we conclude that combination therapy increases the activity of HGPRT and subsequently 6-TGN concentrations. PMID:22132961

  11. Effect of Antiviral Therapy on Serum Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Sofic, Amela; Huskic, Jasminko; Bulja, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renin-angiotenzin system (RAS) is frequently activated in patients with chronic liver disease. Angiotenzin - II (AT-II), produced by angiotenzin converting enzyme (ACE), has many physiological effects, including an important role in liver fibrogenesis. Combined antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN and ribavirin besides its antiviral effect also leads to a reduction in liver parenchyma fibrosis. Aim of the study: Determining the value of ACE in serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after combined antiviral therapy, as well as the value of ACE activities in sera of the control group. Materials and methods: We studied 50 patients treated at Gastroenterohepatology Department, in the time-period of four years. Value of ACE in serum was determined by Olympus AU 400 device, with application of kit “Infinity TN ACE Liquid Stable Reagent”. HCV RNA levels in sera were measured by real time PCR. HCV RNA test was performed with modular analysis of AMPLICOR and COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test v2.0, which has proved infection and was used for quantification of the viruses and monitoring of the patients’ response to therapy. Liver histology was evaluated in accordance with the level of necroinflammation activity and stage of fibrosis. Results: Serum activities of ACE in chronic hepatitis C patients is statistically higher than the values in the control group (p=0.02). Antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients statistically decreases serum activities of ACE (p= 0.02) and indirectly affects fibrogenesis of the liver parenchyma. Correlation between ACE and ALT activity after the therapy was proved (0.3934). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the activity of ACE in serum is a good indirect parameter of the liver damage, and could be used as an indirect prognostic factor of the level of liver parenchyma damage. Serum activity of ACE can be used as a parameter for non-invasive assessment of intensity of liver damage. PMID:27147779

  12. Clonal contributions of small numbers of retrovirally marked hematopoietic stem cells engrafted in unirradiated neonatal W/Wv mice.

    PubMed

    Capel, B; Hawley, R; Covarrubias, L; Hawley, T; Mintz, B

    1989-06-01

    Mice were repopulated with small numbers of retrovirally marked hematopoietic cells operationally definable as totipotent hematopoietic stem cells, without engraftment of cells at later stages of hematopoiesis, in order to facilitate analysis of stem cell clonal histories. This result depended upon the use of unirradiated W/Wv newborn recipients. Before transplantation, viral integration markers were introduced during cocultivation of fetal liver or bone marrow cells with helper cell lines exporting defective recombinant murine retroviruses of the HHAM series. Omission of selection in culture [although the vector contained the bacterial neomycin-resistance (neo) gene] also limited the proportion of stem cells that were virally labeled. Under these conditions, engraftment was restricted to a small population of marked and unmarked normal donor stem cells, due to their competitive advantage over the corresponding defective cells of the mutant hosts. A relatively simple and coherent pattern emerged, of one or a few virally marked clones, in contrast to previous studies. In order to establish the totipotent hematopoietic stem cell identity of the engrafted cells, tissues were sampled for viral and inbred-strain markers for periods close to one year after transplantation. The virally labeled clones were characterized as stem cell clones by their extensive self-renewal and by formation of the wide range of myeloid and lymphoid lineages tested. Results clearly documented concurrent contributions of cohorts of stem cells to hematopoiesis. A given stem cell can increase or decrease its proliferative activity, become completely inactive or lost, or become active after a long latent period. The contribution of a single clone present in a particular lineage was usually between 5% and 20%. PMID:2567516

  13. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell–directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV. PMID:26909355

  14. Dog-assisted therapies and activities in rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Elmacı, Dilek Tunçay; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate dog-assisted therapies and activities in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities who have difficulties in benefiting from well-being and health-improving services. This descriptive-explanatory study was conducted in disabled children of various ages between 2008 and 2011 by an experienced team in a private training and rehabilitation center in Antalya (Turkey). In this study, five study groups were formed among the children with physical and mental disabilities. During the therapy studies, three dogs were used. For each therapy group, the goals for the children and therapist were defined, and the activities were determined according to these goals. The entire study process was followed using audio-records and photographs of patients. The expected targets were reached in all study groups. The children who experienced fear, anxiety and difficulties due to their disabilities in daily life learned to cope with their anxieties and fears, set goals and make plans to achieve their aims. During this study, the children improved their abilities to use their bodies according to their capabilities. Accordingly, they improved their ability to develop empathy between themselves and a therapy dog, to receive and present help, and to communicate. The results of the present study revealed that dog-assisted therapies and activities can be a supportive method for routine treatment procedures in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities. PMID:25985307

  15. Dog-Assisted Therapies and Activities in Rehabilitation of Children with Cerebral Palsy and Physical and Mental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Tunçay Elmacı, Dilek; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate dog-assisted therapies and activities in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities who have difficulties in benefiting from well-being and health-improving services. This descriptive-explanatory study was conducted in disabled children of various ages between 2008 and 2011 by an experienced team in a private training and rehabilitation center in Antalya (Turkey). In this study, five study groups were formed among the children with physical and mental disabilities. During the therapy studies, three dogs were used. For each therapy group, the goals for the children and therapist were defined, and the activities were determined according to these goals. The entire study process was followed using audio-records and photographs of patients. The expected targets were reached in all study groups. The children who experienced fear, anxiety and difficulties due to their disabilities in daily life learned to cope with their anxieties and fears, set goals and make plans to achieve their aims. During this study, the children improved their abilities to use their bodies according to their capabilities. Accordingly, they improved their ability to develop empathy between themselves and a therapy dog, to receive and present help, and to communicate. The results of the present study revealed that dog-assisted therapies and activities can be a supportive method for routine treatment procedures in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy and physical and mental disabilities. PMID:25985307

  16. Retinal complications with elevated circulating plasma C5a associated with interferon-alpha therapy for chronic active hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sugano, S; Yanagimoto, M; Suzuki, T; Sato, M; Onmura, H; Aizawa, H; Makino, H

    1994-11-01

    Retinal hemorrhage is a complication of interferon therapy of unknown pathogenesis. We report two chronic active hepatitis C patients who developed retinal hemorrhage and/or cotton wool patches during interferon-alpha therapy 4 and 12 wk after beginning treatment. At the time of the hemorrhage, plasma-activated complement 5, a known potent intravascular aggregator of granulocytes, increased to 54 ng/ml in one patient and to 29 ng/ml in the other patient. When the hemorrhage resolved, it decreased to under 5 ng/ml. Our cases suggest that complement activation occurs in patients treated with interferon-alpha and that activation of complement 5 can lead to retinal capillary infarction and retinal hemorrhage. High levels of activated complement 5 may predict retinal artery infarction or perhaps microvascular emboli in the other organs. PMID:7942735

  17. Anticancer Therapy: Light-Activated Hypoxia-Responsive Nanocarriers for Enhanced Anticancer Therapy (Adv. Mater. 17/2016).

    PubMed

    Qian, Chenggen; Yu, Jicheng; Chen, Yulei; Hu, Quanyin; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Feng, Peijian; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A light-activated hypoxia-responsive drug-delivery vehicle is described by Q.-D. Shen, Z. Gu, and co-workers on page 3313. This conjugated-polymer-based nanocarrier can be activated by photoirradiation, producing singlet oxygen ((1) O2 ) and inducing hypoxia to promote release of its cargo inside tumor cells for enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27122110

  18. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Waseem; Gennery, Andrew R

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy using autologous haematopoietic stem cells offers a valuable treatment option for patients with primary immunodeficiencies who do not have access to an HLA-matched donor, although such treatments have not been without their problems. This review details gene therapy trials for X-linked and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). X-linked SCID was chosen for gene therapy because of previous 'natural' genetic correction through a reversion event in a single lymphoid precursor, demonstrating limited thymopoiesis and restricted T-lymphocyte receptor repertoire, showing selective advantage of progenitors possessing the wild-type gene. In early studies, patients were treated with long terminal repeats-intact gamma-retroviral vectors, without additional chemotherapy. Early results demonstrated gene-transduced cells, sustained thymopoiesis, and a diverse T-lymphocyte repertoire with normal function. Serious adverse effects were subsequently reported in 5 of 20 patients, with T-lymphocyte leukaemia developing, secondary to the viral vector integrating adjacent to a known oncogene. New trials using self-inactivating gamma-retroviral vectors are progressing. Trials for ADA-SCID using gamma-retroviral vectors have been successful, with no similar serious adverse effects reported; trials using lentiviral vectors are in progress. Patients with WAS and CGD treated with early gamma-retroviral vectors have developed similar lymphoproliferative adverse effects to those seen in X-SCID--current trials are using new-generation vectors. Targeted gene insertion using homologous recombination of corrected gene sequences by cellular DNA repair pathways following targeted DNA breakage will improve efficacy and safety of gene therapy. A number of new techniques are discussed. PMID:24848753

  19. Regorafenib: Antitumor Activity upon Mono and Combination Therapy in Preclinical Pediatric Malignancy Models

    PubMed Central

    Daudigeos-Dubus, Estelle; Le Dret, Ludivine; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Bawa, Olivia; Opolon, Paule; Vievard, Albane; Villa, Irène; Pagès, Mélanie; Bosq, Jacques; Vassal, Gilles; Zopf, Dieter; Geoerger, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib (BAY 73–4506) exerts both anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activity in adult solid malignancies mainly advanced colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We intended to explore preclinically the potential of regorafenib against solid pediatric malignancies alone and in combination with anticancer agents to guide the pediatric development plan. In vitro effects on cell proliferation were screened against 33 solid tumor cell lines of the Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC) panel covering five pediatric solid malignancies. Regorafenib inhibited cell proliferation with a mean half maximal growth inhibition of 12.5 μmol/L (range 0.7 μmol/L to 28 μmol/L). In vivo, regorafenib was evaluated alone at 10 or 30 mg/kg/d or in combination with radiation, irinotecan or the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor refametinib against various tumor types, including patient-derived brain tumor models with an amplified platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) gene. Regorafenib alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in all xenografts derived from nervous system and connective tissue tumors. Enhanced effects were observed when regorafenib was combined with irradiation and irinotecan against PDGFRA amplified IGRG93 glioma and IGRM57 medulloblastoma respectively, resulting in 100% tumor regressions. Antitumor activity was associated with decreased tumor vascularization, inhibition of PDGFR signaling, and induction of apoptotic cell death. Our work demonstrates that regorafenib exhibits significant antitumor activity in a wide spectrum of preclinical pediatric models through inhibition of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, radio- and chemosensitizing effects were observed with DNA damaging agents in PDGFR amplified tumors. PMID:26599335

  20. Hypertension among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Nazisa; MSL, Huang; Lin, Khor Geok; Choong, Lee Christopher Kwok

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing researches about non-communicable disease such as elevated blood pressure among people living with HIV before and after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors among 340 HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy at a Malaysian public hospital providing HIV-related treatment. Data on socioeconomic background, anthropometry, medical history and dietary intake of the patients were collected. Hypertension is defined as blood pressure ≥130/85 (mm Hg). Prevalence of hypertension was 45.60% (n=155) of which 86.5% of the hypertensive group were male (n=134). The results showed that increase in age (OR 1.051, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.024-1.078), higher body mass index (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.106-2.71), bigger waist circumference (OR 1.18, 95%CI 1.106-2.71), higher waist-hip ratio (OR 1.070, 95%CI 1.034-1.106), higher fasting plasma glucose (OR 1.332, 95% CI 0.845-2.100) and percentage energy intake from protein >15 (OR 2.519, 95%CI 1.391-4.561) were significant risk factors for hypertension (p<0.001). After adjusting for other variables, increasing age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.069 95%CI 1.016-1.124, p=0.010), being male (aOR 3.026, 95%CI 1.175-7.794, p=0.022) and higher body mass index (aOR 1.26, 95%CI 1.032-1.551, p=0.024) were independently associated with hypertension. None of the antiretroviral therapy and immunologic factors was linked to hypertension. In conclusion hypertension among PLHIV was linked to the well-known risk factors such as age, gender and body mass index. With HAART, people can live longer by making monitoring and control of some reversible factors, especially excessive weight gain for maintaining quality of life. PMID:24576366

  1. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Adverse Birth Outcomes Among HIV-Infected Women in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jennifer Y.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Souda, Sajini; Parekh, Natasha; Ogwu, Anthony; Lockman, Shahin; Powis, Kathleen; Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Creek, Tracy; Jimbo, William; Madidimalo, Tebogo; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Shapiro, Roger L

    2012-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether adverse birth outcomes are associated with maternal highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in pregnancy, particularly in resource-limited settings. Methods. We abstracted obstetrical records at 6 sites in Botswana for 24 months. Outcomes included stillbirths (SBs), preterm delivery (PTD), small for gestational age (SGA), and neonatal death (NND). Among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected women, comparisons were limited to HAART exposure status at conception, and those with similar opportunities for outcomes. Comparisons were adjusted for CD4+ lymphocyte cell count. Results. Of 33 148 women, 32 113 (97%) were tested for HIV, of whom 9504 (30%) were HIV infected. Maternal HIV was significantly associated with SB, PTD, SGA, and NND. Compared with all other HIV-infected women, those continuing HAART from before pregnancy had higher odds of PTD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1, 1.4), SGA (AOR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.6, 2.1) and SB (AOR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2, 1.8). Among women initiating antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy, HAART use (vs zidovudine) was associated with higher odds of PTD (AOR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2, 1.8), SGA (AOR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2, 1.9), and SB (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.6, 3.9). Low CD4+ was independently associated with SB and SGA, and maternal hypertension during pregnancy with PTD, SGA, and SB. Conclusions. HAART receipt during pregnancy was associated with increased PTD, SGA, and SB. PMID:23066160

  2. A novel cationic lipid with intrinsic antitumor activity to facilitate gene therapy of TRAIL DNA.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; Miao, Lei; Zhao, Yi; Musetti, Sara; Wang, Yuhua; Shi, Kai; Huang, Leaf

    2016-09-01

    Metformin (dimethylbiguanide) has been found to be effective for the treatment of a wide range of cancer. Herein, a novel lipid (1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-biguanide-propane (DOBP)) was elaborately designed by utilizing biguanide as the cationic head group. This novel cationic lipid was intended to act as a gene carrier with intrinsic antitumor activity. When compared with 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), a commercially available cationic lipid with a similar structure, the blank liposomes consisting of DOBP showed much more potent antitumor effects than DOTAP in human lung tumor xenografts, following an antitumor mechanism similar to metformin. Given its cationic head group, biguanide, DOBP could encapsulate TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) plasmids into Lipid-Protamine-DNA (LPD) nanoparticles (NPs) for systemic gene delivery. DOBP-LPD-TRAIL NPs demonstrated distinct superiority in delaying tumor progression over DOTAP-LPD-TRAIL NPs, due to the intrinsic antitumor activity combined with TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumor. These results indicate that DOBP could be used as a versatile and promising cationic lipid for improving the therapeutic index of gene therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:27344367

  3. Activatable Ferritin Nanocomplex for Real-Time Monitoring of Caspase-3 Activation during Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Liwen; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-21

    One mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the ablation of tumors is to induce apoptosis. Visualization of apoptosis during PDT in real-time is of great benefit for predicting and evaluating therapeutic outcomes. Herein, we engineered a highly stable and sensitive caspase-3 ferritin activatable probe (FABP/ZnPc) for simultaneous delivery of a photosensitizer (ZnPc) and real-time visualization of apoptosis during PDT. Upon near-infrared (NIR) light irradiation, ZnPc becomes active and initiates apoptosis, upon which the outer layer of the FABP/ZnPc is degraded by the apoptotic marker, caspase-3, to boost strong fluorescent signals, ultimately allowing real-time imaging of apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the utility of FABP/ZnPc as a tool for PDT and simultaneous imaging of caspase-3 activation in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the ability of FABP/ZnPc to image apoptosis during PDT will not only facilitate optimizing and personalizing the PDT strategy but is also important for understanding the mechanisms of PDT. PMID:26388178

  4. Mindfulness-based therapy and behavioral activation: A randomized controlled trial with depressed college students.

    PubMed

    McIndoo, C C; File, A A; Preddy, T; Clark, C G; Hopko, D R

    2016-02-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) manifests in 20-30% of college students, with increased incidence in recent decades. Very limited research has assessed the efficacy of evidence-based interventions for MDD in college students. Mindfulness-Based Therapy (MBT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are two interventions with significant potential to meet demands of college counseling clinics and effectively treat college students with MDD. This study utilized a randomized controlled research design (n = 50) to examine the efficacy of four-sessions of abbreviated MBT and BA relative to a wait-list control condition with depressed college students. Intent-to-treat data analyses on depression outcome measures suggested both treatments were superior to the control group. There were significant pre-post treatment improvements across measures of depression, rumination, stress, and mindfulness, gains largely maintained at 1-month follow-up. Neither active treatment effectively reduced somatic anxiety. Both treatments generally had moderate-strong effect sizes relative to the control group, and based on depression response and remission criteria, 56-79% of patients exhibited clinically significant improvement. Based on reliable change indices, 75-85% experienced clinically significant reductions in depression. There was strong therapist competence and adherence to treatment protocols and high patient satisfaction with both interventions. Study limitations and implications for the assessment and treatment of depressed college students are discussed. PMID:26745622

  5. Silent left ventricular dysfunction during routine activity after thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kayden, D.S.; Wackers, F.J.; Zaret, B.L. )

    1990-06-01

    To investigate prospectively the occurrence and significance of postinfarction transient left ventricular dysfunction, 33 ambulatory patients who underwent thrombolytic therapy after myocardial infarction were monitored continuously for 187 +/- 56 min during normal activity with a radionuclide left ventricular function detector at the time of hospital discharge. Twelve patients demonstrated 19 episodes of transient left ventricular dysfunction (greater than 0.05 decrease in ejection fraction, lasting greater than or equal to 1 min), with no change in heart rate. Only two episodes in one patient were associated with chest pain and electrocardiographic changes. The baseline ejection fraction was 0.52 +/- 0.12 in patients with transient left ventricular dysfunction and 0.51 +/- 0.13 in patients without dysfunction (p = NS). At follow-up study (19.2 +/- 5.4 months), cardiac events (unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death) occurred in 8 of 12 patients with but in only 3 of 21 patients without transient left ventricular dysfunction (p less than 0.01). During submaximal supine bicycle exercise, only two patients demonstrated a decrease in ejection fraction greater than or equal to 0.05 at peak exercise; neither had a subsequent cardiac event. These data suggest that transient episodes of silent left ventricular dysfunction at hospital discharge in patients treated with thrombolysis after myocardial infarction are common and associated with a poor outcome. Continuous left ventricular function monitoring during normal activity may provide prognostic information not available from submaximal exercise test results.

  6. Efficacy of physical activity counseling plus sleep restriction therapy on the patients with chronic insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihui; Yin, Guangxia; Li, Guanying; Liang, Wenjing; Wei, Qinling

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lack of physical activity (PA) is common in patients with chronic insomnia. Studies to increase PA and decrease sedentary behavior in those patients are limited. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of “PA counseling combined with sleep restriction (SR) therapy (PASR)” vs only SR in the patients with chronic insomnia. Methods Seventy-one outpatients were assigned to either PASR (n=35), consisting of four weekly PA counseling sessions based on 5A model (assess, advise, agree, assist, and arrange) + SR, or SR (n=36), consisting of four weekly SR. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Chinese version) and pedometer-based daily steps were evaluated as the primary endpoints. Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Scale-14, and Sleep Diary were evaluated as the secondary endpoints. Results The results showed that the patients in the PASR group gained more benefits than the SR group in terms of PA level and pedometer-based daily steps (all P<0.05). Better improvements of the study group were also shown in Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Scale-14, and Sleep efficiency (all P<0.05). Conclusion We conclude that PA counseling based on 5A model combined with SR cannot only effectively increase the PA levels but also improve the sleep quality for patients with chronic insomnia. PMID:26566369

  7. Smart hyaluronidase-actived theranostic micelles for dual-modal imaging guided photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjun; Zheng, Cuifang; Pan, Zhengyin; Chen, Chi; Hu, Dehong; Gao, Guanhui; Kang, Shendong; Cui, Haodong; Gong, Ping; Cai, Lintao

    2016-09-01

    We here report smart hyaluronidase-actived theranostic nanoparticles based on hyaluronic acid (HA) coupled with chlorin e6 (Ce6) via adipic dihydrazide (ADH) forming HA-ADH-Ce6 conjugates and self-assembling into HACE NPs. The resulting nanoparticles showed stable nano-structure in aqueous condition with uniform size distribution and can be actively disassembled in the presence of hyaluronidase (over-expressed in tumor cells), exhibiting hyaluronidase-responsive "OFF/ON" behavior of fluorescence signal. The HACE NPs were rapidly taken up to human lung cancer cells A549 via CD44 (the HA receptor on the surface of tumor cells) receptor mediated endocytosis. Upon laser irradiation, the HACE NPs realized good near-infrared fluorescence imaging and photoacoustic imaging in the tumor bearing mice, which showed 5-fold higher fluorescence intensity and 3-fold higher photoacoustic (PA) intensity than free Ce6, respectively. In addition, under low dose of laser power, the HACE NPs presented more effective photodynamic therapy to suppression of tumor growth than free Ce6 in vitro and in vivo. Overall, these results suggest that the well-defined HACE NPs is a biocompatible theranostic nanoplatform for in vivo dual-modal tumor imaging and phototherapy simultaneously. PMID:27262027

  8. Natural Xanthones from Garcinia mangostana with Multifunctional Activities for the Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Nan; Li, Qian; Jing, Ming-Hua; Alba, Espargaró; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Sabaté, Raimon; Han, Yi-Fan; Pi, Rong-Biao; Lan, Wen-Jian; Yang, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Jing-Kao

    2016-07-01

    Natural xanthones have diversity pharmacological activities. Here, a series of xanthones isolated from the pericarps of Garcinia mangostana Linn, named α-Mangostin, 8-Deoxygartanin, Gartanin, Garciniafuran, Garcinone C, Garcinone D, and γ-Mangostin were investigated. Biological screening performed in vitro and in Escherichia coli cells indicated that most of the xanthones exhibited significant inhibition of self-induced β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation and also β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1, acted as potential antioxidants and biometal chelators. Among these compounds, α-Mangostin, Gartanin, Garcinone C and γ-Mangostin showed better antioxidant properties to scavenge Diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical than Trolox, and potent neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced HT22 cell death partly by up-regulating HO-1 protein level and then scavenging reactive oxygen species. Moreover, Gartanin, Garcinone C and γ-Mangostin could be able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro. These findings suggest that the natural xanthones have multifunctional activities against Alzheimer's disease (AD) and could be promising compounds for the therapy of AD. PMID:27038926

  9. Targeting histone methylation for cancer therapy: enzymes, inhibitors, biological activity and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongcheng; Wu, Fangrui; Wu, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational methylation of histone lysine or arginine residues plays important roles in gene regulation and other physiological processes. Aberrant histone methylation caused by a gene mutation, translocation, or overexpression can often lead to initiation of a disease such as cancer. Small molecule inhibitors of such histone modifying enzymes that correct the abnormal methylation could be used as novel therapeutics for these diseases, or as chemical probes for investigation of epigenetics. Discovery and development of histone methylation modulators are in an early stage and undergo a rapid expansion in the past few years. A number of highly potent and selective compounds have been reported, together with extensive preclinical studies of their biological activity. Several compounds have been in clinical trials for safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy, targeting several types of cancer. This review summarizes the biochemistry, structures, and biology of cancer-relevant histone methylation modifying enzymes, small molecule inhibitors and their preclinical and clinical antitumor activities. Perspectives for targeting histone methylation for cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:27316347

  10. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  11. Success for gene therapy: render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jian; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Vile, Richard G

    2004-01-01

    Reports that two young children developed leukemia after being treated for immunodeficiency with their own retrovirally modified bone-marrow cells delivered a severe blow to confidence in gene therapy as a treatment. Two reports, published since the trial was initiated, now take away some of the mystery as to why these events happened and allay fears for the safety of gene therapy across all therapeutic applications. PMID:15287968

  12. Cytokine release syndrome after blinatumomab treatment related to abnormal macrophage activation and ameliorated with cytokine-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Rheingold, Susan R; Maude, Shannon L; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Barrett, David M; Seif, Alix E; Nichols, Kim E; Suppa, Erica K; Kalos, Michael; Berg, Robert A; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Aplenc, Richard; Gore, Lia; Grupp, Stephan A

    2013-06-27

    Blinatumomab is a CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell receptor-engaging (BiTE) antibody with efficacy in refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Some patients treated with blinatumomab and other T cell-activating therapies develop cytokine release syndrome (CRS). We hypothesized that patients with more severe toxicity may experience abnormal macrophage activation triggered by the release of cytokines by T-cell receptor-activated cytotoxic T cells engaged by BiTE antibodies and leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We prospectively monitored a patient during blinatumomab treatment and observed that he developed HLH. He became ill 36 hours into the infusion with fever, respiratory failure, and circulatory collapse. He developed hyperferritinemia, cytopenias, hypofibrinogenemia, and a cytokine profile diagnostic for HLH. The HLH continued to progress after discontinuation of blinatumomab; however, he had rapid improvement after IL-6 receptor-directed therapy with tocilizumab. Patients treated with T cell-activating therapies, including blinatumomab, should be monitored for HLH, and cytokine-directed therapy may be considered in cases of life-threatening CRS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00103285. PMID:23678006

  13. Successful use of oral linezolid as a single active agent in endocarditis unresponsive to conventional antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, V; John, J; Kaye, G C; Meigh, R E

    2003-08-01

    Treatment of resistant gram-positive endocarditis is difficult. We report a case of resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis endocarditis that failed to respond to conventional antibiotic therapy but was treated successfully with an oral regimen of a new antibiotic, linezolid as a single active agent. This case report demonstrates the use of linezolid as an effective alternative to conventional antibiotics in such cases. PMID:12860152

  14. Effectiveness of Group Activity Play Therapy on Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior Problems of Preadolescent Orphans in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojiambo, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the impact of group activity play therapy (GAPT) on displaced orphans aged 10 to 12 years living in a large children's village in Uganda. Teachers and housemothers identified 60 preadolescents exhibiting clinical levels of internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. The participants' ethnicity was…

  15. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Keith S.; Hollon, Steven D.; Dimidjian, Sona; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert J.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2008-01-01

    This study followed treatment responders from a randomized controlled trial of adults with major depression. Patients treated with medication but withdrawn onto pill-placebo had more relapse through 1 year of follow-up compared to patients who received prior behavioral activation, prior cognitive therapy, or continued medication. Prior…

  16. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of “eat me” and “don't eat me” signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80high, CD86high, and CD40high) and functional stimulation (NOhigh, IL-10absent) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of “eat me” signal and “don't eat me” signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  17. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of "eat me" and "don't eat me" signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80(high), CD86(high), and CD40(high)) and functional stimulation (NO(high), IL-10(absent)) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of "eat me" signal and "don't eat me" signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  18. Dialectical behavior therapy alters emotion regulation and amygdala activity in patients with borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Marianne; Carpenter, David; Tang, Cheuk Y.; Goldstein, Kim E.; Avedon, Jennifer; Fernandez, Nicolas; Mascitelli, Kathryn A.; Blair, Nicholas J.; New, Antonia S.; Triebwasser, Joseph; Siever, Larry J.; Hazlett, Erin A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Siever and Davis’ (1991) psychobiological framework of borderline personality disorder (BPD) identifies affective instability (AI) as a core dimension characterized by prolonged and intense emotional reactivity. Recently, deficient amygdala habituation, defined as a change in response to repeated relative to novel unpleasant pictures within a session, has emerged as a biological correlate of AI in BPD. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an evidence-based treatment, targets AI by teaching emotion-regulation skills. This study tested the hypothesis that BPD patients would exhibit decreased amygdala activation and improved habituation, as well as improved emotion regulation with standard 12-month DBT. Methods Event-related fMRI was obtained pre- and post-12-months of standard-DBT in unmedicated BPD patients. Healthy controls (HCs) were studied as a benchmark for normal amygdala activity and change over time (n = 11 per diagnostic-group). During each scan, participants viewed an intermixed series of unpleasant, neutral and pleasant pictures presented twice (novel, repeat). Change in emotion regulation was measured with the Difficulty in Emotion Regulation (DERS) scale. Results fMRI results showed the predicted Group × Time interaction: compared with HCs, BPD patients exhibited decreased amygdala activation with treatment. This post-treatment amygdala reduction in BPD was observed for all three pictures types, but particularly marked in the left hemisphere and during repeated-emotional pictures. Emotion regulation measured with the DERS significantly improved with DBT in BPD patients. Improved amygdala habituation to repeated-unpleasant pictures in patients was associated with improved overall emotional regulation measured by the DERS (total score and emotion regulation strategy use subscale). Conclusion These findings have promising treatment implications and support the notion that DBT targets amygdala hyperactivity—part of the disturbed neural

  19. Relapse Prevention in Major Depressive Disorder: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus an Active Control Condition

    PubMed Central

    Shallcross, Amanda J.; Gross, James J.; Visvanathan, Pallavi D.; Kumar, Niketa; Palfrey, Amy; Ford, Brett Q.; Dimidjian, Sona; Shirk, Stephen; Holm-Denoma, Jill; Goode, Kari M.; Cox, Erica; Chaplin, William; Mauss, Iris B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the comparative effectiveness of Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus an active control condition (ACC) for depression relapse prevention, depressive symptom reduction, and improvement in life satisfaction. Method Ninety-two participants in remission from Major Depressive Disorder with residual depressive symptoms were randomized to either an 8-week MBCT or a validated ACC that is structurally equivalent to MBCT and controls for non-specific effects (e.g., interaction with a facilitator, perceived social support, treatment outcome expectations). Both interventions were delivered according to their published manuals. Results Intention-to-treat analyses indicated no differences between MBCT and ACC in depression relapse rates or time to relapse over a 60-week follow-up. Both groups experienced significant and equal reductions in depressive symptoms and improvements in life satisfaction. A significant quadratic interaction (group x time) indicated that the pattern of depressive symptom reduction differed between groups. The ACC experienced immediate symptom reduction post-intervention and then a gradual increase over the 60-week follow-up. The MBCT group experienced a gradual linear symptom reduction. The pattern for life satisfaction was identical but only marginally significant. Conclusions MBCT did not differ from an ACC on rates of depression relapse, symptom reduction, or life satisfaction, suggesting that MBCT is no more effective for preventing depression relapse and reducing depressive symptoms than the active components of the ACC. Differences in trajectory of depressive symptom improvement suggest that the intervention-specific skills acquired may be associated with differential rates of therapeutic benefit. This study demonstrates the importance of comparing psychotherapeutic interventions to active control conditions. PMID:26371618

  20. Retroviral insertional mutagenesis in telomerase-immortalized hepatocytes identifies RIPK4 as novel tumor suppressor in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heim, D; Cornils, K; Schulze, K; Fehse, B; Lohse, A W; Brümmendorf, T H; Wege, H

    2015-01-15

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving alterations in various cellular pathways. The critical genetic events driving the evolution of primary liver cancer, specifically hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), are still poorly understood. However, telomere stabilization is acknowledged as prerequisite for cancer progression in humans. In this project, human fetal hepatocytes were utilized as a cell culture model for untransformed, proliferating human liver cells, with telomerase activation as first oncogenic hit. To elucidate critical downstream genetic events driving further transformation of immortalized liver cells, we used retroviral insertional mutagenesis as an unbiased approach to induce genetic alterations. Following isolation of hyperproliferating, provirus-bearing cell clones, we monitored cancer-associated growth properties and characterized changes toward a malignant phenotype. Three transformed clones with the ability to form colonies in soft agar were expanded. As proof-of-principle for our experimental setup, we identified a transforming insertion on chromosome 8 within the pleiomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1), resulting in a 20-fold increase in PLAG1 expression. Upregulation of PLAG1 has already been described to promote human hepatoblastoma development. In a separate clone, a transforming insertion was detected in close proximity to the receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 4 (RIPK4) with an approximately eightfold suppression in RIPK4 expression. As validation for this currently unknown driver in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined RIPK4 expression in human HCC samples and confirmed a significant suppression of RIPK4 in 80% of the samples. Furthermore, overexpression of RIPK4 in transformed human fetal hepatocytes resulted in an almost complete elimination of anchorage-independent growth. On the basis of these data, we propose RIPK4 as a novel putative tumor suppressor in human hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24413083

  1. A Proline-Rich Motif Downstream of the Receptor Binding Domain Modulates Conformation and Fusogenicity of Murine Retroviral Envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Maurice, Marielle; Roche, Catherine; Russell, Stephen J.; Sitbon, Marc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    1998-01-01

    The entry of retroviruses into cells depends on receptor recognition by the viral envelope surface subunit SU followed by membrane fusion, which is thought to be mediated by a fusion peptide located at the amino terminus of the envelope transmembrane subunit TM. Several fusion determinants have been previously identified in murine leukemia virus (MLV) envelopes, but their functional interrelationships as well as the processes involved in fusion activation upon retroviral receptor recognition remain unelucidated. Despite both structural and functional similarities of their envelope glycoproteins, ecotropic and amphotropic MLVs display two different postbinding properties: (i) while amphotropic MLVs fuse the cells at neutral pH, penetration of ecotropic MLVs is relatively acid pH dependent and (ii) ecotropic envelopes are more efficient than amphotropic envelopes in inducing cell-to-cell fusion and syncytium formation. By exploiting the latter characteristic in the analysis of chimeras of ecotropic and amphotropic MLV envelopes, we show here that substitution of the ecotropic MLV proline-rich region (PRR), located in the SU between the amino-terminal receptor binding domain and the TM-interacting SU carboxy-terminal domains, is sufficient to revert the amphotropic low-fusogenic phenotype into a high-fusogenic one. Furthermore, we have identified potential β-turns in the PRR that control the stability of SU-TM associations as well as the thresholds required to trigger either cell-to-cell or virus-to-cell fusion. These data, demonstrating that the PRR functions as a signal which induces envelope conformational changes leading to fusion, have enabled us to derive envelopes which can infect cells harboring low levels of available amphotropic receptors. PMID:9811733

  2. Activation of HER3 Interferes with Antitumor Effects of Axl Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: Suggestion of Combination Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Torka, Robert; Pénzes, Kinga; Gusenbauer, Simone; Baumann, Christine; Szabadkai, István; Őrfi, Lászlȯ; Kéri, György; Ullrich, Axel

    2014-01-01

    The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has been established as a strong candidate for targeted therapy of cancer. However, the benefits of targeted therapies are limited due to acquired resistance and activation of alternative RTKs. Therefore, we asked if cancer cells are able to overcome targeted Axl therapies. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of Axl by short interfering RNA or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) BMS777607 induces the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) and the neuregulin 1(NRG1)–dependent phosphorylation of HER3 in MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Moreover, analysis of 20 Axl-expressing cancer cell lines of different tissue origin indicates a low basal phosphorylation of RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT) as a general requirement for HER3 activation on Axl inhibition. Consequently, phosphorylation of AKT arises as an independent biomarker for Axl treatment. Additionally, we introduce phosphorylation of HER3 as an independent pharmacodynamic biomarker for monitoring of anti-Axl therapy response. Inhibition of cell viability by BMS777607 could be rescued by NRG1-dependent activation of HER3, suggesting an escape mechanism by tumor microenvironment. The Axl-TKI MPCD84111 simultaneously blocked Axl and HER2/3 signaling and thereby prohibited HER3 feedback activation. Furthermore, dual inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 using BMS777607 and lapatinib led to a significant inhibition of cell viability in Axl-expressing MDA-MB231 and Ovcar8 cells. Therefore, we conclude that, in patient cohorts with expression of Axl and low basal activity of AKT, a combined inhibition of Axl and HER2/3 kinase would be beneficial to overcome acquired resistance to Axl-targeted therapies. PMID:24862757

  3. Anti-TNFα therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases is associated with Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation.

    PubMed

    Lapsia, Sameer; Koganti, Siva; Spadaro, Salvatore; Rajapakse, Ramona; Chawla, Anupama; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita

    2016-02-01

    Anti-TNFα therapy, known to suppress T-cell immunity, is increasingly gaining popularity for treatment of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). T-cell suppression increases the risk of B-cell EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas. Since EBV-lytic activation is essential for development of EBV-lymphomas and there have been reports of EBV-lymphomas in patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy, we investigated if patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies demonstrate greater EBV-lytic activity in blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 10 IBD patients solely on anti-TNFα therapy compared to 3 control groups (10 IBD patients not on immunosuppressive therapy, 10 patients with abdominal pain but without IBD, and 10 healthy subjects) were examined for the percentage of T-cells, EBV load and EBV-lytic transcripts. Patients on anti-TNFα therapy had significantly fewer T-cells, greater EBV load, and increased levels of transcripts from EBV-lytic genes of all kinetic classes compared to controls. Furthermore, exposure of EBV-infected B-cell lines to anti-TNFα antibodies resulted in increased levels of BZLF1 mRNA; BZLF1 encodes for ZEBRA, the viral latency-to-lytic cycle switch. Thus, IBD patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies have greater EBV loads likely due to enhanced EBV-lytic gene expression and anti-TNFα antibodies may be sufficient to activate the EBV lytic cycle. Findings from this pilot study lay the groundwork for additional scientific and clinical investigation into the effects of anti-TNFα therapy on the life cycle of EBV, a ubiquitous oncovirus that causes lymphomas in the setting of immunocompromise. PMID:26307954

  4. Features, processing states, and heterologous protein interactions in the modulation of the retroviral nucleocapsid protein function.

    PubMed

    Mirambeau, Gilles; Lyonnais, Sébastien; Gorelick, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) is central to viral replication. Nucleic acid chaperoning is a key function for NC through the action of its conserved basic amino acids and zinc-finger structures. NC manipulates genomic RNA from its packaging in the producer cell to reverse transcription into the infected host cell. This chaperone function, in conjunction with NC's aggregating properties, is up-modulated by successive NC processing events, from the Gag precursor to the fully mature protein, resulting in the condensation of the nucleocapsid within the capsid shell. Reverse transcription also depends on NC processing, whereas this process provokes NC dissociation from double-stranded DNA, leading to a preintegration complex (PIC), competent for host chromosomal integration. In addition NC interacts with cellular proteins, some of which are involved in viral budding, and also with several viral proteins. All of these properties are reviewed here, focusing on HIV-1 as a paradigmatic reference and highlighting the plasticity of the nucleocapsid architecture. PMID:21045549

  5. [Hybrid nanocarriers for controlled delivery of antitumour and retroviral drugs delivery].

    PubMed

    Horcajada, Patricia; Serre, Christian; Férey, Gérard; Couvreur, Patrick; Gref, Ruxandra

    2010-01-01

    The efficient delivery of drugs in the body requires the use of non-toxic nanocarriers. Most of the existing materials show poor drug loading and/or rapid release of the proportion of the drug that is simply adsorbed (or anchored) at the external surface of the nanocarrier. The new porous hybrid solids, with the ability to tune their structures and porosities are well suited to serve as nanocarriers for delivery and imaging applications. Here we show that specific non-toxic porous iron(III) - based metal - organic frameworks with engineered cores and surfaces, as well as imaging properties, function as superior nanocarriers for efficient controlled delivery of antitumour and retroviral drugs against cancer and AIDS. They also potentially associate therapeutics and diagnostics, and open the way for theranostics, or -personalized patient treatments. double dagger. PMID:20819715

  6. A Systematic Review of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Behavioral Activation Apps for Depression

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Patrick J.; Wozney, Lori; Wheaton, Mike; Conrod, Jill; Rozario, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common mental health condition for which many mobile apps aim to provide support. This review aims to identify self-help apps available exclusively for people with depression and evaluate those that offer cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or behavioural activation (BA). One hundred and seventeen apps have been identified after searching both the scientific literature and the commercial market. 10.26% (n = 12) of these apps identified through our search offer support that seems to be consistent with evidence-based principles of CBT or BA. Taking into account the non existence of effectiveness/efficacy studies, and the low level of adherence to the core ingredients of the CBT/BA models, the utility of these CBT/BA apps are questionable. The usability of reviewed apps is highly variable and they rarely are accompanied by explicit privacy or safety policies. Despite the growing public demand, there is a concerning lack of appropiate CBT or BA apps, especially from a clinical and legal point of view. The application of superior scientific, technological, and legal knowledge is needed to improve the development, testing, and accessibility of apps for people with depression. PMID:27135410

  7. The lived experience of physically active older prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wright-St Clair, Valerie A; Malcolm, Wanda; Keogh, Justin W L

    2014-03-01

    This study sought to explore the lived experiences of physically active prostate cancer survivors on androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), who exercise individually. Three older men (74-88 years old) with prostate cancer, using ADT continuously for at least 12 months and regularly exercising for at least 6 months, participated in this qualitative pilot study, informed by interpretive phenomenology. Data were gathered using individual semi-structured interviews, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Coherent stories were drawn from each transcript and analyzed using iterative and interpretive methods. van Manen's lifeworld existentials provided a framework for interpreting across the research text. Three notions emerged: Getting started, Having a routine and Being with music. Together they reveal what drew the participants to exercising regularly despite the challenges associated with their cancer and treatments. This study provides insights into the benefits of, and what it means for, older men with prostate cancer to regularly exercise individually. These findings may assist cancer clinicians and other allied health professionals to be more attuned to prostate cancer survivors' lived experiences when undergoing ADT, allowing clinicians to better promote regular exercise to their patients as a foundational component of living well. PMID:23862577

  8. A Systematic Review of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Behavioral Activation Apps for Depression.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Anna; Rao, Sanjay; McGrath, Patrick J; Wozney, Lori; Wheaton, Mike; Conrod, Jill; Rozario, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common mental health condition for which many mobile apps aim to provide support. This review aims to identify self-help apps available exclusively for people with depression and evaluate those that offer cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or behavioural activation (BA). One hundred and seventeen apps have been identified after searching both the scientific literature and the commercial market. 10.26% (n = 12) of these apps identified through our search offer support that seems to be consistent with evidence-based principles of CBT or BA. Taking into account the non existence of effectiveness/efficacy studies, and the low level of adherence to the core ingredients of the CBT/BA models, the utility of these CBT/BA apps are questionable. The usability of reviewed apps is highly variable and they rarely are accompanied by explicit privacy or safety policies. Despite the growing public demand, there is a concerning lack of appropiate CBT or BA apps, especially from a clinical and legal point of view. The application of superior scientific, technological, and legal knowledge is needed to improve the development, testing, and accessibility of apps for people with depression. PMID:27135410

  9. Vitamin E Concentrations in Adults with HIV/AIDS on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaio, Daniella J. Itinoseki; Rondó, Patricia Helen C.; Luzia, Liania Alves; Souza, José Maria P.; Firmino, Aline Vale; Santos, Sigrid Sousa

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients are probably more predisposed to vitamin E deficiency, considering that they are more exposed to oxidative stress. Additionally, there are an extensive number of drugs in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens that may interfere with vitamin E concentrations. The objective of this study was to compare serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol in 182 HIV/AIDS patients receiving different HAART regimens. The patients were divided into three groups according to regimen: nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) + non-nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs); NRTIs + protease inhibitors + ritonavir; NRTIs + other classes. Alpha-tocopherol was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of HAART regimen, time of use, and compliance with the regimen on alpha-tocopherol concentrations. Alpha-tocopherol concentrations were on average 4.12 μmol/L lower for the NRTIs + other classes regimen when compared to the NRTIs + NNRTIs regimen (p = 0.037). A positive association (p < 0.001) was observed between alpha-tocopherol and cholesterol concentrations, a finding due, in part, to the relationship between liposoluble vitamins and lipid profile. This study demonstrated differences in alpha-tocopherol concentrations between patients using different HAART regimens, especially regimens involving the use of new drugs. Long-term prospective cohort studies are needed to monitor vitamin E status in HIV/AIDS patients since the beginning of treatment. PMID:25225815

  10. Prolonged Exposure Therapy With Veterans and Active Duty Personnel Diagnosed With PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gregory K; Kretzmer, Tracy; Crawford, Eric; Thors, Christina; Wagner, H Ryan; Strom, Thad Q; Eftekhari, Afsoon; Klenk, Megan; Hayward, Laura; Vanderploeg, Rodney D

    2015-08-01

    The present study used archival clinical data to analyze the delivery and effectiveness of prolonged exposure (PE) and ancillary services for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans (N = 69) with histories of mild to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data from standard clinical assessments of veterans and active duty personnel treated in both inpatient and outpatient programs at 2 Department of Veteran Affairs medical centers were examined. Symptoms were assessed with self-report measures of PTSD (PTSD Checklist) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II) before and throughout therapy. Mixed linear models were utilized to determine the slope of reported symptoms throughout treatment, and the effects associated with fixed factors such as site, treatment setting (residential vs. outpatient), and TBI severity were examined. Results demonstrated significant decreases in PTSD, B = -3.00, 95% CI [-3.22, -2.78]; t(210) = -13.5; p < .001, and in depressive symptoms, B = -1.46, 95% CI [-1.64, -1.28]; t(192) = -8.32; p < .001. The effects of PE treatment did not differ by clinical setting and participants with moderate to severe injuries reported more rapid gains than those with a history of mild TBI. The results provide evidence that PE may well be effective for veterans with PTSD and TBI. PMID:26201688

  11. Effect of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on Incident AIDS Using Calendar Period as an Instrumental Variable

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Stephen R.; Greenland, Sander; Brown, Todd T.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Kingsley, Lawrence; Detels, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) researchers often use calendar periods as an imperfect proxy for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) when estimating the effect of HAART on HIV disease progression. The authors report on 614 HIV-positive homosexual men followed from 1984 to 2007 in 4 US cities. During 5,321 person-years, 268 of 614 men incurred acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, 49 died, and 90 were lost to follow-up. Comparing the pre-HAART calendar period (<1996) with the HAART calendar period (≥1996) resulted in a naive rate ratio of 3.62 (95% confidence limits: 2.67, 4.92). However, this estimate is likely biased because of misclassification of HAART use by calendar period. Simple calendar period approaches may circumvent confounding by indication at the cost of inducing exposure misclassification. To correct this misclassification, the authors propose an instrumental-variable estimator analogous to ones previously used for noncompliance corrections in randomized clinical trials. When the pre-HAART calendar period was compared with the HAART calendar period, the instrumental-variable rate ratio was 5.02 (95% confidence limits: 3.45, 7.31), 39% higher than the naive result. Weighting by the inverse probability of calendar period given age at seroconversion, race/ethnicity, and time since seroconversion did not appreciably alter the results. These methods may help resolve discrepancies between observational and randomized evidence. PMID:19318615

  12. Enhancing Team-Based Active Learning Through Hands-On Experience With Nicotine Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To enhance tobacco cessation active-learning in an ambulatory care elective course by adding hands-on experience with nicotine replacement therapy to a team-based learning (TBL) session. Design. A hands-on experience that included students chewing a piece of nicotine gum was added to a TBL class session. Student pairs used a skills checklist to evaluate and give peer feedback on appropriate counseling and gum use. Assessment. Students’ scores on a tobacco cessation examination were higher than those of students enrolled in the previous course in which TBL alone had been used. Based on pre- and post-experience survey responses, students’ perceptions regarding their abilities to provide tobacco cessation counseling improved. Subjective student comments regarding the experience were positive. Conclusion. Participating in a TBL session that incorporated hands-on experience with nicotine gum in an ambulatory care elective course increased students’ confidence in their ability to provide tobacco cessation counseling and provided a unique perspective on the product’s characteristics. PMID:23966731

  13. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the delivery of anti-VEGF mAbs in the mouse K-ras(LA1) model. We found that pulmonary delivery of these mAbs significantly reduced the number of tumor lesions and inhibited malignant progression. The antitumor effect involves the VEGFR2-dependent inhibition of blood vessel growth, which impairs tumor proliferation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of aerosolized anti-VEGF showed its low rate of passage into the bloodstream, suggesting that this delivery route is associated with reduced systemic side effects. Our findings highlight the value of the aerosol route for administration of anti-angiogenic mAbs in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations. PMID:25484066

  14. Development of retroviral vectors for insertional mutagenesis in medaka haploid cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Liu, Qizhi; Yuan, Yongming; Hong, Yunhan

    2015-12-01

    Insertional mutagenesis (IM) by retrovirus (RV) is a high-throughput approach for interrogating gene functions in model species. Haploid cell provides a unique system for genetic screening by IM and prosperous progress has been achieved in mammal cells. However, little was known in lower vertebrate cells. Here, we report development of retroviral vectors (rvSAchCVgfp, rvSAchCVpf and rvSAchSTpf) and establishment of IM library in medaka haploid cells. Each vector contains a modified gene trapping (GT) cassette, which could extend the mutated cell population including GT insertions not in-frame or in weakly expressed genes. Virus titration determined by flow cytometry showed that rvSAchSTpf possessed the highest supernatant virus titer (1.5×10(5)TU/ml) in medaka haploid cell, while rvSAchCVpf produced the lowest titer (2.8×10(4)TU/ml). However, quantification of proviral DNAs in transduced cells by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) demonstrated that the "real titer" may be similar among the three vectors. Furthermore, an IM library was established by FACS of haploid cells transduced with rvSAchCVgfp at a MOI of 0.1. A single copy RV integration in the majority of cells was confirmed by ddPCR in the library. Notably, there was a significant decrease of haploid cell percentage after FACS, suggesting potential trapping for survival/growth essential genes. Our results demonstrated successful development of retroviral vectors for IM in medaka haploid cells, serving for haploid genetic screening of host factors for virus infection and genes underlying certain cellular processes in fish model. PMID:26192464

  15. Murine retroviral vector producer cells survival and toxicity in the peritoneal cavity of dogs.

    PubMed

    Link, C J; Moorman, D W; Ackerman, M; Levy, J P; Seregina, T

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral vector producer cells (VPC) can effectively transfer genes in vivo. To develop a safe method to target gene delivery into intraperitoneal tumors, we have examined the toxicity of intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of retroviral VPC in a xenogeneic canine model. Mongrel dogs were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 2 x 10(9) murine LTKOSN.2 VPC. The animals did not demonstrate acute toxicity and tolerated the i.p. infusion of the cells without difficulty. Starting 7 days after i.p. injection, the dogs received intravenous injections of ganciclovir (GCV) twice daily (5 mg/kg) for 7 days. The treatment dogs underwent peritoneal washings on days 3, 7 and 14 after their initial infusion of cells to study the persistence of the VPC. GCV treatment did not cause significant toxicities. Dogs underwent serial blood tests to evaluate bone marrow, renal, liver and immunological function. Complete blood counts, electrolytes and renal function remained normal throughout the study. Although, transient mild elevations occurred of serum alkaline phosphate, the remaining hepatic enzymes remained normal. Histologic examination of tissues from animals sacrificed after the i.p. administration of the VPC revealed no tissue destruction of the normal peritoneal lining. The dogs mounted an antibody response to the murine VPC that was first observed 7 days post injection. PCR analysis of selected tissues after GCV administration did not reveal persistent vector sequences. These results demonstrated that the injection of xenogeneic VPC is not accompanied by significant adverse effects over a 1 month period following administration into the canine peritoneal cavity. These data support the potential clinical application of the VPC in Phase I clinical trials in humans. PMID:11212841

  16. Interleukin-Encoding Adenoviral Vectors as Genetic Adjuvant for Vaccination against Retroviral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity. PMID:24349306

  17. Feline mediastinal lymphoma: a retrospective study of signalment, retroviral status, response to chemotherapy and prognostic indicators.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Francesca; Calam, Amy E; Dobson, Jane M; Middleton, Stephanie A; Murphy, Sue; Taylor, Samantha S; Schwartz, Anita; Stell, Anneliese J

    2014-08-01

    Historically, feline mediastinal lymphoma has been associated with young age, positive feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) status, Siamese breed and short survival times. Recent studies following widespread FeLV vaccination in the UK are lacking. The aim of this retrospective multi-institutional study was to re-evaluate the signalment, retroviral status, response to chemotherapy, survival and prognostic indicators in feline mediastinal lymphoma cases in the post-vaccination era. Records of cats with clinical signs associated with a mediastinal mass and cytologically/histologically confirmed lymphoma were reviewed from five UK referral centres (1998-2010). Treatment response, survival and prognostic indicators were assessed in treated cats with follow-up data. Fifty-five cases were reviewed. The median age was 3 years (range, 0.5-12 years); 12 cats (21.8%) were Siamese; and the male to female ratio was 3.2:1.0. Five cats were FeLV-positive and two were feline immunodeficiency-positive. Chemotherapy response and survival was evaluated in 38 cats. Overall response was 94.7%; complete (CR) and partial response (PR) rates did not differ significantly between protocols: COP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone) (n = 26, CR 61.5%, PR 34.0%); Madison-Wisconsin (MW) (n = 12, CR 66.7%, PR 25.0%). Overall median survival was 373 days (range, 20-2015 days) (COP 484 days [range, 20-980 days]; MW 211 days [range, 24-2015 days] [P = 0.892]). Cats achieving CR survived longer (980 days vs 42 days for PR; P = 0.032). Age, breed, sex, location (mediastinal vs mediastinal plus other sites), retroviral status and glucocorticoid pretreatment did not affect response or survival. Feline mediastinal lymphoma cases frequently responded to chemotherapy with durable survival times, particularly in cats achieving CR. The prevalence of FeLV-antigenaemic cats was low; males and young Siamese cats appeared to be over-represented. PMID:24366846

  18. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  19. Multiple Groups of Novel Retroviral Genomes in Pigs and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Patience, Clive; Switzer, William M.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Griffiths, David J.; Goward, Melanie E.; Heneine, Walid; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Weiss, Robin A.

    2001-01-01

    In view of the concern over potential infection hazards in the use of porcine tissues and organs for xenotransplantation to humans, we investigated the diversity of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) genomes in the DNA of domestic pigs and related species. In addition to the three known envelope subgroups of infectious gamma retroviruses (PERV-A, -B, and -C), classed together here as PERV group γ1, four novel groups of gamma retrovirus (γ2 to γ5) and four novel groups of beta retrovirus (β1 to β4) genomes were detected in pig DNA using generic and specific PCR primers. PCR quantification indicated that the retroviral genome copy number in the Landrace × Duroc F1 hybrid pig ranged from 2 (β2 and γ5) to approximately 50 (γ1). The γ1, γ2, and β4 genomes were transcribed into RNA in adult kidney tissue. Apart from γ1, the retroviral genomes are not known to be infectious, and sequencing of a small number of amplified genome fragments revealed stop codons in putative open reading frames in several cases. Analysis of DNA from wild boar and other species of Old World pigs (Suidae) and New World peccaries (Tayassuidae) showed that one retrovirus group, β2, was common to all species tested, while the others were present among all Old World species but absent from New World species. The PERV-C subgroup of γ1 genomes segregated among domestic pigs and were absent from two African species (red river hog and warthog). Thus domestic swine and their phylogenetic relatives harbor multiple groups of hitherto undescribed PERV genomes. PMID:11222700

  20. The immune pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuhuang; Zhou, Huaying; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo; He, Mei

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the immunological pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A total of 238 patients with AIDS who received initial HAART were included in this prospective cohort study. Blood samples were collected immediately, at baseline, at week 12, and at week 24 after initial HAART and at the onset of IRIS. Lymphocyte subsets, Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and interleukin (IL)-7 levels were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Among the 238 patients with AIDS who received HAART, 47 patients developed IRIS. The percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naive, memory, and activated cells exhibited no significant differences between AIDS patients with and without IRIS 24 weeks after initial HAART. The percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was lower in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients before HAART, 12 weeks after HAART, 24 weeks after HAART, and at the onset of IRIS. IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly higher at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were significantly lower at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. Plasma IL-7 decreased gradually with the progression of HAART. The level of IL-7 was higher in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients at all follow-up time points. An imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines, a consistently low CD(+)CD25(+)Fox3(+) percentage, and a high IL-7 level may be crucial in the pathogenesis of IRIS in AIDS patients who had received HAART. PMID:25131160

  1. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  2. Evaluation of the United States Public Health Service guidelines for discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after immune recovery in patients with CMV retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Janet T.; Colvin, Ryan; Van Natta, Mark L.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Bardsley, Mark; Jabs, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate US Public Health Service (USPHS) guidelines for discontinuing anti-CMV therapy in patients with AIDS who have immune recovery and quiescent retinitis after initiating highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Design Cohort study of patients with CMV retinitis (Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS). Methods Participants had CMV retinitis and CD4+ T-cell counts of 50 cells/uL or fewer enrolled from 1998 to 2009 who demonstrated sustained immune recovery (two consecutive CD4+ T-cell counts of 100 cells/uL or more at least 6 months apart) and inactive retinitis. Participants were classified into 2 groups according to anti-CMV treatment after immune recover: (1) continued anti-CMV therapy and (2) discontinued therapy. We evaluated survival, visual acuity, and CMV retinitis activity; we employed propensity scores to adjust for confounding factors for these analyses. Results Of 152 participants reviewed, 71 demonstrated immune recovery; 37 of whom discontinued therapy and 34 who continued therapy. At immune recovery, participants continuing therapy tended to be older (44 vs 40 years, P=0.09), have bilateral retinitis (53% vs 32%, P=0.10), and have lower CD4+ T-cell counts (148 vs 207 cells/μL, P<0.001). There were no statistical differences in any of the clinical outcomes (death, retinitis progress, visual acuity or incidence of bilateral retinitis). Both groups lost visual acuity during follow-up, on average 1.2 letters per year (P<0.01). Conclusion Discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after immune recovery did not increase the risk of poor outcomes. These results support the current guidelines for discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after achievement of sustained immune recovery. PMID:21742304

  3. Clinical evidence on high flow oxygen therapy and active humidification in adults.

    PubMed

    Gotera, C; Díaz Lobato, S; Pinto, T; Winck, J C

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been growing interest in an alternative to conventional oxygen therapy: the heated, humidified high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC). A number of physiological effects have been described with HFNC: pharyngeal dead space washout, reduction of nasopharyngeal resistance, a positive expiratory pressure effect, an alveolar recruitment, greater humidification, more comfort and better tolerance by the patient, better control of FiO2 and mucociliary clearance. There is limited experience of HFNC in adults. There are no established guidelines or decision-making pathways to guide use of the HFNC therapy for adults. In this article we review the existing evidence of HFNC oxygen therapy in adult patients, its advantages, limitations and the current literature on clinical applications. Further research is required to determine the long-term effect of this therapy and identify the adult patient population to whom it is most beneficial. PMID:23845744

  4. Enteric parasitic infections in HIV/AIDS patients before and after the highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Bachur, Tatiana Paschoalette Rodrigues; Vale, Josias Martins; Coêlho, Ivo Castelo Branco; Queiroz, Telma Régia Bezerra Sales de; Chaves, Cristina de Souza

    2008-04-01

    Enteroparasites are related to gastrointestinal alterations among patients with HIV/AIDS, some causing severe manifestations in the period before the institution of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The prevalence of enteroparasitoses in patients with HIV/AIDS seen at two hospitals in Ceará , Brazil, was compared in the pre-HAART (Group 1; n = 482) and HAART (Group 2; n = 100) eras. Fecal parasitologic examinations (FPE) were performed using the direct, Lutz, Baermann-Moraes and modified Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The following parasites were detected in Groups 1 and 2, respectively: Strongyloides stercoralis--30.1% and 11% (p<0.0001), Ascaris lumbricoides--15.6% and 2% (p<0.0001), hookworms--3.7% and 2% (p<0.0001), Trichuris trichiura--13.1% and 1% (p<0.0001), Hymenolepis nana--0 and 1% (p = 0.1718), Giardia duodenalis--7.9% and 1% (p = 0.0076), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar--3.3% and 1% (p = 0.3301), Isospora belli--4.8% and 1% (p = 0.0993), Cryptosporidium sp.--8.1% and 0 (p = 0.0007), and non-pathogenic protozoans as well. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence of enteroparasites between the eras (63.9% to 24%; p<0.0001). In the HAART era, the following observations were made: greater frequency of enteroparasites in patients without antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.0575), as in those with AIDS (p = 0.08), and diarrhea (36% of the patients); lack of association with positive FPE (p = 0.626); and non-detection of Cryptosporidium sp. Strongyloides stercoralis showed an elevated prevalence in the two eras and was more frequent in men (32.41%) than women (19.04%) of Group 1 (p = 0.018), a finding suggesting the transmission of the helminth through sodomy. The advent of the HAART modified the profile of opportunistic infections, including parasites, probably due to the reconstitution of cellular immunity and the direct action of HAART on the parasites. PMID:18641847

  5. [Media use and physical activity patterns of adolescent participants in obesity therapy: Analysis of the impact of selected sociodemographic factors].

    PubMed

    Wulff, Hagen; Wagner, Petra

    2016-02-01

    To meet the challenge of obesity, effective therapeutic concepts for adolescents focusing on lifestyle changes are necessary. Particularly relevant are nutrition and physical activity patterns associated with media use, which can be influenced by sociodemographic factors. For the optimization of obesity therapy approaches, it is essential to analyze these sociodemographic factors to adjust the aims, content, and methods of interventions, and to use the potential of media in treatment concepts. Thus, the research question is: what are the media and physical activity patterns of 11- to 17-year-old participants in obesity therapy, depending on sociodemographic factors? The national multicenter study was conducted from 2012 to 2013. A questionnaire was administered to 564 participants aged 13.4 ± 1.6 (mean ± standard deviation) years. Standardized instruments were used to assess the variables physical activity, media use, and sociodemographic factors. Participants were physically active for 1 h on 3.3 ± 1.8 days per week, 8.5 % daily. Televisions, mobile phones, and computers were available in all sociodemographic groups and were used for 2 h per day. Sociodemographic differences can be seen in the extent of media usage (h/day). These differences can be found between girls and boys concerning their usage of mobile phones (2.49 vs. 1.90; p  < 0.001), between 11- to 13- and 14- to 17-year-old children concerning their usage of game consoles (0.55 vs. 1.65; p  = 0.007), and in the correlation analysis of media usage and physical activity. Compared with existing literature, the survey results reveal reduced activity and increased media use, which vary among the groups. Thus, differentiated therapy approaches appear to be reasonable. Future research needs to evaluate to what extent media, despite the risks, can contribute to the methodological support of therapy, training, and aftercare concepts. PMID:26689417

  6. Effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase activator and stimulator therapy on nitroglycerin-induced nitrate tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jabs, A; Oelze, M; Mikhed, Y; Stamm, P; Kröller-Schön, S; Welschof, P; Jansen, T; Hausding, M; Kopp, M; Steven, S; Schulz, E; Stasch, J-P; Münzel, T; Daiber, A

    2015-08-01

    Chronic nitroglycerin (GTN) anti-ischemic therapy induces side effects such as nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Both phenomena could be based on a desensitization/oxidation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Therefore, the present study aims at investigating the effects of the therapy with the sGC activator BAY 60-2770 and the sGC stimulator BAY 41-8543 on side effects induced by chronic nitroglycerin treatment. Male Wistar rats were treated with nitroglycerin (100mg/kg/d for 3.5days, s.c. in ethanol) and BAY 60-2770 (0.5 or 2.5mg/kg/d) or BAY 41-8543 (1 and 5mg/kg/d) for 6days. Therapy with BAY 60-2770 but not with BAY 41-8543 improved nitroglycerin-triggered endothelial dysfunction and nitrate tolerance, corrected the decrease in aortic nitric oxide levels, improved the cGMP dependent activation of protein kinase I in aortic tissue and reduced vascular, cardiac and whole blood oxidative stress (fluorescence and chemiluminescence assays; 3-nitrotyrosine staining). In contrast to BAY 41-8543, the vasodilator potency of BAY 60-2770 was not impaired in isolated aortic ring segments from nitrate tolerant rats. sGC activator therapy improves partially the adverse effects of nitroglycerin therapy whereas sGC stimulation has only minor beneficial effects pointing to a nitroglycerin-dependent sGC oxidation/inactivation mechanism contributing to nitrate tolerance. PMID:25869522

  7. Chaperone therapy for GM2 gangliosidosis: effects of pyrimethamine on β-hexosaminidase activity in Sandhoff fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chiricozzi, Elena; Niemir, Natalia; Aureli, Massimo; Magini, Alessandro; Loberto, Nicoletta; Prinetti, Alessandro; Bassi, Rosaria; Polchi, Alice; Emiliani, Carla; Caillaud, Catherine; Sonnino, Sandro

    2014-08-01

    Sphingolipidoses are inherited genetic diseases due to mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in the lysosomal catabolism of sphingolipids. Despite a low incidence of each individual disease, altogether, the number of patients involved is relatively high and resolutive approaches for treatment are still lacking. The chaperone therapy is one of the latest pharmacological approaches to these storage diseases. This therapy allows the mutated protein to escape its natural removal and to increase its quantity in lysosomes, thus partially restoring the metabolic functions. Sandhoff disease is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder resulting from β-hexosaminidase deficiency and characterized by large accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in brain. No enzymatic replacement therapy is currently available, and the use of inhibitors of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis for substrate reduction therapy, although very promising, is associated with serious side effects. The chaperone pyrimethamine has been proposed as a very promising drug in those cases characterized by a residual enzyme activity. In this review, we report the effect of pyrimethamine on the recovery of β-hexosaminidase activity in cultured fibroblasts from Sandhoff patients. PMID:24356898

  8. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6–8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions. No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed. The dropout rate was lower with cognitive behavioural therapy than with recreational activity, and participants in cognitive behavioural therapy rated themselves as more generally improved, as well as more improved regarding expression of needs and understanding of difficulties. Both interventions appear to be promising treatment options for adults with autism spectrum disorder. The interventions’ similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout. PMID:24089423

  9. Immune reconstitution but persistent activation after 48 weeks of antiretroviral therapy in youth with pre-therapy CD4 >350 in ATN 061

    PubMed Central

    Rudy, Bret J.; Kapogiannis, Bill G.; Worrell, Carol; Squires, Kathleen; Bethel, James; Li, Su; Wilson, Craig M.; Agwu, Allison; Emmanuel, Patricia; Price, Georgine; Hudey, Stephanie; Goodenow, Maureen M.; Sleasman, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Measures of immune outcomes in youth who initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) early in HIV infection are limited. Design Adolescent Trials Network 061 examined changes over 48 weeks of cART in T cell subsets and markers of T cell and macrophage activation in subjects with pre-therapy CD4>350. All subjects had optimal viral suppression from weeks 24 through 48. Methods Subjects (n=48) initiated cART with tenofovir/emtricitabine plus ritonavir-boosted atazanavir. Data were collected at baseline and weeks 12, 24, and 48. Trends were compared to uninfected controls. Results Significant increases over 48 weeks were noted in all CD4 populations including total, naïve, central memory (CM), and effector memory RO (EM RO) and effector memory RA (EM RA) while numbers of CM and EMRO CD8 cells declined significantly. By week 48, CD4 naïve cells were similar to controls while CM CD4 cells remained significantly lower and EM RO and EM RA subsets were significantly higher. CD38 and HLA DR expression, both individually and when co-expressed, decreased over 48 weeks of cART on CD8 cells but remained significantly higher than controls at week 48. In contrast, markers of macrophage activation measured by sCD14 and sCD163 in plasma did not change with cART and were significantly higher than controls. Conclusion In youth initiating early cART, CD4 cell reconstitution is robust with decreases in CD8 cells. However CD8 T cell and macrophage activation persists at higher levels than uninfected controls. PMID:25942459

  10. Repurposing the NRF2 Activator Dimethyl Fumarate as Therapy Against Synucleinopathy in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    García-Yagüe, Angel J.; Scannevin, Robert H.; Casarejos, María J.; Kügler, Sebastian; Rábano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: This preclinical study was aimed at determining whether pharmacological targeting of transcription factor NRF2, a master controller of many homeostatic genes, might provide a disease-modifying therapy in the animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) that best reproduces the main hallmark of this pathology, that is, α-synucleinopathy, and associated events, including nigral dopaminergic cell death, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation. Results: Pharmacological activation of NRF2 was achieved at the basal ganglia by repurposing dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a drug already in use for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Daily oral gavage of DMF protected nigral dopaminergic neurons against α-SYN toxicity and decreased astrocytosis and microgliosis after 1, 3, and 8 weeks from stereotaxic delivery to the ventral midbrain of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector expressing human α-synuclein. This protective effect was not observed in Nrf2-knockout mice. In vitro studies indicated that this neuroprotective effect was correlated with altered regulation of autophagy markers SQTSM1/p62 and LC3 in MN9D, BV2, and IMA 2.1 and with a shift in microglial dynamics toward a less pro-inflammatory and a more wound-healing phenotype. In postmortem samples of PD patients, the cytoprotective proteins associated with NRF2 expression, NQO1 and p62, were partly sequestered in Lewy bodies, suggesting impaired neuroprotective capacity of the NRF2 signature. Innovation: These experiments provide a compelling rationale for targeting NRF2 with DMF as a therapeutic strategy to reinforce endogenous brain defense mechanisms against PD-associated synucleinopathy. Conclusion: DMF is ready for clinical validation in PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 61–77. PMID:27009601

  11. Sex Differences in HIV Outcomes in the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Era: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Melekhin, Vlada V.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract To assess sex disparities in AIDS clinical and laboratory outcomes in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era we conducted a systematic review of the published literature on mortality, disease progression, and laboratory outcomes among persons living with HIV and starting HAART. We performed systematic PubMed and targeted bibliographic searches of observational studies published between January, 1998, and November, 2013, that included persons starting HAART and reported analyses of mortality, progression to AIDS, or virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes by sex. Risk ratios (relative risks, odd ratios, and hazard ratios) and 95% confidence intervals were obtained. Sixty-five articles were included in this review. Thirty-nine studies were from North America and Europe and 26 were from Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Forty-four studies (68%) showed no statistically significant difference in risk of mortality, progression to AIDS, or virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes by sex. Decreased risk of death among females compared to males was observed in 24 of the 25 articles that included mortality analyses [pooled risk ratio 0.72 (95% confidence interval=0.69–0.75)], and decreased risk of death or AIDS was observed in 9 of the 13 articles that examined the composite outcome [pooled risk ratio=0.91 (0.84–0.98)]. There was no significant effect of sex on the risk of progression to AIDS [pooled risk ratio=1.15 (0.99–1.31)]. In this systematic review, females starting HAART appeared to have improved survival compared to males. However, this benefit was not associated with decreased progression to either AIDS or to differences in virologic or immunologic treatment outcomes. PMID:24401107

  12. IFN-α subtypes: distinct biological activities in anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbert, K; Schlaak, JF; Yang, D; Dittmer, U

    2013-01-01

    During most viral infections, the immediate host response is characterized by an induction of type I IFN. These cytokines have various biological activities, including anti-viral, anti-proliferative and immunomodulatory effects. After induction, they bind to their IFN-α/β receptor, which leads to downstream signalling resulting in the expression of numerous different IFN-stimulated genes. These genes encode anti-viral proteins that directly inhibit viral replication as well as modulate immune function. Thus, the induction of type I IFN is a very powerful tool for the host to fight virus infections. Many viruses evade this response by various strategies like the direct suppression of IFN induction or inhibition of the IFN signalling pathway. Therefore, the therapeutic application of exogenous type I IFN or molecules that induce strong IFN responses should be of great potential for future immunotherapies against viral infections. Type I IFN is currently used as a treatment in chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection, but as yet is not widely utilized for other viral infections. One reason for this restricted clinical use is that type I IFN belongs to a multigene family that includes 13 different IFN-α subtypes and IFN-β, whose individual anti-viral and immunomodulatory properties have so far not been investigated in detail to improve IFN therapy against viral infections in humans. In this review, we summarize the recent achievements in defining the distinct biological functions of type I IFN subtypes in cell culture and in animal models of viral infection as well as their clinical usage in chronic hepatitis virus infections. PMID:23072338

  13. Erectile Dysfunction Among HIV Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: Dyslipidemia as a Main Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Velez, Gustavo; Lisker-Cervantes, Andrés; Villeda-Sandoval, Christian I; Sotomayor de Zavaleta, Mariano; Olvera-Posada, Daniel; Sierra-Madero, Juan Gerardo; Arreguin-Camacho, Lucrecia O; Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence and risk factors of erectile dysfunction (ED) in HIV patients from the HIV clinic of a tertiary referral center in Mexico City. Design Prevalence was obtained from cross-sectional studies, and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), a standardized method, was used to assess ED. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in the HIV clinic. Participants completed the IIEF to allow ED assessment. Information on demographics, clinical and HIV-related variables was retrieved from their medical records. Results One hundred and nine patients were included, with a mean age of 39.9 ± 8.8 years. ED was present in 65.1% of the individuals. Patients had been diagnosed with HIV for a mean of 92.7 ± 70.3 months and had undergone a mean 56.4 ± 45.5 months of HAART. The only variable associated with ED in the univariate analysis was dyslipidemia, and this association was also found in the multivariate analysis (P = 0.01). Conclusions ED is highly prevalent in HIV patients. Dyslipidemia should be considered as a risk factor for ED in HIV patients. Romero-Velez G, Lisker-Cervantes A, Villeda-Sandoval CI, Sotomayor de Zavaleta M, Olvera-Posada D, Sierra-Madero JG, Arreguin-Camacho LO, and Castillejos-Molina RA. Erectile dysfunction among HIV patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy: Dyslipidemia as a main risk factor. Sex Med 2014;2:24–30. PMID:25356298

  14. Neural activity based biofeedback therapy for Autism spectrum disorder through wearable wireless textile EEG monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahi, Ahna; Rai, Pratyush; Oh, Sechang; Ramasamy, Mouli; Harbaugh, Robert E.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    Mu waves, also known as mu rhythms, comb or wicket rhythms are synchronized patterns of electrical activity involving large numbers of neurons, in the part of the brain that controls voluntary functions. Controlling, manipulating, or gaining greater awareness of these functions can be done through the process of Biofeedback. Biofeedback is a process that enables an individual to learn how to change voluntary movements for purposes of improving health and performance through the means of instruments such as EEG which rapidly and accurately 'feedback' information to the user. Biofeedback is used for therapeutic purpose for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) by focusing on Mu waves for detecting anomalies in brain wave patterns of mirror neurons. Conventional EEG measurement systems use gel based gold cup electrodes, attached to the scalp with adhesive. It is obtrusive and wires sticking out of the electrodes to signal acquisition system make them impractical for use in sensitive subjects like infants and children with ASD. To remedy this, sensors can be incorporated with skull cap and baseball cap that are commonly used for infants and children. Feasibility of Textile based Sensor system has been investigated here. Textile based multi-electrode EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system with embedded electronics for data acquisition and wireless transmission has been seamlessly integrated into fabric of these items for continuous detection of Mu waves. Textile electrodes were placed on positions C3, CZ, C4 according to 10-20 international system and their capability to detect Mu waves was tested. The system is ergonomic and can potentially be used for early diagnosis in infants and planning therapy for ASD patients.

  15. CLEFT PALATE IN HIV-EXPOSED NEWBORNS OF MOTHERS ON HIGHLY ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    James, Ayotunde; Oluwatosin, Babatunde; Njideka, Georgina; Babafemi; Benjamin, Onyekwere George; Olufemi, David; Leo, Robert; Folorunso, Isaac; Phylis; Olusina, Olusegun

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cleft lip/palate, though rare, is the commonest head and neck congenital malformation. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis but the role of in-utero exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is still being investigated. This short communication reports the occurrence of cleft palate in three newborns exposed in-utero to HIV and HAART. Material and methods This is a case series of HIV-exposed newborns observed to have cleft palate among a larger cohort of HIV-exposed and unexposed newborns in a study evaluating the effect of HIV infection and HAART on newborn hearing. The Risk Ratio (RR) was calculated to detect a potential association between in-utero exposure to Efavirenz containing ART and cleft palate. Results Three HIV-exposed newborns with cleft palate were identified during hearing screening performed on 126 HIV-exposed and 121 HIV unexposed newborns. Two had exposure to tenofovir+lamivudine+efavirenz (TDF+3TC+EFV) while the third had exposure to zidovudine+lamivudine+nevirapine (ZDV+3TC+NVP) during the first trimester. There was no statistically significant association between presence of cleft palate and exposure to an EFV containing HAART regimen (p=0.07, RR=10.95 [0.94-126.84]). Conclusions This communication highlights the possible aetiologic role of HAART in cleft palate, the need for further prospective follow-up studies and establishment of antiretroviral pregnancy, birth and neonatal registries. PMID:25653715

  16. Glycaemic profile changes by highly active antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Duro, M; Rebelo, I; Barreira, S; Sarmento-Castro, R; Medeiros, R; Almeida, C

    2015-10-01

    To study dysglycaemia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients we conducted a retrospective cohort study of the glucose profile in HIV-infected patients. The fasting blood glucose was analysed taking into consideration conventional risk factors as well as HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). One hundred seventy-three cases were selected for this study. Five risk factors had significant effects (p < 0.05) on glucose levels: age, body mass index (BMI), hepatitis C virus/hepatitis B virus (HCV/HBV) co-infection, viral load (VL), and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count. Fasting blood glucose levels increased with age (0.59 mg/dL/year), decreased with the VL (-4.1 × 10(-6 )mg/dL/number of viral RNA copies) and the CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count (-0.016 mg/dL/cell count). Furthermore, obese patients and those co-infected with HCV/HBV were more prone to develop dysglycaemia having, on average, 15.4 mg/dL and 13.8 mg/dL higher levels, respectively, of fasting blood glucose. Despite an increase of 1.0% and 8.4% in the glucose levels noticed among HIV patients treated with non-nucleotide inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors, respectively, HAART did not prove to be a significant predictor of fasting glucose levels as well as lipodystrophy and male gender. Age, BMI, HCV/HBV co-infection and HIV-related (VL and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count) factors seem to be the most influential on fasting blood glucose levels in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:25281540

  17. Importance of Baseline Prognostic Factors With Increasing Time Since Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent to which the prognosis for AIDS and death of patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) continues to be affected by their characteristics at the time of initiation (baseline) is unclear. Methods We analyzed data on 20,379 treatment-naive HIV-1–infected adults who started HAART in 1 of 12 cohort studies in Europe and North America (61,798 person-years of follow-up, 1844 AIDS events, and 1005 deaths). Results Although baseline CD4 cell count became less prognostic with time, individuals with a baseline CD4 count <25 cells/µL had persistently higher progression rates than individuals with a baseline CD4 count >350 cells/µL (hazard ratio for AIDS = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0 to 2.3; mortality hazard ratio = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 5.5, 4 to 6 years after starting HAART). Rates of AIDS were persistently higher in individuals who had experienced an AIDS event before starting HAART. Individuals with presumed transmission by means of injection drug use experienced substantially higher rates of AIDS and death than other individuals throughout follow-up (AIDS hazard ratio = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.8 to 3.0; mortality hazard ratio = 3.5, 95% CI: 2.2 to 5.5, 4 to 6 years after starting HAART). Conclusions Compared with other patient groups, injection drug users and patients with advanced immunodeficiency at baseline experience substantially increased rates of AIDS and death up to 6 years after starting HAART. PMID:18043315

  18. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  19. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  20. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Johnson, Patricia J.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Secor, W. Evan; Anderson, Deborah J.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas. PMID:26252012

  1. Equivalent inhibition of half-site and full-site retroviral strand transfer reactions by structurally diverse compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Hazuda, D; Felock, P; Hastings, J; Pramanik, B; Wolfe, A; Goodarzi, G; Vora, A; Brackmann, K; Grandgenett, D

    1997-01-01

    In vitro assay systems which use recombinant retroviral integrase (IN) and short DNA oligonucleotides fail to recapitulate the full-site integration reaction as it is known to occur in vivo. The relevance of using such circumscribed in vitro assays to define inhibitors of retroviral integration has not been formerly demonstrated. Therefore, we analyzed a series of structurally diverse inhibitors with respect to inhibition of both half-site and full-site strand transfer reactions with either recombinant or virion-produced IN. Half-site and full-site reactions catalyzed by avian myeloblastosis virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN from virions are shown to be equivalently sensitive to inhibition by compounds which inhibit half-site reactions catalyzed by the recombinant HIV-1 IN. These studies therefore support the utility of using in vitro assays employing either recombinant or virion-derived IN to identify inhibitors of integration. PMID:8985421

  2. Closing the gap between ethics knowledge and practice through active engagement: an applied model of physical therapy ethics.

    PubMed

    Delany, Clare M; Edwards, Ian; Jensen, Gail M; Skinner, Elizabeth

    2010-07-01

    Physical therapist practice has a distinct focus that is holistic (ie, patient centered) and at the same time connected to a range of other providers within health care systems. Although there is a growing body of literature in physical therapy ethics knowledge, including clinical obligations and underlying philosophical principles, less is known about the unique ethical issues that physical therapists encounter, and how and why they make ethical decisions. As moral agents, physical therapists are required to make autonomous clinical and ethical decisions based on connections and relationships with their patients, other health care team members, and health institutions and policies. This article identifies specific ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and highlights the development and focus of ethics knowledge in physical therapy over the last several decades. An applied ethics model, called the "active engagement model," is proposed to integrate clinical and ethical dimensions of practice with the theoretical knowledge and literature about ethics. The active engagement model has 3 practical steps: to listen actively, to think reflexively, and to reason critically. The model focuses on the underlying skills, attitudes, and actions that are required to build a sense of moral agency and purpose within physical therapist practice and to decrease gaps between the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and physical therapy ethics knowledge and scholarship. A clinical case study is provided to illustrate how the ethics engagement model might be used to analyze and provide insight into the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice. PMID:20448105

  3. The Study of External Dose Rate and Retained Body Activity of Patients Receiving 131I Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiying; Jiao, Ling; Cui, Songye; Wang, Liang; Tan, Jian; Zhang, Guizhi; He, Yajing; Ruan, Shuzhou; Fan, Saijun; Zhang, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    Radiation safety is an integral part of targeted radionuclide therapy. The aim of this work was to study the external dose rate and retained body activity as functions of time in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients receiving 131I therapy. Seventy patients were stratified into two groups: the ablation group (A) and the follow-up group (FU). The patients’ external dose rate was measured, and simultaneously, their retained body radiation activity was monitored at various time points. The equations of the external dose rate and the retained body activity, described as a function of hours post administration, were fitted. Additionally, the release time for patients was calculated. The reduction in activity in the group receiving a second or subsequent treatment was more rapid than the group receiving only the initial treatment. Most important, an expeditious method was established to indirectly evaluate the retained body activity of patients by measuring the external dose rate with a portable radiation survey meter. By this method, the calculated external dose rate limits are 19.2, 8.85, 5.08 and 2.32 μSv·h−1 at 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 m, respectively, according to a patient’s released threshold level of retained body activity <400 MBq. This study is beneficial for radiation safety decision-making. PMID:25337944

  4. Retroviral insertional mutagenesis identifies genes that collaborate with NUP98‐HOXD13 during leukemic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Slape, Christopher; Hartung, Helge; Lin, Ying‐Wei; Bies, Juraj; Wolff, Linda; Aplan, Peter D

    2007-01-01

    The t(2;11)(q31;p15) chromosomal translocation results in a fusion between the NUP98 and HOXD13genes and has been observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We previously demonstrated that expression of the NUP98‐HOXD13 (NHD13) fusion gene in transgenic mice results in an invariably fatal MDS; approximately one third of mice die due to complications of severe pancytopenia, and about two thirds progress to a fatal acute leukemia. In the present study, we used retroviral insertional mutagenesis to identify genes that might collaborate with NHD13 as the MDS transformed to an acute leukemia. Newborn NHD13 transgenic mice and littermate controls were infected with the MOL4070LTR retrovirus. The onset of leukemia was accelerated, suggesting a synergistic effect between the NHD13 transgene and the genes neighbouring retroviral insertion events. We identified numerous common insertion sites located near protein‐coding genes, and confirmed dysregulation of a subset of these by expression analyses. Among these genes were Meis1, a known collaborator of HOX and NUP98‐HOX fusion genes, and Mn1, a transcriptional coactivator involved in human leukemia through fusion with the TEL gene. Other putative collaborators included Gata2, Erg and Epor. Of note, we identified a common insertion site that was >100 kb from the nearest coding gene, but within 20 kb of the miR29a/miR29b1 microRNA locus. Both of these miRNA were upregulated, demonstrating that retroviral insertional mutagenesis can target miRNA loci as well as protein‐coding loci. Our data provides new insights into NHD13 mediated leukemogenesis as well as retroviral insertional mutagenesis mechanisms. PMID:17545593

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression and some other mental illnesses. ... During ECT, the electric current triggers a seizure in the brain. Doctors believe that the seizure activity may help the brain "rewire" itself, which ...

  6. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of combined therapy of silver nanoparticles and visible blue light against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Nour El Din, Suzanne; El-Tayeb, Tarek A; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; El-Azizi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as potential antimicrobial agents against resistant pathogens. We investigated the possible therapeutic use of AgNPs in combination with visible blue light against a multidrug resistant clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa (1×10(5) colony forming unit/mL) was investigated at its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and sub-MIC, alone and in combination with blue light at 460 nm and 250 mW for 2 hours. The effect of this combined therapy on the treated bacteria was then visualized using transmission electron microscope. The therapy was also assessed in the prevention of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on AgNP-impregnated gelatin biopolymer discs. Further, in vivo investigations were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the combined therapy to prevent burn-wound colonization and sepsis in mice and, finally, to treat a real infected horse with antibiotic-unresponsive chronic wound. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs and visible blue light was significantly enhanced (P<0.001) when both agents were combined compared to each agent alone when AgNPs were tested at MIC, 1/2, or 1/4 MIC. Transmission electron microscope showed significant damage to the cells that were treated with the combined therapy compared to other cells that received either the AgNPs or blue light. In addition, the combined treatment significantly (P<0.001) inhibited biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on gelatin discs compared to each agent individually. Finally, the combined therapy effectively treated a horse suffering from a chronic wound caused by mixed infection, where signs of improvement were observed after 1 week, and the wound completely healed after 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this combinatorial therapy has not been investigated before. It was proved efficient and promising in managing infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria and could be used as an

  7. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of combined therapy of silver nanoparticles and visible blue light against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nour El Din, Suzanne; El-Tayeb, Tarek A; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; El-Azizi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as potential antimicrobial agents against resistant pathogens. We investigated the possible therapeutic use of AgNPs in combination with visible blue light against a multidrug resistant clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs against P. aeruginosa (1×105 colony forming unit/mL) was investigated at its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and sub-MIC, alone and in combination with blue light at 460 nm and 250 mW for 2 hours. The effect of this combined therapy on the treated bacteria was then visualized using transmission electron microscope. The therapy was also assessed in the prevention of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on AgNP-impregnated gelatin biopolymer discs. Further, in vivo investigations were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the combined therapy to prevent burn-wound colonization and sepsis in mice and, finally, to treat a real infected horse with antibiotic-unresponsive chronic wound. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs and visible blue light was significantly enhanced (P<0.001) when both agents were combined compared to each agent alone when AgNPs were tested at MIC, 1/2, or 1/4 MIC. Transmission electron microscope showed significant damage to the cells that were treated with the combined therapy compared to other cells that received either the AgNPs or blue light. In addition, the combined treatment significantly (P<0.001) inhibited biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa on gelatin discs compared to each agent individually. Finally, the combined therapy effectively treated a horse suffering from a chronic wound caused by mixed infection, where signs of improvement were observed after 1 week, and the wound completely healed after 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this combinatorial therapy has not been investigated before. It was proved efficient and promising in managing infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria and could be used as an

  8. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  9. Combinatorial Incorporation of Enhancer Blocking Components of the Chicken β-Globin 5′HS4 and Human T-Cell Receptor α/δ BEAD-1 Insulators in Self-Inactivating Retroviral Vectors Reduces their Genotoxic Potential

    PubMed Central

    RAMEZANI, ALI; HAWLEY, TERESA S.; HAWLEY, ROBERT G.

    2008-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis by retroviral vectors has emerged as a serious impediment to the widespread application of hematopoietic stem cell gene transfer for the treatment of hematologic diseases. Here we report the development of a 77-bp element, FII/BEAD-A (FB), which contains the minimal enhancer blocking components of the chicken β-globin 5′HS4 insulator and a homologous region from the human T-cell receptor α/δ BEAD-1 insulator. With a new flow cytometry-based assay, we show that the FB element is as effective in enhancer blocking activity as the prototypical 1.2-kb 5′HS4 insulator fragment. When incorporated into the residual U3 region of the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) of a self-inactivating (SIN) gammaretroviral vector, the FB element was stably transferred to the 5′ LTR during reverse transcription, flanking the integrated transgene expression cassette. Notably, using a recently established in vitro insertional mutagenesis assay involving primary murine hematopoietic cells, we found that SIN gammaretroviral vectors as well as SIN lentiviral vectors containing the FB element exhibited greatly reduced transforming potential—to background levels under the experimental conditions used—compared to their unshielded counterparts. These results suggest that the FB element-mediated enhancer blocking modification is a promising approach to dramatically improve the safety of retroviral vectors for therapeutic gene transfer. PMID:18787211

  10. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types.

  11. A novel molecule integrating therapeutic and diagnostic activities reveals multiple aspects of stem cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Hingtgen, Shawn D; Kasmieh, Randa; van de Water, Jeroen; Weissleder, Ralph; Shah, Khalid

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutic delivery vehicles; however pre-clinical and clinical applications of stem cell-based therapy w