Science.gov

Sample records for active reverberant acoustic

  1. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  2. Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnell, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

  3. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  4. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  5. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  6. Acoustic Signaling by Singing Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae): What Role Does Reverberation Play?

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    When humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) sing in coastal waters, the units they produce can generate reverberation. Traditionally, such reverberant acoustic energy has been viewed as an incidental side-effect of high-amplitude, long-distance, sound transmission in the ocean. An alternative possibility, however, is that reverberation actually contributes to the structure and function of songs. In the current study, this possibility was assessed by analyzing reverberation generated by humpback whale song units, as well as the spectral structure of unit sequences, produced by singers from different regions. Acoustical analyses revealed that: (1) a subset of units within songs generated narrowband reverberant energy that in some cases persisted for periods longer than the interval between units; (2) these highly reverberant units were regularly repeated throughout the production of songs; and (3) units occurring before and after these units often contained spectral energy peaks at non-overlapping, adjacent frequencies that were systematically related to the bands of reverberant energy generated by the units. These findings strongly suggest that some singing humpback whales not only produce sounds conducive to long-duration reverberation, but also may sequentially structure songs to avoid spectral overlap between units and ongoing reverberation. Singer-generated reverberant energy that is received simultaneously with directly transmitted song units can potentially provide listening whales with spatial cues that may enable them to more accurately determine a singer’s position. PMID:27907182

  7. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  8. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC?s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA?s space exploration program. T he large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world?s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada?s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic de-sign and subsequent on-going construction.

  9. The Testing Behind the Test Facility: the Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, U.S.A. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, U.S.A. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent ongoing construction.

  10. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  11. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  12. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, WIlliam O.; Chang, Li, C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007-2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their "t-junctions" connecting the 12 inch supply line to their respective 4 inch branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed "t-junction" connections through non-destructive evaluation testing . Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the "t-junction" connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  13. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, William O.; Chang, Li C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007 to 2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cubic feet in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their T-junctions connecting the 12 in. supply line to their respective 4 in. branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed T-junction connections through non-destructive evaluation testing. Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the T-junction connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  14. Beam stresses induced by a turbulent boundary layer and simulated with a reverberant acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    Unsteady pressure fluctuations are a feature of the flow field of an airplane or a space vehicle in atmospheric flight. Undesirable effects of these fluctuations range from internal (cabin) noise to structural fatigue and damage of avionic and ordnance systems. The integrity to withstand these fluctuating loads is established through reverberant room acoustical qualification testing. The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology of simulating turbulent boundary layer fluctuating pressure loading for a simply supported beam with a reverberant acoustic field. This goal was accomplished using normal mode vibration analysis. The main results were developed in terms of dimensionless quantities such as turbulent boundary layer spectrums, reverberant acoustical field simulation spectrums, and stress response spectrums with parameters: dimensionless fundamental frequency, Mach number, and relative boundary layer displacement thickness.

  15. Characterization of the Reverberation Chamber at the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 the noise generating capabilities in the reverberation chamber of the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at NASA Langley Research Center were enhanced with two fiberglass reinforced polyester resin exponential horns, each coupled to Wyle Acoustic Source WAS-3000 airstream modulators. This report describes the characterization of the reverberation chamber in terms of the background noise, diffusivity, sound pressure levels, the reverberation times and the related overall acoustic absorption in the empty chamber and with the acoustic horn(s) installed. The frequency range of interest includes the 80 Hz to 8000 Hz one-third octave bands. Reverberation time and sound pressure level measurements were conducted and standard deviations from the mean were computed. It was concluded that a diffuse field could be produced above the Schroeder frequency in the 400 Hz one-third octave band and higher for all applications. This frequency could be lowered by installing panel diffusers or moving vanes to improve the acoustic modal overlap in the chamber. In the 80 Hz to 400 Hz one-third octave bands a successful measurement will be dependent on the type of measurement, the test configuration, the source and microphone locations and the desired accuracy. It is recommended that qualification measurements endorsed in the International Standards be conducted for each particular application.

  16. Dynamic Response of X-37 Hot Structure Control Surfaces Exposed to Controlled Reverberant Acoustic Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Rice, Chad E.

    2004-01-01

    This document represents a compilation of three informal reports from reverberant acoustic tests performed on X-37 hot structure control surfaces in the NASA Langley Research Center Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility. The first test was performed on a carbon-silicone carbide flaperon subcomponent on February 24, 2004. The second test was performed on a carbon-carbon ruddervator subcomponent on May 27, 2004. The third test was performed on a carbon-carbon flaperon subcomponent on June 30, 2004.

  17. Reverberation, Sediment Acoustics, and Targets-in-the-Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    RESULTS Reverberation Figure 1: TREX experiment data (blue and red curves) are compared to an energy transport model ( yellow line with red stars...Model used measured bathymetry, sediment and water properties, and a Lambert parameter of -27 dB. Other models -magenta line – PE (by Dajun Tang ...funding by D. Tang and B. T. Hefner. 4 Targets-in-the-environment Figure 2. The geometry, finite element model, targets, experimental

  18. Closed-Loop Acoustic Control of Reverberant Room for Satellite Environmental Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, Karl; Bianciardi, Fabio; Sabbatini, Danilo; Debille, Jan; Carrella, Alex

    2012-07-01

    The full satellite acoustic test is an important milestone in a satellite launch survivability verification campaign. This test is required to verify the satellite’s mechanical design against the high-level acoustic loads induced by the launch vehicle during the atmospheric flight. During the test, the satellite is subjected to a broadband diffuse acoustic field, reproducing the pressure levels observed during launch. The excitation is in most cases provided by a combination of horns for the low frequencies and noise generators for the higher frequencies. Acoustic control tests are commonly performed in reverberant rooms, controlling the sound pressure levels in third octave bands over the specified target spectrum. This paper discusses an automatic feedback control system for acoustic control of large reverberation rooms for satellite environmental testing. The acoustic control system consists of parallel third octave PI (Proportional Integral) feedback controllers that take the reverberation characteristics of the room into consideration. The drive output of the control system is shaped at every control step based on the comparison of the average third octave noise spectrum, measured from a number of microphones in the test room, with the target spectrum. Cross-over filters split the output drive into band- limited signals to feed each of the horns. The control system is realized in several steps. In the first phase, a dynamic process model is developed, including the non-linear characteristics of the horns and the reverberant properties of the room. The model is identified from dynamic experiments using system identification techniques. In the next phase, an adequate control strategy is designed which is capable of reaching the target spectrum in the required time period without overshoots. This control strategy is obtained from model-in-the-loop (MIL) simulations, evaluating the performance of various potential strategies. Finally, the proposed strategy is

  19. Design and construction of a reverberation chamber for high-intensity acoustic testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A high-intensity acoustic test facility was constructed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to support the Mariner Mars 1971 project. For ease of construction, the reverberation chamber itself is rectangular, which resulted in very little sacrifice in acoustic performance. Levels as high as 156 dB can be achieved with the chamber empty and test levels of 150 dB have been used with a Mariner Mars spacecraft model (full size) in the chamber. Levels as high as this must be generated using electropneumatic transducers, which modulate gaseous nitrogen to this facility.

  20. Using acoustic information to perceive room size: effects of blindness, room reverberation time, and stimulus.

    PubMed

    Kolarik, Andrew J; Pardhan, Shahina; Cirstea, Silvia; Moore, Brian C J

    2013-01-01

    Blind participants greatly rely on sound for spatial information regarding the surrounding environment. It is not yet established whether lack of vision to calibrate audition in far space affects blind participants' internal spatial representation of acoustic room size. Furthermore, blind participants may rely more on farthest distance estimates to sound sources compared with sighted participants when perceiving room size. Here we show that judgments of apparent room size and sound distance are correlated, more so for blind than for sighted participants. Sighted participants judged a reverberant virtual room to be larger for speech than for music or noise stimuli, whereas blind participants did not. The results suggest that blindness affects the use of room reverberation for distance and room-size judgments.

  1. Investigation of Acoustic Fields for the Cassini Spacecraft: Reverberant Versus Launch Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Himelblau, Harry

    2000-01-01

    The characterization and understanding of the acoustic field within a launch vehicle's payload fairing (PLF) is critical to the qualification of a spacecraft and ultimately to the success of its mission. Acoustic measurements taken recently for the Cassini mission have allowed unique opportunities to advance the aerospace industry's knowledge in this field. Prior to its launch, the expected liftoff acoustic environment of the spacecraft was investigated in a full-scale acoustic test of a Titan IV PLF and Cassini simulator in a reverberant test chamber. A major goal of this acoustic ground test was to quantify and verify the noise reduction performance of special barrier blankets that were designed especially to reduce the Cassirii acoustic environment. This paper will describe both the ground test and flight measurements, and compare the Cassini acoustic environment measured during launch with that measured earlier in the ground test. Special emphasis will be given to the noise reduction performance of the barrier blankets and to the acoustic coherence measured within the PLF.

  2. Subjective Listening Effort and Electrodermal Activity in Listening Situations with Reverberation and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Haeder, Kristina; Imbery, Christina; Weber, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Disturbing factors like reverberation or ambient noise can impair speech recognition and raise the listening effort needed for successful communication in daily life. Situations with high listening effort are thought to result in increased stress for the listener. The aim of this study was to explore possible measures to determine listening effort in situations with varying background noise and reverberation. For this purpose, subjective ratings of listening effort, speech recognition, and stress level, together with the electrodermal activity as a measure of the autonomic stress reaction, were investigated. It was expected that the electrodermal activity would show different stress levels in different acoustic situations and might serve as an alternative to subjective ratings. Ten young normal-hearing and 17 elderly hearing-impaired subjects listened to sentences from the Oldenburg sentence test either with stationary background noise or with reverberation. Four listening situations were generated, an easy and a hard one for each of the two disturbing factors, which were related to each other by the Speech Transmission Index. The easy situation resulted in 100% and the hard situation resulted in 30 to 80% speech recognition. The results of the subjective ratings showed significant differences between the easy and the hard listening situations in both subject groups. Two methods of analyzing the electrodermal activity values revealed similar, but nonsignificant trends. Significant correlations between subjective ratings and physiological electrodermal activity data were observed for normal-hearing subjects in the noise situation. PMID:27698257

  3. Surface Photometry of Reverberation-Mapped Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    I present a statistical analysis of the surface photometry obtained for a sample of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archival images of the host galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGN), whose time-delay between continuum and broad emission line variations have been analyzed (i.e., reverberation mapping). For quiescent galaxies, strong correlations exist between central black hole mass and host galaxy structure. If there are similar correlations for AGN between central black hole masses derived from reverberation mapping and the host galaxy structure that I have derived from archival HST images, this would imply some validation of the assumptions underlying reverberation mapping concerning the structure, kinematics, and orientation of the broad line regions in AGN.The correlations for quiescent galaxies bewteen central black hole mass and host galaxy structure imply that there might be a strong causal connection between the formation and evolution of the black hole and the galaxy bulge. A current hypothesis is that bulges, black holes, and quasars formed, grew, or turned on as parts of the same process, in part because the collapse or merger of bulges might provide a rich fuel supply to a central black hole. One way of testing this hypothesis would be to plot AGN as a function of redshift on these correlations. However, two severe obstacles limit the ability to measure black hole masses in AGN using HST to analyze the central stellar and/or gas dynamics: (1) since spatial resolution becomes more limited at larger distances, only two reverberation-mapped AGN are close enough to Earth to render the analysis feasible, and (2) it isdifficult to obtain useful spectra of the stars and/or gas in the presence of the bright nonstellar nucleus. The most useful alternative is to exploit reverberation mapping, which uses the time delay in a given AGN between variations in the continuum emission and broad emission lines.

  4. Digital servo control of random sound test excitation. [in reverberant acoustic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A digital servocontrol system for random noise excitation of a test object in a reverberant acoustic chamber employs a plurality of sensors spaced in the sound field to produce signals in separate channels which are decorrelated and averaged. The average signal is divided into a plurality of adjacent frequency bands cyclically sampled by a time division multiplex system, converted into digital form, and compared to a predetermined spectrum value stored in digital form. The results of the comparisons are used to control a time-shared up-down counter to develop gain control signals for the respective frequency bands in the spectrum of random sound energy picked up by the microphones.

  5. Reverberant acoustic energy in auditoria that comprise systems of coupled rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason E.

    2003-11-01

    A frequency-dependent model for reverberant energy in coupled rooms is developed and compared with measurements for a 1:10 scale model and for Bass Hall, Ft. Worth, TX. At high frequencies, prior statistical-acoustics models are improved by geometrical-acoustics corrections for decay within sub-rooms and for energy transfer between sub-rooms. Comparisons of computational geometrical acoustics predictions based on beam-axis tracing with scale model measurements indicate errors resulting from tail-correction assuming constant quadratic growth of reflection density. Using ray tracing in the late part corrects this error. For mid-frequencies, the models are modified to account for wave effects at coupling apertures by including power transmission coefficients. Similarly, statical-acoustics models are improved through more accurate estimates of power transmission measurements. Scale model measurements are in accord with the predicted behavior. The edge-diffraction model is adapted to study transmission through apertures. Multiple-order scattering is theoretically and experimentally shown inaccurate due to neglect of slope diffraction. At low frequencies, perturbation models qualitatively explain scale model measurements. Measurements confirm relation of coupling strength to unperturbed pressure distribution on coupling surfaces. Measurements in Bass Hall exhibit effects of the coupled stage house. High frequency predictions of statistical acoustics and geometrical acoustics models and predictions of coupling apertures all agree with measurements.

  6. Acoustic emission localization in plates with dispersion and reverberations using sparse PZT sensors in passive mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelli, Alessandro; De Marchi, Luca; Marzani, Alessandro; Speciale, Nicolò

    2012-02-01

    A strategy for the localization of acoustic emissions (AE) in plates with dispersion and reverberation is proposed. The procedure exploits signals received in passive mode by sparse conventional piezoelectric transducers and a three-step processing framework. The first step consists in a signal dispersion compensation procedure, which is achieved by means of the warped frequency transform. The second step concerns the estimation of the differences in arrival time (TDOA) of the acoustic emission at the sensors. Complexities related to reflections and plate resonances are overcome via a wavelet decomposition of cross-correlating signals where the mother function is designed by a synthetic warped cross-signal. The magnitude of the wavelet coefficients in the warped distance-frequency domain, in fact, precisely reveals the TDOA of an acoustic emission at two sensors. Finally, in the last step the TDOA data are exploited to locate the acoustic emission source through hyperbolic positioning. The proposed procedure is tested with a passive network of three/four piezo-sensors located symmetrically and asymmetrically with respect to the plate edges. The experimentally estimated AE locations are close to those theoretically predicted by the Cramèr-Rao lower bound.

  7. Comparison between psycho-acoustics and physio-acoustic measurement to determine optimum reverberation time of pentatonic angklung music concert hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarsono, Anugrah S.; Merthayasa, I. G. N.; Suprijanto

    2015-09-01

    This research tried to compare psycho-acoustics and Physio-acoustic measurement to find the optimum reverberation time of soundfield from angklung music. Psycho-acoustic measurement was conducted using a paired comparison method and Physio-acoustic measurement was conducted with EEG Measurement on T3, T4, FP1, and FP2 measurement points. EEG measurement was conducted with 5 persons. Pentatonic angklung music was used as a stimulus with reverberation time variation. The variation was between 0.8 s - 1.6 s with 0.2 s step. EEG signal was analysed using a Power Spectral Density method on Alpha Wave, High Alpha Wave, and Theta Wave. Psycho-acoustic measurement on 50 persons showed that reverberation time preference of pentatonic angklung music was 1.2 second. The result was similar to Theta Wave measurement on FP2 measurement point. High Alpha wave on T4 measurement gave different results, but had similar patterns with psycho-acoustic measurement

  8. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption during Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customers aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facilitys available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customers environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customers in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  9. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customer's aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facility's available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customer's environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customer's in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station's Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  10. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  11. A hybrid algorithm for robust acoustic source localization in noisy and reverberant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, Ramesh; Dessonville, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic source localization using microphone arrays is widely used in videoconferencing and surveillance systems. However, it still remains a challenging task to develop efficient algorithms for accurate estimation of source location using distributed data processing. In this work, we propose a new algorithm for efficient localization of a speaker in noisy and reverberant environments such as videoconferencing. We propose a hybrid algorithm that combines generalized cross correlation based phase transform method (GCC-PHAT) and Tabu search to obtain a robust and accurate estimate of the speaker location. The Tabu Search algorithm iteratively improves the time difference of arrival (TDOA) estimate of GCC-PHAT by examining the neighboring solutions until a convergence in the TDOA value is obtained. Experiments were performed based on real world data recorded from a meeting room in the presence of noise such as computer and fans. Our results demonstrate that the proposed hybrid algorithm outperforms GCC-PHAT especially when the noise level is high. This shows the robustness of the proposed algorithm in noisy and realistic videoconferencing systems.

  12. Reverberant acoustic energy in auditoria that comprise systems of coupled rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Jason Erik

    A frequency-dependent model for levels and decay rates of reverberant energy in systems of coupled rooms is developed and compared with measurements conducted in a 1:10 scale model and in Bass Hall, Fort Worth, TX. Schroeder frequencies of subrooms, fSch, characteristic size of coupling apertures, a, relative to wavelength lambda, and characteristic size of room surfaces, l, relative to lambda define the frequency regions. At high frequencies [HF (f >> f Sch, a >> lambda, l >> lambda)], this work improves upon prior statistical-acoustics (SA) coupled-ODE models by incorporating geometrical-acoustics (GA) corrections for the model of decay within subrooms and the model of energy transfer between subrooms. Previous researchers developed prediction algorithms based on computational GA. Comparisons of predictions derived from beam-axis tracing with scale-model measurements indicate that systematic errors for coupled rooms result from earlier tail-correction procedures that assume constant quadratic growth of reflection density. A new algorithm is developed that uses ray tracing rather than tail correction in the late part and is shown to correct this error. At midfrequencies [MF (f >> f Sch, a ˜ lambda)], HF models are modified to account for wave effects at coupling apertures by including analytically or heuristically derived power transmission coefficients tau. This work improves upon prior SA models of this type by developing more accurate estimates of random-incidence tau. While the accuracy of the MF models is difficult to verify, scale-model measurements evidence the expected behavior. The Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin-Svensson (BTMS) time-domain edge-diffraction model is newly adapted to study transmission through apertures. Multiple-order BTMS scattering is theoretically and experimentally shown to be inaccurate due to the neglect of slope diffraction. At low frequencies (f ˜ f Sch), scale-model measurements have been qualitatively explained by application of

  13. High-Resolution Analysis of Seismic Air Gun Impulses and Their Reverberant Field as Contributors to an Acoustic Environment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Melania; Dugan, Peter J; Ponirakis, Dimitri W; Popescu, Marian; Shiu, Yu; Rice, Aaron N; Clark, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    In September and October 2011, a seismic survey took place in Baffin Bay, Western Greenland, in close proximity to a marine protected area (MPA). As part of the mitigation effort, five bottom-mounted marine acoustic recording units (MARUs) collected data that were used for the purpose of measuring temporal and spectral features from each impulsive event, providing a high-resolution record of seismic reverberation persistent after the direct impulse. Results were compared with ambient-noise levels as computed after the seismic survey to evidence that as a consequence of a series of repeating seismic impulses, sustained elevated levels create the potential for masking.

  14. Modeling the Compton Hump Reverberation Observed in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoormann, Janie; Beheshtipour, Banafsheh; Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, observations of the Iron K alpha reverberation in supermassive black holes have provided a new way to probe the inner accretion flow. Furthermore, a time lag between the direct coronal emission and the reprocessed emission forming the Compton Hump in AGN has been observed. In order to model this Compton Hump reverberation we performed general relativistic ray tracing studies of the accretion disk surrounding supermassive black holes, taking into account both the radial and angular dependence of the ionization parameter. We are able to model emission not only from a lamp-post corona but also implementing 3D corona geometries. Using these results we are able to model the observed data to gain additional insight into the geometry of the corona and the structure of the inner accretion disk.

  15. Reverberation Mapping of Accretion Disk Winds in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangham, S.

    2015-09-01

    Reverberation mapping is commonly used for determining black holes masses in AGN from the delayed response of the Broad Line Region (BLR) to fluctuations in the intensity of the AGN continuum source. However, it can also be an effective tool for investigating the structure and kinematics of the BLR itself. Much prior work has been performed to simulate the transfer functions associated with a range of basic geometries (e.g. Keplerian disks, Hubble-like outflows, etc). One promising model for the BLR is that the emission lines are formed in an equatorial accretion disk wind. Here, we predict the reverberation signatures expected from such a model, by modifying the radiative transfer and ionisation code Python that has previously been used to model broad absorption line quasars. This allows to account self-consistently for ionization and radiative transfer effects in the predicted BLR response, which are normally ignored in such calculations. We discuss the agreement between our results and prior work and consider the possibility of detecting the signature of rotating equatorial disk winds in observations obtained by velocity-resolved reverberation mapping campaigns.

  16. Long Term Optical and Infrared Reverberation Mapping of High and Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Barth, Aaron; Brandt, Niel; Dawson, Kyle; Green, Paul; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Joner, Mike; Kenney, John; McGreer, Ian; Nordgren, Tyler; Schneider, Donald; Shen, Yue; Tao, Charling

    2016-08-01

    Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust have been limited to very low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). Cycle 11-12's two year baseline allowed for the reverberation mapping of 17 high luminosity quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. By combining ground based monitoring from Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes with Spitzer data we have for the first time detected dust reverberation in quasars. We propose to continue this project to capitalize on the continuing optical motnoring from the ground and to increase the confidence in the detected lags. Additionally, the Call for Proposals asks for up to 1000 hours of observations in the Spitzer CVZ to accommodate battery charging needs. We propose to add to our quasar sample five lower luminosity Seyfert galaxies from the Pan-STARRS ground based optical survey that are in the Spitzer CVZ, which will increase the luminosity range of AGN we are studying and, combined with additional ground based observatories, provide for a continuous monitoring campaign lasting 2 years and thus provide the most detailed study of dust around AGN to date.

  17. Reverberation Mapping of the Dusty Tori in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Michael; Batcheldor, Daniel; Buchanan, Catherine; Capetti, Alessandro; Moshe, Elitzur; Gallimore, Jack; Horne, Keith; Kishimoto, Makoto; Marconi, Alessandro; Mason, Rachel; Maiolino, Robert; Netzer, Hagai; Packham, Christopher; Perez, Enrique; Peterson, Brad; Tadhunter, Clive; Robinson, Andrew; Stirpe, Giovanna; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2012-12-01

    Our current understanding of the size and structure of AGN tori is weak, despite their central role in AGN unification models and their importance for studies of supermassive black hole demographics. We propose to use the warm phase of Spitzer to determine the sizes of circum-nuclear dust tori in AGN. To accomplish this we will extend an existing Spitzer monitoring campaign, coordinated with ground-based observations, to measure the 'light echo' as the dust emission responds to variations in the AGN optical/UV continuum. We have selected a sample of 12 bright type 1 nuclei in close proximity to the Spitzer Continuous Viewing Zone which can be observed for at least 70% of the 365 day cycle. We will observe each AGN every 30 days for the whole of Cycle 9, roughly doubling our existing baseline of one year, permitting us to identify optical-IR time lags of many months. We will continue our current ground based monitoring program using a variety of telescopes to determine the AGN light-curves in the optical. These observations will sample the torus more faithfully than previous measurements made in the K-band. Such high fidelity, continuously sampled IR light curves covering ~years cannot be obtained from the ground, and are needed because the expected reverberation timescales are hundreds of days. We will apply well developed techniques to determine the reverberation lag and therefore obtain the characteristic size of the torus in this sample which spans a range of black hole mass and Eddington ratio. Our team contains many leading experts in reverberation mapping of AGN and in the observational study and theoretical modeling of the physics of the dusty torus. We are requesting a total of 14 hours in the cycle to perform our observations. These observations will provide a stringent observational test of current models for the obscuring torus in AGN. The required measurements - long timescales, continuous monitoring in the near-infrared - are possible only with the

  18. High-frequency underwater acoustic communications using FH-FSK signaling in a reverberant shallow water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen-Bin; Yang, T. C.

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes the experimental results of frequency-hopped frequency-shift-key (FH-FSK) signaling operated at 20 kHz with a 4 kHz bandwidth for underwater acoustic communications in a reverberant shallow water environment. The data were collected during the RDS4 (Rapidly Deployable Systems) experiment in a shallow water (<80 m depth) near Halifax, Canada. The measured impulse response function showed multipaths lasting over a second, which is an order of magnitude longer than the symbol length. Time-varying Doppler shifts of 30-70 Hz were found in the data. The long multipath delay and high Doppler shift are found to have a significant impact on data processing. For example, using conventional processing that detects the symbol energy over the symbol duration, the bit error rates (BER) are of the order 30-40%. Using a longer time window allowing integration of multipath energy and using Doppler estimated from trigger signals, the uncoded BER is reduced to 10-15%. The data are error-free after error decoding using a convolutional code with a rate and constraint length of 9. Consequences for acoustic networking will be discussed. [Work supported by ONR.

  19. Arbitrary shaped, liquid filled reverberators with non-resonant transducers for broadband focusing of ultrasound using Time Reversed Acoustics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, A; Fillinger, L

    2009-03-01

    The ability to generate short focused ultrasonic pulses with duration on the order of one period of carrier frequency depends on the bandwidth of the transmitter as the pulse duration is inversely proportional to the bandwidth. Conventional focusing arrays used for focusing ultrasound have limited bandwidth due to the resonant nature of the piezoelements generating ultrasound. Theoretically it is possible to build a broadband phased array composed of "non-resonant" elements: wedge-shaped or flat-concave piezotransducers, though there are numerous technical difficulties in designing arrays with hundreds of elements of complex shape. This task is much easier to realize in an alternative technique of ultrasound focusing based on the principles of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) because in TRA systems, effective focusing can be achieved with just a few, or even one, transducers. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the possibility of broadband focusing of ultrasonic waves using a TRA system with non-resonant transducers and to explore the factors affecting the performance of such a system. A new type of TRA reverberators, such as water-filled thin-wall plastic vessels, which can be used with the submersible piezotransducers fixed internally in the reverberator, are proposed and tested. The experiments are conducted in a water tank with the walls and bottom covered by a sound absorbing lining. A needle hydrophone mounted on a 3D positioning system is used as a beacon for the TRA focusing and then for measuring the spatial distribution of the focused ultrasound field. The bandwidth and spatial distribution of the signal focused by the TRA system using a single channel with the resonant versus non-resonant transducers have been analyzed. Two types of non-resonant transducers were tested: a flat-concave transducer with a diameter of 30 mm, and a thickness varying from 2 mm in the center to 11 mm at the edge, and a specially designed submersible transducer having an

  20. A NEW APPROACH TO CONSTRAIN BLACK HOLE SPINS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES USING OPTICAL REVERBERATION MAPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Min; Du, Pu; Li, Yan-Rong; Hu, Chen; Ho, Luis C.; Bai, Jin-Ming

    2014-09-01

    A tight relation between the size of the broad-line region (BLR) and optical luminosity has been established in about 50 active galactic nuclei studied through reverberation mapping of the broad Hβ emission line. The R {sub BLR}-L relation arises from simple photoionization considerations. Using a general relativistic model of an optically thick, geometrically thin accretion disk, we show that the ionizing luminosity jointly depends on black hole mass, accretion rate, and spin. The non-monotonic relation between the ionizing and optical luminosity gives rise to a complicated relation between the BLR size and the optical luminosity. We show that the reverberation lag of Hβ to the varying continuum depends very sensitively on black hole spin. For retrograde spins, the disk is so cold that there is a deficit of ionizing photons in the BLR, resulting in shrinkage of the hydrogen ionization front with increasing optical luminosity, and hence shortened Hβ lags. This effect is specially striking for luminous quasars undergoing retrograde accretion, manifesting in strong deviations from the canonical R {sub BLR}-L relation. This could lead to a method to estimate black hole spins of quasars and to study their cosmic evolution. At the same time, the small scatter of the observed R {sub BLR}-L relation for the current sample of reverberation-mapped active galaxies implies that the majority of these sources have rapidly spinning black holes.

  1. The Impact of Very High Frequency Surface Reverberation on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    months into this 36 month project, and work in this initial phase has focused on laboratory measurements of high frequency surface scattering and...continuously measured with a wire wave gauge placed slightly downstream of the acoustic transducers. The transducers themselves were placed in the...16 bit data acquisition system sampling at 4 MHz. Figure 1. Geometry for the high frequency scattering experiment in the wind-wave simulator

  2. The Impact of Very High Frequency Surface Reverberation on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    range of wind -driven conditions. The model will focus on signal coherence, and second-order amplitude and Doppler statistics. A second long-term goal...surface scattering in the literature are rare. The physics of very high frequency (VHF) scattering is expected to be strongly dependent on wind speed...Doppler and coherence of VHF acoustic signals scattered from a rough ocean surface driven by a range of wind speeds. The second is to investigate the

  3. Ensemble statistics of active and reactive sound intensity in reverberation rooms.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines fundamental statistical properties of the active and reactive sound intensity in reverberant enclosures driven with pure tones. The existing theory for sound intensity in a diffuse sound field, which is based on Waterhouse's random wave model and therefore limited to the region of high modal overlap, is extended to the region of low modal overlap by taking account of the random fluctuations of the sound power emitted by the source that generates the sound field. The validity of the extended model is confirmed by experimental and numerical results.

  4. Multichannel time-reversal processing for acoustic communications in a highly reverberant environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, James V.; Poggio, Andrew J.; Chambers, David H.; Guidry, Brian L.; Robbins, Christopher L.; Kent, Claudia A.

    2005-10-01

    The development of time-reversal (T/R) communication systems is a recent signal processing research area dominated by applying T/R techniques to communicate in hostile environments. The fundamental concept is based on time-reversing the impulse response or Green's function characterizing the uncertain communications channel to mitigate deleterious dispersion and multipath effects. In this paper, we extend point-to-point to array-to-point communications by first establishing the basic theory to define and solve the underlying multichannel communications problem and then developing various realizations of the resulting T/R receivers. We show that not only do these receivers perform well in a hostile environment, but they also can be implemented with a ``1 bit'' analog-to-digital converter design structure. We validate these results by performing proof-of-principle acoustic communications experiments in air. It is shown that the resulting T/R receivers are capable of extracting the transmitted coded sequence from noisy microphone array measurements with zero-bit error.

  5. Auditory target detection in reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Freyman, Richard L.; Balakrishnan, Uma

    2004-04-01

    Measurements and theoretical predictions of auditory target detection in simulated reverberant conditions are reported. The target signals were pulsed 13-octave bands of noise and the masker signal was a continuous wideband noise. Target and masker signals were passed through a software simulation of a reverberant room with a rigid sphere modeling a listener's head. The location of the target was fixed while the location of the masker was varied in the simulated room. Degree of reverberation was controlled by varying the uniform acoustic absorption of the simulated room's surfaces. The resulting target and masker signals were presented to the listeners over headphones in monaural-left, monaural-right, or binaural listening modes. Changes in detection performance in the monaural listening modes were largely predictable from the changes in target-to-masker ratio in the target band, but with a few dB of extra masking in reverberation. Binaural detection performance was generally well predicted by applying Durlach's [in Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory (Academic, New York, 1972)] equalization-cancellation theory to the direct-plus-reverberant ear signals. Predictions in all cases were based on a statistical description of room acoustics and on acoustic diffraction by a sphere. The success of these detection models in the present well-controlled reverberant conditions suggests that they can be used to incorporate listening mode and source location as factors in speech-intelligibility predictions.

  6. Transport Theory for Propagation and Reverberation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    and reverberation modeling is important for many prediction methods that are important for Navy applications and for underwater acoustics systems...development. While acoustic propagation and reverberation modeling has been extensively developed for many years, significant limitations still exist on...the acoustic field in modes, and therefore would most readily apply at mid-frequencies and below, and in relatively shallow water environments such as

  7. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  8. Brief wide-field photostimuli evoke and modulate oscillatory reverberating activity in cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Pulizzi, Rocco; Musumeci, Gabriele; Van den Haute, Chris; Van De Vijver, Sebastiaan; Baekelandt, Veerle; Giugliano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Cell assemblies manipulation by optogenetics is pivotal to advance neuroscience and neuroengineering. In in vivo applications, photostimulation often broadly addresses a population of cells simultaneously, leading to feed-forward and to reverberating responses in recurrent microcircuits. The former arise from direct activation of targets downstream, and are straightforward to interpret. The latter are consequence of feedback connectivity and may reflect a variety of time-scales and complex dynamical properties. We investigated wide-field photostimulation in cortical networks in vitro, employing substrate-integrated microelectrode arrays and long-term cultured neuronal networks. We characterized the effect of brief light pulses, while restricting the expression of channelrhodopsin to principal neurons. We evoked robust reverberating responses, oscillating in the physiological gamma frequency range, and found that such a frequency could be reliably manipulated varying the light pulse duration, not its intensity. By pharmacology, mathematical modelling, and intracellular recordings, we conclude that gamma oscillations likely emerge as in vivo from the excitatory-inhibitory interplay and that, unexpectedly, the light stimuli transiently facilitate excitatory synaptic transmission. Of relevance for in vitro models of (dys)functional cortical microcircuitry and in vivo manipulations of cell assemblies, we give for the first time evidence of network-level consequences of the alteration of synaptic physiology by optogenetics. PMID:27099182

  9. Reverberation clutter induced by nonlinear internal waves in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Henyey, Frank S; Tang, Dajun

    2013-10-01

    Clutter is related to false alarms for active sonar. It is demonstrated that, in shallow water, target-like clutter in reverberation signals can be caused by nonlinear internal waves. A nonlinear internal wave is modeled using measured stratification on the New Jersey shelf. Reverberation in the presence of the internal wave is modeled numerically. Calculations show that acoustic energy propagating near a sound speed minimum is deflected as a high intensity, higher angle beam into the bottom, where it is backscattered along the reciprocal path. The interaction of sound with the internal wave is isolated in space, hence resulting in a target-like clutter, which is found to be greater than 10 dB above the mean reverberation level.

  10. ASTROMETRIC REVERBERATION MAPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue

    2012-10-01

    Spatially extended emission regions of active galactic nuclei respond to continuum variations, if such emission regions are powered by energy reprocessing of the continuum. The response from different parts of the reverberating region arrives at different times lagging behind the continuum variation. The lags can be used to map the geometry and kinematics of the emission region (i.e., reverberation mapping, RM). If the extended emission region is not spherically symmetric in configuration and velocity space, reverberation may produce astrometric offsets in the emission region photocenter as a function of time delay and velocity, detectable with future {mu}as to tens of {mu}as astrometry. Such astrometric responses provide independent constraints on the geometric and kinematic structure of the extended emission region, complementary to traditional RM. In addition, astrometric RM is more sensitive to infer the inclination of a flattened geometry and the rotation angle of the extended emission region.

  11. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: THE M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} RELATION FOR REVERBERATION-MAPPED ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Jong-Hak; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Bentz, Misty C.; Wright, Shelley A.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Martini, Paul; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor; Greene, Jenny; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Minezaki, Takeo

    2010-06-10

    To investigate the black hole mass versus stellar velocity dispersion (M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *}) relation of active galaxies, we measured the velocity dispersions of a sample of local Seyfert 1 galaxies, for which we have recently determined black hole masses using reverberation mapping. For most objects, stellar velocity dispersions were measured from high signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra centered on the Ca II triplet region ({approx}8500 A), obtained at the Keck, Palomar, and Lick Observatories. For two objects, in which the Ca II triplet region was contaminated by nuclear emission, the measurement was based on high-quality H-band spectra obtained with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph at the Keck-II telescope. Combining our new measurements with data from the literature, we assemble a sample of 24 active galaxies with stellar velocity dispersions and reverberation-based black hole mass measurements in the range of black hole mass 10{sup 6} < M {sub BH}/M {sub sun} < 10{sup 9}. We use this sample to obtain reverberation-mapping constraints on the slope and intrinsic scatter of the M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of active galaxies. Assuming a constant virial coefficient f for the reverberation-mapping black hole masses, we find a slope {beta} = 3.55 {+-} 0.60 and the intrinsic scatter {sigma}{sub int} = 0.43 {+-} 0.08 dex in the relation log(M {sub BH}/M {sub sun}) = {alpha} + {beta} log({sigma}{sub *}/200 km s{sup -1}), which are consistent with those found for quiescent galaxies. We derive an updated value of the virial coefficient f by finding the value which places the reverberation masses in best agreement with the M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of quiescent galaxies; using the quiescent M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation determined by Gueltekin et al., we find log f = 0.72{sup +0.09} {sub -0.10} with an intrinsic scatter of 0.44 {+-} 0.07 dex. No strong correlations between f and parameters connected to the physics of accretion

  12. A new method to measure the virial factors in the reverberation mapping of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.; Feng, H. C.; Bai, J. M.

    2017-04-01

    Based on the gravitational red shift, which is a prediction of Einstein's general relativity theory, of broad optical emission lines in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), a new method is proposed to estimate the virial factors f in measuring black hole masses MRM by the reverberation mapping of AGNs. The factors f can be measured based on two physical quantities, i.e. the gravitational red shifts zg and the full widths at half maxima vFWHM of broad lines. In the past, it has been difficult to determine the factors f for individual AGNs. We apply this new method to several reverberation-mapped type 1 Seyfert galaxies. There is a correlation between f and the radius of the broad-line region (BLR) rBLR, f=5.4 r_{BLR}^{0.3}, for the gravitationally red-shifted broad lines He II, He I, Hβ and Hα in the narrow-line type 1 Seyfert galaxy (NLS1) Mrk 110. This correlation results from the influence of the radiation pressure of the accretion disc on the BLR clouds. This influence seems to be more important than usually thought so in AGNs. Mrk 110 has f ≈ 8-16, distinctly larger than the mean ≈ 1 usually used to estimate MRM for vFWHM. NGC 4593 and NLS1 Mrk 486 have f ≈ 3 and f ≈ 9, respectively. Higher f values of several tens are derived for three other NLS1s. There is a correlation between f and accretion rate dot{M}_{f=1}, f=6.8dot{M}^{0.4}_{f=1} for five objects, where dot{M}_{f=1}=dot{M}_{bullet }/L_{Edd}c^{-2} as f = 1 is assumed when estimating MRM used in the Eddington luminosity LEdd, dot{M}_{bullet } is the mass accretion rate, and c is the speed of light. These larger f values will produce higher MRM values and lower Eddington ratios.

  13. Designing acoustics for linguistically diverse classrooms: Effects of background noise, reverberation and talker foreign accent on speech comprehension by native and non-native English-speaking listeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhao Ellen

    The current classroom acoustics standard (ANSI S12.60-2010) recommends core learning spaces not to exceed background noise level (BNL) of 35 dBA and reverberation time (RT) of 0.6 second, based on speech intelligibility performance mainly by the native English-speaking population. Existing literature has not correlated these recommended values well with student learning outcomes. With a growing population of non-native English speakers in American classrooms, the special needs for perceiving degraded speech among non-native listeners, either due to realistic room acoustics or talker foreign accent, have not been addressed in the current standard. This research seeks to investigate the effects of BNL and RT on the comprehension of English speech from native English and native Mandarin Chinese talkers as perceived by native and non-native English listeners, and to provide acoustic design guidelines to supplement the existing standard. This dissertation presents two studies on the effects of RT and BNL on more realistic classroom learning experiences. How do native and non-native English-speaking listeners perform on speech comprehension tasks under adverse acoustic conditions, if the English speech is produced by talkers of native English (Study 1) versus native Mandarin Chinese (Study 2)? Speech comprehension materials were played back in a listening chamber to individual listeners: native and non-native English-speaking in Study 1; native English, native Mandarin Chinese, and other non-native English-speaking in Study 2. Each listener was screened for baseline English proficiency level, and completed dual tasks simultaneously involving speech comprehension and adaptive dot-tracing under 15 acoustic conditions, comprised of three BNL conditions (RC-30, 40, and 50) and five RT scenarios (0.4 to 1.2 seconds). The results show that BNL and RT negatively affect both objective performance and subjective perception of speech comprehension, more severely for non

  14. Reverberation Time Measurements in the NASA Langley Exterior Effects Room (EER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2006-01-01

    One-third octave band background noise and reverberation time measurements were conducted in the Exterior Effect Room (EER) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The related overall acoustic absorption of the room was calculated. The acoustic field in the room was characterized. Reverberation time measurements were performed using the integrated impulse response method. The results were compared with independent measurements using the interrupted noise reverberation time method and different instrumentation. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the reverberation times of the two methods.

  15. Accounting for delay of energy transfer between coupled rooms in statistical-acoustics models of reverberant-energy decay.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jason E

    2012-08-01

    A statistical-acoustics model for energy decay in systems of two or more coupled rooms is introduced, which accounts for the distribution of delay in the transfer of energy between subrooms that results from the finite speed of sound. The method extends previous models based on systems of coupled ordinary differential equations by using functional differential equations to explicitly model dependence on prior values of energy in adjacent subrooms. Predictions of the model are illustrated for a two-room coupled system and compared with the predictions of a benchmark computational geometrical-acoustics model.

  16. Transient Auditory Storage of Acoustic Details Is Associated with Release of Speech from Informational Masking in Reverberant Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ying; Huang, Qiang; Chen, Xun; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Perceptual integration of the sound directly emanating from the source with reflections needs both temporal storage and correlation computation of acoustic details. We examined whether the temporal storage is frequency dependent and associated with speech unmasking. In Experiment 1, a break in correlation (BIC) between interaurally correlated…

  17. Characterizing Broadband Acoustic Propagation Scintillation and Modelling Scattering and Reverberation for Sensing in a Random Ocean Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 annulus offset from the origin in the complex plane. The phase distributions are found to...Complex field, (b) amplitude and (c) phase distributions of ocean acoustic signal propagated over small source-receiver separations in the Gulf of

  18. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Articles Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    It is important to realize that some test-articles may have significant sound absorption that may challenge the acoustic power capabilities of a test facility. Therefore, to mitigate this risk of not being able to meet the customers target spectrum, it is prudent to demonstrate early-on an increased acoustic power capability which compensates for this test-article absorption. This paper describes a concise method to reduce this risk when testing aerospace test-articles which have significant absorption. This method was successfully applied during the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations RATF.

  19. Amplitude-modulation detection by gerbils in reverberant sound fields.

    PubMed

    Lingner, Andrea; Kugler, Kathrin; Grothe, Benedikt; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2013-08-01

    Reverberation can dramatically reduce the depth of amplitude modulations which are critical for speech intelligibility. Psychophysical experiments indicate that humans' sensitivity to amplitude modulation in reverberation is better than predicted from the acoustic modulation depth at the receiver position. Electrophysiological studies on reverberation in rabbits highlight the contribution of neurons sensitive to interaural correlation. Here, we use a prepulse-inhibition paradigm to quantify the gerbils' amplitude modulation threshold in both anechoic and reverberant virtual environments. Data show that prepulse inhibition provides a reliable method for determining the gerbils' AM sensitivity. However, we find no evidence for perceptual restoration of amplitude modulation in reverberation. Instead, the deterioration of AM sensitivity in reverberant conditions can be quantitatively explained by the reduced modulation depth at the receiver position. We suggest that the lack of perceptual restoration is related to physical properties of the gerbil's ear input signals and inner-ear processing as opposed to shortcomings of their binaural neural processing.

  20. Reverberation Mapping of the size of the Dusty Tori in Active Galactic Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axon, David; Batcheldor, Daniel; Buchanan, Catherine; Capetti, Alessandro; Elitzur, Moshe; Gallimore, Jack; Geballe, Thomas; Horne, Keith; Kishimoto, Makoto; Marconi, Alessandro; Mason, Rachel; Maiolino, Roberto; Netzer, Hagai; Packham, Christopher; Perez, Enrique; Peterson, Brad; Tadhunter, Clive; Richmond, Michael; Robinson, Andrew; Stirpe, Giovanna; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2011-05-01

    Despite its central role in AGN unification models and its importance for studies of supermassive black hole demographics, our current understanding of the size and structure of AGN tori is weak. We propose to use the unique opportunity provided by the warm phase of Spitzer to determine the sizes of circum-nuclear dust tori in AGN. To accomplish this we will carry out a monitoring campaign, coordinated with ground-based observations, to measure the 'light echo' as the dust emission responds to variations in the AGN optical/UV continuum. We have selected a sample of 12 bright type 1 nuclei in close proximity to the Spitzer Continuous Viewing Zone which can be observed repeatedly with visibility windows for at least 70% of the ~400 day cycle and generally > 90% (10 objects )of the ~400 day cycle. We will observe each AGN with 3 day sampling on Spitzer for the whole of Cycle 8. We have in place a plan for a supporting ground based monitoring program using a variety of conventional and robotic telescopes, which will allow ?world-wide? coverage, to determine the AGN light-curves in the B band. These observations will more than double the number of AGN with simultaneous optical and NIR time-series data, providing well-sampled, high signal-to-noise light curves of both S1 and NLS1. Such high fidelity, continuously sampled lR light curves covering hundreds of days cannot be obtained from the ground, and are needed because the expected reverberation time scales are many tens of days (30-150). We will apply well developed techniques to determine the reverberation lag and therefore obtain the characteristic size of the torus in this sample which has diverse properties and samples a range of black hole mass and Eddington ratio. Our team contains many leading experts in reverberation mapping of AGN and in the observational study and theoretical modeling of the physics of the dusty torus. We are requesting a total of 196 hrs in the cycle to perform our observations.

  1. Effects of virtual speaker density and room reverberation on spatiotemporal thresholds of audio-visual motion coherence.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Narayan; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of spatial sound-source density and reverberation on the spatiotemporal window for audio-visual motion coherence. Three different acoustic stimuli were generated in Virtual Auditory Space: two acoustically "dry" stimuli via the measurement of anechoic head-related impulse responses recorded at either 1° or 5° spatial intervals (Experiment 1), and a reverberant stimulus rendered from binaural room impulse responses recorded at 5° intervals in situ in order to capture reverberant acoustics in addition to head-related cues (Experiment 2). A moving visual stimulus with invariant localization cues was generated by sequentially activating LED's along the same radial path as the virtual auditory motion. Stimuli were presented at 25°/s, 50°/s and 100°/s with a random spatial offset between audition and vision. In a 2AFC task, subjects made a judgment of the leading modality (auditory or visual). No significant differences were observed in the spatial threshold based on the point of subjective equivalence (PSE) or the slope of psychometric functions (β) across all three acoustic conditions. Additionally, both the PSE and β did not significantly differ across velocity, suggesting a fixed spatial window of audio-visual separation. Findings suggest that there was no loss in spatial information accompanying the reduction in spatial cues and reverberation levels tested, and establish a perceptual measure for assessing the veracity of motion generated from discrete locations and in echoic environments.

  2. Reverberation impairs brainstem temporal representations of voiced vowel sounds: challenging “periodicity-tagged” segregation of competing speech in rooms

    PubMed Central

    Sayles, Mark; Stasiak, Arkadiusz; Winter, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory system typically processes information from concurrently active sound sources (e.g., two voices speaking at once), in the presence of multiple delayed, attenuated and distorted sound-wave reflections (reverberation). Brainstem circuits help segregate these complex acoustic mixtures into “auditory objects.” Psychophysical studies demonstrate a strong interaction between reverberation and fundamental-frequency (F0) modulation, leading to impaired segregation of competing vowels when segregation is on the basis of F0 differences. Neurophysiological studies of complex-sound segregation have concentrated on sounds with steady F0s, in anechoic environments. However, F0 modulation and reverberation are quasi-ubiquitous. We examine the ability of 129 single units in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) of the anesthetized guinea pig to segregate the concurrent synthetic vowel sounds /a/ and /i/, based on temporal discharge patterns under closed-field conditions. We address the effects of added real-room reverberation, F0 modulation, and the interaction of these two factors, on brainstem neural segregation of voiced speech sounds. A firing-rate representation of single-vowels' spectral envelopes is robust to the combination of F0 modulation and reverberation: local firing-rate maxima and minima across the tonotopic array code vowel-formant structure. However, single-vowel F0-related periodicity information in shuffled inter-spike interval distributions is significantly degraded in the combined presence of reverberation and F0 modulation. Hence, segregation of double-vowels' spectral energy into two streams (corresponding to the two vowels), on the basis of temporal discharge patterns, is impaired by reverberation; specifically when F0 is modulated. All unit types (primary-like, chopper, onset) are similarly affected. These results offer neurophysiological insights to perceptual organization of complex acoustic scenes under realistically challenging listening

  3. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, Sho C.; de Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-03-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently `explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies.

  4. Neural coding of sound envelope in reverberant environments.

    PubMed

    Slama, Michaël C C; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2015-03-11

    Speech reception depends critically on temporal modulations in the amplitude envelope of the speech signal. Reverberation encountered in everyday environments can substantially attenuate these modulations. To assess the effect of reverberation on the neural coding of amplitude envelope, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of unanesthetized rabbit using sinusoidally amplitude modulated (AM) broadband noise stimuli presented in simulated anechoic and reverberant environments. Although reverberation degraded both rate and temporal coding of AM in IC neurons, in most neurons, the degradation in temporal coding was smaller than the AM attenuation in the stimulus. This compensation could largely be accounted for by the compressive shape of the modulation input-output function (MIOF), which describes the nonlinear transformation of modulation depth from acoustic stimuli into neural responses. Additionally, in a subset of neurons, the temporal coding of AM was better for reverberant stimuli than for anechoic stimuli having the same modulation depth at the ear. Using hybrid anechoic stimuli that selectively possess certain properties of reverberant sounds, we show that this reverberant advantage is not caused by envelope distortion, static interaural decorrelation, or spectral coloration. Overall, our results suggest that the auditory system may possess dual mechanisms that make the coding of amplitude envelope relatively robust in reverberation: one general mechanism operating for all stimuli with small modulation depths, and another mechanism dependent on very specific properties of reverberant stimuli, possibly the periodic fluctuations in interaural correlation at the modulation frequency.

  5. Applied Reverberation Modeling Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...Later, Zhou [3] and others extended their work to reverberation. ASPM/ ASTRAL agreed reasonably well with the energy flux model reverberation and...simulation and training requirements. RELATED PROJECTS The ONR-SPAWAR Reverberation Modeling Workshop is a closely related project that was intended

  6. Strategies for distant speech recognitionin reverberant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Marc; Yoshioka, Takuya; Ogawa, Atsunori; Kubo, Yotaro; Fujimoto, Masakiyo; Ito, Nobutaka; Kinoshita, Keisuke; Espi, Miquel; Araki, Shoko; Hori, Takaaki; Nakatani, Tomohiro

    2015-12-01

    Reverberation and noise are known to severely affect the automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance of speech recorded by distant microphones. Therefore, we must deal with reverberation if we are to realize high-performance hands-free speech recognition. In this paper, we review a recognition system that we developed at our laboratory to deal with reverberant speech. The system consists of a speech enhancement (SE) front-end that employs long-term linear prediction-based dereverberation followed by noise reduction. We combine our SE front-end with an ASR back-end that uses neural networks for acoustic and language modeling. The proposed system achieved top scores on the ASR task of the REVERB challenge. This paper describes the different technologies used in our system and presents detailed experimental results that justify our implementation choices and may provide hints for designing distant ASR systems.

  7. Acoustic trapping of active matter

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Sho C.; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently ‘explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  8. HARD X-RAY LAGS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: TESTING THE DISTANT REVERBERATION HYPOTHESIS WITH NGC 6814

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Uttley, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2013-11-10

    We present an X-ray spectral and temporal analysis of the variable active galaxy NGC 6814, observed with Suzaku during 2011 November. Remarkably, the X-ray spectrum shows no evidence for the soft excess commonly observed amongst other active galaxies, despite its relatively low level of obscuration, and is dominated across the whole Suzaku bandpass by the intrinsic powerlaw-like continuum. Despite this, we clearly detect the presence of a low-frequency hard lag of ∼1600 s between the 0.5-2.0 and 2.0-5.0 keV energy bands at greater than 6σ significance, similar to those reported in the literature for a variety of other active galactic nuclei (AGNs). At these energies, any additional emission from, e.g., a very weak, undetected soft excess, or from distant reflection must contribute less than 3% of the observed countrates (at 90% confidence). Given the lack of any significant continuum emission component other than the powerlaw, we can rule out models that invoke distant reprocessing for the observed lag behavior, which must instead be associated with this continuum emission. These results are fully consistent with a propagating fluctuation origin for the low-frequency hard lags, and with the interpretation of the high-frequency soft lags—a common feature seen in the highest quality AGN data with strong soft excesses—as reverberation from the inner accretion disk.

  9. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  10. Diagnostic techniques for measurement of aerodynamic noise in free field and reverberant environment of wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.; Mawardi, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    Techniques for studying aerodynamic noise generating mechanisms without disturbing the flow in a free field, and in the reverberation environment of the ARC wind tunnel were investigated along with the design and testing of an acoustic antenna with an electronic steering control. The acoustic characteristics of turbojet as a noise source, detection of direct sound from a source in a reverberant background, optical diagnostic methods, and the design characteristics of a high directivity acoustic antenna. Recommendations for further studies are included.

  11. Reverberant speech recognition exploiting clarity index estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parada, Pablo Peso; Sharma, Dushyant; Naylor, Patrick A.; Waterschoot, Toon van

    2015-12-01

    We present single-channel approaches to robust automatic speech recognition (ASR) in reverberant environments based on non-intrusive estimation of the clarity index ( C 50). Our best performing method includes the estimated value of C 50 in the ASR feature vector and also uses C 50 to select the most suitable ASR acoustic model according to the reverberation level. We evaluate our method on the REVERB Challenge database employing two different C 50 estimators and show that our method outperforms the best baseline of the challenge achieved without unsupervised acoustic model adaptation, i.e. using multi-condition hidden Markov models (HMMs). Our approach achieves a 22.4 % relative word error rate reduction in comparison to the best baseline of the challenge.

  12. Design of a programmable active acoustics metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoker, Jason J.

    Metamaterials are artificial materials engineered to provide properties which may not be readily available in nature. The development of such class of materials constitutes a new area of research that has grown significantly over the past decade. Acoustic metamaterials, specifically, are even more novel than their electromagnetic counterparts arising only in the latter half of the decade. Acoustic metamaterials provide a new tool in controlling the propagation of pressure waves. However, physical design and frequency tuning, is still a large obstacle when creating a new acoustic metamaterial. This dissertation describes active and programmable design for acoustic metamaterials which allows the same basic physical design principles to be used for a variety of application. With cloaking technology being of a great interest to the US Navy, the proposed design approach would enable the development of a metamaterial with spatially changing effective parameters while retaining a uniform physical design features. The effective parameters would be controlled by tuning smart actuators embedded inside the metamaterial structure. Since this design is based on dynamic effective parameters that can be electrically controlled, material property ranges of several orders of magnitude could potentially be achieved without changing any physical parameters. With such unique capabilities, physically realizable acoustic cloaks can be achieved and objects treated with these active metamaterials can become acoustically invisible.

  13. Analysis and Modeling of Target Echo and Reverberation: FY15 Annual Report for ONR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    during the past year: • Michael A. Ainslie, Dale D. Ellis, and Chris H. Harrison . Low frequency bottom reverberation in a Pekeris waveguide with...Chris H. Harrison . Towards benchmarks of low frequency reverberation level in a Pekeris waveguide: Insight from analytical solutions. J. Acoust...USA, 23–27 May 2011. [AEH15] Michael A. Ainslie, Dale D. Ellis, and Chris H. Harrison . Low frequency bottom reverberation in a Pekeris waveguide

  14. Advanced Technology Development for Active Acoustic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Nishida, Toshikazu; Kurdila, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives include: (1) Develop electro-mechanical/acoustic models of a Helmholtz resonator possessing a compliant diaphragm coupled to a piezoelectric device; (2) Design and fabricate the energy reclamation module and active Helmholtz resonator; (3) Develop and build appropriate energy reclamation/storage circuit; (4) Develop and fabricate appropriate piezoelectric shunt circuit to tune the compliance of the active Helmholtz resonator via a variable capacitor; (5) Quantify energy reclamation module efficiency in a grazing-flow plane wave tube possessing known acoustic energy input; and (6) Quantify actively tuned Helmholtz resonator performance in grazing-flow plane wave tube for a white-noise input

  15. Applied Reverberation Modeling Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation Modeling Workshop 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...included both propagation and reverberation with the receiver on a transect perpendicular to the wedge (3-D effects were ignored). The ASTRAL /ASPM...by the PI. The interest was in determining how the operational models ( ASTRAL /ASPM) performed in a sloping environment. ASTRAL is extremely fast

  16. Supermassive Black Holes with High Accretion Rates in Active Galactic Nuclei. I. First Results from a New Reverberation Mapping Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pu; Hu, Chen; Lu, Kai-Xing; Wang, Fang; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong; Bai, Jin-Ming; Kaspi, Shai; Netzer, Hagai; Wang, Jian-Min; SEAMBH Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    We report first results from a large project to measure black hole (BH) mass in high accretion rate active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Such objects may be different from other AGNs in being powered by slim accretion disks and showing saturated accretion luminosities, but both are not yet fully understood. The results are part of a large reverberation mapping (RM) campaign using the 2.4 m Shangri-La telescope at the Yunnan Observatory in China. The goals are to investigate the gas distribution near the BH and the properties of the central accretion disks, to measure BH mass and Eddington ratios, and to test the feasibility of using such objects as a new type of cosmological candles. The paper presents results for three objects, Mrk 335, Mrk 142, and IRAS F12397+3333, with Hβ time lags relative to the 5100 Å continuum of 10.6^{+1.7}_{-2.9}, 6.4^{+0.8}_{-2.2} and 11.4^{+2.9}_{-1.9} days, respectively. The corresponding BH masses are (8.3_{-3.2}^{+2.6})\\times 10^6\\,M_{\\odot }, (3.4_{-1.2}^{+0.5})\\times 10^6\\,M_{\\odot }, and (7.5_{-4.1}^{+4.3})\\times 10^6\\,M_{\\odot }, and the lower limits on the Eddington ratios are 0.6, 2.3, and 4.6 for the minimal radiative efficiency of 0.038. Mrk 142 and IRAS F12397+333 (extinction corrected) clearly deviate from the currently known relation between Hβ lag and continuum luminosity. The three Eddington ratios are beyond the values expected in thin accretion disks and two of them are the largest measured so far among objects with RM-based BH masses. We briefly discuss implications for slim disks, BH growth, and cosmology.

  17. Constraining the size of the dusty torus in Active Galactic Nuclei: An Optical/Infrared Reverberation Lag Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Billy

    The dusty torus is the key component in the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) Unification Scheme that explains the spectroscopic differences between Seyfert galaxies of types 1 and 2. The torus dust is heated by the nuclear source and emits the absorbed energy in the infrared (IR); but because of light travel times, the torus IR emission responds to variations of the nuclear ultraviolet/optical continuum with a delay that corresponds to the size of the emitting region. The results from a mid-infrared (MIR) monitoring campaign using the Spitzer Space Telescope and optical ground-based telescopes (B and V band imaging), which spanned over 2 years and covered a sample of 12 Seyfert galaxies, are presented. The aim was to constrain the distances from the nucleus to the regions in the torus emitting at wavelengths of 3.6 microm and 4.5 microm. MIR light curves showing the variability characteristics of these AGN are presented and the effects of photometric uncertainties on the time-series analysis of the light curves are discussed. Significant variability was observed in the IR light curves of 10 of 12 objects, with relative amplitudes ranging from ˜10% to ˜100% from their mean flux. The "reverberation lags" between the 3.6 microm and 4.5 microm IR bands were determined for the entire sample and between the optical and MIR bands for NGC6418. In NGC6418, the 3.6 microm and 4.5 microm fluxes lagged behind those of the optical continuum by 47.5+2.0-1.9) days and 62.5+2.5-2.9 days, respectively. This is consistent with the inferred lower limit to the sublimation radius for pure graphite grains at T=1800 K but smaller by a factor of 2 than the lower limit for dust grains with a "standard" interstellar medium (ISM) composition. There is evidence that the lags increased following approximately by a factor of 2 increase in luminosity, consistent with an increase in the sublimation radius.

  18. Supermassive black holes with high accretion rates in active galactic nuclei. I. First results from a new reverberation mapping campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Pu; Hu, Chen; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Lu, Kai-Xing; Wang, Fang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Kaspi, Shai; Netzer, Hagai; Collaboration: SEAMBH collaboration

    2014-02-10

    We report first results from a large project to measure black hole (BH) mass in high accretion rate active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Such objects may be different from other AGNs in being powered by slim accretion disks and showing saturated accretion luminosities, but both are not yet fully understood. The results are part of a large reverberation mapping (RM) campaign using the 2.4 m Shangri-La telescope at the Yunnan Observatory in China. The goals are to investigate the gas distribution near the BH and the properties of the central accretion disks, to measure BH mass and Eddington ratios, and to test the feasibility of using such objects as a new type of cosmological candles. The paper presents results for three objects, Mrk 335, Mrk 142, and IRAS F12397+3333, with Hβ time lags relative to the 5100 Å continuum of 10.6{sub −2.9}{sup +1.7}, 6.4{sub −2.2}{sup +0.8} and 11.4{sub −1.9}{sup +2.9} days, respectively. The corresponding BH masses are (8.3{sub −3.2}{sup +2.6})×10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}, (3.4{sub −1.2}{sup +0.5})×10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}, and (7.5{sub −4.1}{sup +4.3})×10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}, and the lower limits on the Eddington ratios are 0.6, 2.3, and 4.6 for the minimal radiative efficiency of 0.038. Mrk 142 and IRAS F12397+333 (extinction corrected) clearly deviate from the currently known relation between Hβ lag and continuum luminosity. The three Eddington ratios are beyond the values expected in thin accretion disks and two of them are the largest measured so far among objects with RM-based BH masses. We briefly discuss implications for slim disks, BH growth, and cosmology.

  19. NEAR-INFRARED REVERBERATION BY DUSTY CLUMPY TORI IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Mori, Masao

    2011-08-20

    According to recent models, the accretion disk and black hole in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are surrounded by a clumpy torus. We investigate the NIR flux variation of the torus in response to a UV flash for various geometries. Anisotropic illumination by the disk and the torus self-occultation contrast our study with earlier works. Both the waning effect of each clump and the torus self-occultation selectively reduce the emission from the region with a short delay. Therefore, the NIR delay depends on the viewing angle (where a more inclined angle leads to a longer delay), and the time response shows an asymmetric profile with negative skewness, opposing the results for optically thin tori. The range of the computed delay coincides with the observed one, suggesting that the viewing angle is primarily responsible for the scatter of the observed delay. We also propose that the red NIR-to-optical color of type 1.8/1.9 objects is caused not only by the dust extinction but also the intrinsically red color. Compared with the modest torus thickness, both a thick and a thin tori display weaker NIR emission. A selection bias is thus expected such that NIR-selected AGNs tend to possess moderately thick tori. A thicker torus shows a narrower and more heavily skewed time profile, while a thin torus produces a rapid response. A super-Eddington accretion rate leads to much weaker NIR emission due to the disk self-occultation and the disk truncation by self-gravity. A long delay is expected from an optically thin and/or a largely misaligned torus. Very weak NIR emission, such as in hot-dust-poor active nuclei, can arise from a geometrically thin torus, a super-Eddington accretion rate, or a slightly misaligned torus.

  20. Concert hall acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2004-05-01

    I will review some work at Bell Laboratories on artificial reverberation and concert hall acoustics including Philharmonic Hall (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York). I will also touch on sound diffusion by number-theoretic surfaces and the measurement of reverberation time using the music as played in the hall as a ``test'' signal.

  1. Auditory-tactile echo-reverberating stuttering speech corrector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniszyk-Jozkowiak, Wieslawa; Adamczyk, Bogdan

    1997-02-01

    The work presents the construction of a device, which transforms speech sounds into acoustical and tactile signals of echo and reverberation. Research has been done on the influence of the echo and reverberation, which are transmitted as acoustic and tactile stimuli, on speech fluency. Introducing the echo or reverberation into the auditory feedback circuit results in a reduction of stuttering. A bit less, but still significant corrective effects are observed while using the tactile channel for transmitting the signals. The use of joined auditory and tactile channels increases the effects of their corrective influence on the stutterers' speech. The results of the experiment justify the use of the tactile channel in the stutterers' therapy.

  2. Shallow Water Reverberation and Low Frequency Seabed Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Analytical method of angular power spectrum, range and depth structure of the echo-to-reverberation ratio in shallow water Sound Field,” (Chinese) ACTA ... ACUSTICA , 5 (2), 86-99 (1980). 2. D.R. Jackson and M.D. Richardson, <High-frequency Seafloor Acoustics>, 616 pages, Springer, 2007. 3. J.X. Zhou, X.Z

  3. Estimation of the Area of a Reverberant Plate Using Average Reverberation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achdjian, Hossep; Moulin, Emmanuel; Benmeddour, Farouk; Assaad, Jamal

    This paper aims to present an original method for the estimation of the area of thin plates of arbitrary geometrical shapes. This method relies on the acquisition and ensemble processing of reverberated elastic signals on few sensors. The acoustical Green's function in a reverberant solid medium is modeled by a nonstationary random process based on the image-sources method. In that way, mathematical expectations of the signal envelopes can be analytically related to reverberation properties and structural parameters such as plate area, group velocity, or source-receiver distance. Then, a simple curve fitting applied to an ensemble average over N realizations of the late envelopes allows to estimate a global term involving the values of structural parameters. From simple statistical modal arguments, it is shown that the obtained relation depends on the plate area and not on the plate shape. Finally, by considering an additional relation obtained from the early characteristics (treated in a deterministic way) of the reverberation signals, it is possible to deduce the area value. This estimation is performed without geometrical measurements and requires an access to only a small portion of the plate. Furthermore, this method does not require any time measurement nor trigger synchronization between the input channels of instrumentation (between measured signals), thus implying low hardware constraints. Experimental results obtained on metallic plates with free boundary conditions and embedded window glasses will be presented. Areas of up to several meter-squares are correctly estimated with a relative error of a few percents.

  4. Infrared Reverberation Mapping of 17 Quasars from the SDSS Reverberation Mapping Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Shen, Yue; Barth, Aaron J.; Brandt, W. Niel; Dawson, Kyle S.; Green, Paul J.; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith D.; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Tao, Charling

    2017-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope Cycle 11/12 proposals allowed observations over a 20 month long period which opened up a new window for long term reverberation monitoring of high luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN). Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust had been limited to AGN that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). This had narrowed the sample of sources to low luminosity AGN which would have a small dust sublimation radius thus having their dust close enough so that the light travel time from the UV/optical emitting region of the accretion disk to the IR emitting region of the dust would be on the 1-2 month timescale. With this new opportunity we monitored 17 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. This sample has photometric monitoring for 849 quasars starting in 2010 combining data from the Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes. By combining these ground based observations with Spitzer data we can, for the first time, detect dust reverberation in high luminosity AGN.

  5. A survey of acoustic conditions in semi-open plan classrooms in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Greenland, Emma E; Shield, Bridget M

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a large scale, detailed acoustic survey of 42 open plan classrooms of varying design in the UK each of which contained between 2 and 14 teaching areas or classbases. The objective survey procedure, which was designed specifically for use in open plan classrooms, is described. The acoustic measurements relating to speech intelligibility within a classbase, including ambient noise level, intrusive noise level, speech to noise ratio, speech transmission index, and reverberation time, are presented. The effects on speech intelligibility of critical physical design variables, such as the number of classbases within an open plan unit and the selection of acoustic finishes for control of reverberation, are examined. This analysis enables limitations of open plan classrooms to be discussed and acoustic design guidelines to be developed to ensure good listening conditions. The types of teaching activity to provide adequate acoustic conditions, plus the speech intelligibility requirements of younger children, are also discussed.

  6. The Dependence of Long-Range Reverberation on Bottom Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauss, Roger; Fromm, David; LePage, Kevin; Gragg, Robert

    2004-11-01

    At long-range, shallow-water reverberation can be driven by sub-critical-angle scattering, i.e. by rough interrace scattering. The Naval Research Laboratory has recently developed a small-slope model for elastic seafloors that provides physics-based estimates of the dependence of scattering on the incident and scattered angles, and physical descriptors of the environment. In this paper, this incoherent model is used as kernels in reverberation models, which in turn are used to assess the sensitivity at 3.5 kHz of long-range monostatic reverberation to the roughness of the water-sediment interface. It is shown that when sub-critical-angle scattering dominates, the acoustic field could be quite sensitive to the parameter values of the roughness, thus arguing for the need for regional in-situ methods for its estimation.

  7. An Update of Classroom Acoustics for Children with Hearing Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandell, Carl C.; Smaldino, Joseph J.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined ambient noise levels, reverberation times, and noise/reverberation reduction treatments in 32 classrooms utilized for students with hearing impairment. None of the classrooms met recommended acoustical criteria for ambient noise levels, and only nine rooms complied with recommended standards for reverberation. (Author/DB)

  8. Microphone array power ratio for quality assessment of reverberated speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkun, Reuven; Cohen, Israel

    2015-12-01

    Speech signals in enclosed environments are often distorted by reverberation and noise. In speech communication systems with several randomly distributed microphones, involving a dynamic speaker and unknown source location, it is of great interest to monitor the perceived quality at each microphone and select the signal with the best quality. Most of existing approaches for quality estimation require prior information or a clean reference signal, which is unfortunately seldom available. In this paper, a practical non-intrusive method for quality assessment of reverberated speech signals is proposed. Using a statistical model of the reverberation process, we examine the energies as measured by unidirectional elements in a microphone array. By measuring the power ratio, we obtain a measure for the amount of reverberation in the received acoustic signals. This measure is then utilized to derive a blind estimation of the direct-to-reverberation energy ratio in the room. The proposed approach attains a simple, reliable, and robust quality measure, shown here through persuasive simulation results.

  9. Characterization of a Reverberation Chamber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    electromagnetic susceptibility and immunity of a device under test because of its repeatability and measurement speed. A reverberation chamber is...devices or unmanned aircraft systems has led to a baseline characterization of the reverberation chamber at the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL). A...

  10. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  11. Broadband Transmission Loss Due to Reverberant Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barisciano, Lawrence P. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The noise transmission characteristics of candidate curved aircraft sidewall panel constructions is examined analytically using finite element models of the selected panel geometries. The models are validated by experimental modal analyses and transmission loss testing. The structural and acoustic response of the models are then examined when subjected to random or reverberant excitation, the simulation of which is also discussed. For a candidate curved honeycomb panel, the effect of add-on trim panel treatments is examined. Specifically, two different mounting configurations are discussed and their effect on the transmission loss of the panel is presented. This study finds that the add-on acoustical treatments do improve on the primary structures transmission loss characteristics, however, much more research is necessary to draw any valid conclusions about the optimal configuration for the maximum noise transmission loss. This paper describes several directions for the extension of this work.

  12. High-directivity acoustic antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustic antenna with unique electronic steering control is used to identify and define aerodynamic noise sources in free field, particularly in wind tunnel which is quite reverberant. Provision is made for high directivity as well as improved discrimination against unwanted background noise such as reverberation or echoes.

  13. Time course of a perceptual enhancement effect for noise-masked speech in reverberant environments.

    PubMed

    Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2013-08-01

    Speech intelligibility has been shown to improve with prior exposure to a reverberant room environment [Brandewie and Zahorik (2010). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128, 291-299] with a spatially separated noise masker. Here, this speech enhancement effect was examined in multiple room environments using carrier phrases of varying lengths in order to control the amount of exposure. Speech intelligibility enhancement of between 5% and 18% was observed with as little as 850 ms of exposure, although the effect's time course varied considerably with reverberation and signal-to-noise ratio. In agreement with previous work, greater speech enhancement was found for reverberant environments compared to anechoic space.

  14. Comparison of Two High Intensity Acoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, A.; Tadao Sakita, M.; Kim, Youngkey K.

    2004-08-01

    In two different countries, at the same period of time, the institutes in charge of the development of space activities have decided to extend their satellite integration and test center, and to implement a reverberant acoustic chamber. In Brazil the INPE laboratory (LIT : Laboratorio de Integracao e Testes) and in South Korea the KARI laboratory (SITC : Satellite Integration and Test Center) started their projects in July 2000 for the RATF (Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility) and in May 2001 for the HIAC (High Intensity Acoustic Chamber) respectively, writing the technical specifications. The kick-off meetings took place in December 2000 and in February 2002 and the opening ceremonies in December 19, 2002 in Brazil and in August 22, 2003 in Korea. This paper compares the two projects in terms of design choices, manufacturing processes, equipment installed and technical final characteristics.

  15. Comments on Dust Reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, B.

    2015-09-01

    Dust reverberation is an important technique for studying the inner structure of AGNs and probing the properties of astrophysical dust, and even has some potential as a cosmological probe. We will discuss two recent results that pose a serious limitation to understanding dust reverberation at the present time. First, recent high-cadence monitoring of the UV and optical continuum in two AGNs, NGC 2617 and NGC 5548, have yielded unambiguous lags between variations of the UV continuum and corresponding variations of the continuum at longer wavelengths. In the absence of UV data, this leads to a systematic underestimate of the innermost radius where dust is found. This similarly leads to an underestimate of the size of the broad emission-line region, although it does not affect the AGN black hole mass scale, which calibrates out this effect. Second, broad-band monitoring of continuum variations in the optical through near-IR show that the innermost dust is not necessarily at the 'instantaneous sublimation radius.' The innermost dust can be considerably cooler than expected at the sublimation radius and thus can heat up without sublimating when the central continuum source becomes more luminous (see the poster by Pott).

  16. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Lawson, Gareth L.

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  17. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Lawson, Gareth L

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  18. Acoustic (loudspeaker) facial EMG monitoring: II. Use of evoked EMG activity during acoustic neuroma resection.

    PubMed

    Prass, R L; Kinney, S E; Hardy, R W; Hahn, J F; Lüders, H

    1987-12-01

    Facial electromyographic (EMG) activity was continuously monitored via loudspeaker during eleven translabyrinthine and nine suboccipital consecutive unselected acoustic neuroma resections. Ipsilateral facial EMG activity was synchronously recorded on the audio channels of operative videotapes, which were retrospectively reviewed in order to allow detailed evaluation of the potential benefit of various acoustic EMG patterns in the performance of specific aspects of acoustic neuroma resection. The use of evoked facial EMG activity was classified and described. Direct local mechanical (surgical) stimulation and direct electrical stimulation were of benefit in the localization and/or delineation of the facial nerve contour. Burst and train acoustic patterns of EMG activity appeared to indicate surgical trauma to the facial nerve that would not have been appreciated otherwise. Early results of postoperative facial function of monitored patients are presented, and the possible value of burst and train acoustic EMG activity patterns in the intraoperative assessment of facial nerve function is discussed. Acoustic facial EMG monitoring appears to provide a potentially powerful surgical tool for delineation of the facial nerve contour, the ongoing use of which may lead to continued improvement in facial nerve function preservation through modification of dissection strategy.

  19. Active control of harmonic sound transmission into an acoustic enclosure using both structural and acoustic actuators

    PubMed

    Kim; Brennan

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an analytical and experimental investigation into the active control of harmonic sound transmission in a structural-acoustic coupled system. A rectangular enclosure is considered that has five acoustically rigid walls and a flexible plate on the remaining side through which a harmonic sound wave is transmitted into the enclosure. The control system is designed to globally reduce the sound field inside the enclosure, and the roles of structural and acoustic actuators are of particular interest. Three control configurations, classified by the type of actuators, are compared and discussed. They are: (i) use of a single point-force actuator, (ii) use of a single acoustic piston source, and (iii) simultaneous use of both a point-force actuator and an acoustic piston source. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the point-force actuator is effective in controlling plate-dominated modes while the acoustic source is effective in controlling cavity-dominated modes. Since the transmitted sound field is governed by both plate- and cavity-dominated modes, the hybrid use of both types of actuators is shown to be a desirable configuration for the active control of sound transmission into a structural-acoustic coupled system.

  20. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES WITH HIGH ACCRETION RATES IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. VI. VELOCITY-RESOLVED REVERBERATION MAPPING OF THE Hβ LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Pu; Lu, Kai-Xing; Hu, Chen; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong; Huang, Ying-Ke; Wang, Jian-Min; Wang, Fang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Bian, Wei-Hao; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Ho, Luis C. E-mail: wangjm@ihep.ac.cn; Collaboration: SEAMBH Collaboration

    2016-03-20

    In the sixth of a series of papers reporting on a large reverberation mapping (RM) campaign of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with high accretion rates, we present velocity-resolved time lags of Hβ emission lines for nine objects observed in the campaign during 2012–2013. In order to correct the line broadening caused by seeing and instruments before analyzing the velocity-resolved RM, we adopt the Richardson–Lucy deconvolution to reconstruct their Hβ profiles. The validity and effectiveness of the deconvolution are checked using Monte Carlo simulation. Five among the nine objects show clear dependence of the time delay on velocity. Mrk 335 and Mrk 486 show signatures of gas inflow whereas the clouds in the broad-line regions (BLRs) of Mrk 142 and MCG +06-26-012 tend to be radial outflowing. Mrk 1044 is consistent with having virialized motions. The lags of the remaining four are not velocity-resolvable. The velocity-resolved RM of super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) shows that they have diverse kinematics in their BLRs. Comparing with the AGNs with sub-Eddington accretion rates, we do not find significant differences in the BLR kinematics of SEAMBHs.

  1. Supermassive Black Holes with High Accretion Rates in Active Galactic Nuclei. VI. Velocity-resolved Reverberation Mapping of the Hβ Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pu; Lu, Kai-Xing; Hu, Chen; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong; Huang, Ying-Ke; Wang, Fang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Bian, Wei-Hao; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Ho, Luis C.; Wang, Jian-Min; SEAMBH Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    In the sixth of a series of papers reporting on a large reverberation mapping (RM) campaign of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with high accretion rates, we present velocity-resolved time lags of Hβ emission lines for nine objects observed in the campaign during 2012-2013. In order to correct the line broadening caused by seeing and instruments before analyzing the velocity-resolved RM, we adopt the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution to reconstruct their Hβ profiles. The validity and effectiveness of the deconvolution are checked using Monte Carlo simulation. Five among the nine objects show clear dependence of the time delay on velocity. Mrk 335 and Mrk 486 show signatures of gas inflow whereas the clouds in the broad-line regions (BLRs) of Mrk 142 and MCG +06-26-012 tend to be radial outflowing. Mrk 1044 is consistent with having virialized motions. The lags of the remaining four are not velocity-resolvable. The velocity-resolved RM of super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs) shows that they have diverse kinematics in their BLRs. Comparing with the AGNs with sub-Eddington accretion rates, we do not find significant differences in the BLR kinematics of SEAMBHs.

  2. A state feedback electro-acoustic transducer for active control of acoustic impedance.

    PubMed

    Samejima, Toshiya

    2003-03-01

    In this paper, a new control system in which the acoustic impedance of an electro-acoustic transducer diaphragm can be actively varied by modifying design parameters is presented and its effectiveness is theoretically investigated. The proposed control system is based on a state-space description of the control system derived from an electrical equivalent circuit of an electro-acoustic transducer to which a differentiating circuit is connected, and is designed using modem control theory. The optimal quadratic regulator is used in the control system design, with its quadratic performance index formulated for producing desired acoustic impedance. Computer simulations indicate that the acoustic impedance of the diaphragm can be significantly varied over a wide frequency range that includes the range below the resonance frequency of the electro-acoustic transducer. A computer model of the proposed control system is used to illustrate its application to semi-active noise control in a duct. It is demonstrated that the proposed control system provides substantial reductions in the noise radiating from the outlet of the duct, both in the stiffness control range and in the mass control range.

  3. Statistics of natural reverberation enable perceptual separation of sound and space.

    PubMed

    Traer, James; McDermott, Josh H

    2016-11-29

    In everyday listening, sound reaches our ears directly from a source as well as indirectly via reflections known as reverberation. Reverberation profoundly distorts the sound from a source, yet humans can both identify sound sources and distinguish environments from the resulting sound, via mechanisms that remain unclear. The core computational challenge is that the acoustic signatures of the source and environment are combined in a single signal received by the ear. Here we ask whether our recognition of sound sources and spaces reflects an ability to separate their effects and whether any such separation is enabled by statistical regularities of real-world reverberation. To first determine whether such statistical regularities exist, we measured impulse responses (IRs) of 271 spaces sampled from the distribution encountered by humans during daily life. The sampled spaces were diverse, but their IRs were tightly constrained, exhibiting exponential decay at frequency-dependent rates: Mid frequencies reverberated longest whereas higher and lower frequencies decayed more rapidly, presumably due to absorptive properties of materials and air. To test whether humans leverage these regularities, we manipulated IR decay characteristics in simulated reverberant audio. Listeners could discriminate sound sources and environments from these signals, but their abilities degraded when reverberation characteristics deviated from those of real-world environments. Subjectively, atypical IRs were mistaken for sound sources. The results suggest the brain separates sound into contributions from the source and the environment, constrained by a prior on natural reverberation. This separation process may contribute to robust recognition while providing information about spaces around us.

  4. The perception of consonants in reverberation and noise by adults fitted with bimodal devices

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Michelle; Kokkinakis, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of a contralateral hearing aid (HA) to the perception of consonants, in terms of voicing, manner, and place of articulation cues in reverberation and noise by adult cochlear implantees aided by bimodal fittings. Method Eight post-lingually deafened adult cochlear implant listeners with a fully inserted cochlear implant in one ear and low-frequency hearing in the other ear were tested on consonant perception. The subjects were presented with consonant stimuli processed in the following experimental conditions: one quiet condition, two different reverberation times (0.3 s and 1.0 s), and the combination of two reverberation times with a single signal-to-noise ratio (SNR = 5 dB). Results Consonant perception improved significantly when listening in combination with a contralateral hearing aid (HA) as opposed to listening with a cochlear implant (CI) alone in 0.3 s and 1.0 s of reverberation. Significantly higher scores were also noted when noise was added to 0.3 s of reverberation. Conclusion A considerable benefit was noted from the additional acoustic information in conditions of reverberation and reverberation plus noise. The bimodal benefit observed was more pronounced for voicing and manner of articulation than for place of articulation. PMID:24686826

  5. Effect of reverberation and noise on the intelligibility of sentences in cases of presbyacusis.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, A J; Plomp, R

    1980-08-01

    For 80 male subjects (age 60--90) and 30 female subjects (age 71--89) the monaural Speech-Reception Threshold (SRT) for sentences was investigated under five reverberation conditions at a constant noise level. The reverberation times used were between 0 and 2.3 s. The noise, with the long-term average speech spectrum, had a level of 52.5 dBA. Each subject was assigned to one of several subgroups formed on the basis of the maximum reverberation time at which the subject was still able to understand the sentences correctly The mean SRTs and the standard deviations are given, per subgroup, as a function of reverberation time. It is shown that, for each subgroup, the SRT in different reverberant sound fields can be expressed as a single number, namely the required Speech Transmission Index (STI) as introduced in room acoustics by Houtgast and Steeneken [Acustica 28, 66--73 (1973)]. Furthermore, it is shown that a model of SRT as a function of noise level, developed by Plomp [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 63, 533--549 (1978)], can be combined with the STI model and can thus include the effect of reverberation.

  6. Feedforward control of sound transmission using an active acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Stephen; McCormick, Cameron

    2017-02-01

    Metamaterials have received significant interest in recent years due to their potential ability to exhibit behaviour not found in naturally occurring materials. This includes the generation of band gaps, which are frequency regions with high levels of wave attenuation. In the context of acoustics, these band gaps can be tuned to occur at low frequencies where the acoustic wavelength is large compared to the material, and where the performance of traditional passive noise control treatments is limited. Therefore, such acoustic metamaterials have been shown to offer a significant performance advantage compared to traditional passive control treatments, however, due to their resonant behaviour, the band gaps tend to occur over a relatively narrow frequency range. A similar long wavelength performance advantage can be achieved using active noise control, but the systems in this case do not rely on resonant behaviour. This paper demonstrates how the performance of an acoustic metamaterial, consisting of an array of Helmholtz resonators, can be significantly enhanced by the integration of an active control mechanism that is facilitated by embedding loudspeakers into the resonators. Crucially, it is then also shown how the active acoustic metamaterial significantly outperforms an equivalent traditional active noise control system. In both cases a broadband feedforward control strategy is employed to minimise the transmitted pressure in a one-dimensional acoustic control problem and a new method of weighting the control effort over a targeted frequency range is described.

  7. Sorting drops and cells with acoustics: acoustic microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Lothar; Weitz, David A; Franke, Thomas

    2014-10-07

    We describe a versatile microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter that uses acoustic actuation to sort cells or drops at ultra-high rates. Our acoustic sorter combines the advantages of traditional fluorescence-activated cell (FACS) and droplet sorting (FADS) and is applicable for a multitude of objects. We sort aqueous droplets, at rates as high as several kHz, into two or even more outlet channels. We can also sort cells directly from the medium without prior encapsulation into drops; we demonstrate this by sorting fluorescently labeled mouse melanoma cells in a single phase fluid. Our acoustic microfluidic FACS is compatible with standard cell sorting cytometers, yet, at the same time, enables a rich variety of more sophisticated applications.

  8. Reverberance of AN Existing Hall in Relation to both Subsequent Reverberation Time and Spl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HASE, S.; TAKATSU, A.; SATO, S.; SAKAI, H.; ANDO, Y.

    2000-04-01

    The reverberance of sound fields was evaluated by psychological tests in a multi-purpose hall with 400 seats. Both the subsequent reverberation time (Tsub) and sound pressure level (SPL) were changed, and the scale values of reverberance for both the music and speech signals were obtained by using the paired comparison method. This study found that Tsuband SPL have an independent influence on the scale value of reverberance. The reverberance increases when both Tsuband SPL are increased.

  9. Predicting the intelligibility of reverberant speech for cochlear implant listeners with a non-intrusive intelligibility measure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C

    2013-05-01

    Reverberation is known to reduce the temporal envelope modulations present in the signal and affect the shape of the modulation spectrum. A non-intrusive intelligibility measure for reverberant speech is proposed motivated by the fact that the area of the modulation spectrum decreases with increasing reverberation. The proposed measure is based on the average modulation area computed across four acoustic frequency bands spanning the signal bandwidth. High correlations (r = 0.98) were observed with sentence intelligibility scores obtained by cochlear implant listeners. Proposed measure outperformed other measures including an intrusive speech-transmission index based measure.

  10. Predicting the intelligibility of reverberant speech for cochlear implant listeners with a non-intrusive intelligibility measure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2012-01-01

    Reverberation is known to reduce the temporal envelope modulations present in the signal and affect the shape of the modulation spectrum. A non-intrusive intelligibility measure for reverberant speech is proposed motivated by the fact that the area of the modulation spectrum decreases with increasing reverberation. The proposed measure is based on the average modulation area computed across four acoustic frequency bands spanning the signal bandwidth. High correlations (r = 0.98) were observed with sentence intelligibility scores obtained by cochlear implant listeners. Proposed measure outperformed other measures including an intrusive speech-transmission index based measure. PMID:23710246

  11. Environmentally Adaptive Reverberation Nulling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-15

    Kim, H.C. Song, and W.A. Kuperman, “Adaptive time-reversal mirror,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109(5): 1817-1825 (2001). [6] S. Kim, G. Edelmann , W.S...W.A. Kuperman, W.S. Hodgkiss, H.C. Song, G.F. Edelmann , and T. Akal, “Robust time reversal focusing in the ocean,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114(1): 145-157...IEEE J. Oceanic Engr. 28(2): 246-249 (2003). [10] S. Kim, W.A. Kuperman, W.S. Hodgkiss, H.C. Spong, G.F. Edelmann , and T. Akal, “Echo-to

  12. Preference of reverberation time for musicians and audience of the Javanese traditional gamelan music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyatno; Tjokronegoro, H. A.; Merthayasa, I. G. N.; Supanggah, R.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of room acoustic parameters those are appropriated particularly to perform a Javanese gamelan. The acoustic parameters were obtained by analysing simulated sounds of performance. Those simulated sounds were obtained by sound convolution technique of a dry sound signal of Javanese gamelan performance with impulse responses rooms whose appropriated reverberation time. The reverberation time were varied between 1.0s to 1.8s, those belong to the characteristic of Pendopo Mangkunegaran Surakarta. In this case, Pendopo Mangkunegaran is assumed as one of the most suitable concert halls for Javanese gamelan performance. To obtain the acoustic parameters, we used a psycho-acoustics measurement based on paired comparison test that having different of acoustic parameters to determine the most comfortable one to majority of respondents. The respondents who have participated in this research composed of a group of professional musicians of Javanese gamelan and groups of audience who are not musician, nevertheless part of them were familiar with Javanese gamelan music. The comparison test gave results and showed majority of respondents of group of musicians had a notion sound reverberation time of 1.2s was most comfortable. This corresponds to +6.2dB, clarity and 74% definition. It means the appropriate acoustic condition allows musicians to recognize and distinguish clearly sound of each instrument being played. Meanwhile, group of audience had a notion reverberation time in a range of 1.2s - 1.6s was most comfortable. This range of reverberation time corresponds to +4dB to +6.2dB of clarity, and 66% to 74% of definition.

  13. Wireless Communications in Reverberant Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Drexel Wireless Systems Laboratory (DWSL) have been instrumental in my studies, research, and growth as an academic . In particular, I would like to...Experimental Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.2 Contribution 2: Wireless Performance in Reverberation Chambers...8 1.2.3 Contribution 3: Wireless Performance in Below-Deck Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.2.4 Contribution 4: Empirical Evaluation of Pre

  14. Formation and reverberation of sequential neural activity patterns evoked by sensory stimulation are enhanced during cortical desynchronization.

    PubMed

    Bermudez Contreras, Edgar J; Schjetnan, Andrea Gomez Palacio; Muhammad, Arif; Bartho, Peter; McNaughton, Bruce L; Kolb, Bryan; Gruber, Aaron J; Luczak, Artur

    2013-08-07

    Memory formation is hypothesized to involve the generation of event-specific neural activity patterns during learning and the subsequent spontaneous reactivation of these patterns. Here, we present evidence that these processes can also be observed in urethane-anesthetized rats and are enhanced by desynchronized brain state evoked by tail pinch, subcortical carbachol infusion, or systemic amphetamine administration. During desynchronization, we found that repeated tactile or auditory stimulation evoked unique sequential patterns of neural firing in somatosensory and auditory cortex and that these patterns then reoccurred during subsequent spontaneous activity, similar to what we have observed in awake animals. Furthermore, the formation of these patterns was blocked by an NMDA receptor antagonist, suggesting that the phenomenon depends on synaptic plasticity. These results suggest that anesthetized animals with a desynchronized brain state could serve as a convenient model for studying stimulus-induced plasticity to improve our understanding of memory formation and replay in the brain.

  15. Baffling or Baffled: Improve Your Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdoo, Frank B.

    1981-01-01

    Presents techniques for evaluating the acoustics (reverberation time, and standing waves and resonance phenomena) of a band performance room. Gives instructions for building and placing inexpensive baffles (free-standing, portable sound barriers) to correct room defects. (SJL)

  16. Analysis and Modeling of Multistatic Clutter and Reverberation and Support for the FORA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Penn State, is operated and maintained by ARL- PSU. Work under this task includes overseeing repairs at Teledyne Instruments in Houston TX as funds...FORA at Penn State and in processing and discussing reverberation and clutter data with APL-UW, DRDC Canada and many other organizations...Song, Steve Cho, Taehyuk Kang, William Hodgkiss, and John Preston, “Long-range acoustic communication in deep water using a towed array," J. Acoust

  17. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An activated carbon fiber nonwoven (ACF) was manufactured from cotton nonowoven fabric. For the ACF acoustical application, a nonwoven composite of ACF with cotton nonwoven as a base layer was developed. Also produced were the composites of the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of glass fiber ...

  18. Non-reciprocal and highly nonlinear active acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-02-27

    Unidirectional devices that pass acoustic energy in only one direction have numerous applications and, consequently, have recently received significant attention. However, for most practical applications that require unidirectionality at audio and low frequencies, subwavelength implementations capable of the necessary time-reversal symmetry breaking remain elusive. Here we describe a design approach based on metamaterial techniques that provides highly subwavelength and strongly non-reciprocal devices. We demonstrate this approach by designing and experimentally characterizing a non-reciprocal active acoustic metamaterial unit cell composed of a single piezoelectric membrane augmented by a nonlinear electronic circuit, and sandwiched between Helmholtz cavities tuned to different frequencies. The design is thinner than a tenth of a wavelength, yet it has an isolation factor of >10 dB. The design method generates relatively broadband unidirectional devices and is a good candidate for numerous acoustic applications.

  19. Improving Acoustics in American Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article to a clinical forum describes the following seven articles that discuss the problem of noisy classrooms and resulting reduction in learning, basic principles of noise and reverberation measurements in classrooms, solutions to the problem of poor classroom acoustics, and the development of a classroom acoustics standard.…

  20. The effect of loudness on the reverberance of music: reverberance prediction using loudness models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doheon; Cabrera, Densil; Martens, William L

    2012-02-01

    This study examines the auditory attribute that describes the perceived amount of reverberation, known as "reverberance." Listening experiments were performed using two signals commonly heard in auditoria: excerpts of orchestral music and western classical singing. Listeners adjusted the decay rate of room impulse responses prior to convolution with these signals, so as to match the reverberance of each stimulus to that of a reference stimulus. The analysis examines the hypothesis that reverberance is related to the loudness decay rate of the underlying room impulse response. This hypothesis is tested using computational models of time varying or dynamic loudness, from which parameters analogous to conventional reverberation parameters (early decay time and reverberation time) are derived. The results show that listening level significantly affects reverberance, and that the loudness-based parameters outperform related conventional parameters. Results support the proposed relationship between reverberance and the computationally predicted loudness decay function of sound in rooms.

  1. Suitable reverberation times for halls for rock and pop music.

    PubMed

    Adelman-Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric R; Gade, Anders C

    2010-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of popular music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of 20 rock music venues in Denmark and a questionnaire was used in a subjective assessment of those venues with professional rock musicians and sound engineers as expert listeners. Correlations between the measurements show that clarity, including bass frequencies down to 63 Hz, is important for the general impression of the acoustics of the hall. The best-rated halls in the study have reverberation times that are approximately frequency independent from 0.6 to 1.2 s for hall volumes from 1000 to 6000 m(3). The worst rated halls in the study had significantly higher reverberation times in the 63 and 125 Hz bands. Since most audiences at rock concerts are standing, absorption coefficients were measured with a standing audience from 63 Hz to 4 kHz. These measurements showed that a standing audience absorbs about five times as much energy in mid-/high-frequency bands as in low-frequency bands.

  2. Reverberant shear wave fields and estimation of tissue properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Kevin J.; Ormachea, Juvenal; Zvietcovich, Fernando; Castaneda, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    The determination of shear wave speed is an important subject in the field of elastography, since elevated shear wave speeds can be directly linked to increased stiffness of tissues. MRI and ultrasound scanners are frequently used to detect shear waves and a variety of estimators are applied to calculate the underlying shear wave speed. The estimators can be relatively simple if plane wave behavior is assumed with a known direction of propagation. However, multiple reflections from organ boundaries and internal inhomogeneities and mode conversions can create a complicated field in time and space. Thus, we explore the mathematics of multiple component shear wave fields and derive the basic properties, from which efficient estimators can be obtained. We approach this problem from the historic perspective of reverberant fields, a conceptual framework used in architectural acoustics and related fields. The framework can be recast for the alternative case of shear waves in a bounded elastic media, and the expected value of displacement patterns in shear reverberant fields are derived, along with some practical estimators of shear wave speed. These are applied to finite element models and phantoms to illustrate the characteristics of reverberant fields and provide preliminary confirmation of the overall framework.

  3. Assessing the acoustical climate of underground stations.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Elzbieta

    2007-01-01

    Designing a proper acoustical environment--indispensable to speech recognition--in long enclosures is difficult. Although there is some literature on the acoustical conditions in underground stations, there is still little information about methods that make estimation of correct reverberation conditions possible. This paper discusses the assessment of the reverberation conditions of underground stations. A comparison of the measurements of reverberation time in Warsaw's underground stations with calculated data proves there are divergences between measured and calculated early decay time values, especially for long source-receiver distances. Rapid speech transmission index values for measured stations are also presented.

  4. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    derived reflection coefficients as a function of range along the reverberation track (right). RESULTS Analysis of Acoustic Scattering for Layered and... acoustic interaction with the ocean floor, including penetration through and reflection from smooth and rough water/sediment interfaces, scattering ...can account for the all of the physical processes and variability of acoustic propagation and scattering in ocean environments with special emphasis

  5. 78 FR 19652 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Office of Naval Research Acoustic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Specified Activities; Office of Naval Research Acoustic Technology Experiments in the Western North Pacific... Acoustic Technology Experiments (ATE) in the western North Pacific Ocean. The Navy's activities are... underwater active acoustic sources are likely to result in the take of marine mammals. Take, by Level...

  6. Blind estimation of reverberation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, Rama; Jones, Douglas L.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; O'Brien, William D.; Lansing, Charissa R.; Feng, Albert S.

    2003-11-01

    The reverberation time (RT) is an important parameter for characterizing the quality of an auditory space. Sounds in reverberant environments are subject to coloration. This affects speech intelligibility and sound localization. Many state-of-the-art audio signal processing algorithms, for example in hearing-aids and telephony, are expected to have the ability to characterize the listening environment, and turn on an appropriate processing strategy accordingly. Thus, a method for characterization of room RT based on passively received microphone signals represents an important enabling technology. Current RT estimators, such as Schroeder's method, depend on a controlled sound source, and thus cannot produce an online, blind RT estimate. Here, a method for estimating RT without prior knowledge of sound sources or room geometry is presented. The diffusive tail of reverberation was modeled as an exponentially damped Gaussian white noise process. The time-constant of the decay, which provided a measure of the RT, was estimated using a maximum-likelihood procedure. The estimates were obtained continuously, and an order-statistics filter was used to extract the most likely RT from the accumulated estimates. The procedure was illustrated for connected speech. Results obtained for simulated and real room data are in good agreement with the real RT values.

  7. A survey of acoustic conditions and noise levels in secondary school classrooms in England.

    PubMed

    Shield, Bridget; Conetta, Robert; Dockrell, Julie; Connolly, Daniel; Cox, Trevor; Mydlarz, Charles

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic survey of secondary schools in England has been undertaken. Room acoustic parameters and background noise levels were measured in 185 unoccupied spaces in 13 schools to provide information on the typical acoustic environment of secondary schools. The unoccupied acoustic and noise data were correlated with various physical characteristics of the spaces. Room height and the amount of glazing were related to the unoccupied reverberation time and therefore need to be controlled to reduce reverberation to suitable levels for teaching and learning. Further analysis of the unoccupied data showed that the introduction of legislation relating to school acoustics in England and Wales in 2003 approximately doubled the number of school spaces complying with current standards. Noise levels were also measured during 274 lessons to examine typical levels generated during teaching activities in secondary schools and to investigate the influence of acoustic design on working noise levels in the classroom. Comparison of unoccupied and occupied data showed that unoccupied acoustic conditions affect the noise levels occurring during lessons. They were also related to the time spent in disruption to the lessons (e.g., students talking or shouting) and so may also have an impact upon student behavior in the classroom.

  8. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  9. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  10. Acoustical Considerations in Planning and Design of Library Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrightson, Denelle; Wrightson, John M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses acoustical demands in public libraries to consider during the design and construction process of new or renovated library space. Topics include intrusive noises; overly reverberant spaces; lack of speech privacy; sound transmission class; noise criteria; reverberation time and noise reduction coefficient; space planning; sound systems;…

  11. Combination of MVDR beamforming and single-channel spectral processing for enhancing noisy and reverberant speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Benjamin; Kodrasi, Ina; Rehr, Robert; Gerlach, Stephan; Jukić, Ante; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Goetze, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a system aiming at joint dereverberation and noise reduction by applying a combination of a beamformer with a single-channel spectral enhancement scheme. First, a minimum variance distortionless response beamformer with an online estimated noise coherence matrix is used to suppress noise and reverberation. The output of this beamformer is then processed by a single-channel spectral enhancement scheme, based on statistical room acoustics, minimum statistics, and temporal cepstrum smoothing, to suppress residual noise and reverberation. The evaluation is conducted using the REVERB challenge corpus, designed to evaluate speech enhancement algorithms in the presence of both reverberation and noise. The proposed system is evaluated using instrumental speech quality measures, the performance of an automatic speech recognition system, and a subjective evaluation of the speech quality based on a MUSHRA test. The performance achieved by beamforming, single-channel spectral enhancement, and their combination are compared, and experimental results show that the proposed system is effective in suppressing both reverberation and noise while improving the speech quality. The achieved improvements are particularly significant in conditions with high reverberation times.

  12. Effects of reverberation on brainstem representation of speech in musicians and non-musicians

    PubMed Central

    Bidelman, Gavin M.; Krishnan, Ananthanarayan

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual and neurophysiological enhancements in linguistic processing in musicians suggest that domain specific experience may enhance neural resources recruited for language specific behaviors. In everyday situations, listeners are faced with extracting speech signals in degraded listening conditions. Here, we examine whether musical training provides resilience to the degradative effects of reverberation on subcortical representations of pitch and formant-related harmonic information of speech. Brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) were recorded from musicians and non-musician controls in response to the vowel /i/ in four different levels of reverberation and analyzed based on their spectro-temporal composition. For both groups, reverberation had little effect on the neural encoding of pitch but significantly degraded neural encoding of formant-related harmonics (i.e., vowel quality) suggesting a differential impact on the source-filter components of speech. However, in quiet and across nearly all reverberation conditions, musicians showed more robust responses than non-musicians. Neurophysiologic results were confirmed behaviorally by comparing brainstem spectral magnitudes with perceptual measures of fundamental (F0) and first formant (F1) frequency difference limens (DLs). For both types of discrimination, musicians obtained DLs which were 2–4 times better than non-musicians. Results suggest that musicians’ enhanced neural encoding of acoustic features, an experience-dependent effect, is more resistant to reverberation degradation which may explain their enhanced perceptual ability on behaviorally relevant speech and/or music tasks in adverse listening conditions. PMID:20691672

  13. Activities of the Acoustical Society of America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    During the period covered by this grant report, the following accomplishments were achieved: (1) 10 new American National Standards were adopted and published; (2) Five International Standards were adopted as dual-numbered American National Standards and published; (3) Six draft American National Standards were balloted (not yet adopted or published); (4) Other National Standards Ballots were processed by the Secretariat; (5) US Positions on International Standards Activities processed by the Secretariat; (6) Reporting was conducted at conferences.

  14. Measuring and Modeling Sound Interference and Reverberation Time in Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumina, Kaitlyn; Martell, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Research shows that children, even those without hearing difficulties, are affected by poor classroom acoustics, especially children with hearing loss, learning disabilities, speech delay, and attention problems. Poor acoustics can come in a variety of forms, including destructive interference causing ``dead spots'' and extended Reverberation Times (RT), where echoes persist too long, interfering with further speech. In this research, I measured sound intensity at locations throughout three different types of classrooms at frequencies commonly associated with human speech to see what effect seating position has on intensity. I also used a program called Wave Cloud to model the time necessary for intensity to decrease by 60 decibels (RT50), both in idealized classrooms and in classrooms modeled on the ones I studied.

  15. An approximate form of the Rayleigh reflection loss and its phase: application to reverberation calculation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Chris H

    2010-07-01

    A useful approximation to the Rayleigh reflection coefficient for two half-spaces composed of water over sediment is derived. This exhibits dependence on angle that may deviate considerably from linear in the interval between grazing and critical. It shows that the non-linearity can be expressed as a separate function that multiplies the linear loss coefficient. This non-linearity term depends only on sediment density and does not depend on sediment sound speed or volume absorption. The non-linearity term tends to unity, i.e., the reflection loss becomes effectively linear, when the density ratio is about 1.27. The reflection phase in the same approximation leads to the well-known "effective depth" and "lateral shift." A class of closed-form reverberation (and signal-to-reverberation) expressions has already been developed [C. H. Harrison, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2744-2756 (2003); C. H. Harrison, J. Comput. Acoust. 13, 317-340 (2005); C. H. Harrison, IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 30, 660-675 (2005)]. The findings of this paper enable one to convert these reverberation expressions from simple linear loss to more general reflecting environments. Correction curves are calculated in terms of sediment density. These curves are applied to a test case taken from a recent ONR-funded Reverberation Workshop.

  16. Prediction of the influence of reverberation on binaural speech intelligibility in noise and in quiet.

    PubMed

    Rennies, Jan; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger

    2011-11-01

    Reverberation usually degrades speech intelligibility for spatially separated speech and noise sources since spatial unmasking is reduced and late reflections decrease the fidelity of the received speech signal. The latter effect could not satisfactorily be predicted by a recently presented binaural speech intelligibility model [Beutelmann et al. (2010). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 2479-2497]. This study therefore evaluated three extensions of the model to improve its predictions: (1) an extension of the speech intelligibility index based on modulation transfer functions, (2) a correction factor based on the room acoustical quantity "definition," and (3) a separation of the speech signal into useful and detrimental parts. The predictions were compared to results of two experiments in which speech reception thresholds were measured in a reverberant room in quiet and in the presence of a noise source for listeners with normal hearing. All extensions yielded better predictions than the original model when the influence of reverberation was strong, while predictions were similar for conditions with less reverberation. Although model (3) differed substantially in the assumed interaction of binaural processing and early reflections, its predictions were very similar to model (2) that achieved the best fit to the data.

  17. The influence of reverberation on spatial release of masking in consonant identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, Sasha; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.; Colburn, H. Steven

    2002-05-01

    This study investigates how reverberation influences spatial release of masking in consonant identification. HRTFs were measured in two rooms with different reverberation characteristics from sources directly in front of and to the right of the listener at a distance of 1 m. These two sets of room HRTFs and pseudo-anechoic HRTFs (time-windowing out the reverberation) were used to simulate a speech target and speech-shaped masker over headphones in two spatial configurations. In both configurations, the target was directly ahead of the listener; the masker was either directly ahead or 45° to the right of the listener. Subjects were asked to identify the initial or final consonant (one of 12 stop and fricative consonants) in CVC nonsense syllables for different target-to-masker levels. Each spatial configuration and room condition was tested using binaural, monaural-left, and monaural-right headphone presentations. Consonant confusion matrices are analyzed to determine how specific acoustic features of consonants in different frequency regions are affected by reverberation and noise. Comparisons across the different conditions reveal how binaural and spatial cues influence consonant identification and how different acoustic environments affect both monaural and binaural performance. [Work supported in part by AFOSR Grant Nos. F49620-01-1-0005 and F49620-98-1-0442.

  18. Photometric reverberation mapping of 3C 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo Nuñez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Westhues, C.; Bruckmann, C.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Steenbrugge, K.; Murphy, M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of a five month monitoring campaign of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) 3C 120. Observations with a median sampling of two days were conducted with the robotic 15 cm telescope VYSOS-6 located near Cerro Armazones in Chile. Broad band (B, V) and narrow band (NB) filters were used in order to measure fluxes of the AGN and the Hβ broad line region (BLR) emission line. The NB flux is constituted by about 50% continuum and 50% Hβ emission line. To disentangle line and continuum flux, a synthetic Hβ light curve was created by subtracting a scaled V-band light curve from the NB light curve. Here we show that the Hβ emission line responds to continuum variations with a rest frame lag of 23.6 ± 1.69 days. We estimate a virial mass of the central black hole MBH = 57 ± 27 × 106 M⊙, by combining the obtained lag with the velocity dispersion of a single contemporaneous spectrum. Using the flux variation gradient method, we determined the host galaxy subtracted rest frame 5100 Å luminosity at the time of our monitoring campaign with an uncertainty of 10% (LAGN = (6.94 ± 0.71) × 1043 erg s-1). Compared with recent spectroscopic reverberation results, 3C 120 shifts in the RBLR - LAGN diagram remarkably close to the theoretically expected relation of R ∝ L0.5. Our results demonstrate the performance of photometric AGN reverberation mapping, in particular for efficiently determining the BLR size and the AGN luminosity. Table 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Facts and reflections on thalamocortical reverberation of impulses.

    PubMed

    Narikashvili, S P

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on cats, either unanesthetized or anesthetized with various doses of pentobarbital, showed that the cortical rhythmic after-discharge ("slow after-activity"), which has been regarded as a manifestation of reverberation of impulses in thalamocortical circuits [17], consists of a burst of spontaneous "spindles" evoked by stimulation. This conclusion is supported by the following facts: Spontaneous "spindles" and the rhythmic after-discharge respond absolutely identically (disappear) to activation of the EEG and deepening of pentobarbital anesthesia. The absence of thalamocortical reverberation is also indicated by the preservation of a rhythmic after-discharge (to clicks), synchronous with the cortex, in the thalamic relay nucleus (the medial geniculate body) after cooling or after removal of its projection zone.

  20. Classroom acoustics and intervention strategies to enhance the learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Christal

    The classroom environment can be an acoustically difficult atmosphere for students to learn effectively, sometimes due in part to poor acoustical properties. Noise and reverberation have a substantial influence on room acoustics and subsequently intelligibility of speech. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA, 1995) developed minimal standards for noise and reverberation in a classroom for the purpose of providing an adequate listening environment. A lack of adherence to these standards may have undesirable consequences, which may lead to poor academic performance. The purpose of this capstone project is to develop a protocol to measure the acoustical properties of reverberation time and noise levels in elementary classrooms and present the educators with strategies to improve the learning environment. Noise level and reverberation will be measured and recorded in seven, unoccupied third grade classrooms in Lincoln Parish in North Louisiana. The recordings will occur at six specific distances in the classroom to simulate teacher and student positions. The recordings will be compared to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards for noise and reverberation. If discrepancies are observed, the primary investigator will serve as an auditory consultant for the school and educators to recommend remediation and intervention strategies to improve these acoustical properties. The hypothesis of the study is that the classroom acoustical properties of noise and reverberation will exceed the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards; therefore, the auditory consultant will provide strategies to improve those acoustical properties.

  1. Acoustic Aspects of Active-Twist Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2002-01-01

    The use of an Active Twist Rotor system to provide both vibration reduction and performance enhancement has been explored in recent analytical and experimental studies. Effects of active-twist control on rotor noise, however, had not been determined. During a recent wind tunnel test of an active-twist rotor system, a set of acoustic measurements were obtained to assess the effects of active-twist control on noise produced by the rotor, especially blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. It was found that for rotor operating conditions where BVI noise is dominant, active-twist control provided a reduction in BVI noise level. This BVI noise reduction was almost, but not quite, as large as that obtained in a similar test using HHC. However, vibration levels were usually adversely affected at operating conditions favoring minimum BVI noise. Conversely, operating conditions favoring minimum vibration levels affected BVI noise levels, but not always adversely.

  2. Objective and subjective evaluation of the acoustic comfort in classrooms.

    PubMed

    Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta; Marcon, Carolina Reich

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic comfort of classrooms in a Brazilian public school has been evaluated through interviews with 62 teachers and 464 pupils, measurements of background noise, reverberation time, and sound insulation. Acoustic measurements have revealed the poor acoustic quality of the classrooms. Results have shown that teachers and pupils consider the noise generated and the voice of the teacher in neighboring classrooms as the main sources of annoyance inside the classroom. Acoustic simulations resulted in the suggestion of placement of perforated plywood on the ceiling, for reduction in reverberation time and increase in the acoustic comfort of the classrooms.

  3. A model for reverberating circuits with controlled feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vanessa de Freitas; de Castro, Maria Clícia Stelling; Wedemann, Roseli Suzi; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2015-12-01

    We studied the behavior of a mathematic-computational model for a reverberating neuronal circuit with controlled feedback, verifying the output pattern of the circuit, by means simulations using a program in language C++. Using values obtained from surveying the literature from animal experiments, we observed that the model was able to reproduce the polissynaptic activity of a neuron group of a vigil rat, with looping time of three neurons of the order of magnitude of 102 ms.

  4. AGN STORM: A Leap Forward In Reverberation Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Bontà, Elena; AGN STORM Team

    2016-10-01

    Reverberation mapping is a tomographic technique that can be used to determine the structure and kinematics of the broad- line emitting region at the center of active galactic nuclei. By-products of these investigations are the masses of the central black holes and information about the structure of the accretion disk. I will show some of the most recent results from the AGN Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping (AGN STORM) project, which was built around 180 daily observations of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on Hubble Space Telescope. AGN STORM included observations made with Swift, XMM, and several ground-based telescopes, including the 1.22-m telescope at Asiago Observatory. Elena Dalla Bonta` on behalf of the AGN STORM Team.

  5. Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure Timothy K. Stanton Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Woods Hole...understand the acoustic reverberation properties of zooplankton and microstructure. The results will lead to improved capability in 1) predicting sonar...performance and 2) use of sonars in the mapping of the zooplankton and microstructure. OBJECTIVES To understand the physics of the scattering by

  6. Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-30

    Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure Timothy K. Stanton Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Woods Hole...understand the acoustic reverberation properties of zooplankton and microstructure. The results will lead to improved capability in 1) predicting sonar...performance and 2) use of sonars in the mapping of the zooplankton and microstructure. OBJECTIVES To understand the physics of the scattering by

  7. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    of buried mines and improve SONAR performance in shallow water. OBJECTIVES 1) Determination of the correct physical model of acoustic propagation...Measurements for Range Dependent Geoacoustic Parameters: Bottom loss data from 5 – 30 kHz were collected as part of the Target and Reverberation Experiment...2013 (TREX13). These data were analyzed and range dependent geoacoustic parameters were derived for the TREX reverberation site including bottom loss

  8. Analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Arun; Jat, K. L.

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma has been reported. In the present analytical investigation, the lattice displacement, acousto-optical polarization, susceptibility, acousto-optical gain constant arising due to the induced nonlinear current density and acousto-optical process are deduced in an acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma using the hydrodynamical model of plasma and coupled mode scheme. The influence of wave number and magnetic field has been explored. The analysis has been applied to centrosymmetric crystal. Numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystal duly irradiated by a frequency doubled 10.6 µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is found that lattice displacement, susceptibility and acousto-optical gain increase linearly with incident wave number and applied dc magnetic field, while decrease with scattering angle. The gain also increases with electric amplitude of incident laser beam. Results are found to be well in agreement with available literature.

  9. Transport Theory for Propagation and Reverberation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-20

    two days are shown in Figure 8, where the 2 wide reverberation track at a bearing centered on 129 is shown by the magenta line. These wave spectra...wave field that is confined more narrowly about a bearing perpendicular to the reverberation track. At least, that is how it appears based on the...Initially, this directional frequency spectrum appeared promising, because the higher spectral levels appear more concentrated about a bearing

  10. Transport Theory for Propagation and Reverberation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-30

    scattering, though comprising a relatively small fraction of the total energy, can significantly impact the reverberation level. The available...included with small -scale boundary roughness ignored. Even the simple expedient of using a loss at the boundary to approximately account for boundary...considered a point source or receiver, the contributions to reverberation arise from a circular annulus , and directional aspects of the wave field will not

  11. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Carrier bandwidth effects and binaural versus monaural comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Collecchia, Regina; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 12, 050005 (2011)] has reported that for a broadband noise carrier signal in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the broadband acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. Interpretation of this result was complicated by the fact that acoustical MTFs of rooms are often quite different for different carrier frequency regions, and listeners may have selectively responded to advantageous carrier frequency regions where the effective acoustic modulation loss due to the room was less than indicated by a broadband acoustic MTF analysis. Here, AM sensitivity testing and acoustic MTF analyses were expanded to include narrowband noise carriers (1-octave and 1/3-octave bands centered at 4 kHz), as well as monaural and binaural listening conditions. Narrowband results were found to be consistent with broadband results: In a reverberant sound field, human AM sensitivity is higher than indicated by the acoustical MTFs. The effect was greatest for modulation frequencies above 32 Hz and was present whether the stimulation was monaural or binaural. These results are suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening. PMID:23437416

  12. Prediction of reverberation time and speech transmission index in long enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai Ming; Lam, Pou Man

    2005-06-01

    It is known that the sound field in a long space is not diffuse, and that the classic theory of room acoustics is not applicable. A theoretical model is developed for the prediction of reverberation time and speech transmission index in rectangular long enclosures, such as corridors and train stations, where the acoustic quality is important for speech. The model is based on an image-source method, and both acoustically hard and impedance boundaries are investigated. An approximate analytical solution is used to predict the frequency response of the sound field. The reverberation time is determined from the decay curve which is computed by a reverse-time integration of the squared impulse response. The angle-dependence of reflection coefficients of the boundaries and the change of phase upon reflection are incorporated in this model. Due to the relatively long distance of sound propagation, the effect of atmospheric absorption is also considered. Measurements of reverberation time and speech transmission index taken from a real tunnel, a corridor, and a model tunnel are presented. The theoretical predictions are found to agree well with the experimental data. An application of the proposed model has been suggested. .

  13. Evaluation of free-field transfer functions in anomalous reverberant fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guo; He, Lin; Xu, Rongwu

    2017-01-01

    The structural-acoustic transfer functions of complex structures are often measured in anomalous reverberant environments. Aiming to eliminating the influences of these reverberant fields on structural-acoustic transfer functions, an impulse-based synchronization average evaluation method is proposed. Structures are actuated according to an impulse signal, and the response signals are synchronized in time and averaged in space. This method does not require complex data processing, and the free-field transfer functions can be obtained based on the measurements in reverberant fields and the transfer characteristics of the structures are preserved. Moreover, in combination with the principle of reciprocity, the proposed method does not require the installation of impulse actuators in structures. The proposed method is verified numerically and validated in a deep lake experiment using a cylindrical model. The results show that the structural-acoustic transfer functions in the profundal zone can be effectively evaluated using the data collected in the shallow zone, and the error is less than 3 dB at most frequencies.

  14. THE ACOUSTIC CUTOFF FREQUENCY OF THE SUN AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A.; Palle, P. L.; Garcia, R. A.

    2011-12-20

    The acoustic cutoff frequency-the highest frequency for acoustic solar eigenmodes-is an important parameter of the solar atmosphere as it determines the upper boundary of the p-mode resonant cavities. At frequencies beyond this value, acoustic disturbances are no longer trapped but are traveling waves. Interference among them gives rise to higher-frequency peaks-the pseudomodes-in the solar acoustic spectrum. The pseudomodes are shifted slightly in frequency with respect to p-modes, making possible the use of pseudomodes to determine the acoustic cutoff frequency. Using data from the GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, we calculate the acoustic cutoff frequency using the coherence function between both the velocity and intensity sets of data. By using data gathered by these instruments during the entire lifetime of the mission (1996 until the present), a variation in the acoustic cutoff frequency with the solar magnetic activity cycle is found.

  15. Simulations of the OzDES AGN reverberation mapping project

    SciTech Connect

    King, Anthea L.; Martini, Paul; Davis, Tamara M.; Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Skielboe, Andreas; Vestergaard, Marianne; Huff, Eric; Watson, Darach; Banerji, Manda; McMahon, Richard; Sharp, Rob; Lidman, C.

    2015-08-26

    As part of the Australian spectroscopic dark energy survey (OzDES) we are carrying out a large-scale reverberation mapping study of ~500 quasars over five years in the 30 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova fields. These quasars have redshifts ranging up to 4 and have apparent AB magnitudes between 16.8 mag < r < 22.5 mag. The aim of the survey is to measure time lags between fluctuations in the quasar continuum and broad emission-line fluxes of individual objects in order to measure black hole masses for a broad range of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and constrain the radius–luminosity (R–L) relationship. Here we investigate the expected efficiency of the OzDES reverberation mapping campaign and its possible extensions. We expect to recover lags for ~35–45 % of the quasars. AGN with shorter lags and greater variability are more likely to yield a lag measurement, and objects with lags ≲6 months or ~1 yr are expected to be recovered the most accurately. The baseline OzDES reverberation mapping campaign is predicted to produce an unbiased measurement of the R–L relationship parameters for Hβ, MgIIλ2798, and C IVλ1549. As a result, extending the baseline survey by either increasing the spectroscopic cadence, extending the survey season, or improving the emission-line flux measurement accuracy will significantly improve the R–L parameter constraints for all broad emission lines.

  16. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  17. Modified acoustic transmission tube apparatus incorporating an active downstream termination.

    PubMed

    Machuca-Tzili, F Arturo; Orduña-Bustamante, Felipe; Pérez-López, Antonio; Pérez-Ruiz, Santiago J; Pérez-Matzumoto, Andrés E

    2017-02-01

    Current techniques for measuring normal incidence sound transmission loss with a modified impedance tube, or transmission tube, require setting up two different absorbing termination loads at the end of the downstream tube [ASTM E2611-09, Standard Test Method for Measurement of Normal Incidence Sound Transmission of Acoustical Materials Based on the Transfer Matrix Method (American Society for Testing and Materials, West Conshohocken, 2009)]. The process of physically handling the two required passive absorbing loads is a possible source of measurement errors, which are mainly due to changes in sample test position, or in test setup re-assembly, between measurements. In this paper, a modified transmission tube apparatus is proposed for non-intrusively changing the downstream acoustic load by means of a combined passive-active termination. It provides a controlled variable sound absorption which simplifies the setup of standard two-load techniques, without the need of physically handling the apparatus during the tests. This virtually eliminates the risk of errors associated with the physical manipulation of the two passive terminations. Transmission loss measurements in some representative test conditions are reported, showing improvements over current implementations, in reducing by approximately 50% the measurement variations associated with the setup of the two required absorbing terminations. Measurement results agree within 0.4 dB (maximum difference in high resolution broadband), and 0.04 dB (mean difference in 1/3-octave bands), with those obtained using standard passive two-load methods.

  18. Acoustical Modifications for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandell, Carl C.; Smaldino, Joseph J.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews procedures for evaluating, measuring, and modifying noise and reverberation levels in the classroom environment. Recommendations include: relocating children away from high noise sources, such as fans, air conditioners, heating ducts, and faulty lighting fixtures, using sound-absorbing materials, using acoustical ceiling tile…

  19. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Effects of prior listening exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Anderson, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 15, 050002 (2012)] has reported that for both broadband and narrowband noise carrier signals in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. These results may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening, although many details of this enhancement effect are unknown. Given recent findings that demonstrate improvements in speech understanding with prior exposure to reverberant listening environments, it is of interest to determine whether listening exposure to a reverberant room might also influence AM detection in the room, and perhaps contribute to the AM enhancement effect. Here, AM detection thresholds were estimated (using an adaptive 2-alternative forced-choice procedure) in each of two listening conditions: one in which consistent listening exposure to a particular room was provided, and a second that intentionally disrupted listening exposure by varying the room from trial-to-trial. Results suggest that consistent prior listening exposure contributes to enhanced AM sensitivity in rooms. [Work supported by the NIH/NIDCD.] PMID:24163718

  20. Experimental investigation of the effects of the acoustical conditions in a simulated classroom on speech recognition and learning in children.

    PubMed

    Valente, Daniel L; Plevinsky, Hallie M; Franco, John M; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth C; Lewis, Dawna E

    2012-01-01

    The potential effects of acoustical environment on speech understanding are especially important as children enter school where students' ability to hear and understand complex verbal information is critical to learning. However, this ability is compromised because of widely varied and unfavorable classroom acoustics. The extent to which unfavorable classroom acoustics affect children's performance on longer learning tasks is largely unknown as most research has focused on testing children using words, syllables, or sentences as stimuli. In the current study, a simulated classroom environment was used to measure comprehension performance of two classroom learning activities: a discussion and lecture. Comprehension performance was measured for groups of elementary-aged students in one of four environments with varied reverberation times and background noise levels. The reverberation time was either 0.6 or 1.5 s, and the signal-to-noise level was either +10 or +7 dB. Performance is compared to adult subjects as well as to sentence-recognition in the same condition. Significant differences were seen in comprehension scores as a function of age and condition; both increasing background noise and reverberation degraded performance in comprehension tasks compared to minimal differences in measures of sentence-recognition.

  1. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure.

  2. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2004-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  3. Activating Molecules, Ions, and Solid Particles with Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects. PMID:24747272

  4. Activating molecules, ions, and solid particles with acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2014-04-11

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects.

  5. Broadband Acoustic Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    shallow water 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to...claims to the contrary in the ocean acoustics community, sub-bottom clutter can and does occur in shallow water environments. A step-by-step detailed...that of the overlying water column and hence there is no critical angle. Thus, the reflection, scattering, propagation and reverberation are

  6. The underwater acoustic activities of the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Buscaino, Giuseppa; Filiciotto, Francesco; Buffa, Gaspare; Di Stefano, Vincenzo; Maccarrone, Vincenzo; Buscaino, Carmelo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Alonge, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Stefania; Maccarrone, Vincenzo

    2012-09-01

    This study describes the underwater acoustic behavior of the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The study was conducted both in a tank and in the natural environment. The tank was equipped with video and acoustic recording systems. Observations were conducted to identify the underwater acoustic signals produced and their association with behavioral events and the movement status of the animals. In a lake in a natural reserve, a remote acoustic recording station was used to study the circadian underwater acoustic activity of the crayfish and to assess the acoustic features of the signals. The red swamp crayfish produces irregular trains of wide-band pulses (duration 0.4 ms, SPL(PK) 128 dB re 1 μPa, peak frequency 28 kHz, bandwidth(RMS) 20 kHz). The production of signals is positively related to intraspecific interactions (encounter/approach, fighting and successive Tail Flips). In the natural environment, acoustic activity is almost absent during the day, increases abruptly at sunset and continues until dawn. This study reveals the previously unknown underwater acoustic signals of Procambarus clarkii and the potential of passive acoustic methods to monitor the presence, the abundance and the behavioral activities of this invasive species.

  7. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  8. Architectural Acoustics in Residences for Adults with Mental Retardation and Its Relation to Perceived Homelikeness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egli, Mark; Roper, Todd; Feurer, Irene; Thompson, Travis

    1999-01-01

    Acoustical characteristics of 18 residences for people with mental retardation were evaluated and compared to ratings of room photographs for apparent homelikeness. Reverberation times in living and dining rooms were negatively correlated with mean homelikeness ratings. High reverberation rates were the result of insufficient sound absorption by…

  9. Passive acoustic monitoring of human physiology during activity indicates health and performance of soldiers and firefighters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory has developed a unique gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor that has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin. This facilitates the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repels ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. The sensor's sensitivity and bandwidth produce excellent signatures for detection and spectral analysis of diverse physiological events. Acoustic signal processing detects heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. Comfortable acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Noise-canceling sensor arrays help remove out-of-phase motion noise and enhance covariant physiology by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and two additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist acoustic sensors will indicate systolic blood pressure. Larger torso-sized arrays can be used to acoustically inspect the lungs and heart, or built into beds for sleep monitoring. Acoustics is an excellent input for sensor fusion.

  10. BROADBAND PHOTOMETRIC REVERBERATION MAPPING OF NGC 4395

    SciTech Connect

    Edri, Haim; Rafter, Stephen E.; Kaspi, Shai; Behar, Ehud; Chelouche, Doron E-mail: shai@physics.technion.ac.il E-mail: doron@sci.haifa.ac.il

    2012-09-01

    We present results of broadband photometric reverberation mapping (RM) to measure the radius of the broad-line region, and subsequently the black hole mass (M{sub BH}), in the nearby, low-luminosity active galactic nuclei NGC 4395. Using the Wise Observatory's 1 m telescope equipped with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey g', r', and i' broadband filters, we monitored NGC 4395 for nine consecutive nights and obtained three light curves each with over 250 data points. The g' and r' bands include time variable contributions from H{beta} and H{alpha}, respectively, plus continuum. The i' band is free of broad lines and covers exclusively continuum. We show that by looking for a peak in the difference between the cross-correlation and the auto-correlation functions for all combinations of filters, we can get a reliable estimate of the time lag necessary to compute M{sub BH}. We measure the time lag for H{alpha} to be 3.6 {+-} 0.8 hr, comparable to previous studies using the line-resolved spectroscopic RM method. We argue that this lag implies a black hole mass of M{sub BH} = (4.9 {+-} 2.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }.

  11. Neural Segregation of Concurrent Speech: Effects of Background Noise and Reverberation on Auditory Scene Analysis in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sayles, Mark; Stasiak, Arkadiusz; Winter, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent complex sounds (e.g., two voices speaking at once) are perceptually disentangled into separate "auditory objects". This neural processing often occurs in the presence of acoustic-signal distortions from noise and reverberation (e.g., in a busy restaurant). A difference in periodicity between sounds is a strong segregation cue under quiet, anechoic conditions. However, noise and reverberation exert differential effects on speech intelligibility under "cocktail-party" listening conditions. Previous neurophysiological studies have concentrated on understanding auditory scene analysis under ideal listening conditions. Here, we examine the effects of noise and reverberation on periodicity-based neural segregation of concurrent vowels /a/ and /i/, in the responses of single units in the guinea-pig ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN): the first processing station of the auditory brain stem. In line with human psychoacoustic data, we find reverberation significantly impairs segregation when vowels have an intonated pitch contour, but not when they are spoken on a monotone. In contrast, noise impairs segregation independent of intonation pattern. These results are informative for models of speech processing under ecologically valid listening conditions, where noise and reverberation abound.

  12. Effectiveness of dereverberation, feature transformation, discriminative training methods, and system combination approach for various reverberant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachioka, Yuuki; Narita, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Shinji

    2015-12-01

    The recently released REverberant Voice Enhancement and Recognition Benchmark (REVERB) challenge includes a reverberant automatic speech recognition (ASR) task. This paper describes our proposed system based on multi-channel speech enhancement preprocessing and state-of-the-art ASR techniques. For preprocessing, we propose a single-channel dereverberation method with reverberation time estimation, which is combined with multichannel beamforming that enhances direct sound compared with the reflected sound. In addition, this paper also focuses on state-of-the-art ASR techniques such as discriminative training of acoustic models including the Gaussian mixture model, subspace Gaussian mixture model, and deep neural networks, as well as various feature transformation techniques. Although, for the REVERB challenge, it is necessary to handle various acoustic environments, a single ASR system tends to be overly tuned for a specific environment, which degrades the performance in the mismatch environments. To overcome this mismatch problem with a single ASR system, we use a system combination approach using multiple ASR systems with different features and different model types because a combination of various systems that have different error patterns is beneficial. In particular, we use our discriminative training technique for system combination that achieves better generalization by making systems complementary with the modified discriminative criteria. Experiments show the effectiveness of these approaches, reaching 6.76 and 18.60 % word error rates on the REVERB simulated and real test sets. These are 68.8 and 61.5 % relative improvements over the baseline.

  13. The effective air absorption coefficient for predicting reverberation time in full octave bands.

    PubMed

    Wenmaekers, R H C; Hak, C C J M; Hornikx, M C J

    2014-12-01

    A substantial amount of research has been devoted to producing a calculation model for air absorption for pure tones. However, most statistical and geometrical room acoustic prediction models calculate the reverberation time in full octave bands in accordance with ISO 3382-1 (International Organization for Standardization, 2009). So far, the available methods that allow calculation of air absorption in octave bands have not been investigated for room acoustic applications. In this paper, the effect of air absorption on octave band reverberation time calculations is investigated based on calculations. It is found that the approximation method, as described in the standard ANSI S1.26 (American National Standards Institute, 1995), fails to estimate accurate decay curves for full octave bands. In this paper, a method is used to calculate the energy decay curve in rooms based on a summation of pure tones within the band. From this decay curve, which is found to be slightly concave upwards, T20 and T30 can be determined. For different conditions, an effective intensity attenuation coefficient mB ;eff for the full octave bands has been calculated. This mB ;eff can be used for reverberation time calculations, if results are to be compared with T20 or T30 measurements. Also, guidelines are given for the air absorption correction of decay curves, measured in a scale model.

  14. On the angular error of intensity vector based direction of arrival estimation in reverberant sound fields.

    PubMed

    Levin, Dovid; Habets, Emanuël A P; Gannot, Sharon

    2010-10-01

    An acoustic vector sensor provides measurements of both the pressure and particle velocity of a sound field in which it is placed. These measurements are vectorial in nature and can be used for the purpose of source localization. A straightforward approach towards determining the direction of arrival (DOA) utilizes the acoustic intensity vector, which is the product of pressure and particle velocity. The accuracy of an intensity vector based DOA estimator in the presence of noise has been analyzed previously. In this paper, the effects of reverberation upon the accuracy of such a DOA estimator are examined. It is shown that particular realizations of reverberation differ from an ideal isotropically diffuse field, and induce an estimation bias which is dependent upon the room impulse responses (RIRs). The limited knowledge available pertaining the RIRs is expressed statistically by employing the diffuse qualities of reverberation to extend Polack's statistical RIR model. Expressions for evaluating the typical bias magnitude as well as its probability distribution are derived.

  15. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  16. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1995-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the period 1 Oct. 1995 - 30 Sept. 1996. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics and high lift modeling studies. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the high lift activities.

  17. Volcano acoustic activity associated with the eruption of Mt. Usu, 2000 - Mud-pool Strombolian -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, H.; Oshima, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2001-12-01

    There was intense acoustic activity associated with the eruption of Mount Usu, which began on March 31, 2000. Repeating phreatic explosions generated many isolated infrasonic signals, which were observed at plural acoustic stations. During the periods when acoustic activity was high, infrasonic pulses as many as 200 were identified every 10 minutes. Source location of infrasonic signals could be well identified from the records of the low frequency microphone network. Two active craters, Nishiyama craterlets and Konpirayama craterlets, are clearly distinguished by sound source determination analysis though distance between them is around 1 km. To investigate the transition of acoustic activity from April to June, 2000, we contrive a method to detect arrival and amplitude of infrasonic signals automatically. The number of automatically identified infrasonic signals exceeds 1.46 million during three months. It seems that there is a good correlation between acoustic activity and seismic signal amplitude. Patterns of acoustic activity and infrasonic pulse shapes observed at Usu volcano are very similar to those of observed at Stromboli volcano, Italy. We name the acoustic activity accompanied with phreatic explosion that scatters a lot of clods `mud-pool Strombolian type'. Phreatic explosion excites not only infrasonic pulse but also seismic signal observed before the arrival of infrasonic pulse. Existence of Rayleigh wave phase with large amplitude suggests that the seismic wave is excited at a shallow part.

  18. Active structural acoustic control using the remote sensor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is an effective method of reducing the sound radiation from vibrating structures. In order to implement ASAC systems using only structural actuators and sensors, it is necessary to employ a model of the sound radiation from the structure. Such models have been presented in the literature for simple structures, such as baffled rectangular plates, and methods of determining the radiation modes of more complex practical structures using experimental data have also been explored. A similar problem arises in the context of active noise control, where cancellation of a disturbance is required at positions in space where it is not possible to locate a physical error microphone. In this case the signals at the cancellation points can be estimated from the outputs of remotely located measurement sensors using the “remote microphone method”. This remote microphone method is extended here to the ASAC problem, in which the pressures at a number of microphone locations must be estimated from measurements on the structure of the radiating system. The control and estimation strategies are described and the performance is assessed for a typical structural radiation problem.

  19. New theory on the reverberation of rooms. [considering sound wave travel time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujolle, J.

    1974-01-01

    The inadequacy of the various theories which have been proposed for finding the reverberation time of rooms can be explained by an attempt to examine what might occur at a listening point when image sources of determined acoustic power are added to the actual source. The number and locations of the image sources are stipulated. The intensity of sound at the listening point can be calculated by means of approximations whose conditions for validity are given. This leads to the proposal of a new expression for the reverberation time, yielding results which fall between those obtained through use of the Eyring and Millington formulae; these results are made to depend on the shape of the room by means of a new definition of the mean free path.

  20. Acoustical evaluation of carbonized and activated cotton nonwovens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, N; Chen, J Y; Parikh, D V

    2009-12-01

    An activated carbon fiber nonwoven (ACF) was manufactured from a cotton nonwoven fabric. For the ACF acoustic application, a nonwoven composite of ACF with cotton nonwoven as a base layer was developed. Also produced were the composites of the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of glassfiber nonwoven, and the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of cotton fiber nonwoven. Their noise absorption coefficients and sound transmission loss were measured using the Brüel and Kjaer impedance tube instrument. Statistical significance of the differences between the composites was tested using the method of Duncan's grouping. The study concluded that the ACF composite exhibited a greater ability to absorb normal incidence sound waves than the composites with either glassfiber or cotton fiber. The analysis of sound transmission loss revealed that the three composites still obeyed the mass law of transmission loss. The composite with the surface layer of cotton fiber nonwoven possessed a higher fabric density and therefore showed a better sound insulation than the composites with glassfiber and ACF.

  1. Bubble-based acoustic micropropulsors: active surfaces and mixers.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Nicolas; Spelman, Tamsin A; Combriat, Thomas; Hue, Hervé; Stéphan, Olivier; Lauga, Eric; Marmottant, Philippe

    2017-04-11

    Acoustic micropropulsors present great potential for microfluidic applications. The propulsion is based on encapsulated 20 μm bubbles excited by a contacless ultrasonic transducer. The vibrating bubbles then generate a powerful streaming flow, with speeds 1-100 mm s(-1) in water, through the action of viscous stresses. In this paper we introduce a full toolbox of micropropulsors using a versatile three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication setup. Doublets and triplets of propulsors are introduced, and the flows they generate are predicted by a theoretical hydrodynamic model. We then introduce whole surfaces covered with propulsors, which we term active surfaces. These surfaces are excited by a single ultrasonic wave, can generate collective flows and may be harnessed for mixing purposes. Several patterns of propulsors are tested, and the flows produced by the two most efficient mixers are predicted by a simple theoretical model based on flow singularities. In particular, the vortices generated by the most efficient pattern, an L-shaped mixer, are analysed in detail.

  2. Experimental investigation of the effects of the acoustical conditions in a simulated classroom on speech recognition and learning in children a

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Daniel L.; Plevinsky, Hallie M.; Franco, John M.; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth C.; Lewis, Dawna E.

    2012-01-01

    The potential effects of acoustical environment on speech understanding are especially important as children enter school where students’ ability to hear and understand complex verbal information is critical to learning. However, this ability is compromised because of widely varied and unfavorable classroom acoustics. The extent to which unfavorable classroom acoustics affect children’s performance on longer learning tasks is largely unknown as most research has focused on testing children using words, syllables, or sentences as stimuli. In the current study, a simulated classroom environment was used to measure comprehension performance of two classroom learning activities: a discussion and lecture. Comprehension performance was measured for groups of elementary-aged students in one of four environments with varied reverberation times and background noise levels. The reverberation time was either 0.6 or 1.5 s, and the signal-to-noise level was either +10 or +7 dB. Performance is compared to adult subjects as well as to sentence-recognition in the same condition. Significant differences were seen in comprehension scores as a function of age and condition; both increasing background noise and reverberation degraded performance in comprehension tasks compared to minimal differences in measures of sentence-recognition. PMID:22280587

  3. High Intensity Radiation Laboratory Reverberation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo depicts the interior of the large Reverberation Chamber located in the High Intensity, Radiation Facility (HIRL). These chambers are used to test susceptibility of aircraft avionics systems responses to high intensity radiated fields. These resources include a Gigahertz Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (GTEM), which provides a uniform field of up to 1000V/m from 10 kHz to 18 Ghz.

  4. Space Power Facility Reverberation Chamber Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Catherine C.; Dolesh, Robert J.; Garrett, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the process and results of calibrating the Space Environmental Test EMI Test facility at NASA Plum Brook Space Power Facility according to the specifications of IEC61000-4-21 for susceptibility testing from 100 MHz to 40 GHz. The chamber passed the field uniformity test, in both the empty and loaded conditions, making it the world's largest Reverberation Chamber.

  5. Acoustic emission spectra and sonochemical activity in a 36 kHz sonoreactor.

    PubMed

    Son, Younggyu; Lim, Myunghee; Khim, Jeehyeong; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-01-01

    During ultrasound-induced cavitation in liquids, acoustic emissions at fundamental and harmonic frequencies can be detected. The effect of acoustic emissions at harmonic frequencies on the sonochemical and sonophysical activities has not been explored, especially in large-scale sonoreactors. In this study, the acoustic emissions in the range, 0-250 kHz in a 36 kHz sonoreactor with varying liquid heights were studied and compared with the sonochemical activities. The acoustic pressures at both fundamental and harmonics decreased drastically as the liquid height was increased due to the attenuation of sound energy. It was observed that the increase in input power resulted in only an increase in the acoustic emissions at derivative frequencies such as, harmonics and subharmonics. The sonochemical activity, evaluated in terms of sonochemiluminescence and H2O2 yield, was not significantly enhanced at higher input power levels. This suggests that at higher power levels, the "extra" acoustic energy is not effectively used to generate primary cavitation activity; rather it is converted to generate acoustic emissions at harmonic and subharmonic frequencies. This is an important observation for the design of energy efficiency large-scale sonochemical reactors.

  6. Virtual reflections in electronic acoustic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Munster, Bjorn

    2005-09-01

    In the era of the ancient Greeks and Byzantines, the first attempts for increasing reverberation time are noted. In the 1950s, the Ambiophonic system accomplished this by means of an electronic device, for the first time. The early systems only increased the reverberation time by delaying the picked-up reverberation. With the introduction of multichannel feedback-based systems, the reverberation level also could be increased. Later, it was understood that it was important to also fill in the missing reflections, address reflection density, frequency dependence, etc. This resulted in the development of the SIAP concept. Current DSP technology led to the development of a processor whereby density, length, level, and the frequency content can be controlled for different areas in the same room or different rooms, leading to the concept of the acoustic server. electronic acoustic architecture has become the current state-of-the-art approach for solving acoustic deficiencies in, among others, rehearsal rooms, theaters, churches, and multipurpose venues. Incorporation of complementary passive acoustic solutions provides an optimum solution for all room problems. This paper discusses the utilization of virtual reflections in the new approach of electronic acoustic architecture for different environments. Measurements performed in the Sejong Performing Arts Centre, Seoul, South Korea, show the power of this approach.

  7. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  8. Acoustical considerations for secondary uses of government facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jack B.

    2003-10-01

    Government buildings are by their nature, public and multi-functional. Whether in meetings, presentations, documentation processing, work instructions or dispatch, speech communications are critical. Full-time occupancy facilities may require sleep or rest areas adjacent to active spaces. Rooms designed for some other primary use may be used for public assembly, receptions or meetings. In addition, environmental noise impacts to the building or from the building should be considered, especially where adjacent to hospitals, hotels, apartments or other urban sensitive land uses. Acoustical criteria and design parameters for reverberation, background noise and sound isolation should enhance speech intelligibility and privacy. This presentation looks at unusual spaces and unexpected uses of spaces with regard to room acoustics and noise control. Examples of various spaces will be discussed, including an atrium used for reception and assembly, multi-jurisdictional (911) emergency control center, frequent or long-duration use of emergency generators, renovations of historically significant buildings, and the juxtaposition of acoustically incompatible functions. Brief case histories of acoustical requirements, constraints and design solutions will be presented, including acoustical measurements, plan illustrations and photographs. Acoustical criteria for secondary functional uses of spaces will be proposed.

  9. Computer Modeling of Direct Path, Backscattered Bottom Reverberations for the Acoustic Reverberation Special Research Program (ARSRP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    34 .. .:. ..... . . ... H3Od KV38 F-0 (cc .ILI 0 L) C7C) LS..i~i *Q p a 5 -- ,s g v -J -J C)c Z1 E~ KV3 K’o - S.- ’ " , ’ , ~~.. .... ..... . ......., , -inn *Q o c "<g - aa...a -IC) | *."I I I I!-) Sa ao <o o3~ INY3U U) CQC CC) -C0 r- 0 - CD C> CC CC)) ZJ3M~d KV3 ct: Loo 00 00 CE~ ~ ~ ..... 43~ NV3 C’,) I 0 I

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  11. Observational Requirements for High-Fidelity Reverberation Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Keith; Peterson, Bradley M.; Collier, Stefan J.; Netzer, Hagai

    2004-01-01

    We present a series of simulations to demonstrate that high-fidelity velocity-delay maps of the emission-line regions in active galactic nuclei can be obtained from time-resolved spectrophotometric data sets like those that will arise from the proposed Kronos satellite. While previous reverberation-mapping experiments have established the size scale R of the broad emission-line regions from the mean time delay tau = R/c between the line and continuum variations and have provided strong evidence for supermassive black holes, the detailed structure and kinematics of the broad-line region remain ambiguous and poorly constrained. Here we outline the technical improvements that will be required to successfully map broad-line regions by reverberation techniques. For typical AGN continuum light curves, characterized by power-law power spectra P (f) is proportional to f(exp -alpha) with a = -1.5 +/- 0.5, our simulations show that a small UV/optical spectrometer like Kronos will clearly distinguish between currently viable alternative kinematic models. From spectra sampled at time intervals Delta t and sustained for a total duration T(sub dur), we can reconstruct high-fidelity velocity-delay maps with velocity resolution comparable to that of the spectra, and delay resolution Delta tau approx. 2 Delta t, provided T(sub dur) exceeds the broad-line region light crossing time by at least a factor of three. Even very complicated kinematical models, such as a Keplerian flow with superimposed spiral wave pattern, are resolved in maps from our simulated Kronos datasets. Reverberation mapping with Kronos data is therefore likely deliver the first clear maps of the geometry and kinematics in the broad emission-line regions 1-100 microarcseconds from supermassive black holes.

  12. Simulations of the OzDES AGN reverberation mapping project

    DOE PAGES

    King, Anthea L.; Martini, Paul; Davis, Tamara M.; ...

    2015-08-26

    As part of the Australian spectroscopic dark energy survey (OzDES) we are carrying out a large-scale reverberation mapping study of ~500 quasars over five years in the 30 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova fields. These quasars have redshifts ranging up to 4 and have apparent AB magnitudes between 16.8 mag < r < 22.5 mag. The aim of the survey is to measure time lags between fluctuations in the quasar continuum and broad emission-line fluxes of individual objects in order to measure black hole masses for a broad range of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and constrainmore » the radius–luminosity (R–L) relationship. Here we investigate the expected efficiency of the OzDES reverberation mapping campaign and its possible extensions. We expect to recover lags for ~35–45 % of the quasars. AGN with shorter lags and greater variability are more likely to yield a lag measurement, and objects with lags ≲6 months or ~1 yr are expected to be recovered the most accurately. The baseline OzDES reverberation mapping campaign is predicted to produce an unbiased measurement of the R–L relationship parameters for Hβ, MgIIλ2798, and C IVλ1549. As a result, extending the baseline survey by either increasing the spectroscopic cadence, extending the survey season, or improving the emission-line flux measurement accuracy will significantly improve the R–L parameter constraints for all broad emission lines.« less

  13. Effects of Classroom Acoustics on Performance and Well-Being in Elementary School Children: A Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klatte, Maria; Hellbruck, Jurgen; Seidel, Jochen; Leistner, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Children are more impaired than adults by unfavorable listening conditions such as reverberation and noise. Nevertheless, the acoustical conditions in classrooms often do not fit the specific needs of young listeners. This field study aimed to analyze the effects of classroom reverberation on children's performance and well-being at school.…

  14. Active-passive gradient shielding for MRI acoustic noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, William A; Kidane, Tesfaye K; Taracila, Victor; Baig, Tanvir N; Eagan, Timothy P; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Brown, Robert W; Mallick, John A

    2005-05-01

    An important source of MRI acoustic noise-magnet cryostat warm-bore vibrations caused by eddy-current-induced forces-can be mitigated by a passive metal shield mounted on the outside of a vibration-isolated, vacuum-enclosed shielded gradient set. Finite-element (FE) calculations for a z-gradient indicate that a 2-mm-thick Cu layer wrapped on the gradient assembly can decrease mechanical power deposition in the warm bore and reduce warm-bore acoustic noise production by about 25 dB. Eliminating the conducting warm bore and other magnet parts as significant acoustic noise sources could lead to the development of truly quiet, fully functioning MRI systems with noise levels below 70 dB.

  15. ClassTalk system for predicting and auralizing speech in noise with reverberation in classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Murray; Graves, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses and demonstrates the ClassTalk system for predicting, visualizing and auralizing speech in noise with reverberation in classrooms. The classroom can contain a speech-reinforcement system (SRS). Male or female speech sources, SRS loudspeakers and overhead, slide or digital projectors, or ventilation-noise sources, can have four output levels. Empirical models are used to predict speech and noise levels, and Early Decay Times, from which Speech Transmission Index (STI) and Speech Intelligibility (SI) are calculated. ClassTalk visualizes the floor-plan, speech- and noise-source positions, and the receiver position. The user can walk through the room at will. In real time five quantities, background-noise level, speech level, signal-to-noise difference, STI and SI, are displayed along with occupied and unoccupied reverberation times. The sound module auralizes male or female speech mixed with the relevant noise signals, with predicted, frequency-varying reverberation superimposed using MaxxVerb. Technical issues related to the development of the sound module are discussed. The potential of the systems auralization module for demonstrating the effects of the acoustical environment and its control on speech is discussed and demonstrated.

  16. Efficient modeling of range-dependent ray convergence effects in propagation and reverberation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Chris H

    2015-05-01

    In an earlier paper [Harrison (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 3777-3789] the computationally efficient energy flux approach to modeling sound propagation was modified to include focusing, ray convergence, and caustic-like behavior. The derivation started with the coherent normal mode sum but retained only terms that interfered on a scale of a ray cycle distance. Here, by starting with the adiabatic mode sum, the formulation is extended to a slowly varying range-dependent environment and applied to the target-echo and reverberation model, Artemis. Some examples are given.

  17. A Literature Survey of Reverberation Modeling: With Emphasis on Bellhop Compatibility for Operational Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    necessarily have the approval or endorsement of Defence R&D Canada. Contract Project Manager: Diana McCammon, 902-538-3003 Contract number: W7707...McCammon Acoustical Consulting 475 Baseline Road Waterville, NS B0P 1V0 Contract Project Manager: Diana McCammon, 902-538-3003 Contract Number...in some cases, the scattering area. Some of the older models of reverberation are the Generic Sonar Model (GSM), Cass/Grab, BiRasp, and ASTRAL . A

  18. Comparative evaluation of predicted and measured performance of a 68-cubic meter truncated reverberant noise chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cyphers, H. D.; Munson, A. N.; On, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    The performance of a medium size, truncated reverberation chamber is evaluated in detail. Chamber performance parameters are predicted, using classical acoustic theory, and are compared to results from actual chamber measurements. Discrepancies are discussed in relation to several available empirical corrections developed by other researchers. Of more practical interest is the confirmation of a recent theory stating that the present guide for the ratio of specimen volume to test chamber volume, approximately 10 percent, is overly conservative, and can be increased by a factor of at least 2 and possibly 3. Results and theoretical justification of these findings are presented.

  19. Reverberation Mapping of AGN Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausnaugh, Michael; AGN STORM Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    I will discuss new reverberation mapping results that allow us to investigate the temperature structure of AGN accretion disks. By measuring time-delays between broad-band continuum light curves, we can determine the size of the disk as a function of wavelength. I will discuss the detection of continuum lags in NGC 5548 reported by the AGN STORM project and implications for the accretion disk. I will also present evidence for continuum lags in two other AGN for which we recently measured black hole masses from continuum-Hbeta reverberations. The mass measurements allow us to compare the continuum lags to predictions from standard thin disk theory, and our results indicate that the accretion disks are larger than the simplest expectations.

  20. Modeling of Mid-Frequency Reverberation in Very Shallow Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    reverberation at mid frequencies for a wide variety of sea bed types. In particular, they are primary tools used in the Ocean Bottom Characterization...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Modeling of Mid -Frequency Reverberation in Very Shallow...research is to develop a mid -frequency shallow-water reverberation model relevant to specific conditions (1 – 10 kHz, ~20 m water depth, ~ 5 km range) of

  1. Octave-Band Thresholds for Modeled Reverberant Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Tran, Laura L.; Anderson, Mark R.; Trejo, Leonard J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Auditory thresholds for 10 subjects were obtained for speech stimuli reverberation. The reverberation was produced and manipulated by 3-D audio modeling based on an actual room. The independent variables were octave-band-filtering (bypassed, 0.25 - 2.0 kHz Fc) and reverberation time (0.2- 1.1 sec). An ANOVA revealed significant effects (threshold range: -19 to -35 dB re 60 dB SRL).

  2. [Specifics of perception of acoustic image of intrinsic bioelectric brain activity].

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, K V; Leonova, M K; Miroshnikov, D B; Klimenko, V M

    2014-06-01

    We studied the particularities of perception of the acoustic image of intrinsic EEG. We found that the assessment of perception of sounds, the presentation of which was synchronized and was agreed with current bioelectric brain activity, is higher that assessment of perception of acoustic EEG image presented in recorded form. Presentation of recorded acoustic image of EEG is accompanied by increased activity of beta-band in the frontal areas, while real-time presentation of acoustic EEG image is accompanied by the increase of slow wave activity: theta- and delta-bands of occipital areas of the brain. Increase activity in theta- and delta-bands of occipital areas in sessions of hearing the acoustic image of EEG in real time depend on the baseline frequency structure of EEG and correlates with expression of alpha-, beta- and theta-bands of bioelectric brain activity in both frontal and occipital areas. We suppose that presentation of sounds synchronized and agreed with the current bioelectric activity, activated the regulatory brain structures.

  3. Seamounts, Direct Blast and Volume Reverberation Upgrades

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-30

    Highway. Suits 1204. Arlington, VA 22202-4302. "n to the Office of Management and Budget. Peperworik Reduction Project (0704-0188). Washington. DC 2050M. 1...Subtitle. 5. Funding Numbers. Seamounts, Direct Blast And Volume Reverberation Upgrades proram Eemen No 3 7 85N Project No R02017 6. Author(s). L...Section Pae 1 INTRODUCTION ................................. 1-1 2 ASERT: DATA PREPARATION FOR ASTRAL ........... 2-1 2.1 Overview and Purpose of

  4. Binaural segregation in multisource reverberant environments.

    PubMed

    Roman, Nicoleta; Srinivasan, Soundararajan; Wang, DeLiang

    2006-12-01

    In a natural environment, speech signals are degraded by both reverberation and concurrent noise sources. While human listening is robust under these conditions using only two ears, current two-microphone algorithms perform poorly. The psychological process of figure-ground segregation suggests that the target signal is perceived as a foreground while the remaining stimuli are perceived as a background. Accordingly, the goal is to estimate an ideal time-frequency (T-F) binary mask, which selects the target if it is stronger than the interference in a local T-F unit. In this paper, a binaural segregation system that extracts the reverberant target signal from multisource reverberant mixtures by utilizing only the location information of target source is proposed. The proposed system combines target cancellation through adaptive filtering and a binary decision rule to estimate the ideal T-F binary mask. The main observation in this work is that the target attenuation in a T-F unit resulting from adaptive filtering is correlated with the relative strength of target to mixture. A comprehensive evaluation shows that the proposed system results in large SNR gains. In addition, comparisons using SNR as well as automatic speech recognition measures show that this system outperforms standard two-microphone beamforming approaches and a recent binaural processor.

  5. Monitoring of acoustic emission activity using thin wafer piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei; Meisner, Daniel; Momeni, Sepand

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-known technique for monitoring onset and propagation of material damage. The technique has demonstrated utility in assessment of metallic and composite materials in applications ranging from civil structures to aerospace vehicles. While over the course of few decades AE hardware has changed dramatically with the sensors experiencing little changes. A traditional acoustic emission sensor solution utilizes a thickness resonance of the internal piezoelectric element which, coupled with internal amplification circuit, results in relatively large sensor footprint. Thin wafer piezoelectric sensors are small and unobtrusive, but they have seen limited AE applications due to low signal-to-noise ratio and other operation difficulties. In this contribution, issues and possible solutions pertaining to the utility of thin wafer piezoelectrics as AE sensors are discussed. Results of AE monitoring of fatigue damage using thin wafer piezoelectric and conventional AE sensors are presented.

  6. Active cancellation of acoustical resonances with an FPGA FIR filter.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Albert; Simon, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel approach to enhancing the bandwidth of a feedback-controlled mechanical system by digitally canceling acoustical resonances (poles) and anti-resonances (zeros) in the open-loop response via an FPGA FIR filter. By performing a real-time convolution of the feedback error signal with an inverse filter, we can suppress arbitrarily many poles and zeros below 100 kHz, each with a linewidth down to 10 Hz. We demonstrate the efficacy of this technique by canceling the ten largest mechanical resonances and anti-resonances of a high-finesse optical resonator, thereby enhancing the unity gain frequency by more than an order of magnitude. This approach is applicable to a broad array of stabilization problems including optical resonators, external cavity diode lasers, and scanning tunneling microscopes and points the way to applying modern optimal control techniques to intricate linear acoustical systems.

  7. GOATS 2008: Autonomous, Adaptive Multistatic Acoustic Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    develop the OASES -3d modeling framework for target scattering and reverberation in shallow ocean waveguides. As has been the case for the autonomous...using Green’s functions using legacy environmental acoustic models such as OASES , CSNAP, and RAM. This new unique simulation environment allows for...MIT are being maintained and dissiminated under the GOATS grant. The OASES and CSNAP environmental acoustic modeling codes are used extensively in

  8. Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    Acoustic Scattering Models of Zooplankton and Microstructure Timothy K. Stanton Department of Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Woods Hole...LONG-TERM GOALS To understand the acoustic reverberation properties of zooplankton and microstructure. The results will lead to improved capability...in 1) predicting sonar performance and 2) use of sonars in the mapping of the zooplankton and microstructure. OBJECTIVES To understand the physics of

  9. Temporal pattern of acoustic imaging noise asymmetrically modulates activation in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Ranaweera, Ruwan D; Kwon, Minseok; Hu, Shuowen; Tamer, Gregory G; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the hemisphere-specific effects of the temporal pattern of imaging related acoustic noise on auditory cortex activation. Hemodynamic responses (HDRs) to five temporal patterns of imaging noise corresponding to noise generated by unique combinations of imaging volume and effective repetition time (TR), were obtained using a stroboscopic event-related paradigm with extra-long (≥27.5 s) TR to minimize inter-acquisition effects. In addition to confirmation that fMRI responses in auditory cortex do not behave in a linear manner, temporal patterns of imaging noise were found to modulate both the shape and spatial extent of hemodynamic responses, with classically non-auditory areas exhibiting responses to longer duration noise conditions. Hemispheric analysis revealed the right primary auditory cortex to be more sensitive than the left to the presence of imaging related acoustic noise. Right primary auditory cortex responses were significantly larger during all the conditions. This asymmetry of response to imaging related acoustic noise could lead to different baseline activation levels during acquisition schemes using short TR, inducing an observed asymmetry in the responses to an intended acoustic stimulus through limitations of dynamic range, rather than due to differences in neuronal processing of the stimulus. These results emphasize the importance of accounting for the temporal pattern of the acoustic noise when comparing findings across different fMRI studies, especially those involving acoustic stimulation.

  10. Temporal pattern of acoustic imaging noise asymmetrically modulates activation in the auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ranaweera, Ruwan D.; Kwon, Minseok; Hu, Shuowen; Tamer, Gregory G.; Luh, Wen-Ming; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the hemisphere-specific effects of the temporal pattern of imaging related acoustic noise on auditory cortex activation. Hemodynamic responses (HDRs) to five temporal patterns of imaging noise corresponding to noise generated by unique combinations of imaging volume and effective repetition time (TR), were obtained using a stroboscopic event-related paradigm with extra-long (≥27.5s) TR to minimize inter-acquisition effects. In addition to confirmation that fMRI responses in auditory cortex do not behave in a linear manner, temporal patterns of imaging noise were found to modulate both the shape and spatial extent of hemodynamic responses, with classically non-auditory areas exhibiting responses to longer duration noise conditions. Hemispheric analysis revealed the right primary auditory cortex to be more sensitive than the left to the presence of imaging related acoustic noise. Right primary auditory cortex responses were significantly larger during all the conditions. This asymmetry of response to imaging related acoustic noise could lead to different baseline activation levels during acquisition schemes using short TR, inducing an observed asymmetry in the responses to an intended acoustic stimulus through limitations of dynamic range, rather than due to differences in neuronal processing of the stimulus. These results emphasize the importance of accounting for the temporal pattern of the acoustic noise when comparing findings across different fMRI studies, especially those involving acoustic stimulation. PMID:26519093

  11. Manipulation of acoustic focusing with an active and configurable planar metasurface transducer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiajun; Ye, Huapeng; Huang, Kun; Chen, Zhi Ning; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    It has a pivotal role in medical science and in industry to concentrate the acoustic energy created with piezoelectric transducers (PTs) into a specific area. However, previous researches seldom consider the focal resolution, whose focal size is much larger than one wavelength. Furthermore, there is to date no such design method of PTs that allows a large degree of freedom to achieve designed focal patterns. Here, an active and configurable planar metasurface PT prototype is proposed to manipulate the acoustic focal pattern and the focal resolution freely. By suitably optimized ring configurations of the active metasurface PT, we demonstrate the manipulation of focal patterns in acoustic far fields, such as the designed focal needle and multi foci. Our method is also able to manipulate and improve the cross-sectional focal resolution from subwavelength to the extreme case: the deep sub-diffraction-limit resolution. Via the acoustic Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral (RSI) cum the binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO), the free manipulation of focusing properties is achieved in acoustics for the first time. Our approach may offer more initiatives where the strict control of acoustic high-energy areas is demanding. PMID:25174409

  12. Manipulation of acoustic focusing with an active and configurable planar metasurface transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Ye, Huapeng; Huang, Kun; Chen, Zhi Ning; Li, Baowen; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-09-01

    It has a pivotal role in medical science and in industry to concentrate the acoustic energy created with piezoelectric transducers (PTs) into a specific area. However, previous researches seldom consider the focal resolution, whose focal size is much larger than one wavelength. Furthermore, there is to date no such design method of PTs that allows a large degree of freedom to achieve designed focal patterns. Here, an active and configurable planar metasurface PT prototype is proposed to manipulate the acoustic focal pattern and the focal resolution freely. By suitably optimized ring configurations of the active metasurface PT, we demonstrate the manipulation of focal patterns in acoustic far fields, such as the designed focal needle and multi foci. Our method is also able to manipulate and improve the cross-sectional focal resolution from subwavelength to the extreme case: the deep sub-diffraction-limit resolution. Via the acoustic Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral (RSI) cum the binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO), the free manipulation of focusing properties is achieved in acoustics for the first time. Our approach may offer more initiatives where the strict control of acoustic high-energy areas is demanding.

  13. O the Use of Modern Control Theory for Active Structural Acoustic Control.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, William Richard

    A modern control theory formulation of Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) of simple structures radiating acoustic energy into light or heavy fluid mediums is discussed in this dissertation. ASAC of a baffled, simply-supported plate subject to mechanical disturbances is investigated. For the case of light fluid loading, a finite element modelling approach is used to extend previous ASAC design methods. Vibration and acoustic controllers are designed for the plate. Comparison of the controller performance shows distinct advantages of the ASAC method for minimizing radiated acoustic power. A novel approach to the modelling of the heavy fluid-loaded plate is developed here. Augmenting structural and acoustic dynamics using state vector formalism allows the design of both vibration and ASAC controllers for the fluid-loaded plate. This modern control approach to active structural acoustic control is unique in its ability to suppress both persistent and transient disturbances on a plate in a heavy fluid. Numerical simulations of the open-loop and closed-loop plate response are provided to support the theoretical developments.

  14. Reverberation of excitation in neuronal networks interconnected through voltage-gated gap junction channels

    PubMed Central

    Maciunas, Kestutis; Snipas, Mindaugas; Paulauskas, Nerijus

    2016-01-01

    We combined Hodgkin–Huxley equations and gating models of gap junction (GJ) channels to simulate the spread of excitation in two-dimensional networks composed of neurons interconnected by voltage-gated GJs. Each GJ channel contains two fast and slow gates, each exhibiting current–voltage (I-V) rectification and gating properties that depend on transjunctional voltage (Vj). The data obtained show how junctional conductance (gj), which is necessary for synchronization of the neuronal network, depends on its size and the intrinsic firing rate of neurons. A phase shift between action potentials (APs) of neighboring neurons creates bipolar, short-lasting Vj spikes of approximately ±100 mV that induce Vj gating, leading to a small decay of gj, which can accumulate into larger decays during bursting activity of neurons. We show that I-V rectification of GJs in local regions of the two-dimensional network of neurons can lead to unidirectional AP transfer and consequently to reverberation of excitation. This reverberation can be initiated by a single electrical pulse and terminated by a low-amplitude pulse applied in a specific window of reverberation cycle. Thus, the model accounts for the influence of dynamically modulatable electrical synapses in shaping the function of a neuronal network and the formation of reverberation, which, as proposed earlier, may be important for the development of short-term memory and its consolidation into long-term memory. PMID:26880752

  15. Active modal control simulation of vibro-acoustic response of a fluid-loaded plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Active modal control simulation of vibro-acoustic response of a fluid-loaded plate is presented. The active modal control of the vibro-acoustic response is implemented using piezoelectric actuators/sensors. The active modal damping is added to the coupled system via negative velocity feedback. The feedback gain between the piezoelectric actuators/sensors for the modal control is obtained using the in-vacuo modal matrix and the incompressible fluid-loaded modal matrix. The modal control performance of structural vibration and acoustic radiation of a baffled plate is numerically studied. It is shown that the proposed method increases the modal damping ratio and achieves reduction in the mean square velocity and the sound power for given modes of the fluid-loaded plate.

  16. A Summary Comparison of Active Acoustic Detections and Visual Observations of Marine Mammals in the Canadian Beaufort Sea.

    PubMed

    Pyć, Cynthia D; Geoffroy, Maxime; Knudsen, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries sonar was used to determine the applicability of active acoustic monitoring (AAM) for marine mammal detection in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. During 170 h of simultaneous observation by marine mammal observers and active acoustic observation, 119 Balaena mysticetus (bowheads) and 4 Delphinapterus leucas (belugas) were visually sighted, while 59 acoustic signals of bowheads were detected by AAM operators. Observations and detection of seals were also recorded. Comparative results indicate that commercially available active acoustic systems can detect seals at distances up to 500 m and large baleen whales at distances up to 2 km.

  17. Evaluation of multiple-frequency, active and passive acoustics as surrogates for bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Pachman, Gregory; Lorang, Mark; Tonolla, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The use of multiple-frequency, active acoustics through deployment of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) shows potential for estimating bedload in selected grain size categories. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the University of Montana (UM), evaluated the use of multiple-frequency, active and passive acoustics as surrogates for bedload transport during a pilot study on the Kootenai River, Idaho, May 17-18, 2012. Four ADCPs with frequencies ranging from 600 to 2000 kHz were used to measure apparent moving bed velocities at 20 stations across the river in conjunction with physical bedload samples. Additionally, UM scientists measured the sound frequencies of moving particles with two hydrophones, considered passive acoustics, along longitudinal transects in the study reach. Some patterns emerged in the preliminary analysis which show promise for future studies. Statistically significant relations were successfully developed between apparent moving bed velocities measured by ADCPs with frequencies 1000 and 1200 kHz and bedload in 0.5 to 2.0 mm grain size categories. The 600 kHz ADCP seemed somewhat sensitive to the movement of gravel bedload in the size range 8.0 to 31.5 mm, but the relation was not statistically significant. The passive hydrophone surveys corroborated the sample results and could be used to map spatial variability in bedload transport and to select a measurement cross-section with moving bedload for active acoustic surveys and physical samples.

  18. Synchronous behaviour of cetaceans observed with active acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godø, Olav Rune; Sivle, Lise Doksæter; Patel, Ruben; Torkelsen, Terje

    2013-12-01

    Scientific split-beam echosounders are sensitive instruments for observing biomass densities and individual behaviour. Earlier studies have demonstrated that these instruments can be used to study diving behaviour of cetaceans. In this paper, we go into more detail about the recorded signal to see if and how acoustic split-beam data can be used to extract information about synchronous behaviour and other species related characteristics. Data of several cetacean individuals were collected by a moored echosounder pinging upwards from about 900 m in the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone. In this paper, we discuss methodological issues associated with using split-beam tracking of large marine animals. Further we demonstrate that target tracking of cetaceans can be used to study solo dives as well as behavioural synchrony. We also show that paired signals can easily be interpreted as false synchrony due to the size of the animals. In such cases a rough estimate of the diameter, and hence size, of the animals can be estimated. We emphasise on four examples that clarify methodological challenges including synchronous swimmers as well as large single cetaceans that might be interpreted as two synchronous swimmers. The applied technology requires that the animals remain in a narrow acoustic beam for long enough time to extract behavioural information. The technology can be improved by developing automatic tracking of cetaceans with a steerable transducer. This will substantially increase the search volume and enable tracking of cetaceans over longer periods and thus, produce more realistic information about the whale behaviour.

  19. Reverberation Mapping of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 7469

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Grier, C. J.; Horne, Keith; Pogge, R. W.; Bentz, M. C.; De Rosa, G.; Denney, K. D.; Martini, Paul; Sergeev, S. G.; Kaspi, S.; Minezaki, T.; Zu, Y.; Kochanek, C. S.; Siverd, R. J.; Shappee, B.; Araya Salvo, C.; Beatty, T. G.; Bird, J. C.; Bord, D. J.; Borman, G. A.; Che, X.; Chen, C.-T.; Cohen, S. A.; Dietrich, M.; Doroshenko, V. T.; Drake, T.; Efimov, Yu. S.; Free, N.; Ginsburg, I.; Henderson, C. B.; King, A. L.; Koshida, S.; Mogren, K.; Molina, M.; Mosquera, A. M.; Motohara, K.; Nazarov, S. V.; Okhmat, D. N.; Pejcha, O.; Rafter, S.; Shields, J. C.; Skowron, D. M.; Skowron, J.; Valluri, M.; van Saders, J. L.; Yoshii, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A large reverberation-mapping study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 has yielded emission-line lags for Hβ λ4861 and He II λ4686 and a central black hole mass measurement M BH ≈ 1 × 107 M ⊙, consistent with previous measurements. A very low level of variability during the monitoring campaign precluded meeting our original goal of recovering velocity-delay maps from the data, but with the new Hβ measurement, NGC 7469 is no longer an outlier in the relationship between the size of the Hβ-emitting broad-line region and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus. It was necessary to detrend the continuum and Hβ and He II λ4686 line light curves and those from archival UV data for different time-series analysis methods to yield consistent results.

  20. Reverberation mapping of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, B. M.; Grier, C. J.; Pogge, R. W.; De Rosa, G.; Denney, K. D.; Martini, Paul; Zu, Y.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B.; Araya Salvo, C.; Beatty, T. G.; Bird, J. C.; Horne, Keith; Bentz, M. C.; Sergeev, S. G.; Borman, G. A.; Minezaki, T.; Siverd, R. J.; Bord, D. J.; and others

    2014-11-10

    A large reverberation-mapping study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 has yielded emission-line lags for Hβ λ4861 and He II λ4686 and a central black hole mass measurement M {sub BH} ≈ 1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, consistent with previous measurements. A very low level of variability during the monitoring campaign precluded meeting our original goal of recovering velocity-delay maps from the data, but with the new Hβ measurement, NGC 7469 is no longer an outlier in the relationship between the size of the Hβ-emitting broad-line region and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus. It was necessary to detrend the continuum and Hβ and He II λ4686 line light curves and those from archival UV data for different time-series analysis methods to yield consistent results.

  1. Seabed Scattering from Low Frequency Reverberation Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    method has further been developed and widely used for SW reverberation calculations,17–30 mainly due to works by Harrison , Holland and Ainslie...18,20,21,23–30 All the closed-form expressions in isovelocity shallow water, derived by Zhou,6 Harrison ,18 Ainslie27,30 and Holland,24 are almost identical...rð2þn=2Þ : (24) Here the bottom scattering index n ¼ m þ k, i.e., it is a combination of any k and m, integer or decimal. Harrison ,18 Ainslie27 and

  2. Evidence for a common scale O(0.1) m that controls seabed scattering and reverberation in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W

    2012-10-01

    Analysis of the spectral content of long-range reverberation yields two observations. First, there is a remarkably similar scale, O(0.1) m, between three diverse continental shelf regions. This is surprising given the complexity and diversity of geologic processes. Second, there is strong evidence that the scale is associated with heterogeneities within the sediment. Thus, sediment volume scattering, not interface scattering, controls long-range reverberation from a few hundred hertz to several kilohertz. This is also unexpected given that at long ranges the vertical grazing angles are less than the critical angle, and hence the penetration of the acoustic field into the sub-bottom is expected to be modest. The consistency of the scale, O(0.1) m, suggests an underlying feature or mechanism that is consistent across many ostensibly diverse geological settings. Neither the feature nor mechanism is known at this time.

  3. Spatiotemporal patterns of acoustic emission (AE) activity in salt mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, S.; Cesca, S.; Hainzl, S.; Kaiser, D.; Dahm, T.

    2012-04-01

    Assessing the magnitude of completeness (Mc) is essential for the correct interpretation of earthquake catalogs. Knowledge on the spatiotemporal variation of Mc allows the mapping of other seismicity parameters, such as b-values. Spatial and temporal variations of b-values can indicate structural heterogeneities, stress perturbations and time-dependent fracturing processes. In order to precisely estimate Mc in strongly heterogeneous media, we propose a 3D development of the probabilistic magnitude of completeness (PMC) method, which relies on the analysis of network detection capabilities, to study spatial distribution of the Mc and b-value estimations for mining networks. We used a large dataset including more than 1 million acoustic emissions (AE), recorded at the Morsleben salt mine, Germany. Our study shows that the PMC estimations strongly depend on the source-receiver direction, and cannot be correctly accounted using a standard approach. The comparison between Mc using the 3D PMC method and Gutenberg-Richter methods show agreements for two reference depth ranges. Following our approach, we estimate Mc ranging between 1.25 (AE ,relative acoustic magnitude), at the center of the network, and 3.5, at further distances outside the network. Our method provides small-scale details about the capability of sensors to detect an AE event, and spatial distributions of Mc and b-value, which can be linked to the presence of structural heterogeneities or cavities in specific directions. Effects of heterogeneities on detection analysis are confirmed by synthetic tests using waveform modeling in heterogeneous media. This work has been funded by the German BMBF "Geotechnologien" project MINE (BMBF03G0737A).

  4. Passive acoustic monitoring of biological activity on coral reefs and in nearby waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, Marc O.; Mooney, T. Aran; Brainard, Russell E.; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2005-09-01

    Monitoring the changing state of coral reef habitats is a challenging task that is exacerbated when the reefs in question are in remote locations. Physical sensors provide a wide range of measurements of local environmental variables, but do not give an indication of biological activity. The preliminary findings of an effort to use the ambient sound field as a means of characterizing and monitoring biological activity on coral reefs and surrounding waters are reported. Moored recording systems were developed to sample the sound field of reefs on Oahu, Hawaii for 1-min periods, at 30-min intervals, for 10 days at a time. Snapping shrimp produce the dominant acoustic energy on the reefs examined and exhibit clear diel acoustic trends. Peaks in activity consistently occur during crepuscular periods. At frequencies below 2 kHz, many fish sounds occur, which also exhibit distinct temporal variability. Cetacean sounds are also common, indicating the occurrence of an apex predator in the area. Many sounds can be detected automatically, making the examination of the sound field an efficient means of tracking acoustically active species. The results indicate that acoustic monitoring may be an effective means of tracking biological activity at locations where traditional surveys are impractical.

  5. Ground-based acoustic parametric generator impact on the atmosphere and ionosphere in an active experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, Yuriy G.; Cheremnykh, Oleg K.; Koshovy, Volodymyr V.; Melnik, Mykola O.; Ivantyshyn, Oleh L.; Nogach, Roman T.; Selivanov, Yuriy A.; Grimalsky, Vladimir V.; Mezentsev, Valentyn P.; Karataeva, Larysa M.; Ivchenko, Vasyl. M.; Milinevsky, Gennadi P.; Fedun, Viktor N.; Tkachenko, Eugen N.

    2017-01-01

    We develop theoretical basics of active experiments with two beams of acoustic waves, radiated by a ground-based sound generator. These beams are transformed into atmospheric acoustic gravity waves (AGWs), which have parameters that enable them to penetrate to the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions where they influence the electron concentration of the ionosphere. Acoustic waves are generated by the ground-based parametric sound generator (PSG) at the two close frequencies. The main idea of the experiment is to design the output parameters of the PSG to build a cascade scheme of nonlinear wave frequency downshift transformations to provide the necessary conditions for their vertical propagation and to enable penetration to ionospheric altitudes. The PSG generates sound waves (SWs) with frequencies f1 = 600 and f2 = 625 Hz and large amplitudes (100-420 m s-1). Each of these waves is modulated with the frequency of 0.016 Hz. The novelty of the proposed analytical-numerical model is due to simultaneous accounting for nonlinearity, diffraction, losses, and dispersion and inclusion of the two-stage transformation (1) of the initial acoustic waves to the acoustic wave with the difference frequency Δf = f2 - f1 in the altitude ranges 0-0.1 km, in the strongly nonlinear regime, and (2) of the acoustic wave with the difference frequency to atmospheric acoustic gravity waves with the modulational frequency in the altitude ranges 0.1-20 km, which then reach the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions, in a practically linear regime. AGWs, nonlinearly transformed from the sound waves, launched by the two-frequency ground-based sound generator can increase the transparency of the ionosphere for the electromagnetic waves in HF (MHz) and VLF (kHz) ranges. The developed theoretical model can be used for interpreting an active experiment that includes the PSG impact on the atmosphere-ionosphere system, measurements of electromagnetic and acoustic fields, study of

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of activation behavior of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloy

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Igor Maria; Dell'Era, Alessandro; Pasquali, Mauro; Santulli, Carlo; Sarasini, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The acoustic emission technique is proposed for assessing the irreversible phenomena occurring during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling in LaNi5. In particular, we have studied, through a parametric analysis of in situ detected signals, the correlation between acoustic emission (AE) parameters and the processes occurring during the activation of an intermetallic compound. Decreases in the number and amplitude of AE signals suggest that pulverization due to hydrogen loading involves progressively smaller volumes of material as the number of cycles increases. This conclusion is confirmed by electron microscopy observations and particle size distribution measurements. PMID:27877423

  7. Exploration of amphoteric and negative refraction imaging of acoustic sources via active metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jihong; Shen, Huijie; Yu, Dianlong; Wen, Xisen

    2013-11-01

    The present work describes the design of three flat superlens structures for acoustic source imaging and explores an active acoustic metamaterial (AAM) to realise such a design. The first two lenses are constructed via the coordinate transform method (CTM), and their constituent materials are anisotropic. The third lens consists of a material that has both a negative density and a negative bulk modulus. In these lenses, the quality of the images is “clear” and sharp; thus, the diffraction limit of classical lenses is overcome. Finally, a multi-control strategy is developed to achieve the desired parameters and to eliminate coupling effects in the AAM.

  8. Using Passive and Active Acoustics to Examine Relationships of Cetacean and Prey Densities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    mounted on a glider running on two California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) lines and passive as well as active acoustic...Southwest Fisheries Science Center. WORK COMPLETED A preliminary experiment was carried out (see section Results) that documented sound production

  9. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1997-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the Institute include the following: (1) To conduct basic and applied research; (2) to promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community; (3) to provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute; (4) to provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute; and (5) to disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  10. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1996 to September 30, 1997. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the institute include the following: To conduct basic and applied research. To promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community To provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute. To provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute. To disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  11. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  12. Control strategies and mechanisms for active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guoyong; Feng, Na; Yang, Tiejun

    2011-06-01

    An analytical study was presented on active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure comprising two flexible plates. Two types of actuators were used, i.e. acoustic actuator and distributed lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric (PZT) actuator instead of point force actuator. Using the modal acoustic transfer impedance-mobility matrices, the excitation and interaction in the coupled sound transmission system can be described with clear physical significance. With the control system designed to globally reduce the sound field, different control system configurations were considered, including the structural actuator on the incident plate, actuator on the receiving plate, acoustic actuator on the cavity, and their combinations. The effectiveness and performance of the control strategy corresponding to each system configuration were compared and discussed. The role and control mechanism of each type of actuator were of particular interest. It was shown that the incident plate actuator is effective in controlling the cavity-dominated modes and the structural modes dominated by the incident plate and receiving plate. Two main control mechanisms are involved in this control configuration, i.e., modal suppressing and modal rearrangement. For control system configuration with only acoustic actuator in the enclosure, the mechanism involved in this arrangement is purely modal suppression. Desirable placements of structural actuators in terms of total potential energy reduction were also discussed.

  13. Acoustic manipulation of active spherical carriers: Generation of negative radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    This paper examines theoretically a novel mechanism of generating negative (pulling) radiation force for acoustic manipulation of spherical carriers equipped with piezoelectric actuators in its inner surface. In this mechanism, the spherical particle is handled by common plane progressive monochromatic acoustic waves instead of zero-/higher- order Bessel beams or standing waves field. The handling strategy is based on applying a spatially uniform harmonic electrical voltage at the piezoelectric actuator with the same frequency of handling acoustic waves, in order to change the radiation force effect from repulsive (away from source) to attractive (toward source). This study may be considered as a start point for development of contact-free precise handling and entrapment technology of active carriers which are essential in many engineering and medicine applications.

  14. Design, construction, activation, and operation of a high intensity acoustic test chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    The design philosophy, construction, integration, and activation of the high intensity acoustic test chamber for production acceptance testing of satellites are discussed. The 32,000 cubic-foot acoustic test cell consists of a steel reinforced concrete chamber with six electropneumatic noise generators. One of the innovative features of the chamber is a unique quarter horn assembly that acoustically couples the noise generators to the chamber. Design concepts, model testing, and evaluation results are presented. Considerations such as nitrogen versus compressed air source, digital closed loop spectrum control versus manual equalizers, and microprocessor based interlock systems are included. Construction difficulties, anomalies encountered, and their resolution are also discussed. Results of the readiness testing are highlighted.

  15. Plasticity in developing brain: active auditory exposure impacts prelinguistic acoustic mapping.

    PubMed

    Benasich, April A; Choudhury, Naseem A; Realpe-Bonilla, Teresa; Roesler, Cynthia P

    2014-10-01

    A major task across infancy is the creation and tuning of the acoustic maps that allow efficient native language processing. This process crucially depends on ongoing neural plasticity and keen sensitivity to environmental cues. Development of sensory mapping has been widely studied in animal models, demonstrating that cortical representations of the sensory environment are continuously modified by experience. One critical period for optimizing human language mapping is early in the first year; however, the neural processes involved and the influence of passive compared with active experience are as yet incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that, while both active and passive acoustic experience from 4 to 7 months of age, using temporally modulated nonspeech stimuli, impacts acoustic mapping, active experience confers a significant advantage. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we show that active experience increases perceptual vigilance/attention to environmental acoustic stimuli (e.g., larger and faster P2 peaks) when compared with passive experience or maturation alone. Faster latencies are also seen for the change discrimination peak (N2*) that has been shown to be a robust infant predictor of later language through age 4 years. Sharpening is evident for both trained and untrained stimuli over and above that seen for maturation alone. Effects were also seen on ERP morphology for the active experience group with development of more complex waveforms more often seen in typically developing 12- to 24-month-old children. The promise of selectively "fine-tuning" acoustic mapping as it emerges has far-reaching implications for the amelioration and/or prevention of developmental language disorders.

  16. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  17. Reverberation measurements of the inner radius of the dust torus in 17 Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Shintaro; Minezaki, Takeo; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Suganuma, Masahiro; Enya, Keigo; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A. E-mail: minezaki@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-06-20

    We present the results of a dust reverberation survey for 17 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies, which provides the largest homogeneous data collection for the radius of the innermost dust torus. A delayed response of the K-band light curve after the V-band light curve was found for all targets, and 49 measurements of lag times between the flux variation of the dust emission in the K band and that of the optical continuum emission in the V band were obtained by the cross-correlation function analysis and also by an alternative method for estimating the maximum likelihood lag. The lag times strongly correlated with the optical luminosity in the luminosity range of M{sub V} = –16 to –22 mag, and the regression analysis was performed to obtain the correlation log Δt (days) = –2.11 – 0.2 M{sub V} assuming Δt∝L {sup 0.5}, which was theoretically expected. We discuss the possible origins of the intrinsic scatter of the dust lag-luminosity correlation, which was estimated to be approximately 0.13 dex, and we find that the difference of internal extinction and delayed response of changes in lag times to the flux variations could have partly contributed to intrinsic scatter. However, we could not detect any systematic change of the correlation with the subclass of the Seyfert type or the Eddington ratio. Finally, we compare the dust reverberation radius with the near-infrared interferometric radius of the dust torus and the reverberation radius of broad Balmer emission lines. The interferometric radius in the K band was found to be systematically larger than the dust reverberation radius in the same band by the about a factor of two, which could be interpreted by the difference between the flux-weighted radius and response-weighted radius of the innermost dust torus. The reverberation radius of the broad Balmer emission lines was found to be systematically smaller than the dust reverberation radius by about a factor of four to five, which strongly supports the unified

  18. Adaptation to Room Acoustics Using the Modified Rhyme Test

    PubMed Central

    Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The negative effect of reverberant sound energy on speech intelligibility is well documented. Recently, however, prior exposure to room acoustics has been shown to increase intelligibility for a number of listeners in simulated room environments. This room adaptation effect, a possible extension of dynamic echo suppression, has been shown to be specific to reverberant rooms and requires binaural input. Because this effect has been demonstrated only using the Coordinated Response Measure (CRM) corpus it is important to determine whether the increase in intelligibility scores reported previously was due to the specific nature of the CRM task. Here we demonstrate a comparable room-acoustic effect using the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) corpus in multiple room environments. The results are consistent with the idea that the room adaptation effect may be a natural phenomenon of listening in reverberant environments. PMID:23437415

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Quasar Reverberation Mapping Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Catherine; SDSS-RM Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project (SDSS-RM) has completed its first three years of spectroscopic observations of a sample of ~850 quasars with the SDSS-III BOSS spectrograph. From January-July in 2014, 2015, and 2016, more than 55 epochs of spectroscopy were obtained for this quasar sample, and continued monitoring has been approved for 2017. Supporting photometric observations were also carried out at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope. In addition, the SDSS-RM field overlaps with the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Field MD07, so we have photometric data for three years prior to the SDSS-RM observations, which considerably extends the time delay sensitivity of the campaign. Preliminary reverberation mapping results were presented by Shen et al. (2015) and the program has also yielded ancillary science results in regimes such as broad absorption line variability, quasar ensemble variability characteristics, quasar emission line studies, SDSS quasar redshift measurements, and host galaxy properties. I will discuss the current status of the SDSS-RM program, including recent reverberation mapping results from the wider 850-quasar sample using the full set of first-year photometric and spectroscopic data.

  20. Active Path Selection of Fluid Microcapsules in Artificial Blood Vessel by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohji; Muramatsu, Yusuke; Ueda, Sawami; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakayashiki, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ken

    2009-07-01

    Micrometer-sized microcapsules collapse upon exposure to ultrasound. Use of this phenomenon for a drug delivery system (DDS), not only for local delivery of medication but also for gene therapy, should be possible. However, enhancing the efficiency of medication is limited because capsules in suspension diffuse in the human body after injection, since the motion of capsules in blood flow cannot be controlled. To control the behavior of microcapsules, acoustic radiation force was introduced. We detected local changes in microcapsule density by producing acoustic radiation force in an artificial blood vessel. Furthermore, we theoretically estimated the conditions required for active path selection of capsules at a bifurcation point in the artificial blood vessel. We observed the difference in capsule density at both in the bifurcation point and in alternative paths downstream of the bifurcation point for different acoustic radiation forces. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained theoretically, the conditions for active path selection were calculated from the acoustic radiation force and fluid resistance of the capsules. The possibility of controlling capsule flow towards a specific point in a blood vessel was demonstrated.

  1. The Combined Effects of Aging and Hearing Loss on Temporal Resolution and Recognition of Reverberant Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halling, Dan C.

    Listeners perform more poorly on a speech-recognition task when in a reverberant listening condition than a non -reverberant one. Elderly listeners experience even greater difficulty than young listeners. It has been suggested that this greater difficulty can be almost entirely explained by taking into account the hearing-impairment that typically accompanies the aging process. Nevertheless, existing evidence suggests that elderly hearing-impaired listeners still experience greater difficulty than young hearing -impaired listeners. Some have suggested that elderly listeners, in addition to the hearing loss, also exhibit poorer temporal resolution than young listeners, poorer than even young hearing-impaired listeners. Temporal resolution and speech -recognition performance was evaluated in 8 young normal -hearing listeners, 8 elderly normal-hearing listeners, and 12 elderly listeners with hearing impairment of varying degree. The results suggested that there was an effect of both age and hearing loss on temporal resolution and speech-recognition performance. Additional analyses indicated that the age effects may have actually been caused by slight elevations in the quiet thresholds for the elderly normal -hearing subjects relative to the young normal-hearing subjects. The results also suggested that individual differences in hearing loss and temporal resolution underlie individual differences in speech-recognition performance. Finally, an objective measure of predicting speech intelligibility, the Speech Transmission Index (STI), was evaluated as to its adequacy as a tool for predicting speech-recognition performance in young and elderly, normal-hearing and hearing-impaired, listeners in anechoic or reverberant conditions. Several derivations of the STI provided tight-fitting functions relating percent correct to STI, one of which requires only knowledge of the listener's quiet thresholds and the acoustical properties of the room.

  2. REVERBERATION MAPPING MEASUREMENTS OF BLACK HOLE MASSES IN SIX LOCAL SEYFERT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, K. D.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Atlee, D. W.; Bentz, M. C.; Bird, J. C.; Comins, M. L.; Dietrich, M.; Eastman, J. D.; Adair, A.; Au-Yong, K.; Chisholm, E.; Ewald, S.; Ferbey, S.; Jackson, K.; Brokofsky, D. J.; Gaskell, C. M.; Hedrick, C. H.; Doroshenko, V. T.

    2010-09-20

    We present the final results from a high sampling rate, multi-month, spectrophotometric reverberation mapping campaign undertaken to obtain either new or improved H{beta} reverberation lag measurements for several relatively low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have reliably measured the time delay between variations in the continuum and H{beta} emission line in six local Seyfert 1 galaxies. These measurements are used to calculate the mass of the supermassive black hole at the center of each of these AGNs. We place our results in context to the most current calibration of the broad-line region (BLR) R{sub BLR}-L relationship, where our results remove outliers and reduce the scatter at the low-luminosity end of this relationship. We also present velocity-resolved H{beta} time-delay measurements for our complete sample, though the clearest velocity-resolved kinematic signatures have already been published.

  3. Modeling of Mid-Frequency Reverberation in Very Shallow Water: A Green’s Function Approach and Application to TREX2013 Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-31

    inversion , TREX13 data analysis and model-data comparisons. Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 2...inputs. Also, it was suggested to consider analytical expressions for reverberation, methods of its inversion for environmental parameters, and...1913), “Physics-based inversion of multibeam sonar data for seafloor characterization”, J. Acoust. Soc. Amer., 134(4), Pt.2, p.4240. B.T. Hefner

  4. Reverberation Mapping Results for NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Caroline Anna; Bentz, Misty C.; Batiste, Merida

    2017-01-01

    In the spring of 2014 and 2015, reverberation mapping data were collected for the AGN NGC 4151. Spectroscopy and photometry were obtained from Apache Point Observatory (Sunspot, NM) and supplemental photometry was gathered from Hard Labor Creek Observatory (Rutledge, GA). In our preliminary results, we compare our supermassive black hole mass calculations to previously published values. We investigate the gravity-dominated, virialized BLR model by expanding the expected RBLR∝V-2 size-velocity relationship for NGC 4151, providing results for the broad emission lines at multiple luminosities of the AGN. With these luminosities and BLR radii, we create a Hβ RBLR-L5100Å relationship for NGC 4151, and we compare it against the population average Hβ RBLR-L5100Å relationship and to Hβ RBLR-L5100Å relationships for AGN in the literature.

  5. Experimental characterization of active acoustic metamaterial cell with controllable dynamic density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Wael; Baz, Amr

    2012-10-01

    Controlling wave propagation pattern within acoustic fluid domains has been the motivation for the acoustic metamaterials developments to target applications ranging from acoustic cloaking to passive noise control techniques. Currently, various numerical and analytical approaches exist to predict the fluid domain material properties necessary for specific propagation pattern. Physical attempts to realize such material properties have revealed engineered material constructions that are focused on predefined wave propagation patterns. In the current paper, coupled fluid-structure one-dimensional metamaterial cell, in which piezoelectric active ingredient has been introduced, is manufactured to achieve controllable dynamic density. The density-controllable cell has been manufactured by coupling a water-filled cavity with piezoelectric elements in a cell of 4.5 cm length and 4.1 cm diameter subject to impulse excitation. A finite element model of the cell has been developed and its predictions are validated against the experimental results. The validated model is utilized to predict the changes in the pressure gradient inside the developed cell which is a direct measure of the changes introduced to the dynamic density of the acoustic metamaterial domain. With such predictions, it is demonstrated that densities as high as 3.2 gm/cm3 and as low as 0.72 gm/cm3 can be achieved experimentally for excitation frequencies ranging between 100 Hz and 500 Hz.

  6. Statistical properties of kinetic and total energy densities in reverberant spaces.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodríguez

    2010-04-01

    Many acoustical measurements, e.g., measurement of sound power and transmission loss, rely on determining the total sound energy in a reverberation room. The total energy is usually approximated by measuring the mean-square pressure (i.e., the potential energy density) at a number of discrete positions. The idea of measuring the total energy density instead of the potential energy density on the assumption that the former quantity varies less with position than the latter goes back to the 1930s. However, the phenomenon was not analyzed until the late 1970s and then only for the region of high modal overlap, and this analysis has never been published. Moreover, until fairly recently, measurement of the total sound energy density required an elaborate experimental arrangement based on finite-difference approximations using at least four amplitude and phase matched pressure microphones. With the advent of a three-dimensional particle velocity transducer, it has become somewhat easier to measure total rather than only potential energy density in a sound field. This paper examines the ensemble statistics of kinetic and total sound energy densities in reverberant enclosures theoretically, experimentally, and numerically.

  7. Acoustic stratigraphy and hydrothermal activity within Epi Submarine Caldera, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Exon, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Geological and geophysical surveys of active submarine volcanoes offshore and southeast of Epi Island, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc, have delineated details of the structure and acoustic stratigraphy of three volcanic cones. These submarine cones, named Epia, Epib, and Epic, are aligned east-west and spaced 3.5 km apart on the rim of a submerged caldera. At least three acoustic sequences, of presumed Quaternary age, can be identified on single-channel seismic-reflection profiles. Rocks dredged from these cones include basalt, dacite, and cognate gabbroic inclusions with magmatic affinities similar to those of the Karua (an active submarine volcano off the southeastern tip of Epi) lavas. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  8. Relation between near field and far field acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bies, D. A.; Scharton, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    Several approaches to the problem of determining the far field directivity of an acoustic source located in a reverberant environment, such as a wind tunnel, are investigated analytically and experimentally. The decrease of sound pressure level with distance is illustrated; and the spatial extent of the hydrodynamic and geometric near fields, the far field, and the reverberant field are described. A previously-prosposed analytical technique for predicting the far field directivity of the acoustic source on the basis of near field data is investigated. Experiments are conducted with small acoustic sources and an analysis is performed to determine the variation with distance from the source of the directionality of the sound field. A novel experiment is conducted in which the sound pressure measured at various distances from an acoustic driver located in the NASA Ames 40 x 80 ft wind tunnel is crosscorrelated with the driver excitation voltage.

  9. The Reverberation Lag in the Low-mass X-ray Binary H1743-322

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, Barbara; Ponti, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of the inner accretion flow of a black hole X-ray binary during an outburst is still a matter of active research. X-ray reverberation lags are powerful tools for constraining disk-corona geometry. We present a study of X-ray lags in the black hole transient H1743-322. We compared the results obtained from analysis of all the publicly available XMM-Newton observations. These observations were carried out during two different outbursts that occurred in 2008 and 2014. During all the observations the source was caught in the hard state and at similar luminosities ({L}3-10{keV}/{L}{Edd}˜ 0.004). We detected a soft X-ray lag of ˜60 ms, most likely due to thermal reverberation. We did not detect any significant change of the lag amplitude among the different observations, indicating a similar disk-corona geometry at the same luminosity in the hard state. On the other hand, we observe significant differences between the reverberation lag detected in H1743-322 and in GX 339-4 (at similar luminosities in the hard state), which might indicate variations of the geometry from source to source.

  10. Relativistic reverberation in the accretion flow of a tidal disruption event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Erin; Miller, Jon M.; Reynolds, Chris; Dai, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    Our current understanding of the curved space-time around supermassive black holes is based on actively accreting black holes, which make up only ten per cent or less of the overall population. X-ray observations of that small fraction reveal strong gravitational redshifts that indicate that many of these black holes are rapidly rotating; however, selection biases suggest that these results are not necessarily reflective of the majority of black holes in the Universe. Tidal disruption events, where a star orbiting an otherwise dormant black hole gets tidally shredded and accreted onto the black hole, can provide a short, unbiased glimpse at the space-time around the other ninety per cent of black holes. Observations of tidal disruptions have hitherto revealed the formation of an accretion disk and the onset of an accretion-powered jet, but have failed to reveal emission from the inner accretion flow, which enables the measurement of black hole spin. Here we report observations of reverberation arising from gravitationally redshifted iron Kα photons reflected off the inner accretion flow in the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57. From the reverberation timescale, we estimate the mass of the black hole to be a few million solar masses, suggesting an accretion rate of 100 times the Eddington limit or more. The detection of reverberation from the relativistic depths of this rare super-Eddington event demonstrates that the X-rays do not arise from the relativistically moving regions of a jet, as previously thought.

  11. A Reverberation-based Black Hole Mass for MCG-06-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Cackett, Edward M.; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Horne, Keith; Street, Rachel; Ou-Yang, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of a reverberation campaign targeting MGC-06-30-15. Spectrophotometric monitoring and broad-band photometric monitoring over the course of four months in spring 2012 allowed a determination of a time delay in the broad Hβ emission line of τ = 5.3 ± 1.8 days in the rest frame of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Combined with the width of the variable portion of the emission line, we determine a black hole mass of M BH = (1.6 ± 0.4) × 106 M ⊙. Both the Hβ time delay and the black hole mass are in good agreement with expectations from the R BLR-L and M BH-σ ⋆ relationships for other reverberation-mapped AGNs. The Hβ time delay is also in good agreement with the relationship between Hβ and broad-band near-IR delays, in which the effective size of the broad-line region is ˜4-5 times smaller than the inner edge of the dust torus. Additionally, the reverberation-based mass is in good agreement with estimates from the scaling relationship of the break in the X-ray power spectral density, and with constraints based on stellar kinematics derived from integral field spectroscopy of the inner ˜0.5 kpc of the galaxy.

  12. Relativistic reverberation in the accretion flow of a tidal disruption event.

    PubMed

    Kara, Erin; Miller, Jon M; Reynolds, Chris; Dai, Lixin

    2016-07-21

    Our current understanding of the curved space-time around supermassive black holes is based on actively accreting black holes, which make up only ten per cent or less of the overall population. X-ray observations of that small fraction reveal strong gravitational redshifts that indicate that many of these black holes are rapidly rotating; however, selection biases suggest that these results are not necessarily reflective of the majority of black holes in the Universe. Tidal disruption events, where a star orbiting an otherwise dormant black hole gets tidally shredded and accreted onto the black hole, can provide a short, unbiased glimpse at the space-time around the other ninety per cent of black holes. Observations of tidal disruptions have hitherto revealed the formation of an accretion disk and the onset of an accretion-powered jet, but have failed to reveal emission from the inner accretion flow, which enables the measurement of black hole spin. Here we report observations of reverberation arising from gravitationally redshifted iron Kα photons reflected off the inner accretion flow in the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57. From the reverberation timescale, we estimate the mass of the black hole to be a few million solar masses, suggesting an accretion rate of 100 times the Eddington limit or more. The detection of reverberation from the relativistic depths of this rare super-Eddington event demonstrates that the X-rays do not arise from the relativistically moving regions of a jet, as previously thought.

  13. The lick AGN monitoring project 2011: Fe II reverberation from the outer broad-line region

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Aaron J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Pancoast, Anna; Treu, Tommaso; Bennert, Vardha N.; Brewer, Brendon J.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Sand, David J.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Buehler, Tabitha; and others

    2013-06-01

    The prominent broad Fe II emission blends in the spectra of active galactic nuclei have been shown to vary in response to continuum variations, but past attempts to measure the reverberation lag time of the optical Fe II lines have met with only limited success. Here we report the detection of Fe II reverberation in two Seyfert 1 galaxies, NGC 4593 and Mrk 1511, based on data from a program carried out at Lick Observatory in Spring 2011. Light curves for emission lines including Hβ and Fe II were measured by applying a fitting routine to decompose the spectra into several continuum and emission-line components, and we use cross-correlation techniques to determine the reverberation lags of the emission lines relative to V-band light curves. In both cases, the measured lag (τ{sub cen}) of Fe II is longer than that of Hβ, although the inferred lags are somewhat sensitive to the choice of Fe II template used in the fit. For spectral decompositions done using the Fe II template of Véron-Cetty et al., we find τ{sub cen}(Fe II)/τ{sub cen}(Hβ) = 1.9 ± 0.6 in NGC 4593 and 1.5 ± 0.3 in Mrk 1511. The detection of highly correlated variations between Fe II and continuum emission demonstrates that the Fe II emission in these galaxies originates in photoionized gas, located predominantly in the outer portion of the broad-line region.

  14. Acoustic Recordings of Strombolian and Subplinian Activity at Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan-Auerbach, J.; McNutt, S. R.; Vergniolle, S.; Boichu, M.

    2002-05-01

    New data from a pressure sensor provide a detailed perspective on the 1999 eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska. The eruption was well monitored by a 6-station seismic network and frequent satellite passes, but visual observations were minimal. To refine our interpretation of the 1999 eruption we investigate acoustic data recorded on a pressure sensor 6.5 km north of Shishaldin. Three types of acoustic signals were identified, representing different types of eruptive behavior. On April 19, 1999 the pressure sensor recorded a monotonic (2-3 Hz) hum that grew in amplitude for more than 13 hours. At 19:35 UTC on April 19, the humming signal abruptly ended and seismic tremor amplitude increased dramatically. Four minutes later, a broadband (1-15 Hz) signal was recorded on both the pressure sensor and the seismometers, suggesting the onset of the main Subplinian phase. The Subplinian phase appears in the acoustic record as a 50-min broadband signal, over which several low-frequency bursts are superimposed. The final acoustic phase detected by the pressure sensor was a series of discrete pulses, interpreted to be strong Strombolian gas explosions. The strongest explosions, recorded on April 23rd were associated with a small, ash-poor plume and strong seismic tremor. In time series, these events are similar to gas explosions observed at other volcanoes such as Stromboli and Karymsky, but are of lower frequency (1-2 Hz) and are 1-2 orders of magnitude (up to 60 Pa at 6.5 km) larger. Waveform modeling allows us to constrain the size and overpressure of the bubbles, as well as the amount of gas and magma released during the Strombolian phase of the eruption. The acoustic data may be used to investigate the change from Strombolian activity to Subplinian, and back to Strombolian. The 1999 Shishaldin eruption shows that pressure sensors can serve as an excellent complement to traditional means of monitoring remote volcanoes.

  15. Auditory-based algorithms for sound segregation in multisource and reverberant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Nicoleta

    At a cocktail party, we can selectively attend to a single voice and filter out all the other acoustical interferences. This perceptual ability has motivated the emergence of a new field of study known as computational auditory scene analysis (CASA) which aims to build speech separation systems that incorporate principles of auditory organization. This dissertation investigates four aspects of CASA processing: location-based speech segregation in multisource environments, binaural tracking of multiple moving sources, binaural sound segregation in reverberant environments, and monaural segregation of reverberant speech. The principal cues used by the auditory system to determine locations are the interaural time difference (ITD) and interaural intensity difference (IID) between the two ears. We observe that within a narrow frequency band, modifications to the relative strength of the target source with respect to the interference trigger systematic changes for ITD and IID. Moreover, for a fixed spatial configuration, this interaction produces a characteristic clustering in the binaural feature space. Consequently, we propose a supervised learning approach to estimate the ideal binary mask using the estimated binaural features. A systematic evaluation in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as well as automatic speech recognition (ASR) scores shows that the resulting system produces masks very close to the ideal binary ones in anechoic conditions. Furthermore, the model produces large speech intelligibility improvements with normal listeners. While the above binaural systems perform optimally in anechoic conditions, reverberation affects the ITD and IID cues and therefore degrades their performance. For reverberant conditions, we propose a binaural segregation system that combines target cancellation through adaptive filtering and a binary decision rule to estimate the ideal binary mask. Specifically, we observe a correlation between the attenuation produced by the

  16. Music-induced emotions can be predicted from a combination of brain activity and acoustic features.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ian; Williams, Duncan; Hallowell, James; Hwang, Faustina; Kirke, Alexis; Malik, Asad; Weaver, James; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2015-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that music can communicate and induce a wide range of emotions in the listener. However, music is a highly-complex audio signal composed of a wide range of complex time- and frequency-varying components. Additionally, music-induced emotions are known to differ greatly between listeners. Therefore, it is not immediately clear what emotions will be induced in a given individual by a piece of music. We attempt to predict the music-induced emotional response in a listener by measuring the activity in the listeners electroencephalogram (EEG). We combine these measures with acoustic descriptors of the music, an approach that allows us to consider music as a complex set of time-varying acoustic features, independently of any specific music theory. Regression models are found which allow us to predict the music-induced emotions of our participants with a correlation between the actual and predicted responses of up to r=0.234,p<0.001. This regression fit suggests that over 20% of the variance of the participant's music induced emotions can be predicted by their neural activity and the properties of the music. Given the large amount of noise, non-stationarity, and non-linearity in both EEG and music, this is an encouraging result. Additionally, the combination of measures of brain activity and acoustic features describing the music played to our participants allows us to predict music-induced emotions with significantly higher accuracies than either feature type alone (p<0.01).

  17. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  18. Acoustic Emission Transducers: Calibration Activities and Transducer Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    transducer calibration and development activities -j at NBS is summiarized. DO Fo"� roiion or olv as is OBSOLETE DOS/N 0 102. LP.60 4. 6601...developed. This development was partially supported by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Office of Naval Research. The calibration subjects the...and tangential components of motion must be measured tb describe the dynamic displacement at a point on a surface. We previously have developed the NBS

  19. Comparison of STRUCTURAL-ACOUSTIC Control Designs on AN Active Composite Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BINGHAM, B.; ATALLA, M. J.; HAGOOD, N. W.

    2001-07-01

    This work presents a comparison of three technologies for structural-acoustic control that, while prevalent in the literature, had not been compared on a single structure. The comparison is generalizable because the techniques are implemented on a panel structure representative of a more complex structure (e.g., an aircraft fuselage, a submarine vehicle hull, a satellite payload shroud, etc.). The test-bed used for this comparison is a carbon-fiber composite panel manufactured with embedded active fiber composite actuators. Since such integrated structures constitute a continued avenue of research, the manufacturing and performance of this structure is illustrated. The design of the test-bed is guided by an effort to achieve a dynamic response similar to a single panel in a typical aircraft or rotorcraft fuselage.Existing active control architectures for broadband acoustic radiation reduction are compared both analytically and experimentally on a representative structure to quantify the capabilities and limitations of the existing control methodologies. Specifically, three broad categories of control are compared: classical feedback (rate feedback), optimal feedback (linear quadratic Gaussian), and adaptive feedforward control (x -filtered least mean square). The control architectures implemented during this study are all single-input/single-output in order to allow a fair comparison of the issues involved in the design, as well as the use and performance of each approach. Both the vibration and the acoustic performance are recorded for each experiment under equivalent conditions to allow a generalizable comparison. Experimental results lead to conclusions pertaining to the application of active structural-based control to improve the acoustic performance of more complex structures.

  20. Effect of acoustically assisted treatments on vitamins, antioxidant activity, organic acids and drying kinetics of pineapple.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Óscar; Gomes, Wesley; Rodrigues, Sueli; Fernandes, Fabiano A N

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the application of an acoustically assisted treatment on the vitamins (C, B1, B2, B3, and B5), the antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP), the polyphenol and flavonoid contents, the organic acid contents (citric and malic) and drying kinetics of pineapple (Ananas comosus var. Perola) have been studied. Treatments were carried out using two different soaking media: distilled water and pineapple juice at 30°C during 10, 20 and 30min without and with acoustic assistance (23.2W/L). After treatment, samples were dried at 60°C and 0.5m/s during 8h. The quality parameters were determined in untreated, treated, and treated-dried samples. The acoustic assistance promoted an increment of vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B5, total flavonoid and malic acid contents, and a reduction of vitamin C, total polyphenol content, antioxidant activity and citric acid content in treated samples. However, in all treated-dried samples the final content of those quality parameters was higher than the observed in the untreated dried sample.

  1. Active control of acoustic radiation from laminated cylindrical shells integrated with a piezoelectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiongtao; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Xusheng; Jiang, Guohe

    2013-06-01

    Active control of sound radiation from piezoelectric laminated cylindrical shells is theoretically investigated in the wavenumber domain. The governing equations of the smart cylindrical shells are derived by using first-order shear deformation theory. The smart layer is divided into lots of actuator patches, each of which is coated with two very thin electrodes at its inner and outer surfaces. Proportional derivative negative feedback control is applied to the actuator patches and the stiffness of the controlled layer is derived in the wavenumber domain. The equivalent driving forces and moments generated by the piezoelectric layer can produce distinct sound radiation. Large actuator patches cause strong wavenumber conversion and fluctuation of the far-field sound pressure, and do not make any contribution to sound reduction. Nevertheless, suitable small actuator patches induce weak wavenumber conversion and play an important role in the suppression of vibration and acoustic power. The derivative gain of the active control can effectively suppress sound radiation from smart cylindrical shells. The effects of small proportional gain on the sound field can be neglected, but large proportional gain has a great impact on the acoustic radiation of cylindrical shells. The influence of different piezoelectric materials on the acoustic power is described in the numerical results.

  2. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  3. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  4. Probing the Raman-active acoustic vibrations of nanoparticles with extraordinary spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, Skyler; Gelfand, Ryan M.; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots, viruses, DNA and all other nanoparticles have acoustic vibrations that can act as ‘fingerprints’ to identify their shape, size and mechanical properties, yet high-resolution Raman spectroscopy in this low-energy range has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy to measure the Raman-active vibrations of single isolated nanoparticles in the 0.1-10 cm-1 range with ˜0.05 cm-1 resolution, to resolve peak splitting from material anisotropy and to probe the low-frequency modes of biomolecules. EAR employs a nanoaperture laser tweezer that can select particles of interest and manipulate them once identified. We therefore believe that this nanotechnology will enable expanded capabilities for the study of nanoparticles in the materials and life sciences.

  5. Are the kHz QPO Lags in Neutron Star 4U 1608-52 due to Reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward M.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 1608-52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGNs for neutron star LMXBs. Assuming that relativistic reflection forms the broad iron line and associated reflection continuum, we use reflection fits to the energy spectrum along with the impulse response functions to calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies in 4U 1608-52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608-52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608-52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star LMXBs, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  6. Are the kHz QPO lags in neutron star 4U 1608-52 due to reverberation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cackett, Edward

    2016-04-01

    X-ray reverberation lags have recently been discovered in both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and black hole X-ray binaries. A recent study of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 has also shown significant lags, whose properties hint at a reverberation origin. Here, we adapt general relativistic ray tracing impulse response functions used to model X-ray reverberation in AGN for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and calculate the expected lags as a function of energy over the range of observed kHz QPO frequencies in 4U 1608-52. We find that the lag energy spectrum is expected to increase with increasing energy above 8 keV, while the observed lags in 4U 1608-52 show the opposite behavior. This demonstrates that the lags in the lower kHz QPO of 4U 1608-52 are not solely due to reverberation. We do note, however, that the models appear to be more consistent with the much flatter lag energy spectrum observed in the upper kHz QPO of several neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, suggesting that lower and upper kHz QPOs may have different origins.

  7. Shelf-Scale Mapping of Fish Distribution Using Active and Passive Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Carrie C.

    Fish sound production has been associated with courtship and spawning behavior. Acoustic recordings of fish sounds can be used to identify distribution and behavior. Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) can record large amounts of acoustic data in a specific area for days to years. These data can be collected in remote locations under potentially unsafe seas throughout a 24-hour period providing datasets unattainable using observer-based methods. However, the instruments must withstand the caustic ocean environment and be retrieved to obtain the recorded data. This can prove difficult due to the risk of PAMs being lost, stolen or damaged, especially in highly active areas. In addition, point-source sound recordings are only one aspect of fish biogeography. Passive acoustic platforms that produce low self-generated noise, have high retrieval rates, and are equipped with a suite of environmental sensors are needed to relate patterns in fish sound production to concurrently collected oceanographic conditions on large, synoptic scales. The association of sound with reproduction further invokes the need for such non-invasive, near-real time datasets that can be used to enhance current management methods limited by survey bias, inaccurate fisher reports, and extensive delays between fisheries data collection and population assessment. Red grouper (Epinephelus morio) exhibit the distinctive behavior of digging holes and producing a unique sound during courtship. These behaviors can be used to identify red grouper distribution and potential spawning habitat over large spatial scales. The goal of this research was to provide a greater understanding of the temporal and spatial distribution of red grouper sound production and holes on the central West Florida Shelf (WFS) using active sonar and passive acoustic recorders. The technology demonstrated here establishes the necessary methods to map shelf-scale fish sound production. The results of this work could aid resource

  8. The optimization of force inputs for active structural acoustic control using a neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Lester, H. C.; Silcox, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of a neural network to determine which force actuators, of a multi-actuator array, are best activated in order to achieve structural-acoustic control. The concept is demonstrated using a cylinder/cavity model on which the control forces, produced by piezoelectric actuators, are applied with the objective of reducing the interior noise. A two-layer neural network is employed and the back propagation solution is compared with the results calculated by a conventional, least-squares optimization analysis. The ability of the neural network to accurately and efficiently control actuator activation for interior noise reduction is demonstrated.

  9. Pitch-based monaural segregation of reverberant speech.

    PubMed

    Roman, Nicoleta; Wang, DeLiang

    2006-07-01

    In everyday listening, both background noise and reverberation degrade the speech signal. Psychoacoustic evidence suggests that human speech perception under reverberant conditions relies mostly on monaural processing. While speech segregation based on periodicity has achieved considerable progress in handling additive noise, little research in monaural segregation has been devoted to reverberant scenarios. Reverberation smears the harmonic structure of speech signals, and our evaluations using a pitch-based segregation algorithm show that an increase in the room reverberation time causes degraded performance due to weakened periodicity in the target signal. We propose a two-stage monaural separation system that combines the inverse filtering of the room impulse response corresponding to target location and a pitch-based speech segregation method. As a result of the first stage, the harmonicity of a signal arriving from target direction is partially restored while signals arriving from other directions are further smeared, and this leads to improved segregation. A systematic evaluation of the system shows that the proposed system results in considerable signal-to-noise ratio gains across different conditions. Potential applications of this system include robust automatic speech recognition and hearing aid design.

  10. Measurement of reverberation gain in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Mijić, Miomir; Šumarac Pavlović, Dragana

    2012-09-01

    Multipath propagation within an urban area introduces a specific type of reverberation in response to sound excitation. That appearance affects the level of ambient noise produced by strong sound sources. In this paper, the signals recorded during the 1999 bombing of Belgrade were used to analyze the characteristics of reverberation in that urban environment. Six recorded signals were selected among more than 50 explosions recorded at that time. Due to the impulse nature of sound sources, the recorded signals represent the impulse responses of that area. The measured reverberation time T30 is about 7 ± 1 s in octaves between 31.5 Hz and 1 kHz. There is a variation of decay slope in time that is verified by differences between values of T10 and T30. The reverberation gain calculated from recorded signals is 2-7 dB, depending on the global position of the sound excitation point as well as its micro-location according to its position among the surrounding buildings. A variation of gain over octave bands is in the interval of approximately 3 dB. Information about reverberation gain in urban environment can be useful in a quick estimation of noise level produced by strong sound sources in a large area of urban environment.

  11. Pattern reverberation in networks of excitable systems with connection delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücken, Leonhard; Rosin, David P.; Worlitzer, Vasco M.; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-01-01

    We consider the recurrent pulse-coupled networks of excitable elements with delayed connections, which are inspired by the biological neural networks. If the delays are tuned appropriately, the network can either stay in the steady resting state, or alternatively, exhibit a desired spiking pattern. It is shown that such a network can be used as a pattern-recognition system. More specifically, the application of the correct pattern as an external input to the network leads to a self-sustained reverberation of the encoded pattern. In terms of the coupling structure, the tolerance and the refractory time of the individual systems, we determine the conditions for the uniqueness of the sustained activity, i.e., for the functionality of the network as an unambiguous pattern detector. We point out the relation of the considered systems with cyclic polychronous groups and show how the assumed delay configurations may arise in a self-organized manner when a spike-time dependent plasticity of the connection delays is assumed. As excitable elements, we employ the simplistic coincidence detector models as well as the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron models. Moreover, the system is implemented experimentally on a Field-Programmable Gate Array.

  12. Pattern reverberation in networks of excitable systems with connection delays.

    PubMed

    Lücken, Leonhard; Rosin, David P; Worlitzer, Vasco M; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-01-01

    We consider the recurrent pulse-coupled networks of excitable elements with delayed connections, which are inspired by the biological neural networks. If the delays are tuned appropriately, the network can either stay in the steady resting state, or alternatively, exhibit a desired spiking pattern. It is shown that such a network can be used as a pattern-recognition system. More specifically, the application of the correct pattern as an external input to the network leads to a self-sustained reverberation of the encoded pattern. In terms of the coupling structure, the tolerance and the refractory time of the individual systems, we determine the conditions for the uniqueness of the sustained activity, i.e., for the functionality of the network as an unambiguous pattern detector. We point out the relation of the considered systems with cyclic polychronous groups and show how the assumed delay configurations may arise in a self-organized manner when a spike-time dependent plasticity of the connection delays is assumed. As excitable elements, we employ the simplistic coincidence detector models as well as the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron models. Moreover, the system is implemented experimentally on a Field-Programmable Gate Array.

  13. Reverberation Mapping Results for Five Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, C. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Denney, K. D.; Bentz, M. C.; Martini, Paul; Sergeev, S. G.; Kaspi, S.; Minezaki, T.; Zu, Y.; Kochanek, C. S.; Siverd, R.; Shappee, B.; Stanek, K. Z.; Araya Salvo, C.; Beatty, T. G.; Bird, J. C.; Bord, D. J.; Borman, G. A.; Che, X.; Chen, C.; Cohen, S. A.; Dietrich, M.; Doroshenko, V. T.; Drake, T.; Efimov, Yu. S.; Free, N.; Ginsburg, I.; Henderson, C. B.; King, A. L.; Koshida, S.; Mogren, K.; Molina, M.; Mosquera, A. M.; Nazarov, S. V.; Okhmat, D. N.; Pejcha, O.; Rafter, S.; Shields, J. C.; Skowron, J.; Szczygiel, D. M.; Valluri, M.; van Saders, J. L.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results from a detailed analysis of photometric and spectrophotometric data on five Seyfert 1 galaxies observed as a part of a recent reverberation mapping program. The data were collected at several observatories over a 140 day span beginning in 2010 August and ending in 2011 January. We obtained high sampling-rate light curves for Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C 120, Mrk 6, and PG 2130+099, from which we have measured the time lag between variations in the 5100 Å continuum and the Hβ broad emission line. We then used these measurements to calculate the mass of the supermassive black hole at the center of each of these galaxies. Our new measurements substantially improve previous measurements of M BH and the size of the broad line-emitting region for four sources and add a measurement for one new object. Our new measurements are consistent with photoionization physics regulating the location of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei.

  14. REVERBERATION MAPPING RESULTS FOR FIVE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, C. J.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Martini, Paul; Zu, Y.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B.; Stanek, K. Z.; Salvo, C. Araya; Beatty, T. G.; Bird, J. C.; Denney, K. D.; Bentz, M. C.; Sergeev, S. G.; Borman, G. A.; Minezaki, T.; Siverd, R.; Bord, D. J.; Che, X.; and others

    2012-08-10

    We present the results from a detailed analysis of photometric and spectrophotometric data on five Seyfert 1 galaxies observed as a part of a recent reverberation mapping program. The data were collected at several observatories over a 140 day span beginning in 2010 August and ending in 2011 January. We obtained high sampling-rate light curves for Mrk 335, Mrk 1501, 3C 120, Mrk 6, and PG 2130+099, from which we have measured the time lag between variations in the 5100 A continuum and the H{beta} broad emission line. We then used these measurements to calculate the mass of the supermassive black hole at the center of each of these galaxies. Our new measurements substantially improve previous measurements of M{sub BH} and the size of the broad line-emitting region for four sources and add a measurement for one new object. Our new measurements are consistent with photoionization physics regulating the location of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei.

  15. Velar activity in individuals with velopharyngeal insufficiency assessed by acoustic rhinometry

    PubMed Central

    TRINDADE, Inge Elly Kiemle; ARAÚJO, Bruna Mara Adorno Marmontel; TEIXEIRA, Ana Claudia Martins Sampaio; da SILVA, Andressa Sharllene Carneiro; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic rhinometry is routinely used for the evaluation of nasal patency. Objective To investigate whether the technique is able to identify the impairment of velopharyngeal (VP) activity in individuals with clinical diagnosis of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Methods Twenty subjects with repaired cleft palate and inadequate velopharyngeal function (IVF) and 18 non-cleft controls with adequate velopharyngeal function (AVF), adults, of both genders, were evaluated. Area-distance curves were obtained during VP rest and speech activity, using an Eccovision Acoustic Rhinometry system. Volume was determined by integrating the area under the curve at the segment corresponding to the nasopharynx. VP activity (∆V) was estimated by the absolute and relative differences between nasopharyngeal volume at rest (Vr) and during an unreleased /k/ production (Vk). The efficiency of the technique to discriminate IVF and AVF was assessed by a ROC curve. Results Mean Vk and Vr values (±SD) obtained were: 23.2±3.6 cm3 and 15.9±3.8 cm3 (AVF group), and 22.7±7.9 cm3 and 20.7±7.4 cm3 (IVF group), corresponding to a mean ∆V decay of 7.3 cm3 (31%) for the AVF group and a significantly smaller ∆V decay of 2.0 cm3 (9%) for the IVF group (p<0.05). Seventy percent of the IVF individuals showed a ∆V suggesting impaired VP function (below the cutoff score of 3.0 cm3 which maximized both sensitivity and specificity of the test), confirming clinical diagnosis. Conclusion Acoustic rhinometry was able to identify, with a good discriminatory power, the impairment of VP activity which characterizes VPI. PMID:25141205

  16. Evidence for enhanced discrimination of virtual auditory distance among blind listeners using level and direct-to-reverberant cues.

    PubMed

    Kolarik, Andrew J; Cirstea, Silvia; Pardhan, Shahina

    2013-02-01

    Totally blind listeners often demonstrate better than normal capabilities when performing spatial hearing tasks. Accurate representation of three-dimensional auditory space requires the processing of available distance information between the listener and the sound source; however, auditory distance cues vary greatly depending upon the acoustic properties of the environment, and it is not known which distance cues are important to totally blind listeners. Our data show that totally blind listeners display better performance compared to sighted age-matched controls for distance discrimination tasks in anechoic and reverberant virtual rooms simulated using a room-image procedure. Totally blind listeners use two major auditory distance cues to stationary sound sources, level and direct-to-reverberant ratio, more effectively than sighted controls for many of the virtual distances tested. These results show that significant compensation among totally blind listeners for virtual auditory spatial distance leads to benefits across a range of simulated acoustic environments. No significant differences in performance were observed between listeners with partial non-correctable visual losses and sighted controls, suggesting that sensory compensation for virtual distance does not occur for listeners with partial vision loss.

  17. Quantifying activation of perfluorocarbon-based phase-change contrast agents using simultaneous acoustic and optical observation.

    PubMed

    Li, Sinan; Lin, Shengtao; Cheng, Yi; Matsunaga, Terry O; Eckersley, Robert J; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-05-01

    Phase-change contrast agents in the form of nanoscale droplets can be activated into microbubbles by ultrasound, extending the contrast beyond the vasculature. This article describes simultaneous optical and acoustical measurements for quantifying the ultrasound activation of phase-change contrast agents over a range of concentrations. In experiments, decafluorobutane-based nanodroplets of different dilutions were sonicated with a high-pressure activation pulse and two low-pressure interrogation pulses immediately before and after the activation pulse. The differences between the pre- and post-interrogation signals were calculated to quantify the acoustic power scattered by the microbubbles activated over a range of droplet concentrations. Optical observation occurred simultaneously with the acoustic measurement, and the pre- and post-microscopy images were processed to generate an independent quantitative indicator of the activated microbubble concentration. Both optical and acoustic measurements revealed linear relationships to the droplet concentration at a low concentration range <10(8)/mL when measured at body temperature. Further increases in droplet concentration resulted in saturation of the acoustic interrogation signal. Compared with body temperature, room temperature was found to produce much fewer and larger bubbles after ultrasound droplet activation.

  18. Studies on Sonar Clutter and Reverberation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    support ONR’s three major experiment efforts scheduled for FY 2013, 2015 and 2017 with FORA. Also, planning for a pilot experiment to support the...from a shallow- water mud- volcano cluster,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 1946-1958 (2007). [2] D. T. Hughes, “Aspects of cardioid processing,” SACLANT

  19. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  20. Method of monaural localization of the acoustic source direction from the standpoint of the active perception theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, V. E.; Polyakov, I. V.; Krasheninnikov, M. S.; Koshurina, A. A.; Dorofeev, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the scientific and educational center of the “Transport” of NNSTU performs work on the creation of the universal rescue vehicle. This vehicle is a robot, and intended to reduce the number of human victims in accidents on offshore oil platforms. An actual problem is the development of a method for determining the location of a person overboard in low visibility conditions, when a traditional vision is not efficient. One of the most important sensory robot systems is the acoustic sensor system, because it is omnidirectional and does not require finding of an acoustic source in visibility scope. Features of the acoustic sensor robot system can complement the capabilities of the video sensor in the solution of the problem of localization of a person or some event in the environment. This paper describes the method of determination of the direction of the acoustic source using just one microphone. The proposed method is based on the active perception theory.

  1. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units.

    PubMed

    Pope, Diana S; Miller-Klein, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s' standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  2. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Diana S.; Miller-Klein, Erik T.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s’ standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered. PMID:26780959

  3. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    For several decades large reverberant chambers and most recently direct field acoustic testing have been used in the aerospace industry to test larger structures with low surface densities such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify them and to detect faults in the design and fabrication. It has been reported that in reverberant chamber and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes may strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware (Reference 1). In this paper results from a recent reverberant chamber acoustic test of a composite reflector are discussed. These results provide further convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave and structural modes coupling phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to alert test organizations to this phenomenon so that they can account for the potential increase in structural responses and ensure that flight hardware undergoes safe testing. An understanding of the coupling phenomenon may also help minimize the over and/or under testing that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues.

  4. Broad-line Reverberation in the Kepler-field Seyfert Galaxy Zw 229-015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Aaron J.; Nguyen, My L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Gorjian, Varoujan; Joner, Michael D.; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Botyanszki, Janos; Cenko, S. Bradley; Childress, Michael; Choi, Jieun; Comerford, Julia M.; Cucciara, Antonino; da Silva, Robert; Duchêne, Gaspard; Fumagalli, Michele; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Gates, Elinor L.; Gerke, Brian F.; Griffith, Christopher V.; Harris, Chelsea; Hintz, Eric G.; Hsiao, Eric; Kandrashoff, Michael T.; Keel, William C.; Kirkman, David; Kleiser, Io K. W.; Laney, C. David; Lee, Jeffrey; Lopez, Liliana; Lowe, Thomas B.; Moody, J. Ward; Morton, Alekzandir; Nierenberg, A. M.; Nugent, Peter; Pancoast, Anna; Rex, Jacob; Rich, R. Michael; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Graeme H.; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Suzuki, Nao; Tytler, David; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Yang, Yizhe; Zeisse, Carl

    2011-05-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy Zw 229-015 is among the brightest active galaxies being monitored by the Kepler mission. In order to determine the black hole mass in Zw 229-015 from Hβ reverberation mapping, we have carried out nightly observations with the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3 m telescope during the dark runs from 2010 June through December, obtaining 54 spectroscopic observations in total. We have also obtained nightly V-band imaging with the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at Lick Observatory and with the 0.9 m telescope at the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory over the same period. We detect strong variability in the source, which exhibited more than a factor of two change in broad Hβ flux. From cross-correlation measurements, we find that the Hβ light curve has a rest-frame lag of 3.86+0.69 -0.90 days with respect to the V-band continuum variations. We also measure reverberation lags for Hα and Hγ and find an upper limit to the Hδ lag. Combining the Hβ lag measurement with a broad Hβ width of σline = 1590 ± 47 km s-1 measured from the rms variability spectrum, we obtain a virial estimate of M BH = 1.00+0.19 -0.24 × 107 M sun for the black hole in Zw 229-015. As a Kepler target, Zw 229-015 will eventually have one of the highest-quality optical light curves ever measured for any active galaxy, and the black hole mass determined from reverberation mapping will serve as a benchmark for testing relationships between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.

  5. BROAD-LINE REVERBERATION IN THE KEPLER-FIELD SEYFERT GALAXY Zw 229-015

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Aaron J.; Nguyen, My L.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Choi, Jieun; Duchene, Gaspard; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Gorjian, Varoujan; Joner, Michael D.; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Botyanszki, Janos; Childress, Michael; Cucciara, Antonino; Comerford, Julia M.; Da Silva, Robert; Gates, Elinor L.; Gerke, Brian F.

    2011-05-10

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy Zw 229-015 is among the brightest active galaxies being monitored by the Kepler mission. In order to determine the black hole mass in Zw 229-015 from H{beta} reverberation mapping, we have carried out nightly observations with the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3 m telescope during the dark runs from 2010 June through December, obtaining 54 spectroscopic observations in total. We have also obtained nightly V-band imaging with the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at Lick Observatory and with the 0.9 m telescope at the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory over the same period. We detect strong variability in the source, which exhibited more than a factor of two change in broad H{beta} flux. From cross-correlation measurements, we find that the H{beta} light curve has a rest-frame lag of 3.86{sup +0.69}{sub -0.90} days with respect to the V-band continuum variations. We also measure reverberation lags for H{alpha} and H{gamma} and find an upper limit to the H{delta} lag. Combining the H{beta} lag measurement with a broad H{beta} width of {sigma}{sub line} = 1590 {+-} 47 km s{sup -1} measured from the rms variability spectrum, we obtain a virial estimate of M{sub BH} = 1.00{sup +0.19}{sub -0.24} x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun} for the black hole in Zw 229-015. As a Kepler target, Zw 229-015 will eventually have one of the highest-quality optical light curves ever measured for any active galaxy, and the black hole mass determined from reverberation mapping will serve as a benchmark for testing relationships between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.

  6. Simultaneous suppression of noise and reverberation in cochlear implants using a ratio masking strategy.

    PubMed

    Hazrati, Oldooz; Sadjadi, Seyed Omid; Loizou, Philipos C; Hansen, John H L

    2013-11-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) recipients' ability to identify words is reduced in noisy or reverberant environments. The speech identification task for CI users becomes even more challenging in conditions where both reverberation and noise co-exist as they mask the spectro-temporal cues of speech in a rather complementary fashion. Ideal channel selection (ICS) was found to result in significantly more intelligible speech when applied to the noisy, reverberant, as well as noisy reverberant speech. In this study, a blind single-channel ratio masking strategy is presented to simultaneously suppress the negative effects of reverberation and noise on speech identification performance for CI users. In this strategy, noise power spectrum is estimated from the non-speech segments of the utterance while reverberation spectral variance is computed as a delayed and scaled version of the reverberant speech spectrum. Based on the estimated noise and reverberation power spectra, a weight between 0 and 1 is assigned to each time-frequency unit to form the final mask. Listening experiments conducted with CI users in two reverberant conditions (T60 = 0.6 and 0.8 s) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 15 dB indicate substantial improvements in speech intelligibility in both reverberant-alone and noisy reverberant conditions considered.

  7. Shallow Water Propagation and Surface Reverberation Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-29

    terminus of one or more glaciers . The program objective was to measure the directionality of underwater ambient noise in a glacial fjord in...1 mile from Hans glacier . The measurement system (the directional acoustic buoy or DAB) consisted of two broad-band hydrophones mounted on a...BrepoUen fjord are overlaid on a picture of the terminus of Hans glacier in Fig. 4. Note that the satellite image of the glacier was taken in 2010 and

  8. Shallow Water Propagation and Surface Reverberation Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    compare the results with experiment. This work will be used to help interpret field data of bistatic scattering from sea ice cover and calibrate...approximate analytical and numerical acoustic models used to compute bistatic scattering. The clouds of bubbles entrained at the sea surface by breaking...ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified

  9. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  10. Divorce and Union Dissolution: Reverberations over Three Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connidis, Ingrid Arnet

    2003-01-01

    High divorce rates over the past 40 years have affected multiple generations and have long-term consequences for family relationships. This article applies a life course perspective as it explores the reverberation of relationship dissolution beyond the nuclear family. Qualitative data from a study involving 86 adults from 10 three-generation…

  11. Acoustics and sociolinguistics: Patterns of communication in hearing impairing classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKellin, William; Shahin, Kimary; Jamieson, Janet; Hodgson, Murray; Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen

    2005-04-01

    In elementary school classes, noise during student led activities is often taken as evidence of successful interaction and learning. In this complex social environment of elementary school classrooms, acquisition of complex language and social skills-the focus of activities in early education-is expected to take place in hearing-hostile environments. Communication and language processing in these contexts requires interactive strategies, discourse forms, and syntactic structures different from the educationally desired forms used in acoustically advantageous environments. Recordings were made of the interaction of groups of students in grades 1-3, 5, and 7 during collaborative group work in their regular classrooms. Each student wore microphones at the ear level and head-mounted video cameras. Each group as a whole was also audio- and videotaped and noise level readings were recorded. Analysis of the acoustical and phonological properties of language heard by each student has demonstrated that the language variety used in these noisy and reverberant settings is similar to that of individuals with hearing impairments. This paper reports similarities between the syntactic structures and pragmatic strategies used by hearing impaired children and normally hearing children in noisy contexts. [Work supported by Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia.

  12. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  13. Transient Sound Intensity Measurements for Evaluating the Spatial Information of Sound Fields in Reverberant Enclosures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdov, Adel Abdel-Moneim

    Over the last twenty years, new subjectively relevant objective room-acoustic indicators for evaluating the acoustical quality of an enclosure have been introduced. While these indicators give new insight into the acoustical "Goodness" of a listener position, in order to design halls, assess or to correct an acoustical defect in an existing enclosure, there is a need to understand to what extent they are influenced by the physical design features of the enclosure. To meet such a need, information about the directional characteristics of sound is required. The spatial distribution of sound energy is usually not considered due to lack of an efficient, accurate and easy to perform measurement method. The main objectives of the present study are, first; to review known and speculative room-acoustic indicators for use in assessing reverberant spaces such as concert halls, opera houses, multi-purpose halls and churches. Second, to introduce an easy to perform measurement method for directional sensing in sound fields. Third, to develop a simple and inexpensive PC-based instrument primarily for the measurement of sound fields directional characteristics as well as contemporary room-acoustic indicators. Fourth, to propose new room-acoustic indicators which have relevance to directional information. This study introduces a three-dimensional sound intensity measurement technique for obtaining spatial information of sound fields in an enclosure. The technique has been validated and its accuracy investigated. The method gives results that provide valuable information regarding the directional behaviour of sound in enclosures. Subsequently both the system and the measurement method were applied to known spaces as example applications in order to assess sound quality, to detect the effect of the surrounding interior features of the space, and to assess potential diagnostic capability with respect to interior physical changes. The study has validated the measurement procedure as

  14. On the minimum audible difference in direct-to-reverberant energy ratio1

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik; Iyer, Nandini; Lansing, Charissa R.; Feng, Albert S.

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this study were to measure sensitivity to the direct-to-reverberant energy ratio (D∕R) across a wide range of D∕R values and to gain insight into which cues are used in the discrimination process. The main finding is that changes in D∕R are discriminated primarily based on spectral cues. Temporal cues may be used but only when spectral cues are diminished or not available, while sensitivity to interaural cross-correlation is too low to be useful in any of the conditions tested. These findings are based on an acoustic analysis of these variables and the results of two psychophysical experiments. The first experiment employs wideband noise with two values for onset and offset times to determine the D∕R just-noticeable difference at −10, 0, 10, and 20 dB D∕R. This yielded substantially higher sensitivity to D∕R at 0 and 10 dB D∕R (2–3 dB) than has been reported previously, while sensitivity is much lower at −10 and 20 dB D∕R. The second experiment consists of three parts where specific cues to D∕R are reduced or removed, which enabled the specified rank ordering of the cues. The acoustic analysis and psychophysical experiments also provide an explanation for the “auditory horizon effect.” PMID:18646989

  15. Reverberation Reduction in Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) by Front-face Reflectivity Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; La Mura, Monica; Mauti, Barbara; Lamberti, Nicola; Caliano, Giosuè

    Front-face acoustic reflectivity of ultrasonic imaging transducers, due to acoustic impedance mismatch with the propagation medium, may cause reverberation phenomena during wideband pulse-echo operation. Front-face reflectivity may be reduced by promoting the transmission of the echoes, received from the medium, to the transducer backing, and by maximizing the mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion and dissipation by tuning the electrical load impedance connected to the transducer. In Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs), the energy transfer from the medium to the backing is very low due to the large impedance mismatch between the medium and the transducer substrate, typically made of silicon. Reverse Fabrication Process (RFP) makes it possible providing CMUTs with custom substrate materials, thus eliminating the original silicon microfabrication support. In this paper, we propose two methods for the front-face reflectivity reduction in RFP-CMUTs: the first one is based on the use of low-impedance, highly attenuating backing materials, and the second one is based on the maximization of the mechanoelectrical energy conversion and dissipation. We analyze the methods by finite element simulations and experimentally validate the obtained results by fabricating and characterizing single-element RFP-CMUTs provided with different backing materials and electrical loads.

  16. The BLR structure and dust torus size of AGN - Implications from photometric and dust reverberation mapping campaigns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo Nuñez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Westhues, C.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Steenbrugge, K.; Lemke, R.; Murphy, M.

    2014-03-01

    Photometric reverberation mapping (PRM) is a novel method used to study the geometry of the broad emission-line region (BLR), black hole masses and host-subtracted luminosities of active galactic nuclei (AGN). We obtained high-quality sampling data with small (15 to 80 cm) robotic telescopes at the observatory of the Ruhr-University Bochum, located in the Atacama desert in Chile.

  17. Tissue plasminogen activator in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis regulates acoustic startle.

    PubMed

    Matys, T; Pawlak, R; Strickland, S

    2005-01-01

    The bed nucleus of stria terminalis is a basal forebrain region involved in regulation of hormonal and behavioral responses to stress. In this report we demonstrate that bed nucleus of stria terminalis has a high and localized expression of tissue plasminogen activator, a serine protease with neuromodulatory properties and implicated in neuronal plasticity. Tissue plasminogen activator activity in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis is transiently increased in response to acute restraint stress or i.c.v. administration of a major stress mediator, corticotropin-releasing factor. We show that tissue plasminogen activator is important in bed nucleus of stria terminalis function using two criteria: 1, Neuronal activation in this region as measured by c-fos induction is reduced in tissue plasminogen activator-deficient mice; and 2, a bed nucleus of stria terminalis-dependent behavior, potentiation of acoustic startle by corticotropin-releasing factor, is attenuated in tissue plasminogen activator-deficient mice. These studies identify a novel site of tissue plasminogen activator expression in the mouse brain and demonstrate a functional role for this protease in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis.

  18. Reventador Volcano 2005: Eruptive activity inferred from seismo-acoustic observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Ruiz, Mario; Troncoso, Liliana; Welsh, Matt

    2008-09-01

    Reventador Volcano entered an eruptive phase in 2005 which included a wide variety of seismic and infrasonic activity. These are described and illustrated: volcano-tectonic, harmonic tremor, drumbeats, chugging and spasmodic tremor, long period and very long period events. The recording of this simultaneous activity on an array of three broadband, seismo-acoustic instruments provides detailed information of the state of the conduit and vent during this phase of volcanic eruption. Quasi-periodic tremor at Reventador is similar to that observed at other volcanoes and may be used as an indicator of vent aperture. Variations in the vibration modes of the volcano, frequency fluctuations and rapid temporal fluctuations suggest the influx of new material, choking of the vent and possible modification of the conduit geometry during explosions and effusion over a period of six weeks.

  19. Acoustic measurements of the 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska 1. Origin of Strombolian activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vergniolle, S.; Boichu, M.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2004-01-01

    The 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano (Alaska, USA) displayed both classical Strombolian activity and an explosive Subplinian plume. Strombolian activity at Shishaldin occurred in two major phases following the Subplinian activity. In this paper, we use acoustic measurements to interpret the Strombolian activity. Acoustic measurements of the two Strombolian phases show a series of explosions that are modeled by the vibration of a large overpressurised cylindrical bubble at the top of the magma column. Results show that the bubble does not burst at its maximum radius, as expected if the liquid film is stretched beyond its elasticity. But bursting occurs after one cycle of vibration, as a consequence of an instability of the air-magma interface close to the bubble minimum radius. During each Strombolian period, estimates of bubble length and overpressure are calculated. Using an alternate method based on acoustic power, we estimate gas velocity to be 30-60 m/s, in very good agreement with synthetic waveforms. Although there is some variation within these parameters, bubble length and overpressure for the first Strombolian phase are found to be ??? 82 ?? 11 m and 0.083 MPa. For the second Strombolian phase, bubble length and overpressure are estimated at 24 ?? 12 m and 0.15 MPa for the first 17 h after which bubble overpressure shows a constant increase, reaching a peak of 1.4 MPa, just prior to the end of the second Strombolian phase. This peak suggests that, at the time, the magma in the conduit may contain a relatively large concentration of small bubbles. Maximum total gas volume and gas fluxes at the surface are estimated to be 3.3 ?? 107 and 2.9 ?? 103 m3/s for the first phase and 1.0 ?? 108 and 2.2 ?? 103 m3/s for the second phase. This gives a mass flux of 1.2 ?? 103 and 8.7 ?? 102 kg/s, respectively, for the first and the second Strombolian phases. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Spitzer Space Telescope Measurements of Dust Reverberation Lags in the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 6418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Billy; Galianni, Pasquale; Richmond, Michael; Robinson, Andrew; Axon, David J.; Horne, Keith; Almeyda, Triana; Fausnaugh, Michael; Peterson, Bradley M.; Bottorff, Mark; Gallimore, Jack; Eltizur, Moshe; Netzer, Hagai; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Marconi, Alessandro; Capetti, Alessandro; Batcheldor, Dan; Buchanan, Catherine; Stirpe, Giovanna; Kishimoto, Makoto; Packham, Christopher; Perez, Enrique; Tadhunter, Clive; Upton, John; Estrada-Carpenter, Vicente

    2015-03-01

    We present results from a 15 month campaign of high-cadence (˜3 days) mid-infrared Spitzer and optical (B and V) monitoring of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 6418, with the objective of determining the characteristic size of the dusty torus in this active galactic nucleus (AGN). We find that the 3.6 and 4.5 μm flux variations lag behind those of the optical continuum by 37.2-2.2+2.4 days and 47.1-3.1+3.1 days, respectively. We report a cross-correlation time lag between the 4.5 and 3.6 μm flux of 13.9-0.1+0.5 days. The lags indicate that the dust emitting at 3.6 and 4.5 μm is located at a distance ≈ 1 light-month (≈ 0.03 pc) from the source of the AGN UV-optical continuum. The reverberation radii are consistent with the inferred lower limit to the sublimation radius for pure graphite grains at 1800 K, but smaller by a factor of ˜2 than the corresponding lower limit for silicate grains; this is similar to what has been found for near-infrared (K-band) lags in other AGNs. The 3.6 and 4.5 μm reverberation radii fall above the K-band τ \\propto {{L}0.5} size-luminosity relationship by factors ≲ 2.7 and ≲ 3.4, respectively, while the 4.5 μm reverberation radius is only 27% larger than the 3.6 μm radius. This is broadly consistent with clumpy torus models, in which individual optically thick clouds emit strongly over a broad wavelength range.

  1. Baseline acoustic levels of the NASA Active Noise Control Fan rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Elliott, David M.; Nallasamy, M.

    1996-01-01

    Extensive measurements of the spinning acoustic mode structure in the NASA 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) test rig have been taken. A continuously rotating microphone rake system with a least-squares data reduction technique was employed to measure these modes in the inlet and exhaust. Farfield directivity patterns in an anechoic environment were also measured at matched corrected rotor speeds. Several vane counts and spacings were tested over a range of rotor speeds. The Eversman finite element radiation code was run with the measured in-duct modes as input and the computed farfield results were compared to the experimentally measured directivity pattern. The experimental data show that inlet spinning mode measurements can be made very accurately. Exhaust mode measurements may have wake interference, but the least-squares reduction does a good job of rejecting the non-acoustic pressure. The Eversman radiation code accurately extrapolates the farfield levels and directivity pattern when all in-duct modes are included.

  2. Optimal virtual sensing for active noise control in a rigid-walled acoustic duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Dick; Zander, Anthony C.; Cazzolato, Ben S.; Hansen, Colin H.

    2005-11-01

    The performance of local active noise control systems is generally limited by the small sizes of the zones of quiet created at the error sensors. This is often exacerbated by the fact that the error sensors cannot always be located close to an observer's ears. Virtual sensing is a method that can move the zone of quiet away from the physical location of the transducers to a desired location, such as an observer's ear. In this article, analytical expressions are derived for optimal virtual sensing in a rigid-walled acoustic duct with arbitrary termination conditions. The expressions are derived for tonal excitations, and are obtained by employing a traveling wave model of a rigid-walled acoustic duct. It is shown that the optimal solution for the virtual sensing microphone weights is independent of the source location and microphone locations. It is also shown that, theoretically, it is possible to obtain infinite reductions at the virtual location. The analytical expressions are compared with forward difference prediction techniques. The results demonstrate that the maximum attenuation, that theoretically can be obtained at the virtual location using forward difference prediction techniques, is expected to decrease for higher excitation frequencies and larger virtual distances.

  3. Modeling the reverberation of optical polarization in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Lobos, P. A.; Goosmann, R.; Marin, F.

    2016-12-01

    According to the standard paradigm, the strong and compact luminosity of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is due to multi-temperature black body emission originating from an accretion disk formed around a supermassive black hole. This central engine is thought to be surrounded by a dusty region along the equatorial plane and by ionized winds along the poles. The innermost regions cannot yet be resolved neither in the optical nor in the infrared and it is fair to say that we still lack a satisfactory understanding of the physical processes, geometry and composition of the central (sub-parsec) components of AGN. Like spectral or polarimetric observations, the reverberation data needs to be modeled in order to infer constraints on the AGN geometry (such as the inner radius or the half-opening angle of the dusty torus). In this research note, we present preliminary modeling results using a time-dependent Monte Carlo method to solve the radiative transfer in a simplified AGN set up. We investigate different model configurations using both polarization and time lags and find a high dependency on the geometry to the time-lag response. For all models there is a clear distinction between edge-on or face-on viewing angles for fluxes and time lags, the later showing a higher wavelength-dependence than the former. Time lags, polarization and fluxes point toward a clear dichotomy between the different inclinations of AGN, a method that could help us to determine the true orientation of the nucleus in Seyfert galaxies.

  4. Photometric Reverberation Mapping using a Meter-class Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Carla June; Joner, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    For the past several decades, mass estimates for supermassive black holes hosted by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been made using the reverberation mapping (RM) technique. This methodology has produced consistent results and has been used to establish several relations that link the characteristics of the host galaxy to the mass of the central black hole. Despite this success, there are less than 50 AGNs with black hole masses derived from RM. This low number is generally attributed to the difficulties in coordinating large blocks of telescope time for making the simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations. In addition, the spectroscopic observations generally require several months of nightly observations with moderate to large size telescopes.We have made photometric observations of several AGNs in selected filters in order to evaluate a photometric methodology for determining the lag time between the variations observed in the continuum and the response signal that is seen coming from the broad-line region (BLR) gas. This time delay represents the mean light travel time to the BLR, and is therefore a measurement of the mean BLR radius. In traditional RM campaigns, this time lag is combined with a measure of the width of the broad line to determine the velocity of the gas and then make a virial estimate of the black hole mass. We investigate results obtained using photometric time lags and a single epoch spectroscopic measurement of the line width in order to estimate the mass of the central black hole.We present results from our photometric observations of several target AGNs made with the West Mountain Observatory 0.9 m reflector during the spring and summer of 2014.This research was supported by the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University as well as through a fellowship from the NASA Rocky Mountain Space Grant Consortium.

  5. The combined effects of reverberation and noise on speech intelligibility by cochlear implant listeners

    PubMed Central

    Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to assess the individual effect of reverberation and noise, as well as their combined effect, on speech intelligibility by cochlear implant (CI) users. Design Sentence stimuli corrupted by reverberation, noise, and reverberation + noise are presented to 11 CI listeners for word identification. They are tested in two reverberation conditions (T60 = 0.6 s, 0.8 s), two noise conditions (SNR = 5 dB, 10 dB), and four reverberation + noise conditions. Study sample Eleven CI users participated. Results Results indicated that reverberation degrades speech intelligibility to a greater extent than additive noise (speech-shaped noise), at least for the SNR levels tested. The combined effects were greater than those introduced by either reverberation or noise alone. Conclusions The effect of reverberation on speech intelligibility by CI users was found to be larger than that by noise. The results from the present study highlight the importance of testing CI users in reverberant conditions, since testing in noise-alone conditions might underestimate the difficulties they experience in their daily lives where reverberation and noise often coexist. PMID:22356300

  6. Analogy electromagnetism-acoustics: Validation and application to local impedance active control for sound absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, L.; Furstoss, M.; Galland, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    An analogy between electromagnetism and acoustics is presented in 2D. The propagation of sound in presence of absorbing material is modeled using an open boundary microwave package. Validation is performed through analytical and experimental results. Application to local impedance active control for free field sound absorption is finally described. Une analogie entre acoustique et électromagnétisme est présentée en 2D, afin de modéliser la propagation d'ondes acoustiques, en présence de matériau absorbant et à l'aide d'un logiciel de micro-ondes en domaine ouvert. Cette analogie est validée par des résultats analytiques et expérimentaux. Une application au contrôle actif de l'impédance acoustique de surface de matériaux poreux est finalement décrite.

  7. A high intensity acoustic source for active attenuation of exhaust noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Elliott, S. J.; Nelson, P. A.

    1988-04-01

    An electropneumatic sound source was developed for active noise control systems applied in hostile environments such as the exhaust systems of gas turbines and internal combustion engines. It employs a gas bearing to support the friction free motion of a sliding plate which is used to modulate the supply of compressed air. The sliding plate is driven by an electrodynamic vibrator. Experimental results demonstrate that this arrangement reduces harmonic distortion to at least 20 dB below the fundamental driving frequency for most operating conditions. A theoretical analysis of the transducer enables predictions to be made of the acoustic volume velocity (source strength) produced by the transducer as a function of the upstream pressure and displacement of the sliding valve. Applicability of the transducer to gas turbine and internal combustion engine exhaust systems was tested, and net power consumption resulting from the operation of the device was estimated.

  8. Patterns of acoustical activity of bats prior to and following White-nose Syndrome occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ford, W. Mark; Britzke, Eric R.; Dobony, Christopher A.; Rodrigue, Jane L.; Johnson, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose Syndrome (WNS), a wildlife health concern that has decimated cave-hibernating bat populations in eastern North America since 2006, began affecting source-caves for summer bat populations at Fort Drum, a U.S. Army installation in New York in the winter of 2007–2008. As regional die-offs of bats became evident, and Fort Drum's known populations began showing declines, we examined whether WNS-induced change in abundance patterns and seasonal timing of bat activity could be quantified using acoustical surveys, 2003–2010, at structurally uncluttered riparian–water habitats (i.e., streams, ponds, and wet meadows). As predicted, we observed significant declines in overall summer activity between pre-WNS and post-WNS years for little brown bats Myotis lucifugus, northern bats M. septentrionalis, and Indiana bats M. sodalis. We did not observe any significant change in activity patterns between pre-WNS and post-WNS years for big brown bats Eptesicus fuscus, eastern red bats Lasiurus borealis, or the small number of tri-colored bats Perimyotis subflavus. Activity of silver-haired bats Lasionycteris noctivagans increased from pre-WNS to post-WNS years. Activity levels of hoary bats Lasiurus cinereus significantly declined between pre- and post-WNS years. As a nonhibernating, migratory species, hoary bat declines might be correlated with wind-energy development impacts occurring in the same time frame rather than WNS. Intraseason activity patterns also were affected by WNS, though the results were highly variable among species. Little brown bats showed an overall increase in activity from early to late summer pre-WNS, presumably due to detections of newly volant young added to the local population. However, the opposite occurred post-WNS, indicating that reproduction among surviving little brown bats may be declining. Our data suggest that acoustical monitoring during the summer season can provide insights into species' relative abundance on the

  9. Classroom Acoustics: A Resource for Creating Environments with Desirable Listening Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seep, Benjamin; Glosemeyer, Robin; Hulce, Emily; Linn, Matt; Aytar, Pamela

    This booklet provides a general overview of classroom acoustic problems and their solutions for both new school construction and renovation. Practical explanations and examples are discussed on topics including reverberation, useful and undesirable reflections, mechanical equipment noise, interior noise sources, and sound reinforcement. Examples…

  10. Classroom Acoustics. IssueTrak: A CEFPI Brief on Educational Facility Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdreich, John

    This report examines the problem of acoustic inadequacy in the classroom, how it affects students and teachers, and possible solutions. It explains how to predict classroom adequacy for communication by assessing the level of speech in competition with other noise, and the level of that competing noise itself in terms of reverberation that allows…

  11. Interplay between Acoustic/Phonetic and Semantic Processes during Spoken Sentence Comprehension: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulenger, Veronique; Hoen, Michel; Jacquier, Caroline; Meunier, Fanny

    2011-01-01

    When listening to speech in everyday-life situations, our cognitive system must often cope with signal instabilities such as sudden breaks, mispronunciations, interfering noises or reverberations potentially causing disruptions at the acoustic/phonetic interface and preventing efficient lexical access and semantic integration. The physiological…

  12. Effects of Classroom Acoustics and Self-Reported Noise Exposure on Teachers' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristiansen, Jesper; Persson, Roger; Lund, Soren Peter; Shibuya, Hitomi; Nielsen, Per Moberg

    2013-01-01

    Beyond noise annoyance and voice problems, little is known about the effects that noise and poor classroom acoustics have on teachers' health and well-being. The aim of this field study was therefore to investigate the effects of perceived noise exposure and classroom reverberation on measures of well-being. Data on self-reported noise exposure,…

  13. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project.VI. Reverberating Disk Models for NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, D.; Horne, Keith; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Peterson, B. M.; Bentz, M. C.; Kochanek, C. S.; Denney, K. D.; Edelson, R.; Goad, M. R.; De Rosa, G.; Anderson, M. D.; Arévalo, P.; Barth, A. J.; Bazhaw, C.; Borman, G. A.; Boroson, T. A.; Bottorff, M. C.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Cackett, E. M.; Carini, M. T.; Croxall, K. V.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Dalla Bontà, E.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Ely, J.; Evans, P. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Gonzalez, L.; Gorjian, V.; Grier, C. J.; Grupe, D.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Jensen, J. J.; Joner, M. D.; Jones, J.; Kaastra, J.; Kaspi, S.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, M.; Klimanov, S. A.; Korista, K. T.; Kriss, G. A.; Lee, J. C.; Leonard, D. C.; Lira, P.; MacInnis, F.; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Pancoast, A.; Parks, J. R.; Pei, L.; Pogge, R. W.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schimoia, J. S.; Schnülle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Siegel, M. H.; Spencer, M.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Vestergaard, M.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.; Zheng, W.; Zu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We conduct a multiwavelength continuum variability study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 to investigate the temperature structure of its accretion disk. The 19 overlapping continuum light curves (1158 \\mathringA to 9157 \\mathringA ) combine simultaneous Hubble Space Telescope, Swift, and ground-based observations over a 180 day period from 2014 January to July. Light-curve variability is interpreted as the reverberation response of the accretion disk to irradiation by a central time-varying point source. Our model yields the disk inclination i=36^\\circ +/- 10^\\circ , temperature {T}1=(44+/- 6)× {10}3 K at 1 light day from the black hole, and a temperature–radius slope (T\\propto {r}-α ) of α =0.99+/- 0.03. We also infer the driving light curve and find that it correlates poorly with both the hard and soft X-ray light curves, suggesting that the X-rays alone may not drive the ultraviolet and optical variability over the observing period. We also decompose the light curves into bright, faint, and mean accretion-disk spectra. These spectra lie below that expected for a standard blackbody accretion disk accreting at L/{L}{Edd}=0.1.

  14. SWIFT/UVOT GRISM MONITORING OF NGC 5548 IN 2013: AN ATTEMPT AT Mg ii REVERBERATION MAPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, E. M.; Troyer, J.; Gültekin, K.; Bentz, M. C.; Fausnaugh, M. M.; Peterson, B. M.; Vestergaard, M.

    2015-09-10

    Reverberation-mapping-based scaling relations are often used to estimate the masses of black holes from single-epoch spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). While the radius–luminosity relation that is the basis of these scaling relations is determined using reverberation mapping of the Hβ line in nearby AGNs, the scaling relations are often extended to use other broad emission lines, such as Mg ii, in order to get black hole masses at higher redshifts when Hβ is redshifted out of the optical waveband. However, there is no radius–luminosity relation determined directly from Mg ii. Here, we present an attempt to perform reverberation mapping using Mg ii in the well-studied nearby Seyfert 1 NGC 5548. We used Swift to obtain UV grism spectra of NGC 5548 once every two days from 2013 April to September. Concurrent photometric UV monitoring with Swift provides a well determined continuum light curve that shows strong variability. The Mg ii emission line, however, is not strongly correlated with the continuum variability, and there is no significant lag between the two. We discuss these results in the context of using Mg ii scaling relations to estimate high-redshift black hole masses.

  15. A modified diffusion equation for room-acoustic predication.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yun; Xiang, Ning

    2007-06-01

    This letter presents a modified diffusion model using an Eyring absorption coefficient to predict the reverberation time and sound pressure distributions in enclosures. While the original diffusion model [Ollendorff, Acustica 21, 236-245 (1969); J. Picaut et al., Acustica 83, 614-621 (1997); Valeau et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 1504-1513 (2006)] usually has good performance for low absorption, the modified diffusion model yields more satisfactory results for both low and high absorption. Comparisons among the modified model, the original model, a geometrical-acoustics model, and several well-established theories in terms of reverberation times and sound pressure level distributions, indicate significantly improved prediction accuracy by the modification.

  16. Evaluation of speech interference due to noise and reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuyama, H.

    1988-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of noise and reverberation on speech intelligibility and to find a simple method for evaluating the quality of speech transmission. Articulation scores and subjectively judged intelligibility of sentences were obtained in a laboratory situation together with the physical measure of the cross-correlation between the source and the listening point. The effect of broadband steady noise was examined by a monosyllable articulation test and subjective judgment of speech interference. A three-syllable articulation test was used to detect the effect of reverberation. These subjective indices showed correspondence with the source to listening point cross-correlation. The measurement of cross-correlation appeared to be effective as an objective method for estimating speech interference.

  17. Mid-Frequency Reverberation Measurements with Full Companion Environmental Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-30

    MEASUREMENTS WITH FULL COMPANION ENVIRONMENTAL SUPPORT Dajun (DJ) Tang Applied Physics Laboratory University of Washington 1013 NE 40 th Street...bottom and sub- bottom impact on propagation and scattering, surface and water column influence on propagation, culminating in a full understanding...had not been a true 6.1 level reverberation experiment where the environment has been sufficiently measured to support full modeling of the data

  18. Seabed Characterization for SW2013 Mid-Frequency Reverberation Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-11

    TREX13 experiment) to measure those scales in an inner shelf ridge and swale environment off the coast of Panama City, Florida. One of the surprising...measurement sites, one on a small ridge and one in a swale. Very large differences were observed between the gross sediment properties on the ridge and in...Characterization for SW2013 Mid -Frequency Reverberation Experiment Charles W. Holland The Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory P.O

  19. Seabed Characterization for SW2013 Mid-Frequency Reverberation Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Seabed Characterization for SW2013 Mid -Frequency...geoacoustic properties as a function of depth and frequency at two sites: one on a ridge crest along the clutter track, and one in a swale near the main...for SW2013 Mid -Frequency Reverberation Experiment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  20. Front-end technologies for robust ASR in reverberant environments—spectral enhancement-based dereverberation and auditory modulation filterbank features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Feifei; Meyer, Bernd T.; Moritz, Niko; Rehr, Robert; Anemüller, Jörn; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Goetze, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents extended techniques aiming at the improvement of automatic speech recognition (ASR) in single-channel scenarios in the context of the REVERB (REverberant Voice Enhancement and Recognition Benchmark) challenge. The focus is laid on the development and analysis of ASR front-end technologies covering speech enhancement and feature extraction. Speech enhancement is performed using a joint noise reduction and dereverberation system in the spectral domain based on estimates of the noise and late reverberation power spectral densities (PSDs). To obtain reliable estimates of the PSDs—even in acoustic conditions with positive direct-to-reverberation energy ratios (DRRs)—we adopt the statistical model of the room impulse response explicitly incorporating DRRs, as well in combination with a novel proposed joint estimator for the reverberation time T 60 and the DRR. The feature extraction approach is inspired by processing strategies of the auditory system, where an amplitude modulation filterbank is applied to extract the temporal modulation information. These techniques were shown to improve the REVERB baseline in our previous work. Here, we investigate if similar improvements are obtained when using a state-of-the-art ASR framework, and to what extent the results depend on the specific architecture of the back-end. Apart from conventional Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-hidden Markov model (HMM) back-ends, we consider subspace GMM (SGMM)-HMMs as well as deep neural networks in a hybrid system. The speech enhancement algorithm is found to be helpful in almost all conditions, with the exception of deep learning systems in matched training-test conditions. The auditory feature type improves the baseline for all system architectures. The relative word error rate reduction achieved by combining our front-end techniques with current back-ends is 52.7% on average with the REVERB evaluation test set compared to our original REVERB result.

  1. Online Damage Detection on Metal and Composite Space Structures by Active and Passive Acoustic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheerer, M.; Cardone, T.; Rapisarda, A.; Ottaviano, S.; Ftancesconi, D.

    2012-07-01

    In the frame of ESA funded programme Future Launcher Preparatory Programme Period 1 “Preparatory Activities on M&S”, Aerospace & Advanced Composites and Thales Alenia Space-Italia, have conceived and tested a structural health monitoring approach based on integrated Acoustic Emission - Active Ultrasound Damage Identification. The monitoring methods implemented in the study are both passive and active methods and the purpose is to cover large areas with a sufficient damage size detection capability. Two representative space sub-structures have been built and tested: a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) and a curved, stiffened Al-Li panel. In each structure, typical critical damages have been introduced: delaminations caused by impacts in the COPV and a crack in the stiffener of the Al-Li panel which was grown during a fatigue test campaign. The location and severity of both types of damages have been successfully assessed online using two commercially available systems: one 6 channel AE system from Vallen and one 64 channel AU system from Acellent.

  2. Listening effort and speech intelligibility in listening situations affected by noise and reverberation.

    PubMed

    Rennies, Jan; Schepker, Henning; Holube, Inga; Kollmeier, Birger

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the combined effect of noise and reverberation on listening effort and speech intelligibility to predictions of the speech transmission index (STI). Listening effort was measured in normal-hearing subjects using a scaling procedure. Speech intelligibility scores were measured in the same subjects and conditions: (a) Speech-shaped noise as the only interfering factor, (b) + (c) fixed signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 0 or 7 dB and reverberation as detrimental factors, and (d) reverberation as the only detrimental factor. In each condition, SNR and reverberation were combined to produce STI values of 0.17, 0.30, 0.43, 0.57, and 0.70, respectively. Listening effort always decreased with increasing STI, thus enabling a rough prediction, but a significant bias was observed indicating that listening effort was lower in reverberation only than in noise only at the same STI for one type of impulse responses. Accordingly, speech intelligibility increased with increasing STI and was significantly better in reverberation only than in noise only at the same STI. Further analyses showed that the broadband reverberation time is not always a good estimate of speech degradation in reverberation and that different speech materials may differ in their robustness toward detrimental effects of reverberation.

  3. Discrimination of virtual auditory distance using level and direct-to-reverberant ratio cues.

    PubMed

    Kolarik, Andrew; Cirstea, Silvia; Pardhan, Shahina

    2013-11-01

    The study investigated how listeners used level and direct-to-reverberant ratio (D/R) cues to discriminate distances to virtual sound sources. Sentence pairs were presented at virtual distances in simulated rooms that were either reverberant or anechoic. Performance on the basis of level was generally better than performance based on D/R. Increasing room reverberation time improved performance based on the D/R cue such that the two cues provided equally effective information at further virtual source distances in highly reverberant environments. Orientation of the listener within the virtual room did not affect performance.

  4. Evaluation method for hearing aid fitting under reverberation: comparison between monaural and binaural hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kimio; Inoue, Megumi; Yonemoto, Kiyoshi; Imamura, Akihide

    2004-11-01

    Some hearing-impaired persons with hearing aids complain of listening difficulty under reverberation. No method, however, is currently available for hearing aid fitting that permits evaluation of hearing difficulty caused by reverberations. In this study, we produced speech materials with a reverberation time of 2.02 s that mimicked a reverberant environment (a classroom). Speech materials with reverberation times of 0 and 1.01 s were also made. Listening tests were performed with these materials in hearing-impaired subjects and normal-hearing subjects in a soundproof booth. Listening tests were also done in a classroom. Our results showed that speech material with a reverberation time of 2.02 s had a decreased listening-test score in hearing-impaired subjects with both monaural and binaural hearing aids. Similar results were obtained in a reverberant environment. Our findings suggest the validity of using speech materials with different reverberation times to predict the listening performance under reverberation of hearing-impaired persons with hearing aids.

  5. Investigation of the Statistics of Pure Tone Sound Power Injection from Low Frequency, Finite Sized Sources in a Reverberant Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wayne Farrior

    1973-01-01

    The effect of finite source size on the power statistics in a reverberant room for pure tone excitation was investigated. Theoretical results indicate that the standard deviation of low frequency, pure tone finite sources is always less than that predicted by point source theory and considerably less when the source dimension approaches one-half an acoustic wavelength or greater. A supporting experimental study was conducted utilizing an eight inch loudspeaker and a 30 inch loudspeaker at eleven source positions. The resulting standard deviation of sound power output of the smaller speaker is in excellent agreement with both the derived finite source theory and existing point source theory, if the theoretical data is adjusted to account for experimental incomplete spatial averaging. However, the standard deviation of sound power output of the larger speaker is measurably lower than point source theory indicates, but is in good agreement with the finite source theory.

  6. Acoustic Testing of Flight Hardware Using Loudspeakers: How Much do We Know About This Method of Testing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Kern, Dennis L

    2011-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecrafts, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Even though a lot of hardware has been acoustic tested using this method, the nature of the acoustic field generated by controlling an ensemble of speakers with and without the hardware in the test volume has not been thoroughly investigated. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. Unlike the reverberant chamber acoustic test, for which the acoustic field in most chambers is known to be diffuse except below several tens of Hz where acoustic standing waves and large spatial variations exist, the characteristics of the acoustic field within the speaker test volume has not been quantified. It has only been recently that a detailed acoustic field characterization of speaker testing has been made at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) with involvement of various organizations. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structures, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The analysis of the data from this exercise reveals that there are significant differences both in the acoustic field and in the structural responses. In this paper the differences between the two methods are reviewed in some detail and the over- or under-testing of articles that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues are discussed. A framework for discussing the validity of the speaker acoustic testing method with the current control system and a path forward for improving it will be provided.

  7. Utilizing computer models for optimizing classroom acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Jennifer M.; Rosenberg, Carl J.

    2002-05-01

    The acoustical conditions in a classroom play an integral role in establishing an ideal learning environment. Speech intelligibility is dependent on many factors, including speech loudness, room finishes, and background noise levels. The goal of this investigation was to use computer modeling techniques to study the effect of acoustical conditions on speech intelligibility in a classroom. This study focused on a simulated classroom which was generated using the CATT-acoustic computer modeling program. The computer was utilized as an analytical tool in an effort to optimize speech intelligibility in a typical classroom environment. The factors that were focused on were reverberation time, location of absorptive materials, and background noise levels. Speech intelligibility was measured with the Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI) method.

  8. Active Structural Acoustic Control in an Original A400M Aircraft Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehne, C.; Sachau, D.; Renger, K.

    2016-09-01

    Low frequency noise has always been a challenge in propeller driven aircraft. At low frequencies passive noise treatments are not as efficient as active noise reduction systems. The Helmut-Schmidt-University has built up a full-scale test rig with an original A400M aircraft structure. This provides a good opportunity to develop and test active noise reduction systems in a realistic environment. The currently installed system consists of mechanical actuators and acoustical sensors. The actuators are called TVAs (Tuneable Vibration Absorber) and contain two spring-mass systems whose natural frequencies are adjusted to the BPFs (Blade Passage Frequency) of the propellers. The TVAs are mounted to the frames and the force direction is normal to the skin. The sensors are condenser microphones which are attached to the primary structure of the airframe. The TVAs are equipped with signal processing devices. These components carry out Fourier transforms and signal amplification for the sensor data and actuator signals. The communication between the TVAs and the central control unit is implemented by the CAN Bus protocol and mainly consists of complex coefficients for the sensor and actuator data. This paper describes the basic structure of the system, the hardware set-up and function tests of the controller.

  9. Issues Related to Large Flight Hardware Acoustic Qualification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Perry, Douglas C.; Kern, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of acoustical testing volumes generated by reverberant chambers or a circle of loudspeakers with and without large flight hardware within the testing volume are significantly different. The parameters attributing to these differences are normally not accounted for through analysis or acoustic tests prior to the qualification testing without the test hardware present. In most cases the control microphones are kept at least 2-ft away from hardware surfaces, chamber walls, and speaker surfaces to minimize the impact of the hardware in controlling the sound field. However, the acoustic absorption and radiation of sound by hardware surfaces may significantly alter the sound pressure field controlled within the chamber/speaker volume to a given specification. These parameters often result in an acoustic field that may provide under/over testing scenarios for flight hardware. In this paper the acoustic absorption by hardware surfaces will be discussed in some detail. A simple model is provided to account for some of the observations made from Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft that recently underwent acoustic qualification tests in a reverberant chamber.

  10. Classroom acoustics in Omaha, Nebraska: Measurements and outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Erica E.; Wang, Lily M.; Bradley, David T.

    2002-11-01

    This project collected data detailing the current status of classroom acoustics while simultaneously increasing awareness of educational acoustics and exposure to acoustical engineering research in local schools. In 8 Omaha-area schools, 2 acoustical aspects which directly influence speech intelligibility were measured and studied: (1) background noise levels resulting from a building's mechanical systems; and (2) reverberation times within the classroom. Prior to each measurement session, a presentation on good classroom acoustic principles was presented to the teacher and students in that classroom. Subsequently, the teacher and students assisted the principal investigator and research assistants in the measurement of the acoustic data from their classroom. In total, 13 classrooms were studied, with the assistance of 425 middle and high school students in 14 different classes. The background noise results have been associated with commonly used noise criterion curves. Results are compared to recommended background noise levels and reverberation times suggested by ANSI standard S12.60-2002. The resulting database provides knowledge on the current status of classrooms in Omaha, and may be indicative of classroom situations across the midwestern United States.

  11. Understanding AGNs in the Local Universe through Optical Reverberation Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Liuyi

    2016-01-01

    I present the results of observational projects aimed at measuring the mass of the black hole at the center of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and understanding the structure and kinematics of the broad-line emitting gas within the black hole's sphere of influence.The first project aims to measure the black hole mass in the Kepler-field AGN KA1858. We obtained simultaneous spectroscopic data from the Lick Observatory 3-m telescope using the Kast Double Spectrograph and photometry data from five ground-based telescopes, and used reverberation mapping (RM) techniques to measure the emission-line light curves' lags relative to continuum variations. We obtained lags for H-beta, H-gamma, H-delta, and He II, and obtained the first black hole mass measurement for this object. Our results will serve as a reference point for future studies on relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics using Kepler AGN light curves.The second project, in collaboration with the AGN STORM team, aims to understand the structure and dynamics of the broad line region (BLR) in NGC 5548 in both UV and optical wavelengths. To supplement 6 months of HST UV observations, we obtained simultaneous optical spectroscopic data from six ground-based observatories. We obtained emission-line lags for the optical H-beta and He II lines as well as velocity-resolved lag measurements for H-beta. We also compared the velocity-resolved lags for H-beta to the UV emission lines C IV and Ly-alpha and found similar lag profiles for all three lines.Finally, I will discuss my contributions to two other collaborations in AGN RM. A key component in RM is monitoring continuum variability, which is often done through ground-based photometry. I will present a pipeline that performs aperture photometry on any number of images of an AGN with WCS coordinates and immediately produces relative light curves. This pipeline enables quick looks of AGN variability in real time and has been used in the

  12. The Classroom Acoustical Environment and the Americans With Disabilities Act.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Donna L

    2000-10-01

    Audiologists and acoustical engineers have urged that acoustics be considered in the design of classrooms for more than 30 years. Research has demonstrated that children with hearing loss have great difficulty understanding speech in noisy, reverberant environments. However, there has never been a legal mechanism to require local educational systems to address acoustics in the design and construction of schools. An effort by a broad-based coalition of engineers, audiologists, parents, architects, and educators is now underway to develop a standard for acoustics that would then be referenced in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Although the legal mechanism for this action is to address the needs of children with disabilities as the ADA requires (most notably, children with hearing impairments, but also those with central auditory disorders, attention deficit disorders, and vision impairments), the impact will be more far-reaching. All children-whether or not they have a disability-will benefit from a favorable acoustical environment.

  13. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic tests in reverberation chambers. Working in 14 one-third-octave bands from 50 to 1000 Hz, the desired sound pressure levels are set into the memory in the control system before the test. The control system then increases the sound pressure level in the reverberation chamber gradually in each of the one-third-octave bands until the level set in the memory is reached. This level is then maintained for the duration of the test. Additional features of the system are overtest protection, the capability of 'holding' the spectrum at any time, and the presence of a total test timer.

  14. The effects of noise and reverberation on listening effort for adults with normal hearing

    PubMed Central

    Picou, Erin M.; Gordon, Julia; Ricketts, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of background noise and reverberation on listening effort. Four specific research questions were addressed related to listening effort. These questions were: A) with comparable word recognition performance across levels of reverberation, what are the effects of noise and reverberation on listening effort? (B) what is the effect of background noise when reverberation time is constant? (C) what is the effect of increasing reverberation from low to moderate when signal-to-noise ratio is constant? (D) what is the effect of increasing reverberation from moderate to high when signal-to-noise ratio is constant? Design Eighteen young adults (mean age 24.8 years) with normal hearing participated. A dual-task paradigm was used to simultaneously assess word recognition and listening effort. The primary task was monosyllable word recognition and the secondary task was word categorization (press a button if the word heard was judged to be a noun). Participants were tested in quiet and in background noise in three levels of reverberation (T30 < 100 ms, T30 = 475 ms, and T30 = 834 ms). Signal-to-noise ratios used were chosen individually for each participant and varied by reverberation to address the specific research questions. Results As expected, word recognition performance was negatively affected by both background noise and by increases in reverberation. Furthermore, analysis of mean response times revealed that background noise increased listening effort, regardless of degree of reverberation. Conversely, reverberation did not affect listening effort, regardless of whether word recognition performance was comparable or signal-to-noise ratio was constant. Conclusions The finding that reverberation did not affect listening effort, even when word recognition performance was degraded, is inconsistent with current models of listening effort. The reasons for this surprising finding are unclear and warrant

  15. Active control of membrane-type acoustic metamaterial by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Songwen; Ma, Guancong; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-03-01

    By employing a metal-coated central platelet and a rigid mesh electrode which is transparent to acoustic wave, we show that the membrane-type acoustic metamaterials (MAMs) can be easily tuned by applying an external voltage. With static voltage, the MAM's eigenfrequencies and therefore the phase of the transmitted wave are tunable up to 70 Hz. The MAM's vibration can be significantly suppressed or enhanced by using phase-matched AC voltage. Functionalities such as phase modulation and acoustic switch with on/off ratio up to 21.3 dB are demonstrated.

  16. A novel approach to achieving significant reverberation control in performance halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, David A.; Chu, William

    2005-09-01

    Conventional methods for achieving broadband, variable sound absorption in large halls normally include heavy application of sound-absorptive drapery and/or thick fibrous panels, applied near available surfaces below, at, and in volumes above the catwalk plane. Occasionally, direct adjustments to room air volume are also provided to effect double-sloped decays. The novel method described here combines carefully located, broad scattering and absorption in singular architectural elements and was applied to a new, 1200-seat concert hall. A change of 0.70 s RT60 in midfrequency is achieved in a visually dramatic manner while neither materially changing room volume nor introducing often-maligned drapery. The aggregate of reverberation control methodologies employed reduces the unoccupied RT60 at midfrequencies from about 3.2 to 1.7 s in this space programed principally for music, including pipe organ. Results of MLS measurements including binaural measurements and binaural recordings of anechoic material and CATT-acoustic modeling and auralizations are discussed.

  17. Modeling and design of two-dimensional membrane-type active acoustic metamaterials with tunable anisotropic density.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ahmed; Elsabbagh, Adel; Akl, Wael

    2016-11-01

    A two-dimensional active acoustic metamaterial with controllable anisotropic density is introduced. The material consists of composite lead-lead zirconate titanate plates clamped to an aluminum structure with air as the background fluid. The effective anisotropic density of the material is controlled, independently for two orthogonal directions, by means of an external static electric voltage signal. The material is used in the construction of a reconfigurable waveguide capable of controlling the direction of the acoustic waves propagating through it. An analytic model based on the acoustic two-port theory, the theory of piezoelectricity, the laminated pre-stressed plate theory, and the S-parameters retrieval method is developed to predict the behavior of the material. The results are verified using the finite element method. Excellent agreement is found between both models for the studied frequency and voltage ranges. The results show that, below 1600 Hz, the density is controllable within orders of magnitude relative to the uncontrolled case. The results also suggest that simple controllers could be used to program the material density toward full control of the directivity and dispersion characteristics of acoustic waves.

  18. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  19. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Adel A

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  20. Tutorial on the Psychophysics and Technology of Virtual Acoustic Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Virtual acoustics, also known as 3-D sound and auralization, is the simulation of the complex acoustic field experienced by a listener within an environment. Going beyond the simple intensity panning of normal stereo techniques, the goal is to process sounds so that they appear to come from particular locations in three-dimensional space. Although loudspeaker systems are being developed, most of the recent work focuses on using headphones for playback and is the outgrowth of earlier analog techniques. For example, in binaural recording, the sound of an orchestra playing classical music is recorded through small mics in the two "ear canals" of an anthropomorphic artificial or "dummy" head placed in the audience of a concert hall. When the recorded piece is played back over headphones, the listener passively experiences the illusion of hearing the violins on the left and the cellos on the right, along with all the associated echoes, resonances, and ambience of the original environment. Current techniques use digital signal processing to synthesize the acoustical properties that people use to localize a sound source in space. Thus, they provide the flexibility of a kind of digital dummy head, allowing a more active experience in which a listener can both design and move around or interact with a simulated acoustic environment in real time. Such simulations are being developed for a variety of application areas including architectural acoustics, advanced human-computer interfaces, telepresence and virtual reality, navigation aids for the visually-impaired, and as a test bed for psychoacoustical investigations of complex spatial cues. The tutorial will review the basic psychoacoustical cues that determine human sound localization and the techniques used to measure these cues as Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) for the purpose of synthesizing virtual acoustic environments. The only conclusive test of the adequacy of such simulations is an operational one in which

  1. Active Structural Acoustic Control of Interior Noise on a Raytheon 1900D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran; Sullivan, Brenda; Cline, John

    2000-01-01

    An active structural acoustic control system has been demonstrated on a Raytheon Aircraft Company 1900D turboprop airliner. Both single frequency and multi-frequency control of the blade passage frequency and its harmonics was accomplished. The control algorithm was a variant of the popular filtered-x LMS implemented in the principal component domain. The control system consisted of 21 inertial actuators and 32 microphones. The actuators were mounted to the aircraft's ring frames. The microphones were distributed uniformly throughout the interior at head height, both seated and standing. Actuator locations were selected using a combinatorial search optimization algorithm. The control system achieved a 14 dB noise reduction of the blade passage frequency during single frequency tests. Multi-frequency control of the first 1st, 2nd and 3rd harmonics resulted in 10.2 dB, 3.3 dB and 1.6 dB noise reductions respectively. These results fall short of the predictions which were produced by the optimization algorithm (13.5 dB, 8.6 dB and 6.3 dB). The optimization was based on actuator transfer functions taken on the ground and it is postulated that cabin pressurization at flight altitude was a factor in this discrepancy.

  2. Active structural acoustic control of a smart cylindrical shell using a virtual microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loghmani, Ali; Danesh, Mohammad; Kwak, Moon K.; Keshmiri, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the active structural acoustic control of sound radiated from a smart cylindrical shell. The cylinder is equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators to estimate and control the sound pressure that radiates from the smart shell. This estimated pressure is referred to as a virtual microphone, and it can be used in control systems instead of actual microphones to attenuate noise due to structural vibrations. To this end, the dynamic model for the smart cylinder is derived using the extended Hamilton’s principle, the Sanders shell theory and the assumed mode method. The simplified Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral estimates the far-field sound pressure radiating from the baffled cylindrical shell. A modified higher harmonic controller that can cope with a harmonic disturbance is designed and experimentally evaluated. The experimental tests were carried out on a baffled cylindrical aluminum shell in an anechoic chamber. The frequency response for the theoretical virtual microphone and the experimental actual microphone are in good agreement with each other, and the results show the effectiveness of the designed virtual microphone and controller in attenuating the radiated sound.

  3. [Determination of a Spectrum of Lytic Activity of Bacteriophages by the Method of Acoustic Analysis].

    PubMed

    Guliy, O I; Zaitsev, B D; Kuznetsova, I E; Shikhabudinov, A M; Dykman, L A; Staroverov, S A; Karavaeva, O A; Pavliy, S A; Ignatov, O V

    2015-01-01

    The changes in the electro-acoustic parameters of cell suspension due to the interaction of cells with bacteriophages both in a pure. culture and in the presence of extraneous microflora were investigated. It has been found that the specific changes in the electroacoustic parameters of cell suspension under the action of bacteriophage occur only in microbial cells which are sensitive to the bacteriophage studied. It has been established that a sensor unit allows of distinguishing a situation when the bacterial cells are infected with specific bacteriophages of the control experiments and a situation with no introduction of infection. An approximate criterion of the presence of specific interactions of bacteriophages and cells in suspension was developed. In accordance with this criterion the change in electrical impedance of the sensor unit must not be less than - 1%. In control experiments a standard microbiological technique, plating the cells infected with bacteriophages on solid nutrient medium, was used. For the first time the possibility of using the method of electroacoustic analysis for determination of a spectrum of lytic activity of bacteriophages was shown. The results obtained may be used for development of a new express method for determining the sensitivity to bacteriophages of the microbial cells.

  4. A new targeted drug delivery method using ultrasound and acoustically active lipospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shortencarier, Michaelann; Bloch, Susannah; Dayton, Paul; Ferrara, Kathy; Matsunaga, Terry; Labell, Rachel; Schumann, Patricia

    2005-04-01

    The goal is to create a strategy for localized drug delivery using engineered delivery vehicles and ultrasound energy. These drug delivery vehicles, referred to as acoustically active lipospheres (AALs), consist of small gas bubbles surrounded by thick oil shells (where drugs can be carried) and are enclosed by an outermost lipid layer. Ultrasound radiation force can be used to displace these vehicles near the blood vessel wall, after which a higher intensity pulse can fragment the vehicle and transfer its contents to the endothelium. Blood velocity ranges from 1 to 10 mm/s in the microvasculature. Therefore, agents in capillaries insonified by a transducer with a 1 mm focal beam width for 0.1 to 1 seconds can be displaced of 1 to 2 mm. Delivery vehicles containing various fluorescent dyes within the oil layer are exposed to ultrasound in cell chambers or flowing vessels. Fluorescence intensity increases more than 10-fold with application of radiation force and fragmentation, both over no exposure and over fragmentation pulses alone (both P<0.001). This implies radiation force is necessary to bring AALs into proximity of the cell monolayer before their destruction in order for drug delivery to occur.

  5. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  6. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  7. Tackling the Combined Effects of Reverberation and Masking Noise Using Ideal Channel Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazrati, Oldooz; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, a new signal-processing algorithm is proposed and evaluated for the suppression of the combined effects of reverberation and noise. Method: The proposed algorithm decomposes, on a short-term basis (every 20 ms), the reverberant stimuli into a number of channels and retains only a subset of the channels satisfying a…

  8. Optimizing acoustical treatment. [structural design criteria for theater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuran, N.; Ramboiu, S.; Farcas, I.; Halpert, E.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical linear programming model is presented for optimizing acoustical treatment and interior decoration of concert and other public halls. This method provides the designer with a range of acoustically correct solutions at increased economical efficiency. The mathematical model uses geometrical data about the room, recommended reverberation time values, the architect's choice of given sound absorbing structures and finishing materials. The model permits inclusion of aesthetical considerations about conditioning, proportioning, or, on the contrary, reciprocal exclusion of any classes of material and/or sound absorbing structure.

  9. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions.

  10. Active Travel-Time Tomography using a Distributed Acoustic Sensing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancelle, C.; Fratta, D.; Lord, N. E.; Wang, H. F.; Chalari, A.

    2015-12-01

    Distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is a sensor array used for monitoring ground motion by utilizing the interaction of light pulses with sections of a fiber-optic cable. In September 2013 a field test was conducted at the NEES@UCSB Garner Valley field site in Southern California incorporating DAS technology. A 762-meter-long fiber-optic cable was trenched to a depth of about 0.3 m in a rectangular design with two interior diagonal segments. The fiber was excited by a number of sources, including a 45 kN shear shaker and a smaller 450 N portable mass shaker, both of which were available through NEES@UCLA. In addition to these sources, signals were recorded from a minivib source and hammer blows on a steel plate, as well as 8 hours of overnight ambient noise recording. One goal of the field test was to evaluate the use of DAS for tomographic studies. The large number of measurement points inherent to DAS lends itself well to this type of study. Tomograms were constructed using two of the active-sources at multiple locations. There were 8 minivib locations within the array and 13 hammer locations along the boundary of the array. Travel-time data were collected with the DAS array. Two-dimensional velocity tomograms were constructed for different resolutions from the two active sources and compared. In all the images, the lowest velocities lie near the center of the array with higher velocities surrounding this area. The impact results, however, may contain an artifact due to multiple propagation modes. This research is part of the DOE's PoroTomo project.

  11. Active control of acoustic field-of-view in a biosonar system.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Falk, Ben; Moss, Cynthia F; Ulanovsky, Nachum

    2011-09-01

    Active-sensing systems abound in nature, but little is known about systematic strategies that are used by these systems to scan the environment. Here, we addressed this question by studying echolocating bats, animals that have the ability to point their biosonar beam to a confined region of space. We trained Egyptian fruit bats to land on a target, under conditions of varying levels of environmental complexity, and measured their echolocation and flight behavior. The bats modulated the intensity of their biosonar emissions, and the spatial region they sampled, in a task-dependant manner. We report here that Egyptian fruit bats selectively change the emission intensity and the angle between the beam axes of sequentially emitted clicks, according to the distance to the target, and depending on the level of environmental complexity. In so doing, they effectively adjusted the spatial sector sampled by a pair of clicks-the "field-of-view." We suggest that the exact point within the beam that is directed towards an object (e.g., the beam's peak, maximal slope, etc.) is influenced by three competing task demands: detection, localization, and angular scanning-where the third factor is modulated by field-of-view. Our results suggest that lingual echolocation (based on tongue clicks) is in fact much more sophisticated than previously believed. They also reveal a new parameter under active control in animal sonar-the angle between consecutive beams. Our findings suggest that acoustic scanning of space by mammals is highly flexible and modulated much more selectively than previously recognized.

  12. Optimizing acoustical conditions for speech intelligibility in classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wonyoung

    High speech intelligibility is imperative in classrooms where verbal communication is critical. However, the optimal acoustical conditions to achieve a high degree of speech intelligibility have previously been investigated with inconsistent results, and practical room-acoustical solutions to optimize the acoustical conditions for speech intelligibility have not been developed. This experimental study validated auralization for speech-intelligibility testing, investigated the optimal reverberation for speech intelligibility for both normal and hearing-impaired listeners using more realistic room-acoustical models, and proposed an optimal sound-control design for speech intelligibility based on the findings. The auralization technique was used to perform subjective speech-intelligibility tests. The validation study, comparing auralization results with those of real classroom speech-intelligibility tests, found that if the room to be auralized is not very absorptive or noisy, speech-intelligibility tests using auralization are valid. The speech-intelligibility tests were done in two different auralized sound fields---approximately diffuse and non-diffuse---using the Modified Rhyme Test and both normal and hearing-impaired listeners. A hybrid room-acoustical prediction program was used throughout the work, and it and a 1/8 scale-model classroom were used to evaluate the effects of ceiling barriers and reflectors. For both subject groups, in approximately diffuse sound fields, when the speech source was closer to the listener than the noise source, the optimal reverberation time was zero. When the noise source was closer to the listener than the speech source, the optimal reverberation time was 0.4 s (with another peak at 0.0 s) with relative output power levels of the speech and noise sources SNS = 5 dB, and 0.8 s with SNS = 0 dB. In non-diffuse sound fields, when the noise source was between the speaker and the listener, the optimal reverberation time was 0.6 s with

  13. On the role of scattering and reverberation in seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, Lapo; Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel

    2013-04-01

    The ensemble-averaged ambient wave field observed on Earth is approximately diffuse, and it is precisely this property that makes ambient-noise interferometry valid within approximation. How close is ambient noise to being exactly diffuse? What features of the Earth (coupling between oceans and solid Earth, scattering by crustal heterogeneities...) contribute to its randomness and complexity? It is necessary to understand the roles of scattering and reverberation, to determine the range of applicability of seismic interferometry. Studies of cross-correlation of late coda in earthquake data, conducted mostly by the Grenoble group, emphasize the contributions of scattering in the interferometric reconstruction of Green functions. Yet, other authors like R. Snieder and co-workers point to the limitations that the presence of a complex (scattering) structure introduces: they have noted, in particular, that although direct surface waves are accurately extracted by interferometry, examples of the reconstruction of scattered waves are still lacking. We analyze the cross-correlations of diffuse flexural waves, generated by an air nozzle shooting compressed air on a 1-square-meter aluminum plate, and recorded by two accelerometers on the plate. Flexural waves are dispersive, thus reproducing one of the main characteristics of surface waves observed on Earth. The aluminum plate is pierced by 500 randomly distributed holes (6mm in diameter) that give rise to scattering. Seismic noise is known to be largely generated by the coupling between atmosphere and solid Earth, and the air-nozzle approach can be seen as a way to reproduce this phenomenon as realistically as possible in a laboratory. We find ensemble-averaged cross-correlations of the so generated diffuse flexural wave field to be strongly symmetric with respect to (causal and anti-causal) time, beyond the direct flexural-wave arrivals; this indicates that the Green function is correctly reconstructed, including

  14. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. .

  15. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria.

  16. Flare-Shaped Acoustic Anomalies in the Water Column Along the Ecuadorian Margin: Relationship with Active Tectonics and Gas Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Francois; Proust, Jean-Noël; Dano, Alexandre; Collot, Jean-Yves; Guiyeligou, Grâce Daniella; Hernández Salazar, María José; Ratzov, Gueorgui; Martillo, Carlos; Pouderoux, Hugo; Schenini, Laure; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Loayza, Glenda

    2016-10-01

    With hull-mounted multibeam echosounder data, we report for the first time along the active Ecuadorian margin, acoustic signatures of water column fluid emissions and seep-related structures on the seafloor. In total 17 flare-shaped acoustic anomalies were detected from the upper slope (1250 m) to the shelf break (140 m). Nearly half of the flare-shaped acoustic anomalies rise 200-500 m above the seafloor. The base of the flares is generally associated with high-reflectivity backscatter patches contrasting with the neighboring seafloor. We interpret these flares as caused by fluid escape in the water column, most likely gases. High-resolution seismic profiles show that most flares occur close to the surface expression of active faults, deformed areas, slope instabilities or diapiric structures. In two areas tectonic deformation disrupts a Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR), suggesting that buried frozen gas hydrates are destabilized, thus supplying free gas emissions and related flares. This discovery is important as it opens the way to determine the nature and origin of the emitted fluids and their potential link with the hydrocarbon system of the forearc basins along the Ecuadorian margin.

  17. Optoacoustic tweezers: a programmable, localized cell concentrator based on opto-thermally generated, acoustically activated, surface bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanhui; Li, Sixing; Rufo, Joseph; Yang, Shikuan; Guo, Feng; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    We present a programmable, biocompatible technique for dynamically concentrating and patterning particles and cells in a microfluidic device. Since our technique utilizes opto-thermally generated, acoustically activated, surface bubbles, we name it “optoacoustic tweezers.” The optoacoustic tweezers are capable of concentrating particles/cells at any prescribed locations in a microfluidic chamber without the use of permanent structures, rendering it particularly useful for the formation of flexible, complex cell patterns. Additionally, this technique has demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and can be conveniently integrated with other microfluidic units. In our experiments, micro-bubbles were generated by focusing a 405 nm diode laser onto a gold-coated glass chamber. By properly tuning the laser, we demonstrate precise control over the position and size of the generated bubbles. Acoustic waves were then applied to activate the surface bubbles, causing them to oscillate at an optimized frequency. The resulting acoustic radiation force allowed us to locally trap particles/cells, including 15 μm polystyrene beads and HeLa cells, around each bubble. Cell-adhesion tests were also conducted after cell concentrating to confirm the biocompatibility of this technique. PMID:23511348

  18. An Improved Azimuth Angle Estimation Method with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor Based on an Active Sonar Detection System.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anbang; Ma, Lin; Ma, Xuefei; Hui, Juan

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, an improved azimuth angle estimation method with a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS) is proposed based on matched filtering theory. The proposed method is mainly applied in an active sonar detection system. According to the conventional passive method based on complex acoustic intensity measurement, the mathematical and physical model of this proposed method is described in detail. The computer simulation and lake experiments results indicate that this method can realize the azimuth angle estimation with high precision by using only a single AVS. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed method achieves better estimation performance. Moreover, the proposed method does not require complex operations in frequencydomain and achieves computational complexity reduction.

  19. An Improved Azimuth Angle Estimation Method with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor Based on an Active Sonar Detection System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Anbang; Ma, Lin; Ma, Xuefei; Hui, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an improved azimuth angle estimation method with a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS) is proposed based on matched filtering theory. The proposed method is mainly applied in an active sonar detection system. According to the conventional passive method based on complex acoustic intensity measurement, the mathematical and physical model of this proposed method is described in detail. The computer simulation and lake experiments results indicate that this method can realize the azimuth angle estimation with high precision by using only a single AVS. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed method achieves better estimation performance. Moreover, the proposed method does not require complex operations in frequency-domain and achieves computational complexity reduction. PMID:28230763

  20. Approaches to Adaptive Active Acoustic Noise Control at a Point Using Feedforward Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulch, Peter A.

    Active acoustic noise control systems have been of interest since their birth in the 1930's. The principle is to superimpose on an unwanted noise wave shape its inverse with the intention of destructive interference. This work presents two approaches to this idea. The first approach uses a direct design method to develop a controller using an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model that will be used to condition the primary noise to produce the required anti-noise for cancellation. The development of this approach has shown that the stability of the controller relies heavily on a non-minimum phase model of the secondary noise path. For this reason, a second approach, using a controller consisting of two parts was developed. The first part of the controller is designed to cancel broadband noise and the second part is an adaptive controller designed to cancel periodic noise. A simple technique for identifying the parameters of the broadband controller is developed. An ARMA model is used, and it is shown that its stability is improved by prefiltering the test signal with a minimum-phase inverse of the secondary noise channel. The periodic controller uses an estimate of the fundamental frequency to cancel the first few harmonics of periodic noise. A computationally efficient adaptive technique based on least squares is developed for updating the harmonic controller gains at each time step. Experimental results are included for the broadband controller, the harmonic controller, and the combination of the two algorithms. The advantages of using both techniques in conjunction are shown using test cases involving both broadband noise and periodic noise.

  1. Acoustic, fiber optic, and silicon microelectronic microsensors research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Wiczer, J.J.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, an 8500+ person, multiprogram research and development facility operated for the US Department of Energy, has over 400 research, development and applications scientists and engineers working on sensor technologies. Sandia`s 20 person Microsensors Research and Development Department has invented, developed and fielded sensor systems based on acoustic, fiber optic, and silicon microelectronic technologies. These sensors have been used for diverse applications inducting the monitoring of cleaning chemical concentrations in industrial process effluent streams, detection of explosive gas concentrations in aging industrial equipment, real-time measurements of fluid viscosity in equipment lubricants, and monitoring of contaminant concentration levels in ultrapure process gases. Representative sensor technologies available for technology transfer will be described including bulk acoustic wave resonators, surface acoustic wave devices, fiber optic micromirror sensors, and silicon microelectronic sensors.

  2. Long-range acoustic scattering from a shallow-water mud-volcano cluster.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Preston, John R; Abraham, Douglas A

    2007-10-01

    Analysis of reverberation measurements in the Straits of Sicily shows high intensity, discrete, scattered returns 10-20 dB above background reverberation. These returns are due to scattering from mud volcanoes. The reverberation from the mud volcanoes at ranges of 15-22 km is reasonably consistent over these spatial scales (i.e., kilometers) and temporal scales of several hours; measurements separated by 4 years are also similar. Statistical characterization indicates that the reverberation associated with a mud-volcano cluster is strongly non-Rayleigh and that the reverberation can be characterized by a single (shape) parameter, roughly independent of frequency. The non-Rayleigh statistics, with a concomitant increase in the probability of false alarm, indicate that mud volcanoes are a likely source of clutter. Mean target strengths were estimated at 1-11 dB over 160-1400 Hz and are consistent with target strengths measured during a different year at short (direct-path) ranges. Accumulated evidence points to small (order 10 m diameter and several meters high) carbonate chimneys on the mud-volcano edifice as the scattering mechanism as opposed to the edifice itself or scattering from gas bubbles in the water column. Thus, the results represent acoustic scattering from mud volcanoes in a quiescent state.

  3. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, SShao-sheng R.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic modeling can be used to identify key noise sources, determine/analyze sub-allocated requirements, keep track of the accumulation of minor noise sources, and to predict vehicle noise levels at various stages in vehicle development, first with estimates of noise sources, later with experimental data. In FY09, the physical mockup developed in FY08, with interior geometric shape similar to Orion CM (Crew Module) IML (Interior Mode Line), was used to validate SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) acoustic model development with realistic ventilation fan sources. The sound power levels of these sources were unknown a priori, as opposed to previous studies that RSS (Reference Sound Source) with known sound power level was used. The modeling results were evaluated based on comparisons to measurements of sound pressure levels over a wide frequency range, including the frequency range where SEA gives good results. Sound intensity measurement was performed over a rectangular-shaped grid system enclosing the ventilation fan source. Sound intensities were measured at the top, front, back, right, and left surfaces of the and system. Sound intensity at the bottom surface was not measured, but sound blocking material was placed tinder the bottom surface to reflect most of the incident sound energy back to the remaining measured surfaces. Integrating measured sound intensities over measured surfaces renders estimated sound power of the source. The reverberation time T6o of the mockup interior had been modified to match reverberation levels of ISS US Lab interior for speech frequency bands, i.e., 0.5k, 1k, 2k, 4 kHz, by attaching appropriately sized Thinsulate sound absorption material to the interior wall of the mockup. Sound absorption of Thinsulate was modeled in three methods: Sabine equation with measured mockup interior reverberation time T60, layup model based on past impedance tube testing, and layup model plus air absorption correction. The evaluation/validation was

  4. C IV and C III] reverberation mapping of the luminous quasar PG 1247+267

    SciTech Connect

    Trevese, D.; Saturni, F. G.; Perna, M.; Dadina, M.

    2014-11-10

    So far the masses of about 50 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been measured through the reverberation mapping technique (RM). Most measurements have been performed for objects of moderate luminosity and redshift, based on Hβ, which is also used to calibrate the scaling relation that allows single-epoch (SE) mass determination based on AGN luminosity and the width of different emission lines. Due to the complex structure and gas dynamics of the relevant emission region, the SE masses obtained from the C IV(1549 Å) line show a large spread around the mean values. Direct RM measures of C IV exist for only six AGNs of low luminosity and redshift, and only one luminous quasar. Since 2003, we have collected photometric and spectroscopic observations of PG1247+267, the most luminous quasar ever analyzed for RM. We provide light curves for the continuum and for C IV(1549 Å) and C III](1909 Å), and measures of the reverberation time lags based on the SPEAR method. The sizes of the line emission regions assume a ratio of R {sub C} {sub III]}/R {sub C} {sub IV} ∼ 2, similar to the case of Seyfert galaxies, indicating for the first time a similar ionization stratification in a luminous quasar and low-luminosity nuclei. Due to the relatively small size of the broad line region and the relatively narrow line widths, we estimate a small mass and an anomalously high Eddington ratio. We discuss the possibility that either the shape of the emission region or an amplification of the luminosity caused by gravitational lensing may be partly responsible for the result.

  5. A SOFT X-RAY REVERBERATION LAG IN THE AGN ESO 113-G010

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Zogbhi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Uttley, P.

    2013-02-10

    Reverberation lags have recently been discovered in a handful of nearby, variable active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Here, we analyze a {approx}100 ks archival XMM-Newton observation of the highly variable AGN, ESO 113-G010, in order to search for lags between hard, 1.5-4.5 keV, and soft, 0.3-0.9 keV, energy X-ray bands. At the lowest frequencies available in the light curve ({approx}< 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Hz), we find hard lags where the power-law-dominated hard band lags the soft band (where the reflection fraction is high). However, at higher frequencies in the range (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Hz we find a soft lag of -325 {+-} 89 s. The general evolution from hard to soft lags as the frequency increases is similar to other AGNs where soft lags have been detected. We interpret this soft lag as due to reverberation from the accretion disk, with the reflection component responding to variability from the X-ray corona. For a black hole mass of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} this corresponds to a light-crossing time of {approx}9 R{sub g} /c; however, dilution effects mean that the intrinsic lag is likely longer than this. Based on recent black hole mass scaling for lag properties, the lag amplitude and frequency are more consistent with a black hole a few times more massive than the best estimates, though flux-dependent effects could easily add scatter this large.

  6. THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT 2011: REVERBERATION MAPPING OF MARKARIAN 50

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Aaron J.; Thorman, Shawn J.; Pancoast, Anna; Bennert, Vardha N.; Sand, David J.; Treu, Tommaso; Brewer, Brendon J.; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Gates, Elinor L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bae, Hyun-Jin; Buehler, Tabitha; and others

    2011-12-10

    The Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2011 observing campaign was carried out over the course of 11 weeks in spring 2011. Here we present the first results from this program, a measurement of the broad-line reverberation lag in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 50. Combining our data with supplemental observations obtained prior to the start of the main observing campaign, our data set covers a total duration of 4.5 months. During this time, Mrk 50 was highly variable, exhibiting a maximum variability amplitude of a factor of {approx}4 in the U-band continuum and a factor of {approx}2 in the H{beta} line. Using standard cross-correlation techniques, we find that H{beta} and H{gamma} lag the V-band continuum by {tau}{sub cen} = 10.64{sup +0.82}{sub -0.93} and 8.43{sup +1.30}{sub -1.28} days, respectively, while the lag of He II {lambda}4686 is unresolved. The H{beta} line exhibits a symmetric velocity-resolved reverberation signature with shorter lags in the high-velocity wings than in the line core, consistent with an origin in a broad-line region (BLR) dominated by orbital motion rather than infall or outflow. Assuming a virial normalization factor of f = 5.25, the virial estimate of the black hole mass is (3.2 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }. These observations demonstrate that Mrk 50 is among the most promising nearby active galaxies for detailed investigations of BLR structure and dynamics.

  7. Using iron line reverberation and spectroscopy to distinguish Kerr and non-Kerr black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jiachen; Bambi, Cosimo; Steiner, James F. E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn

    2015-05-01

    The iron Kα line commonly observed in the X-ray spectrum of both stellar-mass and supermassive black hole candidates is produced by the illumination of a cold accretion disk by a hot corona. In this framework, the activation of a new flaring region in the hot corona imprints a time variation on the iron line spectrum. Future X-ray facilities with high time resolution and large effective areas may be able to measure the so-called 2-dimensional transfer function; that is, the iron line profile detected by a distant observer as a function of time in response to an instantaneous flare from the X-ray primary source. This work is a preliminary study to determine if and how such a technique can provide more information about the spacetime geometry around the compact object than the already possible measurements of the time-integrated iron line profile. Within our simplified model, we find that a measurement of iron line reverberation can improve constraints appreciably given a sufficiently strong signal, though that most of the information is present in the time-integrated spectrum. Our aim is to test the Kerr metric. We find that current X-ray facilities and data are unable to provide strong tests of the Kerr nature of supermassive black hole candidates. We consider an optimistic case of 10{sup 5} iron line photons from a next-generation data set. With such data, the reverberation model improves upon the spectral constraint by an order of magnitude.

  8. Robotic Reverberation Mapping of Arp 151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, S.; Sand, D. J.; Barth, A. J.; Horne, K.; Treu, T.; Raganit, L.; Boroson, T.; Crawford, S.; Pancoast, A.; Pei, L.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Villforth, C.; Winkler, H.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network's Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) Key Project, a large program devoted to using the robotic resources of LCOGT to perform time domain studies of active galaxies. We monitored the Seyfert 1 galaxy Arp 151 (Mrk 40) for ∼200 days with robotic imagers and with the FLOYDS robotic spectrograph at Faulkes Telescope North. Arp 151 was highly variable during this campaign, with V-band light curve variations of ∼0.3 mag and Hβ flux changing by a factor of ∼3. We measure robust time lags between the V-band continuum and the Hα, Hβ, and Hγ emission lines, with {τ }{cen}={13.89}-1.41+1.39, {7.52}-1.06+1.43, and {7.40}-1.32+1.50 days, respectively. The lag for the He iiλ4686 emission line is unresolved. We measure a velocity-resolved lag for the Hβ line, which is clearly asymmetric with higher lags on the blue wing of the line that decline to the red, possibly indicative of radial inflow, and is similar in morphology to past observations of the Hβ transfer function shape. Assuming a virialization factor of f = 5.5, we estimate a black hole mass of {M}{BH}={6.2}-1.2+1.4 × 106 M⊙, also consistent with past measurements for this object. These results represent the first step to demonstrate the powerful robotic capabilities of LCOGT for long-term AGN time domain campaigns that human intensive programs cannot easily accomplish. Arp 151 is now one of just a few AGNs where the virial product is known to remain constant against substantial changes in Hβ lag and luminosity.

  9. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test system is reported that consists of a reverberation room measuring 18 feet wide by 21 feet long by 26 feet high, with an internal volume of 10,900 cubic feet. The room is rectangular in shape. Acoustic energy is supplied through two 50-Hz cutoff exponential horns about 12 feet long. Each of the two horns has two transducers rated at 4000 acoustic watts each. A gaseous nitrogen supply is used to supply the energy. The equalized electrical signal is corrected by a circuit designed to compensate for the transducer nonlinearity, then fed into one channel of a phase linear power amplifier, then into the transducer. The amplifiers have been modified to increase their reliability. The acoustic energy in the room is monitored by six B and K 1/2-inch condenser microphones. The electrical signal from each microphone is fed into a six channel real time averager to give a spatial average of the signals.

  10. Children’s Understanding of Instructions Presented in Noise and Reverberation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Dawna E.; Manninen, Crystal M.; Valente, Daniel L.; Smith, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examined children’s ability to follow audio-visual instructions presented in noise and reverberation. Method Children (8–12 years) with normal hearing followed instructions in noise or noise plus reverberation. Performance was compared for a single talker (ST), multiple talkers (MT) and multiple talkers with competing comments (MTC). Working memory was assessed using measures of digit span. Results Performance was better for children in noise than for those in noise plus reverberation. In noise, performance for ST was better than for either MT or MTC and performance for MT was better than for MTC. In noise plus reverberation, performance for ST and MT were better than for MTC but there were no differences between ST and MT. Digit span did not account for significant variance in the task. Conclusions Overall, children performed better in noise than in noise plus reverberation. However, differing patterns across conditions for the two environments suggested that the addition of reverberation may have affected performance in a way that was not apparent in noise alone. Continued research is needed to examine the differing effects of noise and reverberation on children’s speech understanding. PMID:25036922

  11. Acoustically regulated carrier injection into a single optically active quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schülein, Florian J. R.; Müller, Kai; Bichler, Max; Koblmüller, Gregor; Finley, Jonathan J.; Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J.

    2013-08-01

    We study the carrier injection into a single InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot regulated by a radio frequency surface acoustic wave. We find that the time of laser excitation during the acoustic cycle programs both the emission intensities and time of formation of neutral (X0) and negatively charged (X-) excitons. We identify underlying, characteristic formation pathways of both few-particle states in the time-domain experiments and show that both exciton species can be formed either with the optical pump or at later times by injection of single electrons and holes “surfing” the acoustic wave. All experimental observations are in excellent agreement with calculated electron and hole trajectories in the plane of the two-dimensional wetting layer which is dynamically modulated by the acoustically induced piezoelectric potentials. Taken together, our findings provide insight on both the onset of acoustoelectric transport of electrons and holes and their conversion into the optical domain after regulated injection into a single quantum dot emitter.

  12. Reverberant speech recognition combining deep neural networks and deep autoencoders augmented with a phone-class feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, Masato; Sakai, Shinsuke; Kawahara, Tatsuya

    2015-12-01

    We propose an approach to reverberant speech recognition adopting deep learning in the front-end as well as b a c k-e n d o f a r e v e r b e r a n t s p e e c h r e c o g n i t i o n s y s t e m, a n d a n o v e l m e t h o d t o i m p r o v e t h e d e r e v e r b e r a t i o n p e r f o r m a n c e of the front-end network using phone-class information. At the front-end, we adopt a deep autoencoder (DAE) for enhancing the speech feature parameters, and speech recognition is performed in the back-end using DNN-HMM acoustic models trained on multi-condition data. The system was evaluated through the ASR task in the Reverb Challenge 2014. The DNN-HMM system trained on the multi-condition training set achieved a conspicuously higher word accuracy compared to the MLLR-adapted GMM-HMM system trained on the same data. Furthermore, feature enhancement with the deep autoencoder contributed to the improvement of recognition accuracy especially in the more adverse conditions. While the mapping between reverberant and clean speech in DAE-based dereverberation is conventionally conducted only with the acoustic information, we presume the mapping is also dependent on the phone information. Therefore, we propose a new scheme (pDAE), which augments a phone-class feature to the standard acoustic features as input. Two types of the phone-class feature are investigated. One is the hard recognition result of monophones, and the other is a soft representation derived from the posterior outputs of monophone DNN. The augmented feature in either type results in a significant improvement (7-8 % relative) from the standard DAE.

  13. PREFACE: ARENA 2006—Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino detection Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Lee

    2007-06-01

    The International Conference on Acoustic and Radio EeV Neutrino Activities, ARENA 2006 was jointly hosted by the Universities of Northumbria and Sheffield at the City of Newcastle Campus of the University of Northumbria in June 2006. ARENA 2006 was the latest in a series of meetings which have addressed, either separately or jointly, the use of radio and acoustic sensors for the detection of highly relativistic particles. Previous successful meetings have taken place in Los Angeles (RADHEP, 2000), Stanford (2003) and DESY Zeuthen (ARENA 2005). A total of 50 scientists from across Europe, the US and Japan attended the conference presenting status reports and results from a number of projects and initiatives spread as far afield as the Sweden and the South Pole. The talks presented at the meeting and the proceedings contained herein represent a `snapshot' of the status of the fields of acoustic and radio detection at the time of the conference. The three day meeting also included two invited talks by Dr Paula Chadwick and Dr Johannes Knapp who gave excellent summaries of the related astroparticle physics fields of high energy gamma ray detection and high energy cosmic ray detection respectively. As well as a full academic agenda there were social events including a Medieval themed conference banquet at Lumley Castle and a civic reception kindly provided by the Lord Mayor of Newcastle and hosted at the Mansion House. Thanks must go to the International Advisory Board members for their input and guidance, the Local Organising Committee for their hard work in bringing everything together and finally the delegates for the stimulating, enthusiastic and enjoyable spirit in which ARENA 2006 took place. Lee Thompson

    International Advisory Board

    G. Anton, ErlangenD. Besson, Kansas
    J. Blümer, KarlsruheA. Capone, Rome
    H. Falcke, BonnP. Gorham, Hawaii
    G. Gratta

  14. Doppler Spectra of Bistatic Reverberation from the Sea Surface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-08

    Doppler spectrum of surface scattered acoustic waves was performed by Liebermann [1-2]. Acoustic waves in air were scattered from capillary waves generated...scattered angle. Liebermann concluded that out of a broad spectrum of surface wave frequen- cies the wavelength most effective in scattering the acoustic... Liebermann , the theoretical prediction of a 1030 Hz Doppler shift was not in good agreement with the measured. It was suggested that nonlinear sur- face

  15. Enhancement of speech intelligibility in reverberant rooms: role of amplitude envelope and temporal fine structure.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Nirmal Kumar; Zahorik, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    The temporal envelope and fine structure of speech make distinct contributions to the perception of speech in normal-hearing listeners, and are differentially affected by room reverberation. Previous work has demonstrated enhanced speech intelligibility in reverberant rooms when prior exposure to the room was provided. Here, the relative contributions of envelope and fine structure cues to this intelligibility enhancement were tested using an open-set speech corpus and virtual auditory space techniques to independently manipulate the speech cues within a simulated room. Intelligibility enhancement was observed only when the envelope was reverberant, indicating that the enhancement is envelope-based.

  16. Effect of stimuli presentation method on perception of room size using only acoustic cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jeffrey Barnabas

    People listen to music and speech in a large variety of rooms and many room parameters, including the size of the room, can drastically affect how well the speech is understood or the music enjoyed. While multi-modal (typically hearing and sight) tests may be more realistic, in order to isolate what acoustic cues listeners use to determine the size of a room, a listening-only tests is conducted here. Nearly all of the studies to-date on the perception of room volume using acoustic cues have presented the stimuli only over headphones and these studies have reported that, in most cases, the perceived room volume is more highly correlated with the perceived reverberation (reverberance) than with actual room volume. While reverberance may be a salient acoustic cue used for the determination or room size, the actual sound field in a room is not accurately reproduced when presented over headphones and it is thought that some of the complexities of the sound field that relate to perception of geometric volume, specifically directional information of reflections, may be lost. It is possible that the importance of reverberance may be overemphasized when using only headphones to present stimuli so a comparison of room-size perception is proposed where the sound field (from modeled and recorded impulse responses) is presented both over headphones and also over a surround system using higher order ambisonics to more accurately produce directional sound information. Major results are that, in this study, no difference could be seen between the two presentation methods and that reverberation time is highly correlated to room-size perception while real room size is not.

  17. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    The potential effect of active source seismic research on marine mammal populations is a topic of increasing concern, and controversy surrounding such operations has begun to impact the planning and permitting of academic surveys [e.g., Malakoff, 2002 Science]. Although no causal relationship between marine mammal strandings and seismic exploration has been proven, any circumstantial evidence must be thoroughly investigated. A 2002 stranding of two beaked whales in the Gulf of California within 50 km of a R/V Ewing seismic survey has been a subject of concern for both marine seismologists and environmentalists. In order to better understand possible received levels for whales in the vicinity of these operations, modeling is combined with ground-truth calibration measurements. A wide-angle parabolic equation model, which is capable of including shear within the sediment and basement layers, is used to generate predictive models of low-frequency transmission loss within the Gulf of California. This work incorporates range-dependent bathymetry, sediment thickness, sound velocity structure and sub-bottom properties. Oceanic sounds speed profiles are derived from the U.S. Navy's seasonal GDEM model and sediment thicknesses are taken from NOAA's worldwide database. The spectral content of the Ewing's 20-airgun seismic array is constrained by field calibration in the spring of 2003 [Tolstoy et al., 2004 GRL], indicating peak energies at frequencies below a few hundred Hz, with energy spectral density showing an approximate power-law decrease at higher frequencies (being ~40 dB below peak at 1 kHz). Transmission loss is estimated along a series of radials extending from multiple positions along the ship's track, with the directivity of the array accounted for by phase-shifting point sources that are scaled by the cube root of the individual airgun volumes. This allows the time-space history of low-frequency received levels to be reconstructed within the Gulf of California

  18. Patterns of Occurrence and Marine Mammal Acoustic Behavior in Relation to Navy Sonar Activity Off Jacksonville, Florida.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Julie N; Norris, Thomas F; Yack, Tina M; Ferguson, Elizabeth L; Kumar, Anurag; Nissen, Jene; Bell, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Passive acoustic data collected from marine autonomous recording units deployed off Jacksonville, FL (from 13 September to 8 October 2009 and 3 December 2009 to 8 January 2010), were analyzed for detection of cetaceans and Navy sonar. Cetaceans detected included Balaenoptera acutorostrata, Eubalaena glacialis, B. borealis, Physeter macrocephalus, blackfish, and delphinids. E. glacialis were detected at shallow and, somewhat unexpectedly, deep sites. P. macrocephalus were characterized by a strong diel pattern. B. acutorostrata showed the strongest relationship between sonar activity and vocal behavior. These results provide a preliminary assessment of cetacean occurrence off Jacksonville and new insights on vocal responses to sonar.

  19. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk tomography and compton hump reverberation

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Lohfink, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C.; Harrison, F. A.; Balokovic, M.; Matt, G.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W.; Christensen, F. E.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-07-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

  20. Observations of MCG-5-23-16 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR: Disk Tomography and Compton Hump Reverberation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoghbi, A.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, C.; Kara, E.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Lohfink, A.; Matt, G.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first active galactic nuclei (AGNs) where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different timescales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.

    1. Low frequency acoustic pulse propagation in temperate forests.

      PubMed

      Albert, Donald G; Swearingen, Michelle E; Perron, Frank E; Carbee, David L

      2015-08-01

      Measurements of acoustic pulse propagation for a 30-m path were conducted in an open field and in seven different forest stands in the northeastern United States consisting of deciduous, evergreen, or mixed tree species. The waveforms recorded in forest generally show the pulse elongation characteristic of propagation over a highly porous ground surface, with high frequency scattered arrivals superimposed on the basic waveform shape. Waveform analysis conducted to determine ground properties resulted in acoustically determined layer thicknesses of 4-8 cm in summer, within 2 cm of the directly measured thickness of the litter layers. In winter the acoustic thicknesses correlated with the site-specific snow cover depths. Effective flow resistivity values of 50-88 kN s m(-4) were derived for the forest sites in summer, while lower values typical for snow were found in winter. Reverberation times (T60) were typically around 2 s, but two stands (deciduous and pruned spruce planted on a square grid) had lower values of about 1.2 s. One site with a very rough ground surface had very low summer flow resistivity value and also had the longest reverberation time of about 3 s. These measurements can provide parameters useful for theoretical predictions of acoustic propagation within forests.

    2. Computer simulations in room acoustics: concepts and uncertainties.

      PubMed

      Vorländer, Michael

      2013-03-01

      Geometrical acoustics are used as a standard model for room acoustic design and consulting. Research on room acoustic simulation focuses on a more accurate modeling of propagation effects such as diffraction and other wave effects in rooms, and on scattering. Much progress was made in this field so that wave models also (for example, the boundary element method and the finite differences in time domain) can now be used for higher frequencies. The concepts and implementations of room simulation methods are briefly reviewed. After all, simulations in architectural acoustics are indeed powerful tools, but their reliability depends on the skills of the operator who has to create an adequate polygon model and has to choose the correct input data of boundary conditions such as absorption and scattering. Very little is known about the uncertainty of this input data. With the theory of error propagation of uncertainties it can be shown that prediction of reverberation times with accuracy better than the just noticeable difference requires input data in a quality which is not available from reverberation room measurements.

    3. Quantum corral resonance widths: lossy scattering as acoustics.

      PubMed

      Barr, Matthew C; Zaletel, Michael P; Heller, Eric J

      2010-09-08

      We present an approach to predicting extrinsic electron resonance widths within quantum corral nanostructures based on analogies with acoustics. Established quantum mechanical methods for calculating resonance widths, such as multiple scattering theory, build up the scattering atom by atom, ignoring the structure formed by the atoms, such as walls or enclosures. Conversely, particle-in-a-box models, assuming continuous walls, have long been successful in predicting quantum corral energy levels, but not resonance widths. In acoustics, partial reflection from walls and various enclosures has long been incorporated for determining reverberation times. Pursuing an exact analogy between the local density of states of a quantum corral and the acoustic impedance of a concert hall, we show electron lifetimes in nanoscopic structures of arbitrary convex shape are well accounted for by the Sabine formula for acoustic reverberation times. This provides a particularly compact and intuitive prescription for extrinsic finite lifetimes in a particle-in-a-box with leaky walls, including quantum corral atomic walls, given single particle scattering properties.

    4. Ocean Acoustic Propagation: Fluctuations and Coherence in Dynamically Active Shallow-Water Regions

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2011-03-04

      sponsored field programs. These were 1. The Littoral Environmental Acoustics Research portion of the ONR Shallow-Water 2006 experiment (SW06- LEAR ...cooled water on the shelf. In this particular frontal zone there can be a thin deep warm salty layer, capped by an inverted thermocline, on the near... deep thermocline (above the thin deep salty layer) both summer and winter. The South China Sea experiment area has multiple types of large nonlinear

    5. A Unified Approach to Passive and Active Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2012-09-30

      fish from man-made targets. Many species of animals including fish, birds , insects and other self-propelled particles (SPPs) are known to form...synchronous motion within the SPP group, and that disturbances can propagate as waves within a group at speeds much higher than that of any individual...noise sources, both natural and anthropogenic , on acoustic detection will be evaluated quantitatively. An analytic model that accounts for the

    6. Investigation of Volcanic Seismo-Acoustic Signals: Applying Subspace Detection to Lava Fountain Activity at Etna Volcano

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Sciotto, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Cannata, A.; Arrowsmith, S.; Privitera, E.; Gresta, S.

      2011-12-01

      The current eruption of Mount Etna, which began in January, 2011, has produced numerous energetic episodes of lava fountaining, which have bee recorded by the INGV seismic and acoustic sensors located on and around the volcano. The source of these events was the pit crater on the east flank of the Southeast crater of Etna. Simultaneously, small levels of activity were noted in the Bocca Nuova as well, prior to its lava fountaining activity. We will present an analysis of seismic and acoustic signals related to the 2011 activity wherein we apply the method of subspace detection to determine whether the source exhibits a temporal evolution within or between fountaining events, or otherwise produces repeating, classifiable events occurring through the continuous explosive degassing. We will examine not only the raw waveforms, but also spectral variations in time as well as time-varying statistical functions such as signal skewness and kurtosis. These results will be compared to straightforward cross-correlation analysis. In addition to classification performance, the subspace method has promise to outperform standard STA/LTA methods for real-time event detection in cases where similar events can be expected.

    7. Acoustic Cluster Therapy: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Measurement of Activated Bubble Size Distribution and Temporal Dynamics.

      PubMed

      Healey, Andrew John; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Eriksen, Morten; Bendiksen, Ragnar; Tornes, Audun; Østensen, Jonny

      2016-05-01

      Acoustic cluster technology (ACT) is a two-component, microparticle formulation platform being developed for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. Sonazoid microbubbles, which have a negative surface charge, are mixed with micron-sized perfluoromethylcyclopentane droplets stabilized with a positively charged surface membrane to form microbubble/microdroplet clusters. On exposure to ultrasound, the oil undergoes a phase change to the gaseous state, generating 20- to 40-μm ACT bubbles. An acoustic transmission technique is used to measure absorption and velocity dispersion of the ACT bubbles. An inversion technique computes bubble size population with temporal resolution of seconds. Bubble populations are measured both in vitro and in vivo after activation within the cardiac chambers of a dog model, with catheter-based flow through an extracorporeal measurement flow chamber. Volume-weighted mean diameter in arterial blood after activation in the left ventricle was 22 μm, with no bubbles >44 μm in diameter. After intravenous administration, 24.4% of the oil is activated in the cardiac chambers.

    8. Variation in acoustic activity of North Atlantic right whales in three critical habitat areas in 2004

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Parks, Susan E.; Clark, Christopher W.

      2005-04-01

      The North Atlantic right whale is a critically endangered species. Five major habitat areas have been defined based on the presence of groups of right whales during different seasons of the year. Autonomous seafloor acoustic recorders, ``pop-ups,'' have been used over the past five years to identify the presence/absence of right whales in Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts by detection of right whale contact calls. These recordings have shown the effectiveness of using acoustics to monitor right whale behavior. In 2004, multi-unit arrays of pop-ups were deployed in three critical habitat areas; Cape Cod Bay (January-April), Great South Channel (May), and the Bay of Fundy (August). The presence/absence of right whale calls within range of the array, estimates of the minimum number of individuals calling, the types of calls recorded, and the diurnal patterns of sound production were measured to compare the acoustic repertoire use of right whales in these three habitats. These data were compared to visual survey data in the Bay of Fundy. These results can be used to compare diurnal and nocturnal behavioral patterns of the whales and provide information on behavioral differences between these three critical habitat areas.

    9. Dialogic reverberations: police, domestic abuse, and the discontinuance of cases.

      PubMed

      Lea, Susan J; Lynn, Nick

      2012-10-01

      This study investigated the social construction of domestic abuse by police officers, specifically in the context of arguments presented to the prosecutor for a decision on whether to proceed with or discontinue the case. Nineteen police files were examined with a particular focus on the MG3, the "Report to Crown Prosecutors for Charging Decision." Access to such sensitive material is usually denied to researchers; therefore, this study offers unusual insights into the treatment of victims and perpetrators of interpersonal violence by the police. Discourse analysis revealed three dominant speech genres: impartiality, credibility, and the "real" victim. These genres separately and in interaction served to construct domestic abuse cases in ways that did not support the victim's account. The "dialogic reverberations" of these findings are discussed and the implications of the work for research and practice are considered.

    10. Acoustical case studies of three green buildings

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Siebein, Gary; Lilkendey, Robert; Skorski, Stephen

      2005-04-01

      Case studies of 3 green buildings with LEED certifications that required extensive acoustical retrofit work to become satisfactory work environments for their intended user groups will be used to define areas where green building design concepts and acoustical design concepts require reconciliation. Case study 1 is an office and conference center for a city environmental education agency. Large open spaces intended to collect daylight through clerestory windows provided large, reverberant volumes with few acoustic finishes that rendered them unsuitable as open office space and a conference room/auditorium. Case Study 2 describes one of the first gold LEED buildings in the southeast whose primary design concepts were so narrowly focused on thermal and lighting issues that they often worked directly against basic acoustical requirements resulting in sound levels of NC 50-55 in classrooms and faculty offices, crosstalk between classrooms and poor room acoustics. Case study 3 is an environmental education and conference center with open public areas, very high ceilings, and all reflective surfaces made from wood and other environmentally friendly materials that result in excessive loudness when the building is used by the numbers of people which it was intended to serve.

    11. Evidence from acoustic imaging for submarine volcanic activity in 2012 off the west coast of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pérez, Nemesio M.; Somoza, Luis; Hernández, Pedro A.; de Vallejo, Luis González; León, Ricardo; Sagiya, Takeshi; Biain, Ander; González, Francisco J.; Medialdea, Teresa; Barrancos, José; Ibáñez, Jesús; Sumino, Hirochika; Nogami, Kenji; Romero, Carmen

      2014-12-01

      We report precursory geophysical, geodetic, and geochemical signatures of a new submarine volcanic activity observed off the western coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands. Submarine manifestation of this activity has been revealed through acoustic imaging of submarine plumes detected on the 20-kHz chirp parasound subbottom profiler (TOPAS PS18) mounted aboard the Spanish RV Hespérides on June 28, 2012. Five distinct "filament-shaped" acoustic plumes emanating from the flanks of mounds have been recognized at water depth between 64 and 88 m on a submarine platform located NW El Hierro. These plumes were well imaged on TOPAS profiles as "flares" of high acoustic contrast of impedance within the water column. Moreover, visible plumes composed of white rafts floating on the sea surface and sourcing from the location of the submarine plumes were reported by aerial photographs on July 3, 2012, 5 days after acoustic plumes were recorded. In addition, several geophysical and geochemical data support the fact that these submarine vents were preceded by several precursory signatures: (i) a sharp increase of the seismic energy release and the number of daily earthquakes of magnitude ≥2.5 on June 25, 2012, (ii) significant vertical and horizontal displacements observed at the Canary Islands GPS network (Nagoya University-ITER-GRAFCAN) with uplifts up to 3 cm from June 25 to 26, 2012, (iii) an anomalous increase of the soil gas radon activity, from the end of April until the beginning of June reaching peak values of 2.7 kBq/m3 on June 3, 2012, and (iv) observed positive peak in the air-corrected value of 3He/4He ratio monitored in ground waters (8.5 atmospheric 3He/4He ratio ( R A)) at the northwestern El Hierro on June 16, 2012. Combining these submarine and subaerial information, we suggest these plumes are the consequence of submarine vents exhaling volcanic gas mixed with fine ash as consequence of an event of rapid rise of volatile-rich magma beneath the NW submarine ridge

    12. Shielding Effectiveness in a Two-Dimensional Reverberation Chamber Using Finite-Element Techniques

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Bunting, Charles F.

      2006-01-01

      Reverberation chambers are attaining an increased importance in determination of electromagnetic susceptibility of avionics equipment. Given the nature of the variable boundary condition, the ability of a given source to couple energy into certain modes and the passband characteristic due the chamber Q, the fields are typically characterized by statistical means. The emphasis of this work is to apply finite-element techniques at cutoff to the analysis of a two-dimensional structure to examine the notion of shielding-effectiveness issues in a reverberating environment. Simulated mechanical stirring will be used to obtain the appropriate statistical field distribution. The shielding effectiveness (SE) in a simulated reverberating environment is compared to measurements in a reverberation chamber. A log-normal distribution for the SE is observed with implications for system designers. The work is intended to provide further refinement in the consideration of SE in a complex electromagnetic environment.

    13. High second-language proficiency protects against the effects of reverberation on listening comprehension.

      PubMed

      Sörqvist, Patrik; Hurtig, Anders; Ljung, Robert; Rönnberg, Jerker

      2014-04-01

      The purpose of this experiment was to investigate whether classroom reverberation influences second-language (L2) listening comprehension. Moreover, we investigated whether individual differences in baseline L2 proficiency and in working memory capacity (WMC) modulate the effect of reverberation time on L2 listening comprehension. The results showed that L2 listening comprehension decreased as reverberation time increased. Participants with higher baseline L2 proficiency were less susceptible to this effect. WMC was also related to the effect of reverberation (although just barely significant), but the effect of WMC was eliminated when baseline L2 proficiency was statistically controlled. Taken together, the results suggest that top-down cognitive capabilities support listening in adverse conditions. Potential implications for the Swedish national tests in English are discussed.

    14. Acoustic Neuroma

      MedlinePlus

      An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

    15. Closed-form and Numerical Reverberation and Propagation: Inclusion of Convergence Effects

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2013-09-30

      mailbox.nurc.nato.int LONG-TERM GOALS The flux formulation of propagation has already been used to calculate bistatic , range-dependent reverberation...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 10 19a...propagation and bistatic reverberation theory has been extended to range-dependent environments. This has been incorporated in a version of Artemis

    16. Towards modelling X-ray reverberation in AGN: piecing together the extended corona

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wilkins, D. R.; Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.

      2016-05-01

      Models of X-ray reverberation from extended coronae are developed from general relativistic ray tracing simulations. Reverberation lags between correlated variability in the directly observed continuum emission and that reflected from the accretion disc arise due to the additional light travel time between the corona and reflecting disc. X-ray reverberation is detected from an increasing sample of Seyfert galaxies and a number of common properties are observed, including a transition from the characteristic reverberation signature at high frequencies to a hard lag within the continuum component at low frequencies, as well as a pronounced dip in the reverberation lag at 3 keV. These features are not trivially explained by the reverberation of X-rays originating from simple point sources. We therefore model reverberation from coronae extended both over the surface of the disc and vertically. Causal propagation through its extent for both the simple case of constant velocity propagation and propagation linked to the viscous time-scale in the underlying accretion disc is included as well as stochastic variability arising due to turbulence locally on the disc. We find that the observed features of X-ray reverberation in Seyfert galaxies can be explained if the long time-scale variability is dominated by the viscous propagation of fluctuations through the corona. The corona extends radially at low height over the surface of the disc but with a bright central region in which fluctuations propagate up the black hole rotation axis driven by more rapid variability arising from the innermost regions of the accretion flow.

    17. Acoustic Seaglider

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2008-03-07

      a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

    18. Acoustic seal

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

      2006-01-01

      The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

    19. Acoustic Seal

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

      2006-01-01

      The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

    20. Differences in foraging activity of deep sea diving odontocetes in the Ligurian Sea as determined by passive acoustic recorders

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Neuheimer, Anna

      2016-01-01

      Characterizing the trophic roles of deep-diving odontocete species and how they vary in space and time is challenged by our ability to observe foraging behavior. Though sampling methods are limited, foraging activity of deep-diving odontocetes can be monitored by recording their biosonar emissions. Daily occurrence of echolocation clicks was monitored acoustically for five months (July-December 2011) in the Ligurian Sea (Mediterranean Sea) using five passive acoustic recorders. Detected odontocetes included Cuvier's beaked whales (Zipuhius cavirostris), sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus), Risso's dolphins (Grampus griseus), and long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). The results indicated that the foraging strategies varied significantly over time, with sperm whales switching to nocturnal foraging in late September whereas Risso's dolphins and pilot whales foraged mainly at night throughout the sampling period. In the study area, winter nights are about five hours longer than summer nights and an analysis showed that pilot whales and Risso's dolphins adjusted their foraging activity with the length of the night, foraging longer during the longer winter nights. This is the first study to show that marine mammals exhibit diurnal foraging patterns closely correlated to sunrise and sunset.

    1. Acoustic detection of biosonar activity of deep diving odontocetes at Josephine Seamount High Seas Marine Protected Area.

      PubMed

      Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W L; Ou, Hui; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald; Moretti, David

      2015-05-01

      The temporal occurrence of deep diving cetaceans in the Josephine Seamount High Seas Marine Protected Area (JSHSMPA), south-west Portugal, was monitored using a passive acoustic recorder. The recorder was deployed on 13 May 2010 at a depth of 814 m during the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation cruise "Sirena10" and recovered on 6 June 2010. The recorder was programmed to record 40 s of data every 2 min. Acoustic data analysis, for the detection and classification of echolocation clicks, was performed using automatic detector/classification systems: M3R (Marine Mammal Monitoring on Navy Ranges), a custom matlab program, and an operator-supervised custom matlab program to assess the classification performance of the detector/classification systems. M3R CS-SVM algorithm contains templates to detect beaked whales, sperm whales, blackfish (pilot and false killer whales), and Risso's dolphins. The detections of each group of odontocetes was monitored as a function of time. Blackfish and Risso's dolphins were detected every day, while beaked whales and sperm whales were detected almost every day. The hourly distribution of detections reveals that blackfish and Risso's dolphins were more active at night, while beaked whales and sperm whales were more active during daylight hours.

    2. Detecting the Activation of a Self-Healing Mechanism in Concrete by Acoustic Emission and Digital Image Correlation

      PubMed Central

      Tsangouri, E.; Aggelis, D. G.; Van Tittelboom, K.; De Belie, N.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

      2013-01-01

      Autonomous crack healing in concrete is obtained when encapsulated healing agent is embedded into the material. Cracking damage in concrete elements ruptures the capsules and activates the healing process by healing agent release. Previously, the strength and stiffness recovery as well as the sealing efficiency after autonomous crack repair was well established. However, the mechanisms that trigger capsule breakage remain unknown. In parallel, the conditions under which the crack interacts with embedded capsules stay black-box. In this research, an experimental approach implementing an advanced optical and acoustic method sets up scopes to monitor and justify the crack formation and capsule breakage of concrete samples tested under three-point bending. Digital Image Correlation was used to visualize the crack opening. The optical information was the basis for an extensive and analytical study of the damage by Acoustic Emission analysis. The influence of embedding capsules on the concrete fracture process, the location of capsule damage, and the differentiation between emissions due to capsule rupture and crack formation are presented in this research. A profound observation of the capsules performance provides a clear view of the healing activation process. PMID:24381518

    3. Detecting the activation of a self-healing mechanism in concrete by acoustic emission and digital image correlation.

      PubMed

      Tsangouri, E; Aggelis, D G; Van Tittelboom, K; De Belie, N; Van Hemelrijck, D

      2013-01-01

      Autonomous crack healing in concrete is obtained when encapsulated healing agent is embedded into the material. Cracking damage in concrete elements ruptures the capsules and activates the healing process by healing agent release. Previously, the strength and stiffness recovery as well as the sealing efficiency after autonomous crack repair was well established. However, the mechanisms that trigger capsule breakage remain unknown. In parallel, the conditions under which the crack interacts with embedded capsules stay black-box. In this research, an experimental approach implementing an advanced optical and acoustic method sets up scopes to monitor and justify the crack formation and capsule breakage of concrete samples tested under three-point bending. Digital Image Correlation was used to visualize the crack opening. The optical information was the basis for an extensive and analytical study of the damage by Acoustic Emission analysis. The influence of embedding capsules on the concrete fracture process, the location of capsule damage, and the differentiation between emissions due to capsule rupture and crack formation are presented in this research. A profound observation of the capsules performance provides a clear view of the healing activation process.

    4. FIRST SEARCH FOR AN X-RAY–OPTICAL REVERBERATION SIGNAL IN AN ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE

      SciTech Connect

      Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Trippe, Margaret L.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Gandhi, Poshak

      2016-02-10

      Using simultaneous optical (VLT/FORS2) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) data of NGC 5408, we present the first ever attempt to search for a reverberation signal in an ultraluminous X-ray source (NGC 5408 X-1). The idea is similar to active galactic nucleus broad line reverberation mapping where a lag measurement between the X-ray and the optical flux combined with a Keplerian velocity estimate should enable us to weigh the central compact object. We find that although NGC 5408 X-1's X-rays are variable on a timescale of a few hundred seconds (rms of 9.0 ± 0.5%), the optical emission does not show any statistically significant variations. We set a 3σ upper limit on the rms optical variability of 3.3%. The ratio of the X-ray to the optical variability is an indicator of X-ray reprocessing efficiency. In X-ray binaries, this ratio is roughly 5. Assuming a similar ratio for NGC 5408 X-1, the expected rms optical variability is ≈2%, which is still a factor of roughly two lower than what was possible with the VLT observations in this study. We find marginal evidence (3σ) for optical variability on a ∼24 hr timescale. Our results demonstrate that such measurements can be made, but photometric conditions, low sky background levels, and longer simultaneous observations will be required to reach optical variability levels similar to those of X-ray binaries.

    5. Application of ray-born scattering and boundary perturbation methods to acoustic reverberation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Toksoz, M. N.

      1992-08-01

      This study utilizes ultrasonic water tank modeling to examine three-dimensional scattering trends from a random set of parallel grooves, and compares this with theoretical results obtained from two-dimensional finite-difference calculations. Ultrasonic laboratory modeling is carried out using computer-controlled source and receivers with an aluminum block submerged in a water tank. The block's upper interface is plane for the reference model and grooved for the test model. The grooves measure about one-third the center source wavelength and have a Gaussian distribution with a mean of 1 wavelength and a standard deviation of 1/3 wavelength. This experiment places both the source and receiver at the water's surface with the receiver array in the horizontal plane. The receiver line is then positioned at various angles to grooves. A staggered-grid finite-difference scheme is used for theoretical computations and comparisons with laboratory data. These theoretical results matched experimental data well for both the plane interface and the grooved model. Specifically, this study shows that scattering mechanisms are different for propagation normal to grooves than those parallel to the grooves. In the first case scattering takes place in the form of point diffractors. This causes reduction of the specular reflections. Amplitudes decrease by more than 60 percent, relative to a plane interface, when the incidence angle exceeds 45 degrees. 'Snapshots' of finite-difference synthetics helped to clarify details of scattering. In the second case, where the wave front is parallel to the grooves, scattering takes a form of guided head waves and continuous diffractions giving rise to constructive and destructive interference. This gives the illusion of 'broken' reflectors at depth.

    6. Stochastic Modeling of Seafloor Morphology in Support of the Acoustic Reverberation SRP

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1990-10-29

      Ocean near the Cocos -Pacific spreading center of the east Pacific Rise, and SMl-A, corresponding to a 100km x 100km area of the North Atlantic Ocean...the Cocos -Pacific spreading center of the East Pacific Rise and SMI-A, corresponding to a 100 km x 100 km area of the North Atlantic Ocean west of the...ranging from 100 km to 0.1 m. The two areas selected for this study are a 100 km x 100 km region of the east central Pacific Ocean, near the Cocos -Pacific

    7. Exploiting flow to control the in vitro spatiotemporal distribution of microbubble-seeded acoustic cavitation activity in ultrasound therapy.

      PubMed

      Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Bonaccorsi, Simone; Choi, James J

      2014-11-21

      Focused ultrasound and microbubbles have been extensively used to generate therapeutic bioeffects. Despite encouraging in vivo results, there remains poor control of the magnitude and spatial distribution of these bioeffects due to the limited ability of conventional pulse shapes and sequences to control cavitation dynamics. Thus current techniques are restricted by an efficacy-safety trade-off. The primary aim of the present study was to incorporate the presence of flow in the design of new short pulse sequences, which can more uniformly distribute the cavitation activity. Microbubbles flowing (fluid velocity: 10 mm s(-1)) through a 300 μm tube were sonicated with a focused 0.5 MHz transducer while acoustic emissions were captured with an inserted focused 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector. The two foci were co-axially aligned and their focal points were overlapped. Whereas conventional sequences are composed of a long burst (>10,000 cycles) emitted at a low burst repetition frequency (<10 Hz), we decomposed this burst into short pulses by adding intervals to facilitate inter-pulse microbubble movement. To evaluate how this sequence influenced cavitation distribution, we emitted short pulses (peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP): 40-366 kPa, pulse length (PL): 5-25 cycles) at high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF: 0.625-10 kHz) for a burst length of 100 ms. Increased cavitation persistence, implied by the duration of the microbubble acoustic emissions, was a measure of improved distribution due to the presence of flow. Sonication at lower acoustic pressures, longer pulse intervals and lower PLs improved the spatial distribution of cavitation. Furthermore, spectral analysis of the microbubble emissions revealed that the improvement at low pressures is due to persisting stable cavitation. In conclusion, new short-pulse sequences were shown to improve spatiotemporal control of acoustic cavitation dynamics during physiologically relevant flow. This

    8. GOATS 2011 Adaptive and Collaborative Exploitation of 3-Dimensional Environmental Acoustics in Distributed Undersea Networks

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2013-09-30

      MIT continues to develop the OASES -3d modeling framework for target scattering and reverberation in shallow ocean waveguides. As was previously the...element-level timeseries using Green’s functions using legacy environmental acoustic models such as OASES , KRAKEN and BELLHOP. WORK COMPLETED...derive a confidence model and critical regions for the AUV to sample. The full field scattered field may be simulated using the SCATT- OASES

    9. The Impact of Model Uncertainty on Spatial Compensation in Active Structural Acoustic Control

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Sprofera, Joseph D.; Clark, Robert L.

      2004-01-01

      Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) noise is considered a primary factor in the interior noise experienced by passengers aboard commercial airliners. There have been numerous investigations of interior noise control devoted to aircraft panels; however, practical realization is a challenge since the physical boundary conditions are uncertain at best. In most prior studies, pinned or clamped boundary conditions have been assumed; however, realistic panels likely display a range of varying boundary conditions between these two limits. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is a challenge for control system designers, both in terms of the compensator implemented and the location of actuators and sensors required to achieve the desired control. The impact of model uncertainties, uncertain boundary conditions in particular, on the selection of actuator and sensor locations for structural acoustic control are considered herein. Results from this research effort indicate that it is possible to optimize the design of actuator and sensor location and aperture, which minimizes the impact of boundary conditions on the desired structural acoustic control.

    10. A hardware model of the auditory periphery to transduce acoustic signals into neural activity

      PubMed Central

      Tateno, Takashi; Nishikawa, Jun; Tsuchioka, Nobuyoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kawano, Satoyuki

      2013-01-01

      To improve the performance of cochlear implants, we have integrated a microdevice into a model of the auditory periphery with the goal of creating a microprocessor. We constructed an artificial peripheral auditory system using a hybrid model in which polyvinylidene difluoride was used as a piezoelectric sensor to convert mechanical stimuli into electric signals. To produce frequency selectivity, the slit on a stainless steel base plate was designed such that the local resonance frequency of the membrane over the slit reflected the transfer function. In the acoustic sensor, electric signals were generated based on the piezoelectric effect from local stress in the membrane. The electrodes on the resonating plate produced relatively large electric output signals. The signals were fed into a computer model that mimicked some functions of inner hair cells, inner hair cell–auditory nerve synapses, and auditory nerve fibers. In general, the responses of the model to pure-tone burst and complex stimuli accurately represented the discharge rates of high-spontaneous-rate auditory nerve fibers across a range of frequencies greater than 1 kHz and middle to high sound pressure levels. Thus, the model provides a tool to understand information processing in the peripheral auditory system and a basic design for connecting artificial acoustic sensors to the peripheral auditory nervous system. Finally, we discuss the need for stimulus control with an appropriate model of the auditory periphery based on auditory brainstem responses that were electrically evoked by different temporal pulse patterns with the same pulse number. PMID:24324432

    11. Relative activity of cholesterol in OPPC/cholesterol/sphingomyelin mixtures measured with an acoustic sensor.

      PubMed

      Melzak, Kathryn A; Gizeli, Electra

      2009-03-01

      Acoustic devices are sensitive to the mole fraction of cholesterol present in liposomes adsorbed to the device surface as a result of the different mechanical properties of the liposomes. This fact was exploited to develop an acoustic assay to determine the relative affinity of cholesterol for different lipid mixtures. In the assay described here, the initial rate of beta-cyclodextrin-induced removal of cholesterol was measured for liposomes having a range of compositions. The initial rate of cholesterol removal was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of beta-cyclodextrin (betaCD) present over the range of 0-7.5 mg/ml (0-6.6 mM), consistent with other assays measuring the betaCD-accelerated transfer of cholesterol between liposomes. The affinity of cholesterol for 1-oleoyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (OPPC) liposomes with a sphingomyelin mole fraction, chi(SPM), of 0.2 was found to be 1.4x higher than that for pure OPPC liposomes. For liposomes composed only of OPPC and cholesterol in varying ratios, the initial rate of cholesterol removal was determined as a function of cholesterol mole fraction (chi(C)). The initial rate of removal showed an increase at chi(C) = 0.13, consistent with phase diagrams showing the start of liquid ordered domain formation, but no such increase at chi(C) = 0.25, in contrast to the predictions of the umbrella model for OPPC/cholesterol interactions.

    12. Active control of passive acoustic fields: passive synthetic aperture/Doppler beamforming with data from an autonomous vehicle.

      PubMed

      D'Spain, Gerald L; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C David; Smith, Jerome A; Lynch, Stephen D

      2006-12-01

      The maneuverability of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with hull-mounted arrays provides the opportunity to actively modify received acoustic fields to optimize extraction of information. This paper uses ocean acoustic data collected by an AUV-mounted two-dimensional hydrophone array, with overall dimension one-tenth wavelength at 200-500 Hz, to demonstrate aspects of this control through vehicle motion. Source localization is performed using Doppler shifts measured at a set of receiver velocities by both single elements and a physical array. Results show that a source in the presence of a 10-dB higher-level interferer having exactly the same frequency content (as measured by a stationary receiver) is properly localized and that white-noise-constrained adaptive beamforming applied to the physical aperture data in combination with Doppler beamforming provides greater spatial resolution than physical-aperture-alone beamforming and significantly lower sidelobes than single element Doppler beamforming. A new broadband beamformer that adjusts for variations in vehicle velocity on a sample by sample basis is demonstrated with data collected during a high-acceleration maneuver. The importance of including the cost of energy expenditure in determining optimal vehicle motion is demonstrated through simulation, further illustrating how the vehicle characteristics are an integral part of the signal/array processing structure.

    13. Acoustic-resonance spectrometry as a process analytical technology for the quantification of active pharmaceutical ingredient in semi-solids.

      PubMed

      Medendorp, Joseph; Buice, Robert G; Lodder, Robert A

      2006-09-01

      The purpose of this study was to demonstrate acoustic resonance spectrometry (ARS) as an alternative process analytical technology to near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for the quantification of active pharmaceutical ingradient (API) in semi-solids such as creams, gels, ointments, and lotions. The ARS used for this research was an inexpensive instrument constructed from readily available parts. Acoustic-resonance spectra were collected with a frequency spectrum from 0 to 22.05 KHz. NIR data were collected from 1100 to 2500 nm. Using 1-point net analyte signal (NAS) calibration, NIR for the API (colloidal oatmeal [CO]) gave anr (2) prediction accuracy of 0.971, and a standard error of performance (SEP) of 0.517%CO. ARS for the API resulted in anr (2) of 0.983 and SEP of 0.317%CO. NAS calibration is compared with principal component regression. This research demonstrates that ARS can sometimes outperform NIR spectrometry and can be an effective analytical method for the quantification of API in semi-solids. ARS requires no sample preparation, provides larger penetration depths into lotions than optical techniques, and measures API concentrations faster and more accurately. These results suggest that ARS is a useful process analytical technology (PAT).

    14. Recent Enhancements to the NASA Langley Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) Facility

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Rizzi, Stephen A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Allen, Albert R.

      2013-01-01

      The Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of an anechoic room and a reverberant room, and may act as a transmission loss suite when test articles are mounted in a window connecting the two rooms. In the latter configuration, the reverberant room acts as the noise source side and the anechoic room as the receiver side. The noise generation system used for qualification testing in the reverberant room was previously shown to achieve a maximum overall sound pressure level of 141 dB. This is considered to be marginally adequate for generating sound pressure levels typically required for launch vehicle payload qualification testing. Recent enhancements to the noise generation system increased the maximum overall sound pressure level to 154 dB, through the use of two airstream modulators coupled to 35 Hz and 160 Hz horns. This paper documents the acoustic performance of the enhanced noise generation system for a variety of relevant test spectra. Additionally, it demonstrates the capability of the SALT facility to conduct transmission loss and absorption testing in accordance with ASTM and ISO standards, respectively. A few examples of test capabilities are shown and include transmission loss testing of simple unstiffened and built up structures and measurement of the diffuse field absorption coefficient of a fibrous acoustic blanket.

    15. The acoustics for speech of eight auditoriums in the city of Sao Paulo

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bistafa, Sylvio R.

      2002-11-01

      Eight auditoriums with a proscenium type of stage, which usually operate as dramatic theaters in the city of Sao Paulo, were acoustically surveyed in terms of their adequacy to unassisted speech. Reverberation times, early decay times, and speech levels were measured in different positions, together with objective measures of speech intelligibility. The measurements revealed reverberation time values rather uniform throughout the rooms, whereas significant variations were found in the values of the other acoustical measures with position. The early decay time was found to be better correlated with the objective measures of speech intelligibility than the reverberation time. The results from the objective measurements of speech intelligibility revealed that the speech transmission index STI, and its simplified version RaSTI, are strongly correlated with the early-to-late sound ratio C50 (1 kHz). However, it was found that the criterion value of acceptability of the latter is more easily met than the former. The results from these measurements enable to understand how the characteristics of the architectural design determine the acoustical quality for speech. Measurements of ST1-Gade were made as an attempt to validate it as an objective measure of ''support'' for the actor. The preliminary diagnosing results with ray tracing simulations will also be presented.

    16. A thorough analysis of the short- and mid-term activity-related variations in the solar acoustic frequencies

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Santos, A. R. G.; Cunha, M. S.; Avelino, P. P.; Chaplin, W. J.; Campante, T. L.

      2017-02-01

      The frequencies of the solar acoustic oscillations vary over the activity cycle. The variations in other activity proxies are found to be well correlated with the variations in the acoustic frequencies. However, each proxy has a slightly different time behaviour. Our goal is to characterize the differences between the time behaviour of the frequency shifts and of two other activity proxies, namely the area covered by sunspots and the 10.7-cm flux. We define a new observable that is particularly sensitive to the short-term frequency variations. We then compare the observable when computed from model frequency shifts and from observed frequency shifts obtained with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) for cycle 23. Our analysis shows that on the shortest time-scales, the variations in the frequency shifts seen in the GONG observations are strongly correlated with the variations in the area covered by sunspots. However, a significant loss of correlation is still found. We verify that the times when the frequency shifts and the sunspot area do not vary in a similar way tend to coincide with the times of the maxima of the quasi-biennial variations seen in the solar seismic data. A similar analysis of the relation between the 10.7-cm flux and the frequency shifts reveals that the short-time variations in the frequency shifts follow even more closely those of the 10.7-cm flux than those of the sunspot area. However, a loss of correlation between frequency shifts and 10.7-cm flux variations is still found around the same times.

    17. Exposure to advertisement calls of reproductive competitors activates vocal-acoustic and catecholaminergic neurons in the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus.

      PubMed

      Petersen, Christopher L; Timothy, Miky; Kim, D Spencer; Bhandiwad, Ashwin A; Mohr, Robert A; Sisneros, Joseph A; Forlano, Paul M

      2013-01-01

      While the neural circuitry and physiology of the auditory system is well studied among vertebrates, far less is known about how the auditory system interacts with other neural substrates to mediate behavioral responses to social acoustic signals. One species that has been the subject of intensive neuroethological investigation with regard to the production and perception of social acoustic signals is the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, in part because acoustic communication is essential to their reproductive behavior. Nesting male midshipman vocally court females by producing a long duration advertisement call. Females localize males by their advertisement call, spawn and deposit all their eggs in their mate's nest. As multiple courting males establish nests in close proximity to one another, the perception of another male's call may modulate individual calling behavior in competition for females. We tested the hypothesis that nesting males exposed to advertisement calls of other males would show elevated neural activity in auditory and vocal-acoustic brain centers as well as differential activation of catecholaminergic neurons compared to males exposed only to ambient noise. Experimental brains were then double labeled by immunofluorescence (-ir) for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), an enzyme necessary for catecholamine synthesis, and cFos, an immediate-early gene product used as a marker for neural activation. Males exposed to other advertisement calls showed a significantly greater percentage of TH-ir cells colocalized with cFos-ir in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dopaminergic periventricular posterior tuberculum, as well as increased numbers of cFos-ir neurons in several levels of the auditory and vocal-acoustic pathway. Increased activation of catecholaminergic neurons may serve to coordinate appropriate behavioral responses to male competitors. Additionally, these results implicate a role for specific catecholaminergic neuronal groups in

    18. Tackling the combined effects of reverberation and masking noise using ideal channel selection

      PubMed Central

      Hazrati, Oldooz

      2012-01-01

      Purpose A new signal processing algorithm is proposed and evaluated in this study for the suppression of the combined effects of reverberation and noise. Method The proposed algorithm decomposes, on a short-term basis (every 20 ms), the reverberant stimuli into a number of channels and retains only a subset of the channels satisfying a signal-to-reverberant ratio (SRR) criterion. The construction of this criterion assumes access to a priori knowledge of the target (anechoic) signal and the aim of the present study is to assess the full potential of the proposed channel-selection algorithm assuming that this criterion can be estimated accurately. Listening tests were conducted with normal-hearing listeners to assess the performance of the proposed algorithm in highly reverberant conditions (T60 = 1.0 s) which included additive noise at 0 and 5 dB SNR. Results A substantial gain in intelligibility was obtained in both reverberant and combined reverberant and noise conditions. The mean intelligibility scores improved by 44 and 33 percentage points at 0 and 5 dB SNR reverberant+noise conditions. Feature analysis of the consonant confusion matrices revealed that the transmission of voicing information was most negatively affected, followed by manner and place of articulation. Conclusions The proposed algorithm was found to produce substantial gains in intelligibility, and this benefit was attributed to the ability of the proposed SRR criterion to accurately detect voiced/unvoiced boundaries. Detection of those boundaries is postulated to be critical for better perception of voicing information and manner of articulation. PMID:22232411

    19. Case study of restaurant successfully designed, constructed, and operated for excellent dining acoustics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bollard, Paul; Des Jardins, Stephen

      2005-09-01

      Prior to the construction of La Provence Restaurant in Roseville, California in 2004, the owner, Stephen Des Jardins, traveled with his cook, architect, and engineer to the Provence Region of France to study the cuisine, architecture, and acoustics of the local restaurants. This information was incorporated into the design, construction, and operation of his restaurant, with acoustical design assistance provided by the author, Paul Bollard. The result of the owner's painstaking attention to detail is a restaurant which has received very positive reviews for its architecture, quality of food, service, and acoustic ambience. This paper documents the measures included in the construction of the restaurant to ensure that the building acoustics enhance the dining experience, rather than detract from it. Photographs of acoustic treatments are included, as are reverberation time (RT60) test results and ambient noise level measurement results.

    20. Bottlebrush and comb-like elastomers as ultra-soft electrical and acoustically active materials

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Daniel, William; Vatankhah-Varnosfaderani, Mohammad; Pandya, Ashish; Burdynska, Joanna; Morgan, Benjamin; Everhart, Matthew; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Dobrynin, Andrey; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei; UNC MIRT Team

      Without swelling in a solvent, it is challenging to obtain materials with a modulus below 105 Pa, which is dictated by chain entanglements. We show that macromolecules can be disentangled by dense grafting of side chains to long polymer chains. The bottlebrush and comb-like architectures demonstrate a unique combination of flexibility and network dilution, leading to significant decrease of the entanglement modulus (Ge) and increase of extensibility. Following theoretical predictions, it has been shown that the Ge is controlled by the polymerization degrees of sidechains (nsc) and grafting spacer (ng) as Ge ~ (ng /nsc) 1 . 5 . Using the reduced entanglement density, we developed solvent-free elastomers with moduli on the order of 100 Pa and excellent extensibility. Using bottlebrush architectures we have developed PDMS dielectric actuators with high deformation at low electric field strength. Additionally strong acoustic adsorption leads to materials showing shape and volume control in light opaque environments. NSF (DMR 1409710, DMR 1122483, DMR 1407645, and DMR 1436201).

    1. Acoustic transducer

      DOEpatents

      Drumheller, Douglas S.

      2000-01-01

      An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

    2. Masses of Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Peterson, Bradley M.

      2003-01-01

      We present a progress report on a project whose goal is to improve both the precision and accuracy of reverberation-based black-hole masses. Reverberation masses appear to be accurate to a factor of about three, and the black-hole mass/bulge velocity dispersion (M-sigma) relationship appears to be the same in active and quiescent galaxies.

    3. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

      2016-05-01

      Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

    4. A signal processing approach for enhanced Acoustic Emission data analysis in high activity systems: Application to organic matrix composites

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kharrat, M.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Boubakar, M. L.

      2016-03-01

      Structural elements made of Organic Matrix Composites (OMC) under complex loading may suffer from high Acoustic Emission (AE) activity caused by the emergence of different emission sources at high rates with high noise level, which finally engender continuous emissions. The detection of hits in this situation becomes a challenge particularly during fatigue tests. This work suggests an approach based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) denoising applied on signal segments. A particular attention is paid to the adjustment of the denoising parameters based on pencil lead breaks and their influence on the quality of the denoised AE signals. The validation of the proposed approach is performed on a ring-shaped Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) under in-service-like conditions involving continuous emissions with superimposed damage-related transients. It is demonstrated that errors in hit detection are greatly reduced leading to a better identification of the natural damage scenario based on AE signals.

    5. Room Acoustical Simulation Algorithm Based on the Free Path Distribution

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      VORLÄNDER, M.

      2000-04-01

      A new algorithm is presented which provides estimates of impulse responses in rooms. It is applicable to arbitrary shaped rooms, thus including non-diffuse spaces like workrooms or offices. In the latter cases, for instance, sound propagation curves are of interest to be applied in noise control. In the case of concert halls and opera houses, the method enables very fast predictions of room acoustical criteria like reverberation time, strength or clarity. The method is based on a low-resolved ray tracing and recording of the free paths. Estimates of impulse responses are derived from evaluation of the free path distribution and of the free path transition probabilities.

    6. Aging and Temporal Influences on Speech Perception in Reverberation and Noise.

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Helfer, Karen S.

      The present study examined the interactions of age, temporal resolution, hearing loss, and consonant perception under realistic listening conditions. Four subject groups were employed, with N = 8 per group: young adults with normal hearing or sloping sensorineural hearing loss; and elderly individuals with minimal peripheral hearing loss or presbycusis. Copies of the CUNY Nonsense Syllable Test (NST) were re-recorded under four levels of reverberation in quiet and in +10 signal-to-noise ratio of cafeteria noise. The test stimuli were presented binaurally to the subjects via TDH-49 headphones. In addition, a diotic wideband gap detection task, using a 72 dBSPL presentation level, was used as a measure of temporal resolution. Results of the present investigation demonstrated that all other subject groups performed significantly poorer than the young, normal hearing adults. Scores decreased as the amount of distortion increased, although there was very little difference between performance in the two highest reverberation conditions. For reverberation alone, the young, hearing-impaired listeners obtained the lowest scores; for reverberation + noise, the older, hearing-impaired subjects performed poorest. Large within-group variability was noted in the size of the gap thresholds, and only the two groups of young subjects differed significantly on this task of temporal resolution. Correlation analyses demonstrated a strong inverse relation between age and performance in reverberation + noise, even when degree of hearing loss was partialed out. Pure -tone average, as well as NST scores in quiet and in noise alone were related strongly to performance in reverberation. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that nonsense syllable perception in reverberation could be predicted from a combination of age, pure-tone thresholds, scores in quiet and noise, and gap threshold. Gap threshold was the strongest predictor variable for reverberation alone, while the NST score

    7. Effectiveness of Active Learning Strategy in Improving the Acoustic Awareness Skills and Understanding What Is Heard by the Basic Stage Students in Jordan

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Al-Odwan, Yaser

      2016-01-01

      This research aims to get acquainted with the effectiveness of the active learning strategy in improving the acoustic awareness skills and understanding what is heard by the basic stage students in Jordan by answering the two following questions: This research has been applied to a sample of 60 students from the basic third grade in Al-Ahnaf Ben…

    8. The Black Hole Mass-Bulge Luminosity Relationship for Reverberation-Mapped AGNs in the Near-IR

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Nicholas, Emily; Bentz, M. C.

      2014-01-01

      We present preliminary results for a near-IR M-L scaling relationship for active galaxies in the reverberation sample. We are particularly interested in the effect of host-galaxy morphology on the M-L scaling relationship. In order to study evolution over cosmic time we must employ scaling relations, which are calibrated to the direct methods of black hole mass measurement and rely on correlations between host galaxy properties and black hole masses. However, it remains uncertain which scaling relation most reliably predicts black hole masses based on host galaxy observables. Recent studies of the M- relationship have uncovered a possible offset in the relationship due to the presence of a pseudobulge or bar in the host galaxy. This offset would adversely affect one's ability to use the M-relationship as a way to estimate black hole masses efficiently because it would require the detailed morphology of the galaxy to be known a priori. Preliminary results based on optical HST data suggest that the M-L relation for active galaxies with reverberation-based black hole masses is not plagued by the same offsets. However, due to dust and on-going star formation, the optical data yield an M-L relationship with a slightly higher scatter than the M- relation. We have carried out near-IR imaging with the WIYN High-Resolution Infrared Camera (WHIRC) on the WIYN telescope to minimize the effects of dust and star formation in order to test whether the M-L relationship is a more accurate predictor of black hole masses and a potentially more fundamental relationship. The imaging campaign has been completed, and we are currently in the process of carefully modeling the galaxy surface brightness features so that we can accurately remove the contribution from the point spread function of the active nucleus. We present our preliminary results here, and we expect that the final results will prove to be quite useful in conjunction with future large imaging surveys, such as LSST, which

    9. The combined effects of reverberation and nonstationary noise on sentence intelligibility.

      PubMed

      George, Erwin L J; Festen, Joost M; Houtgast, Tammo

      2008-08-01

      Listening conditions in everyday life typically include a combination of reverberation and nonstationary background noise. It is well known that sentence intelligibility is adversely affected by these factors. To assess their combined effects, an approach is introduced which combines two methods of predicting speech intelligibility, the extended speech intelligibility index (ESII) and the speech transmission index. First, the effects of reverberation on nonstationary noise (i.e., reduction of masker modulations) and on speech modulations are evaluated separately. Subsequently, the ESII is applied to predict the speech reception threshold (SRT) in the masker with reduced modulations. To validate this approach, SRTs were measured for ten normal-hearing listeners, in various combinations of nonstationary noise and artificially created reverberation. After taking the characteristics of the speech corpus into account, results show that the approach accurately predicts SRTs in nonstationary noise and reverberation for normal-hearing listeners. Furthermore, it is shown that, when reverberation is present, the benefit from masker fluctuations may be substantially reduced.

    10. X-ray reverberation of the inner accretion disc in X-ray binaries

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Uttley, Phil; Cassatella, Pablo; Wilkinson, Tony; Wilms, Joern; Pottschmidt, Katja; Hanke, Manfred; Boeck, Moritz

      Rapid fluctuations in the Comptonised emission close to accreting compact objects should lead to reverberation of the accretion disc, both through X-ray heating of the disc (to produce a variable blackbody component) and also correlated changes in the disc reflection component, including the iron K line. If they can be detected, these reverberation signatures can provide powerful constraints on the geometry of the disc and Comptonising regions. The measure-ment of the reverberation delays will provide a natural 'yardstick' to measure the inner disc radius (in km, not R/M!) and so constrain the black hole spin or the neutron star equation of state. I will present new results from XMM-Newton and RXTE observations, which confirm the presence of X-ray reverberation in X-ray binary systems and allow the first measurement of reverberation delays. These results are a pathfinder which highlights the enormous po-tential of high-throughput spectral-timing with the proposed HTRS instrument on board the International X-ray Observatory.

    11. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

      PubMed

      Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

      2016-08-01

      Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals.

    12. Influence of Architectural Features and Styles on Various Acoustical Measures in Churches

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Carvalho, Antonio Pedro Oliveira De.

      This work reports on acoustical field measurements made in a major survey of 41 Catholic churches in Portugal that were built in the last 14 centuries. A series of monaural and binaural acoustical measurements was taken at multiple source/receiver positions in each church using the impulse response with noise burst method. The acoustical measures were Reverberation Time (RT), Early Decay Time (EDT), Clarity (C80), Definition (D), Center Time (TS), Loudness (L), Bass Ratios based on the Reverberation Time and Loudness rm (BR_-RT and rm BR_-L), Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI), and the binaural Coherence (COH). The scope of this research is to investigate how the acoustical performance of Catholic churches relates to their architectural features and to determine simple formulas to predict acoustical measures by the use of elementary architectural parameters. Prediction equations were defined among the acoustical measures to estimate values at individual locations within each room as well as the mean values in each church. Best fits with rm R^2~0.9 were not uncommon among many of the measures. Within and interchurch differences in the data for the acoustical measures were also analyzed. The variations of RT and EDT were identified as much smaller than the variations of the other measures. The churches tested were grouped in eight architectural styles, and the effect of their evolution through time on these acoustical measures was investigated. Statistically significant differences were found regarding some architectural styles that can be traced to historical changes in Church history, especially to the Reformation period. Prediction equations were defined to estimate mean acoustical measures by the use of fifteen simple architectural parameters. The use of the Sabine and Eyring reverberation time equations was tested. The effect of coupled spaces was analyzed, and a new algorithm for the application of the Sabine equation was developed, achieving an average of

    13. Numerical methods for solving the wave equation in large enclosures with application to room acoustics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Naka, Yusuke

      Many acoustical events in our everyday lives occur in enclosures, in which echoes and reverberation impact auditory perception in many ways. Numerical models play an important role in analyzing the acoustic behavior in reverberant environments, as they allow systematic control of physical parameters that affect human perception. Most numerical models used in architectural and room acoustics are based on the ray acoustics approximation, which leads to reasonable computational costs, at the expense of excluding certain important wave phenomena such as diffraction. In order to obtain more accurate results, an approach based on solving the wave equation is appropriate. However, standard numerical methods for solving the wave equation are not practical for room acoustics applications, since these problems are acoustically large and incur prohibitively large computational costs. Even in a small room, a sound wave with audible high-frequency content must propagate for about 10,000 wavelengths before it decays to an inaudible level. To address this, three new, efficient ways of simulating acoustic responses in a room are developed in this study. First, a method for calculating the resonant frequencies and normal modes in a rectangular room with arbitrary wall impedance is developed that uses the interval Newton/generalized bisection (IN/GB) method for solving the acoustic eigenvalue equation. The second approach applies the finite element method in the frequency domain, but uses a Dirichlet-to-Neumann (DtN) map to model empty, rectangular portions of the room, thereby truncating the effective computational domain. Finally, a finite difference method with minimal dispersion and dissipation errors is developed in the time domain. The parameters in the discretization in both space and time are optimized to minimize these errors. This method has been implemented on the IBM Blue Gene platform at Boston University, and allows for the calculation of the impulse response in a

    14. A Non-parametric Approach to Constrain the Transfer Function in Reverberation Mapping

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Bai, Jin-Ming

      2016-11-01

      Broad emission lines of active galactic nuclei stem from a spatially extended region (broad-line region, BLR) that is composed of discrete clouds and photoionized by the central ionizing continuum. The temporal behaviors of these emission lines are blurred echoes of continuum variations (i.e., reverberation mapping, RM) and directly reflect the structures and kinematic information of BLRs through the so-called transfer function (also known as the velocity-delay map). Based on the previous works of Rybicki and Press and Zu et al., we develop an extended, non-parametric approach to determine the transfer function for RM data, in which the transfer function is expressed as a sum of a family of relatively displaced Gaussian response functions. Therefore, arbitrary shapes of transfer functions associated with complicated BLR geometry can be seamlessly included, enabling us to relax the presumption of a specified transfer function frequently adopted in previous studies and to let it be determined by observation data. We formulate our approach in a previously well-established framework that incorporates the statistical modeling of continuum variations as a damped random walk process and takes into account long-term secular variations which are irrelevant to RM signals. The application to RM data shows the fidelity of our approach.

    15. Bias in C IV-based quasar black hole mass scaling relationships from reverberation mapped samples

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Brotherton, Michael S.; Runnoe, J. C.; Shang, Zhaohui; DiPompeo, M. A.

      2015-08-01

      The masses of the black holes powering quasars represent a fundamental parameter of active galaxies. Estimates of quasar black hole masses using single-epoch spectra are quite uncertain, and require quantitative improvement. We recently identified a correction for C IV λ1549-based scaling relationships used to estimate quasar black hole masses that relies on the continuum-subtracted peak flux ratio of the ultraviolet emission-line blend Si IV + O IV] (the λ1400 feature) to that of C IV. This parameter correlates with the suite of associated quasar spectral properties collectively known as `Eigenvector 1' (EV1). Here we use a sample of 85 quasars with quasi-simultaneous optical-ultraviolet spectrophotometry to demonstrate how biases in the average EV1 properties can create systematic biases in C IV-based black hole mass scaling relationships. This effect results in nearly an order of magnitude moving from objects with small , which have overestimated black hole masses, to objects with large , which have underestimated values. We show that existing reverberation-mapped samples of quasars with ultraviolet spectra - used to calibrate C IV-based scaling relationships - have significant EV1 biases that result in predictions of black hole masses nearly 50 per cent too high for the average quasar. We offer corrections and suggestions to account for this bias.

    16. Acoustic imaging system

      DOEpatents

      Smith, Richard W.

      1979-01-01

      An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

    17. Compact acoustic refrigerator

      SciTech Connect

      Bennett, G.A.

      1991-12-31

      This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

    18. Compact acoustic refrigerator

      DOEpatents

      Bennett, G.A.

      1992-11-24

      A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

    19. Compact acoustic refrigerator

      DOEpatents

      Bennett, Gloria A.

      1992-01-01

      A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

    20. Developing a system for blind acoustic source localization and separation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kulkarni, Raghavendra

      This dissertation presents innovate methodologies for locating, extracting, and separating multiple incoherent sound sources in three-dimensional (3D) space; and applications of the time reversal (TR) algorithm to pinpoint the hyper active neural activities inside the brain auditory structure that are correlated to the tinnitus pathology. Specifically, an acoustic modeling based method is developed for locating arbitrary and incoherent sound sources in 3D space in real time by using a minimal number of microphones, and the Point Source Separation (PSS) method is developed for extracting target signals from directly measured mixed signals. Combining these two approaches leads to a novel technology known as Blind Sources Localization and Separation (BSLS) that enables one to locate multiple incoherent sound signals in 3D space and separate original individual sources simultaneously, based on the directly measured mixed signals. These technologies have been validated through numerical simulations and experiments conducted in various non-ideal environments where there are non-negligible, unspecified sound reflections and reverberation as well as interferences from random background noise. Another innovation presented in this dissertation is concerned with applications of the TR algorithm to pinpoint the exact locations of hyper-active neurons in the brain auditory structure that are directly correlated to the tinnitus perception. Benchmark tests conducted on normal rats have confirmed the localization results provided by the TR algorithm. Results demonstrate that the spatial resolution of this source localization can be as high as the micrometer level. This high precision localization may lead to a paradigm shift in tinnitus diagnosis, which may in turn produce a more cost-effective treatment for tinnitus than any of the existing ones.

    1. Effects of source-to-listener distance and masking on perception of cochlear implant processed speech in reverberant rooms

      PubMed Central

      Whitmal, Nathaniel A.; Poissant, Sarah F.

      2009-01-01

      Two experiments examined the effects of source-to-listener distance (SLD) on sentence recognition in simulations of cochlear implant usage in noisy, reverberant rooms. Experiment 1 tested sentence recognition for three locations in the reverberant field of a small classroom (volume=79.2 m3). Subjects listened to sentences mixed with speech-spectrum noise that were processed with simulated reverberation followed by either vocoding (6, 12, or 24 spectral channels) or no further processing. Results indicated that changes in SLD within a small room produced only minor changes in recognition performance, a finding likely related to the listener remaining in the reverberant field. Experiment 2 tested sentence recognition for a simulated six-channel implant in a larger classroom (volume=175.9 m3) with varying levels of reverberation that could place the three listening locations in either the direct or reverberant field of the room. Results indicated that reducing SLD did improve performance, particularly when direct sound dominated the signal, but did not completely eliminate the effects of reverberation. Scores for both experiments were predicted accurately from speech transmission index values that modeled the effects of SLD, reverberation, and noise in terms of their effects on modulations of the speech envelope. Such models may prove to be a useful predictive tool for evaluating the quality of listening environments for cochlear implant users. PMID:19894835

    2. Creation of cavitation activity in a microfluidic device through acoustically driven capillary waves.

      PubMed

      Tandiono; Ohl, Siew-Wan; Ow, Dave Siak-Wei; Klaseboer, Evert; Wong, Victor V T; Camattari, Andrea; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

      2010-07-21

      We present a study on achieving intense acoustic cavitation generated by ultrasonic vibrations in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic devices. The substrate to which the PDMS is bonded was forced into oscillation with a simple piezoelectric transducer attached at 5 mm from the device to a microscopic glass slide. The transducer was operated at 100 kHz with driving voltages ranging between 20 V and 230 V. Close to the glass surface, pressure and vibration amplitudes of up to 20 bar and 400 nm were measured respectively. It is found that this strong forcing leads to the excitation of nonlinear surface waves when gas-liquid interfaces are present in the microfluidic channels. Also, it is observed that nuclei leading to intense inertial cavitation are generated by the entrapment of gas pockets at those interfaces. Subsequently, cavitation bubble clusters with void fractions of more than 50% are recorded with high-speed photography at up to 250,000 frames/s. The cavitation clusters can be sustained through the continuous injection of gas using a T-junction in the microfluidic device.

    3. Active monitoring of formaldehyde diffusion into histological tissues with digital acoustic interferometry

      PubMed Central

      Bauer, Daniel R.; Stevens, Benjamin; Chafin, David; Theiss, Abbey P.; Otter, Michael

      2016-01-01

      Abstract. The preservation of certain labile cancer biomarkers with formaldehyde-based fixatives can be considerably affected by preanalytical factors such as quality of fixation. Currently, there are no technologies capable of quantifying a fixative’s concentration or the formation of cross-links in tissue specimens. This work examined the ability to detect formalin diffusion into a histological specimen in real time. As formaldehyde passively diffused into tissue, an ultrasound time-of-flight (TOF) shift of several nanoseconds was generated due to the distinct sound velocities of formalin and exchangeable fluid within the tissue. This signal was resolved with a developed digital acoustic interferometry algorithm, which compared the phase differential between signals and computed the absolute TOF with subnanosecond precision. The TOF was measured repeatedly across the tissue sample for several hours until diffusive equilibrium was realized. The change in TOF from 6-mm thick ex vivo human tonsil fit a single-exponential decay (Radj2≥0.98) with rate constants that varied drastically spatially between 2 and 10 h (σ=2.9  h) due to substantial heterogeneity. This technology may prove essential to personalized cancer diagnostics by documenting and tracking biospecimen preanalytical fixation, guaranteeing their suitability for diagnostic assays, and speeding the workflow in clinical histopathology laboratories. PMID:26866049

    4. Musical Acoustics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gough, Colin

      This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

    5. Timescale-dependent X-ray Reverberation in AGN: Decoding the relativistic spectro-timing response

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Miller, Jon

      2016-07-01

      Relativistic X-ray reverberation has been detected in many objects. The goal now is to go beyond simple detections and start to understand the full iron K delay response. Here, we report results from the analysis of recent large campaigns on two of the brightest and best targets that have iron K reverberation: NGC 4151 and MCG-5-23-16. Using data from a 400 ks observation of NGC 4151 with XMM-Newton and 500 ks observation of MCG-5-23-16 with NuSTAR, we present the first attempts at empirically constructing the relativistic line response as a function of both energy and variability timescale. With the assumption that these delays are due to relativistic reverberation, this response encodes both the geometry of the primary/reflector sources and the general relativistic effects imprinted in the photon travel paths.

    6. "Explosive volcanic activity at Mt. Yasur: A characterization of the acoustic events (9-12th July 2011)"

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Spina, Laura; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Cannata, Andrea; Gresta, Stefano; Lodato, Luigi; Privitera, Eugenio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Gaeta, Mario; Gaudin, Damien; Palladino, Danilo Mauro

      2016-08-01

      Volcanic processes occur in a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. However, a key step of magma ascent is recognizable in the dynamics of gas and magma in the shallow plumbing system, where volatiles play a fundamental role in controlling the eruptive style. With the aim of investigating shallow degassing processes, an experimental setup was deployed at Mt. Yasur, an active volcano located in Tanna Island (Vanuatu arc), from 9th to 12th July 2011. The setup comprised high-speed and thermal cameras, as well as a microphone, capable of recording both in the infrasonic and audible range. The analysis of acoustic signals, validated by observing images from the high-speed and thermal cameras, has enabled characterizing the explosive activity during the investigated period. Two types of explosions, distinct for spectral features and waveforms, were observed: (i) minor events, corresponding to small overpressurized bursts, occurring almost continuously; (ii) major events, characterizing the Strombolian activity at Mt. Yasur. By investigating variation in the occurrence rate of the minor events, we found that, on a short timescale, the dynamics responsible for the two types of explosions are decoupled. These results, together with previous literature data, bring additional evidence of the existence of distinct sources of degassing. Finally, major events can be distinguished as emergent events, i.e. long-lasting signals, corresponding to ash-rich explosions, and impulsive events, featuring shorter duration and larger amplitude.

    7. Active micro-mixers using surface acoustic waves on Y-cut 128° LiNbO3

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Tseng, Wei-Kuo, Jr.; Lin, Lung; Sung, Wang-Chou; Chen, Shu-Hui; Lee, Gwo-Bin

      2006-03-01

      This study presents an active method for micro-mixers using surface acoustic waves (SAW) to rapidly mix co-fluent fluids. Mixing is challenging work in microfluidic systems due to their low-Reynolds-number flow conditions. SAW devices were fabricated on 128° Y-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO3). The micro-mixers are these piezoelectric actuators integrated with polydimethylsiloxane microchannels. The effects of the applied voltages on interdigitated transducers (IDTs) and two layouts, parallel- and transversal-type, of micro-mixers on the mixing performance were experimentally explored. The experimental results revealed that the parallel-type mixer achieved a higher mixing effect. Meanwhile, a higher applied voltage on the IDTs led to a significant improvement in the mixing performance of the active micro-mixer. Typical temperature effects associated with the applied voltages on the IDTs were also investigated. Finally, a digestion reaction between a protein (hemoglobin) and an enzyme (trypsin) was performed to verify the capability of the micro-mixers. The protein-enzyme mixture was qualitatively analyzed using mass spectrometry. Using these SAW-based mixers, the amount of digested peptides increased. Additionally, the protein-enzyme mixture was also quantitatively analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Experimental data showed that the amount of digested peptides increased 21.1% using the active mixer. Therefore, the developed micro-mixers can be applied in microfluidic systems for improving mixing efficiency and thus enhancing the bio-reaction.

    8. Speech recognition in reverberant and noisy environments employing multiple feature extractors and i-vector speaker adaptation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Alam, Md Jahangir; Gupta, Vishwa; Kenny, Patrick; Dumouchel, Pierre

      2015-12-01

      The REVERB challenge provides a common framework for the evaluation of feature extraction techniques in the presence of both reverberation and additive background noise. State-of-the-art speech recognition systems perform well in controlled environments, but their performance degrades in realistic acoustical conditions, especially in real as well as simulated reverberant environments. In this contribution, we utilize multiple feature extractors including the conventional mel-filterbank, multi-taper spectrum estimation-based mel-filterbank, robust mel and compressive gammachirp filterbank, iterative deconvolution-based dereverberated mel-filterbank, and maximum likelihood inverse filtering-based dereverberated mel-frequency cepstral coefficient features for speech recognition with multi-condition training data. In order to improve speech recognition performance, we combine their results using ROVER (Recognizer Output Voting Error Reduction). For two- and eight-channel tasks, to get benefited from the multi-channel data, we also use ROVER, instead of the multi-microphone signal processing method, to reduce word error rate by selecting the best scoring word at each channel. As in a previous work, we also apply i-vector-based speaker adaptation which was found effective. In speech recognition task, speaker adaptation tries to reduce mismatch between the training and test speakers. Speech recognition experiments are conducted on the REVERB challenge 2014 corpora using the Kaldi recognizer. In our experiments, we use both utterance-based batch processing and full batch processing. In the single-channel task, full batch processing reduced word error rate (WER) from 10.0 to 9.3 % on SimData as compared to utterance-based batch processing. Using full batch processing, we obtained an average WER of 9.0 and 23.4 % on the SimData and RealData, respectively, for the two-channel task, whereas for the eight-channel task on the SimData and RealData, the average WERs found were 8

    9. School cafeteria noise-The impact of room acoustics and speech intelligibility on children's voice levels

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bridger, Joseph F.

      2002-05-01

      The impact of room acoustics and speech intelligibility conditions of different school cafeterias on the voice levels of children is examined. Methods of evaluating cafeteria designs and predicting noise levels are discussed. Children are shown to modify their voice levels with changes in speech intelligibility like adults. Reverberation and signal to noise ratio are the important acoustical factors affecting speech intelligibility. Children have much more difficulty than adults in conditions where noise and reverberation are present. To evaluate the relationship of voice level and speech intelligibility, a database of real sound levels and room acoustics data was generated from measurements and data recorded during visits to a variety of existing cafeterias under different occupancy conditions. The effects of speech intelligibility and room acoustics on childrens voice levels are demonstrated. A new method is presented for predicting speech intelligibility conditions and resulting noise levels for the design of new cafeterias and renovation of existing facilities. Measurements are provided for an existing school cafeteria before and after new room acoustics treatments were added. This will be helpful for acousticians, architects, school systems, regulatory agencies, and Parent Teacher Associations to create less noisy cafeteria environments.

    10. Teachers and Teaching: Speech Production Accommodations Due to Changes in the Acoustic Environment

      PubMed Central

      Hunter, Eric J.; Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Leishman, Timothy W.; Berardi, Mark L.; Eyring, Nathan G.; Jensen, Zachary R.; Rolins, Michael K.; Whiting, Jennifer K.

      2016-01-01

      School teachers have an elevated risk of voice problems due to the vocal demands in the workplace. This manuscript presents the results of three studies investigating teachers’ voice use at work. In the first study, 57 teachers were observed for 2 weeks (waking hours) to compare how they used their voice in the school environment and in non-school environments. In a second study, 45 participants performed a short vocal task in two different rooms: a variable acoustic room and an anechoic chamber. Subjects were taken back and forth between the two rooms. Each time they entered the variable acoustics room, the reverberation time and/or the background noise condition had been modified. In this latter study, subjects responded to questions about their vocal comfort and their perception of changes in the acoustic environment. In a third study, 20 untrained vocalists performed a simple vocal task in the following conditions: with and without background babble and with and without transparent plexiglass shields to increase the first reflection. Relationships were examined between [1] the results for the room acoustic parameters; [2] the subjects’ perception of the room; and [3] the recorded speech acoustic. Several differences between male and female subjects were found; some of those differences held for each room condition (at school vs. not at school, reverberation level, noise level, and early reflection). PMID:26949426

    11. Passive Acoustic Detection of Wind Turbine In-Flow Conditions for Active Control and Optimization

      SciTech Connect

      Murray, Nathan E.

      2012-03-12

      Wind is a significant source of energy; however, the human capability to produce electrical energy still has many hurdles to overcome. One of these is the unpredictability of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The ABL is highly turbulent in both stable and unstable conditions (based on the vertical temperature profile) and the resulting fluctuations can have a dramatic impact on wind turbine operation. Any method by which these fluctuations could be observed, estimated, or predicted could provide a benefit to the wind energy industry as a whole. Based on the fundamental coupling of velocity fluctuations to pressure fluctuations in the nearly incompressible flow in the ABL, This work hypothesizes that a ground-based array of infrasonic pressure transducers could be employed to estimate the vertical wind profile over a height relevant for wind turbines. To analyze this hypothesis, experiments and field deployments were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed for a thick turbulent boundary layer over a neutral or heated surface. Surface pressure and velocity probe measurements were acquired simultaneously. Two field deployments yielded surface pressure data from a 49 element array. The second deployment at the Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, TX, also included data from a smaller aperture, 96-element array and a 200-meter tall meteorological tower. Analysis of the data successfully demonstrated the ability to estimate the vertical velocity profile using coherence data from the pressure array. Also, dynamical systems analysis methods were successful in identifying and tracking a gust type event. In addition to the passive acoustic profiling method, this program also investigated a rapid response Doppler SODAR system, the optimization of wind turbine blades for enhanced power with reduced aeroacoustic noise production, and the implementation of a wireless health monitoring system for the wind turbine blades. Each of these other objectives

    12. Performance of active feedforward control systems in non-ideal, synthesized diffuse sound fields.

      PubMed

      Misol, Malte; Bloch, Christian; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

      2014-04-01

      The acoustic performance of passive or active panel structures is usually tested in sound transmission loss facilities. A reverberant sending room, equipped with one or a number of independent sound sources, is used to generate a diffuse sound field excitation which acts as a disturbance source on the structure under investigation. The spatial correlation and coherence of such a synthesized non-ideal diffuse-sound-field excitation, however, might deviate significantly from the ideal case. This has consequences for the operation of an active feedforward control system which heavily relies on the acquisition of coherent disturbance source information. This work, therefore, evaluates the spatial correlation and coherence of ideal and non-ideal diffuse sound fields and considers the implications on the performance of a feedforward control system. The system under consideration is an aircraft-typical double panel system, equipped with an active sidewall panel (lining), which is realized in a transmission loss facility. Experimental results for different numbers of sound sources in the reverberation room are compared to simulation results of a comparable generic double panel system excited by an ideal diffuse sound field. It is shown that the number of statistically independent noise sources acting on the primary structure of the double panel system depends not only on the type of diffuse sound field but also on the sample lengths of the processed signals. The experimental results show that the number of reference sensors required for a defined control performance exhibits an inverse relationship to control filter length.

    13. Reverberation Mapping of the KEPLER Field AGN KA1858+4850

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pei, Liuyi; Barth, Aaron J.; Aldering, Greg S.; Briley, Michael M.; Carroll, Carla J.; Carson, Daniel J.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Cohen, Daniel P.; Cucchiara, Antonino; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Edelson, Rick; Fang, Jerome J.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Ori D.; Furniss, Amy; Gates, Elinor L.; Gregg, Michael; Gustafson, Scott; Horst, J. Chuck; Joner, Michael D.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Lacy, Mark; Laney, C. David; Leonard, Douglas C.; Li, Weidong; Malkan, Matthew A.; Margon, Bruce; Neeleman, Marcel; Nguyen, My L.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ross, Nathaniel R.; Sand, David J.; Searcy, Kinchen J.; Shivvers, Isaac S.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Graeme H.; Suzuki, Nao; Smith, Krista Lynne; Tytler, David; Werk, Jessica K.; Worseck, Gábor

      2014-11-01

      KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3 m telescope from 2012 February to November, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the Hβ light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method and found rest-frame lags of τ CCF = 13.53+2.03-2.32 days and τ JAVELIN = 13.15+1.08-1.00 days. The Hβ rms line profile has a width of σline = 770 ± 49 km s-1. Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M{BH} = 8.06+1.59-1.72 × 106 {M}⊙ for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L Edd ≈ 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.

    14. Reverberation Mapping of the Kepler-Field AGN KA1858+4850

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Pei, Liuyi; Barth, Aaron J.; Aldering, Greg S.; Briley, Michael M.; Carroll, Carla J.; Carson, Daniel J.; Cenko, S., Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Cohen, Daniel P.; Cucchiara, Antonino; Desjardins, Tyler D.

      2014-01-01

      KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3-m telescope from February to November of 2012, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the Hbeta light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method, and found rest-frame lags of tCCF = 13.53+2.03 -2.32 days and tJAVELIN = 13.15+1.08 -1.00 days. The Hbeta root-mean-square line profile has a width of sigma line = 770 +/- 49 km s(exp -1). Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M(sub BH) = 8.06+1.59 -1.72 ×10(exp 6) solar mass for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L(sub Edd) (is) approx. 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.

    15. Reverberation mapping of the Kepler field AGN KA1858+4850

      SciTech Connect

      Pei, Liuyi; Barth, Aaron J.; Carson, Daniel J.; Aldering, Greg S.; Cucchiara, Antonino; Briley, Michael M.; Carroll, Carla J.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Edelson, Rick; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Cohen, Daniel P.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Ori D.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Fang, Jerome J.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Furniss, Amy; Gates, Elinor L.; Gregg, Michael; Gustafson, Scott; and others

      2014-11-01

      KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3 m telescope from 2012 February to November, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the Hβ light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method and found rest-frame lags of τ{sub CCF}=13.53{sub −2.32}{sup +2.03} days and τ {sub JAVELIN} =13.15{sub −1.00}{sup +1.08} days. The Hβ rms line profile has a width of σ{sub line} = 770 ± 49 km s{sup –1}. Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M{sub BH}=8.06{sub −1.72}{sup +1.59}×10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L {sub Edd} ≈ 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.

    16. Acoustics in Halls for Speech and Music

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gade, Anders C.

      This chapter deals specifically with concepts, tools, and architectural variables of importance when designing auditoria for speech and music. The focus will be on cultivating the useful components of the sound in the room rather than on avoiding noise from outside or from installations, which is dealt with in Chap. 11. The chapter starts by presenting the subjective aspects of the room acoustic experience according to consensus at the time of writing. Then follows a description of their objective counterparts, the objective room acoustic parameters, among which the classical reverberation time measure is only one of many, but still of fundamental value. After explanations on how these parameters can be measured and predicted during the design phase, the remainder of the chapter deals with how the acoustic properties can be controlled by the architectural design of auditoria. This is done by presenting the influence of individual design elements as well as brief descriptions of halls designed for specific purposes, such as drama, opera, and symphonic concerts. Finally, some important aspects of loudspeaker installations in auditoria are briefly touched upon.

    17. Children's need for favorable acoustics in schools

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Nelson, Peggy B.

      2003-10-01

      Children continue to improve their understanding of speech in noise and reverberation throughout childhood and adolescence. They do not typically achieve adult performance levels until their late teenage years. As a result, schools that are designed to be acoustically adequate for adult understanding may be insufficient for full understanding by young children. In addition, children with hearing loss, those with attention problems, and those learning in a non-native language require even more favorable signal-to-noise ratios. This tutorial will review the literature gathered by the ANSl/ASA working group on classroom acoustics that shaped the recommendations of the working group. Special topics will include speech perception data from typically developing infants and children, from children with hearing loss, and from adults and children listening in a non-native language. In addition, the tutorial will overview recommendations contained within ANSI standard 12.60-2002: Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements, and Guidelines for Schools. The discussion will also include issues related to designing quiet classrooms and working with local schools and professionals.

    18. Seabed Characterization for SW2013 Mid-Frequency Reverberation Experiment

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2013-09-30

      backscatter (from Chris DeMoustier and Barb Kraft ) and goes from northwest to southeast. The wide angle reflection track is shown on the backscatter map...microtomography,” Phys. Med. Biol., 50, 5545–5556, 2005. [3] Buckingham M.J., On pore-fluid viscosity and the wave properties of saturated granular materials including marine sediments, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 1486, 2007. 7

    19. Mid-Frequency Reverberation Measurements with Full Companion Environmental Support

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2014-12-30

      A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2 Background and Scope: Mid-frequency (1-10 kHz) shallow water acoustics is...frequency tradition, we started planning mid- frequency, shallow water research, approaching the subject by emphasizing contemporaneous environmental...bottom and sub- bottom impact on propagation and scattering, surface and water column influence on propagation, culminating in a full understanding

    20. Room Acoustics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

      The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

    1. Reverberation Mapping of the Broad Line Region: Application to a Hydrodynamical Line-driven Disk Wind Solution

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Waters, Tim; Kashi, Amit; Proga, Daniel; Eracleous, Michael; Barth, Aaron J.; Greene, Jenny

      2016-08-01

      The latest analysis efforts in reverberation mapping are beginning to allow reconstruction of echo images (or velocity-delay maps) that encode information about the structure and kinematics of the broad line region (BLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Such maps can constrain sophisticated physical models for the BLR. The physical picture of the BLR is often theorized to be a photoionized wind launched from the AGN accretion disk. Previously we showed that the line-driven disk wind solution found in an earlier simulation by Proga and Kallman is virialized over a large distance from the disk. This finding implies that, according to this model, black hole masses can be reliably estimated through reverberation mapping techniques. However, predictions of echo images expected from line-driven disk winds are not available. Here, after presenting the necessary radiative transfer methodology, we carry out the first calculations of such predictions. We find that the echo images are quite similar to other virialized BLR models such as randomly orbiting clouds and thin Keplerian disks. We conduct a parameter survey exploring how echo images, line profiles, and transfer functions depend on both the inclination angle and the line opacity. We find that the line profiles are almost always single peaked, while transfer functions tend to have tails extending to large time delays. The outflow, despite being primarily equatorially directed, causes an appreciable blueshifted excess on both the echo image and line profile when seen from lower inclinations (i≲ 45^\\circ ). This effect may be observable in low ionization lines such as {{H}}β .

    2. Reverberation Mapping of the Gamma-Ray Loud Narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0323+342

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wang, Fang; Du, Pu; Hu, Chen; Bai, Jin-Ming; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Yi, Wei-Min; Wang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Ju-Jia; Xin, Yu-Xin; Lun, Bao-Li; Chang, Liang; Fan, Yu-Feng

      2016-06-01

      Recently, 1H 0323+342 has attracted a lot of attention as one of several narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies detected in the γ-ray band. To understand their central energy engines and jet phenomena, the black hole mass is important. We made use of the Lijiang 2.4 m Telescope to monitor 1H 0323+342 for more than two months. This galaxy is one of the candidates for a monitoring project of super-Eddington accreting massive black holes. The reverberation mapping shows that Hβ emission has a delayed response of {14.8}-2.7+3.9 days with respect to the SDSS g‧ light curve in the rest frame. The optical Fe ii variations were detected after subtracting host contaminations, and a reverberation with a delay of {15.2}-4.1+7.4 days was found in the rest frame. By assuming the viral factor f BLR = 6.17 for the broad-line region (BLR) velocity characterized by FWHM because of the face-on orientation, we find that the black hole mass derived from Hβ is {M}\\bullet ={3.4}-0.6+0.9× {10}7{M}⊙ , and the accretion rate is \\dot{{M}}={1.11}-0.47+0.69, where \\dot{{M}}={\\dot{M}}\\bullet {c}2/{L}{{Edd}}, {\\dot{M}}\\bullet is the mass accretion rate, L Edd is the Eddington luminosity, and c is the speed of light. This black hole is one order less massive than that given by the Magorrian relation from the bulge mass. We test the relation between accretion rates and radio-loudnesses in all mapped radio-loud active galactic nuclei, and find that 1H 0323+342 falls within this group.

    3. First Search for an X-Ray-Optical Reverberation Signal in an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Trippe, Margaret L.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Gandhi, Poshak

      2016-01-01

      Using simultaneous optical (VLT/FORS2) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) data of NGC 5408, we present the first ever attempt to search for a reverberation signal in an ultraluminous X-ray source (NGC 5408 X-1). The idea is similar to active galactic nucleus broad line reverberation mapping where a lag measurement between the X-ray and the optical flux combined with a Keplerian velocity estimate should enable us to weigh the central compact object. We find that although NGC 5408 X-1's X-rays are variable on a timescale of a few hundred seconds (rms of 9.0 +/- 0.5%), the optical emission does not show any statistically significant variations. We set a 3s upper limit on the rms optical variability of 3.3%. The ratio of the X-ray to the optical variability is an indicator of X-ray reprocessing efficiency. In X-ray binaries, this ratio is roughly 5. Assuming a similar ratio for NGC 5408 X-1, the expected rms optical variability is approximately equal to 2%, which is still a factor of roughly two lower than what was possible with the VLT observations in this study. We find marginal evidence (3 sigma) for optical variability on an approximately 24 hr timescale. Our results demonstrate that such measurements can be made, but photometric conditions, low sky background levels, and longer simultaneous observations will be required to reach optical variability levels similar to those of X-ray binaries.

    4. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

      DOEpatents

      Andle, Jeffrey C.

      2006-02-21

      An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

    5. Acoustical analysis and multiple source auralizations of charismatic worship spaces

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lee, Richard W.

      2004-05-01

      Because of the spontaneity and high level of call and response, many charismatic churches have verbal and musical communication problems that stem from highly reverberant sound fields, poor speech intelligibility, and muddy music. This research looks at the subjective dimensions of room acoustics perception that affect a charismatic worship space, which is summarized using the acronym RISCS (reverberation, intimacy, strength, coloration, and spaciousness). The method of research is to obtain acoustical measurements for three worship spaces in order to analyze the objective parameters associated with the RISCS subjective dimensions. For the same spaces, binaural room impulse response (BRIR) measurements are done for different receiver positions in order to create an auralization for each position. The subjective descriptors of RISCS are analyzed through the use of listening tests of the three auralized spaces. The results from the measurements and listening tests are analyzed to determine if listeners' perceptions correlate with the objective parameter results, the appropriateness of the subjective parameters for the use of the space, and which parameters seem to take precedent. A comparison of the multi-source auralization to a conventional single-source auralization was done with the mixed down version of the synchronized multi-track anechoic signals.

    6. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

      SciTech Connect

      Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Hall, Patrick B.; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Anderson, Scott F.; Chen, Yuguang; Denney, Kelly D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Gao, Yang; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Kelly, Brandon C.; and others

      2015-01-01

      The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7 deg{sup 2} field with the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i {sub psf} = 21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 4.5 without any other cuts on quasar properties. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 January-July dark/gray time, with an average cadence of ∼4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope in 2014, with a cadence of ∼2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (R.A., decl. = 14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM six month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ∼10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z > 0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.

    7. Mapping lithosphere thickness beneath China with ScS reverberation data: what controls the intraplate seismicity in Mainland China

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Niu, F.

      2011-12-01

      China is a country with high levels of seismic activity, and has a history of strong earthquakes that caused great loss in both life and property. While it is generally believed that the high seismicity is the result of the prolonged collision between India and Eurasia plates in the west, and the continuous rollback of the Pacific subduction in the east, there are, however, no quantitative explanations on the distribution of the observed seismicity. In this study, we intend to seek a possible relationship between the seismicity and lithospheric structure at large scale (~100km). We developed a new method that uses ScS reverberation data from deep earthquakes to image the lithosphere and asthenosphere boundary (LAB). More specifically, we used more than 600 CEArray records (The CEArray consists of 31 regional networks operated by the China Earthquake Administration (CEA)) from a large deep earthquake occurring beneath the Sea of Okhotsk on July 5 of 2008. Multiple reflections of SH waves between the free surface and the core-mantle boundary (ScS1, ScS2, ScS3) can be clearly identified from all the individual records. We used the upperside reflections at the LAB (ScSm_SdS), which arrive after the main ScS multiples (ScSm), to estimate the depth of the boundary. We employed a common-reflection-point (CRP) stacking technique to the ScS reverberation data to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the LAB reflections. At an assuming LAB depth, d, for each source-receiver pair, we first computed the reflection points of ScSm_SdS and the time moveouts of the ScSm_SdS with respect to ScSm by ray tracing the iasp91 velocity model. We further included corrections computed from 3D crustal and mantle velocity models. We divided the study area (18°N to 54°N, 75°E to 134°E) into meshed grid of 1° by 1°, and used a circular cap with a radius of 1 degree for gathering the ScS reverberations. We then summed all the reverberation data within a 0.5 s window centered on the

    8. Effects of Bilingualism, Noise, and Reverberation on Speech Perception by Listeners with Normal Hearing

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Rogers, Catherine L.; Lister, Jennifer J.; Febo, Dashielle M.; Besing, Joan M.; Abrams, Harvey B.

      2006-01-01

      This study compared monosyllabic word recognition in quiet, noise, and noise with reverberation for 15 monolingual American English speakers and 12 Spanish-English bilinguals who had learned English prior to 6 years of age and spoke English without a noticeable foreign accent. Significantly poorer word recognition scores were obtained for the…

    9. Measuring the Effects of Reverberation and Noise on Sentence Intelligibility for Hearing-Impaired Listeners

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      George, Erwin L. J.; Goverts, S. Theo; Festen, Joost M.; Houtgast, Tammo

      2010-01-01

      Purpose: The Speech Transmission Index (STI; Houtgast, Steeneken, & Plomp, 1980; Steeneken & Houtgast, 1980) is commonly used to quantify the adverse effects of reverberation and stationary noise on speech intelligibility for normal-hearing listeners. Duquesnoy and Plomp (1980) showed that the STI can be applied for presbycusic listeners, relating…

    10. The effects of stage absorption on reverberation times in opera house seating areas.

      PubMed

      Jeon, Jin Yong; Kim, Jae Ho; Ryu, Jong Kwan

      2015-03-01

      The effects of stage absorption on reverberation times in opera houses were investigated using computer simulations and scale model measurements. The reverberation time (RT) was measured in stalls seating with and without variable stage elements (e.g., fly curtains, side curtains, cycloramas, and stage sets). The absorption coefficients of the walls and ceiling of the stage houses were varied accordingly. It was found that variable stage elements have a significant influence on reverberation times in seating areas, particularly for a reverberant stage house, due to the low absorption of the walls and ceiling in the stage house. It was also found that the absorption coefficients of the walls and ceiling should be over 0.5 to avoid RT decreases of over 10% due to the absorption of the variable stage elements. In addition, coupled room effects were investigated both with and without variable stage elements and the results show that double slope was not found in the opera houses investigated in this study.

    11. Perception of Consonants in Reverberation and Noise by Adults Fitted with Bimodal Devices

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Mason, Michelle; Kokkinakis, Kostas

      2014-01-01

      Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of a contralateral hearing aid to the perception of consonants, in terms of voicing, manner, and place-of-articulation cues in reverberation and noise by adult cochlear implantees aided by bimodal fittings. Method: Eight postlingually deafened adult cochlear implant (CI) listeners…

    12. Acoustical conditions of typical classrooms in Hong Kong

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Li, Kai Ming; Lam, Coriolanus C. L.

      2005-04-01

      This paper presents measurement results of the acoustical environments of local schools in Hong Kong. In the measurements, several acoustical aspects that affect verbal communication in classrooms have been studied. These conditions include outdoor and indoor ambient noise levels, signal-to-noise ratios, reverberation time and the speech transmission index. Typical classrooms in many different schools and other higher-education institutions have been selected in the present study. Experimental results are compared with such national standards as USA (ANSI S 12.60 V 2002), Australian/New Zealand (AS/NZS 2107:2000), China (GB/T 15508 V 1995) and other national and industrial standards. This study will form the basis of devising acceptable standards for use in Hong Kong. [Work supported by the Research Grants Council of the SAR Government, the Research Committee of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Architectural Services Department of the Hong Kong SAR Government.

    13. Determining Transmission Loss from Measured External and Internal Acoustic Environments

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Scogin, Tyler; Smith, A. M.

      2012-01-01

      An estimate of the internal acoustic environment in each internal cavity of a launch vehicle is needed to ensure survivability of Space Launch System (SLS) avionics. Currently, this is achieved by using the noise reduction database of heritage flight vehicles such as the Space Shuttle and Saturn V for liftoff and ascent flight conditions. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is conducting a series of transmission loss tests to verify and augment this method. For this test setup, an aluminum orthogrid curved panel representing 1/8th of the circumference of a section of the SLS main structure was mounted in between a reverberation chamber and an anechoic chamber. Transmission loss was measured across the panel using microphones. Data measured during this test will be used to estimate the internal acoustic environments for several of the SLS launch vehicle internal spaces.

    14. Numerical investigation of acoustic field in enclosures: Evaluation of active and reactive components of sound intensity

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Meissner, Mirosław

      2015-03-01

      The paper focuses on a theoretical description and numerical evaluation of active and reactive components of sound intensity in enclosed spaces. As the study was dedicated to low-frequency room responses, a modal expansion of the sound pressure was used. Numerical simulations have shown that the presence of energy vortices whose size and distribution depend on the character of the room response is a distinctive feature of the active intensity field. When several modes with frequencies close to a source frequency are excited, the vortices within the room are positioned irregularly. However, if the response is determined by one or two dominant modes, a regular distribution of vortices in the room can be observed. The irrotational component of the active intensity was found using the Helmholtz decomposition theorem. As was evidenced by numerical simulations, the suppression of the vortical flow of sound energy in the nearfield permits obtaining a clear image of the sound source.

    15. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

      1995-01-01

      The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.

    16. Research and training activities of the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Roberts, L.

      1993-12-01

      During the period October 1992 to September 1993 progress was made on each of the following tasks: (1) experimental studies of free shear flows; (2) analysis of conical flow; (3) experimental and theoretical studies of vortex flows; and (4) aircraft attitude control using active flow control devices. The details of this work was discussed with the technical and management staff at Ames Research Center.

    17. 78 FR 40698 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Office of Naval Research Acoustic...

      Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

      2013-07-08

      ... complete on March 7, 2013. On April 2, 2013, NMFS published a Federal Register notice (78 FR 19652... activity was provided in the proposed IHA (78 FR 19652, April 2, 2013). Comments and Responses A notice of... April 2, 2013 (78 FR 19652). During the 30-day public comment period, we received comments from...

    18. A pseudo non-linear method for fast simulations of ultrasonic reverberation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Byram, Brett; Shu, Jasmine

      2016-04-01

      There is growing evidence that reverberation is a primary mechanism of clinical image degradation. This has led to a number of new approaches to suppress reverberation, including our recently proposed model-based algorithm. The algorithm can work well, but it must be trained to reject clutter, while preserving the signal of interest. One way to do this is to use simulated data, but current simulation methods that include multipath scattering are slow and do not readily allow separation of clutter and signal. Here, we propose a more convenient pseudo non-linear simulation method that utilizes existing linear simulation tools like Field II. The approach functions by linearly simulating scattered wavefronts at shallow depths, and then time-shifting these wavefronts to deeper depths. The simulation only requires specification of the first and last scatterers encountered by a multiply reflected wave and a third point that establishes the arrival time of the reverberation. To maintain appropriate 2D correlation, this set of three points is fixed for the entire simulation and is shifted as with a normal linear simulation scattering field. We show example images, and we compute first order speckle statistics as a function of scatterer density. We perform ex vivo measures of reverberation where we find that the average speckle SNR is 1.73, which we can simulate with 2 reverberation scatterers per resolution cell. We also compare ex vivo lateral speckle statistics to those from linear and pseudo non-linear simulation data. Finally, the van Cittert-Zernike curve was shown to match empirical and theoretical observations.

    19. Post-processing enhancement of reverberation-noise suppression in dual-frequency SURF imaging.

      PubMed

      Näsholm, Sven Peter; Hansen, Rune; Angelsen, Bjørn A J

      2011-02-01

      A post-processing adjustment technique to enhance dual-frequency second-order ultrasound field (SURF) reverberation-noise suppression imaging in medical ultrasound is analyzed. Two variant methods are investigated through numerical simulations. They both solely involve post-processing of the propagated high-frequency (HF) imaging wave fields, which in real-time imaging corresponds to post-processing of the beamformed receive radio-frequency signals. Hence, the transmit pulse complexes are the same as for the previously published SURF reverberation-suppression imaging method. The adjustment technique is tested on simulated data from propagation of SURF pulse complexes consisting of a 3.5-MHz HF imaging pulse added to a 0.5-MHz low-frequency soundspeed manipulation pulse. Imaging transmit beams are constructed with and without adjustment. The post-processing involves filtering, e.g., by a time-shift, to equalize the two SURF HF pulses at a chosen depth. This depth is typically chosen to coincide with the depth where the first scattering or reflection occurs for the reverberation noise one intends to suppress. The beams realized with post-processing show energy decrease at the chosen depth, especially for shallow depths where, in a medical imaging situation, a body-wall is often located. This indicates that the post-processing may further enhance the reverberation- suppression abilities of SURF imaging. Moreover, it is shown that the methods might be utilized to reduce the accumulated near-field energy of the SURF transmit-beam relative to its imaging region energy. The adjustments presented may therefore potentially be utilized to attain a slightly better general suppression of multiple scattering and multiple reflection noise compared with non-adjusted SURF reverberation-suppression imaging.

    20. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

      SciTech Connect

      CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

      1999-11-15

      Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to

    1. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

      DOEpatents

      Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

      1980-01-01

      An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

    2. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Kraft, R. E.

      1996-01-01

      A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

    3. Responses to startling acoustic stimuli indicate that movement-related activation is constant prior to action: a replication with an alternate interpretation

      PubMed Central

      Maslovat, Dana; Franks, Ian M; Leguerrier, Alexandra; Carlsen, Anthony N

      2015-01-01

      A recent study by Marinovic et al. (J. Neurophysiol., 2013, 109: 996–1008) used a loud acoustic stimulus to probe motor preparation in a simple reaction time (RT) task. Based on decreasing RT latency and increases in motor output measures as the probe stimulus approached the “go” stimulus, the authors concluded that response-related activation increased abruptly 65 ms prior to the imperative stimulus, a result in contrast to previous literature. However, this study did not measure reflexive startle activity in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle, which has been used to delineate between response triggering by a loud acoustic stimuli and effects of stimulus intensity and/or intersensory facilitation. Due to this methodological limitation, it was unclear if the data accurately represented movement-related activation changes. In order to provide a measure as to whether response triggering occurred on each trial, the current experiment replicated the study by Marinovic et al., with the collection of muscle activation in the SCM. While the replication analyses involving all trials confirmed similar results to those reported by Marinovic et al., when data were limited to those in which startle-related SCM activation occurred, the results indicated that movement-related activation is constant in the 65 ms prior to action initiation. The difference between analyses suggests that when SCM activation is not considered, results may be confounded by trials in which the probe stimulus does not trigger the prepared response. Furthermore, these results provide additional confirmation that reflexive startle activation in the SCM is a robust indicator of response triggering by a loud acoustic stimulus. PMID:25663524

    4. Acoustic biosensors

      PubMed Central

      Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

      2016-01-01

      Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

    5. Acoustic biosensors.

      PubMed

      Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

      2016-06-30

      Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

    6. Architectural-acoustics consulting

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hoover, Anthony K.

      2004-05-01

      Consulting involves both the science of acoustics and the art of communication, requiring an array of inherent and created skills. Perhaps because consulting on architectural acoustics is a relatively new field, there is a remarkable variety of career paths, all influenced by education, interest, and experience. Many consultants juggle dozens of chargeable projects at a time, not to mention proposals, seminars, teaching, articles, business concerns, and professional-society activities. This paper will discuss various aspects of career paths, projects, and clients as they relate to architectural-acoustics consulting. The intended emphasis will be considerations for those who may be interested in such a career, noting that consultants generally seem to thrive on the numerous challenges.

    7. Method and apparatus for generating acoustic energy

      DOEpatents

      Guerrero, Hector N.

      2002-01-01

      A method and apparatus for generating and emitting amplified coherent acoustic energy. A cylindrical transducer is mounted within a housing, the transducer having an acoustically open end and an acoustically closed end. The interior of the transducer is filled with an active medium which may include scattering nuclei. Excitation of the transducer produces radially directed acoustic energy in the active medium, which is converted by the dimensions of the transducer, the acoustically closed end thereof, and the scattering nuclei, to amplified coherent acoustic energy directed longitudinally within the transducer. The energy is emitted through the acoustically open end of the transducer. The emitted energy can be used for, among other things, effecting a chemical reaction or removing scale from the interior walls of containment vessels.

    8. Effect of speaking styles on the relevance of the Speech Transmission Index in the presence of reverberation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      van Wijngaarden, Sander J.; Houtgast, Tammo

      2003-04-01

      The Speech Transmission Index (STI) predicts speech intelligibility under various speech degrading conditions, including noise and reverberation. Measurements of sentence intelligibility in noise and reverberation, for three different talkers adopting different speaking styles, indicate that the STI is sometimes inaccurate in the presence of reverberation. For a trained talker speaking clearly, the STI predictions are accurate, but for conversational speech by untrained talkers, the effect of reverberation is underestimated. By using a wider range of modulation frequencies than prescribed for the standardized STI calculation (up to 31.5 Hz instead of 12.5 Hz), more accurate predictions are obtained for conversational speech. This can be understood by comparing the envelope spectrum between talkers and speaking styles: conversational speech tends to spread more of the energy in its envelope spectrum to higher modulation frequencies. Since higher modulation frequencies are more susceptible to reverberation, conversational speech tends to be affected more by reverberation than clear speech. To investigate the range of between-talker variations, envelope spectra were calculated for a population of 134 talkers. Upper boundaries of the STI modulation frequency range of 12.5 and 31.5 Hz seem approximately appropriate for the 5th and 95th percentile of this population.

    9. Nonlinear Acoustics

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1974-02-14

      Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

    10. Model-based adaptive 3D sonar reconstruction in reverberating environments.

      PubMed

      Saucan, Augustin-Alexandru; Sintes, Christophe; Chonavel, Thierry; Caillec, Jean-Marc Le

      2015-10-01

      In this paper, we propose a novel model-based approach for 3D underwater scene reconstruction, i.e., bathymetry, for side scan sonar arrays in complex and highly reverberating environments like shallow water areas. The presence of multipath echoes and volume reverberation generates false depth estimates. To improve the resulting bathymetry, this paper proposes and develops an adaptive filter, based on several original geometrical models. This multimodel approach makes it possible to track and separate the direction of arrival trajectories of multiple echoes impinging the array. Echo tracking is perceived as a model-based processing stage, incorporating prior information on the temporal evolution of echoes in order to reject cluttered observations generated by interfering echoes. The results of the proposed filter on simulated and real sonar data showcase the clutter-free and regularized bathymetric reconstruction. Model validation is carried out with goodness of fit tests, and demonstrates the importance of model-based processing for bathymetry reconstruction.

    11. Feature enhancement of reverberant speech by distribution matching and non-negative matrix factorization

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Keronen, Sami; Kallasjoki, Heikki; Palomäki, Kalle J.; Brown, Guy J.; Gemmeke, Jort F.

      2015-12-01

      This paper describes a novel two-stage dereverberation feature enhancement method for noise-robust automatic speech recognition. In the first stage, an estimate of the dereverberated speech is generated by matching the distribution of the observed reverberant speech to that of clean speech, in a decorrelated transformation domain that has a long temporal context in order to address the effects of reverberation. The second stage uses this dereverberated signal as an initial estimate within a non-negative matrix factorization framework, which jointly estimates a sparse representation of the clean speech signal and an estimate of the convolutional distortion. The proposed feature enhancement method, when used in conjunction with automatic speech recognizer back-end processing, is shown to improve the recognition performance compared to three other state-of-the-art techniques.

    12. Method and system to perform energy-extraction based active noise control

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Kelkar, Atul (Inventor); Joshi, Suresh M. (Inventor)

      2009-01-01

      A method to provide active noise control to reduce noise and vibration in reverberant acoustic enclosures such as aircraft, vehicles, appliances, instruments, industrial equipment and the like is presented. A continuous-time multi-input multi-output (MIMO) state space mathematical model of the plant is obtained via analytical modeling and system identification. Compensation is designed to render the mathematical model passive in the sense of mathematical system theory. The compensated system is checked to ensure robustness of the passive property of the plant. The check ensures that the passivity is preserved if the mathematical model parameters are perturbed from nominal values. A passivity-based controller is designed and verified using numerical simulations and then tested. The controller is designed so that the resulting closed-loop response shows the desired noise reduction.

    13. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

      DOEpatents

      Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

      1990-01-01

      A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

    14. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

      DOEpatents

      Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

      1990-03-20

      A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

    15. TRACING THE REVERBERATION LAG IN THE HARD STATE OF BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES

      SciTech Connect

      De Marco, B.; Ponti, G.; Nandra, K.; Muñoz-Darias, T.

      2015-11-20

      We report results obtained from a systematic analysis of X-ray lags in a sample of black hole X-ray binaries, with the aim of assessing the presence of reverberation lags and studying their evolution during outburst. We used XMM-Newton and simultaneous Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations to obtain broadband energy coverage of both the disk and the hard X-ray Comptonization components. In most cases the detection of reverberation lags is hampered by low levels of variability-power signal-to-noise ratio (typically when the source is in a soft state) and/or short exposure times. The most detailed study was possible for GX 339-4 in the hard state, which allowed us to characterize the evolution of X-ray lags as a function of luminosity in a single source. Over all the sampled frequencies (∼0.05–9 Hz), we observe the hard lags intrinsic to the power-law component, already well known from previous RXTE studies. The XMM-Newton soft X-ray response allows us to detail the disk variability. At low frequencies (long timescales) the disk component always leads the power-law component. On the other hand, a soft reverberation lag (ascribable to thermal reprocessing) is always detected at high frequencies (short timescales). The intrinsic amplitude of the reverberation lag decreases as the source luminosity and the disk fraction increase. This suggests that the distance between the X-ray source and the region of the optically thick disk where reprocessing occurs gradually decreases as GX 339-4 rises in luminosity through the hard state, possibly as a consequence of reduced disk truncation.

    16. REVERBERATION AND PHOTOIONIZATION ESTIMATES OF THE BROAD-LINE REGION RADIUS IN LOW-z QUASARS

      SciTech Connect

      Negrete, C. Alenka; Dultzin, Deborah; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W. E-mail: deborah@astro.unam.mx E-mail: sulentic@iaa.es

      2013-07-01

      Black hole mass estimation in quasars, especially at high redshift, involves the use of single-epoch spectra with signal-to-noise ratio and resolution that permit accurate measurement of the width of a broad line assumed to be a reliable virial estimator. Coupled with an estimate of the radius of the broad-line region (BLR) this yields the black hole mass M{sub BH}. The radius of the BLR may be inferred from an extrapolation of the correlation between source luminosity and reverberation-derived r{sub BLR} measures (the so-called Kaspi relation involving about 60 low-z sources). We are exploring a different method for estimating r{sub BLR} directly from inferred physical conditions in the BLR of each source. We report here on a comparison of r{sub BLR} estimates that come from our method and from reverberation mapping. Our ''photoionization'' method employs diagnostic line intensity ratios in the rest-frame range 1400-2000 A (Al III {lambda}1860/Si III] {lambda}1892, C IV {lambda}1549/Al III {lambda}1860) that enable derivation of the product of density and ionization parameter with the BLR distance derived from the definition of the ionization parameter. We find good agreement between our estimates of the density, ionization parameter, and r{sub BLR} and those from reverberation mapping. We suggest empirical corrections to improve the agreement between individual photoionization-derived r{sub BLR} values and those obtained from reverberation mapping. The results in this paper can be exploited to estimate M{sub BH} for large samples of high-z quasars using an appropriate virial broadening estimator. We show that the width of the UV intermediate emission lines are consistent with the width of H{beta}, thereby providing a reliable virial broadening estimator that can be measured in large samples of high-z quasars.

    17. Imaging Mantle Discontinuities Beneath North America Using ScS Reverberations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Griebel, K. A.; Schmerr, N. C.; Courtier, A. M.; Lekic, V.

      2015-12-01

      Seismic discontinuities are rapid changes in velocity and density over depth that arise from mechanisms such as changes in mineralogy, major element composition, melt content, volatile abundance, anisotropy, or a combination of the above. Seismic imaging of discontinuities complements information provided by seismic tomography and is important for understanding the dynamics and the structure of the mantle. For example, imaging variations in the depth and sharpness of discontinuities can trace underlying variations in temperature and composition in the mantle. We use ScSScS precursors and ScS postcursors (ScS reverberations) to map the depth and sharpness of upper- and mid- mantle discontinuities beneath North America. To observe the reverberations, we collected broadband data recordings of earthquakes with depth > 300 km, source moment magnitude ≥ 5.5, and location < 60 degrees of EarthScope USArray stations. Two primary source regions met our qualifications: earthquakes from the subduction of the Nazca plate beneath South America, and earthquakes from the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the Sea of Okhotsk. Our dataset consists of ~15 deep focus earthquakes that have well defined ScS and ScSScS arrivals. We use array processing to generate vespagrams for detecting the ScS reverberations. Seismic energy falling at the appropriate slowness and travel time for reflections from upper- and mid- mantle discontinuities is migrated to depth. We use the resulting ScS reverberation derived reflectivity profiles to obtain estimates for discontinuity depth and impedance contrast in the regions falling between the source and array. We can use this information to image parts of the mantle under North America. Preliminary results indicate presence of multiple discontinuities in the upper mantle, including the 410 km discontinuity, a complex 660 km discontinuity, and intermittent mid-mantle discontinuities at 800-900 km depth.

    18. The Effects of Reverberant Impulse Noise (BLAST WAVES) on Hearing: Parametric Studies

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1993-06-16

      high levels of reverberant impulse noise using an animal ( chinchilla ) model. The blast waves were generated by a three inch diameter shock tube...found in previous contractor reports (Hamernik et al., ADA 203-854, ADA 206-180 and ADA 221-731). (a) Subjeeta : The chinchilla was used...as the experimental animal. Over the years, the chinchilla has been used in a wide variety of auditory experiments and consequently, much

    19. Effect of source spectrum on sound localization in an everyday reverberant room

      PubMed Central

      Ihlefeld, Antje; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

      2011-01-01

      Two experiments explored how frequency content impacts sound localization for sounds containing reverberant energy. Virtual sound sources from thirteen lateral angles and four distances were simulated in the frontal horizontal plane using binaural room impulse responses measured in an everyday office. Experiment 1 compared localization judgments for one-octave-wide noise centered at either 750 Hz (low) or 6000 Hz (high). For both band-limited noises, perceived lateral angle varied monotonically with source angle. For frontal sources, perceived locations were similar for low- and high-frequency noise; however, for lateral sources, localization was less accurate for low-frequency noise than for high-frequency noise. With increasing source distance, judgments of both noises became more biased toward the median plane, an effect that was greater for low-frequency noise than for high-frequency noise. In Experiment 2, simultaneous presentation of low- and high-frequency noises yielded performance that was less accurate than that for high-frequency noise, but equal to or better than for low-frequency noise. Results suggest that listeners perceptually weight low-frequency information heavily, even in reverberant conditions where high-frequency stimuli are localized more accurately. These findings show that listeners do not always optimally adjust how localization cues are integrated over frequency in reverberant settings. PMID:21786902

    20. Shaping complex microwave fields in reverberating media with binary tunable metasurfaces

      PubMed Central

      Kaina, Nadège; Dupré, Matthieu; Lerosey, Geoffroy; Fink, Mathias

      2014-01-01

      In this article we propose to use electronically tunable metasurfaces as spatial microwave modulators. We demonstrate that like spatial light modulators, which have been recently proved to be ideal tools for controlling light propagation through multiple scattering media, spatial microwave modulators can efficiently shape in a passive way complex existing microwave fields in reverberating environments with a non-coherent energy feedback. Unlike in free space, we establish that a binary-only phase state tunable metasurface allows a very good control over the waves, owing to the random nature of the electromagnetic fields in these complex media. We prove in an everyday reverberating medium, that is, a typical office room, that a small spatial microwave modulator placed on the walls can passively increase the wireless transmission between two antennas by an order of magnitude, or on the contrary completely cancel it. Interestingly and contrary to free space, we show that this results in an isotropic shaped microwave field around the receiving antenna, which we attribute again to the reverberant nature of the propagation medium. We expect that spatial microwave modulators will be interesting tools for fundamental physics and will have applications in the field of wireless communications. PMID:25331498