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Sample records for active right-lateral strike-slip

  1. Spacing and strength of active continental strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, Andrew V.; Yin, An; Lin, Jessica; Sun, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Parallel and evenly-spaced active strike-slip faults occur widely in nature across diverse tectonic settings. Despite their common existence, the fundamental question of what controls fault spacing remains unanswered. Here we present a mechanical model for the generation of parallel strike-slip faults that relates fault spacing to the following parameters: (1) brittle-crust thickness, (2) fault strength, (3) crustal strength, and (4) crustal stress state. Scaled analogue experiments using dry sand, dry crushed walnut shells, and viscous putty were employed to test the key assumptions of our quantitative model. The physical models demonstrate that fault spacing (S) is linearly proportional to brittle-layer thickness (h), both in experiments with only brittle materials and in two-layer trials involving dry sand overlying viscous putty. The S / h slope in the two-layer sand-putty experiments may be controlled by the (1) rheological/geometric properties of the viscous layer, (2) effects of distributed basal loading caused by the viscous shear of the putty layer, and/or (3) frictional interaction at the sand-putty interface (i.e., coupling between the viscous and brittle layers). We tentatively suggest that this third effect exerts the strongest control on fault spacing in the analogue experiments. By applying our quantitative model to crustal-scale strike-slip faults using fault spacing and the seismogenic-zone thickness obtained from high-resolution earthquake-location data, we estimate absolute fault friction of active strike-slip faults in Asia and along the San Andreas fault system in California. We show that the average friction coefficient of strike-slip faults in the India-Asia collisional orogen is lower than that of faults in the San Andreas fault system. Weaker faults explain why deformation penetrates >3500 km into Asia from the Himalaya and why the interior of Asia is prone to large (M > 7.0) devastating earthquakes along major intra-continental strike-slip

  2. 400My of Deformation Along Tibet Active Strike Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, N. O.

    2003-12-01

    While it is widely accepted that strike slip faults in Tibet accommodate a significant part of the tertiary convergence between India and Asia, the true Cenozoic magnitude of the offset is still largely debated. Direct dating of Cenozoic piercing points is the most powerful tool to assess the total offset, but their use is not always possible. Therefore one gets to use older markers although this leads to significant results ONLY at the supreme condition that pre-Cenozoic movement of those markers be accurately known. The Kunlun and Altyn Tagh faults for example form a prominent example of Tibetan presently active fault, but they also constitute geological frontiers between blocks of different geological histories accreted at various times since early Paleozoic. One may thus question how much of the visible offset is indeed Cenozoic. Although deformation facies agree with recent kinematics, multi-geochronological approach indicates a series of events from 280-230 Ma to 120+/-10 Ma. The former may be linked either with suturing of the Qiantang and Kunlun blocks farther to the south, or collision further to the north or east in the Qilian Shan and Bei Shan ranges, while the latter range appears to be growing in importance with ongoing work but is still largely unexplained. Oblique subductions of collision to the north of the Qilian Shan are adequate candidates. Argon loss suggests that deformation was associated to a 250-300° C thermal pulse that lasted 5 to 20 Ma after the onset of movement (Arnaud et al., 2003). Unroofing on all faults occurred much later, around 25 Ma ago when sudden cooling suggests a component of normal faulting (Mock et al., 1999). Strong inheritage was also found along the Ghoza active fault, in central western Tibet. Of course the fact that some of the deformation is much older than the Cretaceous and shares compatible deformation criteria with the present-day deformation leads to false appreciation of the pure Cenozoic offset, potentially

  3. Quaternary strike-slip crustal deformation around an active fault based on paleomagnetic analysis: a case study of the Enako fault in central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Haruo; Itoh, Yasuto; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate cumulative strike-slip deformation around an active fault, we carried out tectonic geomorphic investigations of the active right-lateral strike-slip Enako fault in central Japan and paleomagnetic investigations of the Kamitakara pyroclastic flow deposit (KPFD; 0.6 Ma welded tuff) distributed around the fault. Tectonic geomorphic study revealed that the strike-slip displacement on the fault is ca. 150 m during the past 600 ka. We carried out measurements of paleomagnetic directions and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) within the pyroclastic flow deposit. Stable primary magnetic directions at each sampling site are well clustered and the AMS fabric is very oblate. We then applied tilt correction of paleomagnetic directions at 15 sites using tilting data obtained by the AMS property and orientations of eutaxitic structures. Within a distance of about 500 m from the fault trace, differential clockwise rotations were detected; the rotation angle is larger for zones closer to the fault. Because of this relation and absence of block boundary faults, a continuous deformation model explains the crustal deformation in the study area. The calculated minimum value of strike-slip displacement associated with this deformation detected within the shear zone is 210 m. The sum of this and offset on the Enako fault is 360 m and the slip rate is estimated at 0.6 mm/year.

  4. Relative tectonic activity assessment along the East Anatolian strike-slip fault, Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Abdelrahman

    2016-04-01

    The East Anatolian transform fault is a morphologically distinct and seismically active left-lateral strike-slip fault that extends for ~ 500 km from Karlıova to the Maraş defining the boundary between the Anatolian Block and Syrian Foreland. Deformed landforms along the East Anatolian fault provide important insights into the nature of landscape development within an intra-continental strike-slip fault system. Geomorphic analysis of the East Anatolian fault using geomorphic indices including mountain front sinuosity, stream length-gradient index, drainage density, hypsometric integral, and the valley-width to valley height ratio helped differentiate the faulting into segments of differing degrees of the tectonic and geomorphic activity. Watershed maps for the East Anatolian fault showing the relative relief, incision, and maturity of basins along the fault zone help define segments of the higher seismic risk and help evaluate the regional seismic hazard. The results of the geomorphic indices show a high degree of activity, reveal each segment along the fault is active and represent a higher seismic hazard along the entire fault.

  5. Slip sense inversion on active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan and its implications for Cenozoic tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2004-05-01

    Analyses of deflected river channels, offset of basement rocks, and fault rock structures reveal that slip sense inversion occurred on major active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan such as the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones and the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Along the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones, small-size rivers cutting shallowly mountain slopes and Quaternary terraces have been deflected sinistrally, whereas large-size rivers which deeply incised into the Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains show no systematically sinistral offset or complicated hairpin-shaped deflection. When the sinistral offsets accumulated on the small-size rivers are restored, the large-size rivers show residual dextral deflections. This dextral offset sense is consistent with that recorded in the pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. S-C fabrics of fault gouge and breccia zone developed in the active fault zones show sinistral shear sense compatible with earthquake focal mechanisms, whereas those of the foliated cataclasite indicate a dextral shear sense. These observations show that the sinistral strike-slip shear fabrics were overprinted on dextral ones which formed during a previous deformation phase. Similar topographic and geologic features are observed along the MTL in the central-eastern part of the Kii Peninsula. Based on these geomorphological and geological data, we infer that the slip sense inversion occurred in the period between the late Tertiary and mid-Quaternary period. This strike-slip inversion might result from the plate rearrangement consequent to the mid-Miocene Japan Sea opening event. This multidisciplinary study gives insight into how active strike-slip fault might evolves with time.

  6. Holocene activity and paleoseismicity of the Selaha Fault, southeastern segment of the strike-slip Xianshuihe Fault Zone, Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Lin, Aiming

    2017-01-01

    In this study we examine the Holocene activity, including slip rate and paleoseismicity, of the Selaha Fault, a branch of the left-lateral strike-slip Xianshuihe Fault Zone located along the southeastern segment of the Ganzhi-Yushu-Xianshuihe Fault System (GYXFS) of the Tibetan Plateau. Interpretation of high-resolution images and field investigations reveal that the Selaha Fault is characterized by left-lateral strike-slip faulting with an average horizontal slip-rate of 9.0 mm/year during the Holocene. Trench excavations and 14C dating results show that at least three morphogenic earthquakes occurred during the past millennium; the most recent event occurred in the past 450 years and corresponds to the 1786 M 7.75 earthquake. The penultimate seismic event (E2) occurred in the period between 560 and 820 year BP (i.e., 1166-1428 CE) and is probably associated with the 1327 M 7.5 earthquake. The antepenultimate event (E3) is inferred to have occurred in the period between 820 ± 30 and 950 ± 30 year BP. Our results confirm that the Selaha Fault, as a portion of the GYXFS, plays an important role as a tectonic boundary in releasing the strain energy accumulated during the northeastward motion of the Tibetan Plateau in response to the ongoing northward penetration of the Indian Plate into the Eurasian Plate. The strain energy is released in the form of repeated large earthquakes that are recorded by strike-slip displacements of stream channels and alluvial fans.

  7. Threshold of geomorphic detectability estimated from geologic observations of active low slip-rate strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Heitaro

    2003-03-01

    Sources of catastrophic earthquakes include not only major active faults, but also those with low slip rates. Geologic observations of two Japanese surface-rupturing earthquakes on low slip-rate strike-slip faults (the 1927 Kita-Tango and the 1943 Tottori earthquakes) suggests a concept of ``threshold of geomorphic detectability'' for strike-slip faults in humid mountainous regions. This threshold must be exceeded in order that progressive coseismic surface offset can be preserved as detectable faulted topography that may be otherwise erased by surface processes. The determined threshold minimum slip rates for both examples are about 0.1 mm/yr, which can be a quantitative explanation for lack of recognition and mapping of many active faults with slip rates of less than 0.1 mm/yr in Japan islands. Although this threshold is probably negligible in arid regions, it can produce another type of unrecognized active fault in humid mountainous regions, in addition to blind thrusts beneath thick sediments.

  8. Walker Lake, Nevada: sedimentation in an active, strike-slip related basin

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Roberts, M.T.

    1984-04-01

    Walker Lake, Nevada, is in an active fault-controlled basin related to the right-lateral, northwest-trending Walker Lane Shear Zone on the western side of the Basin and Range province. The lake occurs in a half graben bounded on its west side by a high-angle normal fault zone along the Wassuk Range front. This fault zone may merge to the north into the Walker Lane fault system, which forms the northeast boundary of the basin. To the south of Walker Lake, the Wassuk front fault merges with an east-northeast trending left-lateral fault. The Walker Lake basin is interpreted to be a pull-apart basin formed within the triangular zone bounded by the Wassuk front, the Walker Lane, and left-lateral faults. The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km/sup 2/ (3800 mi/sup 2/) in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system that drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake. Walker Lake trends north-northwest and is 27.4 km (17 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide with water depths exceeding 30 m (100 ft). Lake Lahontan (Wisconsinian) shorelines ring Walker Lake and suggest water depths of 150 m (500 ft) above the present lake level. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and gentle, areally more extensive fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). The Walker River delta enters the lake from the north and is a major sediment point source for the basin. Older dissected shoreline, alluvial fan, Gilbert delta, and beach ridge deposits were built largely of coarse-grained, locally derived materials. Stromatolites, oncolites, and tufas formed along the shorelines, whereas mud and organic sediments accumulated in the lake on the west side of the basin. Extensive submerged sand flats and local sand dunes occur on the east side of the basin.

  9. Threshold of Geomorphic Detectability Estimated from Geologic Observations of Active Slow-Slipping Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, H.

    2002-12-01

    Sources of catastrophic earthquakes include not only major active faults, but also slow-slipping ones. However, geomorphic characteristics and long-term seismic behavior of slow-slipping faults have not been well understood, although intensive paleoseismic studies were carried out after the unexpected 1992 Landers and 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes. Two Japanese surface faulting earthquakes on slow-slipping strike-slip faults (the 1927 Mw=7.0 Kita-Tango and 1943 Mw=7.0 Tottori earthquakes) provided good opportunity to examine these problems. Analysis of coseismic surface slip, cumulative geomorphic expressions, and paleoseismicity for these two events not only supports a characteristic-slip behavior for these faults, but also suggests a concept of threshold of geomorphic detectability for intramontane strike-slip faults, which must be exceeded in order that progressive coseismic surface offsets can be preserved against surface processes as detectable systematic deflections of channels and ridge crests. The determined threshold slip rates for these examples are in the range of 0.06-0.13 mm/yr, which can be a quantitative explanation for an extremely small number of mapped active faults with slip rates of less than 0.1 mm/yr in Japan islands. On the contrary, the threshold of geomorphic detectability is probably negligible in arid regions where denudation rate would be extremely low. To date, the issue of geomorphologically undetectable active faults has been that of blind thrust faults buried beneath thick sediments, but another type of blind active faults or fault segments can exist in humid and mountainous regions. In spite of their low slip rates and long recurrence intervals, their potential presence must be considered, especially in regions under the tectonically undeveloped regime, where regional strain is accommodated by many scattered slow-slipping faults.

  10. Sag-ponding and its Significance in determining Paleo-seismic events along the active strike- slip fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Zhang, P.; Yuan, D.

    2007-12-01

    During the development of one active fault, we really want to know how it behaves and what it will do next. This mostly depends on the record and preservation of the information showing the action of the fault. Sparse young sediments or sediments with coarse grain along most of big strike-slip faults make it hard record and preserve the vestige of the paleo-seismic events. This extremely restricts the development of the Paleo-seismic research. Sag-ponding as well as the deposits in ponds, which are formed by the movement of the fault, can help settling the difficulty. Periodic sag-ponding is a feature to which should be paid more attention along the strike-slip fault, it can develop a pond to capture plenty fine sediments which well record the action of the faults. Sag-ponding can easily be found on the main active strike-slip faults in northern and eastern Tibet. By disclosing the sag-ponding depositions with 3-D excavations, sediment distribution and characters of relevant sag-ponds, and the relation between the sag-ponding and faulting were discussed. 1. Mechanism of the formation of the sag-pond When the valleys and ridges intersecting with the fault are displaced, the fault scarps will block the flow of the streams cut by the fault, or make the gullies develop ancon-like bend. This would form a space for water-storage, and thus a sag-pond comes into being. If the fault behaves like this many times, multi-sag-ponding will occur. 2. Rhythmic sag-ponding deposition features and stratigraphic sequence (1) Vertical characteristics. Observed from the stratigraphic profiles disclosed by the excavation, stratigraphic sequence shows good rhythms. There are several rhythms in each pond, and one rhythm is composed of the lower coarse layers and the upper fine layers. That is, the grains are coarser below and finer upward. (2) Transverse variation. In the direction parallel to the fault, the deposition center of each sag-pond appears regular movement, or migration

  11. Faults paragenesis and paleostress state in the zone of actively propagating continental strike-slip on the example of North Khangai fault (Northern Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankov, Vladimir; Parfeevets, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Sublatitudinal North Khangai fault extends from Ubsunuur basin to the eastern part of the Selenga corridor trough 800 km. It is the northern boundary of the massive Mongolian block and limits of the Baikal rift system structures propagation in the south (Logatchev, 2003). Late Cenozoic and present-day fault activity are expressed in the left-lateral displacements of a different order of river valleys and high seismicity. We have carried out studies of the kinematics of active faults and palaeostresses reconstruction in the zone of the dynamic influence of North Khangai fault, the width of which varies along the strike and can exceeds 100 km. The result shows that the fault zone has a longitudinal and a transverse zoning. Longitudinal zonation presented gradual change from west to east regions of compression and transpression regimes (Khan-Khukhey ridge) to strike-slip regime (Bolnay ridge) and strike-slip and transtensive regimes (west of Selenga corridor). Strike-slip zones are represented by linearly concentrated rupture deformations. In contrast, near the termination of the fault the cluster fault deformation formed. Here, from north to south, there are radical changes in the palaeostress state. In the north-western sector (east of Selenga corridor) strike-slip faults, strike-slip faults with normal components and normal faults are dominated. For this sector the stress tensors of extensive, transtension and strike-slip regimes are typical. South-western sector is separated from the north-eastern one by massive Buren Nuruu ridge within which the active faults are not identified. In the south-western sector between the Orkhon and Tola rivers the cluster of NW thrusts and N-S strike-slip faults with reverse component are discovered. The faults are perfectly expressed by NW and N-S scarps in the relief. The most structures dip to the east and north-east. Holocene fault activity is demonstrated by the hanging river valleys and horizontal displacements with amplitudes

  12. Earthquake cycle associated with active strike slip faults in central Panamá

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, Bennett; Spinler, Joshua C.; Compton, Kathleen; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Gath, Eldon

    2013-04-01

    The rigidity of the Panamá Isthmus is currently under debate, with important implications for seismic hazards to the Panamá Canal and Panamá City. Whereas Panamá has traditionally been described as a non-deforming microplate caught between a number of larger tectonic plates, new paleoseismic data collected at a limited number of trench sites in association with the ongoing expansion of the Panamá Canal may challenge the validity of the rigid microplate hypothesis. Crustal velocities from a new, ~100 km aperture, 5-station continuous GPS network constructed across the Rio Gatún, Limón, and Pedro Miguel fault zones confirm that these fault zones are active, forming a system of faults that traverse central Panamá in close proximity to the Panamá Canal and Panamá City. However, the slip rates inferred from these new geodetic data are lower than the geologic rates when using an elastic halfspace model. Differences among previous geodetic investigations, which concluded that Panamá is rigid, and the geological slip rate estimates are explained by earthquake cycle effects associated with long recurrence intervals relative to lower crust and upper mantle Maxwell relaxation times. Late in the earthquake cycle the geodetic strain field is broadly distributed, giving the false appearance of low seismic hazards.

  13. Late Quaternary Activity and Seismogenic Potential of the Gonave Microplate: Plantain Garden Strike-Slip Fault Zone of Eastern Jamaica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.; King, W.; Demets, C.; Wiggins-Grandison, M.; Benford, B.

    2008-12-01

    At the longitude of Jamaica, Caribbean (Carib)-North America (Noam) plate motion of 19 ± 2 mm/a is carried by two parallel, left-lateral strike-slip faults, the Oriente fault zone, immediately south of Cuba, and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ), which lies 100-150 km further south. It has been postulated that the lithosphere between these faults constitutes an independent Gonave microplate that has formed in response to the ongoing collision between the leading edge of Carib in Hispaniola and the Bahama carbonate platform. GPS measurements in Jamaica and Hispanola is supportive of the microplate hypothesis and indicates that roughly half of Carib-Noam plate motion (8-14 mm/a) is carried by the EPGFZ of southern Hispaniola and eastern Jamaica. This study applies geomorphic and paleoseismic methods as a direct test of the activity and amount of microplate motion carried on the Plantain Garden fault segment of eastern Hispaniola and how this motion is distributed across a large restraining bend that has formed the island of Jamaica since the late Miocene. The EPFZ curves gently to the northeast and forming a steep mountain front to the Blue Mountains restraining bend with elevations up to 2200 m. Geomorphic fault-related features along the mountain front fault zone include left-laterally deflected rivers and streams, but no small scale features indicative of Holocene activity. River and stream deflections range from 0.1 to 0.5 km. We identified and trenched the most active trace of the mountain front fault at the Morant River where the fault is characterized by a 1.5-m-wide sub-vertical fault zone juxtaposing sheared alluvium and fault Cretaceous basement rocks This section is overlain by a 6-m-thick fluvial terrace. Trenching in the unfaulted terrace immediately overlying the fault trace revealed radiocarbon and OSL ages ranging from 20 to 21 ka that are consistent with a prominent unfaulted alluvial fan along the projection of this fault 1.5 km to

  14. Strike-slip faulting, rotation, and along-strike extension in the Kopeh Dagh mountains, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Jackson, J.; Walker, R.; Gheitanchi, M. R.; Bolourchi, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    The Kopeh Dagh is a linear mountain range separating the shortening in Iran from the stable, flat Turkmenistan shield. In its central part is an array of active right-lateral strike-slip faults that obliquely cut the range and produce offsets of several kilometers in the geomorphology and geological structure. They are responsible for major destructive earthquakes in the 19th and 20th centuries and represent an important seismic hazard for this now-populous region of NE Iran. These strike-slip faults all end in thrusts, revealed by the uplift and incision of late Quaternary river terraces, and do not continue beyond the Atrek river valley, which forms the southern margin of the Kopeh Dagh. The cumulative offset on these strike-slip faults, and their associated rotation about vertical axes, can account for ~ 60~km of N-S shortening. This value is similar to the Late Quaternary N-S right-lateral shear between central Iran and Afghanistan, which must be accommodated in NE Iran. The strike-slip faults also require ~ 30~km of along-strike extension of the Kopeh Dagh, which is taken up by the westward component of motion between the South Caspian Basin and both Eurasia and central Iran. It is probable that these motions occurred over the last ~ 10~Ma.

  15. Strike-slip faulting, rotation, and along-strike elongation in the Kopeh Dagh mountains, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, James; Jackson, James; Walker, Richard; Reza Gheitanchi, Mohammad; Javad Bolourchi, Mohammad

    2006-09-01

    The Kopeh Dagh is a linear mountain range separating the shortening in Iran from the stable, flat Turkmenistan platform. In its central part is an array of active right-lateral strike-slip faults that obliquely cut the range and produce offsets of several kilometres in the geomorphology and geological structure. They are responsible for major destructive earthquakes in the 19th and 20th centuries and represent an important seismic hazard for this now-populous region of NE Iran. These strike-slip faults all end in thrusts, revealed by the uplift and incision of Late Quaternary river terraces, and do not continue beyond the Atrak river valley, which forms the southern margin of the Kopeh Dagh. The cumulative offset on these strike-slip faults, and their associated rotation about vertical axes, can account for ~60 km of N-S shortening. This value is similar to estimates of the Late Quaternary N-S right-lateral shear between central Iran and Afghanistan, which must be accommodated in NE Iran. The strike-slip faults also require ~30 km of along-strike extension of the Kopeh Dagh, which is taken up by the westward component of motion between the South Caspian Basin and both Eurasia and Central Iran. It is probable that these motions occurred over the last ~10 Ma.

  16. Hairpin river loops and slip-sense inversion on southeast Asian strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacassin, Robin; Replumaz, Anne; Hervé Leloup, P.

    1998-08-01

    In the Golden Triangle region of southeast Asia (northern Thailand, Laos and Burma, southern Yunnan), the Mekong, Salween, and neighboring rivers show hairpin geometries where they cross active strike-slip faults. Restoration of young, left-lateral offsets of these rivers leaves residual right-lateral bends of many kilometers. We interpret these hairpins as evidence of late Cenozoic slip-sense inversion on these faults, about 5 to 20 Ma. Near the Red River fault, stress field and slip-sense inversion occurred ca. 5 Ma. This implies that the present course of these large rivers has existed for at least several million years. Pliocene Quaternary slip rates, possibly on the order of 1 mm/yr, are inferred on each of the strike-slip faults of the Golden Triangle.

  17. Active strike-slip faulting history inferred from offsets of topographic features and basement rocks: a case study of the Arima Takatsuki Tectonic Line, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2002-01-01

    Geological, geomorphological and geophysical data have been used to determine the total displacement, slip rates and age of formation of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) in southwest Japan. The ATTL is an ENE-WSW-trending dextral strike-slip fault zone that extends for about 60 km from northwest of the Rokko Mountains to southwest of the Kyoto Basin. The ATTL marks a distinct topographic boundary between mountainous regions and basin regions. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as systematically-deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps, are recognized along the ATTL. The Quaternary drainage system shows progressive displacement along the fault traces: the greater the magnitude of stream channel, the larger the amount of offset. The maximum dextral deflection of stream channels is 600-700 m. The field data and detailed topographic analyses, however, show that pre-Neogene basement rocks on both sides of the ATTL are displaced by about 16-18 km dextrally and pre-Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains are also offset 16-17 km in dextral along the ATTL. This suggests that the ATTL formed in the period between the development of the pre-Mio-Pliocene peneplains and deflection of the Quaternary stream channels. The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence presented in this study indicates that (1) the ATTL formed after the mid-Miocene, (2) the ATTL has moved as a dextral strike-slip fault with minor vertical component since its formation to late Holocene and (3) the ATTL is presently active with dextral slip rates of 1-3 mm/year and a vertical component of >0.3 mm/year. The formation of the ATTL was probably related to the opening of the Japan Sea, which is the dominant tectonic event around Japan since mid-Miocene. The case study of the ATTL provides insight into understanding the tectonic history and relationship between tectonic landforms and structures in active strike-slip faults.

  18. Distribution of strike-slip faults on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppa, Gregory; Greenberg, Richard; Tufts, B. Randall; Geissler, Paul; Phillips, Cynthia; Milazzo, Moses

    2000-09-01

    Study of four different regions on Europa imaged by the Galileo spacecraft during its first 15 orbits has revealed 117 strike-slip faults. Europa appears to form preferentially right-lateral faults in the southern hemisphere and left-lateral faults in the northern hemisphere. This observation is consistent with a model where diurnal tides due to orbital eccentricity drive strike-slip motion through a process of ``walking,'' in which faults open and close out of phase with alternating right-and left-lateral shear. Lineaments that record both left-and right-lateral motion (e.g., Agave Linea) may record the accommodation of compression in nearby chaotic zones. Nearly all identified strike-slip faults were associated with double ridges or bands, and few were detected along ridgeless cracks. Thus the depth of cracks without ridges does not appear to have penetrated to the low-viscosity decoupling layer, required for diurnal displacement, but cracks that have developed ridges do extend down to such a level. This result supports a model for ridge formation that requires cracks to penetrate to a decoupling layer, such as a liquid water ocean.

  19. Strike-slip faulting at Thebes Gap, Missouri and Illinois: Implications for New Madrid tectonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard W.; Schultz, Art

    1994-04-01

    Numerous NNE and NE striking strike-slip faults and associated normal faults, folds, and transtensional grabens occur in the Thebes Gap area of Missouri and Illinois. These structures developed along the northwestern margin of the buried Reelfoot rift of Precambrian-Cambrian age at the northern edge of the Mississippi embayment. They have had a long-lived and complex structural history. This is an area of recent moderate seismicity, approximately 45 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that these faults were active during the Middle Ordovician. They were subsequently reactivated between the Early Devonian and Late Cretaceous, probably in response to both the Acadian and Ouachita orogenies. Deformation during this period was characterized by strongly faulted and folded Ordovician through Devonian rocks. In places, these deformed rocks are overlain with angular unconformity by undeformed Cretaceous strata. Fault motion is interpreted as dominantly strike slip. A still younger period of reactivation involved Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic formations as young as the Miocene or Pliocene Mounds Gravel. These formations have experienced both minor high-angle normal faulting and subsequent major, right-lateral strike-slip faulting. En echelon north-south folds, ENE striking normal faults, regional fracture patterns, and drag folds indicate the right-lateral motion for this major episode of faulting which predates deposition of Quaternary loess. Several nondefinitive lines of evidence suggest Quaternary faulting. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as recent seismicity and proximity, clearly suggest a structural relationship between deformation at Thebes Gap and tectonism associated with the New Madrid area.

  20. Strike-slip faulting at Thebes Gap, Missouri and Illinois; implications for New Madrid tectonism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Richard W.; Schultz, Art

    1994-01-01

    Numerous NNE and NE striking strike-slip faults and associated normal faults, folds, and transtensional grabens occur in the Thebes Gap area of Missouri and Illinois. These structures developed along the northwestern margin of the buried Reelfoot rift of Precambrian-Cambrian age at the northern edge of the Mississippi embayment. They have had a long-lived and complex structural history. This is an area of recent moderate seismicity, approximately 45 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that these faults were active during the Middle Ordovician. They were subsequently reactivated between the Early Devonian and Late Cretaceous, probably in response to both the Acadian and Ouachita orogenies. Deformation during this period was characterized by strongly faulted and folded Ordovician through Devonian rocks. In places, these deformed rocks are overlain with angular unconformity by undeformed Cretaceous strata. Fault motion is interpreted as dominantly strike slip. A still younger period of reactivation involved Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic formations as young as the Miocene or Pliocene Mounds Gravel. These formations have experienced both minor high-angle normal faulting and subsequent major, right-lateral strike-slip faulting. En echelon north-south folds, ENE striking normal faults, regional fracture patterns, and drag folds indicate the right-lateral motion for this major episode of faulting which predates deposition of Quaternary loess. Several nondefinitive lines of evidence suggest Quaternary faulting. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as recent seismicity and proximity, clearly suggest a structural relationship between deformation at Thebes Gap and tectonism associated with the New Madrid area.

  1. Termination of major strike-slip faults against thrust faults in a syntaxis, as interpreted from landsat images

    SciTech Connect

    Iranpanah, A.

    1988-01-01

    The north to northeast-striking Minab fault (Zendan fault) in western Makran, Iran, is interpreted as an intracontinental transform structure that separates, along its length, the Zagros foldbelt from the Makran active trench-arc system. The 200-km long fault has a right-lateral strike-slip component and is terminated at its northern end by the north-northwest and northwest-striking Zagros main thrust. The Minab transform zone delimits the western margin of the Makran convergence zone where an oceanic part of the Afro-Arabian lithosphere is being subducted beneath the Lut and Afghan microplates. A northern extension of the Minab transform zone terminates at an internal convergence boundary within the Bandar Abbas-Minab syntaxis. The Minab transform fault consists of a zone of generally north-northwest-trending thombic conjugate strike-slip faults. The pattern of faulting for the Minab strike-slip fault zone, when traced over the entire area on the Landsat image, shows that areas with rhombic sets of conjugate strike-slip faults are separated by a few areas showing only extensional zones. This is compatible with the traditionally idealized reverse-S pattern for the strike-slip faults reported from the United States Basin and Range province. The mechanical explanation for the rhombic pattern of the fault system is consistent with the same pattern and motion as currently exists in the Makran accretionary belt. The origin of the Bandar Abbas-Minab syntaxis is believed to be related to convergence between the Afro-Arabian plate and the Lut and Afghan microplates. The convergence zone is a well-developed trench-arc gap. The western edge of this trench-arc system has been dragged to the north along the Minab dextral fault zone. This zone, which started developing in the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene, is directly responsible for the development of the Bandar Abbas-Minab syntaxis.

  2. Cenozoic geodynamics of the Ross Sea region, Antarctica: Crustal extension, intraplate strike-slip faulting, and tectonic inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvini, Francesco; Brancolini, Giuliano; Busetti, Martina; Storti, Fabrizio; Mazzarini, Francesco; Coren, Franco

    1997-11-01

    An integrated study of onshore and offshore geology of the Ross Sea region (namely, Victoria Land, north of Ross Island, and the Ross Sea, Antarctica) has revealed a complex, post-Eocene tectonic framework. Regional NW-SE right-lateral, strike-slip faults are the outstanding feature of this framework and overprint an older Mesozoic extensional event, responsible for formation of N-S basins in the Ross Sea. The Cenozoic framework includes kinematic deformation and reactivation along the NW-SE faults, including formation of pull-apart basins, both positive and negative flower structures, and push-up ridges. N-S extensional faults are well developed between NW-SE faults and indicate E-W extension during the Cenozoic, produced by the NW-SE right-lateral strike-slip motion together with regional crustal extension. NNW-SSE compression, induced by the right-lateral, strike-slip kinematics, is indicated by locally inverted NE-SW faults and basins. The evolution, geometry, and location of the Rennick Graben and the Lanterman Range fit well into this model. Variations in the deformational style across the region can be linked to corresponding variations in the bulk crustal rheology, from brittle behavior in the west, to ductile deformation (at subseismic-scale resolution) near the Eastern Basin. A semibrittle region that favors N-S clustering of Cenozoic magmatic activity lies in between. In this region, Cenozoic volcanoes develop at the intersections of the NW-SE and the major N-S faults. The NW-SE faults cut almost continually from the Ross Sea to East Antarctica through lithospheric sectors with different rheology and thickness. At least two of the NW-SE faults correspond to older Paleozoic terrane boundaries in northern Victoria Land. The NW-SE faults link in the Southern Ocean with major transform faults related to the plate motions of Australia, New Zealand, and Antarctica.

  3. Actively evolving microplate formation by oblique collision and sideways motion along strike-slip faults: An example from the northeastern Caribbean plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taylor, F. W.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Ku, Teh-Lung

    1995-06-01

    The pattern of folding, faulting, and late Quaternary coral-reef uplift rates in western and central Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) suggest that the elongate Gonave microplate, a 190,000-km 2 area of the northeastern Caribbean plate, is in the process of shearing off the Caribbean plate and accreting to the North American plate. Late Cenozoic transpression between the southeastern Bahama Platform and the Caribbean plate in Hispaniola has inhibited the eastward motion of the northeastern corner of the plate. Transpression is manifested in western and central Hispaniola by the formation of regional scale folds that correspond to present-day, anticlinal topographic mountain chains continuous with offshore anticlinal ridges. Areas of most rapid Quaternary uplift determined from onland coral reefs 125 ka and younger, coincide with the axial traces of these folds. Offshore data suggest recent folding and faulting of the seafloor. Onshore reef data do not conclusively require late Quaternary folding, but demonstrate that tectonic uplift rates of the axial areas of the anticlines decrease from the Northwest Peninsula of Haiti (0.37 mm/yr) to to the central part of the coast of western Haiti (0.19 mm/yr) to the south-central part of western Haiti (0 mm/yr). Formation of the 1200-km-long Enriquillo-Plantain Garden-Walton fault zone as a 'bypass' strike-slip fault has isolated the southern edge of the Gonave microplate and is allowing continued, unimpeded eastward motion of a smaller Caribbean plate past the zone of late Neogene convergence and Quaternary uplift of coral reefs in Hispaniola. Offshore seismic reflection data from the Jamaica Passage, the marine strait separating Jamaica and Haiti, show that the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone forms a narrow but deep, active fault-bounded trough beneath the passage. The active fault is continuous with active faults mapped onshore in western Haiti and eastern Jamaica; the bathymetric deep is present because the

  4. Co-seismic strike-slip fault displacement determined from push-up structures: the Selsund Fault case, South Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelier, Jacques; Bergerat, Françoise; Bellou, Magalie; Homberg, Catherine

    2004-04-01

    We analysed push-up structures along the Selsund Fault, a N-S right-lateral strike-slip fault activated during the 1912 earthquake in the South Iceland Seismic Zone. Volume changes and syn-tectonic collapse affected push-ups during the earthquake, followed by post-seismic gravitational sagging. To determine the push-up shortening, and hence the strike-slip fault motion, we define a virtual push-up structure, without volume change and collapse, and we compare it with the present-day configuration. Whereas length comparisons are subject to errors, volumetric analysis allows determination of shortening through evaluation of the thickness of the deformed layer affected by the push-ups. We determine a co-seismic peak displacement of 2.4 m along the rupture trace. This value is consistent with the magnitude 7 of the earthquake, based on empirical relationships. Neglecting volume changes and collapse effects gives underestimated displacement. The new method for analysing push-up structures thus allows better determination of magnitudes of ancient earthquakes along strike-slip faults.

  5. Reworking of structural inheritance at strike-slip restraining-bends: templates from sandbox analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, Yago; Storti, Fabrizio; Cavozzi, Cristian; Magistroni, Corrado; Meda, Marco; Piero Righetti, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    master strike-slip fault zone, antithetic shear zones form and enhance dextral escape of fault-bounded compartments. The intermediate case (30°) shows the interaction of both left-lateral synthetic and right-lateral antithetic shearing. Comparison with natural prototypes support the effectiveness of our experimental results.

  6. Structural Evolution of the Central Venezuelan Andes: Changes From Compression to Strike-slip and Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervouet, Y.; Dhont, D.; Backe, G.

    2006-12-01

    The Venezuelan Andes form a N50°E-trending belt extending from the colombian border in the SW to the Caribbean sea in the NE. The belt is 100 km wide and its highest summits reach 5000 m in its central part. Uplift of the belt is a consequence of the relative convergence between the triangular-shaped Maracaibo crustal block on the west and the Guyana shield belonging to South America. The Maracaibo block is cut by a series of strike-slip faults separating several crustal units. Among these, the easternmost Trujillo triangular block is limited on the west by the N-S left-lateral Valera fault and on the south-east by the NE-trending right-lateral Bocono fault. Our methodology, based on the analysis of radar satellite and digital elevation model imagery and implemented by structural field work and the compilation of seismotectonic data, presents a new understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Venezuelan Andes during the Neogene-Quaternary. We have characterized three stages of deformation. The first, Mio-Pliocene in age, corresponds to the NW-SE Andean compression responsible for the uplift of the Venezuelan Andes. The second tectonic stage is consitent with a strike-slip regime of deformation marked by shearing along the Bocono and Valera faults and hence individualizing the Trujillo block, which has been cut into two smaller triangular wedges. This strike-slip faulting- dominated compressional-extensional tectonic regime started at some point between the Pliocene and the Quaternary and allowed the Trujillo crustal block to move towards the NE. The third stage of deformation corresponds to extension in the Trujillo block and is still active today. The present-day distribution of the deformation in the Venezuelan Andes is consistent with strain partitioning. While compression is restricted on both flanks of the belt, strike-slip and extension occurs in the central part of the mountain range. Extension is associated with the motion of crustal blocks moving

  7. Water generation and transport below Europa's strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousová, Klára; Souček, Ondřej; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gaël.; Čadek, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa has a very young surface with the abundance of unique terrains that indicate recent endogenic activity. Morphological models as well as spectral observations suggest that it might possess shallow lenses of liquid water within its outer ice shell. Here we investigate the generation and possible accumulation of liquid water below the tidally activated strike-slip faults using a numerical model of two-phase ice-water mixture in two-dimensional Cartesian geometry. Our results suggest that generation of shallow partially molten regions underneath Europa's active strike-slip faults is possible, but their lifetime is constrained by the formation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities due to the negative buoyancy of the melt. Once formed, typically within a few million years, these instabilities efficiently transport the meltwater through the shell. Consequently, the maximum water content in the partially molten regions never exceeds 10% which challenges their possible detection by future exploration mission.

  8. Subsidence and strike-slip tectonism of the upper continental slope off Manzanillo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandy, William L.; Michaud, François; Bourgois, Jacques; Calmus, Thierry; Dyment, Jérôme; Mortera-Gutiérrez, Carlos A.; Ortega-Ramírez, Jose; Pontoise, Bernard; Royer, Jean-Yves; Sichler, Bertrand; Sosson, Marc; Rebolledo-Vieyra, Mario; Bigot-Cormier, Florence; Díaz-Molina, Oscar; Hurtado-Artunduaga, Angel D.; Pardo-Castro, Guillermo; Trouillard-Perrot, Corrine

    2005-04-01

    The direction of convergence between the Rivera and North American plates becomes progressively more oblique (in a counter-clockwise sense as measured relative to the trench-normal direction) northwestward along the Jalisco subduction zone. By analogy to other subduction zones, the forces resulting from this distribution of convergence directions are expected to produce a NW moving, fore-arc sliver and a NW-SE stretching of the fore-arc area. Also, a series of roughly arc parallel strike-slip faults may form in the fore-arc area, both onshore and offshore, as is observed in the Aleutian arc. In the Jalisco subduction zone, the Jalisco block has been proposed to represent such a fore-arc sliver. However, this proposal has encountered one major problem. Namely, right-lateral strike-slip faulting within the fore-arc sliver, and between the fore-arc sliver and the North American plate, should be observed. However, evidence for the expected right-lateral strike-slip faulting is sparse. Some evidence for right-lateral strike-slip faulting along the Jalisco block-North American plate boundary (the Tepic-Zacoalco rift system) has been reported, although some disagreement exists. Right-lateral strike-slip faulting has also been reported within the interior of the Jalisco block and in the southern Colima rift, which forms the SE boundary of the Jalisco block. Threefold, multi-channel seismic reflection data were collected in the offshore area of the Jalisco subduction zone off Manzanillo in April 2002 during the FAMEX campaign of the N/O L'Atalante. These data provide additional evidence for recent strike-slip motion within the fore-arc region of the Jalisco subduction zone. This faulting offsets right-laterally a prominent horst block within the southern Colima rift, from which we conclude that the sense of motion along the faulting is dextral. These data also provide additional evidence for recent subsidence within the area offshore of Manzanillo, as has been proposed.

  9. Subsidence and Strike-slip Tectonism of the Upper Continental Slope off Manzanillo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandy, W. L.; Michaud, F.; Bourgois, J.; Calmus, T.; Dyment, J.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Ortega-Ramirez, J.; Pontoise, B.; Royer, J.; Sichler, B.; Sosson, M.

    2004-12-01

    The direction of convergence between the Rivera and North American plates becomes progressively more oblique (in a counter-clockwise sense as measured relative to the trench-normal direction) northwestward along the Jalisco subduction zone. By analogy to other subduction zones, the forces resulting from this distribution of convergence directions are expected to produce a NW moving, fore-arc sliver and a NW-SE stretching of the fore-arc area. Also, a series of roughly arc parallel strike slip faults may form in the fore-arc area, both onshore and offshore, as is observed in the Aleutian arc. In the Jalisco subduction zone, the Jalisco block has been proposed to represent such a fore-arc sliver. However, this proposal has encountered one major problem. Namely, right-lateral strike slip faulting within the fore-arc sliver, and between the fore-arc sliver and the North American plate, should be observed. However, evidence for the expected right-lateral strike slip faulting is sparse. Some evidence for right-lateral strike-slip faulting along the Jalisco block-North American plate boundary (the Tepic-Zacoalco rift system) has been reported, although some disagreement exists. Right-lateral strike-slip faulting has also been reported within the interior of the Jalisco block and in the southern Colima rift, which forms the SE boundary of the Jalisco block. Three-fold, multi-channel seismic reflection data were collected in the offshore area of the Jalisco subduction zone off Manzanillo in April 2002 during the FAMEX campaign of the N/O L'Atalante. These data provide additional evidence for recent strike-slip motion within the fore-arc region of the Jalisco subduction zone. This faulting offsets right-laterally a prominent horst block within the southern Colima rift, from which we conclude that the sense of motion along the faulting is dextral. These data also provide additional evidence for recent subsidence within the area offshore of Manzanillo, as has been proposed.

  10. Offset rivers, drainage spacing and the record of strike-slip faulting: The Kuh Banan Fault, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Faye; Allen, Mark B.

    2012-03-01

    This study concerns the ways in which rivers can record part, but not necessarily all, of strike-slip fault offset. The focus is the active right-lateral Kuh Banan Fault in eastern Iran, within the Arabia-Eurasia collision. Plate convergence has caused thrust and strike-slip faulting across SW Asia. The active slip rate of the Kuh Banan Fault is ~ 1-2 mm/yr. Total displacement is ~ 5-7 km, as determined from offset geological markers and the length of a pull-apart basin. A component of thrusting has generated ~ 1 km of relief, which preserves the offset of rivers displaced laterally by the strike-slip motion. Ridge half-widths (W), and river outlet spacings along the fault (S) are related by the drainage spacing parameter R, where R = W/S. Published data for older, larger mountain ranges have extremely characteristic drainage spacing (R = 2.1). Drainage spacing along the Kuh Banan Fault has a mean value of 1.8 and is much more variable (R = 1.1-3.1), due to local structural complexities which have influenced river courses. Most river offsets along the Kuh Banan Fault are small (< 100 m); the maximum observed offset (~ 3.5 km) is smaller than the total fault displacement of at least ~ 5 km. The most likely explanation for this discrepancy is stream capture, whereby reaches of rivers downstream of the fault are juxtaposed by fault slip against rivers upstream of the fault. In this way, offset of individual rivers is repeatedly reset to zero. Stream capture is influenced by outlet spacing such that the largest rivers can accumulate large offsets, while smaller, closely spaced rivers are captured more often, inhibiting large offsets. The mean offset of the main rivers along the Kuh Banan Fault is one-third their mean drainage spacing, indicating that the spacing of smaller rivers controls the size of the maximum offset.

  11. Suppression of strike-slip fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    In orogens elongated parallel to a great circle about the Euler pole for the two bounding plates, theory requires simple-shear deformation in the form of distributed deformation or velocity discontinuities across strike-slip faults. This type of deformation, however, does not develop at all plate boundaries requiring toroidal motion. Using the global plate boundary model, PB2002 [Bird, 2003], as the basis for identifying areas where expected simple-shear deformation is absent or underdeveloped, it was also possible to identify two potential causes for this behavior: (1) the presence of extensive fracturing at right angles to the shear plane and (2) regional cover of flood basalts or andesites with columnar joints. To test this hypothesis, a new plane-stress finite-strain model was developed to study the effects of such pre-existing structures on the development of simple shear in a clay cake. A homogenous kaolinite-water mixture was poured into a deforming parallelogram box and partially dried to allow for brittle and plastic deformation at and below the surface of the clay, respectively. This was floated on a dense fluid foundation, effectively removing basal friction, and driven by a motor in a sinistral direction from the sides of the box. Control experiments produced classic Riedel model fault assemblages and discrete, through-going primary deformation zones (PDZs); experiments with pre-existing structures developed the same, though subdued and distributed, fault assemblages but did not develop through-going PDZs. Although formation of strike-slip faults was underdeveloped at the surface in clay with pre-existing structures, offset within the clay cake (measured, with respect to a fixed point, by markers on the clay surface) as a fraction of total offset of the box was consistently larger than that of the control experiments. This suggests that while the extent of surface faulting was lessened in clay with pre-existing structures, slip was still occurring at

  12. Shell Tectonics: A Mechanical Model for Strike-slip Displacement on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Wurman, Gilead; Huff, Eric M.; Manga, Michael; Hurford, Terry A.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new mechanical model for producing tidally-driven strike-slip displacement along preexisting faults on Europa, which we call shell tectonics. This model differs from previous models of strike-slip on icy satellites by incorporating a Coulomb failure criterion, approximating a viscoelastic rheology, determining the slip direction based on the gradient of the tidal shear stress rather than its sign, and quantitatively determining the net offset over many orbits. This model allows us to predict the direction of net displacement along faults and determine relative accumulation rate of displacement. To test the shell tectonics model, we generate global predictions of slip direction and compare them with the observed global pattern of strike-slip displacement on Europa in which left-lateral faults dominate far north of the equator, right-lateral faults dominate in the far south, and near-equatorial regions display a mixture of both types of faults. The shell tectonics model reproduces this global pattern. Incorporating a small obliquity into calculations of tidal stresses, which are used as inputs to the shell tectonics model, can also explain regional differences in strike-slip fault populations. We also discuss implications for fault azimuths, fault depth, and Europa's tectonic history.

  13. Origin and structure of major orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    The formation of major exhumed strike-slip faults represents one of the most important dynamic processes affecting the evolution of the Earth's lithosphere and surface. Detailed models of the potential initiation and properties and architecture of orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip faults and how these relate to exhumation are rare. In this study, we deal with key properties controlling the development of major exhumed strike-slip fault systems, which are equivalent to the deep crustal sections of active across fault zones. We also propose two dominant processes for the initiation of orogen-scale exhumed strike-slip faults: (1) pluton-controlled and (2) metamorphic core complex-controlled strike-slip faults. In these tectonic settings, the initiation of faults occurs by rheological weakening along hot-to-cool contacts and guides the overall displacement and ultimate exhumation. These processes result in a specific thermal and structural architecture of such faults. These types of strike-slip dominated fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust during various stages of faulting. The high variety of distinctive fault rocks is a potential evidence for recognition of these types of strike-slip faults. Exhumation of mylonitic rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such reverse oblique-slip strike-slip faults, implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion during exhumation. Some orogen-scale strike-slip faults nucleate and initiate along rheologically weak zones, e.g. at granite intrusions, zones of low-strength minerals, thermally weakened crust due to ascending fluids, and lateral borders of hot metamorphic core complexes. A further mechanism is the juxtaposition of mechanically strong mantle lithosphere to hot asthenosphere in continental transform faults (e.g., San

  14. Manifestations of Strike-Slip Faulting on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeRemer, Lindsay C.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2003-01-01

    Voyager images of Ganymede suggested that strike-slip faulting may have taken place [1, 2], but the role of this process in shaping grooved terrain was uncertain. In Galileo high-resolution images of Ganymede's surface, we recognize three signature features of strike-slip faulting: (1) en echelon structures, (2) strike-slip duplexes, and (3) offset preexisting features. We have undertaken a study to recognize and map these features, and identify any morphological progressions of strike-slip features. This will allow a better understanding of the structural history of Ganymede, and the formation and evolution of grooved terrain.

  15. Shell tectonics: A mechanical model for strike-slip displacement on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoden, A.; Wurman, G.; Manga, M.; Hurford, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a new model for producing strike-slip displacement on Europa, which we call shell tectonics. We invoke general principles of stress and failure along faults and include the influence of Europa’s elastic shell when determining the response of faults to periodic tidal stress. We apply a Coulomb failure criterion to determine when and if failure will occur and adopt a linear elastic model for slip and stress release to determine the direction of net offsets along pre-existing faults. Our model reproduces the global-scale strike-slip fault pattern observed on Europa in which left-lateral faults dominate far north of the equator, right-lateral faults do so in the far south, and near-equatorial regions display a mixture of both types of faults. One of the most compelling attributes of the tidal walking model for strike-slip formation on Europa (Hoppa et al., 1999) is its ability to generate this global pattern. The shell tectonics model includes a more physical treatment of fault mechanics than tidal walking and makes a prediction of slip direction along faults by computing the net slip over several orbits. Also, several assumptions made in the tidal walking model are incorporated explicitly in the shell tectonics model. A strike-slip formation model with application to Enceladus has also been proposed (Smith-Konter & Pappalardo, 2008) that includes a mechanical treatment of faults but does not incorporate the effects of the elastic shell. Since this model should be equally applicable to Europa, we present predictions made using this plate-tectonics model along with our shell tectonics predictions. We find that a model neglecting the elastic shell effects does not agree as well with the observations. In addition to global predictions of slip direction, shell tectonics provides an estimate of the relative growth rates of faults and implications for seismicity and heating along faults.

  16. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2017-03-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to 450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  17. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to ~450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  18. Exhumation and continental strike-slip fault systems: Introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeske, S.M.; Till, A.B.; Foster, D.A.; Sample, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Metamorphic rocks adjacent to and within strike-slip faultsystems occur in a wide range of tectonic settings. Detailed studies show that for a number of these locales a significant part of the exhumation occurred during strike-slip fault motion, but the specific processes involved are often cryptic. Although some sites share characteristic features, such as metamorphic rocks exhumed in extensional step-overs within overall transtensional systems, no one common theme emerges from all of the studies. Our understanding of the variables that control continental strike-slip faults' interaction with mid- to lower-crustal structures is still primitive.

  19. Strike-slip and extrusion tectonics of the Greater Caucasus-Kopetdagh region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    In the Paleogene-Early Miocene, the areas of the modern Greater Caucasus and Kopetdagh were occupied by marginal seas (parts of the Paratethys intracontinental sea) inheriting the Cretaceous back-arc basins. In the Early Miocene, a collisional compression of the seas began at the time when the Arabian plate detached from Africa to move northward. The compression proceeded in a good accordance with the Arabia movement that was manifested in a general synchroneity of the Late Alpine orogenies in the Caucasus and Kopetdagh with the rifting and spreading phases in the Aden Gulf and the Red Sea. The earliest orogeny was the Styrian one of the terminal Early Miocene. It corresponds to the initial stage of the rift opening and was mostly pronounced in the east, in Kopetdagh and East Iran, where a recent structure has been formed by the initial Middle Miocene. In the Greater Caucasus, the Styrian deformations occurred in its central part only (i.e., in front of the Arabian plate northern tip) where the main Caucasian thrusts and conjugate asymmetrical megaanticline of the Central Caucasus were formed. An essential feature of the earliest, Styrian, structure of the whole Caucasus-Kopetdagh region was a series of regional right-lateral strike-slip faults. In the Kopetdagh, the strike-slips have no submeridional but northwestern direction although they occurred in the northern continuation of the submeridional right-lateral strike-slip faults framing the Lut block. In the Caucasus, they became even sublatitudinal, in parallel with the North Anatolian fault, thus constituting a single domain with the latter. So, the right-lateral strike-slip faults of East Iran, Kopetdagh, and the Caucasus compose an extensive arc convex to the north and appeared probably as a result of the right-lateral shear caused by the known counterclockwise rotation of the Arabian lithospheric plate. The Middle Miocene was characterized by a tectonic pause both in the Red Sea-Aden rift system and in the

  20. Strike-slip faulting in a foreland fold-thrust belt: The Kalabaugh fault and western Salt range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, James W.; Khan, Shahid Hasan

    1990-10-01

    The 120-km-long Kalabagh fault zone is formed by transpressive right-lateral strike-slip along the western Salt Range-Potwar Plateau allochthon in northern Pakistan. Lateral ramping from a decollement thrust along an Eocambrian evaporite layer produced NNW- to NW-trending folds and NE- to N-dipping thrust faults in a topographically emergent zone up to 10 km wide. Piercing points along the main Kalabagh fault indicate 12-14 km of middle to late Quaternary right-lateral offset. The older right-lateral Surghar fault displaced axes of frontal folds of the eastern Surghar Range by 4-5 km. Total displacement is reduced northward in the Kalabagh fault zone where north-dipping thrust faults splay to the west. Cumulative right-slip offset in the Kalabagh fault zone is comparable to displacement along the Salt Range frontal thrust, at a minimum average displacement rate of 7-10 mm/year near the Indus River since 2 Ma. In the basement, which dips 2-3° north along the Kalabagh fault, a NNW-trending discontinuous ridge beneath the lateral ramp is interpreted from residual gravity anomalies. The eastern flank of this basement ridge probably ramped allochthonous strata upward from a depth of over 5 km in the Kalabagh fault zone. Kalabagh faulting displaced and uplifted Holocene terrace deposits and shifted the course of the Indus River eastward. A high slip rate and associated seismicity indicate that the Kalabagh fault zone should be considered active and capable of earthquakes.

  1. Transpressional segment boundaries in strike-slip fault systems offshore southern California: Implications for fluid expulsion and cold seep habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Jillian M.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Pasulka, Alexis L.; Dawson, Katherine S.; Case, David H.; Frieder, Christina A.; Levin, Lisa A.; Driscoll, Neal W.

    2015-05-01

    The importance of tectonics and fluid flow in controlling cold seep habitats has long been appreciated at convergent margins but remains poorly understood in strike-slip systems. Here we present geophysical, geochemical, and biological data from an active methane seep offshore from Del Mar, California, in the inner California borderlands (ICB). The location of this seep appears controlled by localized transpression associated with a step in the San Diego Trough fault zone and provides an opportunity to examine the interplay between fluid expulsion and restraining step overs along strike-slip fault systems. These segment boundaries may have important controls on seep locations in the ICB and other margins characterized by strike-slip faulting (e.g., Greece, Sea of Marmara, and Caribbean). The strike-slip fault systems offshore southern California appear to have a limited distribution of seep sites compared to a wider distribution at convergent plate boundaries, which may influence seep habitat diversity and connectivity.

  2. Human trace fear conditioning: right-lateralized cortical activity supports trace-interval processes.

    PubMed

    Haritha, Abhishek T; Wood, Kimberly H; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W; Knight, David C

    2013-06-01

    Pavlovian conditioning requires the convergence and simultaneous activation of neural circuitry that supports conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) processes. However, in trace conditioning, the CS and US are separated by a period of time called the trace interval, and thus do not overlap. Therefore, determining brain regions that support associative learning by maintaining a CS representation during the trace interval is an important issue for conditioning research. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research has identified brain regions that support trace-conditioning processes. However, relatively little is known about whether this activity is specific to the trace CS, the trace interval, or both periods of time. The present study was designed to disentangle the hemodynamic response produced by the trace CS from that associated with the trace interval, in order to identify learning-related activation during these distinct components of a trace-conditioning trial. Trace-conditioned activity was observed within dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC, insula, inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and posterior cingulate (PCC). Each of these regions showed learning-related activity during the trace CS, while trace-interval activity was only observed within a subset of these areas (i.e., dorsomedial PFC, PCC, right dorsolateral PFC, right IPL, right superior/middle temporal gyrus, and bilateral insula). Trace-interval activity was greater in right than in left dorsolateral PFC, IPL, and superior/middle temporal gyrus. These findings indicate that components of the prefrontal, cingulate, insular, and parietal cortices support trace-interval processes, as well as suggesting that a right-lateralized fronto-parietal circuit may play a unique role in trace conditioning.

  3. Strike-slip faulting in a foreland fold-thrust belt, western Salt Range, central Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    McDougall, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The N15W-trending Kalabagh fault zone (KFZ) is part of the Himalayan frontal fault (HFF) and is nearly orthogonal to active ENE-trending folds and thrust faults associated with Himalayan convergence. The KFZ extends 20 km north of Kalabagh village on the Indus River (NW Salt Range) before bending to the west along several north-dipping reverse faults. Quaternary low-angle thrust displacement appears to be concentrated at the HFF, especially the Salt Range frontal thrust. Siwalik conglomerate and sandstone cut by the KFZ north of the HFF may be as young as Quaternary, however, late Quaternary faulting has not been documented north of the HFF near Kalabagh village. Evidence of right-lateral strike-slip offset along the KFZ is seen in the field along the NNW-trending western edge of the Salt Range and from there north to Shakardarra village. Focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes show right-slip faulting in basement extending from the southernmost surface trace of the KFZ over 150 km farther south in the Punjab plain. Residual gravity anomalies and the strike of an abrupt change in Bouguer gravity values follow the KFZ along the western Salt Range and farther south. The sedimentary sequence exposed east of the KFZ is thought to be decoupled from basement along a detachment surface underlying much of the Potwar Plateau. West of the KFZ, a similar sedimentary sequence may be more strongly coupled to basement. Detachment surfaces involving major displacement probably ramp upsection, creating relatively complex fold and fault geometry on the west side of the KFZ.

  4. Precarious rock evidence for low near-source accelerations for trans-tensional strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, James N.

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes precarious rock evidence for low ground motions associated with extensional sections of strike-slip faults. Recent evidence from physical and numerical models and data regressions has indicated that ground motion for extensional strike-slip regions may be lower than for strike-slip faults with a large fault-normal tectonic stress component, and for thrust faults in general. Data from compressional strike-slip and thrust earthquakes dominates the database used in most regression curves for ground acceleration, and in the calculation of current probabilistic seismic hazard maps. Therefore, estimates of ground accelerations on these seismic hazard maps may be too high for sites near extensional sections of strike-slip faults. This paper discusses precariously balanced rock data from three areas near extensional sections of strike-slip faulting: (1) the region of the Honey fault, California, with an active Holocene fault, (2) the Red Rock Canyon region of the Garlock fault, near a dilatational step-over, and (3) the region just south of Beaumont, California, near the Hemet dilatational step-over in the San Jacinto fault. These are all active strike-slip faults, with at least a few large earthquakes in the Holocene, and, in the case of the San Jacinto example, historic large earthquakes ( M=7). Thus, the precarious rocks at these sites are evidence of relatively low ground motions associated with extensional strike-slip faulting. The results of this study could be very important in developing more detailed seismic hazard maps in the future.

  5. Structure and deformational character of strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Qidong; Wu, Daning; Zhang, Peizhen; Chen, Shefa

    1986-01-01

    Strike-slip fault zones observed either in the field or in model experiments generally consist of several subparallel faults which make these zones complicated in geometry and kinematics. The geometry of a strike-slip fault or shear zone is dependent on arrangement (pinnate or en echelon), on step (left step or right step), and on the rank )smaller faults within larger faults) of the subparallel fault. The relations and interactions of these three factors create a variety of dynamic circumstances and tectonic settings within the strike-slip fault zones. These include pull-aparts in the release area between subparallel faults, push-ups in the jogs where the subparallel faults overlap, and pivotal movements, or rotation, of single faults along the whole fault zone. Each kind of tectonic setting is in itself characteristic, each setting consists of many subtypes, which are controlled chiefly by the geometric parameters of the subparallel faults. One of the most important phenomena revealed in the field work is two different kinds of evolution of strike-slip fault zones: one is the evolution of a zone with a tensile component, which is related to the growth of rock bridges, and the other, of one with a compressional component, which develops by the destruction of rock bridges. In this paper we discuss, on the basis of recent research on four strike-slip fault zones in China, the essential characteristics of strike-slip faults and the possible causes of the observed structural phenomena. Attention is focussed on the deformation, development, and distribution of horizontal displacements within strike-slip fault zones.

  6. Neotectonics of a subduction/strike-slip transition: the northeastern Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, M.A.; McCann, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Septentrional fault system in the northeastern Dominican Republic marks the zone where the North American-Carribean plate boundary is evolving from subduction to strike-slip motion, and where terranes appear to be forming and migrating laterally in a subduction complex/forearc region. On the Island of Hispaniola, slip vectors are oblique to the strike of the Puerto Rico trench, and oblique subduction thrusts the upper plate over normal seafloor. The offshore geology and seismicity of the northern Caribbean suggest that uplift, broad crustal warping, thrusting, and strike-slip faulting (ie. collisional tectonics) should be present in the northern part of the Dominican Republic. The high topography (>1000m), high levels of seismicity, and large earthquakes support the hypothesis of contemporary deformation in Hispaniola. In this region, the subduction regime dies out toward the west, and deformation is transferred to onshore, oblique-slip faults. As this change in tectonic style has occurred in Neogene to Recent times, we are investigating the modern evolution of a plate boundary. We have already documented: (1) the presence of a strike-slip faulting in the northeastern Dominican Republic; (2) an anomalous push-up structure; and (3) a region of numerous splay faults. In conclusion, recent seismicity suggest a wide zone of deformation and variations in interplate motions near Hispaniola. This island lies at the western limit of active underthrusting and at the eastern limit of onshore faulting, i.e., at an important transition from a subduction to strike-slip regime.

  7. The Hills are Alive: Dynamic Ridges and Valleys in a Strike-Slip Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, A. R.; Tucker, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Strike-slip fault zones have long been known for characteristic landforms such as offset and deflected rivers, linear strike-parallel valleys, and shutter ridges. Despite their common presence, questions remain about the mechanics of how these landforms arise or how their form varies as a function of slip rate, geomorphic process, or material properties. We know even less about what happens far from the fault, in drainage basin headwaters, as a result of strike-slip motion. Here we explore the effects of horizontal fault slip rate, bedrock erodibility, and hillslope diffusivity on river catchments that drain across an active strike-slip fault using the CHILD landscape evolution model. Model calculations demonstrate that lateral fault motion induces a permanent state of landscape disequilibrium brought about by fault offset-generated river lengthening alternating with abrupt shortening due to stream capture. This cycle of shifting drainage patterns and base level change continues until fault motion ceases thus creating a perpetual state of transience unique to strike-slip systems. Our models also make the surprising prediction that, in some cases, hillslope ridges oriented perpendicular to the fault migrate laterally in conjunction with fault motion. Ridge migration happens when slip rate is slow enough and/or diffusion and river incision are fast enough that the hillslopes can respond to the disequilibrium brought about by strike-slip motion. In models with faster slip rates, stronger rocks or less-diffusive hillslopes, ridge mobility is limited or arrested despite the fact that the process of river lengthening and capture continues. Fast-slip cases also develop prominent steep fault-facing hillslope facets proximal to the fault valley and along-strike topographic profiles with reduced local relief between ridges and valleys. Our results demonstrate the dynamic nature of strike-slip landscapes that vary systematically with a ratio of bedrock erodibility (K) and

  8. Global Morphological Mapping of Strike-Slip Structures on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, B. R.; Cameron, M. E.; Seifert, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Collins, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    Many inferences of strike-slip faulting and distributed shear zones on Ganymede suggest that strike-slip tectonism may be important to the structural development of its surface and in the transition from dark to light (grooved) materials. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping Ganymede's multifaceted surface, we identify and map key examples of strike-slip morphologies (en echelon structures, strike-slip duplexes, laterally offset pre-existing features, and possible strained craters) from Galileo and Voyager images. Here we present the current state of these global mapping efforts, with particular emphasis given to complex structures associated with grooved terrain (e.g. Nun Sulci) and terrains transitional from dark to light terrain (e.g. the boundary between Nippur Sulcus and Marius Regio). These results are being synthesized into a global database representing an inferred sense of shear for fractures on Ganymede. This, combined with existing observations of extensional features, is helping to narrow down the range of possible principal stress directions that could have acted at the regional or global scale to produce grooved terrain. Moreover, these data sets, combined with mechanical models of shear failure and global stress sources, are providing constraints for testing possible mechanisms for grooved terrain formation on Ganymede.

  9. How Orogen-scale Exhumed Strike-slip Faults Initiate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Neubauer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Orogen-scale strike-slip faults present one the most important geodynamic processes affecting the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. In specific subtypes, faulting is virtually initiated along hot-to-cool boundaries, e.g. at such of hot granite intrusions or metamorphic core complexes to cool country rocks. Such fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust and are stacked within each other ("telescoping"). Exhumation of rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such strike-slip faults implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion. The hot-to-cool thermal structure across the fault zone significantly influences the physical fault rock properties. One major question is how and where a major strike-slip initiates and further development. Here, we propose a model in which major continental exhumed strike-slip faults potentially evolve along rheologically weak zones such as plutons or margins of metamorphic complexes. As an example, we propose a model for the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, SE Asia, which initiated along the edge of a plutonic belt and evolved in response to India-Asia collision with four tectonic phases.

  10. San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This mosaic of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, about the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault, which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay.

    In a strike-slip fault, two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. Overall motion along the fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the feature's entire length, with a path resembling steps on a staircase crossing zones that have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. The fault's opposite sides can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides and older, individual cracks and ridges broken by its movements.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The red line marks the once active central crack of the fault. The black line outlines the fault zone, including material accumulated in the regions which have been pulled apart.

    Bends in the fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This process created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling-apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled-apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may be filled mostly by sedimentary and eroded material from above.

    One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. Tidal tension

  11. A San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufts, R.; Greenberg, R.; Geissler, P.

    1996-09-01

    Astypalaea Linea, a lineament in the extreme southern hemisphere of Europa, has been found to be a global-scale strike-slip fault, based on a palinspastic reconstruction of landscape on reprojected Voyager 2 images. The fault accommodates 35 km of right-lateral offset and extends at least 810 km - a length comparable to the San Andreas Fault in California. It exhibits familiar strike-slip features including braids and pull-aparts. Straight segments of the fault are concentric about an Euler pole provisionally located at (-48deg , 247.25deg W). Spanning over 29deg from (-60deg ,191deg W) to (-78.5deg , 268.5deg W) Astypalaea Linea is the longest strike-slip fault yet identified on Europa. The fault is consistent with differential stress magnitudes and stress directions predicted for high Europan latitudes due to possible non- synchronous rotation (tidal bulge in its present location) (Greenberg and Weidenschilling, 1984; Helfenstein and Parmentier, 1985). Extension on neighboring gray band Thynia Linea matches the same stress field (Pappalardo and Sullivan, 1996); thus, Astypalaea Linea and Thynia Linea may be part of a south polar deformation zone which acts as a "structural set" (Lucchitta and Soderblom, 1982). Analogous structures may exist at the Europan north pole, although factors such as a possible global structural dichotomy (Lucchitta and Soderblom, 1981) may affect their occurrence. Lateral crustal motion, as implied by the fault, is consistent with a subsurface viscous horizon structurally decoupling the outer layer of the icy Jovian satellite from its interior (e.g. Schenk and McKinnon, 1989).

  12. Strike-slip faulting during the 2014 Bárðarbunga-Holuhraun dike intrusion, central Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ágústsdóttir, Thorbjörg; Woods, Jennifer; Greenfield, Tim; Green, Robert G.; White, Robert S.; Winder, Tom; Brandsdóttir, Bryndís.; Steinthórsson, Sveinbjörn; Soosalu, Heidi

    2016-02-01

    Over a 13 day period magma propagated laterally from the subglacial Bárðarbunga volcano in the northern rift zone, Iceland. It created > 30,000 earthquakes at 5-7 km depth along a 48 km path before erupting on 29 August 2014. The seismicity, which tracked the dike propagation, advanced in short bursts at 0.3-4.7 km/h separated by pauses of up to 81 h. During each surge forward, seismicity behind the dike tip dropped. Moment tensor solutions from the leading edge show exclusively left-lateral strike-slip faulting subparallel to the advancing dike tip, releasing accumulated strain deficit in the brittle layer of the rift zone. Behind the leading edge, both left- and right-lateral strike-slip earthquakes are observed. The lack of non-double-couple earthquakes implies that the dike opening was aseismic.

  13. Structure of the Melajo clay near Arima, Trinidad and strike-slip motion in the El Pilar fault zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, P.; Burke, K.; Wadge, G.

    1985-01-01

    No consensus has yet emerged on the sense, timing and amount of motion in the El Pilar fault zone. As a contribution to the study of this problem, a critical area within the zone in North Central Trinidad has been mapped. On the basis of the mapping, it is concluded that the El Pilar zone has been active in right-lateral strike-slip motion during the Pleistocene. Recognition of structural styles akin to those of the mapped area leads to the suggestion that the El Pilar zone is part of a 300 km wide plate boundary zone extending from the Orinoco delta northward to Grenada. Lateral motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to South America has been suggested to amount to 1900 km in the last 38 Ma. Part of this displacement since the Miocene can be readily accommodated within the broad zone identified here. No one fault system need account for more than a fraction of the total motion and all faults need not be active simultaneously.

  14. Tectonic rotation about the termination of a major strike-slip fault, Marlborough fault system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Andrew P.

    1995-02-01

    The Marlborough fault system comprises a series of major right-lateral strike-slip faults that link the Apline fault to the Hikurangi subduction ozone in the Pacific/Australia plate boundary zone in New Zealand. All of the major active faults of the Marlborough fault system have continuous traces except for the Clarence fault which terminates abruptly near the Ward syncline. Paleomagnetic data from upper Miocene and lower Pliocene sedimentary rocks between the Marlborough faults indicate a consistent post-early Pliocene regional clockwise rotation of about 20 deg. An additional rotation of about 10 deg is evident at many localities near the termination of the Clarence fault. It is proposed that the additional rotation, relative to the rest of the region, is caused by a velocity gradient that likely exists between the active Awatere fault and the termination of the Clarence fault. The existence of such a velocity gradient is consistent with inferences from geodetic strain data which suggest that one-third of the displacement in the Marlborough fault system occurs between the Awatere and Clarence faults. The kinematics of rotation can be modelled by treating the area as a rigid block that pivots about the termination of the Clarence fault. The block rotation model satisfies field contraints on the styles of deformation observed at the boundaries of the block and is consistent with available paleomagnetic and geodetic data.

  15. Intra-arc strike-slip fault exposed at batholithic levels in the southern Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J. ); Saleeby, J.B. )

    1990-03-01

    The Kern Canyon fault is a major north-trending fault that is continuous for a distance of 140 km in the southern Sierra Nevada, California. Previous geologic mapping and geochronological work along the northern third of the fault indicate that dextral offset occurred sometime after 80 Ma and before 3.5 Ma; this offset was interpreted to be the result of Cenozoic basin-and-range extension. Our new results from the central third of the fault (Kernville-Lake Isabella region) indicate an earlier right-lateral movement history, contemporaneous with emplacement of the largest plutons in the Sierra Nevada. The older structure is termed the proto-Kern Canyon fault zone. The Cenozoic fault trace is a narrow zone of brittle deformation, whereas the Cretaceous fault zone is a broad zone of ductile deformation. U-Pb zircon geochronology on plutonic and metavolcanic rocks involved int he ductile deformation, as well as a pluton that postdates ductile deformation, demonstrate that the proto-Kern Canyon fault zone was active at 85 Ma, and may have begun to move as early as 105 Ma. Longitudinal strike-slip faults are common in modern magmatic arcs where convergence is oblique. The proto-Kern Canyon fault zone may have originated in response to a moderate northward component in subduction of the Farallon plate or perhaps a strong northward component for the Kula plate.

  16. Formation and Suppression of Strike-Slip Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, Ivy S.; Bird, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Strike-slip faults are a defining feature of plate tectonics, yet many aspects of their development and evolution remain unresolved. For intact materials and/or regions, a standard sequence of shear development is predicted from physical models and field studies, commencing with the formation of Riedel shears and culminating with the development of a throughgoing fault. However, for materials and/or regions that contain crustal heterogeneities (normal and/or thrust faults, joints, etc.) that predate shear deformation, kinematic evolution of strike-slip faulting is poorly constrained. We present a new plane-stress finite-strain physical analog model developed to investigate primary deformation zone evolution in simple shear, pure strike-slip fault systems in which faults or joints are present before shear initiation. Experimental results suggest that preexisting mechanical discontinuities (faults and/or joints) have a marked effect on the geometry of such systems, causing deflection, lateral distribution, and suppression of shears. A lower limit is placed on shear offset necessary to produce a throughgoing fault in systems containing preexisting structures. Fault zone development observed in these experiments provides new insight for kinematic interpretation of structural data from strike-slip fault zones on Earth, Venus, and other terrestrial bodies.

  17. Strike-slip Faulting On Ganymede, Now And Then

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Cameron, M. E.; DeRemer-Keeney, L. C.; Nimmo, F.

    2012-10-01

    Strike-slip tectonism is important to the structural development of Ganymede’s surface, and in the transition from dark to grooved terrain. Three distinct signatures of strike-slip faulting are recognized [1]: (1) en echelon structures, (2) strike-slip duplexes, and (3) laterally offset pre-existing features. As strike-slip faulting progressed, en echelon fractures (in both dark and grooved terrains) merged to define en echelon swaths, which can become distinct tectonic domains. Three morphological categories of strike-slip “duplexes” (spindle-shaped lensoid regions bounded by strike-slip faults) occur, suggesting an evolutionary sequence from discontinuous fractures in dark terrain, to lensoid bounding structures, to lensoid regions with subparallel internal structure in grooved terrain. Ganymede’s 24 measured duplexes have an average length/width ratio of 2.4, on the low end of the terrestrial range [2]. Lateral offsets of pre-existing features betray the existence of some major strike-slip faults: Dardanus Sulcus (13°W, 18°S) is displaced 45 km by a prominent NE-SW trending fault. We model Coulomb shear failure on Ganymede, considering nonsynchronous rotation (NSR), and diurnal stresses both for present (0.0013) and possible past high ( 0.05) eccentricity [3]. We adopt NSR period 0.14 Ma; Love numbers h2 = 1.52 and l2 = 0.38; Young’s modulus 9.3 GPa; Poisson’s ratio 0.33; and fault depth 2 km. NSR shear stress resolved along the Dardanus fault is 0.3 MPa, sufficient to induce failure to 1.4 km for friction coefficient 0.3. For past high eccentricity, diurnal stress would have modulated NSR stress by 100 kPa through Ganymede’s tidal cycle. This could have induced shear heating [4] and tidal walking [5], as modeled for Europa. References: [1] DeRemer and Pappalardo (2003), LPSC, 34, #2033; [2] Aydin and Nur (1982), Tectonics, 1, 91; [3] Showman and Malhotra (1997), Icarus, 127, 93; [4] Nimmo and Gaidos (2002), JGR, 107, 10.1029/2000JE001476; [5

  18. Direct Seafloor Imaging of the 2012 Wharton Basin Great Strike-slip Earthquakes rupture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Hananto, N.; Leclerc, F.; Wei, S.; Carton, H. D.; Tapponnier, P.; Sieh, K.; Qin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The 2012 Wharton Basin earthquakes (Mw=8.6 and Mw=8.2) were the largest intra-plate strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded. Based on seismological and geodetic studies, different, and partly contradictory, models have been proposed for the fault geometry requiring a complex faulting mechanism with several faults, oblique to one-another. These earthquakes occurred in the Wharton Basin, which is considered to be a broad diffuse zone of intra-plate deformation with deformation taking place along re-activated N5ºE striking fracture zones, which was inconsistent with most of the seismology or geodesy based rupture models. In May-June 2015, we acquired 13 high-resolution seismic reflection profiles and more than 8500 km2 of bathymetric data to the south and southwest of the main N-S segment of the Mw=8.6 earthquake rupture and across the Mw=8.2 earthquake rupture zone. We find that the epicenter of the Mw=8.2 earthquake lies on a re-activated fracture zone, expressed as a ~50-km wide region with four N5ºE striking left-lateral sub-faults. The easternmost sub-fault is most active and might be the master fault, where the maximum deformation might be taking place. The deformation along the other sub-faults becomes more diffuse moving westward. We also imaged a set of N110ºE trending 2-km wide right-lateral shear zones, which might act as transfer zones between the re-activated N5ºE striking fracture zones, and have orientations in agreement with aftershock focal mechanisms. We suggest that the 2012 great Wharton Basin earthquakes ruptured N5ºE re-activated fractures. Furthermore, the rupture of the Mw=8.6 event proceeded in en échelon fashion with this suite of N110ºE striking shear zones connecting the re-activated fracture zone imaged in this study with another N5ºE trending re-activated fracture zone on the Ninety East Ridge. Our model explains the discrepancy between direct observations on the seafloor and distant seismological and geodetic results.

  19. Fault displacement hazard for strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dawson, T.E.; Chen, R.; Cao, T.; Wills, C.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Frankel, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology, data, and regression equations for calculating the fault rupture hazard at sites near steeply dipping, strike-slip faults. We collected and digitized on-fault and off-fault displacement data for 9 global strikeslip earthquakes ranging from moment magnitude M 6.5 to M 7.6 and supplemented these with displacements from 13 global earthquakes compiled byWesnousky (2008), who considers events up to M 7.9. Displacements on the primary fault fall off at the rupture ends and are often measured in meters, while displacements on secondary (offfault) or distributed faults may measure a few centimeters up to more than a meter and decay with distance from the rupture. Probability of earthquake rupture is less than 15% for cells 200 m??200 m and is less than 2% for 25 m??25 m cells at distances greater than 200mfrom the primary-fault rupture. Therefore, the hazard for off-fault ruptures is much lower than the hazard near the fault. Our data indicate that rupture displacements up to 35cm can be triggered on adjacent faults at distances out to 10kmor more from the primary-fault rupture. An example calculation shows that, for an active fault which has repeated large earthquakes every few hundred years, fault rupture hazard analysis should be an important consideration in the design of structures or lifelines that are located near the principal fault, within about 150 m of well-mapped active faults with a simple trace and within 300 m of faults with poorly defined or complex traces.

  20. Investigating Stress Seources and Fault Parameters Along Major Strike-Slip Lineae on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    The surface of Europa is crosscut by a dense network of structures, many of these representing a complex history of strike-slip tectonic activity, presumably arising from a combination of global and local stress sources. Several dominant (~1000 km) structures span geographically diverse locations of Europa, offering a unique opportunity to study strike-slip activity at the hemispheric scale. These structures also exhibit kilometer-scale geometric bends that can promote or discourage shear failure. To better understand the role of tidal stress sources and implications for strike-slip faulting on Europa, we investigate the relationship between shear and normal stresses at four major fault zones: Agenor Linea, Rhadamanthys Linea, Conamara Chaos (Agave and Asterius Lineae), and Astypalaea Linea. Assuming tidal diurnal and non-synchronous rotation (NSR) stresses as the primary mechanisms for strike-slip tectonism, here we investigate the mechanics of Coulomb shear failure on Europa. We consider a range of friction coefficients (µf = 0.2 - 0.6) and fault depths (0 - 6 km) to evaluate how the predicted failure varies as a function of depth and its dependency on ice friction, geographic location, and fault geometry. Our results indicate that the conditions for failure at depth are not met for any of the lineae if subject to diurnal stresses only. Alternatively, models that include both diurnal and NSR stresses readily generate stress magnitudes that could permit shear failure. Shear failure is easily activated and extends to depths ranging from 3 - 6 km on all four linea systems when a low coefficient of friction (µf = 0.2) is assumed, but is generally limited to depths < 3 km when a high coefficient of friction (µf = 0.6) is applied. Based on these results, we infer that the conditions for shear failure are potentially met along at least these four studied lineae, and possibly others, on Europa when NSR is adopted as a driving stress mechanism and the coefficient of

  1. Along strike-slip faults, do fault segments exist and how long are they ? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Y.; Rockwell, T. K.; Cubas, N.; Souloumiac, P.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of relay zones and bends along strike-slip faults has long been recognized. The control of such geometrical asperities in initiation and arrest of seismic ruptures has been documented in many cases, suggesting they have a key role in the structure along strike of strike-slip faults. We produced dense slip distribution for two large strike-slip earthquakes, the 2001 Kunlun earthquake and the 1940 Imperial fault earthquake. In the Kunlun case we correlated satellite images acquired before and after the event to obtain a slip distribution of 1 point/km over 300 km. For the Imperial fault earthquake, we used a set of low altitude aerial photos that were flown just after the earthquake. The resolution of the photos is good enough to allow us to measure offsets of hundreds of plow lines along the trace of the rupture. In both cases the amplitude of the slip varies at a scale of several kilometers. In the case of Kunlun, the correlation between slip variations and jogs or side faults branching off the main rupture is straightforward. In the case of the Imperial fault, where long-term morphology is not preserved because of anthropic activities, still the slip distribution corresponds well with the slip patches determined independently by seismologists. These two examples strongly suggest that the segmentation of the fault controls the way seismic ruptures propagate along strike-slip faults. A more systematic exploration of slip maps derived from kinematic inversions of geophysical data shows that beyond variation due to different methodology and data, the lateral size of slip patches derived from such geophysical studies saturates around 20 km, independently of the earthquake magnitude. In parallel, using the available dataset of well documented ground ruptures maps for strike slip earthquakes, we designed an automatic procedure to quantify the minimum number of connected strait lines, approximating fault segment, needed to fit the rupture trace. The

  2. Neogene-Quaternary strike-slip tectonics in the central Calabrian Arc (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansi, Carlo; Muto, Francesco; Critelli, Salvatore; Iovine, Giulio

    2007-04-01

    A Middle Miocene-Middle Pleistocene regional NW-SE left-lateral strike-slip fault system profoundly conditioned the evolution of central Calabria, during the late tectonic phases which involved the Apulian block and the Calabrian Arc. This system dissected an Oligocene-Early Miocene orogenic belt, made of Alpine nappes overthrusted the Apennine Chain. In the present study, three major faults, arranged in a right-hand en échelon pattern, have been identified within the mentioned strike-slip system: the Falconara-Carpanzano Fault, the Amantea-Gimigliano Fault, and the Lamezia-Catanzaro Fault. A wide active transtensional area (N-S-trending Crati Graben), developed since Late Pliocene, is located at the SE termination of the Falconara-Carpanzano Fault. In the sectors of overlapping of the faults, the transpressional regime induced tectonic extrusions of the deep-seated units of the Chain, producing push-ups within the overlying complexes. In particular, push-ups are either made of Mesozoic carbonate rocks at Mt. Cocuzzo-Mt. Guono and Mt. S. Lucerna, or of ophiolite rocks at Mt. Reventino and Gimigliano. In these sectors, the primary geometric relationships among the units of the orogenic belt were locally altered. The en échelon arrangement of the above-mentioned NW-SE major strike-slip faults indicates the existence of a left-lateral crustal shear zone, striking on average N160. The age of the regional NW-SE left-lateral strike-slip system deserves thorough investigation. Besides evidence from historical and instrumental earthquakes, and from paleoseismological investigations, the kinematic data suggests that the "cause" of the transtensional sector (Crati Graben) could be found in the regional Falconara-Carpanzano Fault.

  3. Models of the Evolution of Finite Strain at Strike-Slip Plate Boundaries and Potential Implications for Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, I.; Roy, M.

    2014-12-01

    While we are aware of the extent and distribution of strain at the surface near the Pacific-North America plate boundary at the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system in California, at depth, our understanding is poor. Recent seismic observations suggest a narrow shear zone throughout the lithosphere corresponding to the narrow plate boundary at the surface. Surrounding the SAF in California, measurements of seismic anisotropy demonstrate orientations which vary depending on the location relative to the fault. Specifically, in northern California, the orientations align along the fault in its proximity, and in the east-west direction elsewhere. We investigate how the finite-strain ellipsoid (FSE) evolves for tracers in a 3D model of the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath the SAF. The top surface of the mesh has a right-lateral strike-slip velocity boundary condition, and the bottom, a uniform asthenospheric flow velocity condition perpendicular to the strike-slip fault. We calculate the orientations of the FSE for various ratios of strike-slip to asthenospheric velocity and viscosity stratification. The two classes of models which we investigate simulate an asthenospheric channel beneath a uniform-thickness lithosphere and a variable-depth lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). In an isoviscous fluid beneath a uniform-thickness lithosphere, strain rates, and thus FSE orientations, are constant throughout the channel, dependent on the ratio of the velocities but not the viscosity. For a two-layered asthenospheric channel of a higher-viscosity layer overlying a lower-viscosity layer, FSE orientations align with the strike-slip boundary in the upper layer and the drag in the lower layer. When we emulate a lithosphere of variable thickness across the fault by increasing the viscosity of the upper layer, we observe asymmetric FSE orientations across the step in the LAB. The direction of lithospheric thickening across the strike-slip fault govern these orientations

  4. Pattern of dynamic displacements in a strike-slip earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltogianni, V.; Gianniou, M.; Moschas, F.; Stiros, S.

    2016-07-01

    High-rate (1 Hz) records from GPS stations uniformly distributed along the fault ruptures of the 2014 Samothraki-Gökçeada Mw6.9 earthquake in the North Aegean Trough, at the extension of the North Anatolian Fault Zone, were analyzed using the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique. Computed dynamic displacements shed light to the pattern of dynamic displacements during shallow strike-slip earthquakes. The area of near-field static seismic displacements bounds ramp-type, long-period dynamic displacements (fling steps) in the sense of static displacements. Along-fault and normal to fault components of dynamic displacement follow typical attenuation laws, but attenuation is higher in the fault-parallel component hence confined to the area of static dislocations. Forward directivity and local, especially topography-controlled amplification effects, consistent with accelerometer evidence, were also observed. The overall pattern seems to characterize shallow strike-slip earthquakes and is expected to prove useful to explain or even predict the near-field damaging potential of strike-slip earthquakes.

  5. Surface rupture of the 2002 Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake and comparison with other strike-slip ruptures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, P.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Dawson, T.E.; Stenner, Heidi D.; Lienkaemper, J.J.; Cinti, F.; Montone, Paola; Sherrod, B.; Craw, P.

    2004-01-01

    On 3 November 2002, an M7.9 earthquake produced 340 km of surface rupture on the Denali and two related faults in Alaska. The rupture proceeded from west to east and began with a 40-km-long break on a previously unknown thrust fault. Estimates of surface slip on this thrust are 3-6 m. Next came the principal surface break along ???218 km of the Denali fault. Right-lateral offsets averaged around 5 m and increased eastward to a maximum of nearly 9 m. The fault also ruptured beneath the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, which withstood almost 6 m of lateral offset. Finally, slip turned southeastward onto the Totschunda fault. Right-lateral offsets are up to 3 m, and the surface rupture is about 76 km long. This three-part rupture ranks among the longest strike-slip events of the past two centuries. The earthquake is typical when compared to other large earthquakes on major intracontinental strike-slip faults. ?? 2004, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  6. Multiple strike slip faults sets: A case study from the Dead Sea transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Eyal, Y.

    1990-01-01

    In many strike slip tectonic settings, large rotations of crust blocks about vertical axes have been inferred from paleomagnetic data. These blocks are bounded by sets of parallel faults which presumably accommodate the relative motion between the blocks as regional deformation progress. A mechanical model by Nur et al., (1986) suggests that rotations greater than phi sub c equals 25 to 45 degrees must be accommodated by more than one set of faults, with angle phi sub c between their direction; consequently the sum of the angles between sets must be roughly equal to the total tectonic material rotation. To test this model, the authors investigated the fault geometry and field relation of fault sets in the Mt. Hermon area in northern Israel, where paleomagnetic declination implies data 69 degrees plus or minus 13 degrees counter-clockwise block rotation. The statistical and field relation analysis of over 315 faults shows that the faulting is predominantly right lateral strike slip consisting of three distinct sets. The oldest set strikes 253 degrees, the second oldest set strikes 293 degrees and the youngest strikes 339 degrees. This last direction is consistent also with the current north-south direction of the maximum principle stress axis. The angle phi sub c between the first and second sets is 39 degrees and between the second and third sets 46 degrees, in good agreement with the phi sub c angle predicted from mechanical considerations. The sum of the two angles is 85 degrees, in good agreement with the 69 degrees plus or minus 13 degrees CCW paleomagnetically derived rotation. The results suggest specifically that the sequential development of multiple intersecting fault sets is responsible for the faulting in the Mt. Hermon area; and generally that the model of block rotation with multiple faults provides very good simple rules for analyzing very complex fault patterns.

  7. The role of large strike-slip faults in a convergent continental setting - first results from the Dzhungarian Fault in Eastern Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützner, Christoph; Campbell, Grace; Elliott, Austin; Walker, Richard; Abdrakhmatov, Kanatbek

    2016-04-01

    The Tien Shan and the Dzhungarian Ala-tau mountain ranges in Eastern Kazakhstan and China take up a significant portion of the total convergence between India and Eurasia, despite the fact that they are more than 1000 km away from the actual plate boundary. Shortening is accommodated by large thrust faults that strike more or less perpendicular to the convergence vector, and by a set of conjugate strike-slip faults. Some of these strike-slip faults are major features of several hundred kilometres length and have produced great historical earthquakes. In most cases, little is known about their slip-rates and earthquake history, and thus, about their role in the regional tectonic setting. This study deals with the NW-SE trending Dzhungarian Fault, a more than 350 km-long, right-lateral strike slip feature. It borders the Dzhungarian Ala-tau range and forms one edge of the so-called Dzhungarian Gate. The fault curves from a ~305° strike at its NW tip in Kazakhstan to a ~328° strike in China. No historical ruptures are known from the Kazakh part of the fault. A possible rupture in 1944 in the Chinese part remains discussed. We used remote sensing, Structure-from-Motion (SfM), differential GPS, field mapping, and Quaternary dating of offset geological markers in order to map the fault-related morphology and to measure the slip rate of the fault at several locations along strike. We also aimed to find out the age of the last surface rupturing earthquake and to determine earthquake recurrence intervals and magnitudes. We were further interested in the relation between horizontal and vertical motion along the fault and possible fault segmentation. Here we present first results from our 2015 survey. High-resolution digital elevation models of offset river terraces allowed us to determine the slip vector of the most recent earthquake. Preliminary dating results from abandoned fluvial terraces allow us to speculate on a late Holocene surface rupturing event. Morphological

  8. Source characteristics of large strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Seok-Goo

    We investigate complex earthquake source processes using both spontaneous dynamic rupture modeling and kinematic finite-source inversion. Dynamic rupture modeling is an efficient tool with which we can examine how stress conditions and frictional behavior on a fault plane play a role in determining kinematic motions on the fault and the resulting ground motions at the Earth's surface. It enables us to develop a physical understanding of the earthquake rupture process in terms of Newtonian mechanics. We construct a set of spontaneous dynamic rupture models for several recent earthquakes in Japan and California in order to have a physical understanding of the earthquake source processes for several specific events. Our dynamic models are used to investigate the scaling properties of dynamic source parameters, i.e., fracture energy and stress drop. Many interesting features of the earthquake source process can also be inferred from the kinematic source inversion of observed seismic or geodetic data. We carry out a comprehensive source study of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake by re-analyzing both geodetic and seismic data in order to reconcile two existing, and mutually inconsistent, source models and obtain a unified one. Our study has important implications for seismic hazard in California, and perhaps more generally for large strike-slip earthquakes. Lastly it is important to utilize our knowledge of the earthquake source to improve our understanding of near-field ground motion characteristics because source complexities are quite uncertain and can be the dominant factor in determining the characteristics of near-field ground motion. We develop a pseudo-dynamic source modeling method with which we can generate physically self-consistent finite source models of large strike-slip earthquakes without high-cost, fully dynamic rupture simulation. The new pseudo-dynamic modeling method enables us to effectively characterize the earthquake source complexities for

  9. Fast rupture propagation for large strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dun; Mori, Jim; Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-04-01

    Studying rupture speeds of shallow earthquakes is of broad interest because it has a large effect on the strong near-field shaking that causes damage during earthquakes, and it is an important parameter that reflects stress levels and energy on a slipping fault. However, resolving rupture speed is difficult in standard waveform inversion methods due to limited near-field observations and the tradeoff between rupture speed and fault size for teleseismic observations. Here we applied back-projection methods to estimate the rupture speeds of 15 Mw ≥ 7.8 dip-slip and 8 Mw ≥ 7.5 strike-slip earthquakes for which direct P waves are well recorded in Japan on Hi-net, or in North America on USArray. We found that all strike-slip events had very fast average rupture speeds of 3.0-5.0 km/s, which are near or greater than the local shear wave velocity (supershear). These values are faster than for thrust and normal faulting earthquakes that generally rupture with speeds of 1.0-3.0 km/s.

  10. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  11. Strike-slip tectonic processes in the northern Caribbean between Cuba and Hispaniola (Windward Passage)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calais, Eric; de Lépinay, Bernard Mercier

    1995-02-01

    Marine geophysical data including Seabeam, seismic reflection, magnetics, gravimetry and side-scan sonar have been recently collected along the northern Caribbean strike-slip plate boundary between Cuba and Hispaniola, in the Windward Passage area. The analysis of this comprehensive data set allows us to illustrate active strike-slip tectonic processes in relation to the kinematics of the Caribbean Plate. We show that the transcurrent plate boundary trace runs straight across the Windward Passage, from the southern Cuban Margin in the west (Oriente Fault) to the Tortue Channel in the east. The Windward Passage Deep is thus not an active pull-apart basin, as previously suggested. The plate boundary geometry implies that the motion of the Caribbean Plate relative to the North American Plate is partitioned between a strike-slip component, accommodated by the Windward Passage active fault zone, and a convergence component, accommodated by compression at the bottom of the Northern Hispaniola Margin. On the basis of a correlation with onland geological data, an age is given to the stratigraphic sequences identified on seismic profiles. A kinematic reconstruction is proposed that follows the tectonic unconformities recognized at sea and on land (Late Eocene, Early Miocene, Middle Miocene and Late Pliocene). Each one of these tectonic events corresponds to a drastic reorganization of the plate boundary geometry. We propose to correlate these events with successive collisions of the northern Caribbean mobile terranes against the Bahamas Bank. During each event, the plate boundary trace is shifted to the south and a part of the Caribbean Plate is accreted to North America.

  12. The Northern Caribbean Plate Boundary Offshore Hispaniola: Strike-slip and Compressive Tectonic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Leroy, S. D.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Meyer, B.; Ellouz, N.

    2014-12-01

    The boundary between the Caribbean plate and the North American plate is transpressive due to the oblique collision between these two plates. The transpressive movement is partitioned and accommodated in the Hispaniola region along two left-lateral strike-slip structures surrounding a fold-and-thrust belt. New multibeam bathymetry data and multichannel seismic reflection profiles have been recently collected during the Haiti-SIS and Haiti-SIS 2 cruises, along part of the northern Caribbean plate boundary between Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola. From the north to the south, three types of deformations are observed. In the Windward Passage, the analysis of the data set reveals that the movement on the Oriente fault between Cuba and Hispaniola is purely left-lateral strike-slip according to the GPS measurements. In the Gonave basin, west of Hispaniola, the deformation is compressive. A series of folds is identified and moves toward the southwest. The Enriquillo-Plantain-Garden Fault (EPGF) is localized in the Jamaica Passage, between Jamaica and Hispaniola. The analysis of the data set reveals that the left-lateral EPGF recently intersects inherited basins from the eastern Cayman Trough margin. The study of the actual EPGF active trace shows that this fault moves with a pure strike-slip component, at least in its western part: the presence of a little push-up structure and a set of three en echelon folds is highlighting in the western part of the Jamaica Passage. The shortening rate in the inherited basins crossed by the EPGF increases from west to east (5.8% to 8.5%), indicating that a thrusting component is also accommodated around the EPGF.

  13. Magma storage in a strike-slip caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxby, J.; Gottsmann, J.; Cashman, K.; Gutiérrez, E.

    2016-07-01

    Silicic calderas form during explosive volcanic eruptions when magma withdrawal triggers collapse along bounding faults. The nature of specific interactions between magmatism and tectonism in caldera-forming systems is, however, unclear. Regional stress patterns may control the location and geometry of magma reservoirs, which in turn may control the spatial and temporal development of faults. Here we provide new insight into strike-slip volcano-tectonic relations by analysing Bouguer gravity data from Ilopango caldera, El Salvador, which has a long history of catastrophic explosive eruptions. The observed low gravity beneath the caldera is aligned along the principal horizontal stress orientations of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Data inversion shows that the causative low-density structure extends to ca. 6 km depth, which we interpret as a shallow plumbing system comprising a fractured hydrothermal reservoir overlying a magmatic reservoir with vol% exsolved vapour. Fault-controlled localization of magma constrains potential vent locations for future eruptions.

  14. Magma storage in a strike-slip caldera

    PubMed Central

    Saxby, J.; Gottsmann, J.; Cashman, K.; Gutiérrez, E.

    2016-01-01

    Silicic calderas form during explosive volcanic eruptions when magma withdrawal triggers collapse along bounding faults. The nature of specific interactions between magmatism and tectonism in caldera-forming systems is, however, unclear. Regional stress patterns may control the location and geometry of magma reservoirs, which in turn may control the spatial and temporal development of faults. Here we provide new insight into strike-slip volcano-tectonic relations by analysing Bouguer gravity data from Ilopango caldera, El Salvador, which has a long history of catastrophic explosive eruptions. The observed low gravity beneath the caldera is aligned along the principal horizontal stress orientations of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Data inversion shows that the causative low-density structure extends to ca. 6 km depth, which we interpret as a shallow plumbing system comprising a fractured hydrothermal reservoir overlying a magmatic reservoir with vol% exsolved vapour. Fault-controlled localization of magma constrains potential vent locations for future eruptions. PMID:27447932

  15. Magma storage in a strike-slip caldera.

    PubMed

    Saxby, J; Gottsmann, J; Cashman, K; Gutiérrez, E

    2016-07-22

    Silicic calderas form during explosive volcanic eruptions when magma withdrawal triggers collapse along bounding faults. The nature of specific interactions between magmatism and tectonism in caldera-forming systems is, however, unclear. Regional stress patterns may control the location and geometry of magma reservoirs, which in turn may control the spatial and temporal development of faults. Here we provide new insight into strike-slip volcano-tectonic relations by analysing Bouguer gravity data from Ilopango caldera, El Salvador, which has a long history of catastrophic explosive eruptions. The observed low gravity beneath the caldera is aligned along the principal horizontal stress orientations of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Data inversion shows that the causative low-density structure extends to ca. 6 km depth, which we interpret as a shallow plumbing system comprising a fractured hydrothermal reservoir overlying a magmatic reservoir with vol% exsolved vapour. Fault-controlled localization of magma constrains potential vent locations for future eruptions.

  16. The impact of strike-slip, transtensional and transpressional fault zones on volcanoes. Part 1: Scaled experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Lucie; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    The activity of a regional strike-slip fault can affect or channel magma migration, can deform a volcano and can destabilise the edifice flanks. The aim of this study is to determine the location, strike, dip and slip of structures that develop in a stable or gravitationally spreading volcanic cone located in the vicinity of a fault with a strike-slip component. This problem is addressed with brittle and brittle-ductile analogue models. The one hundred and twenty three models were deformed by pure strike-slip, transtensional or transpressional fault displacements. The deformation was organized around an uplift in transpressional and strike-slip experiments and around a subsiding area in transtensional experiments. Most displacements are accommodated by a curved fault called Sigmoid-I structure, which is a steep transpressional to transtensional fault. This fault projects the regional fault into the cone and delimits a summit graben that is parallel to the main horizontal stress. The systematic measurements of faults strike and slip in the experiments indicate that extension along the faults in the cone increases with the extensional component of the regional fault and the thickness of the substratum ductile layer. The distribution of the fastest horizontal movements of the analogue cone flanks, which vary depending on the regional fault characteristics and on the composition of the substratum, correspond to the distribution of instabilities in nature. Natural examples of volcanoes sited in strike-slip contexts are described and interpreted in the light of the analogue results in the second article

  17. Geomorphic expression of strike-slip faults: field observations vs. analog experiments: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, S. Y.; Neubauer, F.; Genser, J.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this project is to study the surface expression of strike-slip faults with main aim to find rules how these structures can be extrapolated to depth. In the first step, several basic properties of the fault architecture are in focus: (1) Is it possible to define the fault architecture by studying surface structures of the damage zone vs. the fault core, particularly the width of the damage zone? (2) Which second order structures define the damage zone of strike-slip faults, and how relate these to such reported in basement fault strike-slip analog experiments? (3) Beside classical fault bend structures, is there a systematic along-strike variation of the damage zone width and to which properties relates the variation of the damage zone width. We study the above mentioned properties on the dextral Altyn fault, which is one of the largest strike-slip on Earth with the advantage to have developed in a fully arid climate. The Altyn fault includes a ca. 250 to 600 m wide fault valley, usually with the trace of actual fault in its center. The fault valley is confined by basement highs, from which alluvial fans develop towards the center of the fault valley. The active fault trace is marked by small scale pressure ridges and offset of alluvial fans. The fault valley confining basement highs are several kilometer long and ca. 0.5 to 1 km wide and confined by rotated dextral anti-Riedel faults and internally structured by a regular fracture pattern. Dextral anti-Riedel faults are often cut by Riedel faults. Consequently, the Altyn fault comprises a several km wide damage zone. The fault core zone is a barrier to fluid flow, and the few springs of the region are located on the margin of the fault valley implying the fractured basement highs as the reservoir. Consequently, the southern Silk Road was using the Altyn fault valley. The preliminary data show that two or more orders of structures exist. Small-scale develop during a single earthquake. These finally

  18. Ascension Submarine Canyon, California - Evolution of a multi-head canyon system along a strike-slip continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagel, D.K.; Mullins, H.T.; Greene, H. Gary

    1986-01-01

    Ascension Submarine Canyon, which lies along the strike-slip (transform) dominated continental margin of central California, consists of two discrete northwestern heads and six less well defined southeastern heads. These eight heads coalesce to form a single submarine canyon near the 2700 m isobath. Detailed seismic stratigraphic data correlated with 19 rock dredge hauls from the walls of the canyon system, suggest that at least one of the two northwestern heads was initially eroded during a Pliocene lowstand of sea level ???3.8 m.y. B.P. Paleogeographic reconstructions indicate that at this time, northwestern Ascension Canyon formed the distal channel of nearby Monterey Canyon and has subsequently been offset by right-lateral, strike-slip faulting along the San Gregorio fault zone. Some of the six southwestern heads of Ascension Canyon may also have been initially eroded as the distal portions of Monterey Canyon during late Pliocene-early Pleistocene sea-level lowstands (???2.8 and 1.75 m.y. B.P.) and subsequently truncated and offset to the northwest. There have also been a minimum of two canyon-cutting episodes within the past 750,000 years, after the entire Ascension Canyon system migrated to the northwest past Monterey Canyon. We attribute these late Pleistocene erosional events to relative lowstands of sea level 750,000 and 18,000 yrs B.P. The late Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of the six southeastern heads also appears to have been controlled by structural uplift of the Ascension-Monterey basement high at the southeastern terminus of the Outer Santa Cruz Basin. We believe that uplift of this basement high sufficiently oversteepened submarine slopes to induce gravitational instability and generate mass movements that resulted in the erosion of the canyon heads. Most significantly, though, our results and interpretations support previous proposals that submarine canyons along strike-slip continental margins can originate by tectonic trunction and lateral

  19. Provenance of alluvial fan deposits to constrain the mid-term offsets along a strike-slip active fault: the Elsinore fault in the Coyote Mountains, Imperial Valley, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, Eulalia; Stepancikova, Petra; Rockwell, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The lateral variation in rates along a fault and its constancy along time is a matter of discussion. To give light to this discussion, short, mid and long term offset distribution along a fault is needed. Many studies analyze the short-term offset distribution along a strike-slip fault that can be obtained by the analysis of offset features imprinted in the morphology of the near-fault area. We present an example on how to obtain the mid- to long-term offset values based on the composition of alluvial fans that are offset by the fault. The study area is on the southern tip of the Elsinore fault, which controls the mountain front of the Coyote Mountains (California). The Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault is part of the San Andreas fault (SAF) system, extending 250 km from the Los Angeles Basin southeastward into the Gulf of California, in Mexico. The slip-rate on the southern Elsinore fault is believed to be moderate based on recent InSAR observations, although a recent study near Fossil Canyon (southern Coyote Mountains) suggests a rate in the range of 1-2 mm/yr. For this study we processed the airborne LiDAR dataset (EarthScope Southern & Eastern California, SoCal) to map short to mid-term alluvial offsets. We reprocessed the point clouds to produce DEMs with 0.5m and 0.25m grids and we varied the insolation angles to illuminate the various fault strands and the offset features. We identified numerous offset features, such as rills, channel bars, channel walls, alluvial fans, beheaded channels and small erosional basins that varied in displacement from 1 to 350 m. For the mid- to long-term offsets of the alluvial fans we benefited from the diverse petrological composition of their sources. Moreover, we recognized that older alluvium, which is offset by greater amounts, is in some cases buried beneath younger alluvial fan deposits and separated by buried soils. To determine the source canyon of various alluvial elements, we quantified the clast assemblage of each source

  20. The distribution and characterization of strike-slip faults on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Emily S.

    2016-03-01

    Strike-slip faulting is typically characterized by lateral offsets on icy satellites of the outer solar system. However, strike-slip faults on Enceladus lack these typical lateral offsets and instead are marked by the presence of tailcracks or en echelon cracks. These features are used here to develop the first near-global distribution of strike-slip faults on Enceladus. Strike-slip faults on Enceladus fall into three broad categories: tectonic terrain boundaries, reactivated linear features, and primary strike-slip faults. All three types of strike-slip faults are found predominantly, or within close proximity to, the antipodal cratered terrains on the Saturnian and anti-Saturnian hemispheres. Stress modeling suggests that strike-slip faulting on Enceladus is not controlled by nonsynchronous rotation, as on Europa, suggesting a fundamentally different process driving Enceladus's strike-slip faulting. The motion along strike-slip faults at tectonic terrain boundaries suggests large-scale northward migration of the ice shell on the leading hemisphere of Enceladus, occurring perpendicular to the opening direction of the tiger stripes in the south polar terrain.

  1. A prototype earthquake warning system for strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafi Toksöz, M.; Dainty, Anton M.; Bullitt, John T.

    1990-05-01

    A prototype expert system has been developed to provide rapid warning of earthquakes while they are occurring. Warning times of up to 100 seconds will be possible. In the complete system, several accelerometers are distributed at intervals within a few kilometers of a known fault; data are telemetered to a central computer which implements the expert system. The expert system incorporates specific information about the type of fault to be monitored, and includes simple rules for estimating the fault slip, rupture length, and seismic moment, all in real time. If the seismic moment exceeds a preset value, an alarm may be issued. The prototype is designed for deployment on near-surface strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas and has been successfully tested with data from the 1979 Imperial Valley and 1984 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Crucial concepts have also been tested using synthetic data calculated for a model of the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake. Parkfield, California, could be used as a test site.

  2. Coseismic growth of sedimentary basins along the Yammouneh strike-slip fault (Lebanon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemer, Tony; Gomez, Francisco; Al Haddad, Sharbel; Tabet, Charles

    2008-12-01

    The left-lateral Yammouneh fault (YF) is the main active branch of the Dead Sea Transform Fault (DSTF) within the Lebanese restraining bend. Despite the overall transpressional setting, a series of sedimentary basins have developed along the trace of the YF. Consequently, palaeoseismic studies within these basins provide an opportunity to study the processes of coseismic growth of the basins, as well as elucidate earthquake behaviour of the fault, in general. Geodetic measurements of contemporary fault slip within the Lebanese restraining bend indicate that the YF accommodates most of the expected left-lateral strike-slip motion, despite the apparent lack of present-day seismicity. We studied the YF, using combined investigations of remote imagery, geomorphology and palaeoseismology. The active fault trace along a 51 km strip was delineated as relatively young surface ruptures and fault scarps that affect Holocene deposits with intermittent offset geomorphic markers. Seven closed basins that occur along-strike of the YF, were found to be related to faulting, with at least three of them displaying evident pull-apart settings. We concentrated our work on the rhombohedral Yammouneh basin, an actively evolving example of pull-apart basins, which is presently obliquely cut by the active fault, with an apparently young age of 1.4 +/- 0.3 Myr. 3-D correlation and analysis of palaeoseismic investigations exposed a composite shear zone with a total subsidence that exceeds 1.6 m over the past 4000-4400 yr. Stratigraphic and geochronological constraints suggest the occurrences of at least five large faulting events during that period. By correlating the stratigraphy and ages of this trench with a previously published study located nearby, a combined palaeoseismic history for the past five events is constructed. This suggests a mean recurrence period of 1020-1175 yr for large earthquakes along this section of the YF. Our results suggest a subsidence rate due to faulting of

  3. Phanerozoic strike-slip faulting in the continental interior platform of the United States: Examples from the Laramide Orogen, midcontinent, and Ancestral Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshak, S.; Nelson, W.J.; McBride, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    The continental interior platform of the United States is that part of the North American craton where a thin veneer of Phanerozoic strata covers Precambrian crystalline basement. N- to NE-trending and W- to NW-trending fault zones, formed initially by Proterozoic/Cambrian rifting, break the crust of the platform into rectilinear blocks. These zones were reactivated during the Phanerozoic, most notably in the late Palaeozoic Ancestral Rockies event and the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Laramide orogeny - some remain active today. Dip-slip reactivation can be readily recognized in cross section by offset stratigraphic horizons and monoclinal fault-propagation folds. Strike-slip displacement is hard to document because of poor exposure. Through offset palaeochannels, horizontal slip lineations, and strain at fault bends locally demonstrate strike-slip offset, most reports of strike-slip movements for interior-platform faults are based on occurrence of map-view belts of en echelon faults and anticlines. Each belt overlies a basement-penetrating master fault, which typically splays upwards into a flower structure. In general, both strike-slip and dip-slip components of displacement occur in the same fault zone, so some belts of en echelon structures occur on the flanks of monoclinal folds. Thus, strike-slip displacement represents the lateral components of oblique fault reactivation: dip-slip and strike-slip components are the same order of magnitude (tens of metres to tens of kilometres). Effectively, faults with strike-slip components of displacement act as transfers accommodating jostling of rectilinear crustal blocks. In this context, the sense of slip on an individual strike-slip fault depends on block geometry, not necessarily on the trajectory of regional ??1. Strike-slip faulting in the North American interior differs markedly from that of southern and central Eurasia, possibly because of a contrast in lithosphere strength. Weak Eurasia strained significantly during the

  4. Tectonics, magmatism and paleo-fluid distribution in a strike-slip setting: Insights from the northern termination of the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault System, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Flores, Pamela; Cembrano, José; Sánchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Veloso, Eugenio; Arancibia, Gloria; Roquer, Tomás

    2016-06-01

    This study addresses the interplay between strain/stress fields and paleo-fluid migration in the Southern Andean Volcanic Zone (SVZ). The SVZ coexists with the margin-parallel Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and with NW-striking Andean Transverse Faults (ATF). To tackle the role of different fault-fracture systems on deformation distribution and magma/fluid transport, we map the nature, geometry and kinematics of faults, veins and dikes at various scales. Fault-slip data analysis yields stress and strain fields from the full study area data base (regional scale) and fault zones representative of each fault system (local scale). Regional scale strain analysis shows kinematically heterogeneous faulting. Local strain analyses indicate homogeneous deformation with NE-trending shortening and NW-trending extension at NNE-striking Liquiñe-Ofqui master fault zones. Strain axes are clockwise rotated at second order fault zones, with ENE-trending shortening and NNW-trending stretching. The ATF record polyphasic deformation. Conversely, stress field analysis at regional scale indicates a strike-slip dominated transpressional regime with N64°E-trending σ1 and N30°W-trending σ3. Deformation is further partitioned within the arc through NNE-striking dextral-reverse faults, NE-striking dextral-normal faults and NW-striking sinistral-reverse faults with normal slip activation. The regional tectonic regime controls the geometry of NE-striking dikes and volcanic centers. NE-striking faults record local stress axes that are clockwise rotated with respect to the regional stress field. NNE- and NE-striking faults are favorably oriented for reactivation under the regional stress field and show poorly-developed damage zones. Conversely, NW-striking fault systems, misoriented under the regional stress field, show multiple fault cores, wider damage zones and dense vein networks. Deformation driven by oblique subduction is partially partitioned into strike-slip and shortening

  5. Late Pleistocene to Present - normal and strike slip - faulting in the western Gulf of Corinth; data from high resolution seismic reflection SISCOR surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Arnaud; Bodeux, Sarah; Beck, Christian; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurélia; Tripsanas, Efthymios; Sakellariou, Dimitris; De Batist, Marc; De Rycker, Koen; Bascou, Pascale; Versteeg, Willem

    2013-04-01

    dipping faults, 4 to 6 km long, have been identified. These faults strike NE-SW. The northern one shows a clear strike-slip component. This fault system is not part to the Corinth Fault System. It could be part of a local transfer zone linking the Patras and the Corinth Basins, or of the NE-SW right-lateral slip fault system interconnecting the Gulf of Corinth to the Kephalonia transform Fault and the Hellenic subduction.

  6. Strike-slip fault reactivation as a control on epithermal vein-style gold mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, R. W.; Adams, D. P. M.

    1992-05-01

    Epithermal precious metal mineralization develops within contemporaneously active tectonic and volcanic terranes in which co-active faults focus fluids from deep high-temperature reservoirs and magmas into shallower environments. Recognition of such structural controls through analysis of the architecture of prospective volcanic belts and basins is therefore important in the exploration for epithermal gold deposits. Field and high-resolution aeromagnetic data suggest that gold mineralization at Bimurra and Wirralie in the late Paleozoic Drummond Basin (northeast Queensland, Australia) is primarily controlled by reactivation of a northeast-striking strike-slip fault array that may have developed as a transfer fault in the early history of the basin. Gold mineralization is hosted by volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks whose distribution was also controlled by this reactivated structure.

  7. Overview of cenozoic strike-slip displacement of the caribbean plate

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, P.

    1985-01-01

    Geologic and tectonic studies in the Caribbean region have traditionally focused on Cretaceous and Paleogene arc rocks which, for the most part, record a long period (approx. = 100 Ma) of plate convergence. Since the recognition of the plate structure of the Caribbean by Molnar and Sykes in 1969, there has been steadily increasing interest in mapping widespread ares of Neogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks that generally record a long period (65.-40 Ma) of eastward displacement of the Caribbean plate relative to the Americas. The purpose of this talk is to review different aspects of present knowledge on this strike-slip displacement, namely: 1) location of major strike-slip faults within the northern and southern plate boundary zones; 2) sense, offset, rate of slip of major strike-slip faults; 3) secondary deformational features related to strike-slip displacements; 4) intraplate deformational features related to interplate strike-slip movements; 5) relation of seismicity to major strike-slip faults; and 6) constraints imposed by strike-slip fault systems on plate motion models. Based on these observations, several critical problems which future studies might help resolve are pointed out.

  8. Fault orientations in extensional and conjugate strike-slip environments and their implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Hill, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    Seismically active conjugate strike-slip faults in California and Japan typically have mutually orthogonal right- and left-lateral fault planes. Normal-fault dips at earthquake nucleation depths are concentrated between 40?? and 50??. The observed orientations and their strong clustering are surprising, because conventional faulting theory suggests fault initiation with conjugate 60?? and 120?? intersecting planes and 60?? normal-fault dip or fault reactivation with a broad range of permitted orientations. The observations place new constraints on the mechanics of fault initiation, rotation, and evolutionary development. We speculate that the data could be explained by fault rotation into the observed orientations and deactivation for greater rotation or by formation of localized shear zones beneath the brittle-ductile transition in Earth's crust. Initiation as weak frictional faults seems unlikely. -Authors

  9. A conjugate strike-slip fault system within the extensional tectonics of Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktar, Mustafa; Karabulut, Hayrullah; Özalaybey, Serdar; Childs, Dean

    2007-12-01

    Three main shocks M-1, M-2 and M-3 (17 October 2005 at 05:45 UTC, Mw 5.4; 17 October at 09:46 UTC, Mw 5.8 and 20 October at 21:40 UTC, Mw 5.9) and their associated aftershocks within the Gulf of Siǧacik, 50 km southwest of Izmir, Turkey were studied in detail. A temporary seismic network deployed during the activity allowed the hypocentre of M-3 and subsequent aftershocks to be determined with high accuracy. A relative relocation technique was used to improve the epicentres of M-1 and M-2. All three main shocks have strike-slip mechanisms which agree with the linear trends of the aftershock locations. Two distinct zones were illuminated by the aftershock locations. The zones contain clear echelon patterns with slightly different orientations from the trend of the aftershock distribution. M-2 and M-3 ruptured along of the eastern rupture zone which aligns N45°E. However the strike direction of M-1 is not clearly identified. The alignment of the two rupture zones intersect at their southern terminus at an angle of 90°. The fault zones form conjugate pair system and static triggering is considered as a probable mechanism for the sequential west to east occurrence of M-1, M-2 and M-3. This earthquake sequence provides seismological evidence for conjugate strike-slip faulting co-existing within a region dominated by north-south extension and well-developed east-west trending normal faults.

  10. Strike-slip accommodated core complexes in the Najd fault system, Arabian-Nubian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S. E.; Passchier, C. W.; Abu-Alam, T. S.; Stuewe, K.

    2013-12-01

    Metamorphic core complexes are usually developed as extensional features during crustal thinning in a continental collision zone, such as the Basin and Range and the Aegean Terrane. The Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia is a 2000 km-long and 400 km-wide complex network of crustal-scale strike-slip shear zones in a Neoproterozoic collision zone. Locally, the anastomosing shear zones lead to exhumation of lower crustal segments and represent a new kinematic model for the development of core complexes. We report on two such dome structures: the Qazaz complex in Saudi Arabia and the Hafafit complex in Egypt. The 15-km-wide Qazaz complex is a triangular dome of gently dipping mylonitic foliations within the 140-km-long sinistral strike-slip Qazaz mylonite zone. The gneissic dome consists of high-grade rocks, surrounded by low-grade metasediments and metavolcanics. The main SE trending strike-slip Qazaz shear zone splits southwards into two branches around the gneiss dome: the western branch is continuous with the shallow dipping mylonites of the dome core, without overprinting, and curves by more than 90 degrees eastwards from a NS trending strike slip zone to an EW trending 40 degree south dipping detachment that bounds the gneiss dome to the south. The eastern SE trending sinistral strike slip shear zone branch is slightly younger and transects the central dome fabrics. The gneiss dome appears to have formed along a jog in the strike slip shear zone during 40 km of strike slip motion, which caused local exhumation of lower crustal rocks by 25 km along the detachment. The eastern shear zone branch formed late during exhumation, transacted the gneiss dome and offset the two parts by another 70 km. The Hafafit core complex in Egypt is of similar shape and size to the Qazaz structure, but forms the northern termination of a sinistral strike-slip zone that is at least 100 km in length. This zone may continue into Saudi Arabia as the Ajjaj shear zone for another 100 km. The

  11. Effect of inherited structures on strike-slip plate boundaries: insight from analogue modelling of the central Levant Fracture System, Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalayini, Ramadan; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Homberg, Catherine; Nader, Fadi

    2015-04-01

    Analogue sandbox modeling is a tool to simulate deformation style and structural evolution of sedimentary basins. The initial goal is to test what is the effect of inherited and crustal structures on the propagation, evolution, and final geometry of major strike-slip faults at the boundary between two tectonic plates. For this purpose, we have undertaken a series of analogue models to validate and reproduce the structures of the Levant Fracture System, a major NNE-SSW sinistral strike-slip fault forming the boundary between the Arabian and African plates. Onshore observations and recent high quality 3D seismic data in the Levant Basin offshore Lebanon demonstrated that Mesozoic ENE striking normal faults were reactivated into dextral strike-slip faults during the Late Miocene till present day activity of the plate boundary which shows a major restraining bend in Lebanon with a ~ 30°clockwise rotation in its trend. Experimental parameters consisted of a silicone layer at the base simulating the ductile crust, overlain by intercalated quartz sand and glass sand layers. Pre-existing structures were simulated by creating a graben in the silicone below the sand at an oblique (>60°) angle to the main throughgoing strike-slip fault. The latter contains a small stepover at depth to create transpression during sinistral strike-slip movement and consequently result in mountain building similarly to modern day Lebanon. Strike-slip movement and compression were regulated by steady-speed computer-controlled engines and the model was scanned using a CT-scanner continuously while deforming to have a final 4D model of the system. Results showed that existing normal faults were reactivated into dextral strike-slip faults as the sinistral movement between the two plates accumulated. Notably, the resulting restraining bend is asymmetric and segmented into two different compartments with differing geometries. One compartment shows a box fold anticline, while the second shows an

  12. Late Cretaceous through Cenozoic strike-slip tectonics of southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, M.L.; Bradley, D.C.; Bundtzen, T.K.; McClelland, W.

    2002-01-01

    New geologic mapping and geochronology show that margin-parallel strike-slip faults on the western limb of the southern Alaska orocline have experienced multiple episodes of dextral motion since ~100 Ma. These faults are on the upper plate of a subduction zone ~350-450 km inboard of the paleotrench. In southwestern Alaska, dextral displacement is 134 km on the Denali fault, at least 88-94 km on the Iditarod-Nixon Fork fault, and perhaps tens of kilometers on the Dishna River fault. The strike-slip regime coincided with Late Cretaceous sedimentation and then folding in the Kuskokwim basin, and with episodes of magmatism and mineralization at ~70, ~60, and ~30 Ma. No single driving mechanism can explain all of the ~95 million-year history of strike-slip faulting. Since ~40 Ma, the observed dextral sense of strike slip has run contrary to the sense of subduction obliquity. This may be explained by northward motion of the Pacific plate driving continental margin slivers into and/or around the oroclinal bend. From 44 to 66 Ma, oroclinal rotation, perhaps involving large-scale flexural slip, may have been accompanied by westward escape of crustal blocks along strike-slip faults. However, reconstructions of this period involve unproven assumptions about the identity of the subducting plate, the position of subducting ridges, and the exact timing of oroclinal bending, thus obscuring the driving mechanisms of strike slip. Prior to 66 Ma, oblique subduction is the most plausible driving mechanism for dextral strike slip. Cumulative displacement on all faults of the western limb of the orocline is at least 400 km, about half that on the eastern limb; this discrepancy might be explained by a combination of thrusting and unrecognized strike-slip faulting.

  13. Offset of Latest Pleistocene Shoreface Reveals Slip Rate on the Hosgri Strike-Slip Fault, Offshore Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Hartwell, S. R.; Dartnell, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri-San Gregorio dextral strike-slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore region for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by a ~265-m-wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a relict sand spit that formed during a period of relatively slower sea-level rise (Younger Dryas stadial) in the latest Pleistocene. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault-bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography similar to modern geomorphology along coastal segments of the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6 ± 0.9 mm/yr. Because the Hosgri fault locally includes an active western strand, and regionally converges with several other faults, this slip rate should be considered a minimum for the Hosgri fault in central California and should not be applied for the entire Hosgri-San Gregorio fault system. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike-slip fault budget and is the most active strike-slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high-resolution bathymetry in earthquake-hazard characterization of active offshore faults.

  14. The role of oblique strike-slip faulting in the tectonics of the Puget Lowlands and throughout the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keranen, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Upper-plate seismicity in the Puget Lowland, away from and oblique to known fault structures, challenges our understanding of active tectonics and seismic hazards of the region. The challenge arises in part from the thick glacial sediments and extensive water bodies that obscure active faults. Multichannel seismic reflection data in waterways, combined with aeromagnetic and gravity data, can effectively map fault structures throughout the Puget Lowland. Seismic reflection data indicate a NE-SW zone of recent high-angle faulting and shallow sediment deformation crossing the Seattle Uplift and the Seattle Basin, distinct from previously interpreted E-W fault systems including the main Seattle Fault. These NE-SW faults correlate with a zone of active seismicity, cut or deform sediments at the seafloor, and trend across the central Puget Lowland at an oblique angle to major regional structures. Aeromagnetic data show that the trend continues southeastward across the Seattle Uplift and connects deformation of shallow sediment in the Puget Sound with deformation of shallow sediment in Hood Canal. Two additional zones of faulting have NW-SE trend and cut through the Seattle Basin and Kingston Arch. Though strike-slip motion is a new interpretation for deformation along the southern edge of the Seattle Basin, it is not anomalous in the Puget Lowland; it is observed to the north along the southern Whidbey Island Fault (Sherrod et al., 2008) and Darrington-Devils Mountain Fault (Personius et al., 2014) and to the south along the Mount St. Helens seismic zone. Strike-slip motion accompanying regional compression and thrust-faulting occurs elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest including in south-central Washington (Blakely et al., 2014). Oblique strike-slip faults may contribute more significantly to deformation and seismicity within the Puget Lowland than previously recognized. Future work will evaluate the impact of deformation along these structures in tectonic models and

  15. The Mindanao collision zone: a soft collision event within a continuous Neogene strike-slip setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pubellier, M.; Quebral, R.; Rangin, C.; Deffontaines, B.; Muller, C.; Butterlin, J.; Manzano, J.

    Two volcanic belts are presently juxtaposed on Mindanao Island in the southern Philippines. Southward, the collision is still active in the Molucca Sea which is commonly regarded as a region of doubly verging subduction, plunging eastward below the Halmahera arc and westward below the Sangihe arc. In the Molluca Sea, tectonic features related to the incipient collision appear only in the very thick sediments of the basin, and the morphology of the parallel Halmahera, Talaud and Sangihe ridges is closely controlled by recent N-S strike-slip faults. Among these faults, the Philippine Fault is a neotectonic feature crosscutting the Agusan-Davao Basin which seals tectonic events not younger than Eocene. In addition, the Central Cordillera shows strong similarities with the Pacific Cordillera for both stratigraphy and tectonic evolution, and several indications favour a Eurasian margin affinity for the Daguma Range (Southern and Eastern Kudarat Plateau that may be part of the Sangihe arc, as inferred for the Zamboanga Peninsula and the Northern Arm of Sulawesi. Thus the island of Mindanao can be divided into two composite terranes, the western one (northward extension of the Sangihe arc) being restricted to the Kudarat Plateau and the Zamboanga Peninsula. The apparent continuation of the Sangihe arc into the Central Cordillera of Mindanao is thus the result of post collision tectonics. The portion of the suture where the collision is completed curves westward north of the southern peninsula and extends beneath the sediments of the Cotabato Basin or the volcanic plateaus of the Lanao-Misamis-Bukidnon Highlands. In the northern part, the contact is linear and suggests, together with the absence of compressional deformation, a docking of the eastern oceanic terrane (Philippine Mobile Belt-Halmahera arc) against the western continental terrane (Zamboanga-Daguma) in a strike-slip environment. Prior to Early Pliocene, the eastern and the western terranes were subject to

  16. Shallow Hydrothermal Flow in a Strike-Slip Fault System, Mt Isa, Australia: A Proterozoic Analog for Modern Geothermal Systems Along Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F.; Begbie, M.

    2014-12-01

    Strong E-W shortening during the Isan Orogeny (1590-1500 Ma) led to crustal thickening and compressional inversion of former intracontinental rift basins. The resulting metamorphic/plutonic basement complex is disrupted by conjugate, mutually cross-cutting sets of brittle, late-orogenic strike-slip faults. Dextral strike-slip faults (separations < 25 km) strike NE-NNE, while conjugate sinistral faults strike SE-SSE, defining a wrench regime (σv = σ2) with horizontal maximum compression, σ1, trending c. 100°. The strike-slip faults are recessive except in dilational sites where upwelling hydrothermal fluids have silicified the cataclastic shear zones (CSZ) which protrude as blade-like ridges extending for kilometres across the semi-arid terrain. The mineralized fault segments include sinuous releasing bends where the fault trace is deflected <10° as well as more abrupt dilational stepovers with distributed extension fracturing linking en echelon fault segments. Other components of structural permeability include: (1) innumerable fault-parallel quartz-veins (cm to m thickness) within the CSZ; (2) irregular stringer veins; and (3) a regional set of predominantly extensional, subvertical planar quartz veins oriented 080-120° at moderate angles to the main faults. Broad contemporaneity is indicated by mutual cross-cutting relationships between all structural components. Measured strike separations along shear fractures are consistent with seismic slip increments which refreshed fracture permeability and promoted hydrothermal flow. Textures suggest the faults were exhumed from epithermal boiling environments (<1-2 km depth). Restoration of fault cohesive strength by hydrothermal cementation was critical in allowing continued vein formation by hydraulic extension fracturing. The distribution of hydrothermal quartz within the fault system provides a guide to structural localization of upflow zones in geothermal fields developed along strike-slip faults.

  17. 20 years of GPS interseismic measurements across strike slip faults (comparison with geologic estimates, implications on faults mechanics, lithosphere rheology and seismic hazard)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, P.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of interseismic strain across active faults are an important key to better assess faults dynamics and seismic hazard. Based on geodetic observations across the San Andreas fault Savage and Burford in 1973 have proposed a dislocation in an elastic half space model to fit the observations. Since then, the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and InSAR have allowed to monitor several other faults and one can wonder if this rheologically unrealistic model is still a good one to extrapolate the fault slip rate using the interseimic GPS velocity solution. We have now enough data to start to look at common features for strike slip faults. I will present new velocity solutions across strike slip faults that I will use with results from other studies to discuss what can we learn from geodetic measurement of interseismic strain across strike slip fault. Data from 10 strike slip faults will be used to estimate locking depth and strike slip rate. When available geologic slip rate will be compared to geodetic slip rate. Consistent estimates between geodesy and geology and between several faults suggest a constant behavior through the interseismic time period. This implies that GPS is important for the seismic hazard assessment, but is probably not the key data in the seismic hazard assessment models. Common characteristics between slow and fast slip rate faults, almost pre-seismic and early interseismic period measurements bring new information to discuss the validity of existing interseismic models and to further develop new interseismic models. Indeed, the elastic and viscoelastic two layers model of the crust or the lithosphere although more accurate than the elastic dislocation does not withstand this comparative study.

  18. Strike-slip Fault Structure in the Salton Trough and Deformation During and After the 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake from Geodetic and Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Sun, J.; Gonzalez-Ortega, A.; González-Escobar, M.; Freed, A. M.; Burgmann, R.; Samsonov, S. V.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J.; Fletcher, J. M.; Hinojosa, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary character changes southward from the strike-slip and transpressional configuration along most of California to oblique rifting in the Gulf of California, with a transitional zone of transtension beneath the Salton Trough in southernmost California and northern Mexico. The Salton Trough is characterized by extremely high heat flow and thin lithosphere with a thick fill of sedimentary material delivered by the Colorado River during the past 5-6 million years. Because of the rapid sedimentation, most of the faults in Salton Trough are buried and reveal themselves when they slip either seismically or aseismically. They can also be located by refraction and reflection of seismic waves. The 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake (Mw 7.2) in Baja California and Sonora, Mexico is probably the largest earthquake in the Salton Trough for at least 120 years, and had primarily right-lateral strike-slip motion. The earthquake ruptured a complex set of faults that lie to the west of the main plate boundary fault, the Cerro Prieto Fault, and shows that the strike-slip fault system in the southern Salton Trough has multiple sub-parallel active faults, similar to southern California. The Cerro Prieto Fault is still likely absorbing the majority of strain in the plate boundary. We study the coseismic and postseismic deformation of the 2010 earthquake with interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images (InSAR) and pixel tracking by subpixel correlation of SAR and optical images. We combine sampled InSAR and subpixel correlation results with GPS (Global Positioning System) offsets at PBO (Plate Boundary Observatory) stations to estimate the likely subsurface geometry of the major faults that slipped during the earthquake and to derive a static coseismic slip model. We constrained the surface locations of the fault segments to mapped locations in the Sierra Cucapah to the northwest of the epicenter. SAR along-track offsets

  19. Structural evolution of the La Trocha fault zone: Oblique collision and strike-slip basins in the Cuban Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Orosa, Israel; Sã Bat, Francesc; Ramos, Emilio; Rivero, LluíS.; VáZquez-Taset, Yaniel M.

    2012-10-01

    The La Trocha fault zone acted as a major left-lateral transfer zone and is bounded by the La Trocha (LTF), Zaza-Tuinicú (ZTF), Cristales (CTF) and Taguasco (TGF) faults. These faults were consistent with the clockwise rotation of convergence and shortening in central Cuba. From the Paleocene to the Early Eocene (65-48 Ma), a SSW-NNE shortening produced transtension in the LTF and transpression in the ZTF. Subsequently, during the Middle Eocene (48-37 Ma), shortening shifted to a SW-NE direction, resulting in the normal component of the LTF and transpression in the ZTF and CTF. Since the Late Eocene (37 Ma), central Cuba has been welded to the North American Plate. The post-welding deformation gave rise to transtension of the LTF and TGF. This deformation is consistent with a WSW-ENE shortening and reflects activity in the transform boundary of the Cayman Trough. Both the normal and thrust displacements of these previous faults are corroborated by structural data whereas left-lateral displacement is deduced from the concordance between oblique collision and structural features. Plate-kinematics and the structural evolution of the La Trocha fault zone indicate that the related Central Basin is a strike-slip polygenetic basin and that the formation of this system (i.e., fault zone - strike-slip basin) was a consequence of the Paleogene oblique collision between the Caribbean Volcanic Arc and the Bahamas Borderland (North American plate).

  20. High tsunami frequency as a result of combined strike-slip faulting and coastal landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornbach, Matthew J.; Braudy, Nicole; Briggs, Richard W.; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Davis, Marcy B.; Diebold, John B.; Dieudonne, Nicole; Douilly, Roby; Frohlich, Cliff; Gulick, Sean P.S.; Johnson, Harold E.; Mann, Paul; McHugh, Cecilia; Ryan-Mishkin, Katherine; Prentice, Carol S.; Seeber, Leonardo; Sorlien, Christopher C.; Steckler, Michael S.; Symithe, Steeve Julien; Taylor, Frederick W.; Templeton, John

    2010-01-01

    Earthquakes on strike-slip faults can produce devastating natural hazards. However, because they consist predominantly of lateral motion, these faults are rarely associated with significant uplift or tsunami generation. And although submarine slides can generate tsunami, only a few per cent of all tsunami are believed to be triggered in this way. The 12 January Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake exhibited primarily strike-slip motion but nevertheless generated a tsunami. Here we present data from a comprehensive field survey that covered the onshore and offshore area around the epicentre to document that modest uplift together with slope failure caused tsunamigenesis. Submarine landslides caused the most severe tsunami locally. Our analysis suggests that slide-generated tsunami occur an order-of-magnitude more frequently along the Gonave microplate than global estimates predict. Uplift was generated because of the earthquake's location, where the Caribbean and Gonave microplates collide obliquely. The earthquake also caused liquefaction at several river deltas that prograde rapidly and are prone to failure. We conclude that coastal strike-slip fault systems such as the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault produce relief conducive to rapid sedimentation, erosion and slope failure, so that even modest predominantly strike-slip earthquakes can cause potentially catastrophic slide-generated tsunami - a risk that is underestimated at present.

  1. High tsunami frequency as a result of combined strike-slip faulting and coastal landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornbach, M.J.; Braudy, N.; Briggs, R.W.; Cormier, M.-H.; Davis, M.B.; Diebold, J.B.; Dieudonne, N.; Douilly, R.; Frohlich, C.; Gulick, S.P.S.; Johnson, H. E.; Mann, P.; McHugh, C.; Ryan-Mishkin, K.; Prentice, C.S.; Seeber, L.; Sorlien, C.C.; Steckler, M.S.; Symithe, S.J.; Taylor, F.W.; Templeton, J.

    2010-01-01

    Earthquakes on strike-slip faults can produce devastating natural hazards. However, because they consist predominantly of lateral motion, these faults are rarely associated with significant uplift or tsunami generation. And although submarine slides can generate tsunami, only a few per cent of all tsunami are believed to be triggered in this way. The 12 January Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake exhibited primarily strike-slip motion but nevertheless generated a tsunami. Here we present data from a comprehensive field survey that covered the onshore and offshore area around the epicentre to document that modest uplift together with slope failure caused tsunamigenesis. Submarine landslides caused the most severe tsunami locally. Our analysis suggests that slide-generated tsunami occur an order-of-magnitude more frequently along the Gonave microplate than global estimates predict. Uplift was generated because of the earthquake?s location, where the Caribbean and Gonave microplates collide obliquely. The earthquake also caused liquefaction at several river deltas that prograde rapidly and are prone to failure. We conclude that coastal strike-slip fault systems such as the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault produce relief conducive to rapid sedimentation, erosion and slope failure, so that even modest predominantly strike-slip earthquakes can cause potentially catastrophic slide-generated tsunamig-a risk that is underestimated at present. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  2. Structures associated with strike-slip faults that bound landslide elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, R.W.; Johnson, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Large landslides are bounded on their flanks and on elements within the landslides by structures analogous to strike-slip faults. We observed the formation of thwse strike-slip faults and associated structures at two large landslides in central Utah during 1983-1985. The strike-slip faults in landslides are nearly vertical but locally may dip a few degrees toward or away from the moving ground. Fault surfaces are slickensided, and striations are subparallel to the ground surface. Displacement along strike-slip faults commonly produces scarps; scarps occur where local relief of the failure surface or ground surface is displaced and becomes adjacent to higher or lower ground, or where the landslide is thickening or thinning as a result of internal deformation. Several types of structures are formed at the ground surface as a strike-slip fault, which is fully developed at some depth below the ground surface, propagates upward in response to displacement. The simplest structure is a tension crack oriented at 45?? clockwise or counterclockwise from the trend of an underlying right- or left-lateral strike-slip fault, respectively. The tension cracks are typically arranged en echelon with the row of cracks parallel to the trace of the underlying strike-slip fault. Another common structure that forms above a developing strike-slip fault is a fault segment. Fault segments are discontinuous strike-slip faults that contain the same sense of slip but are turned clockwise or counterclockwise from a few to perhaps 20?? from the underlying strike-slip fault. The fault segments are slickensided and striated a few centimeters below the ground surface; continued displacement of the landslide causes the fault segments to open and a short tension crack propagates out of one or both ends of the fault segments. These structures, open fault segments containing a short tension crack, are termed compound cracks; and the short tension crack that propagates from the tip of the fault segment

  3. Three-dimensional models of deformation near strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Katzman, Rafael; Lin, J.

    1996-01-01

    We use three-dimensional elastic models to help guide the kinematic interpretation of crustal deformation associated with strike-slip faults. Deformation of the brittle upper crust in the vicinity of strike-slip fault systems is modeled with the assumption that upper crustal deformation is driven by the relative plate motion in the upper mantle. The driving motion is represented by displacement that is specified on the bottom of a 15-km-thick elastic upper crust everywhere except in a zone of finite width in the vicinity of the faults, which we term the "shear zone." Stress-free basal boundary conditions are specified within the shear zone. The basal driving displacement is either pure strike slip or strike slip with a small oblique component, and the geometry of the fault system includes a single fault, several parallel faults, and overlapping en echelon faults. We examine the variations in deformation due to changes in the width of the shear zone and due to changes in the shear strength of the faults. In models with weak faults the width of the shear zone has a considerable effect on the surficial extent and amplitude of the vertical and horizontal deformation and on the amount of rotation around horizontal and vertical axes. Strong fault models have more localized deformation at the tip of the faults, and the deformation is partly distributed outside the fault zone. The dimensions of large basins along strike-slip faults, such as the Rukwa and Dead Sea basins, and the absence of uplift around pull-apart basins fit models with weak faults better than models with strong faults. Our models also suggest that the length-to-width ratio of pull-apart basins depends on the width of the shear zone and the shear strength of the faults and is not constant as previously suggested. We show that pure strike-slip motion can produce tectonic features, such as elongate half grabens along a single fault, rotated blocks at the ends of parallel faults, or extension perpendicular to

  4. Influence of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergence on shallow structure, geomorphology, and hazards, Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hartwell, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    We mapped a ~94-km-long portion of the right-lateral Hosgri Fault Zone from Point Sal to Piedras Blancas in offshore central California using high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, marine magnetic data, and multibeam bathymetry. The database includes 121 seismic profiles across the fault zone and is perhaps the most comprehensive reported survey of the shallow structure of an active strike-slip fault. These data document the location, length, and near-surface continuity of multiple fault strands, highlight fault-zone heterogeneity, and demonstrate the importance of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergences in the development of shallow structure and tectonic geomorphology. The Hosgri Fault Zone is continuous through the study area passing through a broad arc in which fault trend changes from about 338° to 328° from south to north. The southern ~40 km of the fault zone in this area is more extensional, resulting in accommodation space that is filled by deltaic sediments of the Santa Maria River. The central ~24 km of the fault zone is characterized by oblique convergence of the Hosgri Fault Zone with the more northwest-trending Los Osos and Shoreline Faults. Convergence between these faults has resulted in the formation of local restraining and releasing fault bends, transpressive uplifts, and transtensional basins of varying size and morphology. We present a hypothesis that links development of a paired fault bend to indenting and bulging of the Hosgri Fault by a strong crustal block translated to the northwest along the Shoreline Fault. Two diverging Hosgri Fault strands bounding a central uplifted block characterize the northern ~30 km of the Hosgri Fault in this area. The eastern Hosgri strand passes through releasing and restraining bends; the releasing bend is the primary control on development of an elongate, asymmetric, "Lazy Z" sedimentary basin. The western strand of the Hosgri Fault Zone passes through a significant restraining bend and

  5. An Exhumed Strike-Slip Duplex Formed at the Seismogenic Base of the Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, S. M.; Paterson, S. R.; Holk, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    In strike-slip systems, the orientation of bedding influences local fault zone architecture. New 1:5,000 and smaller scale mapping of a paleoseismic shear zone in the central eastern Sierra Nevada, California, provides insight into the behavior of strike-slip faults deforming like-oriented bedding at a dextral shearing, pseudotachylyte-bearing brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Sawmill Canyon/Saddlebag Lake segment of the Sierra Crest shear zone. In and near this map area, a strike-slip duplex system, a Riedel shear system, and shear zone-parallel major fault strands all comprise a heavily quartz and silicate vein-sealed, brittle, and partially ductilely overprinted fault system. The strike-slip duplex system is defined by spectacular restraining and releasing bend duplex geometries. New and published stable isotopic compositions of these veins (𝛿18O = +14.5 to -3.2‰) and their fluid inclusions (𝛿D = -79 to -137‰) monitor mixing between three fluid sources. The main mixing trend includes an earlier local (likely hot magmatic) to a later distal (likely cool meteoric) fluid source over time. We interpret the following. (1) Strike-slip faulting subparallel to stratigraphy at the BDT can result in strike-slip duplexes and semi-ductile Riedel shears. As planar mechanical anisotropies are folded, continued offset of the fold requires either rotation of the material about an axis, or extension of the inverted limb. In homogeneous units, rotation becomes exceedingly difficult with thickness. Thus the folded material may be subjected to enhanced tension relative to outside limbs, which in turn nucleates shear zone-subparallel lateral ramps along which folds are transported. (2) This mechanism may promote the fault-assisted descent of fluids from the surface to the seismogenic base of contractional arc crust, where earlier deformation has transposed stratigraphy toward the shear plane in a simple or transpressive wrench shear zone. (3) Duplex

  6. Analytic Study of Three-Dimensional Rupture Propagation in Strike-Slip Faulting with Analogue Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Pei-Chen; Chu, Sheng-Shin; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2014-05-01

    Strike-slip faults are high angle (or nearly vertical) fractures where the blocks have moved along strike way (nearly horizontal). Overburden soil profiles across main faults of Strike-slip faults have revealed the palm and tulip structure characteristics. McCalpin (2005) has trace rupture propagation on overburden soil surface. In this study, we used different offset of slip sandbox model profiles to study the evolution of three-dimensional rupture propagation by strike -slip faulting. In strike-slip faults model, type of rupture propagation and width of shear zone (W) are primary affecting by depth of overburden layer (H), distances of fault slip (Sy). There are few research to trace of three-dimensional rupture behavior and propagation. Therefore, in this simplified sandbox model, investigate rupture propagation and shear zone with profiles across main faults when formation are affecting by depth of overburden layer and distances of fault slip. The investigators at the model included width of shear zone, length of rupture (L), angle of rupture (θ) and space of rupture. The surface results was follow the literature that the evolution sequence of failure envelope was R-faults, P-faults and Y-faults which are parallel to the basement fault. Comparison surface and profiles structure which were curved faces and cross each other to define 3-D rupture and width of shear zone. We found that an increase in fault slip could result in a greater width of shear zone, and proposed a W/H versus Sy/H relationship. Deformation of shear zone showed a similar trend as in the literature that the increase of fault slip resulted in the increase of W, however, the increasing trend became opposite after a peak (when Sy/H was 1) value of W was reached (small than 1.5). The results showed that the W width is limited at a constant value in 3-D models by strike-slip faulting. In conclusion, this study helps evaluate the extensions of the shear zone influenced regions for strike-slip

  7. The rupture process of the Manjil, Iran earthquake of 20 june 1990 and implications for intraplate strike-slip earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Zednik, J.

    1997-01-01

    In terms of seismically radiated energy or moment release, the earthquake of 20 January 1990 in the Manjil Basin-Alborz Mountain region of Iran is the second largest strike-slip earthquake to have occurred in an intracontinental setting in the past decade. It caused enormous loss of life and the virtual destruction of several cities. Despite a very large meizoseismal area, the identification of the causative faults has been hampered by the lack of reliable earthquake locations and conflicting field reports of surface displacement. Using broadband data from global networks of digitally recording seismographs, we analyse broadband seismic waveforms to derive characteristics of the rupture process. Complexities in waveforms generated by the earthquake indicate that the main shock consisted of a tiny precursory subevent followed in the next 20 seconds by a series of four major subevents with depths ranging from 10 to 15 km. The focal mechanisms of the major subevents, which are predominantly strike-slip, have a common nodal plane striking about 285??-295??. Based on the coincidence of this strike with the dominant tectonic fabric of the region we presume that the EW striking planes are the fault planes. The first major subevent nucleated slightly south of the initial precursor. The second subevent occurred northwest of the initial precursor. The last two subevents moved progressively southeastward of the first subevent in a direction collinear with the predominant strike of the fault planes. The offsets in the relative locations and the temporal delays of the rupture subevents indicate heterogeneous distribution of fracture strength and the involvement of multiple faults. The spatial distribution of teleseismic aftershocks, which at first appears uncorrelated with meizoseismal contours, can be decomposed into stages. The initial activity, being within and on the periphery of the rupture zone, correlates in shape and length with meizoseismal lines. In the second stage

  8. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The mosaic on the right of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault on Earth which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay.

    The left mosaic shows the portion of the San Andreas fault near California's san Francisco Bay that has been scaled to the same size and resolution as the Europa image. Each covers an area approximately 170 by 193 kilometers(105 by 120 miles). The red line marks the once active central crack of the Europan fault (right) and the line of the San Andreas fault (left).

    A strike-slip fault is one in which two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. The overall motion along the Europan fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the entire length of the feature, with a path resembling stepson a staircase crossing zones which have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. Opposite sides of the fault can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides as well as older individual cracks and ridges that had been broken by its movements.

    Bends in the Europan fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This pulling-apart along the fault's bends created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, and in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled apart regions can include upwelled

  9. A three-dimensional viscoelastic model of a strike slip fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Jackson, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    An analytic approximation to the Green's function for the displacements due to a strike slip point source in an elastic layer over a viscoelastic half-space is developed. This approximate Green's function is useful because it can be analytically integrated over the fault surface. Comparison with a numerical integration of the exact solution integral indicates that the approximation is quite good. The approximate Green's function is integrated analytically to obtain the displacements due to a finite rectangular strike slip fault in an elastic layer over a viscoelastic half-space. Ground displacements and angle changes from a model survey net are computed to illustrate the viscoelastic relaxation which follows a fracture in the elastic region.

  10. Strike-slip geometry inferred from the seismicity of the Northern-Central Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elter, Franco Marco; Piero, Elter; Claudio, Eva; Elena, Eva; Katharina, Kraus Rita; Matteo, Padovano; Stefano, Solarino

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to draw attention to the real number and distribution of strike-slip earthquake focal mechanisms that are displayed in the recent seismicity of the Northern-Central Apennines. Their relation to the superficial normal fault plane solutions and thrust front along the Eastern side of the Apenninic chain can be described by a geometrical model (Riedel-System, also Riedel shear model). First we define three sectors characterized by their different seismological signatures: the North-Western Sector (NWS), the Western Central Sector (WCS) and the Eastern Central Sector (ECS). These three blocks, according to the available data, act independently from each other as a consequence of interaction among themselves, the forces induced by plate tectonics in the Mediterranean area and the blocking effect of the Alpine Chain, leading to an increased amount of transpressional, pure strike-slip and transtensional tectonics below 10 km depth.

  11. Macrostructural and microstructural architecture of the Karakoram fault: Relationship between magmatism and strike-slip faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Richard J.; Searle, Michael P.

    2007-06-01

    A key factor in interpreting the significance of large-scale strike-slip faults in models of continental deformation is an understanding of the temporal relationship between faulting and magmatism. Knowledge of when a strike-slip fault initiated is essential in order to determine its long-term slip rate and its significance in accommodating strain. We review key structural criteria that identify whether magmatism is prekinematic or synkinematic with faulting and apply these criteria to a major Tibet-bounding strike-slip fault. Along the Karakoram fault, in western Tibet, opinion is divided between (1) those advocating that magmatism and shearing were coeval, in which case the youngest U-Pb crystallization age provides a minimum age of shear, and (2) those advocating that magmatism preceded strike-slip shearing, in which case the youngest U-Pb crystallization age provides a maximum age of shear. Fault zone rocks within the central segment of the fault are variably deformed, displaying high- to low-temperature solid-state fabrics. Mylonites indicate subsolidus noncoaxial deformation at temperatures that have not exceeded greenschist-lower amphibolite facies. There is no evidence for submagmatic deformation, and there are no textural or structural indicators that suggest synkinematic magmatism. Consequently, magmatism preceded shearing suggesting that the U-Pb age of proximal leucogranites sets a maximum age for shear. Coupled with a limited offset (<150 km), these data confirm a low long-term slip rate for the Karakoram fault (3-10 mm/yr). Consequently, the fault is unlikely to have played a significant role in accommodating strain during the Indo-Asian collision, and thus its role in suggested extrusion models of deformation is limited.

  12. What causes an icy fault to slip? Investigating the depth and frictional conditions for tidally driven Coulomb failure along major strike-slip faults of Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Marissa E.; Smith-Konter, Bridget R.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2014-11-01

    The surfaces of Europa and Ganymede display strike-slip fractures, presumably arising from a combination of global and local stress sources. To better understand the role of tidal stress sources and implications for strike-slip faulting on these icy bodies, we investigate the relationship between shear and normal stresses at several major fault zones: Agenor Linea, Rhadamanthys Linea, Agave/Asterius Lineae, and Astypalaea Linea (on Europa), and Dardanus Sulcus (on Ganymede). Assuming tidal diurnal and non-synchronous rotation (NSR) stresses as plausible mechanisms for strike-slip tectonism, here we investigate the mechanics of Coulomb shear failure. We consider a range of friction coefficients (µf = 0.2 - 0.6) and fault depths (0 - 6 km) to evaluate how failure predictions vary between the satellites and as a function of depth, ice friction, geographic location, and fault geometry. Assuming present-day orbital eccentricities, our results indicate that the conditions for failure at depth are not met for any of the fault systems if subject to diurnal stresses only. Alternatively, models that include both diurnal and NSR stresses readily generate stress magnitudes that could permit shear failure. On Europa, shear failure is easily activated and failure extends to depths ranging from 3 - 6 km when a low coefficient of friction (µf = 0.2) is assumed. On Ganymede, failure is limited to even shallower depths (< 2 km). A high coefficient of friction (µf = 0.6) limits failure depths to < 3 km on Europa faults and discourages strike-slip faulting completely on Ganymede. Based on these results, we infer that the conditions for shear failure are potentially met along at least these five studied systems, and possibly others in the outer solar system, if NSR is adopted as a driving stress mechanism and the coefficient of friction is low.

  13. Impact of Cenozoic strike-slip tectonics on the evolution of the northern Levant Basin (offshore Lebanon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalayini, Ramadan; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Homberg, Catherine; Nader, Fadi H.; Comstock, John E.

    2014-11-01

    Sedimentary basins adjacent to plate boundaries contain key tectonic and stratigraphic elements to understand how stress is transmitted through plates. The Levant Basin is a place of choice to study such elements because it flanks the Levant Fracture System and the Africa/Anatolia boundary. This paper uses new high-quality 3-D seismic reflection data to unravel the tectonic evolution of the margin of this basin during the Cenozoic, the period corresponding to the formation of the Levant Fracture System, part of the Africa/Arabia plate boundary. Four major groups of structures are identified in the interpreted Cenozoic units: NW-SE striking normal faults, NNE-SSW striking thrust-faults, ENE-WSW striking dextral strike-slip faults, and NNE trending anticlines. We demonstrate that all structures, apart of the NW-SE striking normal faults, are inherited from Mesozoic faults. Their reactivation and associated folding started during the late Miocene prior to the Messinian salinity crisis due to a NW-SE compressional stress field. No clear evidence of shortening at present-day offshore Lebanon and no large NNE-SSW strike-slip faults parallel to the restraining bend are found indicating that the Levant Fracture System is mainly contained onshore at present day. The intermittent activity of the interpreted structures correlates with the two stages of Levant Fracture System movement during late Miocene and Pliocene. This paper provides a good example of the impact of the evolution of plate boundaries on adjacent basins and indicates that any changes in the stress field, as controlled by the plate boundary, will affect immediately the preexisting structures in adjacent basins.

  14. Strike-slip faulting in the Inner California Borderlands, offshore Southern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Kent, G. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Holmes, J. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kell, A. M.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), offshore of Southern California, modern dextral strike-slip faulting overprints a prominent system of basins and ridges formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Geodetic data indicate faults in the ICB accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of Pacific-North American plate boundary deformation; however, the hazard posed by the ICB faults is poorly understood due to unknown fault geometry and loosely constrained slip rates. We present observations from high-resolution and reprocessed legacy 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection datasets and multibeam bathymetry to constrain the modern fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We use a sequence stratigraphy approach to identify discrete episodes of deformation in the MCS data and present the results of our mapping in a regional fault model that distinguishes active faults from relict structures. Significant differences exist between our model of modern ICB deformation and existing models. From east to west, the major active faults are the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon, Palos Verdes, San Diego Trough, and San Clemente fault zones. Localized deformation on the continental slope along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends results from geometrical complexities in the dextral fault system. Undeformed early to mid-Pleistocene age sediments onlap and overlie deformation associated with the northern Coronado Bank fault (CBF) and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, we interpret the northern CBF to be inactive, and slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Holocene active Palos Verdes fault are unwarranted. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) and San Clemente fault have robust linear geomorphic expression, which suggests that these faults may accommodate a significant portion of modern ICB slip in a westward temporal migration of slip. The SDTF offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the

  15. Stress history controls the spatial pattern of aftershocks: case studies from strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkucu, Murat; Durmuş, Hatice; Nalbant, Süleyman

    2016-09-01

    Earthquake ruptures perturb stress within the surrounding crustal volume and as it is widely accepted now these stress perturbations strongly correlates with the following seismicity. Here we have documented five cases of the mainshock-aftershock sequences generated by the strike-slip faults from different tectonic environments of world in order to demonstrate that the stress changes resulting from large preceding earthquakes decades before effect spatial distribution of the aftershocks of the current mainshocks. The studied mainshock-aftershock sequences are the 15 October 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake (Mw = 6.4) in southern California, the 27 November 1979 Khuli-Boniabad (Mw = 7.1), the 10 May 1997 Qa'enat (Mw = 7.2) and the 31 March 2006 Silakhor (Mw = 6.1) earthquakes in Iran and the 13 March 1992 Erzincan earthquake (Mw = 6.7) in Turkey. In the literature, we have been able to find only these mainshocks that are mainly characterized by dense and strong aftershock activities along and beyond the one end of their ruptures while rare aftershock occurrences with relatively lower magnitude reported for the other end of their ruptures. It is shown that the stress changes resulted from earlier mainshock(s) that are close in both time and space might be the reason behind the observed aftershock patterns. The largest aftershocks of the mainshocks studied tend to occur inside the stress-increased lobes that were also stressed by the background earthquakes and not to occur inside the stress-increased lobes that fall into the stress shadow of the background earthquakes. We suggest that the stress shadows of the previous mainshocks may persist in the crust for decades to suppress aftershock distribution of the current mainshocks. Considering active researches about use of the Coulomb stress change maps as a practical tool to forecast spatial distribution of the upcoming aftershocks for earthquake risk mitigation purposes in near-real time, it is further suggested that

  16. Pushing the Limits of Geological Mapping Outside the Earth: 3D Modeling of Strike-Slip and Extensional Fault Systems in Meridiani Planum Region, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Royo, O.

    2014-12-01

    GIS and geological modeling software have radically changed the means by which geological mapping is produced, published and visualized. This type of software environment normally requires a spatially aware reference system to position data and interpretation, often referred as georeferenced data (i.e. geographic data referenced on the Earth). However, for this study we coin the term areoreferenced data (i.e. Mars-referenced "geographic" data). Thanks to the wealth of areoreferenced data made available by the NASA and the HiRise at University of Arizona it is now possible to carry out 3D areographic and areologic (i.e. related to the topography and geology of Mars, respectively) reconstructions in great detail. The present work benefits from the availability of software and areographic data, and presents the results of an areologic map and 3D model of the fault systems in the Meridiani Planum of Mars. The work has been carried out in Move™ (developed by Midland Valley Exploration), a geological modeling toolkit that allows for easy data loading in a wide range of formats as well as straightforward 2D/3D model building tools of geological bodies. Initial data consisted of Digital Terrain Model and orthoimages (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS). From these we have interpreted several structural domains: right-lateral strike-slip systems with associated releasing bends, which gave room to an extensional event causing a horizontal-axis rotation of the bedding. Bedding ranges from subhorizontal in the southern domain where strike-slip prevails to nearly 40º in the central and northern domains, where a more complex interaction between strike-slip and extensional faults is described. The stratigraphic sequence is mainly composed by moderately rounded well laminated basaltic sandstones (Squyres et al., 2004) in which a high component of sulfurs (e.g. sulfate anhydrate, hexahydrite, epsomite, gypsum) and salts (e.g. halite) has been described (Squyres et al., 2004

  17. Strike-Slip Faulting Processes on Ganymede: Global Morphological Mapping and Structural Interpretation of Grooved and Transitional Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, L. M.; Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Seifert, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Collins, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Ganymede's fractured surface reveals many large-scale, morphologically distinct regions of inferred distributed shear and strike-slip faulting that may be important to the structural development of its surface and in the transition from dark to light (grooved) materials. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping Ganymede's complex icy surface, we perform a detailed mapping of key examples of strike-slip morphologies (i.e., en echelon structures, strike-slip duplexes, laterally offset pre-existing features, and possible strained craters) from Galileo and Voyager images. We focus on complex structures associated with grooved terrain (e.g. Nun Sulcus, Dardanus Sulcus, Tiamat Sulcus, and Arbela Sulcus) and terrains transitional from dark to light terrain (e.g. the boundary between Nippur Sulcus and Marius Regio, including Byblus Sulcus and Philus Sulcus). Detailed structural interpretations suggest strong evidence of strike-slip faulting in some regions (i.e., Nun and Dardanus Sulcus); however, further investigation of additional strike-slip structures is required of less convincing regions (i.e., Byblus Sulcus). Where applicable, these results are synthesized into a global database representing an inferred sense of shear for many of Ganymede's fractures. Moreover, when combined with existing observations of extensional features, these results help to narrow down the range of possible principal stress directions that could have acted at the regional or global scale to produce grooved terrain on Ganymede.

  18. Strike-slip fault network of the Huangshi structure, SW Qaidam Basin: Insights from surface fractures and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiang; Zhang, Qiquan; Yu, Xiangjiang; Du, Wei; Liu, Runchao; Bian, Qing; Wang, Zhendong; Zhang, Tuo; Guo, Zhaojie

    2017-01-01

    The Huangshi structure, as one of the NWW-trending S-shaped structures in the southwestern Qaidam Basin, holds important implications for unraveling the regional structural pattern. There are four dominant sets of surface strike-slip fractures at the core of the Huangshi structure. The fractures with orientations of N28°E, N47°E and N65°E correlate well with conjugate Riedel shears (R‧), tension fractures (T) and Riedel shears (R) in the Riedel shear model, respectively. Two conjugate strike-slip fracture sets occur at the surface of the Hongpan structure (secondary to the Huangshi structure) and the southwestern part of the Huangshi structure. In seismic sections, the Huangshi structure is present as a positive flower or Y-shaped structure governed by steeply dipping faults, whereas Hongpan and Xiaoshaping structures, located symmetrically to the Huangshi structure, are thrust-controlled anticlines. The Riedel shear pattern of surface strike-slip fractures, the positive flower or Y-shaped structure in seismic sections and the NW-trending secondary compressional anticlines consistently demonstrate that the Huangshi structure is dominated by left-lateral strike-slip faults which comprise a strike-slip fault network. Considering the similar S-shaped configuration and NWW trend of structures across the southwestern Qaidam Basin, it can be further speculated that these structures are also predominantly of left-lateral strike-slip types.

  19. Modeling Strike-Slip-Driven Stream Capture in Detachment- and Transport-Limited Fluvial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, S.; Duvall, A. R.; Tucker, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers, especially those in mountainous settings, are known to respond to tectonic and climatic drivers through both gradual and abrupt changes in slope, hydraulic geometry, and planform. Modification of drainage network topology by stream capture, in which drainage area, and therefore water and sediment, is diverted suddenly from one catchment into another, represents the rapid end of the fluvial response spectrum. Such sudden drainage rearrangement affects the river's potential for incision and sediment transport, and thus has implications for the development of topography and for depositional histories in sedimentary basins. Despite recognition of the importance of this process in landscape evolution, the factors controlling the occurrence of stream capture are not well understood. Here we investigate the process of stream capture using strike-slip faults as a natural experiment. Lateral fault motion drives stream capture when offset is enough to juxtapose adjacent fault-perpendicular streams. In the simplest scenario, the capture events should occur regularly in space and time whenever two streams are juxtaposed, the frequency of capture depending only on drainage spacing and fault slip rate. However, in real-world settings such as the San Andreas Fault Zone of California and the Marlborough Fault System of New Zealand, such regularity is not always observed. We use the Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development Model (CHILD) to investigate the mechanisms and frequency of stream capture in a strike-slip setting. Models are designed to address the connection between the size (i.e. drainage area) of juxtaposed rivers and the likelihood that capture will occur between them. We also explore the role of sediment load in the capture process by modeling both detachment-limited and transport-limited systems. Comparison of these model results to case-study field sites will help us to interpret the landscape signature of strike-slip faulting, and to understand

  20. Crustal Strike-Slip Faulting along Small Circle Paths in the Northwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.; Wells, R. E.; Lamb, A. P.; Weaver, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    Late Cenozoic and Quaternary faults, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that clockwise rotation of Washington and Oregon is accommodated by north-directed thrusting and strike-slip deformation in the Washington segment of the Cascadia forearc. Curvilinear NW- to NNW-trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments define small circles around an Euler pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America that approximates GPS-derived poles for the rotation of eastern Washington and the Snake River Plain. Although the lengths of strike-slip faults that follow small circle paths suggest maximum earthquake magnitudes of M6.6 to M7.2, their slip rates calculated from the Euler pole are low (0.3 to 0.5 mm/yr). Many normal faults in the Lewis and Clark Zone in Montana, the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain, west of the Wasatch Front, in the northern Basin and Range, and locally east of the Oregon Cascade arc are radial to this pole of rotation, suggesting that these normal faults help accommodate this crustal rotation. Regions undergoing contraction in western Washington and northwestern Oregon are separated from those to the east undergoing extension by lines radial to the Euler pole. In our regional kinematic model, dextral faults along small circles connect SW-directed crustal extension in the Intermountain Seismic Belt and E-directed extension in the Cascade arc south of Mount Hood to N-directed contraction in the Olympic Peninsula, Puget Lowland, and the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt. The lack of Quaternary faulting and seismicity in the Oregon segment of the forearc is consistent with its clockwise rotation as a rigid block. Potential drivers of the crustal rotation include westward slab rollback and the Yellowstone geoid high, and the overall velocity field may integrate the response of rotating blocks and distributed deformation between them.

  1. Viscoelastic Postseismic Rebound to Strike-Slip Earthquakes in Regions of Oblique Plate Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Steven C.

    1999-01-01

    According to the slip partitioning concept, the trench parallel component of relative plate motion in regions of oblique convergence is accommodated by strike-slip faulting in the overriding continental lithosphere. The pattern of postseismic surface deformation due to viscoelastic flow in the lower crust and asthenosphere following a major earthquake on such a fault is modified from that predicted from the conventual elastic layer over viscoelastic halfspace model by the presence of the subducting slab. The predicted effects, such as a partial suppression of the postseismic velocities by 1 cm/yr or more immediately following a moderate to great earthquake, are potentially detectable using contemporary geodetic techniques.

  2. Analogue modelling of the effect of topographic steps in the development of strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás, Ricardo; Duarte, João C.; Rosas, Filipe M.; Schellart, Wouter; Strak, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Strike-slip faults often cut across regions of overthickened crust, such as oceanic plateaus or islands. These morphological steps likely cause a local variation in the stress field that controls the geometry of these systems. Such variation in the stress field will likely play a role in strain localization and associated seismicity. This is of particular importance since wrench systems can produce very high magnitude earthquakes. However, such systems have been generally overlooked and are still poorly understood. In this work we will present a set of analogue models that were designed with the objective of understanding how a step in the morphology affects the development of a strike-slip fault system. The models consist of a sand-cake with two areas with different thicknesses connected by a gentle ramp perpendicular to a dextral strike-slip basal fault. The sand-cake lies above two basal plates to which the dextral relative motion was imposed using a stepping-motor. Our results show that a Riedel fault system develops across the two flat areas. However, a very asymmetric fault pattern develops across the morphological step. A deltoid constrictional bulge develops in the thinner part of the model, which progressively acquires a sigmoidal shape with increasing offset. In the thicker part of the domain, the deformation is mostly accommodated by Riedel faults and the one closer to the step acquires a relatively lower angle. Associated to this Riedel fault a collapse area develops and amplifies with increasing offset. For high topographic steps, the propagation of the main fault across the step area only occurs in the final stages of the experiments, contrary to what happens when the step is small or inexistent. These results strongly suggest a major impact of the variation of topography on the development of strike-slip fault systems. The step in the morphology causes variations in the potential energy that changes the local stress field (mainly the vertical

  3. Shear heating in continental strike-slip shear zones:model and field examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, Philippe Hervé; Ricard, Yannick; Battaglia, Jean; Lacassin, Robin

    1999-01-01

    A two-layer (crust and upper mantle), finite difference steady-state thermomechanical model of a long-lived (several million years) lithospheric strike-slip fault is presented, and its predictions compared with field observations from various major fault zones. In order to estimate the maximum amount of shear heating, all mechanical energy is assumed to be dissipated in heat, in ductile as well as in brittle layers. Deformation follows a friction law in the brittle layer(s), and a power-flow law in the ductile one(s). Variations of several independent parameters and their influence on the thermo-mechanical state of the fault zone and on shear heating are systematically explored. Shear heating is found to be more important in fault zones affecting an initially cold lithosphere, and increases with slip rate, friction coefficient and stiffness of materials. In extreme cases (slip rate of 10 cm yr^-1, stiff lithosphere), shear heating could lead to temperature increases close to 590 degC at the Moho, and 475 degC at 20 km depth. For more common cases, shear heating leads to smaller temperature increases, but can still explain high-grade metamorphic conditions encountered in strike-slip shear zones. However, modelled temperature conditions often fall short of those observed. This could be due to heat transport by mechanisms more efficient than conduction. Common syntectonic emplacement of granitic melts in ductile strike-slip shear zones can be explained by lower crust partial melting induced by shear heating in the upper mantle. Besides slip rate, the possibility of such melting depends mostly on the upper mantle rheology and on the fertility of the lower crust: for hard upper mantle and highly fertile lower crust, partial melting could occur at rates of 1 cm yr^-1, while in most cases it would result from the breakdown of micas for slip rates over 3 cm yr^-1. As a result of shear heating, partial melting of the upper mantle could occur in the presence of small amounts

  4. The width of fault zones in a brittle-viscous lithosphere: Strike-slip faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.

    1991-01-01

    A fault zone in an ideal brittle material overlying a very weak substrate could, in principle, consist of a single slip surface. Real fault zones have a finite width consisting of a number of nearly parallel slip surfaces on which deformation is distributed. The hypothesis that the finite width of fault zones reflects stresses due to quasistatic flow in the ductile substrate of a brittle surface layer is explored. Because of the simplicity of theory and observations, strike-slip faults are examined first, but the analysis can be extended to normal and thrust faulting.

  5. Numerical model of formation of a 3-D strike-slip fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemenda, Alexandre I.; Cavalié, Olivier; Vergnolle, Mathilde; Bouissou, Stéphane; Delouis, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    The initiation and the initial evolution of a strike-slip fault are modeled within an elastoplasticity constitutive framework taking into account the evolution of the hardening modulus with inelastic straining. The initial and boundary conditions are similar to those of the Riedel shear experiment. The models first deform purely elastically. Then damage (inelastic deformation) starts at the model surface. The damage zone propagates both normal to the forming fault zone and downwards. Finally, it affects the whole layer thickness, forming flower-like structure in cross-section. At a certain stage, a dense set of parallel Riedel shears forms at shallow depth. A few of these propagate both laterally and vertically, while others die. The faults first propagate in-plane, but then rapidly change direction to make a larger angle with the shear axis. New fault segments form as well, resulting in complex 3-D fault zone architecture. Different fault segments accommodate strike-slip and normal displacements, which results in the formation of valleys and rotations along the fault system.

  6. Kinematic Evolution and Mechanisms of Strike-Slip Faults in the Solar System: Insights from Experimental Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, Ivy S.

    Identifying the ways in which faults initiate and propagate in disparate tectonic environments is fundamental for understanding regional and global deformation on rocky and icy bodies throughout the solar system. Furthermore, the kinematics and mechanisms of faulting provide a framework for understanding the range of dynamic processes that operate (or have previously operated) on planetary surfaces. To provide insight into these processes, my research focuses on strike-slip fault formation on Earth, Venus, and tidally deformed satellites (e.g., Europa, Enceladus, Phobos). Strike-slip faults are widespread across tectonic environments and their geometry, morphology, and kinematics are easily identifiable through remote sensing techniques, making this class of structures ideal for reconstructing the histories of planetary crusts. In this work, I integrate geologic observations and interpretations with experimental analogues to investigate the tectonic development of strike-slip faults in response to (1) pre-existing heterogeneous crust structure and/or composition, and (2) cyclic "tidal" stresses. The geometry and morphology of strike-slip faults can be used to test competing models of structural deformation and geodynamic properties of solar system bodies. The current understanding for strike-slip fault initiation, geometry, and morphology, derived from field and experimental studies in homogenous material by unidirectional simple shear, suggests a sequence of deformation variable only by the shape of an underlying fault. Strike-slip fault zones are defined as having a primary throughgoing fault that accommodates the majority of regional strain and flanking offset folds and fractures that form at characteristic angles away from the applied stress direction. However, along-strike variations in morphology and lateral offsets, pervasive off-fault deformation, and the absence of throughgoing faults do not adhere to anticipated outcomes of traditional strike-slip fault

  7. Stress interaction between subduction earthquakes and forearc strike-slip faults: Modeling and application to the northern Caribbean plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.; Lin, J.

    2004-01-01

    Strike-slip faults in the forearc region of a subduction zone often present significant seismic hazard because of their proximity to population centers. We explore the interaction between thrust events on the subduction interface and strike-slip faults within the forearc region using three-dimensional models of static Coulomb stress change. Model results reveal that subduction earthquakes with slip vectors subparallel to the trench axis enhance the Coulomb stress on strike-slip faults adjacent to the trench but reduce the stress on faults farther back in the forearc region. In contrast, subduction events with slip vectors perpendicular to the trench axis enhance the Coulomb stress on strike-slip faults farther back in the forearc, while reducing the stress adjacent to the trench. A significant contribution to Coulomb stress increase on strike-slip faults in the back region of the forearc comes from "unclamping" of the fault, i.e., reduction in normal stress due to thrust motion on the subduction interface. We argue that although Coulomb stress changes from individual subduction earthquakes are ephemeral, their cumulative effects on the pattern of lithosphere deformation in the forearc region are significant. We use the Coulomb stress models to explain the contrasting deformation pattern between two adjacent segments of the Caribbean subduction zone. Subduction earthquakes with slip vectors nearly perpendicular to the Caribbean trench axis is dominant in the Hispaniola segment, where the strike-slip faults are more than 60 km inland from the trench. In contrast, subduction slip motion is nearly parallel to the Caribbean trench axis along the Puerto Rico segment, where the strike-slip fault is less than 15 km from the trench. This observed jump from a strike-slip fault close to the trench axis in the Puerto Rico segment to the inland faults in Hispaniola is explained by different distributions of Coulomb stress in the forearc region of the two segments, as a result

  8. Coarse-grained deltaic sedimentation in the Miocene Cuyama strike-slip basin, California Coast Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alan, Bartow J.

    1990-01-01

    The Cuyama basin, located in the southern Coast Ranges of California southwest of the San Andreas fault, developed early in the history of the San Andreas transform system. The Miocene marine basin formed in a transtensional setting along a dextral strike-slip fault of the transform system following Oligocene non-marine basin formation in an extensional setting. The lower and middle Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the northwestern part of the basin, which represents the first of two transgressive-regressive cycles, is described here in terms of nine facies in two broad facies groups. The 400-m-thick Soda Lake Shale Member (of the Vaqueros) comprises deep-basin and starved-basin facies. A thin transgressive facies occurs locally at the base of the formation. The overlying Painted Rock Sandstone Member (of the Vaqueros), which is more than 2200 m thick and consists mostly of coarse-grained sandstone and pebbly sandstone, constitutes a delta complex of prodelta, slope channel, delta front, tide-influenced distributary channel, interdistributary bay, and fluvial channel facies. The basinal depositional system consisted of turbidite mud and sand, and hemipelagic and pelagic sediments of the basinal facies deposited in a rapidly subsiding basin. The delta depositional system consisted of the delta complex facies that prograded into the deep basin and had a steep prodelta slope that extended to bathyal depths. The delta is inferred to be a mixed fluvial-wave-dominated fan delta, analogous in its delta-front morphology and processes to a fjord delta, in which coarse sediment delivered to the delta front by braided streams was transported down the prodelta slope into deep water by sediment gravity flows. Transgression and rapid deepening of the basin in the early Miocene coincided with rapid tectonic subsidence. Deepening culminated with deposition of a starved-basin facies or condensed section at the time of maximum transgression, which was followed by the beginning of a

  9. The Interaction of Strike-Slip and Convergent Deformation in the Alpine Belt of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, G. A.; Billen, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    The South Island of New Zealand provides a type example of transpressional deformation in the continental environment. Oblique convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates is absorbed partly by strike-slip motion parallel to the Alpine Fault and partly by horizontal convergence perpendicular to the fault. The distribution of strike-parallel deformation observed geodetically is consistent with the theoretical deformation of a thin viscous sheet (England et al., J. Geophys. Res., 90, 3551-3557, 1985). In this model the displacement rate, and hence the strain-rate, decays exponentially away from a strike-slip boundary. The observed exponential length scale is consistent with an along-strike length of the zone of about 450 km, and a stress vs strain-rate exponent of the non-linear viscous constitutive law, of about n = 3. This strike-parallel deformation field implies an effective viscosity distribution across the orogen in which viscosity increases exponentially with distance from the boundary (the Alpine Fault). The length scale of this exponential increase is about 60 km, but the total width of the weak zone depends on the background viscosity level. Weakening of the lithosphere in the region adjacent to the boundary has a key influence on the progress of convergent deformation in the orthogonal direction. Firstly, the weakening localizes the convergent deformation. Secondly, and perhaps more significantly, it promotes the local rate of development of gravitational instability in which the relatively dense mantle lithosphere in the zone of shortening sinks into and is replaced by asthenosphere. The development of instability is affected by other factors also, including the buoyancy of the crustal layer and the strength of crust relative to mantle. Shear induced weakening explains why downwelling can develop relatively quickly in transpressional zones, while in typical continental environments lithosphere appears relatively stable to convective disturbances

  10. Tectonic Tremor Triggered along Major Strike-Slip Faults around the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, C.; Peng, Z.; Shelly, D. R.; Hill, D. P.; Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Chao, K.; Zimmerman, J. P.; Douilly, R.; Deschamps, A.; Haase, J. S.; Calais, E.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, deep tectonic tremor has been observed at several major plate-bounding faults around the Pacific Rim. Observations in these regions show that ambient tremor occurs spontaneously in association with geodetically detectable slow-slip events and that triggered tremor occurs in response to small stress perturbations arising from solid earth tides as well as passing seismic waves of a distant earthquake. Tremor generally occurs in the lower crust, beneath the seismogenic zone where earthquakes occur. In order to investigate the potential link between tremor and earthquake nucleation, further study of when, where, and how tremor occurs is needed. Here, we present a review of remotely triggered tectonic tremor in four strike-slip regions: (1) the Queen Charlotte Fault near Haida Gwaii, Canada, (2) the Eastern Denali Fault in Yukon, Canada, (3) the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault in the southern Haiti peninsula, and (4) the Parkfield-Cholame segment of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California. In Haida Gwaii, Yukon and Parkfield, we first compute the estimated dynamic stress for all magnitude ≥ 5.5 earthquakes based on the magnitude listed in the Advanced National Seismograph System (ANSS) earthquake catalog and epicentral distance to the region where tremor is observed. We then retrieve seismic data from local networks for earthquakes that are estimated to generate ≥ 1 kPa dynamic stress, without regard to epicentral distance. We characterize tremor triggered by these distant earthquakes as broadband signals with long duration that are coincident with surface waves from a distant event or occur in a large cluster immediately following the teleseismic wavetrain. In Haiti, a temporary seismic network was deployed shortly after the 2010/01/12 Mw7.0 Haiti earthquake. Thus, we are only able to report on triggering by the 2010/02/27 Mw8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake that occurred shortly thereafter. In Parkfield, we use a low-frequency earthquake

  11. Deformation of Rock Mass Caused by Strike-Slip Faulting: Insights from Analogue Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, K.

    2006-12-01

    Strike-slip fault zones are induced experimentally in artificial rock subjected to strike-slip displacement along basement fault. The purpose is to investigate in three dimensions, the geometries and sequence of development of structural elements comprising the fault zones by use of an X-ray CT scanner. 860 mm long, 310 mm wide, 25 mm high artificial rocks were made by mixing sand, plaster and water. The basement fault was displaced up to 100 mm at a displacement rate of 0.1mm/sec. The deformation of the artificial rocks with increasing basement displacement was observed as follows.1) En echelon fractures corresponding to the Riedel shears are observed at the surface of the artificial rock. In three dimensions, each fracture has helicoidal shape. The strike of Riedel shear to the basement fault rises by increasing sand content of the artificial rock, in reasonable agreement with the direction predicted by the Coulomb criterion in terms of the angle of internal friction. The width of fault zone that consists of the Riedel shears increases with increasing sand content of the artificial rock. 2) Fractures corresponding to the P-shears forms and serve to connect the Riedel shears. 3) New shears (outer shear) initiate from the points of interconnection of Riedel and P-shears, and propagate aside from the fault zone that consists of Riedel and P- shears. The region among the Riedel shear, P-shear and outer shear is an up-squeezed block, which undergo rotation with increasing displacement. The width of fault zone that consists of the Riedel shear, P-shear and outer shear increases with increasing plaster content of the artificial rock. Such increase in the width of fault zone may result from increasing the cohesive strength of the artificial rock. Likewise, the width of fault zone in rock mass is considered to depend on the mechanical properties of rocks, the geometries and maturity of the fault systems in natural cases of strike-slip faulting.

  12. Formation of Ridge-Type Strike-Slip Faults on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, C.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    Europa, Jupiter's fourth largest moon, has been imaged by both NASA's Voyager and Galileo spacecraft. The most common lineaments found on Europa's pervasively fractured surface are ridges, many of which also appear to be strike-slip faults in that they offset other crosscutting lineaments. Recent formation models have proposed that ridges may be created through shearing, although earlier models characterized them as tension fractures. We developed a technique to determine the dominant deformation characteristics along ridges having apparent lateral offsets. We show evidence for both lateral shearing and convergence along ridges, indicating that apparent lateral offsets are not purely the result of strike-slip motions. Using ISIS software, Galileo images were reprojected using both orthogonal and transverse mercator projections, to conserve line lengths and preserve angular relationships, respectively. These projections are needed to accurately differentiate shearing-related offsets from convergence-related offsets. However, there are caveats to our developed technique for determining these relative offsets and thus the formation mechanisms behind ridge development. Apparent offsets must be large enough to overcome image resolution constraints. It is also important that several offset lineaments crosscut the ridge with a wide range of orientations relative to the ridge in order to most accurately determine the relative motions across the ridge. Relative orientations are defined by angle alpha, measured clockwise from the ridge to the crosscut feature. At both small and large alpha angles (0 to 30 degrees and 160 to 180 degrees), apparent offsets due to convergence across the ridge may become relatively large compared to where alpha angles are closer to 90 degrees (for which pure ridge-orthogonal motion gives an apparent offset of zero). Causes of apparent offsets are quantified using plots of normalized separations of offset features versus alpha, which produce

  13. Modern glacial outwash sand along the Denali Fault: Thermochronological constraints on strike-slip fault and glacier interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benowitz, J.; Layer, P. W.; O'Sullivan, P. B.; Vanlaningham, S.; Herreid, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    The interplay between tectonic and climatic processes on exhumation patterns is a fundamental question in current tectonic research. There has been a special focus on the affect of glacial processes on exhumation patterns in tectonically active orogens. Conclusions about exhumation extent related to late Cenozoic climatic forcing are often complicated by the possibility of movement along unknown ice-covered faults in glaciated mountain belts. In this study we investigate the interaction between glacial processes and the ice-covered Denali fault through detrital geochronology of modern glacier outwash sediments. The narrow high-relief Alaska Range provides a unique opportunity to examine the interaction of Pliocene-Quaternary glaciation with a known large-scale intercontinental strike-slip fault on long term exhumation patterns. Key attributes of the research area are a comprehensive bedrock thermochronology record of long-term rapid/deep exhumation (~24 Ma to present/~14 km), the orogen’s tectonic relationship with the ice covered Denali Fault, a preponderance of highly erosive surge-type glaciers along the Fault trace and a ~350 km transect of easily accessible sampling sites. By comparing U-Pb zircon emplacement ages (~70 Ma to ~38 Ma) and 40Ar/39Ar mica exhumation ages (~33 Ma to ~18 Ma) from bedrock samples with sub-glacial 40Ar/39Ar mica single grain fusion age distributions from glacial outwash sand we can differentiate between predicted cooling age patterns. We can distinguish between three different scenarios from the full data set: a) Outwash data slightly younger than bedrock data set-This would imply same trend as bedrock samples, where as biotite and muscovite samples get younger as you approach the Denali Fault in agreement with dip-slip on the Denali Fault is a significant contributor to topographic development in the region. b) Outwash data same or older then bedrock data set-This would imply structures splaying off the Denali Fault are

  14. Lineament Domain of Regional Strike-Slip Corridor: Insight from the Neogene Transtensional De Geer Transform Fault in NW Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.

    2015-05-01

    Lineaments on regional scale images represent controversial features in tectonic studies. Published models explain the presence of the lineament domains in most geodynamic environments as resulting from the enhanced erosion along strikes normal to the upper crustal regional extension. Despite their success in many tectonic frameworks, these models fail to explain the existing lineament domains in the regional strike-slip corridors that separate regional blocks, including the transform faults. The present paper investigates the lineament distribution in such environments, and specifically presents the results from a study along the shear corridor of the De Geer Transform Fault in the North Atlantic, responsible for the separation and drifting away between Northern Greenland and the Svalbard Archipelago since Oligocene times. The study spans from satellite image analysis and outcrop scale investigations to a more regional analysis on a digital bathymetric model of the North Atlantic-Arctic Ocean. Lineaments were automatically detected in the spectral band 8 (0.52-0.9 μm) of a Landsat 7 image (15 m/pixel resolution). A total of 320 image lineaments were extracted from both the regional and the local scale investigations and statistically analyzed. Results from the multi-scalar lineament analyses revealed the existence of a main N-S lineament domain regionally persistent from the De Geer corridor to the western margin of northern Spitsbergen where it relates to the youngest, post-Oligocene, tectonics observed onshore. This is confirmed by field observations showing that the N-S faults represent the youngest brittle deformation system and systematically cut the deformations associated with the building of the Tertiary West Spitsbergen fold and thrust belt. The N-S lineament domain is the result of the activity of a larger, regional scale tectonic feature, NW-SE oriented and responsible for the localized extension within its deformation corridor, the De Geer Transform

  15. Statistical Correlation between Red Wood Ant Sites and Neotectonic Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberich, G.; Klimetzek, D.; Wöhler, C.; Grumpe, A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research in the West Eifel (West Germany) has demonstrated the correlation of soil gas anomalies and spatial distribution of red wood ant (RWA) mounds along strike-slip faults. RWA can be used as biological indicators for the identification of neotectonic fault systems (Berberich 2010, Schreiber & Berberich 2011). For myrmecologists, the causes and stringency of such a linkage are paramount, since linear patterns have been mostly associated with edge effects of forest stands and/or roads (Klimetzek 1970, Klimetzek & Kaiser 1995, Wellenstein 1990). Therefore, geostatistical techniques were applied in the West Eifel and the Bodanrück (South West Germany) to distribution data of approx. 3,000 resp. 2,300 mounds of RWA (Formica spp., Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in correlation with known neotectonic fault systems Both study areas are located in areas with a complex tectonic history. Commenced during the Neogene and persisted during the Quaternary, the uplift of both, the Rhenoherzynikum and the Black Forest, affects the dynamics of the study areas and reactivates pre-existing Palaeozoic crustal discontinuities. The West Eifel (Rhenoherzynikum) was tectonically sheared in Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. The current NW-SE-trending main stress direction opens pathways for geogenic gases. At the same time, Variscan faults as part of a conjugated shear system, are reactivated. At the Bodanrück, the compressional stress field (NNW-SSE) leads to a WSW-ENE extensional regime, in which faults cut through the entire crust (Ziegler & Dèzes 2007, Nagra 1992). The prominent large-scale neotectonic structure is the NW-SE to WNW-ESE trending "Freiburg-Bonndorf-Hegau-Bodensee-Graben" that consists of several sub-trenches (Müller et al. 2002). Field surveys indicate a possible existence of a NNE-SSW trending strike-slip fault extending east of Stein am Rhein (Büchi & Müller 2003) possibly reactivated in the Quaternary (Birkhäuser et al. 2001). Available focal mechanism solutions

  16. A multilayer model of time dependent deformation following an earthquake on a strike-slip fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    A multilayer model of the Earth to calculate finite element of time dependent deformation and stress following an earthquake on a strike slip fault is discussed. The model involves shear properties of an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard viscoelastic linear solid lower lithosphere, a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere and an elastic mesosphere. Systematic variations of fault and layer depths and comparisons with simpler elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic asthenosphere calculations are analyzed. Both the creep of the lower lithosphere and astenosphere contribute to the postseismic deformation. The magnitude of the deformation is enhanced by a short distance between the bottom of the fault (slip zone) and the top of the creep region but is less sensitive to the thickness of the creeping layer. Postseismic restressing is increased as the lower lithosphere becomes more viscoelastic, but the tendency for the width of the restressed zone to growth with time is retarded.

  17. Strike-slip faulting, wrinkle ridges, and time variable stress states in the Coprates Region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    The existence of strike-slip faults was recently documented in two locations on Mars. Two clear examples are reviewed located southeast of Valles Marineris and preliminary evidence is presented for more widespread strike-slip deformation elsewhere in Coprates. The first two examples show that strike-slip faulting occurred in a broad zone east of the Coprates Rise spanning approximately 400 km east-west by perhaps 1000 km north-south. The last example suggests that the growth of major wrinkle ridges throughout Coprates may have been influenced by horizontally directed shear stresses and that more than one generation of ridges was produced. Thus, 'compressional' deformation of ridged plains south of Valles Marineris was spatially heterogeneous and a temporal change in stress may have been involved.

  18. The role of strike-slip faulting in the evolution of the Afar Depression from remote sensing data fusion, field investigation and radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurmond, Allison Kennedy

    Remote sensing data integration, field studies and radar interferometry has proven to be an effective combination in evaluating the evolution of the Afar Depression, specifically, the interplay of normal and strike-slip faulting within the East Central Block. The Afar triple junction is a ˜200,000 km2 region of diffuse but complex deformation where the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, and the Ethiopian Main Rift meet. The Gulf of Aden and Red Sea rifts are currently propagating into the Afar Depression creating a ˜120 km long and ˜100 km wide overlap zone, known as the East Central Block. Field studies and fault plane solutions of seismic activity within the East Central Block have shown evidence of strike-slip movement along dominantly NW-trending faults. However, integrated radar and optical remote sensing data shows dextral, map-scale kink structures within the Tendaho Graben. Field studies provided additional evidence for dextral displacement along NE- to NNE-trending faults in the Tendaho Graben. Dextral strike-slip movement along NE- to NNE-trending faults are explained as tear zones within regions of localized lithospheric weakness as faulted blocks adjust to clockwise rotation of micro-blocks within the East Central Block. Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) characterizes the strain deformation within the East Central Block. Unwrapped interferograms and displacement maps show relative deformation patterns within and across micro-blocks that support a component of clockwise rotation about a vertical axis. Steep phase shifts along NW-trending faults with and without topographic expression indicate a change in the strain accommodation from preexisting fault scarps to newly formed fault planes. Steep phase shifts delineate NE-trending faults which exist within individual micro-blocks supporting tear zones as a means of accommodating the strain of clockwise rotating fault blocks. This work suggests that dextral strike-slip movement along

  19. Correlation between Coulomb stress changes imparted by large historical strike-slip earthquakes and current seismicity in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibe, Takeo; Shimazaki, Kunihiko; Tsuruoka, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Satake, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    To determine whether current seismicity continues to be affected by large historical earthquakes, we investigated the correlation between current seismicity in Japan and the static stress changes in the Coulomb Failure Function (ΔCFF) due to eight large historical earthquakes (since 1923, magnitude ≥ 6.5) with a strike-slip mechanism. The ΔCFF was calculated for two types of receiver faults: the mainshock and the focal mechanisms of recent moderate earthquakes. We found that recent seismicity for the mainshock receiver faults is concentrated in the positive ΔCFF regions of four earthquakes (the 1927 Tango, 1943 Tottori, 1948 Fukui, and 2000 Tottori-Ken Seibu earthquakes), while no such correlations are recognizable for the other four earthquakes (the 1931 Nishi-Saitama, 1963 Wakasa Bay, 1969 Gifu-Ken Chubu, and 1984 Nagano-Ken Seibu earthquakes). The probability distribution of the ΔCFF calculated for the recent focal mechanisms clearly indicates that recent earthquakes concentrate in positive ΔCFF regions, suggesting that the current seismicity may be affected by a number of large historical earthquakes. The proposed correlation between the ΔCFF and recent seismicity may be affected by multiple factors controlling aftershock activity or decay time.

  20. Earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanisms in central Oklahoma reveal a complex system of reactivated subsurface strike-slip faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, Harley M.; Herrmann, Robert B.; Bergman, Eric A.; Earle, Paul S.; Holland, Austin F.; Baldwin, Randy W.; Gassner, A.

    2015-01-01

    The sharp increase in seismicity over a broad region of central Oklahoma has raised concern regarding the source of the activity and its potential hazard to local communities and energy industry infrastructure. Since early 2010, numerous organizations have deployed temporary portable seismic stations in central Oklahoma in order to record the evolving seismicity. In this study, we apply a multiple-event relocation method to produce a catalog of 3,639 central Oklahoma earthquakes from late 2009 through 2014. RMT source parameters were determined for 195 of the largest and best-recorded earthquakes. Combining RMT results with relocated seismicity enabled us to determine the length, depth and style-of-faulting occurring on reactivated subsurface fault systems. Results show that the majority of earthquakes occur on near vertical, optimally oriented (NE-SW and NW-SE), strike-slip faults in the shallow crystalline basement. These are necessary first order observations required to assess the potential hazards of individual faults in Oklahoma.

  1. A new multilayered visco-elasto-plastic experimental model to study strike-slip fault seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniven, Y.; Dominguez, S.; Soliva, R.; Cattin, R.; Peyret, M.; Marchandon, M.; Romano, C.; Strak, V.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, technological advances in satellite imagery measurements as well as the development of dense geodetic and seismologic networks allow for a detailed analysis of surface deformation associated with active fault seismic cycle. However, the study of earthquake dynamics faces several limiting factors related to the difficulty to access the deep source of earthquake and to integrate the characteristic time scales of deformation processes that extend from seconds to thousands of years. To overcome part of these limitations and better constrain the role and couplings between kinematic and mechanical parameters, we have developed a new experimental approach allowing for the simulation of strike-slip fault earthquakes and analyze in detail hundreds of successive seismic cycle. Model rheology is made of multilayered visco-elasto-plastic analog materials to account for the mechanical behavior of the upper and lower crust and to allow simulating brittle/ductile coupling, postseismic deformation phase and far-field stress transfers. The kinematic evolution of the model surface is monitored using an optical system, based on subpixel spectral correlation of high-resolution digital images. First, results show that the model succeed in reproducing the deformation mechanisms and surface kinematics associated to the main phases of the seismic cycle indicating that model scaling is satisfactory. These results are comforted by using numerical algorithms to study the strain and stress distribution at the surface and at depth, along the fault plane. Our analog modeling approach appears, then, as an efficient complementary approach to investigate earthquake dynamics.

  2. Earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanisms in central Oklahoma reveal a complex system of reactivated subsurface strike-slip faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H. M.; Herrmann, R. B.; Bergman, E. A.; Earle, P.; Holland, A.; Baldwin, R.; Gassner, A.

    2015-04-01

    The sharp increase in seismicity over a broad region of central Oklahoma has raised concern regarding the source of the activity and its potential hazard to local communities and energy industry infrastructure. Since early 2010, numerous organizations have deployed temporary portable seismic stations in central Oklahoma in order to record the evolving seismicity. In this study, we apply a multiple-event relocation method to produce a catalog of 3639 central Oklahoma earthquakes from late 2009 through 2014. Regional moment tensor (RMT) source parameters were determined for 195 of the largest and best recorded earthquakes. Combining RMT results with relocated seismicity enabled us to determine the length, depth, and style of faulting occurring on reactivated subsurface fault systems. Results show that the majority of earthquakes occur on near-vertical, optimally oriented (NE-SW and NW-SE), strike-slip faults in the shallow crystalline basement. These are necessary first-order observations required to assess the potential hazards of individual faults in Oklahoma.

  3. A reality check on the timing of initiation, geological offsets, slip rates and geodetic rates on the Karakoram strike-slip fault.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, M. P.; Phillips, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Total geological offset of 1000 km along the dextral Karakoram fault (Peltzer & Tapponnier 1989) were based on incorrect correlation of granite belts from the Pamir to S. Tibet and active slip rates of 30mm/yr-1 were based on an assumption of the age of offset post-glacial features (10 +/- 2 ka; Liu et al. 1992). Detailed mapping and U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology has confirmed that total dextral offsets are less than 120 km, the timing of initiation of the fault must have been younger than 15 Ma and that exhumation of sheared leucogranites and migmatites occurred between 15-11 Ma (Searle et al., 1997; Dunlap et al., 1998). We stress that: 1. All Tibetan fault slip rates published prior to 1996 are invalid as no precise timing constraints on the post-glacial Quaternary features were used. The common assumption was that all glacial features were formed 10 +/- 2 ka, without any absolute dating. The glacial and fluvial features used to constrain offsets could have been awry by a factor of 3 or 4 (from 3.5 Ma - 20,000 ka). 2. Recent slip rates derived from cosmogenic isotope dating of offset Quaternary features should be treated with immense caution because during the continual recycling process of glacial moraine or alluvial fan burial, exposure and re-deposition, it cannot be known precisely which phase of exhumation is being dated. 3. Long-term geological slip rates on offset granites, precisely constrained by U-Pb geochronology remain the best estimates of timing of initiation, total finite offset and slip rates on Tibetan strike-slip faults. 4. The Karakoram fault is unlikely to be a lithospheric scale fault, because (a) temperatures beneath the southern part of the Tibetan plateau and beneath the faults are high enough to induce melting (>700° C at only 20 km depth), and (b) the lower crust beneath these faults must be underplated cold, old granulite facies crust of the Indian shield. 5. There appears to be a distinct lack of seismicity located along the

  4. Post-Late Jurassic, pre-late Eocene strike-slip faulting in west-central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    Two events of strike-slip faulting interpreted to be of Late Mesozoic-Early Tertiary age are recorded in the northern Deep Creek Mountains. These fault systems display principal detachment zones that strike N50W and N84E. Both fault systems are manifested as fault mosaics, locally anastomosing with local duplex formation. They are interpreted to represent first-order structures that operated independently of other strain regimes. A quartz monzonite stock dated 38 Ma displays strong control of the intrusion by the NW-striking faults. That, in addition to cross-cutting relationships between the NW-striking faults and a granodiorite dated 152 Ma place age constraints on the strike-slip faulting. The ENE-striking faults are younger than the NW-striking faults and are interpreted to be older than the quartz monzonite, although this relationship is ambiguous. Strike-separation on the major NW-striking faults is on the order of 3 km. Offsets of similar magnitude or greater are interpreted for the ENE-striking faults, although this remains unquantified. Despite the small area of influence, relatively minor displacements, and broad time frame of occurrence, these faults have some regional significance. If Cretaceous-aged, the strike-slip faults are markedly different than the extensional structures that formed in the internal zone' of the Cordilleran thrust belt. If Tertiary-aged, the strike-slip faults represent an age of structure with few documented examples in the eastern Basin and Range.

  5. Mnin restraining stepover - evidence of significant Cretaceous-Cenozoic dextral strike-slip faulting along the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konon, Andrzej; Ostrowski, Szymon; Rybak-Ostrowska, Barbara; Ludwiniak, Mirosław; Śmigielski, Michał; Wyglądała, Michał; Uroda, Joanna; Kowalczyk, Sebastian; Mieszkowski, Radosław; Kłopotowska, Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    A newly recognized Mnin restraining stepover is identified in the Permo-Mesozoic cover of the western part of the Late Palaeozoic Holy Cross Mountains Fold Belt (Poland), within a fault pattern consisting of dextral strike-slip faults. The formation of a large contractional structure at the Late Cretaceous - Cenozoic transition displays the significant role of strike-slip faulting along the western border of the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone, in the foreland of the Polish part of the Carpathian Orogen. Theoretical relationships between the maximum fault offsets/ mean step length, as well as between the maximum fault offsets/mean step width allowed the estimation of the values of possible offsets along the Snochowice and Mieczyn faults forming the Mnin stepover. The estimated values suggest displacements of as much as several tens of kilometres. The observed offset along the Tokarnia Fault and theoretical calculations suggest that the strike-slip faults west of the Late Palaeozoic Holy Cross Mountains Fold Belt belong to a large strike-slip fault system. We postulate that the observed significant refraction of the faults forming the anastomosing fault pattern is related also to the interaction of the NW-SE-striking faults formed along the western border of the Teisseyre- Tornquist Zone and the reactivated WNW-ESE-striking faults belonging to the fault systems of the northern margin of the Tethys Ocean.

  6. Strike-slip faulting in the central part of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Zagros Orogen, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi, Alireza; Konon, Andrzej

    2012-07-01

    The Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) is one of the main basement tectonic blocks located close to the northeastern margin of the Zagros Orogenic Belt. New observations in the central part of the zone indicate that the fault pattern is dominated by NW-trending longitudinal faults. The components of movement on the fault planes are interpreted as dextral oblique thrusting and dextral strike-slip. The identified structures along the faults were associated with the strike-slip faults (e.g., Hasan-Robat and Najafabad dextral restraining stepovers) and rotated tectonic blocks (arranged in a 'domino' configuration) near to the Foladshahr and Kolah-Ghazi mountains. Along the longitudinal faults, the dextral offsets of the rock units, streams, alluvial deposits and rivers were measured. The dextral offset values range from 2.4 to 2.7 km, while the estimated offsets based on the geomorphological features are between 50 and 61 m for streams, up to approximately ˜50 m for alluvial deposits and up to 2.2 km for rivers. The dextral strike-slip component on the fault planes occurs along the northern and southern margins of the SSZ, as well as directly within the zone, west and east of the study area. The evidence for strike-slip faulting in the internal part of the zone suggests that the central part of the SSZ probably was horizontally sheared in a manner consistent with a simple shear 'card-deck model'.

  7. Elastoplastic dynamic analysis of strike-slip faults with bends using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, B.; Day, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Nonelastic off-fault response may play a role in rupture dynamics on geometrically complex faults, particularly in the vicinity of bends or other points of stress concentration. In this study, we have performed nonelastic dynamic analysis of strike-slip faults with bends by using a finite element method. The Coulomb yield criterion has been implemented in the code to model off-fault nonelastic response. We find that a smooth scheme (such as viscoplasticity) is required to regularize the numerical calculation of plastic yielding near a fault bend. The method is extensible to other material rheologies (e.g., damage mechanics models, tensile failure, etc), and amenable to parallel implementation. Compared with those from a calculation with elastic off-fault response, results from a calculation with nonelastic off-fault response show that (1) bends are locations of large plastic deformation; (2) stress near a bend is less heterogeneous; (3) less radiation is generated from a bend; (4) lower strong ground motion is produced.

  8. The influence of fault geometry on small strike-slip fault mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Elizabeth; Pollard, David D.; Ferris, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Meter-scale subvertical strike-slip fault traces in the central Californian Sierra Nevada exhibit geometric complexities that significantly contribute to their mechanical behavior. Sections of faults that opened at depth channelized fluid flow, as evidenced by hydrothermal mineral infillings and alteration haloes. Thin sections show a variation in the style of ductile deformation of infill along the fault, with greater intensities of deformation along restraining bends. Orthorectified photomosaics of outcrops provide model geometries and parameter constraints used in a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity model incorporating a complementarity algorithm. Model results show that fault shape influences the distribution of opening, and consequently the spatial distribution of fluid conduits. Geometric irregularities are present at many scales, and sections of opening occur along both releasing and restraining bends. Model sensitivity tests focus on boundary conditions along the fault: frictional properties on closed sections and fluid pressure within sections of opening. The influence of the remote stress state varies along a non-planar fault, complicating the relationships between remote stresses, frictional properties, slip, and opening. Discontinuous sections of opening along model faults are similar in spatial distribution and aperture to the epidote infill assemblages observed in the field.

  9. Analysis of the growth of strike-slip faults using effective medium theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2009-10-15

    Increases in the dimensions of strike-slip faults including fault length, thickness of fault rock and the surrounding damage zone collectively provide quantitative definition of fault growth and are commonly measured in terms of the maximum fault slip. The field observations indicate that a common mechanism for fault growth in the brittle upper crust is fault lengthening by linkage and coalescence of neighboring fault segments or strands, and fault rock-zone widening into highly fractured inner damage zone via cataclastic deformation. The most important underlying mechanical reason in both cases is prior weakening of the rocks surrounding a fault's core and between neighboring fault segments by faulting-related fractures. In this paper, using field observations together with effective medium models, we analyze the reduction in the effective elastic properties of rock in terms of density of the fault-related brittle fractures and fracture intersection angles controlled primarily by the splay angles. Fracture densities or equivalent fracture spacing values corresponding to the vanishing Young's, shear, and quasi-pure shear moduli were obtained by extrapolation from the calculated range of these parameters. The fracture densities or the equivalent spacing values obtained using this method compare well with the field data measured along scan lines across the faults in the study area. These findings should be helpful for a better understanding of the fracture density/spacing distribution around faults and the transition from discrete fracturing to cataclastic deformation associated with fault growth and the related instabilities.

  10. The Trans-Rocky Mountain Fault System - A Fundamental Precambrian Strike-Slip System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of a major Precambrian continental-scale, two-stage conjugate strike-slip fault system - here designated as the Trans-Rocky Mountain fault system - provides new insights into the architecture of the North American continent. The fault system consists chiefly of steep linear to curvilinear, en echelon, braided and branching ductile-brittle shears and faults, and local coeval en echelon folds of northwest strike, that cut indiscriminately across both Proterozoic and Archean cratonic elements. The fault system formed during late stages of two distinct tectonic episodes: Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic orogenies at about 2.70 and 1.70 billion years (Ga). In the Archean Superior province, the fault system formed (about 2.70-2.65 Ga) during a late stage of the main deformation that involved oblique shortening (dextral transpression) across the region and progressed from crystal-plastic to ductile-brittle deformation. In Paleoproterozoic terranes, the fault system formed about 1.70 Ga, shortly following amalgamation of Paleoproterozoic and Archean terranes and the main Paleoproterozoic plastic-fabric-producing events in the protocontinent, chiefly during sinistral transpression. The postulated driving force for the fault system is subcontinental mantle deformation, the bottom-driven deformation of previous investigators. This model, based on seismic anisotropy, invokes mechanical coupling and subsequent shear between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere such that a major driving force for plate motion is deep-mantle flow.

  11. Analysis of the growth of strike-slip faults using effective medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Atilla; Berryman, James G.

    2010-11-01

    Increases in the dimensions of strike-slip faults including fault length, thickness of fault rock and the surrounding damage zone collectively provide quantitative definition of fault growth and are commonly measured in terms of the maximum fault slip. The field observations indicate that a common mechanism for fault growth in the brittle upper crust is fault lengthening by linkage and coalescence of neighboring fault segments or strands, and fault rock-zone widening into highly fractured inner damage zone via cataclastic deformation. The most important underlying mechanical reason in both cases is prior weakening of the rocks surrounding a fault's core and between neighboring fault segments by faulting-related fractures. In this paper, using field observations together with effective medium models, we analyze the reduction in the effective elastic properties of rock in terms of density of the fault-related brittle fractures and fracture intersection angles controlled primarily by the splay angles. Fracture densities or equivalent fracture spacing values corresponding to the vanishing Young's, shear, and quasi-pure shear moduli were obtained by extrapolation from the calculated range of these parameters. The fracture densities or the equivalent spacing values obtained using this method compare well with the field data measured along scan lines across the faults in the study area. These findings should be helpful for a better understanding of the fracture density/spacing distribution around faults and the transition from discrete fracturing to cataclastic deformation associated with fault growth and the related instabilities.

  12. Models of recurrent strike-slip earthquake cycles and the state of crustal stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Raefsky, Arthur; Mulligan, Stephanie G.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical models of the strike-slip earthquake cycle, assuming a viscoelastic asthenosphere coupling model, are examined. The time-dependent simulations incorporate a stress-driven fault, which leads to tectonic stress fields and earthquake recurrence histories that are mutually consistent. Single-fault simulations with constant far-field plate motion lead to a nearly periodic earthquake cycle and a distinctive spatial distribution of crustal shear stress. The predicted stress distribution includes a local minimum in stress at depths less than typical seismogenic depths. The width of this stress 'trough' depends on the magnitude of crustal stress relative to asthenospheric drag stresses. The models further predict a local near-fault stress maximum at greater depths, sustained by the cyclic transfer of strain from the elastic crust to the ductile asthenosphere. Models incorporating both low-stress and high-stress fault strength assumptions are examined, under Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology assumptions. Model results suggest a preference for low-stress (a shear stress level of about 10 MPa) fault models, in agreement with previous estimates based on heat flow measurements and other stress indicators.

  13. Cenozoic strike-slip faults in the northern Wassuk Range, Walker Lane

    SciTech Connect

    Dilles, J.H. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The N. Wassuk Ra. yields estimates of right-lateral Cenozoic strain in a portion of the northwest-trending Walker Lane, which has a total estimated right-lateral strain of 48--60 km (Ekren et al., 1984). The net right-lateral strain is < 10 km within an east-west 50 km-long segment extending from the N. Wassuk Ra. west to the Pine Nut Mts on the basis of continuous Jurassic plutonic units: Yerington batholith and quartz monzodiorite porphyry dikes. One of two dikes in the N. Wassuk Ra. may correlate easterly to Gillis Ra., suggesting [approximately]10 or 25 km right-lateral offset (Diles and R. Hardyman, unpub). In the N. Wassuk Ra. there are several ages of northwesterly striking faults. The oldest are [approximately]N45[degree]W striking, steeply dipping faults including the White Mt. and Wassuk Spur faults that step left to the northwest. Associated moderately dipping faults have tilted Oligocene tuffs to the W or SW to the SW of the fault zone, and both E and W on the NW; based on offset of the Jurassic porphyry dike and slickensides, these faults were dominantly oblique-slip normal faults with WNW-ESE slip. No lateral offsets can be directly measured across the steeply dipping faults; however, they juxtapose different Mesozoic metamorphic rocks and different thicknesses of Oligocene ignimbrites, suggesting significant lateral offset. Bingler's (1978) proposal that the White Mt. fault had left-laterally offset the White Mt. granite (WMG) from granite of Black Mountain (BMG) is unreasonable because the BMG intrudes the Wassuk Range diorite and contain biotite aplites, whereas the WMG intrudes metavolcanic rocks and contains tourmaline-muscovite aplites.

  14. Analogue modelling of strike-slip fault propagation across a rheological/morphological crustal anisotropy: implications for the morphotectonic evolution of the Gloria Fault - Tore Madeira Rise area in NE Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás, Ricardo; Rosas, Filipe M.; Duarte, João C.; Terrinha, Pedro; Kullberg, Maria C.; Almeida, Jaime; Barata, Frederico; Carvalho, Bruno; Almeida, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    The Gloria Fault (GF) marks the E-W dextral transcurrent plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa in NE Atlantic, displaying complying high magnitude (historical and instrumental) seismic activity (e.g. M=7.1 in 1939 and M=8.4 in 1941, Bufforn et al., 1988), and cutting across a NNE-SSW 1000 km long bathymetric ridge: the so called Tore-Madeira Rise - TMR (rising in average 3km above the abyssal plain). The precise origin and tectono-magmatic evolution of the TMR is still not fully understood, although reported wide-angle refraction data points to a rheological configuration comprising an isostatically compensated thickened oceanic crust, possibly formed during a period of high accretion in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Pierce and Barton, 1991). Widespread evidence for volcanic activity has also been recognized, spanning from late Cretaceous to Present (Geldmacher et al. 2006, Merle et al. 2009), noticeably with the most recent volcanism (~500 Ky) occurring as tectonically aligned volcanic plugs, distributed along the E-W tectonic trend of the GF-related structures. To better understand the complex interference at play in this key area between the tectonic structures (essentially determined by the Gloria Fault system), the present and past magmatic activity and the resulting seafloor morphology, a series of dynamically scaled analogue modelling experiments have been conceived and carried out. The main focus of this experimental work was to decipher the potential influence of a rheological vs. morphological anisotropy (accounting for the TMR) on the lateral propagation of a major right-lateral strike-slip fault (representing the GF). The preliminary comparison of the obtained experimental results with the natural morphotectonic pattern in the study area reveals, not only a strong tectonic control of the ongoing volcanism, manifested by the observed preferred directions of aligned volcanic plugs, but also a so far unsuspected deflection/distributed pattern of several

  15. Modern Glacial Outwash Sand Thermochronology Along the Denali Fault: Constraints on Strike-slip Fault and Glacier Erosion Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benowitz, J.; Layer, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    It is now generally accepted that increased climate instability and extent of glaciation associated with late Cenozoic global cooling has led to increased erosion rates in most of the world's orogenic belts. However, the connection between surface processes and mountain building continues to be contentious because while some argue that tectonically driven rock uplift in continental collision zones is the most significant influence on erosion rates others suggest that the deep exhumation found in mountain ranges can mostly be explained by focused erosion driven by climatic processes. The relationship between the introduction of glaciers and erosion rates is also complicated by glacier process behavior in itself. It has been demonstrated that glacial advance-retreat cycles and high basal sliding rates are critical factors affecting if the introduction of glaciers will increase or decrease long-term exhumation rates. Natural experiments using detailed glacial outwash sand thermochronology, by providing an integrated time-space record of material flux, have been shown to be useful on constraining a regions sub-glacial erosion and exhumation history. The Denali Fault system, a continental-scale strike-slip fault and the associated Alaska Range with a known orogenesis development history, a documented increase in exhumation rates correlated to the start of the Northern-Hemisphere glaciation and a known surge-type glacier/fault relationship make the region a prime location to investigate the interaction of active faulting and glacial processes on erosion patterns. We can distinguish between three different scenarios from the full detrital and bedrock age data set: a) Outwash data slightly younger than bedrock data set-This would imply the same trend as bedrock samples, where as bed rock thermochronometric ages get younger as you approach the Denali Fault in agreement with dip-slip on a subglacial Denali Fault master strand as a significant contributor to topographic

  16. Role of the offshore Pedro Banks left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in the plate tectonic evolution of the northern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.; Saunders, M.

    2013-12-01

    Previous workers, mainly mapping onland active faults on Caribbean islands, defined the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone as a 200-km-wide bounded by two active and parallel strike-slip faults: the Oriente fault along the northern edge of the Cayman trough with a GPS rate of 14 mm/yr, and and the Enriquillo-Plaintain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) with a rate of 5-7 mm/yr. In this study we use 5,000 km of industry and academic data from the Nicaraguan Rise south and southwest of the EPGFZ in the maritime areas of Jamaica, Honduras, and Colombia to define an offshore, 700-km-long, active, left-lateral strike-slip fault in what has previously been considered the stable interior of the Caribbean plate as determined from plate-wide GPS studies. The fault was named by previous workers as the Pedro Banks fault zone because a 100-km-long segment of the fault forms an escarpment along the Pedro carbonate bank of the Nicaraguan Rise. Two fault segments of the PBFZ are defined: the 400-km-long eastern segment that exhibits large negative flower structures 10-50 km in width, with faults segments rupturing the sea floor as defined by high resolution 2D seismic data, and a 300-km-long western segment that is defined by a narrow zone of anomalous seismicity first observed by previous workers. The western end of the PBFZ terminates on a Quaternary rift structure, the San Andres rift, associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism and thickening trends indicating initial rifting in the Late Miocene. The southern end of the San Andreas rift terminates on the western Hess fault which also exhibits active strands consistent with left-lateral, strike-slip faults. The total length of the PBFZ-San Andres rift-Southern Hess escarpment fault is 1,200 km and traverses the entire western end of the Caribbean plate. Our interpretation is similar to previous models that have proposed the "stable" western Caribbean plate is broken by this fault whose rate of displacement is less than the threshold

  17. Dynamic response to strike-slip tectonic control on the deposition and evolution of the Baranof Fan, Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, Maureen A. L.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Reece, Robert S.; Barth, Ginger A.; Christeson, Gail L.; VanAvendonk, Harm J.

    2014-01-01

    The Baranof Fan is one of three large deep-sea fans in the Gulf of Alaska, and is a key component in understanding large-scale erosion and sedimentation patterns for southeast Alaska and western Canada. We integrate new and existing seismic reflection profiles to provide new constraints on the Baranof Fan area, geometry, volume, and channel development. We estimate the fan’s area and total sediment volume to be ∼323,000 km2 and ∼301,000 km3, respectively, making it among the largest deep-sea fans in the world. We show that the Baranof Fan consists of channel-levee deposits from at least three distinct aggradational channel systems: the currently active Horizon and Mukluk channels, and the waning system we call the Baranof channel. The oldest sedimentary deposits are in the northern fan, and the youngest deposits at the fan’s southern extent; in addition, the channels seem to avulse southward consistently through time. We suggest that Baranof Fan sediment is sourced from the Coast Mountains in southeastern Alaska, transported offshore most recently via fjord to glacial sea valley conduits. Because of the translation of the Pacific plate northwest past sediment sources on the North American plate along the Queen Charlotte strike-slip fault, we suggest that new channel formation, channel beheadings, and southward-migrating channel avulsions have been influenced by regional tectonics. Using a simplified tectonic reconstruction assuming a constant Pacific plate motion of 4.4 cm/yr, we estimate that Baranof Fan deposition initiated ca. 7 Ma.

  18. Moderately-dipping California Strike-slip Faults With Bends in map View and Cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. H.; Sorlien, C. C.; Nicholson, C.; Legg, M.; Behl, R. J.; Seeber, L.

    2015-12-01

    New faults in a strike-slip stress field are expected to be sub-vertical. However, continental strike-slip faults commonly reactivate arrays of pre-existing non-vertical faults with non-optimal strike. The systems of strike-slip faults that dissect the Inner California Continental Borderland , Santa Monica Bay, and south-Central California are imaged with multiple grids of closely spaced 2D multichannel seismic reflection profiles. From these and stratigraphic information, we constructed multiple digital 3D fault and fold interpretations. Quaternary strike-slip faults that dip moderately in their upper few km include the southern Hosgri fault, part of the Carlsbad fault, and the Santa Monica-Dume fault. These faults reactivate structures that developed in pre-19 Ma subduction and subsequent Miocene extension and transtension. Seismic reflection imaging reveal that they dip 40° to 55°. 3D seismic data image the Hosgri fault to locally dip less than 30° below 1 km depth. Where Pliocene-Quaternary sediment accumulated in basins, these faults tend to propagate upwards as sub-vertical faults, as expected. Thus, cross sectional fault geometry can be used together with other information to infer strike-slip motion. Imaged gently-dipping faults underlie and/or interact with the Santa Monica-Dume and Carlsbad faults. Seismicity and tectonic models suggest that the southern Hosgri fault and faults to its west do not affect the subducted oceanic lower crust. Thus, strike-slip motion there may occur on the former subduction megathrust. These moderately-dipping faults also describe bends and stepovers in map view, resulting in significant vertical deformation. Northwest of San Diego, the Carlsbad fault bends sharply as part of a 15 km right-stepover to the Descanso and Coronado Bank fault system. N-striking fault strands, a releasing orientation for the Pliocene to present strain orientation, connect between the Newport-Inglewood and Carlsbad faults and also between the Rose

  19. Subsurface architecture of a strike-slip collapse structure: insights from Ilopango caldera, El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxby, Jennifer; Gottsmann, Joachim; Cashman, Katherine; Gutierrez, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    While most calderas are created by roof collapse along ring-like faults into an emptying magma reservoir during a large and violent explosive eruption, an additional condition for caldera formation may be tectonically induced extensional stresses. Here we provide geophysical insights into the shallow sub-volcanic plumbing system of a collapse caldera in a major strike-slip tectonic setting by inverting Bouguer gravity data from the Ilopango caldera in El Salvador. Despite a long history of catastrophic eruptions with the most recent in 500 A.D., the internal architecture of the caldera has not been investigated, although studies of the most recent eruption have not identified the ring faults commonly associated with caldera collapse. The gravity data show that low-density material aligned along the principal stress orientations of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) forms a pronounced gravity low beneath the caldera. Extending to around 6 km depth, the low density structure likely maps a complex stacked shallow plumbing system composed of magmatic and fractured hydrothermal reservoirs. A substantial volume of the plumbing system must be composed of a vapour phase to explain the modeled negative density contrasts. We use these constraints to map the possible multi-phase parameter space contributing to the subsurface architecture of the caldera and propose that the local extension along the complex ESFZ controls accumulation, ascent and eruption of magma at Ilopango. The data further suggest that future eruptions at Ilopango could be facilitated by rapid rise of magma along conjugate fault damage zones through a mechanically weak crust under tension. This may explain the absence of clear ring fault structures at the caldera.

  20. Strike-Slip Fault Patterns on Europa: Obliquity or Polar Wander?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A.; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Variations in diurnal tidal stress due to Europa's eccentric orbit have been considered as the driver of strike-slip motion along pre-existing faults, but obliquity and physical libration have not been taken into account. The first objective of this work is to examine the effects of obliquity on the predicted global pattern of fault slip directions based on a tidal-tectonic formation model. Our second objective is to test the hypothesis that incorporating obliquity can reconcile theory and observations without requiring polar wander, which was previously invoked to explain the mismatch found between the slip directions of 192 faults on Europa and the global pattern predicted using the eccentricity-only model. We compute predictions for individual, observed faults at their current latitude, longitude, and azimuth with four different tidal models: eccentricity only, eccentricity plus obliquity, eccentricity plus physical libration, and a combination of all three effects. We then determine whether longitude migration, presumably due to non-synchronous rotation, is indicated in observed faults by repeating the comparisons with and without obliquity, this time also allowing longitude translation. We find that a tidal model including an obliquity of 1.2?, along with longitude migration, can predict the slip directions of all observed features in the survey. However, all but four faults can be fit with only 1? of obliquity so the value we find may represent the maximum departure from a lower time-averaged obliquity value. Adding physical libration to the obliquity model improves the accuracy of predictions at the current locations of the faults, but fails to predict the slip directions of six faults and requires additional degrees of freedom. The obliquity model with longitude migration is therefore our preferred model. Although the polar wander interpretation cannot be ruled out from these results alone, the obliquity model accounts for all observations with a value

  1. Viscoelastic shear zone model of a strike-slip earthquake cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2001-01-01

    I examine the behavior of a two-dimensional (2-D) strike-slip fault system embedded in a 1-D elastic layer (schizosphere) overlying a uniform viscoelastic half-space (plastosphere) and within the boundaries of a finite width shear zone. The viscoelastic coupling model of Savage and Prescott [1978] considers the viscoelastic response of this system, in the absence of the shear zone boundaries, to an earthquake occurring within the upper elastic layer, steady slip beneath a prescribed depth, and the superposition of the responses of multiple earthquakes with characteristic slip occurring at regular intervals. So formulated, the viscoelastic coupling model predicts that sufficiently long after initiation of the system, (1) average fault-parallel velocity at any point is the average slip rate of that side of the fault and (2) far-field velocities equal the same constant rate. Because of the sensitivity to the mechanical properties of the schizosphere-plastosphere system (i.e., elastic layer thickness, plastosphere viscosity), this model has been used to infer such properties from measurements of interseismic velocity. Such inferences exploit the predicted behavior at a known time within the earthquake cycle. By modifying the viscoelastic coupling model to satisfy the additional constraint that the absolute velocity at prescribed shear zone boundaries is constant, I find that even though the time-averaged behavior remains the same, the spatiotemporal pattern of surface deformation (particularly its temporal variation within an earthquake cycle) is markedly different from that predicted by the conventional viscoelastic coupling model. These differences are magnified as plastosphere viscosity is reduced or as the recurrence interval of periodic earthquakes is lengthened. Application to the interseismic velocity field along the Mojave section of the San Andreas fault suggests that the region behaves mechanically like a ???600-km-wide shear zone accommodating 50 mm/yr fault

  2. Equivalent strike-slip earthquake cycles in half-space and lithosphere-asthenosphere Earth models

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, J.C. )

    1990-04-10

    By virtue of the images used in the dislocation solution, the deformation at the free surface produced throughout the earthquake cycle by slippage on a long strike-slip fault in an Earth model consisting of an elastic plate (lithosphere) overlying a visoelastic half-space (asthenosphere) can be duplicated by prescribed slip on a vertical fault embedded in an elastic half-space. For the case in which each earthquake ruptures the entire lithosphere (thickness H), the half-space equivalent slip rate is as follows: Depth interval 0-H, slip identical to that in lithosphere-asthenosphere model (i.e., abrupt coseismic slip and no subsequent slip); depth interval (2n {minus} 1) H to (2n + 1) H (n = 1,2,...), slip rate uniform in space and dependent upon time as F{sub n}(t) exp ({minus}t/{tau}) where F{sub n} is a (n {minus} 1) degree polynomial in t, {tau} is twice the asthenosphere relaxation time, and t is measured from the instant after the preceding earthquake. The slip rate averaged over the seismic cycle in each depth interval equals the secular rate of relative plate motion. The surface deformation due to the earthquake cycle in the lithosphere-asthenosphere model can be calculated very simply from the half-space model with time-dependent slip in the two depth intervals H-3H and 3H-5H, and uniform slip at a rate equal to the secular relative plate velocity below depth 5H. Inversion of 1973-1988 geodetic measurements of deformation across the segment of the San Andrea fault in the Transverse Ranges north of Los Angeles for the half-space equivalent slip distribution suggests no significant slip on the fault above 30 km and a uniform slip rate of 36 mm/yr below 30 km.

  3. Evidence for Right-lateral Shear Along the Northwest Margin of the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, S. J.; McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.

    2007-12-01

    Previous investigators have proposed that extension within the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) is accommodated by intrusion of dikes at a rate similar to the rate of extension in the surrounding Basin and Range. This hypothesis is primarily based on the lack of strike-slip offset along the northwest physiographic boundary of the ESRP, the lack of seismicity within the ESRP relative to the surrounding active Basin and Range, and the presence of NW-trending volcanic rift zones within the ESRP. The ESRP is a 400-km long region within the track of the Yellowstone Hotspot that extends from southern Idaho northeast into northwestern Wyoming. GPS data compiled for this study are used to test this hypothesis. Several institutions including the Idaho National Laboratory, National Geodetic Survey, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and University of Utah observed GPS stations from 1994 to 2007 within the ESRP and surrounding region. The GPS velocities show the average orientation of horizontal GPS velocities in the adjacent northwest Basin and Range region is similar to the average orientation for the ESRP (N113°W vs N91°W, respectively), but the average magnitude of horizontal GPS velocities in the Basin and Range (1.4 ± 0.3 mm/yr) is less than that for the ESRP (2.2 ± 0.3 mm/yr). Additionally, the adjacent northwest Basin and Range extends at about 9 x 10-9 /yr with most of the deformation localized along three NW-trending normal faults (Lost River, Lemhi, and Beaverhead). In contrast, the ESRP extends at a rate that is an order of magnitude lower than the adjacent northwest Basin and Range and we see little indication of extension along the Great Rift or other volcanic rift zones over the 400 km length. The GPS differential motion along the region of the ESRP adjacent to the northwest Basin and Range indicates a NE-trending zone of right-lateral shear. Preliminary inversions of GPS velocities, earthquakes, faults, and volcanic features indicate this zone of right-lateral

  4. Procedure of evaluating parameters of inland earthquakes caused by long strike-slip faults for ground motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Dianshu; Dan, Kazuo; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a procedure of evaluating fault parameters of asperity models for predicting strong ground motions from inland earthquakes caused by long strike-slip faults. In order to obtain averaged dynamic stress drops, we adopted the formula obtained by dynamic fault rupturing simulations for surface faults of the length from 15 to 100 km, because the formula of the averaged static stress drops for circular cracks, commonly adopted in existing procedures, cannot be applied to surface faults or long faults. The averaged dynamic stress drops were estimated to be 3.4 MPa over the entire fault and 12.2 MPa on the asperities, from the data of 10 earthquakes in Japan and 13 earthquakes in other countries. The procedure has a significant feature that the average slip on the seismic faults longer than about 80 km is constant, about 300 cm. In order to validate our proposed procedure, we made a model for a 141 km long strike-slip fault by our proposed procedure for strike-slip faults, predicted ground motions, and showed that the resultant motions agreed well with the records of the 1999 Kocaeli, Turkey, earthquake (Mw 7.6) and with the peak ground accelerations and peak ground velocities by the GMPE of Si and Midorikawa (1999).

  5. The Ural-Herirud transcontinental postcollisional strike-slip fault and its role in the formation of the Earth's crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, Yu. G.; Volozh, Yu. A.; Antipov, M. P.; Kheraskova, T. N.

    2015-11-01

    The paper considers the morphology, deep structure, and geodynamic features of the Ural-Herirud postorogenic strike-slip fault (UH fault), along which the Moho (the "M") shifts along the entire axial zone of the Ural Orogen, then further to the south across the Scythian-Turan Plate to the Herirud sublatitudinal fault in Afghanistan. The postcollisional character of dextral displacements along the Ural-Herirud fault and its Triassic-Jurassic age are proven. We have estimated the scale of displacements and made an attempt to make a paleoreconstruction, illustrating the relationship between the Variscides of the Urals and the Tien Shan before tectonic displacements. The analysis of new data includes the latest generation of 1: 200000 geological maps and the regional seismic profiling data obtained in the most elevated part of the Urals (from the seismic profile of the Middle Urals in the north to the Uralseis seismic profile in the south), as well as within the sedimentary cover of the Turan Plate, from Mugodzhary to the southern boundaries of the former water area of the Aral Sea. General typomorphic signs of transcontinental strike-slip fault systems are considered and the structural model of the Ural-Herirud postcollisional strike-slip fault is presented.

  6. Morphotectonic evolution of the Alhama de Murcia strike-slip fault overprinting drainage systems inherited from Late Miocene extension (Western Mediterranean-Eastern Betics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrater Gómez, Marta; Booth Rea, Guillermo; Azañón, José Miguel; Pérez Peña, José Vicente; Masana, Eulàlia

    2013-04-01

    The adaptation of drainage systems to the evolution of tectonic structures offers important clues to the tectonic regime present in an area and to the tectonic changes that have occurred. The development of new mountain fronts can produce the abandonment of earlier drainage networks by way of fluvial captures. He we analyse the response of a drainage network inherited from late Miocene extension to tectonic forcing associated to the growth and activity of the Alhama de Murcia sinistral strike-slip in a new transpressive tectonic setting. Rock uplift related to the Alhama de Murcia strike-slip fault and associated structures are conditioning the recent drainage network; overprinting the previous extensional related drainage. We carried out a structural and a qualitative and quantitative relief analysis to understand how the relief has evolved and which are the main active structures that currently control the drainage configuration. We identify river capture sites and we present a geomorphic index analysis using SLk anomalies, hypsometric curves, mountain front sinuosity, the comparison between longitudinal and projected river profiles with the SLk values and the position of active faults and folds, and a slope analysis of the area. The results show: 1) the reactivation of the ending part of the main basins by the current uplift of the Sierra de la Tercia, 2) progressive capture processes related to the growth of the Rambla de Lebor and Totana transverse drainages upon the previous drainage, evidenced by the presence of wind gaps, abrupt changes in flow direction, oblique relationship between current river direction and paleosurfaces maximum slope direction and changes in the lithologic composition of terraces, and 3) basin shapes controlled by the interference between an old NE-SW-directed drainage network controlled by extensional structures and another NW-SE one controlled by the sinistral Alhama de Murcia Fault.

  7. Using an Earthquake Simulator to Model Tremor Along a Strike Slip Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, E. S.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Kroll, K.; Harrington, R. M.; Dieterich, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    We employ the earthquake simulator, RSQSim, to investigate the conditions under which tremor occurs in the transition zone of the San Andreas fault. RSQSim is a computationally efficient method that uses rate- and state- dependent friction to simulate a wide range of event sizes for long time histories of slip [Dieterich and Richards-Dinger, 2010; Richards-Dinger and Dieterich, 2012]. RSQSim has been previously used to investigate slow slip events in Cascadia [Colella et al., 2011; 2012]. Earthquakes, tremor, slow slip, and creep occurrence are primarily controlled by the rate and state constants a and b and slip speed. We will report the preliminary results of using RSQSim to vary fault frictional properties in order to better understand rupture dynamics in the transition zone using observed characteristics of tremor along the San Andreas fault. Recent studies of tremor along the San Andreas fault provide information on tremor characteristics including precise locations, peak amplitudes, duration of tremor episodes, and tremor migration. We use these observations to constrain numerical simulations that examine the slip conditions in the transition zone of the San Andreas Fault. Here, we use the earthquake simulator, RSQSim, to conduct multi-event simulations of tremor for a strike slip fault modeled on Cholame section of the San Andreas fault. Tremor was first observed on the San Andreas fault near Cholame, California near the southern edge of the 2004 Parkfield rupture [Nadeau and Dolenc, 2005]. Since then, tremor has been observed across a 150 km section of the San Andreas with depths between 16-28 km and peak amplitudes that vary by a factor of 7 [Shelly and Hardebeck, 2010]. Tremor episodes, comprised of multiple low frequency earthquakes (LFEs), tend to be relatively short, lasting tens of seconds to as long as 1-2 hours [Horstmann et al., in review, 2013]; tremor occurs regularly with some tremor observed almost daily [Shelly and Hardebeck, 2010; Horstmann

  8. Slip rates and ages of past earthquakes along the western Bogd and Valley-of-Lake strike slip faults (Gobi-Altay, Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, R.; Ritz, J. F.; Klinger, Y.; Ferry, M. A.; Davaasambuu, B.; CHOI, J. H.; Magali, R.; Bollinger, L.; Braucher, R.; Ulzibat, M.; Odonbaatar, C.; Demberel, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Gobi-Altay massif in southwestern Mongolia recorded one of the largest intracontinental earthquakes during the XXth century (04.12.57, Mw~8). This left-lateral strike-slip earthquake ruptured a 260 km-long section along the eastern part of the Bogd fault. About 100km of additional ruptures (essentially reverse) were also documented along subsidiary faults. Previous morphological and paleoseismological investigations along the eastern Bogd Fault determined a long-term slip rate of ~1 mm/yr and a mean recurrence interval of 3000-4000 years for events similar to the 1957 earthquake. The active tectonics of the western part of the Gobi-Altay massif proves to be more complex than the eastern section. Deformation is occurring along two strike-slip fault systems, the Western Bogd fault and the Valley-of-Lakes fault. This raises the question of the distribution of the deformation in space and time. In order to determine slip rates and dates of past events along the Western Bogd and Valley of Lakes faults, we carried out tectonic geomorphology and paleoseismological investigations. Preliminary results from a first expedition in 2014 allow estimating a slip rate of 0.3 mm/yr along the Valley-of-Lakes fault during the past 150 ka. Further analyses from a second expedition in summer 2015, should allow testing whether this rate remained stable through time, notably over the Holocene period. They will also enable determining the slip rate and the age of the most recent surface-rupturing event along the Western Bogd fault.

  9. The influence of volcanism on fluvial depositional systems in a Cenozoic strike-slip basin, Denali fault system, Yukon Territory, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.B.; Ridgway, K.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The depositional history of the Eocene-Oligocene Burwash strike-slip basin is characterized by a transition from non-volcanic clastic sedimentation of the Amphitheater Formation to deposition of lavas and volcaniclastic rocks of the overlying lower Wrangell volcanic sequence. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to document the contemporaneous fluvial and volcanic depositional history of a nonmarine strike-slip basin, and (2) to discuss the transition from non-volcanic to volcanic deposition in the context of strike-slip basin evolution. The authors indicate that the onset of volcanism within strike-slip basins can result in major reorganizations of drainage systems as well as changes in sediment sources.

  10. Ductile shear zones beneath strike-slip faults: Implications for the thermomechanics of the San Andreas fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; England, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional (2-D) numerical experiments on the bulk flow of a layer of fluid that is driven in a strike-slip sense by constant velocities applied at its boundaries. The fluid has the (linearized) conventional rheology assumed to apply to lower crust/upper mantle rocks. The temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of the fluid and the shear heating that accompanies deformation have been incorporated into the calculations, as has thermal conduction in an overlying crustal layer. Two end-member boundary conditions have been considered, corresponding to a strong upper crust driving a weaker ductile substrate and a strong ductile layer driving a passive, weak crust. In many cases of practical interest, shear heating is concentrated close to the axial plane of the shear zone for either boundary condition. For these cases, the resulting steady state temperature field is well approximated by a cylindrical heat source embedded in a conductive half-space at a depth corresponding to the top of the fluid layer. This approximation, along with the application of a theoretical result for one-dimensional shear zones, permits us to obtain simple analytical approximations to the thermal effects of 2-D ductile shear zones for a range of assumed rheologies and crustal geotherms, making complex numerical calculations unnecessary. Results are compared with observable effects on heat flux near the San Andreas fault using constraints on the slip distribution across the entire fault system. Ductile shearing in the lower crust or upper mantle can explain the observed increase in surface heat flux southeast of the Mendocino triple junction and match the amplitude of the regional heat flux anomaly in the California Coast Ranges. Because ductile dissipation depends only weakly on slip rate, faults moving only a few millimeters per year can be important heat sources, and the superposition of effects of localized ductile shearing on both currently active and now

  11. Strike-slip linked core complexes: A new kinematic model of basement rock exhumation in a crustal-scale fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sven Erik; Passchier, Cees; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Stüwe, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    Metamorphic core complexes usually develop as extensional features during continental crustal thinning, such as the Basin and Range and the Aegean Terrane. The Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia is a 2000 km-long and 400 km-wide complex network of crustal-scale strike-slip shear zones in a Neoproterozoic collision zone. Locally, the anastomosing shear zones lead to exhumation of lower crustal segments and represent a new kinematic model for the development of core complexes. We report on two such structures: the Qazaz complex in Saudi Arabia and the Hafafit complex in Egypt. The 15 km-wide Qazaz complex is a triangular dome of gently dipping mylonitic foliations within the 140 km-long sinistral strike-slip Qazaz mylonite zone. The gneissic dome consists of high-grade rocks, surrounded by low-grade metasediments and metavolcanics. The main SE-trending strike-slip Qazaz shear zone splits southwards into two branches around the gneiss dome: the western branch is continuous with the shallow dipping mylonites of the dome core, without overprinting, and changes by more than 90 degrees from a NS-trending strike-slip zone to an EW-trending 40 degree south-dipping detachment that bounds the gneiss dome to the south. The eastern SE-trending sinistral strike-slip shear zone branch is slightly younger and transects the central dome fabrics. The gneiss dome appears to have formed along a jog in the strike-slip shear zone during 40 km of horizontal strike-slip motion, which caused local exhumation of lower crustal rocks by 25 km along the detachment. The eastern shear zone branch formed later during exhumation, transacted the gneiss dome and offset the two parts by another 70 km. The Hafafit core complex in Egypt is of similar shape and size to the Qazaz structure, but forms the northern termination of a sinistral strike-slip zone that is at least 100 km in length. This zone may continue into Saudi Arabia as the Ajjaj shear zone for another 100 km. The NW trending strike slip

  12. Strike-slip earthquakes in the oceanic lithosphere: Observations of exceptionally high apparent stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; McGarr, A.

    2002-01-01

    The radiated energies, Es, and seismic moments, Mo, for 942 globally distributed earthquakes that occurred between 1987 to 1998 are examined to find the earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (??a = ?? Es/Mo, where ?? is the modulus of rigidity). The globally averaged ??a for shallow earthquakes in all tectonic environments and seismic regions is 0.3 MPa. However, the subset of 49 earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (??a greater than about 5.0 MPa) is dominated almost exclusively by strike-slip earthquakes that occur in oceanic environments. These earthquakes are all located in the depth range 7-29 km in the upper mantle of the young oceanic lithosphere. Many of these events occur near plate-boundary triple junctions where there appear to be high rates of intraplate deformation. Indeed, the small rapidly deforming Gorda Plate accounts for 10 of the 49 high-??a events. The depth distribution of ??a, which shows peak values somewhat greater than 25 MPa in the depth range 20-25 km, suggests that upper bounds on this parameter are a result of the strength of the oceanic lithosphere. A recently proposed envelope for apparent stress, derived by taking 6 per cent of the strength inferred from laboratory experiments for young (less than 30 Ma) deforming oceanic lithosphere, agrees well with the upper-bound envelope of apparent stresses over the depth range 5-30 km. The corresponding depth-dependent shear strength for young oceanic lithosphere attains a peak value of about 575 MPa at a depth of 21 km and then diminishes rapidly as the depth increases. In addition to their high apparent stresses, which suggest that the strength of the young oceanic lithosphere is highest in the depth range 10-30 km, our set of high-??a earthquakes show other features that constrain the nature of the forces that cause interplate motion. First, our set of events is divided roughly equally between intraplate and transform faulting with similar depth distributions of ??a for

  13. Structure of the la VELA Offshore Basin, Western Venezuela: AN Obliquely-Opening Rift Basin Within the South America-Caribbean Strike-Slip Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, J. M.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic maps show that the east-west trend of the Cretaceous Great Arc of the Caribbean in the Leeward Antilles islands is transected by an en echelon series of obliquely-sheared rift basins that show right-lateral offsets ranging from 20 to 40 km. The basins are 75-100 km in length and 20-30 km in width and are composed of sub-parallel, oblique slip normal faults that define deep, bathymetric channels that bound the larger islands of the Leeward Antilles including Aruba, Curacao and Bonaire. A single basin of similar orientation and structure, the Urumaco basin, is present to the southwest in the Gulf of Venezuela. We mapped structures and sedimentation in the La Vela rift basin using a 3D seismic data volume recorded down to 6 seconds TWT. The basin can be mapped from the Falcon coast where it is correlative with the right-lateral Adicora fault mapped onshore, and its submarine extension. To the southeast of the 3D survey area, previous workers have mapped a 70-km-wide zone of northeast-striking, oblique, right-lateral faults, some with apparent right-lateral offsets of the coastline. On seismic data, the faults vary in dip from 45 to 60 degrees and exhibit maximum vertical offsets of 600 m. The La Vela and other obliquely-opening rifts accommodate right-lateral shear with linkages to intervening, east-west-striking right-lateral faults like the Adicora. The zone of oblique rifts is restricted to the trend of the Great Arc of the Caribbean and may reflect the susceptiblity of this granitic basement to active shearing. The age of onset for the basins known from previous studies on the Leeward Antilles is early Miocene. As most of these faults occur offshore their potential to generate damaging earthquakes in the densely populated Leeward Antilles is not known.

  14. Rupture and frequency-dependent seismic radiation of the 2012 Mw 8.6 Sumatra strike-slip earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiuxun; Yao, Huajian

    2016-06-01

    On 2012 April 11, a great strike-slip earthquake (moment magnitude of Mw 8.6) occurred off the west coast of northern Sumatra area followed by an Mw 8.2 aftershock 2 hr later. Different geophysical data and methods have been used to investigate the mechanism, faulting, seismic radiation and slip propagation of this event, but frequency-dependent features of its rupture process have not been discussed much. In this study, we use a compressive sensing method based on sparsity inversion in the frequency domain to study the frequency-dependent seismic radiation and rupture process of this event. Our results indicate a very complex rupture process concerning at least three different rupture stages on multiple subfaults with nearly conjugate geometries. The main shock has triggered seismicity on a series of ridge-perpendicular or ridge-parallel conjugate strike-slip faults around the Nighty East Ridge. Obvious frequency-dependent rupture process has been presented and discussed. Combining results from slip inversion based on the finite-fault model, we observe that in the beginning stage of the rupture lower frequency radiation appears to originate from the areas with large slip, while the high-frequency radiation is located at the boundary of large-slip region or rupture front. Some radiation probably originates from the repeating slip on the main faults or triggered events on some nearby faults in the rupture area. The complex frequency-dependent seismic radiation patterns observed in this study provide important information for future investigation of rupture physics of this complex strike-slip event.

  15. Jelly Quakes - Characteristics of periodic slip events in an analog model of strike slip seismotectonics using ballistic gelatin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Michael; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    Large lithospheric strike-slip faults, such as the San-Andreas Fault, North-Anatolian Fault, or the Tancheng-Lujiang Faultzone, are major sources of seismic hazard. The interplay of complex 3D-geometry and displacement style along the fault, coupled with a varying rheological layering makes it very difficult to model these faults on all relevant timescales. Here we present a novel experimental approach to model intra- and interplate strike-slip faults using a physical/ analog model. We model earthquakes as a stick-slip process, following a rate-and-state frictional law, with glass beads as granular material within a molded fault zone. Crustal elasticity is introduced by using ballistic gelatin (30 w%, pig skin) as analog material. Furthermore, the low-strength and viscous deep crust below 15 km depth, is modeled using a viscoelastic silicone oil (PDMS-G30M). The layered model crust floats on sugar syrup and is compressed in pure shear vice configuration. We monitor the compressive force along with surface kinematics from optical image correlation. The fault is oriented at 45° to the compression direction imposing ideal strike-slip kinematics onto it. After an initial loading phase the model shows periodic slip events occurring alongside with creep on the fault. Using digital image correlation, surface displacement maps are obtained which are similar to those of natural earthquakes. Coseismic displacement along strike is showing a similar bell-shaped distribution as for natural faults. Furthermore, the recurrence intervals and stress drops are scalable to the natural prototype. The modeling results are combined with numerical rate-and-state models using physical parameters from the experiment. This enables us to explore a wide range of parameters and to draw connections between the parameters that control the behavior of seismic and aseismic fault systems.

  16. Microstructural, textural and thermal evolution of an exhumed strike-slip fault and insights into localization and rheological transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Junlai; Bernroider, Manfred; Genser, Johann

    2016-04-01

    The presence of deep exhumed crustal rocks with a dominant but contrasting mineralogy results in shear concentration in the rheological weakest layer, which exhibits contrasting patterns of fabrics and thermal conditions during their formation. We tested a combination of methodologies including microstructural and textural investigations, geochronology and geothermometry on deformed rocks from exhumed strike-slip fault, Ailao Shan-Red River, SE, Asian. Results indicate that the exhumed deep crustal rocks since late Oligocene (ca. 28 Ma) to Pliocene (ca. 4 Ma) typically involve dynamic microstructural, textural and thermal evolution processes, which typically record a progressive deformation and syn-kinematic reactions from ductile to semi-ductile and brittle behavior during exhumation. This transformation also resulted in dramatic strength reduction that promoted strain localization along the strike-slip and transtensional faults. Detailed analysis has revealed the co-existence of microfabrics ranging from high-temperatures (granulite facies conditions) to overprinting low-temperatures (lower greenschist facies conditions). The high-temperature microstructures and textures are in part or entirely altered by subsequent, overprinting low-temperature shearing. In quartz-rich rocks, quartz was deformed in the dislocation creep regime and records transition of microfabrics and slip systems during decreasing temperature, which lasted until retrogression related to final exhumation. As a result, grain-size reduction associated by fluids circulating within the strike-slip fault zone at brittle-ductile transition leads to rock softening, which resulted in strain localization, weak rock rheology and the overall hot thermal structure of the crust. Decompression occurred during shearing and as a result of tectonic exhumation. All these results demonstrate that the ductile to ductile-brittle transition involves a combination of different deformation mechanisms, rheological

  17. Fracture energies at the rupture nucleation points of large strike-slip earthquakes on the Xianshuihe fault, southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuqing; Kato, Naoyuki

    2017-02-01

    Earthquake cycles along a pure strike-slip fault were numerically simulated using a rate- and state-dependent friction law to obtain the fracture energies at the rupture nucleation points. In the model, deep aseismic slip is imposed on the fault, which generates recurrent earthquakes in the shallower velocity-weakening friction region. The fracture energy at the rupture nucleation point for each simulated earthquake was calculated using the relation between shear stress and slip, which indicates slip-weakening behavior. The simulation results show that the relation between the fracture energy at the nucleation point and other source parameters is consistent with a theoretical approach based on fracture mechanics, in that an earthquake occurs when the energy release rate at the tip of the aseismic slip zone first exceeds the fracture energy. Because the energy release rate is proportional to the square of the amount of deep aseismic slip during the interseismic period, which can be estimated from the recurrence interval of earthquakes and the deep aseismic slip rate, the fracture energies for strike-slip earthquakes can be calculated. Using this result, we estimated the fracture energies at the nucleation points of large earthquakes on selected segments of the Xianshuihe fault, southwestern China. We find that the estimated fracture energies at the rupture nucleation points are generally smaller than the values of average fracture energy for developed ruptures as estimated in previous studies, suggesting that the fracture energy tends to increase with the rupture propagation distance.

  18. Recent, slow normal and strike-slip faulting in the Pasto Ventura region of the southern Puna Plateau, NW Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, Renjie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Cosca, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recent normal and strike-slip faulting on the Puna Plateau of NW Argentina has been linked to lithospheric foundering, gravitational spreading, plate boundary forces and a decrease in crustal shortening from north to south. However, the timing, kinematics and rate of extension remain poorly constrained. We focus on the Pasto Ventura region (NW Argentina) located on the southern Puna Plateau and recent deformation (<1 Ma). Field mapping and kinematic analysis across offset volcanic cinder cones show that the overall extension direction is subhorizontal, is oriented NE-SW to NNE-SSW, and occurs at a slow, time-integrated rate of 0.02 to 0.08 mm/yr since at least 0.8–0.5 Ma. A regional compilation from this study and existing data shows that recent extension across the Puna Plateau is subhorizontal but varies in azimuthal orientation dramatically. Data from the Pasto Ventura region are consistent with a number of models to explain normal and strike-slip faulting on the Puna Plateau, all of which likely influence the region. Some role for lower lithospheric foundering through dripping appears to be seen based on the regional extension directions and ages of mafic volcanism in the southern Puna Plateau.

  19. STRIKE SLIP ON REACTIVATED TRIASSIC(? ) BASIN BOUNDARY FAULT ZONES AS SOURCES OF EARTHQUAKES NEAR CHARLESTON, S. C.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.; Yuan, Annette

    1986-01-01

    Interpretation of several thousand kilometers of multifold seismic reflection data supports the old theory that earthquakes in the Charleston, S. C. area are associated with reactivated Triassic(? ) basin boundary extensional fault zones. The Gants-Cooke fault zone associated with the Jedburg basin in the 1886 meizoseismal area, an unnamed fault along the margin of the Branchville basin in the Bowman earthquake area and the offshore Helena Banks fault zone (no observed seismicity) along the margin of the Kiawah basin show evidence of reactivation of Triassic(? ) normal faults zones in a compressional, probably strike slip sense. The previously reported reverse separation of these faults observed on the seismic profiles in the late Cretaceous-Cenozoic Coastal Plain sediments is possibly produced by oblique slip with the horizontal component possibly 10 to 100 times the vertical. Earthquake recurrence intervals of several thousand years reported in the Charleston area appear consistent with ranges of magnitude of strike slip displacement inferred from the seismic reflection data, and are constrained by aeromagnetic data.

  20. Contractional Strain Related to Interference of Intersecting Sets of Strike-slip Faults in the Southern Death Valley Region, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, C. M.; Pavlis, T. L.; McMackin, M. R.; Serpa, L.

    2006-12-01

    Structural and geomorphic data reveal complex neotectonic deformation(Pliocene-Quaternary, post 3-4 Ma)derived in part from interactions among intersecting sets of strike-slip faults in the southern Death Valley area on the eastern margin of the Eastern California Shear Zone. A distinct 40-km-wide domain of strike-slip faulting and associated contractional strain is bounded on the north by the southern end of the Panamint and Death Valley extensional terrane and on the south by the eastern Garlock fault (EGF). The dominant regional structures are (a) two NW-trending dextral-slip faults—the southern Death Valley fault (SDVF) and southern Panamint Valley fault (SPVF), and (b) three E- to NE-oriented sinistral-slip faults. This latter set includes the EGF, an associated splay of the Owl Lake fault (OLF) and a diffuse fault zone associated with discontinuous surface rupture in upper and central Wingate Wash valley (WWF). The strike-slip faults intersect with one another in a complex interference pattern that produces on-fault zones of transpressive deformation. These faults, moreover, are embedded within widespread areas of off-fault contractional strain in the intervening crustal blocks. Specifically, secondary on-fault transpressive deformation occurs along the majority of the EGF and SDVF and sections of the OLF and SPVF. This transpression is manifested as commonly asymmetric flower structures that produce domal to elongate zones of uplifted topography along the fault trace. Surface deformation within the flower structure appears partitioned between (a)translation along strike-slip faults in the dissected core of the uplifts and (b) contraction and uplift accommodated on near-surface blind thrusts below fault-propagation folds on the flanks of the structure. Where two or more large strike-slip faults intersect one another, one or more of the structures typically merges with or is truncated against one primary though-going structure. The geometry and slip-sense of

  1. Transition from Subduction to Strike-Slip in the Southeast Caribbean: Effects on Lithospheric Structures and Overlying Basin Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, T.; Mann, P.; Wood, L. J.; Vargas, C. A.; Latchman, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Topography, basin structures and geomorphology of the southeast Caribbean-northeast South American margin are controlled by a 200-km-long transition from westward-directed subduction of South American lithosphere beneath the Caribbean plate, to east-west strike-slip motion of the Caribbean and South American plates. Our study of structures and basins present in the transitional area integrates a tomographic study of the lithospheric structures associated with lateral variations in the subduction of the South American lithosphere and orientation of the slab beneath the Caribbean plate as well as the evolution of overlying sedimentary basins imaged with deep-penetration seismic data kindly provided by the oil industry and Trinidad & Tobago government agencies. We use an earthquake dataset containing more than 700 events recorded by the eastern Caribbean regional seismograph network to build travel-time and attenuation tomography models used to image the mantle to depths of 100 km beneath transition zone. Approximately 10,000 km of 2D seismic reflection lines which are recorded to depths > 12 seconds TWT are used to interpret basin scale structures including tectono-stratigraphic sequences and structures which deform and displace sedimentary sequences. We use the observed satellite gravity to generate a gravity model for key sections traversing the tectonic transitional zone and to determine depth to basement in basins with sedimentary fill > 12 km. Within the study area, the dip of subducted South American oceanic lithosphere imaged on tomographic images is variable from ~44 to ~24 degrees. There is a distinct low gravity, low velocity, high attenuation, northwest - southeast trending lineation located east of Trinidad which defines the location of a Mesozoic oceanic fracture zone which accommodated the opening of the Central Atlantic during the Jurassic to Middle Cretaceous. This feature is also coincident with the present-day continent-ocean boundary and acts as a

  2. Spatial and temporal relationships between compression, strike-slip and extension in the Central Venezuelan Andes: Clues for Plio-Quaternary tectonic escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backé, Guillaume; Dhont, Damien; Hervouët, Yves

    2006-10-01

    The geometry of tectonic structures, attributed to the Neogene-Quaternary time interval, is described in the active setting of the Venezuelan Andes. Our methodology is based on the analysis of radar satellite and Digital Elevation Model imagery, complemented by structural fieldwork and the compilation of seismotectonic data to make a structural analysis on a regional scale. Radar images provide first class data for morphostructural analysis in areas of dense vegetation and frequent cloud covering, like the Venezuelan Andes. We focused our analysis in the Burbusay-Río Momboy and Boconó faults corner located in the central part of the belt. We have described three stages of deformation during the Neogene-Quaternary. The first one, Mio-Pliocene in age, is a NW-SE compression responsible for the uplift of the Venezuelan Andes. The second tectonic stage corresponds to a strike-slip regime of deformation marked by shearing along the Boconó, Burbusay and Valera faults, which separates two triangular wedges in the larger Trujillo block. This strike-slip faulting-dominated compressional-extensional tectonic regime allowed the Trujillo crustal block to move towards the NE. Wrenching has therefore started at some point between the Pliocene and the Quaternary. These two tectonic events are consistent with ongoing strain partitioning in the Venezuelan Andes. The third stage corresponds to extensional deformation limited to the Trujillo block and is still active today. Extension is associated with the motion of crustal blocks moving relative to each other, probably above the upper-lower crust boundary. Such extensional deformation can be understood considering that the crust extends and stretches at the same time as it moves towards the NE. The combination of both horizontal lateral motion and extension is characteristic of a tectonic escape process. The northeastward escape of the Trujillo block, which belongs to the larger North Andes block, occurs as a result of the

  3. 'Extra-regional' strike-slip fault systems in Chile and Alaska: the North Pacific Rim orogenic Stream vs. Beck's Buttress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, T. F.; Scholl, D. W.; Fitzgerald, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    The ~2000 km long Denali Fault System (DFS) of Alaska is an example of an extra-regional strike-slip fault system that terminates in a zone of widely-distributed deformation. The ~1200 km long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ) of Patagonia (southern Chile) is another. Both systems are active, having undergone large-magnitude seismic rupture is 2002 (DFS) and 2007 (LOFZ). Both systems appear to be long-lived: the DFS juxtaposes terranes that docked in at least early Tertiary time, whilst the central LOFZ appears to also record early Tertiary or Mesozoic deformation. Both fault systems comprise a relatively well-defined central zone where individual fault traces can be identified from topographic features or zones of deformed rock. In both cases the proximal and distal traces are much more diffuse tributary and distributary systems of individual, branching fault traces. However, since their inception the DFS and LOFZ have followed very different evolutionary paths. Copious Alaskan paleomagnetic data are consistent with vertical axis small block rotation, long-distance latitudinal translation, and a recently-postulated tectonic extrusion towards a distributary of subordinate faults that branch outward towards the Aleution subduction zone (the North Pacific Rim orogenic Stream; see Redfield et al., 2007). Paleomagnetic data from the LOFZ region are consistent with small block rotation but preclude statistically-significant latitudinal transport. Limited field data from the southernmost LOFZ suggest that high-angle normal and reverse faults dominate over oblique to strike-slip structures. Rather than the high-angle oblique 'slivering regime' of the southeasternmost DFS, the initiation of the LOFZ appears to occur across a 50 to 100 km wide zone of brittly-deformed granitic and gneissic rock characterized by bulk compression and vertical pathways of exhumation. In both cases, relative plate motions are consistent with the hypothetical style, and degree, of offset, leading

  4. Triggering of tsunamigenic aftershocks from large strike-slip earthquakes: Analysis of the November 2000 New Ireland earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Tom

    2005-10-01

    The November 2000 New Ireland earthquake sequence started with a Mw = 8.0 left-lateral main shock on 16 November and was followed by a series of aftershocks with primarily thrust mechanisms. The earthquake sequence was associated with a locally damaging tsunami on the islands of New Ireland and nearby New Britain, Bougainville, and Buka. Results from numerical tsunami-propagation models of the main shock and two of the largest thrust aftershocks (Mw > 7.0) indicate that the largest tsunami was caused by an aftershock located near the southeastern termination of the main shock, off the southern tip of New Ireland (Aftershock 1). Numerical modeling and tide gauge records at regional and far-field distances indicate that the main shock also generated tsunami waves. Large horizontal displacements associated with the main shock in regions of steep bathymetry accentuated tsunami generation for this event. Most of the damage on Bougainville and Buka Islands was caused by focusing and amplification of tsunami energy from a ridge wave between the source region and these islands. Modeling of changes in the Coulomb failure stress field caused by the main shock indicate that Aftershock 1 was likely triggered by static stress changes, provided the fault was on or synthetic to the New Britain interplate thrust as specified by the Harvard CMT mechanism. For other possible focal mechanisms of Aftershock 1 and the regional occurrence of thrust aftershocks in general, evidence for static stress change triggering is not as clear. Other triggering mechanisms such as changes in dynamic stress may also have been important. The 2000 New Ireland earthquake sequence provides evidence that tsunamis caused by thrust aftershocks can be triggered by large strike-slip earthquakes. Similar tectonic regimes that include offshore accommodation structures near large strike-slip faults are found in southern California, the Sea of Marmara, Turkey, along the Queen Charlotte fault in British Columbia

  5. Extensional orogenic collapse captured by strike-slip tectonics: Constraints from structural geology and Usbnd Pb geochronology of the Pinhel shear zone (Variscan orogen, Iberian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rubén Díez; Pereira, Manuel Francisco

    2016-11-01

    The late Paleozoic collision between Gondwana and Laurussia resulted in the polyphase deformation and magmatism that characterizes the Iberian Massif of the Variscan orogen. In the Central Iberian Zone, initial continental thickening (D1; folding and thrusting) was followed by extensional orogenic collapse (D2) responsible for the exhumation of high-grade rocks coeval to the emplacement of granitoids. This study presents a tectonometamorphic analysis of the Trancoso-Pinhel region (Central Iberian Zone) to explain the processes in place during the transition from an extension-dominated state (D2) to a compression-dominated one (D3). We reveal the existence of low-dipping D2 extensional structures later affected by several pulses of subhorizontal shortening, each of them typified by upright folds and strike-slip shearing (D3, D4 and D5, as identified by superimposition of structures). The D2 Pinhel extensional shear zone separates a low-grade domain from an underlying high-grade domain, and it contributed to the thermal reequilibration of the orogen by facilitating heat advection from lower parts of the crust, crustal thinning, decompression melting, and magma intrusion. Progressive lessening of the gravitational disequilibrium carried out by this D2 shear zone led to a switch from subhorizontal extension to compression and the eventual cessation and capture of the Pinhel shear zone by strike-slip tectonics during renewed crustal shortening. High-grade domains of the Pinhel shear zone were folded together with low-grade domains to define the current upright folded structure of the Trancoso-Pinhel region, the D3 Tamames-Marofa-Sátão synform. New dating of syn-orogenic granitoids (SHRIMP Usbnd Pb zircon dating) intruding the Pinhel shear zone, together with the already published ages of early extensional fabrics constrain the functioning of this shear zone to ca. 331-311 Ma, with maximum tectonomagmatic activity at ca. 321-317 Ma. The capture and apparent cessation

  6. The tsunami-like sea level disturbance in Crotone harbor, Italy, after the Mw6.5 strike-slip earthquake of 17 November 2015 in Lefkada Isl., Ionian Sea, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, Tatyana; Annunziato, Alessandro; Charalampakis, Marinos; Romano, Fabrizio; Volpe, Manuela; Tonini, Roberto; Gerardinger, Andrea; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.

    2016-04-01

    On 17 November 2015 an Mw6.5 earthquake ruptured offshore Lefkada Isl. in Ionian Sea, Greece, causing two human victims, minor damage and several ground failures including coastal landslides. Fault plane solutions released by CMT/Harvard, NOA and other institutes have indicated that the faulting style was strike-slip right-lateral, which is quite typical for the area, as for example, the Mw6.3 event that occurred on August 14, 2003, in exactly the same fault zone. In spite of the very low tsunami potential commonly associated to this faulting mechanism, a tsunami-like sea level change was recorded after the earthquake by one tide-gauge in the Crotone harbor, Italy. Preliminary tsunami numerical simulations were performed to reproduce the observed signal. The spectral analysis of the synthetic mareograms close to the entrance of the harbor shows the presence of some peaks that could justify the relation between the natural port resonance and the observed wave amplification. Of particular interest is the coupling between the tsunami energy and the natural modes of basin oscillation enhancing tsunami wave amplitude in harbors through resonance, as shown in some historical events in the Mediterranean Sea and elsewhere. This research is a contribution to the EU-FP7 tsunami research project ASTARTE (Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe), grant agreement no: 603839, 2013-10-30.

  7. Dextral strike-slip along the Kapıdağ shear zone (NW Turkey): evidence for Eocene westward translation of the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkoğlu, Ercan; Zulauf, Gernold; Linckens, Jolien; Ustaömer, Timur

    2016-10-01

    The northern part of the Kapıdağ Peninsula (Marmara Sea, NW Turkey) is affected by the E-W trending Kapıdağ shear zone, which cuts through calc-alkaline granitoids of the Ocaklar pluton resulting in mylonitic orthogneiss. Macroscopic and microscopic shear-sense indicators, such as SC fabrics, shear bands, σ-clasts and mica fish, unequivocally suggest dextral strike-slip for the Kapıdağ shear zone. Based on petrographic data, deformation microfabrics of quartz and feldspar, and the slip systems in quartz, the dextral shearing should have been active at T = 500-300 °C and P < 5 kbar. Published K-Ar and 39Ar-40Ar cooling ages of hornblende and biotite suggest that cooling below 500-300 °C occurred during the Eocene (ca. 45-ca. 35 Ma), meaning that the Kapıdağ shear zone should have been active during Middle to Late Eocene times. The differential stress related to the shearing was <50 MPa as is indicated by the size of recrystallized quartz grains. Based on the new and published data, it is concluded that the westward movement of the Anatolian plate might have been active almost continuously from the Middle Eocene until recent times.

  8. Effects of Apparent Supersonic Ruptures for Strike-slip Rupture: Should We Consider it in the Seismic Hazard Analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, M. B.; Shao, G.; Ji, C.

    2009-12-01

    Recent numerical studies indicated that the supersonic rupture could produce larger off-fault damage at distant sites than the sub-shear rupture, due to the famous "mach cone" effect (Dunham and Archuleta, 2005; Bhat et al, 2007). These results were obtained using the steady-state rupture simulations in a half-space earth. For more realistic layered or 3D earth models, we should also consider the effects of apparent supersonic rupture, i.e., the deep rupture is still in a speed slower than the local shear velocity, but faster than the near surface S or even the P wave velocity. The apparent super-shear rupture could excite the mach effect, but how large it is has not yet been quantitatively addressed. In this study, we explore this possibility by performing numerical simulations for pure strike-slip ruptures on a vertical fault inside various layered earth models.

  9. Dextral Strike-Slip Faulting Along the Early Permian Margin of Pangaea (Eastern Australia) and Implications for Oroclinal Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, G.; Uysal, I. T.; Babaahmadi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of the Pangaean supercontinent was one of the most significant events that affected Phanerozoic global tectonics. Heralding this process, and following the Carboniferous maximum stage of continental assembly, was a period in which the southern part of Pangaea (Gondwana) was subjected to a counterclockwise rotation relative to Laurasia. According to tectonic reconstructions, dextral wrench faulting and oroclinal bending in Varsican Europe and eastern Gondwana accompanied this rotation, but direct evidence for dextral strike-slip faulting in the eastern Gondwanan margin has hitherto not been reported. Here we show evidence from a well-preserved fault zone in eastern Australia (Red Rock fault zone), which occurs along the eastern limb of the Z-shaped Texas/Coffs Harbour orocline. Structural observations show evidence for dextral strike-slip faulting, with a reverse kinematic component, along a sub-vertical fault plane oriented NNE-SSW. Direct geochronological data (Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar) from fault gouge samples associated with this fault zone indicate that brittle faulting occurred in the early-mid Permian (288-264 Ma). In addition, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope geochemistry indicates that the origin of fluids that circulated in the fault zone was associated with a deep crustal source. These results are consistent with independent constraints on the timing of oroclinal bending, supporting the idea that dextral wrench faulting has directly contributed to the formation of the oroclines. We propose a kinematic model for the formation of the oroclines, attributing the early stage of oroclinal bending to subduction rollback and slab segmentation (at ~300-288 Ma) followed by a period of dextral wrench faulting at 288-264 Ma. In the context of Pangaea, our model suggests that the origin of oroclines along the rim of Gondwana was likely associated with bending in response to migrating plate boundaries, and a subsequent tightening of pre-existing curvatures by

  10. Late Cretaceous-Paleocene strike-slip faults along the East Greenland margin (63°N to 75°N): constraints for the North East Atlantic opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, P.

    2012-04-01

    segmentation of macro-dyke complexes or the activation of major shear zones with strike-slip movements. Oblique rifting and strike-slip deformation along the East Greenland margin reflect the progressive clockwise shift, from W-E to NW-SE, of the separation trend between Greenland and Europe probably in response to the opening of the Labrador Sea.

  11. Late Neogene structural inversion around the northern Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam: Effects from right-lateral displacement across the Red River fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyhn, Michael B. W.; Phach, Phung V.

    2015-02-01

    Continental extrusion may take up much of the deformation involved in continental collisions. Major strike-slip zones accommodate the relative extrusion displacement and transfer deformation away from the collision front. The Red River fault zone (RRFZ) accommodated left- and right-lateral displacements when Indochina and South China were extruded during the Indian-Eurasian collision. The northern Song Hong basin onshore and offshore in the Gulf of Tonkin delineates the direct extension of the RRFZ and thus records detailed information on the collision-induced continental extrusion. We assess the rapidly evolving kinematics of the fault zone buried within the basin based on seismic analysis. Contrary to previous studies, we do not identify indications for latest Miocene left-lateral motion across the RRFZ. We tentatively consider the shift from left- to right-lateral motion to have occurred already during the middle Late Miocene as indicated by inversion of NE-SW-striking faults in the Bach Long Vi area. Right-lateral displacement terminated around the end of the Miocene in the Song Hong basin. However, continued inversion in the Bach Long Vi area and NNW-SSE-striking normal faulting suggests a stress regime compatible with right-lateral motion across the onshore part of the RRFZ continuing to the present. Inversion around the Bach Long Vi Island may have accommodated up to a few kilometers of right-lateral displacement between the Indochina and South China blocks. Comparable NE-SW-striking fault zones onshore may have accommodated a larger fraction of the right-lateral slip across the RRFZ, thus accounting for the restricted transfer of lateral displacement to the offshore basins.

  12. Alluvial deposits from the strike-slip fault Lo River Basin (Oligocene/Miocene), Red River Fault Zone, north-western Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka, Anna; Swierczewska, Anna

    2003-08-01

    The Lo River Basin (LRB) is one of several narrow sedimentary basins associated with the main faults of the Red River Fault Zone separating the South China and Indochina microplates. The basin is located on the NE boundary of the high-grade metamorphic Con Voi Massif and the sedimentary and metasedimentary Viet Bac fold zone in north-eastern Vietnam. The LRB is filled with over 6000 m of Oligocene/Miocene alluvial deposits. The source area was probably located on the NE margin of the basin and was composed mostly of low-grade metamorphic rocks with a minor component of sedimentary rocks. Three alluvial systems are recognised. The oldest system was a proximal braided river system, with the minor occurrence of alluvial fans. The younger systems record changes in clast composition and lithofacies, which suggests a transition from a distal braided river to a distal braidplain system. The LRB fill shows a range of features characteristic of strike-slip fault basins. The origin of the LRB is correlated with the left-lateral transtensional regime. The present shape of the basin is a result of post-sedimentation tectonic activity.

  13. Interplay of thrust, back-thrust, strike-slip and salt tectonics in a fold and thrust belt system: an example from Zakynthos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelilidis, A.; Papatheodorou, G.; Maravelis, A. G.; Christodoulou, D.; Tserolas, P.; Fakiris, E.; Dimas, X.; Georgiou, N.; Ferentinos, G.

    2016-10-01

    The southwestern flank of the Hellenic fold and thrust belt, situated along the southern edge of the Dinarides-Albanides-Hellenides continental convergent zone, was examined for reconstructing the tectonic deformation. This investigation presents an integrated study of onshore sedimentological and structural analyses, as well as offshore seismic lines, across the Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary succession in Zakynthos Island. Back-thrust faults, using the Triassic evaporites as decollement surface, during the Pliocene, and coeval diapiric intrusions formed three sub-basins on the hangingwall of the Kalamaki back-thrust fault. This interaction is responsible for the growth of the Skopos Mountain and the soft sediment deformation that formed synclines and slumps, respectively. Back-thrust and strike-slip faults were active during the early Pleistocene, and diapiric intrusions modified the bathymetry on the sea floor, giving rise to slumps and recumbent folds. At least five events of synsedimentary diapiric intrusions have been recognized and are marked by five slump horizons. During the Holocene, the diapiric intrusions between the Kalamaki back-thrust and the Vrachionas anticline could be either related to normal faults or gravitationally driven.

  14. The 3D fault and vein architecture of strike-slip releasing- and restraining bends: Evidence from volcanic-centre-relatedmineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, B.R.; ,

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature, volcanic-centre-related hydrothermal systems involve large fluid-flow volumes and are observed to have high discharge rates in the order of 100-400 kg/s. The flows and discharge occur predominantly on networks of critically stressed fractures. The coupling of hydrothermal fluid flow with deformation produces the volumes of veins found in epithermal mineral deposits. Owing to this coupling, veins provide information on the fault-fracture architecture in existence at the time of mineralization. They therefore provide information on the nature of deformation within fault zones, and the relations between different fault sets. The Virginia City and Goldfield mining districts, Nevada, were localized in zones of strike-slip transtension in an Early to Mid-Miocene volcanic belt along the western margin of North America. The Camp Douglas mining area occurs within the same belt, but is localized in a zone of strike-slip transpression. The vein systems in these districts record the spatial evolution of strike-slip extensional and contractional stepovers, as well as geometry of faulting in and adjacent to points along strike-slip faults where displacement has been interrupted and transferred into releasing and restraining stepovers. ?? The Geological Society of London 2007.

  15. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.-F.; Braucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Prentice, C.; Mahan, S.; McGill, S.; Chauvet, A.; Marco, S.; Todbileg, M.; Demberel, S.; Bourles, D.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans-particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region-allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is ~1 mm yr-1 along the WIB and EIB segments and ~0.5 mm yr-1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78-7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of ~2500-5200 yr for past

  16. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, Carol S.; Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.F.; Baucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Mahan, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans—particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region—allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is∼1 mm yr–1 along the WIB and EIB segments and∼0.5 mm yr–1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78–7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of∼2500

  17. Landslide and tsunami hazard at Yate volcano, Chile as an example of edifice destruction on strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Sebastian F. L.; Pyle, David M.; Naranjo, José A.; Mather, Tamsin A.

    2009-07-01

    The edifice of Yate volcano, a dissected stratocone in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone, has experienced multiple summit collapses throughout postglacial time restricted to sectors NE and SW of the summit. The largest such historic event occurred on 19th February 1965 when ˜6.1-10 × 106 m3 of rock and ice detached from 2,000-m elevation to the SW of the summit and transformed into a debris flow. In the upper part of the flow path, velocities are estimated to have reached 40 m s-1. After travelling 7,500 m and descending 1,490 m, the flow entered an intermontane lake, Lago Cabrera. A wavemaker of estimated volume 9 ± 3 × 106 m3 generated a tsunami with an estimated amplitude of 25 m and a run-up of ˜60 m at the west end of the lake where a settlement disappeared with the loss of 27 lives. The landslide followed 15 days of unusually heavy summer rain, which may have caused failure by increasing pore water pressure in rock mechanically weathered through glacial action. The preferential collapse directions at Yate result from the volcano’s construction on the dextral strike-slip Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone. Movement on the fault during the lifetime of the volcano is thought to have generated internal instabilities in the observed failure orientations, at ˜10° to the fault zone in the Riedel shear direction. This mechanically weakened rock may have led to preferentially orientated glacial valleys, generating a feedback mechanism with collapse followed by rapid glacial erosion, accelerating the rate of incision into the edifice through repeated landslides. Debris flows with magnitudes similar to the 1965 event are likely to recur at Yate, with repeat times of the order of 102 years. With a warming climate, increased glacial meltwater due to snowline retreat and increasing rain, at the expense of snow, may accelerate rates of edifice collapse, with implications for landslide hazard and risk at glaciated volcanoes, in particular those in strike-slip tectonic

  18. Inelastic off-fault response and three-dimensional dynamics of earthquake rupture on a strike-slip fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.; Ma, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Large dynamic stress off the fault incurs an inelastic response and energy loss, which contributes to the fracture energy, limiting the rupture and slip velocity. Using an explicit finite element method, we model three-dimensional dynamic ruptures on a vertical strike-slip fault in a homogeneous half-space. The material is subjected to a pressure-dependent Drucker-Prager yield criterion. Initial stresses in the medium increase linearly with depth. Our simulations show that the inelastic response is confined narrowly to the fault at depth. There the inelastic strain is induced by large dynamic stresses associated with the rupture front that overcome the effect of the high confining pressure. The inelastic zone increases in size as it nears the surface. For material with low cohesion (~5 MPa) the inelastic zone broadens dramatically near the surface, forming a "flowerlike" structure. The near-surface inelastic strain occurs in both the extensional and the compressional regimes of the fault, induced by seismic waves ahead of the rupture front under a low confining pressure. When cohesion is large (~10 MPa), the inelastic strain is significantly reduced near the surface and confined mostly to depth. Cohesion, however, affects the inelastic zone at depth less significantly. The induced shear microcracks show diverse orientations near the surface, owing to the low confining pressure, but exhibit mostly horizontal slip at depth. The inferred rupture-induced anisotropy at depth has the fast wave direction along the direction of the maximum compressive stress.

  19. Analysis of the growth of strike-slip faults using effective medium theory together with field data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, A.; Berryman, J. G.

    2009-12-01

    Increases in the dimensions of strike-slip faults including fault length, thickness of fault rock and the surrounding damage zone collectively provide quantitative definition of fault growth and are commonly measured in terms of the maximum slip. The field observations from the Valley of Fire State Park, southeastern Nevada, indicate that a common mechanism for fault growth in the brittle upper crust is fault lengthening by linkage and coalescence of neighboring fault segments or strands, and fault rock-zone widening into highly fractured inner damage zone via cataclastic deformation. The most important underlying mechanical reason in both cases is prior weakening of the rocks surrounding a fault’s core and between neighboring fault segments by fault-related fractures. In this presentation, using field data together with effective medium models, we analyze the reduction in the effective elastic properties of rock in terms of density of the fault-related brittle fractures and fracture intersection angles controlled primarily by the splay angles. Fracture densities or equivalent fracture spacing values corresponding to the vanishing Young’s, shear, and quasi pure shear moduli were obtained by extrapolation from the calculated range of these parameters. The fracture spacing values obtained using this method compare well with the field data measured along scan lines across the faults in the study area.

  20. Formation of flower structures in a geological layer at a strike-slip displacement in the basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, Yu. P.; Bakeev, R. A.

    2015-07-01

    Formation of dislocations in a geological layer at a strike-slip displacement in its basement is studied by three-dimensional (3D) numerical modeling. It is shown that the pattern of strain localization is determined by the initial stress state or thickness of the deformed layer as well as by the Poisson ratio and strength of the medium. Three types of fracture zones are observed. Shear bands of the first type are dominated by the propeller-like surfaces of Riedel R-shears, which merge into a single main fault with feathering structures. In the second type of dislocation zones, the primary role is played by the surfaces oriented at an angle of ˜40° to the shear axis in the horizontal projections. After reaching the free surface, these discontinuities are cut by a V-shaped fault. In this case, the pattern of dislocations most closely corresponds to the flower structures. The third type is a trough, which may accommodate the formation of yet another strain localization zone along its axial part—a vertical fault.

  1. Multi-scale damage signatures across major strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, Neta

    This thesis presents a compilation of results from studies of active fault zone geometry, structural properties, and macro- and micro-scale damage fabrics. Multi-scale observations using a wide range of techniques were made along the transform plate boundary of the Pacific and the North-American plates. A new method for quantifying fault trace heterogeneity using Geographic Information System was outlined and used on the database of active faults in California. Several parameters were defined for quantifying fault trace heterogeneity and the range or dispersion in the data. The cumulative slip and slip rate proved effective measures of fault zone maturity. High resolution topographic models acquired by remote-sensing techniques were utilized to demonstrate how damage to the host rock is related to drainage development about a fault, and how the drainage density can be used as a proxy to study damage zone geometry. A strong correlation between drainage density and proximity to the fault was interpreted as an effect of degree of rock damage. Results of damage mapping using drainage density indicate that the northeast side of the SJF is generally more damaged. The observed asymmetry could be geological evidence for a preferred rupture propagation direction, because a preferred propagation direction is predicted to produce asymmetric damage structure that would be recorded in the volume of rock surrounding a fault. The fault damage zone, as inferred from drainage properties, is more pronounced near areas of complexities in the surface trace. Heterogeneities seen in the fault trace can create stress concentrations and are correlated with observations of higher damage levels. An extensive exploration of the properties of a damage zone phenomenon---pulverized granitic rocks, was performed with an objective of characterizing their chemistry and the changes they undergo due to their proximity to the San Andreas Fault. X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Fluorescence were used to

  2. Stress sensitivity of fault seismicity: A comparison between limited-offset oblique and major strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Stein, R.S.; Simpson, R.W.; Reasenberg, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional inventory of the southern San Francisco Bay area faults and use it to calculate stress applied principally by the 1989 M = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake and to compare fault seismicity rates before and after 1989. The major high-angle right-lateral faults exhibit a different response to the stress change than do minor oblique (right-lateral/thrust) faults. Seismicity on oblique-slip faults in the southern Santa Clara Valley thrust belt increased where the faults were unclamped. The strong dependence of seismicity change on normal stress change implies a high coefficient of static friction. In contrast, we observe that faults with significant offset (>50-100 km) behave differently; microseismicity on the Hayward fault diminished where right-lateral shear stress was reduced and where it was unclamped by the Loma Prieta earthquake. We observe a similar response on the San Andreas fault zone in southern California after the Landers earthquake sequence. Additionally, the offshore San Gregorio fault shows a seismicity rate increase where right-lateral/oblique shear stress was increased by the Loma Prieta earthquake despite also being clamped by it. These responses are consistent with either a low coefficient of static friction or high pore fluid pressures within the fault zones. We can explain the different behavior of the two styles of faults if those with large cumulative offset become impermeable through gouge buildup; coseismically pressurized pore fluids could be trapped and negate imposed normal stress changes, whereas in more limited offset faults, fluids could rapidly escape. The difference in behavior between minor and major faults may explain why frictional failure criteria that apply intermediate coefficients of static friction can be effective in describing the broad distributions of aftershocks that follow large earthquakes, since many of these events occur both inside and outside major fault zones.

  3. From 2012 HAITI-SIS Survey: thick-skin versus thin-skin tectonics partitioned along offshore strike-slip Faults-Haïti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellouz, N.; Leroy, S. D.; Momplaisir, R.; Mercier de Lepinay, B.

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of the deformation along large strike-slip fault-systems like transpressive boundaries between N. Caribbean/N America is a challenging topic, which requires a multi-scale approach. Thanks to Haiti-sis new data, the precise description of the fault segmentation pattern, the sedimentogical distribution, the uplift/subsidence rates, the along-fault and intra-basin fluids circulations, allows to actualize the evolution of the deformation history up to present-day . All the co-seismic surface to near-surface events, have to be also identified in order to integrate geophysical solutions for the earthquake, within the present-day geological and structural pattern. These two approaches, ranging from geological to instantaneous time-scales have been used during multi-tools Haiti-Sis oceanographic survey, allowing to document and image these different aspects at a large scale. The complex strike-slip North Caribbean boundary registered significative stress partitioning. Oblique convergence is expressed by along-strike evolution; from rifted segments (Cayman Through) to transpressive ones (Haiti, Dominican Rep.), to subduction (Porto Rico). In the Haiti-Sis survey, we acquired new offshore data surrounding the active fault areas, in the Gonâve Bay, the Jamaica Channel and along Southern Peninsula. Mapping the sea-floor, and HR seismic acquisition were our main objectives, in order to characterize the fault and fold architecture, with a new delineation of active segments. Offshore piston cores, have been used as representative of the modern basin sedimentation, and to document the catastrophic events (earthquakes, massive flood or sudden destabilization of the platform ) represented by turbiditic or mass-flow sequences, with the objective to track the time recurrence of seismic events by dating some of these catastrophic sediment deposition. At surface, the other markers of the fault activity are linked with along-fault permeability and fluid circulation

  4. Tectonics, magmatism and fluid flow in a transtensional strike-slip setting: The northern termination of the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault System, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembrano, J. M.; Perez-Flores, P.; Sánchez, P.; Sielfeld, G.

    2013-12-01

    vein systems, which appear to be associated with dextral strike-slip displacement on the LOFS. Fault-vein and vein structure varies from mineral fibers to typical ridge-and-groove striae. Bladed calcite occurs in dilational jogs along the main LOFS master faults; they are interpreted to represent boiling episodes. Thicker and more pervasive WNW sinistral-reverse fault-vein systems and breccias bodies suggest that the fault-valve mechanism was active during fluid transport and mineral precipitation. In some sites the WNW-striking system cuts and displaces the active LOFS, suggesting that their active has extended to at least the Pleistocene. Internally consistent structural and kinematic data from fault-fracture systems spatially and temporally associated with volcanoes and hydrothermal systems suggest that the same processes that drive the interplay between volcanism and tectonics may also control the nature, geometry and composition of geothermal reservoirs in the southern Andes.

  5. Late Cenozoic strike-slip faulting in the NE Mojave Block: Deformation at the southwest boundary of the Walker Lane belt

    SciTech Connect

    Schermer, E.R. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    New structural and stratigraphy data from the NE Mojave Block (NEMB) establish the timing and style of Cenozoic deformation south of the Garlock fault and west of the Avawatz Mts. Unlike adjacent areas, most of the NEMB did not undergo early-mid Miocene extension. Major fault zones strike EW; offset markers and small-scale shear criteria indicate left-lateral strike slip with a small reverse component. Lateral offsets average ca. 1--6 km and vertical offset is locally >200m. Pre-Tertiary markers indicate minimum cumulative sinistral shear of ca. 15 km in the area between the Garlock and Coyote Lake faults. Tertiary strata are deformed together with the older rocks. Along the Ft. Irwin fault, alluvial fan deposits interpreted to be <11Ma appear to be displaced as much as Mesozoic igneous rocks. EW sinistral faults S. of the Garlock fault cut unconsolidated Quaternary deposits; geomorphologic features and trench exposures along segments of the McLean Lake fault and the Tiefort Mt. fault suggest Late Quaternary activity. The EW faults do not cut modern drainages and are not seismically active. NW-striking faults are largely absent within the NEMB; the largest faults bound the domain of EW-striking faults. Offset of Cretaceous and Miocene rocks suggests the W boundary (Goldstone Lake fault) has <2km right separation. Along the E boundary (Soda-Avawatz fault zone), the presence of distinctive clasts in mid-late Miocene conglomerates west of the Avawatz Mts. supports the suggestion of Brady (1984) of ca. 20 km dextral displacement. Other NW-striking faults are cut by EW faults, have unknown or minor dextral displacement (Desert King Spring Fault, Garlic Spring fault) or are low- to moderate-angle left-oblique thrust faults (Red Pass Lake fault zone).

  6. Estimating Fault Slip Rates and Deformation at Complex Strike-Slip Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Wayne; Murray-Moraleda, Jessica

    2010-05-01

    Modeling GPS velocity fields in seismically active regions worldwide indicates deformation can be efficiently and usefully described as relative motions among elastic, fault-bounded crustal blocks. These models are providing hundreds of new decadal fault slip rate estimates that can be compared with the (much smaller) independent Holocene (<10 ka) to late Quaternary (<125 ka) rates obtained by geological methods. Updated comparisons show general agreement but a subset of apparently significant outliers. Some of these outliers have been discussed previously and attributed either to a temporal change in slip rate or systematic error in one of the estimates. Here we focus particularly on recent GPS and geologic results from southern California and discuss criteria for assessing the differing rates. In southern California (and elsewhere), subjective choices of block geometry are unavoidable and introduce significant uncertainties in model formulation and in the resultant GPS fault slip rate estimates. To facilitate comparison between GPS and geologic results in southern California we use the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) and geologic slip rates tabulated in the 2008 Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF2) report as starting points for identifying the most important faults and specifying the block geometry. We then apply this geometry in an inversion of the SCEC Crustal Motion Model (CMM4) GPS velocity field to estimate block motions and intra-block fault slip rates and compare our results with previous work. Here we use 4 criteria to evaluate GPS/geologic slip rate differences. First: Is there even-handed evaluation of random and systematic errors? ‘Random error' is sometimes subjectively estimated and its statistical properties are unknown or idealized. Differences between ~equally likely block models introduces a systematic error into GPS rate estimates that is difficult to assess and seldom discussed. Difficulties in constraining the true

  7. Levels of conflict in reasoning modulate right lateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Stollstorff, Melanie; Vartanian, Oshin; Goel, Vinod

    2012-01-05

    Right lateral prefrontal cortex (rlPFC) has previously been implicated in logical reasoning under conditions of conflict. A functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted to explore its role in conflict more precisely. Specifically, we distinguished between belief-logic conflict and belief-content conflict, and examined the role of rlPFC under each condition. The results demonstrated that a specific region of rlPFC is consistently activated under both types of conflict. Moreover, the results of a parametric analysis demonstrated that the same region was modulated by the level of conflict contained in reasoning arguments. This supports the idea that this specific region is engaged to resolve conflict, including during deductive reasoning. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "The Cognitive Neuroscience of Thought".

  8. Tectonic burial and exhumation cycles tracked by muscovite and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology in a strike-slip fault zone, central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idleman, Lauren; Cosca, Michael A.; Heizler, Matthew T.; Thomson, Stuart N.; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna L.

    2014-02-01

    Muscovite and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages from the eastern margin of the Niğde massif in central Anatolia track the timing of initial exhumation, reburial, and final exhumation and cooling of metamorphic rocks deformed within a strike-slip fault zone. Although the ages of initial and final cooling were known from previous studies, our new results document the timing of the reheating/reburial event. Muscovite from four of eight gneiss samples have Late Cretaceous 40Ar/39Ar ages that date initial cooling at ~ 75 Ma. The remaining samples have perturbed spectra that climb to Late Cretaceous ages with increasing extraction temperatures during analysis. These perturbed samples are located beneath a faulted unconformity overlain by Paleogene sedimentary deposits that were derived in part from the metamorphic rocks, then buried, metamorphosed, and deformed under greenschist facies conditions. Samples close to the faulted unconformity are more perturbed than structurally deeper samples. The age of the thermal perturbation is determined at 30 ± 5 Ma using multi-diffusion domain modeling of K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar data from two gneiss samples, one located close to the unconformity and one at a structurally deeper level. Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar results and modeled K-feldspar temperature-time histories show that the eastern margin of the Niğde massif experienced a reheating event that peaked at ~ 30 Ma. The thermal pulse has been attributed to reburial associated with transpression in the Ecemiş segment of the Central Anatolian Fault Zone along the eastern margin of the Niğde massif. Activity of this fault zone may represent a far-field expression of the onset of collision of Arabia with Eurasia in SE Anatolia.

  9. The stress shadow effect: a mechanical analysis of the evenly-spaced parallel strike-slip faults in the San Andreas fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, A. V.; Yin, A.; Lin, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Parallel evenly-spaced strike-slip faults are prominent in the southern San Andreas fault system, as well as other settings along plate boundaries (e.g., the Alpine fault) and within continental interiors (e.g., the North Anatolian, central Asian, and northern Tibetan faults). In southern California, the parallel San Jacinto, Elsinore, Rose Canyon, and San Clemente faults to the west of the San Andreas are regularly spaced at ~40 km. In the Eastern California Shear Zone, east of the San Andreas, faults are spaced at ~15 km. These characteristic spacings provide unique mechanical constraints on how the faults interact. Despite the common occurrence of parallel strike-slip faults, the fundamental questions of how and why these fault systems form remain unanswered. We address this issue by using the stress shadow concept of Lachenbruch (1961)—developed to explain extensional joints by using the stress-free condition on the crack surface—to present a mechanical analysis of the formation of parallel strike-slip faults that relates fault spacing and brittle-crust thickness to fault strength, crustal strength, and the crustal stress state. We discuss three independent models: (1) a fracture mechanics model, (2) an empirical stress-rise function model embedded in a plastic medium, and (3) an elastic-plate model. The assumptions and predictions of these models are quantitatively tested using scaled analogue sandbox experiments that show that strike-slip fault spacing is linearly related to the brittle-crust thickness. We derive constraints on the mechanical properties of the southern San Andreas strike-slip faults and fault-bounded crust (e.g., local fault strength and crustal/regional stress) given the observed fault spacing and brittle-crust thickness, which is obtained by defining the base of the seismogenic zone with high-resolution earthquake data. Our models allow direct comparison of the parallel faults in the southern San Andreas system with other similar strike-slip

  10. Contrasting strike-slip motions on thrust and normal faults: Implications for space-geodetic monitoring of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Andrea; Li, Tao; Maniatis, Georgios

    2013-04-01

    Recent GPS records of surface deformation caused by earthquakes on intra-continental dip-slip faults revealed in unprecedented detail a significant strike-slip component near the fault tips, which is markedly different for thrust and normal faults. In the hanging wall of the thrust fault ruptured during the 2003 Chengkung (Taiwan) earthquake, a divergent displacement pattern was recorded (Hsu et al., 2009). In contrast, a convergent slip pattern was observed in the hanging wall of the normal fault that produced the 2009 L'Aquila (Italy) earthquake (Cheloni et al., 2010; Serpelloni et al., 2012). Remarkably, such convergent slip patterns are also evident in field records of cumulative fault slip (e.g., Jackson et al., 1982; Roberts & Koukouvelas 1996), which underlines the coseismic origin of the cumulative slip pattern. Here we use three-dimensional numerical modeling to demonstrate that the observed fault-parallel motions are a characteristic feature of the coseismic slip pattern on normal and thrust faults (Hampel et al., in press). Modeled slip vectors converge toward the center of normal faults whereas they diverge for thrust faults, which causes contrasting fault-parallel displacements at the model surface. Our model also predicts divergent movements in normal fault footwalls, which were recorded for the first time during the L'Aquila earthquake. During the postseismic phase, viscous flow in the lower crust induces fault-parallel surface displacements, which have the same direction as the coseismic displacements but are distributed over a larger area that extends far beyond the fault tips. Hence, detecting this signal requires GPS stations in the prolongation of the fault's strike. Postseismic velocities vary over several orders of magnitude depending on the lower-crustal viscosity and may reach tens of millimeters per year for low viscosities. Our study establishes the link between coseismic and cumulative slip patterns on normal and thrust faults and

  11. Sedimentologic evidence for structural and topographic evolution following the onset of strike slip, E San Francisco Bay area, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Buising, A.V. )

    1992-01-01

    Mid- to Upper Miocene continental (Orinda and Mulholland Fms.) and shallow marine (Neroly Fm.) strata in the Upper San Leandro Reservoir watershed (SLR) area east of San Francisco Bay preserve important information on structural and landscape evolution during the early phases of strike slip along the Pacific-North American plate boundary. The SLR area lies between the Hayward and Calaveras Faults, major strands of the San Andreas Fault system, and is bisected by the NW-striking Cull Creek Fault (CCF). Geologic mapping delineates five completely intercalated lithofacies in the Mulholland Fm. at SLR. The conglomerate-dominated, sandstone-dominated, and interbedded conglomerate, sandstone, and siltstone facies represent fluvial channel and floodplain deposits; the sandstone + mudstone facies represent lacustrine-deltaic and shallow lacustrine deposits; the shale facies records open lacustrine deposition. Sparse unidirectional paleocurrent indicators show southerly and easterly transport west of the CCF and both westerly and easterly transport east of the CCF. Conglomerate-rich and sand-rich facies tracts are juxtaposed along the CCF. Clast assemblages in Mulholland conglomerates include abundant chart, graywacke, blueschist, and vein quartz, suggesting derivation from a Franciscan-dominated source terrane. Clast assemblages in the gradationally underlying and interfingering Neroly Fm. suggest that it shared the same source terrane; this is atypical for the primarily andesitic (Sierra-derived) Neroly. Fluvial deposits are volumetrically dominant in the Mulholland Fm. at SLR; open-lacustrine shales occur in stratigraphically isolated lenses ranging from > 1 km to < 100 m along strike. This suggests numerous small lakes on a broad drainage plain rather than the single large lake envisioned by previous workers.

  12. Photogeologic and kinematic analysis of lineaments at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Implications for strike-slip faulting and oroclinal bending

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, J.M.; Whitney, J.W.; Hudson, M.R.

    1992-12-31

    The main structural grain at Yucca Mountain, as seen from aerial photographs, is a pronounced north-trending linear fabric defined by parallel east-tilted fault-block ridges. The ridges are bounded on the west by normal faults that are easily recognizable on aerial photographs, mainly as isolated, colinear scarps in alluvium and as offset bedrock units. AH ridge-bounding to adjacent faults, most commonly by short northwest-trending fault splays. The generally north-trending high-angle faults primarily display down-to-the-west normal offset, but also have an auxiliary component of left-lateral slip. Left-lateral slip is indicated by offset stream channels, slickenlines, and en echelon fault splays that are structurally linked, commonly by pull-apart grabens. These grabens, best seen on low-sun angle aerial photographs, rangefrom tens of meters to more than 3 kilometers wide. The smallest pull-apart zones are well developed along the Windy Wash and Solitario Canyon faults on the west side of Yucca Mountain; the largest of these features is interpreted to structurally link the Bow Ridge and Solitario Canyon faults in the north-central part of Yucca Mountain; the pronounced northwest-trending drainage system in this part of Yucca Mountain appears to be controlled by tension fractures related to left-lateral strike-slip movement on these north-trending faults. Midway Valley, directly east of this pull-apart graben, may also owe its origin, in part, to a pull-apart mechanism.

  13. Basins Formed by Interaction of Left- and Right-Lateral Faults in the Eastern Transverse Ranges, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Powell, R. E.; Biehler, S.

    2006-12-01

    the eastern Pinto Basin, the southern margin marked by prominent gravity and magnetic gradients that we use to map the Eagle Mountain strand of the BCF. The N margin of the basin does not coincide with a previously inferred right-lateral strike-slip fault (Sheep Hole Fault;SHF), but rather with a normal fault at the range front. The E-W dimension of the basin is 10±1 km. The CF also consists of left-stepping strands mapped by strong gravity and magnetic gradients. The ENE- striking Hayfield basin is 11-12 km long, ~3 km wide and 1-2 km deep with a 12 km long basin beneath Shaver Valley to the west. At the E end of the CF is a 6 km by 8 km, <2 km deep triangular basin. Using the length of the basins as a proxy for cumulative left slip suggests that displacement increases westward along the PMF and eastward along the Eagle Mountain strand of the BCF. Estimates from this method are consistent with those derived by matching offset magnetic anomalies and best-fit bedrock geologic match-ups. Slip apparently is bled off of the BCF by internal deformation in the Pinto Mountain block and fed onto the PMF by subsidiary faults such as the Ivanhoe Fault. The wider basins at the E ends of the left-lateral faults may reflect interaction with the poorly understood SHF. Geophysical data suggest that the SHF is characterized by mostly normal displacement. The westward decrease in basin width may relate to proximity to the left step in the San Andreas Fault or, for the PMF, proximity to a mafic Jurassic intrusion, north of the Joshua Tree basin.

  14. The Deese and Collings ranch conglomerates of the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma: Evidence of strike-slip movement during the deformation stage of the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Cemen, I.; Pybas, K.; Stafford, C.; Al-Shaieb, Z. . School of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    It has been widely recognized that the Pennsylvanian conglomerates of the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma, record the deformation stage of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Two of these units are the Desmoinesian Deese Conglomerate, exposed in the Mill Creek Syncline area between the Reagan and Mill Creek fault zones, and the Middle Virgilian Collings Ranch Conglomerate, exposed along the Washita Valley fault zone in the Turner Falls area. The authors investigated clast size, geometry, and content, primary sedimentary structures, petrography, petrology, and diagenesis of the two conglomerate units, as well as the geometric relationship of their basins with nearby faults. Their evidence suggests that the two conglomerates were deposited as alluvial fans in basins formed by strike-slip movements. The Collings Ranch Conglomerate was deposited in a basin formed as the result of left-stepping along the nearby Washita Valley strike-slip fault zone. The Deese Conglomerate was deposited in a basin formed due to the combined effect of strike-slip and dip-slip movements along the Reagan and Mill Creek fault zones. In the Collings Ranch basin, the deposition was accomplished primarily by channel-fill and sieve deposits in the proximal region of the fan. The Deese Conglomerate was deposited as an alluvial fan or fans which included several channel deposits while, in the deeper parts of the basin, fine-grained materials and limestones were deposited. These observations and their possible interpretations suggest that the Washita Valley, Mill Creek, and Reagan fault zones have experienced substantial strike-slip movement during the deformation stage of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen.

  15. An old question revisited: the mechanics of shallow creep events on strike-slip faults and their triggering by nearby earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Tectonic displacement on faults can occur as seismic slip, continuous aseismic creep, or transient creep events. Shallow creep events on strike-slip faults can take place in a coupled process with earthquake afterslip, spontaneously, or be triggered by nearby earthquakes. Despite more than five decades of observations, the mechanics of shallow creep events and their implications for seismic hazard are still not fully understood. To understand the mechanics and triggering of creep events, we developed a physics-based model to simulate shallow creep events on a strike-slip fault with rate-and-state frictional properties that vary both in depth and along strike. Our 1D simulation shows that a simple 2-layer model as proposed by Bilham and Behr [1992] cannot explain both the rapid afterslip and shallow creep events that were observed on the Superstition Hills Fault following the 1987 earthquake. Therefore, we propose a 3-layer model that can reproduce all the known surface deformation observations, including the co-seismic slip, afterslip, and the creep events. Using the strike-slip fault model, we also study the triggering process of creep events, by a static, a dynamic or a combined stress perturbation induced on the fault by a nearby earthquake. Preliminary results show that the magnitude of the perturbation relative to the ambient stress level and the timing of perturbation are the important parameters. By developing state-of-the-art models and constraining parameters with rich datasets from the Salton Trough, we aim to transition from a conceptual understanding of fault creep towards a quantitative and predictive understanding of the physical mechanism of creep events on strike-slip faults.

  16. Segmentation and step-overs along strike-slip fault systems in the inner California borderlands: Implications for fault architecture and basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Brothers, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reprocessed, industry multichannel seismic reflection data and high resolution Chirp data were examined to characterize the geometry and recency of faulting in the inner California borderlands (ICB). Two end-member models have been proposed to explain the deformation observed in the ICB. One model invokes reactivation of detachment faults by the Oceanside Blind Thrust (OBT) to explain the deformation and margin architecture (e.g., San Mateo/Carlsbad Trend). In contrast, the other model explains the deformation by step-overs along the strike-slip fault systems. Several observations in both the southern and central portions of the ICB are more consistent with the step-over model than the regional blind thrust model. For example, regions in the ICB exhibit both tensional and compressional structures across the margin, which are more readily explained by the strike-slip model. Localized compression and extension occurs as predicted at fault bends and step-overs. Furthermore, strike slip fault systems that bound extensional regions (i.e., San Diego Bay) exhibit localized normal deformation as they approach the releasing step-overs. In addition, onlapping turbidites reveal that the deformation becomes younger toward the east, an observation not consistent with a westward verging blind thrust fault system. Finally, rotational deformation previously attributed to a splay off the OBT instead appears to be a southward transported gravitational slide deposit. In summary, the nested high-resolution Chirp and MCS data have provided new constraints on ICB tectonic deformation and margin architecture, which are best explained by step-overs on strike slip fault systems.

  17. Active tectonics in northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) inferred from the integration of GPS data and geologic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbini, M.; Cianfarra, P.; Casula, G.; Capra, A.; Salvini, F.

    2010-12-01

    A semipermanent Global Positioning System (GPS) network of 30 vertices known as the Victoria Land Network for Deformation Control (VLNDEF) was set up in the Austral summer of 1998 in northern Victoria Land (NVL), including Terra Nova Bay (TNB), Antarctica. The locations were selected according to the known Cenozoic fault framework, which is characterized by a system of NW-SE regional faults with right-lateral, strike-slip kinematics. The TNB1 permanent GPS station is within the VLNDEF, and following its installation on a bedrock monument in October 1998, it has been recording almost continuously. The GPS network has been surveyed routinely every two summers, using high-quality, dual-frequency GPS receivers. In this study we present the results of a distributed session approach applied to the processing of the GPS data of the VLNDEF. An improved reference frame definition was implemented, including a new Euler pole, to compute the Antarctic intraplate residual velocities. The projection of the residual velocities on the main faults in NVL show present-day activities for some faults, including the Tucker, Leap Year, Lanterman, Aviator, and David faults, with right-lateral strike-slip kinematics and local extensional and compressional components. This active fault pattern divides NVL into eight rigid blocks, each characterized by its relative movements and rigid rotations. These show velocities of up to several millimeters per year, which are comparable to those predicted by plate tectonic theory at active plate margins.

  18. Tectonic and kinematic study of a strike-slip zone along the southern margin of Central Ovda Regio, Venus: Geodynamical implications for crustal plateaux formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Ignacio; Capote, Ramón; Anguita, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    The tectonic system of the southern margin of Central Ovda Regio, a crustal plateau which straddles Venus equator, has been interpreted as a dextral strike-slip array, on the basis of evidence clearly identifiable, as are Riedel fracture patterns of different scales, en échelon folds and brittle strike-slip faults. This transcurrent regime developed two main shear belts (Inner and Outer, on respectively thicker and thinner crust), whose minimum dextral displacement has been estimated in 30-50 km. Since the up or downwelling models for plateau formation cannot easily explain tectonic shears of this magnitude along their margins, an alternative hypothesis has been built, which stands on the proposed collisional belt which could form Ovda northern border (King et al., 1998, Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 29, Abstract 1209; Tuckwell and Ghail, 2002, Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 33, Abstract 1566). Within this framework, the shear would represent a transcollisional transcurrent zone, similar to the strike-slip zones produced in the foreland of the Himalayas-Tibet collision front. Eastern Ovda would be an independent area of thickened crust, pushed to the SSE by the northern collision, with the deformation concentrated at its margins, and experiencing a shear strain on its southern margin. None of the data, however, either supports nor helps to discard theoretical subduction events as a cause of the collision. On the contrary, image relationships could be interpreted as evidence that the main shear deformation took place during the last global resurfacing event on the planet.

  19. The role of thrust faulting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range: Thermochronological constraints from the Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault region of the intracontinental strike-slip Denali Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Steven J.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Benowitz, Jeff A.; Roeske, Sarah M.

    2014-11-01

    Horizontal-slip along restraining bends of strike-slip faults is often partitioned into a vertical component via splay faults. The active Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault (SGTF), as shown by its initiation of the 2002 M7.9 Denali Fault earthquake, lies south of, and intersects the dextral strike-slip Denali Fault. Geochronology and thermochronology data from samples across the SGTF constrain the region's tectonic history and the role of thrusting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range south of the Denali fault. U-Pb zircon ages indicate intrusion of plutons in the footwall (~57 Ma) and hanging wall (~98 Ma). These U-Pb zircon ages correlate to those from the Ruby Batholith/Kluane Terrane ~400 km east along the Denali Fault, supporting geologic correlations and hence constraints on long-term slip rates. 40Ar/39Ar mica and K-feldspar data from footwall and hanging wall samples (~54 to ~46 Ma) reflect cooling following magmatism and/or regional Eocene metamorphism related to ridge subduction. Combined with apatite fission track data (ages 43-28 Ma) and thermal models, both sides of the SGTF acted as a coherent block during the Eocene and early Oligocene. Contrasting apatite (U-Th)/He ages across the Susitna Glacier (~25 Ma footwall, ~15 Ma hanging wall) suggest initiation of faulting during the middle Miocene. Episodic cooling and exhumation is related to thrusting on known or hypothesized faults that progressively activate due to varying partition of strain along the Denali Fault associated with changing kinematics and plate interaction (Yakutat microplate collision, flat-slab subduction and relative plate motion change) at the southern Alaskan plate margin.

  20. Strike-slip fault propagation and linkage via work optimization with application to the San Jacinto fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, E. H.; McBeck, J.; Cooke, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Over multiple earthquake cycles, strike-slip faults link to form through-going structures, as demonstrated by the continuous nature of the mature San Andreas fault system in California relative to the younger and more segmented San Jacinto fault system nearby. Despite its immaturity, the San Jacinto system accommodates between one third and one half of the slip along the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. It therefore poses a significant seismic threat to southern California. Better understanding of how the San Jacinto system has evolved over geologic time and of current interactions between faults within the system is critical to assessing this seismic hazard accurately. Numerical models are well suited to simulating kilometer-scale processes, but models of fault system development are challenged by the multiple physical mechanisms involved. For example, laboratory experiments on brittle materials show that faults propagate and eventually join (hard-linkage) by both opening-mode and shear failure. In addition, faults interact prior to linkage through stress transfer (soft-linkage). The new algorithm GROW (GRowth by Optimization of Work) accounts for this complex array of behaviors by taking a global approach to fault propagation while adhering to the principals of linear elastic fracture mechanics. This makes GROW a powerful tool for studying fault interactions and fault system development over geologic time. In GROW, faults evolve to minimize the work (or energy) expended during deformation, thereby maximizing the mechanical efficiency of the entire system. Furthermore, the incorporation of both static and dynamic friction allows GROW models to capture fault slip and fault propagation in single earthquakes as well as over consecutive earthquake cycles. GROW models with idealized faults reveal that the initial fault spacing and the applied stress orientation control fault linkage propensity and linkage patterns. These models allow the gains in

  1. Kane Basin, Nares-Strait: Strike-slip induced sediment deformation along the coastline of Ellesmere Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, A.; Schnabel, M.; Damm, V.

    2015-12-01

    fault pattern, a pull-apart development of the Kane Basin can't be supported. However, the steepening of the sedimentary beds towards Ellesmere Island and anticlinal deformation parallel to the NS point to the presence of a strike-slip fault that runs parallel to the Ellesmere Island coastline.

  2. Refined Views of Strike-slip Fault Zones, Seismicity, and State of Stress Associated With the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Nicholson, C.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Shearer, P. M.; Sandwell, D. T.; Yang, W.

    2013-12-01

    The mostly strike-slip plate boundary in southern California is expressed as a system of late Quaternary faults or principal slip zones (PSZs), with numerous adjacent smaller slip surfaces. It is complex, even after large cumulative displacements, and consists of major fault systems with multi-stranded, non-planar fault geometry, including some in close proximity to each other. There are also secondary cross faults and low-angle detachments that interact with the PSZs accommodating main plate boundary motion. The loading of plate-tectonic strain causes the largest earthquakes along PSZs, moderate-sized events in their immediate vicinity, and small earthquakes across the whole region. We apply relocated earthquake and refined focal mechanism (1981-2013) catalogs, as well as other geophysical datasets to provide refined views of the 3D fault geometry of these active fault systems. To determine properties of individual fault zones, we measure the Euclidian distance from every hypocenter to the nearest PSZ. In addition, we assign crustal geophysical parameters such as heat flow value and shear or dilatation strain rates to each epicenter. We investigate seismogenic thickness and fault zone width as well as earthquake source processes. We find that the seismicity rate is a function of location, with the rate dying off exponentially with distance from the PSZ. About 80% of small earthquakes are located within 5 km of a PSZ. For small earthquakes, stress drops increase in size with distance away from the PSZs. The magnitude distribution near the PSZs suggests that large earthquakes are more common close to PSZs, and they are more likely to occur at greater depth than small earthquakes. In contrast, small quakes can occur at any geographical location. An optimal combination of heat flow and strain rate is required to concentrate the strain along rheologically weak fault zones, which accommodate the crustal deformation processes, causing seismicity. The regional trend of

  3. Relationships between sliding behavior and internal geometry of laboratory fault zones and some creeping and locked strike-slip faults of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Byerlee, J.

    1992-01-01

    Moore, D.E. and Byerlee, J., 1992. Relationships between sliding behavior and internal geometry of laboratory fault zones and some creeping and locked strike-slip faults of California. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 305-316. In order to relate fault geometries to sliding behavior, maps of recently active breaks within the Hayward fault of central California, which is characterized by fault creep, have been examined and compared to maps of the San Andreas fault. The patterns of recent breaks of the Hayward fault are consistent with those found within the creeping section of the San Andreas, and they appear to have plausible physical explanations in the findings of laboratory experiments. The distinguishing geometric features of the examined locked and creeping faults are: (1) P-type second-order traces predominate over R(Riedel)-type traces in creeping sections; and (2) R-type second-order traces make smaller angles to the local fault strike in creeping sections than they do in locked sections. Two different maps of the Hayward fault gave similar results, supporting the inference that the patterns identified are basic characteristics of the fault rather than artifacts of a particular mapping procedure. P shears predominate over R shears under laboratory conditions that allow dilation within the fault zone. In our own experiments, P-shear development was favored by the generation of excess pore-fluid pressures. We propose that creep in California faults also is the result of fluid overpressures that are maintained in a low-permeability gouge zone and that significantly lower effective stresses, thus helping to stabilize slip and producing high values of the ratio P/R. Small R-trace angles may also be an indicator of low effective stresses, but the evidence for this is not conclusive because other factors can also affect the size of the angles. ?? 1992.

  4. Active faulting in the Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.

    2005-06-01

    Deformation across the San Andreas and Walker Lane fault systems accounts for most relative Pacific-North American transform plate motion. The Walker Lane is composed of discontinuous sets of right-slip faults that are located to the east and strike approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault system. Mapping of active faults in the central Walker Lane shows that right-lateral shear is locally accommodated by rotation of crustal blocks bounded by steep-dipping east striking left-slip faults. The left slip and clockwise rotation of crustal blocks bounded by the east striking faults has produced major basins in the area, including Rattlesnake and Garfield flats; Teels, Columbus and Rhodes salt marshes; and Queen Valley. The Benton Springs and Petrified Springs faults are the major northwest striking structures currently accommodating transform motion in the central Walker Lane. Right-lateral offsets of late Pleistocene surfaces along the two faults point to slip rates of at least 1 mm/yr. The northern limit of northwest trending strike-slip faults in the central Walker Lane is abrupt and reflects transfer of strike-slip to dip-slip deformation in the western Basin and Range and transformation of right slip into rotation of crustal blocks to the north. The transfer of strike slip in the central Walker Lane to dip slip in the western Basin and Range correlates to a northward broadening of the modern strain field suggested by geodesy and appears to be a long-lived feature of the deformation field. The complexity of faulting and apparent rotation of crustal blocks within the Walker Lane is consistent with the concept of a partially detached and elastic-brittle crust that is being transported on a continuously deforming layer below. The regional pattern of faulting within the Walker Lane is more complex than observed along the San Andreas fault system to the west. The difference is attributed to the relatively less cumulative slip that has occurred across the Walker

  5. Evolution of the Rodgers Creek–Maacama right-lateral fault system and associated basins east of the northward-migrating Mendocino Triple Junction, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.; Wagner, David L.; Fleck, Robert J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, Robert C.; Clahan, Kevin; Allen, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The Rodgers Creek–Maacama fault system in the northern California Coast Ranges (United States) takes up substantial right-lateral motion within the wide transform boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, over a slab window that has opened northward beneath the Coast Ranges. The fault system evolved in several right steps and splays preceded and accompanied by extension, volcanism, and strike-slip basin development. Fault and basin geometries have changed with time, in places with younger basins and faults overprinting older structures. Along-strike and successional changes in fault and basin geometry at the southern end of the fault system probably are adjustments to frequent fault zone reorganizations in response to Mendocino Triple Junction migration and northward transit of a major releasing bend in the northern San Andreas fault. The earliest Rodgers Creek fault zone displacement is interpreted to have occurred ca. 7 Ma along extensional basin-forming faults that splayed northwest from a west-northwest proto-Hayward fault zone, opening a transtensional basin west of Santa Rosa. After ca. 5 Ma, the early transtensional basin was compressed and extensional faults were reactivated as thrusts that uplifted the northeast side of the basin. After ca. 2.78 Ma, the Rodgers Creek fault zone again splayed from the earlier extensional and thrust faults to steeper dipping faults with more north-northwest orientations. In conjunction with the changes in orientation and slip mode, the Rodgers Creek fault zone dextral slip rate increased from ∼2–4 mm/yr 7–3 Ma, to 5–8 mm/yr after 3 Ma. The Maacama fault zone is shown from several data sets to have initiated ca. 3.2 Ma and has slipped right-laterally at ∼5–8 mm/yr since its initiation. The initial Maacama fault zone splayed northeastward from the south end of the Rodgers Creek fault zone, accompanied by the opening of several strike-slip basins, some of which were later uplifted and compressed

  6. Understanding progressive-arc- and strike-slip-related rotations in curve-shaped orogenic belts: The case of the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini thrust (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtã¹, Antonio; Satolli, Sara; Maniscalco, Rosanna; Calamita, Fernando; Speranza, Fabio

    2013-02-01

    We report on a paleomagnetic study of the southern sector of the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini (OAS) thrust front, which corresponds to the southern limb of the Northern Apennines (Italy) orogenic salient. A lively debate has developed regarding the oroclinal/progressive-arc versus non-rotational nature of the OAS, which has been alternatively interpreted as a dextral strike-slip fault, dextral transpressive fault, or frontal to oblique ramp that reactivated pre-existing Jurassic normal faults. Here, we document the paleomagnetism, integrated with biostratigraphic and structural data, of 52 new sites from both the OAS hanging wall and footwall. On the basis of 39 retained sites, we find a peculiar pattern of tectonic rotations along the OAS thrust that evidences four rotational domains. The thrust footwall is characterized by a southern domain that undergoes an approximately 30° counterclockwise rotation with respect to the stable foreland, and an approximately non-rotated domain. The data from the hanging wall indicate the occurrence of a dextral strike-slip component along the southern sector of the OAS thrust supported by a strong clockwise rotation close to the NE-SW lateral ramp, which rapidly fades 1 km from the thrust front. A slight but significant CW rotation observed in the remaining sites from the hanging wall confirms the progressive nature of the OAS, and its structural position as the southern limb of the Northern Apennines salient. Our detailed paleomagnetic study is crucial in discriminating between progressive-arc- and strike-slip-related components in the main curved orogenic front of the Northern Apennines.

  7. Coseismic ionospheric disturbance of the large strike-slip earthquakes in North Sumatra in 2012: Mw dependence of the disturbance amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyadi, Mokhamad Nur; Heki, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    We studied ionospheric responses to the 2012 April 11 Mw 8.6 North Sumatra earthquake using total electron content (TEC) measurements with the regional Global Navigation Satellite System network. This earthquake ruptured the oceanic lithosphere off the Indian Ocean coast of North Sumatra, and is known as the largest strike-slip earthquake ever recorded. Coseismic ionospheric disturbances (CIDs) with rapid TEC enhancement of a few TEC units propagated northward with a speed of acoustic waves (˜1 km s-1). Resonant atmospheric oscillation with a frequency ˜4 mHz have been found as monochromatic oscillation of TEC lasting for an hour after the main shock and the largest aftershock. We compared CID amplitudes of 21 earthquakes world-wide with moment magnitudes (Mw) 6.6-9.2. They roughly obeyed a law such that CID amplitude increases by two orders of magnitude for the Mw increase of three. The 2012 North Sumatra earthquakes slightly deviated negatively from the trend possibly reflecting their strike-slip mechanisms, that is small vertical crustal movements for their magnitudes.

  8. The Border Ranges fault system in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska: Evidence for major early Cenozoic dextral strike-slip motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smart, K.J.; Pavlis, T.L.; Sisson, V.B.; Roeske, S.M.; Snee, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Border Ranges fault system of southern Alaska, the fundamental break between the arc basement and the forearc accretionary complex, is the boundary between the Peninsular-Alexander-Wrangellia terrane and the Chugach terrane. The fault system separates crystalline rocks of the Alexander terrane from metamorphic rocks of the Chugach terrane in Glacier Bay National Park. Mylonitic rocks in the zone record abundant evidence for dextral strike-slip motion along north-northwest-striking subvertical surfaces. Geochronologic data together with regional correlations of Chugach terrane rocks involved in the deformation constrain this movement between latest Cretaceous and Early Eocene (???50 Ma). These findings are in agreement with studies to the northwest and southeast along the Border Ranges fault system which show dextral strike-slip motion occurring between 58 and 50 Ma. Correlations between Glacier Bay plutons and rocks of similar ages elsewhere along the Border Ranges fault system suggest that as much as 700 km of dextral motion may have been accommodated by this structure. These observations are consistent with oblique convergence of the Kula plate during early Cenozoic and forearc slivering above an ancient subduction zone following late Mesozoic accretion of the Peninsular-Alexander-Wrangellia terrane to North America.

  9. New c. 270 kyr strike-slip and uplift rates for the southern Alpine Fault and implications for the New Zealand plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, N. C.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Beu, A. G.; Murray-Wallace, C. V.; Hayward, B. W.; Mildenhall, D. C.; Lee, D. E.

    2014-07-01

    Along 100 km of the Alpine Fault, major valleys and glacial deposits can be matched across an 8000 m dextral offset. We use paleontologic and stratigraphic age constraints to date c. 270 ka marine sediments uplifted to 600 m elevation and overlying c. 270 ka glacial deposits related to the 8000 m dextral offset. These constraints yield a fault-proximal Australian plate uplift rate of 2.6 (-0.5/+0.4) mm/yr and an Alpine Fault dextral slip rate of 29.6 (-2.5/+4.5) mm/yr. Our rates resolve an apparent along-strike drop in strike-slip rate and instead support a relatively constant along-strike dextral slip rate of ˜28 mm/yr (˜80% of current Australian-Pacific plate boundary motion). We argue that the rate of dextral slip on the southern Alpine Fault has been relatively constant over the last ≥3.5 myr, and that ductile fault processes may rate-limit the fault from accommodating a progressively higher percentage of plate boundary motion through time (i.e., the fault reached maturity long ago). The spatiotemporally constant strike-slip rate of the southern Alpine Fault and a previously published paleoseismic record of near-regular earthquake recurrence both characterize the Alpine Fault as a mature plate boundary fault zone that behaves in a constant way with behavior predictable over timescales of thousands and hundreds of thousands of years.

  10. Mechanics of evenly spaced strike-slip faults and its implications for the formation of tiger-stripe fractures on Saturn's moon Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, An; Zuza, Andrew V.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first mechanical analysis based on realistic rheology and boundary conditions on the formation of evenly spaced strike-slip faults. Two quantitative models employing the stress-shadow concept, widely used for explaining extensional-joint spacing, are proposed in this study: (1) an empirically based stress-rise-function model that simulates the brittle-deformation process during the formation of evenly spaced parallel strike-slip faults, and (2) an elastic plate model that relates fault spacing to the thickness of the fault-hosting elastic medium. When applying the models for the initiation and development of the tiger-stripe fractures (TSF) in the South Polar Terrain (SPT) of Enceladus, the mutually consistent solutions of the two models, as constrained by the mean spacing of the TSF at ∼35 km, requires that the brittle ice-shell thickness be ∼30 km, the elastic thickness be ∼0.7 km, and the cohesive strength of the SPT ice shell be ∼30 kPa. However, if the brittle and elastic models are decoupled and if the ice-shell cohesive strength is on the order of ∼1 MPa, the brittle ice shell would be on the order of ∼10 km.

  11. Rifting and subduction in the papuan peninsula, papua new guinea: The significance of the trobriand tough, the nubara strike-slip fault, and the woodlark rift to the present configuration of papua new guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Milo Louis

    The calculated extension (~111 km) across the Woodlark rift is incompatible with the > 130 km needed to exhume the Metamorphic Core Complexes on shallow angle faults (< 30°) using N-S extension in the Woodlark Basin. High resolution bathymetry, seismicity, and seismic reflection data indicate that the Nubara Fault continues west of the Trobriand Trough, intersects the Woodlark spreading center, and forms the northern boundary of the Woodlark plate and the southern boundary of the Trobriand plate. The newly defined Trobriand plate, to the north of this boundary, has moved SW-NE along the right lateral Nubara Fault, creating SW-NE extension in the region bounded by the MCC's of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands and Moresby Seamount. Gravity and bathymetry data extracted along four transect lines were used to model the gravity and flexure across the Nubara Fault boundary. Differences exist in the elastic thickness between the northern and southern parts of the lines at the Metamorphic Core Complexes of Goodenough Island (Te_south = 5.7 x 103 m; Te_north = 6.1 x 103 m) and Fergusson Island (Te_south = 1.2 x 103 m; Te_north = 5.5 x 103 m). Differences in the elastic strength of the lithosphere also exist at Moresby Seamount (Te_south = 4.2 x 103 m; Te_north = 4.7 x 103 m) and Egum Atoll (Te_south =7.5 x 103 m; Te_north = 1.3 x 104 m). The differences between the northern and southern parts of each transect line imply an east-west boundary that is interpreted to be the Nubara Fault. The opening of the Woodlark Basin resulted in the rotation of the Papuan Peninsula and the Woodlark Rise, strike slip motion between the Solomon Sea and the Woodlark Basin at the Nubara Fault, and the formation of the PAC-SOL-WLK; SOL-WLK-TRB triple junctions. The intersection of the Woodlark Spreading Center with the Nubara Fault added the AUS-WLK-TRB triple junction and established the Nubara Fault as the northern boundary of the Woodlark plate.

  12. Width of late Quaternary deformation of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden strike-slip fault zone in Haiti and the Jamaica Passage and implications for accumulated stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Bachhuber, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The devastating Haiti earthquake of January 12, 2010, is now known to have occurred on multiple rupture planes with most of the seismic energy release along a north-dipping thrust fault located from 0.5 to 15 km north of the main late Quaternary trace of the EPGFZ. Two alternative views of this rupture are that this north-dipping thrust is unrelated to the main trace of the fault - which showed no rupture during the event - or this north-dipping thrust is part of its larger, subsurface “flower zone” of deformation poorly understood because we have no seismic reflection images crossing the EGPFZ in epicentral area of the 2010 earthquake. The significance of distinguishing these two views of fault behavior relates to whether centuries of accumulated stress were not released on the main trace of the EPGFZ (first model) or whether some accumulated stress was released on the low-angle thrust as part of a broad and linked “flower zone” of deformation parallel to the EPGFZ (second model). In this talk we review observations on the width of the EPGFZ deformation to support the latter view that the EPGFZ is in fact a broad zone of deformation commensurate with its tectonic role as a major, active plate boundary fault. Three areas of broad late Quaternary tectonic deformation varying from transpressional to transtensional in structural style are examined using DEM, imagery, surface geologic maps, and aftershock locations. The Cul-de-Sac basin of Haiti is the xx-km-wide, fault bounded alluvial plain upon which the city of Port-au-Prince was constructed in the early 18th century. Merged DEM and geologic map data from the Cul-de-Sac plain show that an en echelon array of large, open folds deforming uplifted and deeply dissected Plio-Pleistocene fans can be traced 3 to 7 km north of the main trace of the EPGFZ. Map studies show that west-northwest-striking, sub-parallel reverse-oblique/strike-slip faults can be mapped transecting the folds at distances of 3 to 5 km north

  13. Deformation of Rock Mass Caused by Strike-Slip Faulting: 3D Analysis of Analogue Models by Helical X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, K.

    2007-12-01

    Strike-slip fault zones are induced experimentally in artificial rock subjected to strike-slip displacement along basement fault. The purpose is to investigate in three dimensions, the geometries and sequence of development of structural elements comprising the fault zones by use of a helical X-ray CT scanner. 860 mm long, 310 mm wide, 25 mm high artificial rocks were made by mixing sand, plaster and water. The basement fault was displaced up to 100 mm at a displacement rate of 0.1mm/sec. The deformation of the artificial rocks with increasing basement displacement was observed as follows. 1) En echelon fractures corresponding to the Riedel shears are observed at the surface of the artificial rock. These Riedel structures contain within them similar Riedels on a smaller scale (Riedel within Riedel structures). The length of the first and second order Riedel fractures is of the order of 100 mm and 10 mm, respectively. In three dimensions, each fracture has helicoidal shape. 2) Fractures corresponding to the first and second order P-shears form at the junctions between two first and second order Riedel shears, and serve to connect the Riedel shears. The combination of displacement along the Riedel and P-shears leads to the formation of the principal displacement shears including first and second order jogs and pull-aparts. 3) New shears (outer shears) branch off from Riedel and P- shears in compressional jogs and propagate aside from the fault zone that consists of Riedel and P-shears. The outer shears do not join the basement fault directly and develop near the surface of the artificial rock. The region among the Riedel shear, P-shear and outer shear is an up-squeezed block (push-up), which undergo rotation with increasing displacement. The push-up structures tend to be limited to shallow part of the artificial rock. The lower artificial rock on the one side of basement fault adheres to one on the other side in the compressional jogs. 4) As slip proceed, wear erode

  14. The Pombal granite pluton: Magnetic fabric, emplacement and relationships with the Brasiliano strike-slip setting of NE Brazil (Paraiba State)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archanjo, C. J.; Bouchez, J.-L.; Corsini, M.; Vauchez, A.

    1994-03-01

    The Pombal pluton (500 km 2), a suite of diorite, syenite and porphyritic granite bodies, is here used to constrain kinematics of Brasiliano-age tectonic episodes in northeast Brazil. The pluton intrudes high-grade to migmatitic gneiss forming the western basement of the Seridó belt, and is located at the intersection between two sets of continental-scale dextral strike-slip shear zones. The northern set of shear zone strikes NE-SW and branches, southwards, into the E-W Patos mega-shear zone. A detailed microstructural and low-field magnetic susceptibility study was performed to unravel the relationships between solid-state deformation in the country rocks and magma emplacement. Porphyritic granite and syenite have quite high magnetic susceptibilities (10 -3-10 -2 SI units) indicative of magnetite as the principal carrier of susceptibility. The magnetic fabric is remarkably homogeneous in orientation throughout the pluton. It is characterized by a shape-preferred alignment of magnetite, itself parallel to the shape fabric of mainly biotite (±amphibole), i.e. to the magmatic fabric. Even close to the contact with the high-temperature mylonites of the Patos shear zone, south of Pombal, no imprint of the E-W-trending structures is observed in the fabrics of either the granite or the host rocks. Granite emplacement and its internal fabric development is concluded to be independent of the movement of the Patos shear zone. In the southwestern border of the pluton, a low-dip foliation bearing a NE-SW-striking lineation is shared in both the magmatic fabric of the pluton and the solid-state fabric. Farther to the north, approaching the NE-SW strike-slip shear zone, the magmatic fabric is characterized by a steeply dipping NE-striking foliation carrying a subhorizontal lineation. Transition from low to steep dips of the planar fabrics is progressive. Two models are proposed for emplacement of the Pombal pluton. One considers magma injection during an early episode of

  15. Coordinated strike-slip and normal faulting in the Southern Ozark dome of Northern Arkansas: Deformation in a late Paleozoic foreland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Structures that formed on the southern flank of the Ozark dome, in the foreland of the late Paleozoic Ouachita orogeny, have received little modern study. New mapping of the western Buffalo River region of northern Arkansas identifies diversely oriented faults and monoclinal folds that displace the generally flat lying Mississippian Boone Formation over a 180 m elevation range. Kinematic measurements and spatial relations reveal the presence of both east-striking normal faults and broader northeast-striking dextral strike-slip fault zones that acted in a coordinated fashion to accommodate constrictional strain, in which north-south extension was balanced by vertical and east-directed shortening. North-south extension in the Buffalo River region probably reflects Pennsylvanian-Early Permian deformation within the flexural forebulge of the developing Ouachita orogeny, which closed progressively westward along the southern margin of the craton.

  16. Tsunamigenic Aftershocks From Large Strike-Slip Earthquakes: An Example From the November 16, 2000 Mw=8.0 New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, E.; Parsons, T.; Hirata, K.; Hirata, K.

    2001-12-01

    Two reverse mechanism earthquakes (M > 7) were triggered by the November 16, 2000 Mw=8.0 New Ireland (Papua New Guinea) left-lateral, strike-slip earthquake. The mainshock rupture initiated in the Bismarck Sea and propagated unilaterally to the southeast through the island of New Ireland and into the Solomon Sea. Although the mainshock caused a local seiche in the bay near Rabaul (New Britain) with a maximum runup of 0.9 m, the main tsunami observed on the south coast of New Britain, New Ireland, and Bougainville (maximum runup approximately 2.5-3 m), appears to have been caused by the Mw=7.4 aftershock 2.8 hours following the mainshock. It is unclear whether the second Mw=7.6 aftershock on November 17, 2000 (40 hours after the mainshock) also generated a tsunami. Analysis and modeling of the available tsunami information can constrain the source parameters of the tsunamigenic aftershock(s) and further elucidated the triggering mechanism. Preliminary stress modeling indicates that because the location of the first Mw=7.4 aftershock is located near the rupture termination of the mainshock, stress calculations are especially sensitive to the location of both ruptures and the assumed coefficient of friction. A similar example of a triggered tsunamigenic earthquake occurred following the 1812 Wrightwood (M ~7.5) earthquake in southern California as discussed by Deng and Sykes (1996, GRL, p. 1155-1158). In this case, they show that strike-slip rupture on the San Andreas fault produced coseismic stress changes that triggered the Santa Barbara Channel earthquake (M ~7.1), 13 days later. The mechanism for the Santa Barbara Channel event appears to have been an oblique thrust event. The November 2000 New Ireland earthquake sequence provides an important analog for studying the potential for tsunamigenic aftershocks following large San Andreas earthquakes in southern California.

  17. Fault Segmentation and Earthquake Generation in the Transition from Strike-slip to Subduction Plate Motion, Saint Elias Orogen, Alaska and Yukon (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhn, R. L.; Shennan, I.; Pavlis, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    The structural transition from strike-slip motion along the Fairweather transform fault to subduction on the Aleutian megathrust occurs within the collision zone between the Yakutat microplate and southern Alaska. The collision is marked by belts of thrust and strike-slip faulting both within the microplate and along its margins, forming a complex fault network that mechanically interacts with rupturing of the Aleutian megathrust on one hand, and the Fairweather transform fault on the other. For example, stress released by M8+ earthquakes within the central and eastern parts of the Yakutat microplate in 1899 may have constrained the 1964 rupture on the Aleutian megathrust to the western part of the microplate. However, megathrust earthquakes circa 900 BP and 1500 BP may have ruptured farther east than in 1964, generating earthquakes of significantly greater magnitude and tsunami potential. Structurally, the thrust-faulting earthquake of Sept. 10, 1899 occurred on faults that are loaded primarily by the Fairweather transform, but the earlier event of Sept. 4 is more closely linked to the Aleutian megathrust. Large reverse faults that rise off of the megathrust are superimposed on older structures within the microplate; creating complex duplex and wedge fault geometries beneath the mountains onshore that link to simpler fault propagation folds offshore. These lateral variations in fault network style correlate with 1) permanent uplift of the coast at ≈ 1 cm/yr in the Yakataga region of the microplate, 2) an abrupt change in structural style and orientation across the Kayak Island - Bering Glacier deformation zone, and 3) the seaward limit of ruptures in the 1899 earthquakes which occurred beneath the mountains onshore. Future goals include refining locations of earthquake source faults and determining the recurrence history of earthquakes within the Yakutat microplate. The history of rupturing within the microplate offshore is of particular interest given the

  18. Progressive-arc- vs. strike-slip-related rotations in curved orogenic belts: a case study from the Northern Apennines (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtù, Antonio; Satolli, Sara; Maniscalco, Rosanna; Calamita, Fernando; Speranza, Fabio

    2013-04-01

    A detailed paleomagnetic study has been performed in the southern sector of the Olevano-Antrodoco-Sibillini (OAS) thrust front (i. e. the southern limb of the Northern Apennines, Italy). The oroclinal/progressive-arc vs. non rotational nature of the OAS thrust is still a matter of debate, as it has been interpreted in the literature as dextral strike-slip fault, dextral transpressive fault, or as a frontal to oblique ramp complex. We document the paleomagnetism of 52 sites from Jurassic to Eocene pelagic limestones and Messinian siliciclastic turbidites from both the OAS hanging wall and footwall. In the hanging wall, sampling was designed to follow two transects perpendicular to two thrust segments oriented roughly NE-SW and NNW-SSE. Paleomagnetic data have been integrated with biostratigraphical and structural data, in order to understand both the rotational nature of the OAS arc and the kinematics of the thrust front. All samples were paleomagnetically investigated by a 2G DC-SQUID cryogenic magnetometer at the INGV of Rome. Thermal cleaning was used throughout. A characteristic component of magnetization was successfully isolated in 39 (over 52) sites. The tilt-corrected directions were compared to the coeval directions expected for the Adriatic-African foreland, in order to calculate rotations due to Apennine orogenesis. On the basis of cluster analysis and tectonic constrains, we document a peculiar pattern of tectonic rotations along the OAS thrust with four rotational domains: 1. a strongly rotated clockwise (CW) domain (54.78° ±5.46° ) in the hanging wall, close to the NE-SW-trending segment of the thrust; 2. a less CW-rotated domain in the hanging wall (15.1° ±5.8° ) that includes both the NNW-SSE oriented thrust segment and sites far from the thrust; 3. a uniform counterclockwise (CCW) rotation (-30.79° ±4.73° ) in the footwall; 4. an approximately null rotation (-5.2° ±3.8° ) in the external footwall. The strong CW domain in the hanging wall

  19. Cyclical Stress Field Switching and (Total?) Relief of Fault Shear Stress Recorded in Quartz Vein Systems Hosted by Proterozoic Strike-Slip Faults, Mt Isa, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Begbie, M. J.; Ghisetti, F. C.; Blenkinsop, T. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Proterozoic Mt Isa inlier ( ˜50,000 km2) in NW Queensland, Australia, underwent a complex tectonothermal history involving multiple episodes of intracontinental rifting, sedimentation, and magmatism that culminated in the Isan Orogeny (1590-1500 Ma) where strong E-W shortening led to compressional inversion of former rift basins. The resulting metamorphic complex of subgreenschist to amphibolite facies assemblages is disrupted by brittle, late-orogenic (1500-1450 Ma?) strike-slip faults. The faults occur in two mutually cross-cutting sets; a set of dextral strike-slip faults striking NE-SW to NNE-SSW with offsets <20 km, and a conjugate set of sinistral faults striking NW-SE to NNW-SSE. The two contemporaneous fault sets therefore lie at +/-45-60° to inferred E-W maximum compression, approaching the expected lock-up angle for 'Byerlee' friction coefficients. The faults commonly outcrop as linear blade-like ridges extending for many kilometres across the semi-arid terrain. Transects across the NE-SW Fountain Range and Overlander Faults which crosscut Corella Formation amphibolite facies assemblages and granites have shown that the fault zones are about 100 m in width with a composite brittle fabric comprising: (1) subvertical silicified cataclastic shear zones (cataclasites plus microbreccias containing vein fragments); (2) innumerable subvertical quartz-veins (cm to m thickness) lying subparallel to the principal shear zones (some retain purely dilational textures; others are multiply recemented fault-breccias with wallrock fragments); (3) highly irregular non-systematic veins; and (4) a systematic set of predominantly extensional, steep planar quartz veins oriented 080-120° at moderate angles to the main faults. Mutual cross-cutting relationships occur between all structural components, indicating broad contemporaneity. Recorded dextral separations along shear fracture components are commonly of the order of 1-10 cm, consistent with small-moderate seismic

  20. Stress triggering in thrust and subduction earthquakes and stress interaction between the southern San Andreas and nearby thrust and strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Stein, Ross S.

    2004-02-01

    We argue that key features of thrust earthquake triggering, inhibition, and clustering can be explained by Coulomb stress changes, which we illustrate by a suite of representative models and by detailed examples. Whereas slip on surface-cutting thrust faults drops the stress in most of the adjacent crust, slip on blind thrust faults increases the stress on some nearby zones, particularly above the source fault. Blind thrusts can thus trigger slip on secondary faults at shallow depth and typically produce broadly distributed aftershocks. Short thrust ruptures are particularly efficient at triggering earthquakes of similar size on adjacent thrust faults. We calculate that during a progressive thrust sequence in central California the 1983 Mw = 6.7 Coalinga earthquake brought the subsequent 1983 Mw = 6.0 Nuñez and 1985 Mw = 6.0 Kettleman Hills ruptures 10 bars and 1 bar closer to Coulomb failure. The idealized stress change calculations also reconcile the distribution of seismicity accompanying large subduction events, in agreement with findings of prior investigations. Subduction zone ruptures are calculated to promote normal faulting events in the outer rise and to promote thrust-faulting events on the periphery of the seismic rupture and its downdip extension. These features are evident in aftershocks of the 1957 Mw = 9.1 Aleutian and other large subduction earthquakes. We further examine stress changes on the rupture surface imparted by the 1960 Mw = 9.5 and 1995 Mw = 8.1 Chile earthquakes, for which detailed slip models are available. Calculated Coulomb stress increases of 2-20 bars correspond closely to sites of aftershocks and postseismic slip, whereas aftershocks are absent where the stress drops by more than 10 bars. We also argue that slip on major strike-slip systems modulates the stress acting on nearby thrust and strike-slip faults. We calculate that the 1857 Mw = 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake on the San Andreas fault and subsequent interseismic slip brought

  1. Microstructural investigations of principal slip zones in carbonates, examples from shallow crustal strike-slip faults in the Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Helene; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    Faults in the upper crust can move episodically by seismic deformation (individual earthquake ruptures) and/or continuously by aseismic creep deformation. In carbonate fault zones, several studies have shown that seismic deformation produces very narrow principal slip zones (cm to mm wide) that accommodate most of the fault displacement during an individual earthquake. Within these principal slip zones, ultracataclasites containing the principal slip surface, fluidization of ultracataclastic sub-layers and clast cortex grains have been proposed to be characteristic for seismic slip. In contrast, pressure solution has been proposed as a mechanism of aseismic sliding along a fault. Spaced cleavage solution planes and associated veins indicate diffusive mass transfer and precipitation in pervasive vein networks. At micro-scale, calcite CPO in fine-grained matrix of principal slip zones has been suggested to result from post-seismic pressure solution creep. Here, we present field data from the Salzchtal-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system (Austria) to interpret the principal slip zones with regard to possible indicators of seismic or aseismic deformation. We investigated exhumed, ancient sinistral strike-slip faults in dolomite and limestone that formed during eastward lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps during Oligocene to Lower Miocene. The faults belong to a system of convergent strike-slip duplexes that developed at a restraining bend on an eastern segment of the SEMP-fault system. Distinct fault cores contain cataclastic fault rocks differing in textural complexity. Microstructural analysis of cataclastic fault rocks was done using both, optical and electron microscopy. Microstructures reveal several cataclastic types that can be interpreted in terms of different stages of cataclastic evolution. Coarser grained, well cemented cataclasites underlie fine grained ultracataclastic layers. For at least two of the faults, cataclasites containing clast

  2. Near N-S paleo-extension in the western Deccan region, India: Does it link strike-slip tectonics with India-Seychelles rifting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Achyuta Ayan; Bhattacharya, Gourab; Mukherjee, Soumyajit; Bose, Narayan

    2014-09-01

    This is the first detailed report and analyses of deformation from the W part of the Deccan large igneous province (DLIP), Maharashtra, India. This deformation, related to the India-Seychelles rifting during Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene, was studied, and the paleostress tensors were deduced. Near N-S trending shear zones, lineaments, and faults were already reported without significant detail. An E-W extension was envisaged by the previous workers to explain the India-Seychelles rift at ~64 Ma. The direction of extension, however, does not match with their N-S brittle shear zones and also those faults (sub-vertical, ~NE-SW/~NW-SE, and few ~N-S) we report and emphasize in this work. Slickenside-bearing fault planes, brittle shear zones, and extension fractures in meso-scale enabled us to estimate the paleostress tensors (directions and relative magnitudes). The field study was complemented by remote sensing lineament analyses to map dykes and shear zones. Dykes emplaced along pre-existing ~N-S to ~NE-SW/~NW-SE shears/fractures. This information was used to derive regional paleostress trends. A ~NW-SE/NE-SW minimum compressive stress in the oldest Kalsubai Subgroup and a ~N-S direction for the younger Lonavala, Wai, and Salsette Subgroups were deciphered. Thus, a ~NW/NE to ~N-S extension is put forward that refutes the popular view of E-W India-Seychelles extension. Paleostress analyses indicate that this is an oblique rifted margin. Field criteria suggest only ~NE-SW and ~NW-SE, with some ~N-S strike-slip faults/brittle shear zones. We refer this deformation zone as the "Western Deccan Strike-slip Zone" (WDSZ). The observed deformation was matched with offshore tectonics deciphered mainly from faults interpreted on seismic profiles and from magnetic seafloor spreading anomalies. These geophysical findings too indicate oblique rifting in this part of the W Indian passive margin. We argue that the Seychelles microcontinent separated from India only after much of

  3. Stress triggering in thrust and subduction earthquakes and stress interaction between the southern San Andreas and nearby thrust and strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, J.; Stein, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    We argue that key features of thrust earthquake triggering, inhibition, and clustering can be explained by Coulomb stress changes, which we illustrate by a suite of representative models and by detailed examples. Whereas slip on surface-cutting thrust faults drops the stress in most of the adjacent crust, slip on blind thrust faults increases the stress on some nearby zones, particularly above the source fault. Blind thrusts can thus trigger slip on secondary faults at shallow depth and typically produce broadly distributed aftershocks. Short thrust ruptures are particularly efficient at triggering earthquakes of similar size on adjacent thrust faults. We calculate that during a progressive thrust sequence in central California the 1983 Mw = 6.7 Coalinga earthquake brought the subsequent 1983 Mw = 6.0 Nunez and 1985 Mw = 6.0 Kettleman Hills ruptures 10 bars and 1 bar closer to Coulomb failure. The idealized stress change calculations also reconcile the distribution of seismicity accompanying large subduction events, in agreement with findings of prior investigations. Subduction zone ruptures are calculated to promote normal faulting events in the outer rise and to promote thrust-faulting events on the periphery of the seismic rupture and its downdip extension. These features are evident in aftershocks of the 1957 Mw = 9.1 Aleutian and other large subduction earthquakes. We further examine stress changes on the rupture surface imparted by the 1960 Mw = 9.5 and 1995 Mw = 8.1 Chile earthquakes, for which detailed slip models are available. Calculated Coulomb stress increases of 2-20 bars correspond closely to sites of aftershocks and postseismic slip, whereas aftershocks are absent where the stress drops by more than 10 bars. We also argue that slip on major strike-slip systems modulates the stress acting on nearby thrust and strike-slip faults. We calculate that the 1857 Mw = 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake on the San Andreas fault and subsequent interseismic slip brought

  4. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  5. Evolution and dynamics of active faults in southeastern Egyptian Western Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeen, Mamdouh

    2016-07-01

    Remote sensing data processing and analysis together with interpretation of earthquake data that are followed by extensive field studies on some of the prevailing NS and EW striking faults indicate that these faults have an intimate relationship and were formed synchronously as a conjugate Riedel shears. Parallel to the NS and the EW faults open fractures filled with blown sand dominate the area of study. The Quaternary terraces adjacent to these faults are offset by the faults. Kinematic indicators on the NS striking faults indicate major sinistral (left-lateral) strike slip and minor dip-slip (normal) movement. On the other hand, kinematic indicators on the EW striking faults indicate major dextral (right-lateral) strike slip and minor dip-slip (normal) movement. Paleo-stress analysis of the fault striae measured on the NS and EW faults indicate that these faults were formed under NNE-SSW oriented extension. Instrumental earthquake data analysis shows a comparable extension direction to that derived from field measurements of slickenlineation. These observations indicate that the NS- and EW-striking faults are contemporaneous and are related to the Red Sea rifting that is currently active.

  6. Inversion of the moment-tensor Mrr components of the 2012 Sumatra strike-slip double earthquake using radial normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zábranová, Eliška; Matyska, Ctirad

    2017-01-01

    On April 11, 2012, two strike-slip Sumatra earthquakes with moment magnitudes higher than 8 generated strong, preferentially horizontal, motions. If only body and surface waves are inverted, their centroid-moment-tensor (CMT) parameters producing vertical motions, in particular the Mrr components, are poorly resolved. Independent constraints can be obtained from observations of the radial free-oscillation modes. The signal of radial modes is acquired from four unperturbed superconducting gravimeter records with low noise levels in submillihertz frequency range. We show that the observed signal substantially differs from the synthetic calculations for most of the published CMTs except for the Global CMT solution, which agrees better. We perform modal inversions considering uncertainties in centroid times and calculate marginal posterior probability density function of the Mrr components. The amplitude-spectrum inversion is robust enough to estimate the intervals of admissible Mrr values. Finally, we incorporate also a phase information and reduce the trade-off between the Mrr components of the two studied events.

  7. Calcite veins as an indicator of fracture dilatancy and connectivity during strike-slip faulting in Toarcian shale (Tournemire tunnel, Southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Mélody; Guglielmi, Yves; Henry, Pierre; Dick, Pierre; Gout, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The reactivation of faults induced by natural/human induced fluid pressure increases is a major concern to explain subsurface fluid migration and to estimate the risk of losing the integrity of reservoir/seal systems. This study focusses on paleo-fluid migration in a strike slip fault with >100 m long, affecting a Toarcian shale (Causses Basin, France). A high calcite concentration is observed in a 5 cm thick zone at the boundary between the fault core and damage zone. Cumulated displacements in this zone are of millimeter-to-centimeter-scale offsets and different dilatant deformation textures are observed. The zone is affected by thin slip planes containing gouge. Cathodo-luminescence observations indicate that two phases of vein formation occurred. The first phase coincides with the fluid migration along this centimeter thick dilatant zone. The second one is associated to re-shear along the millimeter thick slip planes that results in more localized mineralization, but also in a better hydrologic connection through the shale formation. These results show that in shales fluids may migrate off a slipping surface in centimeter scale dilatant volumes, at first controlled by the intact shale anisotropy related to bedding and then favored by brecciating, structures re-orientation and strengthening processes induced by calcite sealing effects.

  8. Properties of Ductile Shear Zones Below Strike-Slip Faults: Insights From Numerical Experiments Incorporating Laboratory-Derived Rheologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, Y. A.; Takeuchi, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution of stress and strain in a ductile substrate driven by far-field plate motion and slip on a vertical transform fault cutting through the brittle crust. Numerical models that incorporate laboratory-derived power-law rheologies with Arrhenius temperature dependence, viscous dissipation, and conductive heat transfer give rise to long-lived fault "roots" that localize deformation below the brittle-ductile transition. Strain localization in the viscoelastic medium in this case results from thermomechanical coupling and power law dependence of strain rate on stress. For conditions corresponding to the San Jacinto and San Andreas Faults in Southern California, the predicted width of the shear zone in the lower crust is a few kilometers; this shear zone accommodates more than 50% of the far-field plate motion. Coupled thermomechanical models predict a single-layer lithosphere in case of "dry" composition of the lower crust and upper mantle, and a "jelly sandwich" lithosphere in case of "wet" composition. Deviatoric stress in the lithosphere in our models is relatively insensitive to the water content, the far-field loading rate, and the fault strength, and is of the order of 102 MPa. Furthermore, stress in the lithosphere is found to inversely correlate with the velocity of relative plate motion. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that the thermally-activated shear zones have little effect on postseismic relaxation. In particular, the presence of such zones does not change the polarity of vertical displacements in cases of rheologies that are able to generate robust postseismic transients. We conclude that additional (to thermomechanical coupling) mechanisms of strain localization are required for a viscoelastic model to produce a vertical deformation pattern similar to that due to afterslip on a deep extension of a fault. Possible candidates include dynamic grain re-crystallization, and fabric development (mylonitization).

  9. New constraints shed light on strike-slip faulting beneath the southern Apennines (Italy): The 21 August 1962 Irpinia multiple earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoli, Paola; Bernardi, Fabrizio; Palombo, Barbara; Vannucci, Gianfranco; Console, Rodolfo; Ferrari, Graziano

    2016-11-01

    On 21 August 1962 an earthquake sequence set off near the city of Benevento, in Italy's southern Apennines. Three earthquakes, the largest having Mw 6.1, struck virtually the same area in less than 40 min (at 18:09, 18:19 and 18:44 UTC, respectively). Several historical earthquakes hit this region, and its seismic hazard is accordingly among the highest countrywide. Although poorly understood in the past, the seismotectonics of this region can be revealed by the 1962 sequence, being the only significant earthquake in the area for which modern seismograms are available. We determine location, magnitude, and nodal planes of the first event (18:09 UTC) of the sequence. The focal mechanism exhibits dominant strike-slip rupture along a north-dipping, E-W striking plane or along a west-dipping, N-S striking plane. Either of these solutions is significantly different from the kinematics of the typical large earthquakes occurring along the crest of the Southern Apennines, such as the 23 November 1980 Irpinia earthquake (Mw 6.9), caused by predominant normal faulting along NW-SE-striking planes. The epicentre of the 21 August 1962, 18:09 event is located immediately east of the chain axis, near one of the three north-dipping, E-W striking oblique-slip sources thought to have caused one of the three main events of the December 1456 sequence (Io XI MCS), the most destructive events in the southern Apennines known to date. We maintain that the 21 August 1962, 18:09 earthquake occurred along the E-W striking fault system responsible for the southernmost event of the 1456 sequence and for two smaller but instrumentally documented events that occurred on 6 May 1971 (Mw 5.0) and 27 September 2012 (Mw 4.6), further suggesting that normal faulting is not the dominant tectonic style in this portion of the Italian peninsula.

  10. Holocene subsidence at the transition between strike-slip and subduction on the Pacific-Australian plate boundary, Marlborough Sounds, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Bruce W.; Grenfell, Hugh R.; Sabaa, Ashwaq T.; Kay, Jon; Daymond-King, Rhiannon; Cochran, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    This paper provides the first solid evidence in support of a century-old hypothesis that the mountainous Marlborough Sounds region in central New Zealand is subsiding. More recent hypotheses suggest that this may be a result of southward migration of a slab of subducted Pacific Plate causing flexural downwarping of the overlying crust in the vicinity of the transition between subduction and strike-slip on the Pacific-Australian plate boundary. The proxy evidence for gradual Holocene subsidence comes from micropaleontological study of seven intertidal sediment cores from the inner Marlborough Sounds (at Havelock, Mahau Sound and Shakespeare Bay). Quantitative estimates (using Modern Analogue Technique) of former tidal elevations based on fossil foraminiferal faunas provide evidence of tectonic (not compaction-related) subsidence in all cores. Estimates of subsidence rates for individual cores vary within the range 0.2-2.4 m ka -1. The wide variation within subsidence rate estimates are related to a combination of the accuracy limits of radiocarbon dates, elevation estimates, and particularly our poor knowledge of the New Zealand Holocene sea-level curve. The most consistent subsidence rate at all three sites for the mid-late Holocene (last 6-7 ka) is ˜0.7-0.8 m ka -1. This rate is consistent with the average subsidence rate in the adjacent 4-km thick Wanganui sedimentary basin for the last 5 myr. Subsidence is inferred to have migrated southwards from the Wanganui Basin to impinge on the inner Marlborough Sounds in just the last 100-200 ka.

  11. Microstructural record of cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation processes from shallow crustal carbonate strike-slip faults, Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Helene; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The concept of coseismic slip and aseismic creep deformation along faults is supported by the variability of natural fault rocks and their microstructures. Faults in carbonate rocks are characterized by very narrow principal slip zones (cm to mm wide) containing (ultra)cataclastic fault rocks that accommodate most of the fault displacement. Fluidization of ultracataclastic sub layers and thermal decomposition of calcite due to frictional heating have been proposed as possible indicators for seismic slip. Dissolution-precipitation (DP) processes are possible mechanism of aseismic sliding, resulting in spaced cleavage solution planes and associated veins, indicating diffusive mass transfer and precipitation in pervasive vein networks. We investigated exhumed, sinistral strike-slip faults in carbonates of the Northern Calcareous Alps. The study presents microstructural investigations of natural carbonate fault rocks that formed by cataclastic and dissolution-precipitation related deformation processes. Faults belong to the eastern segment of the Salzachtal-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system that was formed during eastward lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps in Oligocene to Lower Miocene. The investigated faults accommodated sinistral slip between several tens and few hundreds of meters. Microstructural analysis of fault rocks was done with scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. Deformation experiments of natural fault rocks are planned to be conducted at the Sapienza University of Roma and should be available at the meeting. The investigated fault rocks give record of alternating cataclastic deformation and DP creep. DP fault rocks reveal various stages of evolution including early stylolites, pervasive pressure solution seams and cleavage, localized shear zones with syn-kinematic calcite fibre growth and mixed DP/cataclastic microstructures, involving pseudo sc- and scc'-fabrics. Pressure solution seams host fine grained kaolinit, chlorite

  12. Resolving Rupture Directivity of Moderate Strike-Slip Earthquakes in Sparse Network with Ambient Noise Location: A Case Study with the 2011 M5.6 Oklahoma Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Ni, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake rupture directivity is essential for improving reliability of shakemap and understanding seismogenic processes by resolving the ruptured fault. Compared with field geological survey and InSAR technique, rupture directivity analysis based on seismological data provides rapid characterization of the rupture finiteness parameters or is almost the only way for resolving ruptured fault for earthquakes weaker than M5. In recent years, ambient seismic noise has been widely used in tomography and as well as earthquake location. Barmin et al. (2011) and Levshin et al. (2012) proposed to locate the epicenter by interpolating the estimated Green's functions (EGFs) determined by cross-correlation of ambient noise to arbitrary hypothetical event locations. This method does not rely on an earth model, but it requires a dense local array. Zhan et al. (2011) and Zeng et al. (2014) used the EGFs between a nearby station and remote stations as calibration for 3D velocity structure and then obtained the centroid location. In contrast, the hypocenter can be determined by P wave onsets. When assuming unilateral rupture, we can resolve the rupture directivity with relative location of the centroid location and hypocenter. We apply this method to the 2011 M5.6 Oklahoma earthquake. One M4.8 foreshock and one M4+ aftershock are chosen as reference event to calibrate the systematic bias of ambient noise location. The resolved rupture plane strikes southwest-northeast, consistent with the spatial distribution of aftershocks (McNamara et al., 2015) and finite fault inversion result (Sun et al., 2014). This method works for unilaterally ruptured strike-slip earthquakes, and more case studies are needed to test its effectiveness.

  13. Mapping the Deeply Eroded Roots of a Major Strike-Slip Fault System: a Summary of Recent Bedrock Mapping Along the Norumbega Fault System in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, D. P.; Pollock, S. G.; Grover, T. W.

    2010-12-01

    have been some “quadrangle boundary discrepancies” that illustrate the challenges of mapping highly sheared fault rocks. Joint field trips enabling workers opportunities to compare geological relationships and fault rock mapping philosophies have been invaluable in resolving these discrepancies. Detailed mapping to date reveals significant differences both along and across the strike of the Norumbega fault system. In general, a wide zone (30+ km) of early right lateral ductile structures of Middle Devonian to Early Carboniferous age is overprinted by more localized zones (< 500 m) of higher strain. These narrow high strain zones contain both mylonite and pseudotachylyte which in some zones appears to be coeval and in other zones appears to represent discrete events. Low temperature thermochronological studies across the region (40Ar/39Ar & fission track) indicate significant episodes of Mesozoic dip slip displacement in the southern portion of the system (Casco Bay area) but no evidence for this in the south-central Maine portion of the system. The new mapping confirms the complexity and longevity of the Norumbega system.

  14. Short-Term Interactions between Strike-Slip Faults across a Plate Boundary Zone at the Transition from Subduction to Collision: Comparison to the Marlborough Fault System, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, S. M.; Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.; Williams, C. A.; Nuechter, J. A.; Robinson, R.; Upton, P.

    2009-12-01

    We use numerical models to investigate stress interactions between semi-parallel strike-slip faults in a zone of transition from subduction to transpressive collision. The models are broadly inspired by the tectonic setting at the northern end of the South Island, New Zealand. After an initial stress-buildup period during which the faults are given a low frictional strength, the faults are locked for a specified interseismic interval. Stresses build up as a result of applied far-field and basal boundary conditions representing average plate motion. Slip along the faults is self-determined in the model as an effect of stresses built up in the initial setup stage, and is strongly controlled by the inelastic rheology. The model rheology includes elasticity, pressure-sensitive brittle yield, and thermally-controlled ductile creep. After the setup stage we turn various fault strands "on" or "off" in order to investigate the effect on neighbouring faults in terms of stress changes. We investigate these changes for a hierarchy of models with increasing complexity in rheology, and for defined sequences of events, prescribed by unlocking certain faults in a given sequence. As found previously for Critical Coulomb Stress elastic models, we predict that an "Alpine Fault" event will preferentially load one strand of the Marlborough Fault system (in our model, it loads the fault corresponding to the approximate location of the Awatere Fault). The inelastic rheology used in the models allows us to go further, and to investigate stress changes in subsequent interseismic steps. Postseismic creep beneath the brittle crust following an Alpine Fault-type event relieves stress in the mid-crust beneath it and loads the southern end of a strike-slip fault corresponding to the Clarence Fault. An "Awatere Fault" event unloads the shallow crust around itself and neighbouring strike slip faults, causing a stress shadow, but loads the mid-crust below, and to a much lesser extent at the

  15. Geochemistry and fluid inclusions across a crustal strike-slip Mesozoic fault: insights of fluid-flow / rock interaction in the Atacama Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, R.; Mitchell, T. M.; Arancibia, G.; Jensen, E.; Rempe, M.; Cembrano, J. M.; Hoshino, K.; Faulkner, D.

    2012-12-01

    Faults architecture and their permeability related fractures play a first order role in fluid-flow migration throughout the upper crust. Commonly, the interaction between fluid-flow migration and host rock is reflected as mineral precipitation in a vein mesh and/or as mineralogical changes (alteration) of the host rock. Often, however, the relationship between a fault zone and the fluid-flow passing through it is poorly understood. In order to improve our understanding of this process we have chosen, as a case study, the Jorgillo Fault (JF), which lies within the Atacama Fault System, a trench-parallel large-scale structure developed within Mesozoic rocks of the present-day Coastal Cordillera in northern Chile. The JF is represented as a ca. 18 km long NNW-SSE, in its southern end, to NW-SE, in its northern part, west-ward concave-shape sinistral strike-slip fault showing a maximum left-lateral displacement of about 4 km and a subvertical dip. The fault cuts through crystalline rocks of gabbric, dioritic and granodioritic composition. The JF core is composed by a ca. 1 m wide cataclasite zone bounded by two fault gouge zones ca. 40 cm in average while its minimum damage zone extension, based in field observations, is ca. 2 m wide each side of the core zone. A fault perpendicular transect was mapped and sampled in order to run XRF and XRD analyses of the fault core, damage zone and undeformed protolith. XRF analyses of the rocks revealed that contents of Al and Ca decrease with increasing Si, while Na increases towards the fault core. Fujita et al. (2012) interpreted similar behavior in analysis of rocks belonging to the Coloso Fault, which is genetically and spatially related to the JF, as compositional changes of plagioclase to albite-rich ones due to chloritic-propilitic alteration processes. In the damage zone, L.O.I. data increase towards the fault core but decrease inside the core in its cataclastic zone. This behavior of L.O.I. data is explained by the

  16. Short- and long-term earthquake triggering along the strike-slip Kunlun fault, China: Insights gained from the Ms 8.1 Kunlun earthquake and other modern large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chaodi; Lei, Xinglin; Wu, Xiaoping; Hu, Xionglin

    2014-03-01

    Following the 2001 Ms8.1 Kunlun earthquake, earthquake records of more than 10 years, in addition to more than one century's records of large earthquakes, provide us with a chance to examine short-term (days to a few years) and long-term (years to decades) seismic triggering following a magnitude ~ 8 continental earthquake along a very long strike-slip fault, the Kunlun fault system, located in northern Tibet, China. Based on the calculations of coseismic Coulomb stress changes (ΔCFS) from the larger earthquake and post-seismic stress changes due to viscoelastic stress relaxation in the lower crust and upper mantle, we examined the temporal evolution of seismic triggering. The ETAS (epidemic type aftershocks sequence) model shows that the seismic rate in the aftershock area over ~ 10 years was higher than the background seismicity before the mainshock. Moreover, we discuss long-term (years to decades) triggering and the evolution of stress changes for the sequence of five large earthquakes of M ≥ 7.0 that ruptured the Kunlun fault system since 1937. All subsequent events of M ≥ 7.0 occurred in the regions of positive accumulated ΔCFS. These results show that short-term (up to 200 days in our case) triggering along the strike-slip Kunlun fault is governed by coseismic stress changes, while long-term triggering is somewhat due to post-seismic Coulomb stress changes resulting from viscoelastic relaxation.

  17. Helena banks strike-slip(. ) fault and the relation to other Cenozoic faults along reactivated Triassic(. ) basin boundary fault zones in the Charleston, South Carolina, earthquake area - results from a marine high-resolution multichannel seismic-reflection survey

    SciTech Connect

    Behrendt, J.C.; Yuan, A.

    1985-01-01

    In 1981, the USGS conducted a high-resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) survey offshore of Charleston, South Carolina, to study the relation of Cenozoic faulting to future earthquake hazard. High-angle reverse displacement of Coastal Plain sedimentary rock indicating a linear increase with depth of 51 +/- 12 m/km is observed on the reflection profiles. This is similar to the Gants and Cooke faults in the meizoseismal area of the 1886 Charleston earthquake. The authors interpret these results to indicate that the stress field cannot have varied significantly in direction or in magnitude from Late Cretaceous time to Miocene or Pliocene time in the region. The HBF zone trends N 66/sup 0/ E; it comprises several 15- to 40-km-long segments that trend from N 68/sup 0/ E to N 77/sup 0/ E. The en-echelon pattern of the segments is compatible with left-lateral strike-slip and is thus consistent with the present northeast-trending maximum compressional stress field. The HBF zone appears to be an obliquely compressional reactivation of a tensional Triassic(.) fault zone bounding the Triassic(.) Kiawah Basin that has been identified on several MCS profiles. Similarly, the northeast-trending Gants reverse or strike-slip fault was probably reactivated from an old tensional fault bounding the Jedburg Triassic(.) basin in the 1886 meizoseismal area.

  18. How crustal-scale strike-slip faults initiate and further develop: The Red River fault and the East Himalaya Syntaxis as a result of the two-stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz

    2014-05-01

    One major question of tectonics is how and where major intracontinental transcurrent strike-slip faults initiate. Models assume an important rheological contrast between rheologically weak and strong lithologies, e.g. at margins of a stiff craton and juxtaposed mobile belts (Molnar & Dayem, 2010 and references therein). Several models assume weakening of the lithosphere by uprise of magma, e.g., formed by subduction or break off of the previously subducted lithosphere or as K-granites at the bases of a metasomatized lithosphere. In the case of slab break-off following oblique convergence, orogen-parallel strike-slip accommodation has been documented. Especially, the spatiotemporal relationships between synkinematic plutons and crustal-scale strike-slip faults have been documented worldwide. It is a matter of continuous debate whether strike-slip faults nucleate where melts have previously weakened the crust/lithosphere or whether pre-existing faults represent the preferred pathways for the ascending melt. A few further models document the role of lateral boundaries of metamorphic core complexes. The significance of some of these processes could be studied along the Red River (RR) fault, SE, Asia. Here we propose a model, how the development of RR fault evolved in response to the two-stage India-Asia collision that recently was proposed by van Hinsbergen et al., (2012 and references therein) and the interaction of the northeastern corner of the East Himalayan Syntaxis with Himalayan-Burman/Indochina collision belt. We propose a four-phase tectonic evolution for the RR fault. During the Eocene accretion of the Tethyan block to Asia, the Sichuan foreland subducted and Eocene K-granites evolved, which started to vertically extrude and introduced, causing a zone of weakness within the crust (Phase 1) along the future RR fault. Another consequence of continuing shortening after the Tethyan block-Asia collision (Stage 1 collision) is lateral extrusion of blocks, and the

  19. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  20. Geomorphic features of active faults around the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, and no evidence of surface rupture associated with the 2015 Gorkha earthquake along the faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumahara, Yasuhiro; Chamlagain, Deepak; Upreti, Bishal Nath

    2016-04-01

    The M7.8 April 25, 2015, Gorkha earthquake in Nepal was produced by a slip on the low-angle Main Himalayan Thrust, a décollement below the Himalaya that emerges at the surface in the south as the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT). The analysis of the SAR interferograms led to the interpretations that the event was a blind thrust and did not produce surface ruptures associated with the seismogenic fault. We conducted a quick field survey along four active faults near the epicentral area around the Kathmandu Valley (the Jhiku Khola fault, Chitlang fault, Kulekhani fault, Malagiri fault and Kolphu Khola fault) from July 18-22, 2015. Those faults are located in the Lesser Himalaya on the hanging side of the HFT. Based on our field survey carried out in the area where most typical tectonic landforms are developed, we confirmed with local inhabitants the lack of any new surface ruptures along these faults. Our observations along the Jhiku Khola fault showed that the fault had some definite activities during the Holocene times. Though in the past it was recognized as a low-activity thrust fault, our present survey has revealed that it has been active with a predominantly right-lateral strike-slip with thrust component. A stream dissecting a talus surface shows approximately 7-m right-lateral offset, and a charcoal sample collected from the upper part of the talus deposit yielded an age of 870 ± 30 y.B.P, implying that the talus surface formed close to 870 y.B.P. Accordingly, a single or multiple events of the fault must have occurred during the last 900 years, and the slip rate we estimate roughly is around 8 mm/year. The fault may play a role to recent right-lateral strike-slip tectonic zone across the Himalayan range. Since none of the above faults showed any relationship corresponding to the April 25 Gorkha earthquake, it is possibility that a potential risk of occurrence of large earthquakes does exist close to the Kathmandu Valley due to movements of these active

  1. Measuring Active Faulting in Bolivia: the 1998 Aiquile Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funning, G. J.; Barke, R.; Lamb, S. H.; Minaya, E.; Parsons, B. E.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    2003-12-01

    The Aiquile region of central Bolivia is situated in the core of the actively deforming Bolivian Orocline. Palaeomagnetic data show that differential rotations consistent with oblique convergence have continued over the past 10 Myr. Structural mapping of the sub-Andean fold-and-thrust belt to the east shows that the majority of this convergence has occurred there as shortening; however there exists a significant transverse component of motion which must be accommodated as strike-slip faulting elsewhere. Many topographic lineations assumed to be related to strike-slip faulting have been identified in the area around Aiquile, however none has been associated with large earthquakes or demonstrated to be active over the past million years. On 22nd May 1998, a Mw = 6.5 earthquake struck the region, the largest shallow earthquake to occur in Bolivia for 50 years, resulting in over 105 fatalities and rendering thousands homeless in the towns of Aiquile and Totora and their surrounding villages. Seismic observations of the event are inconclusive; the correct orientation and style of the faulting -- either right-lateral strike-slip on a N--S fault, or left-lateral on an E--W fault -- cannot be determined as large uncertainties in earthquake location mean we do not know a priori which of the two nodal planes in the focal mechanism is the fault plane, or upon which structure the earthquake occurred. We present here the first study of a Bolivian earthquake using InSAR. Despite the rugged nature of the terrain in the Aiquile region, with its sharp changes of relief ( ˜ 3000 m over 20 km) -- a consequence of its location between the high Altiplano to the west and the foreland basin to the east -- we demonstrate that by using freely-available SRTM digital elevation data we can correct for topographic artifacts and generate a clear deformation signal. Our preferred model is for slip on a N--S-striking fault, with a location which validates Modified Mercalli Intensity maps

  2. Illuminating the near-sonic rupture velocities of the intracontinental Kokoxili Mw 7.8 and Denali fault Mw 7.9 strike-slip earthquakes with global P wave back projection imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kristoffer T.; Shearer, Peter M.

    2009-02-01

    The Denali and Kokoxili strike-slip earthquakes are two of the longest recent intracontinental ruptures. Previous studies report a range of rupture velocities. Here we image these earthquakes by reverse time migration of the intermediate-frequency P wave train recorded by global broadband seismometers. This technique permits a relatively direct measure of rupture velocity (speed and direction) as constrained by the radiated seismic energy, free from restrictive assumptions or rupture speed bounds placed on the solution. We compare our results with published seismic, GPS displacement, and surface slip inversion results. Both ruptures were initially subshear and transitioned over a distance no longer than 40 km to supershear speeds close to the P wave speed of ˜5.6 km/s. We investigate the accuracy of our results with synthetic data and experiment with using different imaging parameters and seismic subnetworks. These tests allow us to rule out the possibility of subshear speeds along the supershear segments. Although we cannot exclude supershear speeds of 4.5-6.5 km/s, our most reliable rupture velocities of ˜5.6 km/s are close to the local P wave speeds. We hypothesize that these intracontinental faults have weak shear strengths or high breakdown slips or crustal rigidities and experience at least moderate slip or slip rate weakening. Our observations and previous published results lead us to speculate that very long, surface-extending faults with general homogeneity in prestress and fault strength, together with smaller adjacent fault segments to provide triggering, may be necessary ingredients for the sub-Rayleigh to supershear rupture speed transition in strike-slip earthquakes.

  3. Active Tectonics of Western Turkmenistan; Implications for the Onset of South Caspian Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Jackson, J.; Priestley, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Kopeh Dagh and Balkan mountain ranges of West Turkmenistan are actively deforming as a result of Arabia- Eurasia collision. We combine observations of the geomorphology made from satellite and topographic data, with historical and recent seismicity to identify major active faults, and how they contribute to regional shortening. Between 55--57.5°E, partitioned (north-vergent) thrust and right-lateral strike-slip fault segments, comprising the Ashkabad fault zone, accommodate regional shortening and the westward-extrusion of the NW Kopeh Dagh-South Caspian block, relative to Central Iran and Eurasia. Reconstruction of displaced geology indicates 35~km total right-lateral motion across the Ashkabad fault zone. The Balkan region lies along-strike of the Ashkabad fault zone, west of 55°E. Fault plane solutions indicate shortening is partitioned onto the Balkan thrust and right-lateral Kum-Dagh fault zones. Thrust earthquakes are relatively deep (30--45~km) and lie along a north-dipping plane which extends 40±5~km north beneath the Balkan anticline. Receiver function data from Turkmenbashi and Nebit Dagh indicate these earthquakes occur in the base of the crust, and may therefore be related to bending of the NW Kopeh Dagh-South Caspian lithosphere as it is overthrust by Eurasia. Movement on a north-dipping blind thrust fault is consistent with the broad asymmetric (south-vergent) fold structure of the Balkan range. Recent uplift is also indicated by extensional faults which displace Quaternary geomorphology along the range crest. South of the Balkan range, right-lateral shear occurs across the Kum-Dagh fault zone which is expressed as a series of right-stepping anticlines (affecting Pliocene Red Series and younger sediments), forming important traps for hydrocarbons. An important structural change occurs near 55°E. To the west, Eurasia overthrusts the NW Kopeh Dagh- South Caspian block, while to the east the polarity of thrusting changes and the Kopeh Dagh

  4. Late Palaeozoic to Mesozoic kinematic history of the Talas-Ferghana strike-slip fault (Kyrgyz West Tianshan) as revealed by 40Ar/39Ar dating of syn-kinematic white mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Yann; Alexeiev, Dmitriy V.; Kröner, Alfred; Corsini, Michel; Loury, Chloé; Monié, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    The NW-trending Talas-Ferghana Fault (TFF) in Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, is one of the largest intracontinental strike-slip faults in the world. It extends over a distance of more than 2000 km from southern Tourghai to western Tarim and exhibits a maximum dextral offset of ˜200 km during the late Palaeozoic to present. The history of the fault provides important insights for the understanding of the evolution of southern Central Asia but remains poorly constrained due to lack of reliable geochronological data. We present new Ar-Ar ages and structural data from the Kyrgyz West Tianshan, that elucidate the kinematic history of the TFF in the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic. 40Ar/39Ar ages on mylonitic white micas document a deformational history consisting of several episodes. A late Carboniferous age of 312 ± 4 Ma point to initiation of top-to-the-south and dextral transpressional deformation during a metamorphic overprint in Precambrian and Palaeozoic rocks along the northern compartment of the TFF. The main phase of dextral motion along the entire fault occurred in the Permian as suggested by minimum ages of 260-290 Ma obtained at two different locations in the NW and central parts of the TFF. Partial isotopic resetting occurred between 240 and 210 Ma and younger ages of <200-210 Ma are ascribed to late brittle reactivation and hydrothermal fluid flow in the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic times. The Jurassic trans-tensional phase is featured by emplacement of 195 ± 3 Ma pegmatitic dykes. The Ar-Ar mineral ages and structural data argue for a major phase of dextral shearing, affecting the entire region from the West Tianshan to Mongolia in the late Permian and leading to formation of almost equally spaced major NW-trending dextral strike-slip faults. The uniform character of this deformation indicates that the process of amalgamation in this part of the CAOB ended prior to the late Permian, and Central Asia evolved as a single coherent continental block since that time.

  5. Fontan operation through a right lateral thoracotomy to treat Cantrell syndrome with severe ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yuki; Harada, Yorikazu; Uchita, Shunji

    2008-04-01

    A median sternotomy would be very difficult for Cantrell syndrome with severe ectopia cordis. For Cantrell syndrome and tricuspid atresia after left modified Blalock-Taussig shunt with severe ectopia cordis, defect in the middle and inferior portion of the sternum, and the closing of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, we performed extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection through a right lateral thoracotomy after establishing right modified Blalock-Taussig shunt and performing coil embolization of left modified Blalock-Taussig shunt by cardiologists.

  6. The 2 March 2016 Wharton Basin Mw 7.8 earthquake: High stress drop north-south strike-slip rupture in the diffuse oceanic deformation zone between the Indian and Australian Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Thorne; Ye, Lingling; Ammon, Charles J.; Dunham, Audrey; Koper, Keith D.

    2016-08-01

    The diffuse deformation zone between the Indian and Australian plates has hosted numerous major and great earthquakes during the seismological record, including the 11 April 2012 Mw 8.6 event, the largest recorded intraplate earthquake. On 2 March 2016, an Mw 7.8 strike-slip faulting earthquake occurred in the northwestern Wharton Basin, in a region bracketed by north-south trending fracture zones with no previously recorded large event nearby. Despite the large magnitude, only minor source finiteness is evident in aftershock locations or resolvable from seismic wave processing including high-frequency P wave backprojections and Love wave directivity analysis. Our analyses indicate that the event ruptured bilaterally on a north-south trending fault over a length of up to 70 km, with rupture speed of ≤ 2 km/s, and a total duration of 35 s. The estimated stress drop, 20 MPa, is high, comparable to estimates for other large events in this broad intraplate oceanic deformation zone.

  7. From extension to transpression: Quaternary reorganization of an extensional-related drainage network by the Alhama de Murcia strike-slip fault (eastern Betics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrater, Marta; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Pérez-Peña, José Vicente; Azañón, José Miguel; Giaconia, Flavio; Masana, Eulàlia

    2015-11-01

    The complex present-day drainage network of the Lorca-Totana area records the changing tectonic setting, from extension to transpression, in the eastern Betics. Through a detailed morphometric analysis we evaluate the topographic response to this major change in the tectonic setting and the influence in the drainage of Miocene extension and middle Pleistocene to present day transpression. The present-day drainage network preserves geomorphic features inherited from Late Miocene extension that are being overprinted by a new transverse fluvial system. This new system advanced towards the NW since the middle Pleistocene in response to a localized base-level drop related to the NE-SW oriented Alhama de Murcia sinistral-reverse fault. Geomorphic indexes calculated in this work suggest the present-day activity of the Alhama de Murcia fault and the Sierra de la Tercia anticline, the two major tectonic structures in the area. The landscape rejuvenation associated with this process results in: contrasting mountain front sinuosity values between old and new mountain fronts, high SLk index anomalies, convex-shaped and complex hypsometric curves, knickpoints in river profiles, contrasting slope-area plots and high steepness index values. This fluvial reorganization was driven progressively by successive fluvial captures preserved as wind-gaps in the present-day drainage network.

  8. Westward extension of the Levantine Basin to the Eratosthenes Seamount and the Cyprus Arc - no evidence for strike-slip motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, Jennifer; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2013-04-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean represents a complex pattern of micro plates. A side by side distribution of diverse tectonic situations like collision, subduction, obduction and shear makes this area a very interesting spot on earth. Whereas subduction of Neo-Tethys oceanic crust is still ongoing at the Hellenic Arc, a collision occurred eastward when the Eratosthenes Seamount (ESM) entered the Cyprus Arc. If subduction is still active further east towards the Syrian coast remains unclear. The collision related deformation of the ESM and the adjacent Levantine Basin will be discussed in this paper. We present a new set of 2D multichannel seismic data, acquired in 2010 with the RV Maria S Merian, which is a dense line grid with NW-SE and NE-SW trending profiles crossing the ESM and the western part of the Levantine Basin south of Cyprus. We show first results of the profiles that were processed up to Pre-Stack Depth Migration. Based on the dense line grid with distances of not more than 5 nautical miles, we picked the key horizons in the Levantine Basin and generated reliable 3D-grids of the horizons. With this dense line grid, it was possible to trace the western extension of the Levantine Basin sometimes also referred to as Baltim Hecataeus Line (BHL), which is a fault lineament of Mesozoic age separating the Levantine Basin from the ESM. This extension is observed on every NW-SE and NE-SW trending profile and we were able to trace it even further north and south of the ESM. The BHL is believed to be reactivated as a linear sinistral transform fault that compensates the northward motion of the African-Arabian plate with respect to the blocked ESM. With our data we can show that the western extension of the Levantine Basin does not coincide with a sinistral transform fault and that it is rather a normal fault with a meandering NNE-SSW trending strike.

  9. World's largest coseismic strike-slip offset: The 1855 rupture of the Wairarapa Fault, New Zealand, and implications for displacement/length scaling of continental earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, D. W.; Little, T. A.

    2006-12-01

    We used detailed microtopographic surveys to measure fault offset along the southern trace of the Wairarapa fault, near Wellington, New Zealand, which most recently experienced a Mw > 8.1 earthquake in 1855. Our measurements at 16 localities support the inference that dextral slip in 1855 reached 18.7 m and averaged ˜16 m over the 16 km length that we studied. Five measurements were made where a single active strand comprises the fault zone, yielding "smallest" dextral offsets of 13.0-18.7 m. At Pigeon Bush, sequential beheading of a stream and new 14C dating support the interpretation that its 18.7 ± 1.0 m of offset accumulated in 1855. We also measured three "next-smallest" offsets on single-strand faults of 26.3-32.7 m, evidence that dextral slip during the previous event was ˜14 m. Eight measurements were made where the Wairarapa fault includes two closely spaced strands, yielding smallest dextral offsets of 12.9-16.0 m. At Tauherenikau River, 14C dating of postoffset mud yielded ages indistinguishable from A.D. 1855. Combining all single-strand and two-strand (minimum) estimates yields an average dextral slip of 15.5 ± 1.4 m in the study area. Historical observations and our data indicate that vertical slip reached ˜2.5 m. The large displacement and short (˜145 km) strike length yield an unusually high displacement/length ratio for the rupture. As suggested by previous dislocation modeling, we propose that the rupture extended tens of kilometers downdip (W) to merge with the underlying subduction interface. Alternatively, the rupture may have been strongly segmented at depth, yielding an earthquake with an unusually large static stress drop.

  10. The influence of fault geometry and frictional contact properties on slip surface behavior and off-fault damage: insights from quasi-static modeling of small strike-slip faults from the Sierra Nevada, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, E.; Pollard, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Geological and geophysical investigations demonstrate that faults are geometrically complex structures, and that the nature and intensity of off-fault damage is spatially correlated with geometric irregularities of the slip surfaces. Geologic observations of exhumed meter-scale strike-slip faults in the Bear Creek drainage, central Sierra Nevada, CA, provide insight into the relationship between non-planar fault geometry and frictional slip at depth. We investigate natural fault geometries in an otherwise homogeneous and isotropic elastic material with a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity method (DDM). Although the DDM is a powerful tool, frictional contact problems are beyond the scope of the elementary implementation because it allows interpenetration of the crack surfaces. By incorporating a complementarity algorithm, we are able to enforce appropriate contact boundary conditions along the model faults and include variable friction and frictional strength. This tool allows us to model quasi-static slip on non-planar faults and the resulting deformation of the surrounding rock. Both field observations and numerical investigations indicate that sliding along geometrically discontinuous or irregular faults may lead to opening of the fault and the formation of new fractures, affecting permeability in the nearby rock mass and consequently impacting pore fluid pressure. Numerical simulations of natural fault geometries provide local stress fields that are correlated to the style and spatial distribution of off-fault damage. We also show how varying the friction and frictional strength along the model faults affects slip surface behavior and consequently influences the stress distributions in the adjacent material.

  11. Active tectonics of the western tethyan himalaya above the underthrusting indian plate: The upper sutlej river basin as a pull-apart structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, James; Barazangi, Muawia

    1985-03-01

    Fault-bounded blocks and structural elements were mapped in the eastern Ladakh-Spiti and upper Sutlej River Basin located within the Tethyan Himalaya and to the southwest of the Karakorum fault zone mainly using LANDSAT Multispectral Scanner (MSS) band 5, band 7 (near-infrared) images with detailed analysis of smaller areas by interactive digital processing of false color images, and Returned Beam Vidicon (RBV) imagery in conjunction with available topographical, geological and seismological data. For the first time the Leo Pargil Horst and other nearby fault-bounded blocks located at the northwestern end of the upper Setlej River Basin were clearly revealed on the LANDSAT color composites. Shallow crustal seismicity is systematically related to the NNE-trending and N-trending normal faults of the Leo Pargil and nearby regions. Some of the aftershocks of the Kinnaur earthquake of January 19,1975 ( Ms = 6.8), appear to be associated with movement along the NNE-trending westbound fault of the Leo Pargil Horst and the nearby Kaurik-Chango fault. The main shock, however, is teleseismically located at about 30 km to the northwest of the Kaurik-Chango fault. Fault plane solutions of the main shock and two aftershocks indicate a large component of normal faulting. In map view, the upper Sutlej River Basin has an approximately rhomboidal shape and is located to the southwest of the Karakorum fault system. We suggest that this basin is a pull-apart between the NW-SE oriented, right-lateral, strike-slip Karakorum fault system and the high-angle faults near the southern boundary of the Tethyan Himalaya. The Leo Pargil Horst is the northwestern bounding fault block of this pull-apart. The active tectonic features in this part of the Tethyan Himalaya appear to reflect right-shear within the crust, and this is probably a consequence of oblique underthrusting of the Indian continental plate beneath the western Himalaya and southwestern Tibet during the Neogene and Quaternary

  12. Palaeoseismic evidence for a medieval earthquake, and preliminary estimate of late Pleistocene slip-rate, on the Firouzkuh strike-slip fault in the Central Alborz region of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, H.; Ritz, J.-F.; Walker, R. T.; Salamati, R.; Rizza, M.; Patnaik, R.; Hollingsworth, J.; Alimohammadian, H.; Jalali, A.; Kaveh Firouz, A.; Shahidi, A.

    2014-03-01

    The ˜55 km-long Firouzkuh fault is located in the Central Alborz Mountains of Iran. It is a left-lateral fault, which dips to the south, and possesses a small dip-slip component of motion that we interpret to result from extension. The ratio of horizontal to vertical displacement across the fault, calculated from the cumulative displacement of landscape features, is 7.6. We provide constraints on the timing of the last earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault from two trenches (T1 and T2) across the fault zone, excavated in 2004, and located east of Firouzkuh city. The trenches expose faulted sedimentary deposits. Two optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from sediments in the lower part of trench T1 date from the late Pleistocene (15.9 ± 0.9 ka and 27.1 ± 1.7 ka). The younger of the two dated units in T1 is displaced vertically across the fault by 2.2-4.4 m, from which we estimate a strike-slip displacement of 18.2-33.4 m, and hence a average horizontal slip-rate of 1.1-2.2 mm/yr. The sediments exposed in T1 do not yield constraints on the most recent earthquake history. In trench T2, however, human skeletal remains of a middle aged male, which yield a radiocarbon age of 1159 ± 28 BP (corresponding to a mean calendar age of 791 AD), were found within a faulted alluvial layer at a depth of 60-70 cm from the surface. The existence of these medieval human places shows that a surface-rupturing earthquake occurred at some time after 1159 ± 28 BP. The amount of slip in each earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault is difficult to estimate, but assuming the entire ˜55 km fault length ruptures in each event, they will have had a maximum magnitude of 7.1. At our estimated late Quaternary slip-rate of ˜1.1-2.2 mm/yr magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, involving ˜1.2 m average displacement, would be expected to occur every ˜1100-540 years. As the last earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault may be up to ˜700 years in age we suggest that the Firouzkuh fault is a major hazard for

  13. Earthquake relocations, crustal rheology, and active deformation in the central-eastern Alps (N Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, Alfio; Scafidi, Davide; Ranalli, Giorgio; Martin, Silvana; Della Vedova, Bruno; Spallarossa, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    A revised seismic catalogue (1994-2007) for the central-eastern Alps (N Italy) is presented. 396 earthquake relocations, for local magnitudes in the 1.2-5.3 range, are performed using a 3D crustal velocity structure and probabilistic locations. The location procedure is validated by computing a set of 41 quarry shot solutions and all the results, both about shots and seismic events, are compared with those obtained using the routine location procedure. Results are shown for five contiguous seismotectonic domains, as supported by geological and geophysical evidence (e.g., fault systems, crustal tomography, focal mechanisms types). Earthquake hypocentres are mostly located in the upper crust (0-15 km of depth), in good agreement with thermo-rheological models about the brittle-ductile transitions (8-9 km of depth) and total crustal strengths (1.0-2.0 TN m- 1). Epicentres are clustered and/or aligned along present-day active geological structures. The proposed seismotectonic model shows dominant compression along the Giudicarie and Belluno-Bassano-Montello thrusts, with strain partitioning along the dominant right-lateral strike-slip faults of the Schio-Vicenza domain. The present-day deformation of the Southern Alps and the internal Alpine chain is compatible with Adria indentation and the related crustal stress distribution.

  14. Ground-penetrating radar investigations along the North Anatolian fault near Izmit, Turkey: Constraints on the right-lateral movement and slip history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Matthieu; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Girard, Jean-François; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Kozaci, Özgur; Akyuz, Serdar; Barka, Aykut

    2004-01-01

    We analyze ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles made across and parallel to the August 1999 earthquake ruptures of the North Anatolian fault in Turkey. The profiles document cumulative right-lateral offset of stream channels and the successive faulting of a medieval (Ottoman) canal. The dominance of fine sand to coarse gravel in the sections imaged allows for reasonably deep penetration, and processed radar signals clearly image visible reflectors within the uppermost 5 m. Near Köseköy, buried fluvial-channel deposits, exposed in some trenches dug to determine paleoseismicity, are also visible on profiles and show a maximum 6.7 7.4 m of lateral displacement. Younger channel units display 4.5 4.9 m of right-lateral displacement at 2 3 m depth and show that the penultimate rupture along the Izmit segment produced a similar amount of displacement as in 1999. At the Ottoman canal site, GPR profiles complement a trench study and provide consistent results showing the occurrence of three faulting events after A.D. 1591, the date of canal construction. This study demonstrates that the use of GPR method in paleoseismology contributes to better identification of cumulative slip along active faults.

  15. Identification of paleoearthquakes based on geomorphological evidence and their tectonic implications for the southern part of the active Anqiu-Juxian fault, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Qisong; Jiang, Wenliang; Zhang, Jingfa; Jiang, Hongbo; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xin

    2016-12-01

    This study utilized an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry system to acquire orthoimages and generate a digital elevation model (DEM) covering the southern part of the Anqiu-Juxian fault for geomorphological analysis and paleoearthquake identification. Six offset gullies were identified and analyzed on the orthoimages. Our results indicate that at least three large and several moderate earthquakes have occurred along the fault zone. Knickpoints recognized from the DEM reveal several paleoearthquakes. An average Holocene horizontal slip rate of 2.86 ± 0.35 mm yr-1 was estimated from the offset gullies, which is consistent with previous results from field surveys. The tectonic evolution of this fault zone is most likely related to subduction of the Pacific plate under the Eurasian plate, which gave rise to the right-lateral strike-slip and thrust movement of the Tan-Lu fault zone. This study provided valuable information regarding fault activity and paleoearthquake occurrence along the Anqiu-Juxian fault zone during the Holocene and demonstrated the potential of using UAVs for studies involving tectonic geomorphology.

  16. Geomorphic signal of active faulting at the northern edge of Lut Block: Insights on the kinematic scenario of Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolari, Gabriele; Della Seta, Marta; Rossetti, Federico; Nozaem, Reza; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Cosentino, Domenico; Faccenna, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Recent works documented Neogene to Quaternary dextral strike-slip tectonics along the Kuh-e-Sarhangi and Kuh-e-Faghan intraplate strike-slip faults at the northern edge of the Lut Block of Central Iran, previously thought to be dominated by sinistral strike-slip deformation. This work focuses on the evidence of Quaternary activity of one of these fault systems, in order to provide new spatiotemporal constraints on their role in the active regional kinematic scenario. Through geomorphological and structural investigation, integrated with optically stimulated luminescence dating of three generations of alluvial fans and fluvial terraces (at ~53, ~25, and ~6 ka), this study documents (i) the topographic inheritance of the long-term (Myr) punctuated history of fault nucleation, propagation, and exhumation along the northern edge of Lut Block; (ii) the tectonic control on drainage network evolution, pediment formation, fluvial terraces, and alluvial fan architecture; (iii) the minimum Holocene age of Quaternary dextral strike-slip faulting; and (iv) the evidence of Late Quaternary fault-related uplift localized along the different fault strands. The documented spatial and temporal constraints on the active dextral strike-slip tectonics at the northern edge of Lut Block provide new insights on the kinematic model for active faulting in Central Iran, which has been reinterpreted in an escape tectonic scenario.

  17. Evidence of active tectonics on a Roman aqueduct system (II-III century A.D.) near Rome, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Fabrizio; Montone, Paola; Pirro, Mario; Boschi, Enzo

    2004-04-01

    In this paper we describe evidence of strong tectonic deformation affecting two aqueducts of Roman age (II-III century A.D.). The channels are located approximately 20 km northeast of Rome along the ancient Via Tiburtina. Brittle and ductile deformation affects these two structures, including extensional joint systems, NE-oriented faults, and horizontal distortion. This deformation is consistent with right-lateral movement on major N-striking faults, and represents the first evidence that tectonic deformation took place in historical times in the vicinity of Rome, with local strike-slip movement superimposed on a regional extensional fault system.

  18. Present-day Focal Mechanisms and Stress Field of the Sichuan-Yunnan Active Block and Its Adjacent Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhao, cuiping; luo, jun; zhou, lianqing

    2013-04-01

    Focal mechanism solutions together with the depths of 66 M 3.5 moderate earthquakes occurred in the Sichuan Yunnan active block and its adjacent regions from Aug.1st, 2007 to Sep.15th, 2012was obtained by CAP method. Furthermore, by combining the results with the focal mechanism solutions from Harvard University, we investigated the characteristics of the stress field in the study area. We discussed the spatial distribution of the focal mechanisms and the focal depths, and then analyzed its dynamics. Four conclusions are drawn as follows. (1)Focal mechanism solutions show zoning characteristic. Along the ANH-ZMH-XJ faults(the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block), the earthquakes are mostly left-lateral strike-slip mechanism. Along the HSH fault, the earthquakes are mostly right-lateral strike-slip mechanism. Around the XGLL block and in its interior, there exists remarkable normal fault mechanism with different fault striking and direction of P and T stress axis. Along the arc boundary of Sichuan-Yunnan block with the Sichuan basin, the earthquakes are reverse fault mechanism. (2) The inversed regional stress field shows complicated local feature. On and to the east side of the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block, the stress field is similar with the stress field of the Eastern China block, which is from the relative motion of Philippine plate towards the Urasia plate. Whereas to the west side of the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block, the stress field is much more complicated, indicting the strong influence of local structures to the stress field, especially the NE striking of JPS-YL over-thrusting tectonic structure located in the interior of Sichuan-Yunnan block.(3)The moment center depths of events occurred in the Sichuan-Yunnan active block are within 15km deep, and mostly among 5~15km, suggesting that the brittle seismic layer is among the depth of 5~15km in the upper and middle crust.

  19. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  20. Right away: A late, right-lateralized category effect complements an early, left-lateralized category effect in visual search.

    PubMed

    Constable, Merryn D; Becker, Stefanie I

    2017-03-27

    According to the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, learned semantic categories can influence early perceptual processes. A central finding in support of this view is the lateralized category effect-namely, the finding that categorically different colors (e.g., blue and green hues) can be discriminated faster than colors within the same color category (e.g., different hues of green), especially when they are presented in the right visual field. Because the right visual field projects to the left hemisphere, this finding has been popularly couched in terms of the left-lateralization of language. However, other studies have reported bilateral category effects, which has led some researchers to question the linguistic origins of the effect. Here we examined the time course of lateralized and bilateral category effects in the classical visual search paradigm by means of eyetracking and RT distribution analyses. Our results show a bilateral category effect in the manual responses, which is combined of an early, left-lateralized category effect and a later, right-lateralized category effect. The newly discovered late, right-lateralized category effect occurred only when observers had difficulty locating the target, indicating a specialization of the right hemisphere to find categorically different targets after an initial error. The finding that early and late stages of visual search show different lateralized category effects can explain a wide range of previously discrepant findings.

  1. GPR investigations along the North Anatolian Fault near Izmit (Turkey): Constraints on the right-lateral movement and slip history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Meghraoui, M.; Rockwell, T. K.; Kozaci, Ö.; Akyuz, S.; Girard, J.-F.; Barka, A.

    2003-04-01

    The 1999 Ms 7.4 Izmit earthquake produced more than 110 km of surface rupture along the North Anatolian fault. We present here ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles surveyed across and parallel to the 1999 Izmit earthquake ruptures at two sites along the Izmit-Sapanca segment. Fine sandy and coarse gravels favor the penetration depth and processed radar profiles image clearly visible reflectors within the uppermost 10 m. In Köseköy, they document cumulative right-lateral offset of a stream channel by the fault. Old fluvial channel deposits also visible in trenches show a maximum 13.5 to 14 m lateral displacement. Younger channel units display 4 m of right-lateral displacement at 2.5 m depth and correlation with dated trench units yields an average slip rate of 15 mm/yr. At site 2, GPR profiles display the successive faulting of a medieval Ottoman Canal which excavation probably took place in 1591 A.D.. GPR profiles image the corresponding surface as well as numerous faults that affect it. A following trench study confirmed these results as they provide consistent results with the occurrence of three faulting events post-1591 A.D., one of which probably as large as the 1999 Izmit earthquake.

  2. Fault Geometry and Active Stress from Earthquakes and Field Geology Data Analysis: The Colfiorito 1997 and L'Aquila 2009 Cases (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, F.; Lavecchia, G.; de Nardis, R.; Brozzetti, F.

    2015-05-01

    The fault segmentation pattern and the regional stress tensor acting since the Early Quaternary in the intra-Apennine area of central Italy was constrained by integrating two large geological and seismological fault-slip data sets collected for the areas struck by the two most energetic seismic sequences of the last 15 years (Colfiorito 1997, M w 6.0 and L'Aquila 2009, M w 6.1). The integrated analysis of the earthquake fault association and the reconstruction of the 3D shape of the seismogenic sources were exploited to identify homogeneous seismogenic volumes associated with subsets of geological and focal mechanism data. The independent analysis of geological and seismological data allowed us to observe and highlight similarities between the attitude of the long-term (e.g., Quaternary) and the instantaneous present-day (seismogenic) extensional deformations and to reveal their substantial coaxiality. Coherently, with the results from the kinematic analysis, the stress field inversion also noted a prevailing tensional seismotectonic regime associated with a subhorizontal, NE-SW, minimum stress axis. A minor, very local, and shallow (<5 km) strike-slip component of the stress field was observed in the Colfiorito sector, where an inherited N-S oriented right-lateral fault was reactivated with sinistral kinematics. Instead, an almost total absence of strike-slip solutions was observed in the L'Aquila area. These results do not agree with those indicating Quaternary regional strike-slip regimes or wide areas characterized by strike-slip deformation during the Colfiorito and L'Aquila seismic sequences.

  3. Fault Geometry and Active Stress from Earthquakes and Field Geology Data Analysis: The Colfiorito 1997 and L'Aquila 2009 Cases (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, F.; Lavecchia, G.; de Nardis, R.; Brozzetti, F.

    2014-09-01

    The fault segmentation pattern and the regional stress tensor acting since the Early Quaternary in the intra-Apennine area of central Italy was constrained by integrating two large geological and seismological fault-slip data sets collected for the areas struck by the two most energetic seismic sequences of the last 15 years (Colfiorito 1997, M w 6.0 and L'Aquila 2009, M w 6.1). The integrated analysis of the earthquake fault association and the reconstruction of the 3D shape of the seismogenic sources were exploited to identify homogeneous seismogenic volumes associated with subsets of geological and focal mechanism data. The independent analysis of geological and seismological data allowed us to observe and highlight similarities between the attitude of the long-term (e.g., Quaternary) and the instantaneous present-day (seismogenic) extensional deformations and to reveal their substantial coaxiality. Coherently, with the results from the kinematic analysis, the stress field inversion also noted a prevailing tensional seismotectonic regime associated with a subhorizontal, NE-SW, minimum stress axis. A minor, very local, and shallow (<5 km) strike-slip component of the stress field was observed in the Colfiorito sector, where an inherited N-S oriented right-lateral fault was reactivated with sinistral kinematics. Instead, an almost total absence of strike-slip solutions was observed in the L'Aquila area. These results do not agree with those indicating Quaternary regional strike-slip regimes or wide areas characterized by strike-slip deformation during the Colfiorito and L'Aquila seismic sequences.

  4. Paleoseismic and geomorphologic evidence of recent tectonic activity of the Pozohondo Fault (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Pascua, M.A.; Pérez-López, R.; Garduño-Monroy, V.H.; Giner-Robles, J.L.; Silva, P.G.; Perucha-Atienza, M.A.; Hernández-Madrigal, V.M.; Bischoff, J.

    2012-01-01

    Instrumental and historical seismicity in the Albacete province (External Prebetic Zone) has been scarcely recorded. However, major strike-slip faults showing NW-SE trending provide geomorphologic and paleoseismic evidence of recent tectonic activity (Late Pleistocene to Present). Moreover, these faults are consistently well oriented under the present stress tensor and therefore, they can trigger earthquakes of magnitude greater than M6, according to the lengths of surface ruptures and active segments recognized in fieldwork. Present landscape nearby the village of Hellin (SE of Albacete) is determined by the recent activity of the Pozohondo Fault (FPH), a NW-SE right-lateral fault with 90 km in length. In this study, we have calculated the Late Quaternary tectonic sliprate of the FPH from geomorphological, sedimentological, archaeoseimological, and paleoseismological approaches. All of these data suggest that the FPH runs with a minimum slip-rate of 0.1 mm/yr during the last 100 kyrs (Upper Pleistocene-Holocene). In addition, we have recognized the last two major paleoearthquakes associated to this fault. Magnitudes of these paleoearthquakes were gretarer than M6 and their recurrence intervals ranged from 6600 to 8600 yrs for the seismic cycle of FPH. The last earthquake was dated between the 1st and 6th centuries, though two earthquakes could be interpreted in this wide time interval, one at the FPH and other from a far field source. Results obtained here, suggest an increasing of the tectonic activity of the Pozohondo Fault during the last 10,000 yrs.

  5. Children show right-lateralized effects of spoken word-form learning

    PubMed Central

    Nora, Anni; Karvonen, Leena; Renvall, Hanna; Parviainen, Tiina; Kim, Jeong-Young; Service, Elisabet; Salmelin, Riitta

    2017-01-01

    It is commonly thought that phonological learning is different in young children compared to adults, possibly due to the speech processing system not yet having reached full native-language specialization. However, the neurocognitive mechanisms of phonological learning in children are poorly understood. We employed magnetoencephalography (MEG) to track cortical correlates of incidental learning of meaningless word forms over two days as 6–8-year-olds overtly repeated them. Native (Finnish) pseudowords were compared with words of foreign sound structure (Korean) to investigate whether the cortical learning effects would be more dependent on previous proficiency in the language rather than maturational factors. Half of the items were encountered four times on the first day and once more on the following day. Incidental learning of these recurring word forms manifested as improved repetition accuracy and a correlated reduction of activation in the right superior temporal cortex, similarly for both languages and on both experimental days, and in contrast to a salient left-hemisphere emphasis previously reported in adults. We propose that children, when learning new word forms in either native or foreign language, are not yet constrained by left-hemispheric segmental processing and established sublexical native-language representations. Instead, they may rely more on supra-segmental contours and prosody. PMID:28158201

  6. Children show right-lateralized effects of spoken word-form learning.

    PubMed

    Nora, Anni; Karvonen, Leena; Renvall, Hanna; Parviainen, Tiina; Kim, Jeong-Young; Service, Elisabet; Salmelin, Riitta

    2017-01-01

    It is commonly thought that phonological learning is different in young children compared to adults, possibly due to the speech processing system not yet having reached full native-language specialization. However, the neurocognitive mechanisms of phonological learning in children are poorly understood. We employed magnetoencephalography (MEG) to track cortical correlates of incidental learning of meaningless word forms over two days as 6-8-year-olds overtly repeated them. Native (Finnish) pseudowords were compared with words of foreign sound structure (Korean) to investigate whether the cortical learning effects would be more dependent on previous proficiency in the language rather than maturational factors. Half of the items were encountered four times on the first day and once more on the following day. Incidental learning of these recurring word forms manifested as improved repetition accuracy and a correlated reduction of activation in the right superior temporal cortex, similarly for both languages and on both experimental days, and in contrast to a salient left-hemisphere emphasis previously reported in adults. We propose that children, when learning new word forms in either native or foreign language, are not yet constrained by left-hemispheric segmental processing and established sublexical native-language representations. Instead, they may rely more on supra-segmental contours and prosody.

  7. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Karlin, R. E.; Baskin, R. L.; Louie, J. N.; Smith, K. D.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary slip rates measured across the East Pyramid Lake fault, or the Lake Range fault, help provide new estimates of extension across the Pyramid Lake basin. Multiple stratigraphic horizons spanning 48 ka were tracked throughout the lake, with layer offsets measured across all significant faults in the basin. A chronstratigraphic framework acquired from four sediment cores allows slip rates of the Lake Range and other faults to be calculated accurately. This region of the northern Walker Lake, strategically placed between the right-lateral strike-slip faults of Honey and Eagle Lakes to the north, and the normal fault bounded basins to the southwest (e.g., Tahoe, Carson), is critical in understanding the underlying structural complexity that is not only necessary for geothermal exploration, but also earthquake hazard assessment due to the proximity of the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. In addition, our seismic CHIRP imaging with submeter resolution allows the construction of the first fault map of Pyramid Lake. The Lake Range fault can be obviously traced west of Anahoe Island extending north along the east end of the lake in numerous CHIRP lines. Initial drafts of the fault map reveal active transtension through a series of numerous, small, northwest striking, oblique-slip faults in the north end of the lake. A previously field mapped northwest striking fault near Sutcliff can be extended into the west end of Pyramid Lake. This fault map, along with the calculated slip rate of the Lake Range, and potentially multiple other faults, gives a clearer picture into understanding the geothermal potential, tectonic regime and earthquake hazards in the Pyramid Lake basin and the northern Walker Lane. These new results have also been merged with seismicity maps, along with focal mechanisms for the larger events to begin to extend our fault map in depth.

  8. North-south compression, active uplift, and abyssal mantle exhumation of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoki, A.; Sichel, S. E.; Campos, T. F.; Motoki, K. F.; Szatmari, P.; Poseidon-Colmeia

    2013-05-01

    This article presents near N-S compression, active uplift tectonism, and the consequent abyssal mantle exhumation of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The mantle peridotite ridge is about 80 km long, 25 km wide, 3800 m high, and of near E-W direction. The ridge flanks are extremely steep with sub-vertical scarps of about 2000 m of relative height. The Flandrian wave-cut and the 14C datings for the carbonaceous algae of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Rock indicate active uplift of 1.5 mm/year. The tectonic factures shows conjugated system of N-S compression tending slightly to NW-ES. Close to the peridotite ridge, the earthquakes with near N-S compression focal mechanism take place. The southern half of the peridotite ridge is constituted by undeformed peridotite. The existence of corrugation morphology indicates that the mantle rocks are originated from old megamullion. On the other hand, the northern half is composed of strongly deformed mylonitic peridotite suggesting that the ultramafic rocks are possibly originated from sub-crustal abyssal mantle of old transform fault. The mylonite structure is intensely perturbed indicating the tectonic events which disturbed the original parallel structure. The Saint Paul transform fault zone is characterized by E-W trend right lateral movement and the near N-S compression is unlikely. Therefore, an unusual local geotectonic process is expected. This tectonism was originated from the plate boundary jump at about 8 Ma, caused by the emergence of a new ridge segment, and the new transform fault is oblique to the relative plate movement. This angular discrepancy causes the compression perpendicular to the oblique transform fault, of near N-S direction, which squeeze out the sub-crustal abyssal mantle up to sea level. Therefore, the peridotite Ridge is considered to be a pressure ridge of the strike-slip movement of the Saint Paul transform fault.

  9. Owens Valley fault kinematics: Right-lateral slip transfer via north-northeast trending normal faults at the northern end of the Owens Valley fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, T. P.; Dawers, N. H.

    2003-12-01

    The occurrence of several northeast trending normal faults along the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada escarpment are evidence of right-lateral slip transfer across northern Owens Valley from the Owens Valley fault to the White Mountains fault zone. Interaction between the Sierran frontal normal fault and these two fault zones has created a transtensional tectonic environment, which allows for right-lateral slip transfer via a population of northwest dipping normal faults within the Late Quaternary-Holocene alluvial valley fill of northern Owens Valley. A component of normal movement within the valley floor has been documented along fifteen faults. This includes the Tungsten Hills fault, two faults near Klondike Lake, and twelve or so, some possibly linked, small NNE trending scarps southeast of the town of Bishop. One fault segment, located just past the tip of the 1872 earthquake rupture, reveals a minimum of 3.2 meters of normal throw along much of its length. This fault shows evidence for at least three large ruptures, each exhibiting at least one meter of vertical slip. In addition, a large population of normal faults with similar orientations is mapped within the immediate vicinity of this scarp segment. These faults accommodate a substantial amount of normal movement allowing for eastward right lateral slip transfer. With the exception of the Tungsten Hills fault, they are primarily concentrated along a segment of the Sierran Escarpment known as the Coyote Warp. The pre-existing normal fault geometry along this segment acts to block the northward propagation of right-lateral movement, which is consequently forced across the valley floor to the White Mountain fault zone.

  10. New insights into the active deformation of accretionary prisms: examples from the Western Makran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Camilla; Copley, Alex; Oveisi, Benham

    2016-04-01

    The Makran subduction zone, along the southern coasts of Iran and Pakistan, hosts one of the largest exposed accretionary wedges in the world. The western Makran has been characterised by a lack of shallow and thrust seismicity in both the instrumental and historical periods. The Mw 6.1 2013 Minab earthquake thus provides a rare opportunity to study the deformation of the accretionary wedge in the transition region between continent-continent collision, in the Zagros, and oceanic subduction, in the Makran. We study the source parameters and slip distribution of this earthquake using seismology, geodesy and field observations. We observe left-lateral strike-slip motion on a fault striking ENE-WSW; approximately perpendicular to the faults of the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault zone, the main structure previously thought to accommodate the right-lateral shear between the Zagros and the Makran. The fault that ruptured in 2013 is one of a series of approximately E-W striking left-lateral faults visible in the geology and geomorphology. These accommodate a velocity field equivalent to right-lateral shear on N-S striking planes by clockwise rotations about vertical axes. The longitudinal range of shear in the western Makran is likely to be controlled by the distance over which the underthrusting Arabian lithosphere deepens in the transition from continent-continent collision to oceanic subduction. The lack of observed megathrust seismicity in the western Makran has led to assertions that the convergence in this region may be aseismic, in contrast to the eastern Makran, which experienced an Mw8.1 earthquake in 1945. The right-lateral Sistan Suture Zone, which runs ~N-S along the Iran-Afghanistan border to the north of the Makran, appears to separate these regimes. However, right-lateral faulting is not observed south of ~27°N, within the wedge. The Minab earthquake and the 2013 Balochistan earthquake show that the Makran accretionary wedge is dominated by strike-slip faulting

  11. Holocene earthquakes and right-lateral slip on the left-lateral Darrington-Devils Mountain fault zone, northern Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, Stephen F.; Briggs, Richard W.; Nelson, Alan R.; Schermer, Elizabeth R; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Sherrod, Brian; Spaulding, Sarah A.; Bradley, Lee-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Sources of seismic hazard in the Puget Sound region of northwestern Washington include deep earthquakes associated with the Cascadia subduction zone, and shallow earthquakes associated with some of the numerous crustal (upper-plate) faults that crisscross the region. Our paleoseismic investigations on one of the more prominent crustal faults, the Darrington–Devils Mountain fault zone, included trenching of fault scarps developed on latest Pleistocene glacial sediments and analysis of cores from an adjacent wetland near Lake Creek, 14 km southeast of Mount Vernon, Washington. Trench excavations revealed evidence of a single earthquake, radiocarbon dated to ca. 2 ka, but extensive burrowing and root mixing of sediments within 50–100 cm of the ground surface may have destroyed evidence of other earthquakes. Cores in a small wetland adjacent to our trench site provided stratigraphic evidence (formation of a laterally extensive, prograding wedge of hillslope colluvium) of an earthquake ca. 2 ka, which we interpret to be the same earthquake documented in the trenches. A similar colluvial wedge lower in the wetland section provides possible evidence for a second earthquake dated to ca. 8 ka. Three-dimensional trenching techniques revealed evidence for 2.2 ± 1.1 m of right-lateral offset of a glacial outwash channel margin, and 45–70 cm of north-side-up vertical separation across the fault zone. These offsets indicate a net slip vector of 2.3 ± 1.1 m, plunging 14° west on a 286°-striking, 90°-dipping fault plane. The dominant right-lateral sense of slip is supported by the presence of numerous Riedel R shears preserved in two of our trenches, and probable right-lateral offset of a distinctive bedrock fault zone in a third trench. Holocene north-side-up, right-lateral oblique slip is opposite the south-side-up, left-lateral oblique sense of slip inferred from geologic mapping of Eocene and older rocks along the fault zone. The cause of this slip reversal is

  12. Late Pleistocene to Historical Activity of the Hovd Fault (Mongolian Altay) from Tectonic Geomorphology and Paleoseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M. A.; Battogtokh, D.; Ritz, J. F.; Kurtz, R.; Braucher, R.; Klinger, Y.; Ulzibat, M.; Chimed, O.; Demberel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Active tectonics of western Mongolia is dominated by large strike-slip fault systems that produced great historical earthquakes: the Bulnay fault (Mw 8.1 and 8.4 in 1905), the Fu-Yun fault (Mw 8.0 in 1931) and the Bogd fault (Mw 8.1 in 1957). Central to these faults is the Altay Range that accommodates ~4 mm/yr of right-lateral motion. An earthquake of similar magnitude occurred in 1761 and has been attributed to the Hovd fault were seemingly fresh surface rupture was reported in 1985. Here, we study the Ar-Hötöl section of the Hovd fault where surface rupture was described over a length of ~200 km. Detailed mapping of stream gullies from high-resolution Pleiades satellite images show a consistent pattern of right-lateral offsets from a few meters to ~500 m. At Climbing Rock, we surveyed a gully offset by 75 ± 5 m. The associated surface was sampled for 10Be profile which yields an exposure age of 154 ± 20 ka. The resulting minimal right-lateral slip rate ranges 0.4-0.6 mm/yr. However, drainage reconstruction suggests this surface may have recorded as much as 400 ± 20 m of cumulative offset. This implies the Hovd fault may accommodate as much as 2.6 ± 0.4 mm/yr, which would make it the main active fault of the Altay. At a smaller scale, TLS topography documents offsets in the order of 2.5-5 m that likely correspond to the most recent surface-rupturing event with Mw ~8. A value of 2.8-3.0 m is reconstructed from a Uiger grave dated AD 750-840. At Marmot Creek and Small Creek, short drainages flow across the fault and form ponds against the main scarp. Two paleoseimic trenches reveal similar stratigraphy with numerous peat layers that developed over alluvial sands. The fault exhibits near vertical strands affecting pre-ponding units as well as a well-developed peat unit radiocarbon-dated AD 1465-1635. This unit likely corresponds to the ground surface at the time of the last rupture. It is overlain with a sandy pond unit on top of which a second continuous peat

  13. Recognition on space photographs of structural elements of Baja California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, W.

    1971-01-01

    Gemini and Apollo photographs provide illustrations of known structural features of the peninsula and some structures not recognized previously. An apparent transform relationship between strike-slip and normal faulting is illustrated by the overlapping vertical photographs of northern Baja California. The active Agua Blanca right-lateral strike-slip fault trends east-southeastward to end at the north end of the Valle San Felipe and Valle Chico. The uplands of the high Sierra San Pedro Martir are a low-relief surface deformed by young faults, monoclines, and warps, which mostly produce west-facing steps and slopes; the topography is basically structural. The Sierra Cucapas of northeasternmost Baja California and the Colorado River delta of northwesternmost Sonora are broken by northwest-trending strike-slip faults. A strike-slip fault is inferred to trend northward obliquely from near Cabo San Lucas to La Paz, thence offshore until it comes ashore again as the Bahia Concepcion strike-slip fault.

  14. Neural Signals Evoked by Stimuli of Increasing Social Scene Complexity Are Detectable at the Single-Trial Level and Right Lateralized

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Carlos P.; Simões, Marco A.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel S.

    2015-01-01

    Classification of neural signals at the single-trial level and the study of their relevance in affective and cognitive neuroscience are still in their infancy. Here we investigated the neurophysiological correlates of conditions of increasing social scene complexity using 3D human models as targets of attention, which may also be important in autism research. Challenging single-trial statistical classification of EEG neural signals was attempted for detection of oddball stimuli with increasing social scene complexity. Stimuli had an oddball structure and were as follows: 1) flashed schematic eyes, 2) simple 3D faces flashed between averted and non-averted gaze (only eye position changing), 3) simple 3D faces flashed between averted and non-averted gaze (head and eye position changing), 4) animated avatar alternated its gaze direction to the left and to the right (head and eye position), 5) environment with 4 animated avatars all of which change gaze and one of which is the target of attention. We found a late (> 300 ms) neurophysiological oddball correlate for all conditions irrespective of their complexity as assessed by repeated measures ANOVA. We attempted single-trial detection of this signal with automatic classifiers and obtained a significant balanced accuracy classification of around 79%, which is noteworthy given the amount of scene complexity. Lateralization analysis showed a specific right lateralization only for more complex realistic social scenes. In sum, complex ecological animations with social content elicit neurophysiological events which can be characterized even at the single-trial level. These signals are right lateralized. These finding paves the way for neuroscientific studies in affective neuroscience based on complex social scenes, and given the detectability at the single trial level this suggests the feasibility of brain computer interfaces that can be applied to social cognition disorders such as autism. PMID:25807525

  15. Neural signals evoked by stimuli of increasing social scene complexity are detectable at the single-trial level and right lateralized.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Carlos P; Simões, Marco A; Castelo-Branco, Miguel S

    2015-01-01

    Classification of neural signals at the single-trial level and the study of their relevance in affective and cognitive neuroscience are still in their infancy. Here we investigated the neurophysiological correlates of conditions of increasing social scene complexity using 3D human models as targets of attention, which may also be important in autism research. Challenging single-trial statistical classification of EEG neural signals was attempted for detection of oddball stimuli with increasing social scene complexity. Stimuli had an oddball structure and were as follows: 1) flashed schematic eyes, 2) simple 3D faces flashed between averted and non-averted gaze (only eye position changing), 3) simple 3D faces flashed between averted and non-averted gaze (head and eye position changing), 4) animated avatar alternated its gaze direction to the left and to the right (head and eye position), 5) environment with 4 animated avatars all of which change gaze and one of which is the target of attention. We found a late (> 300 ms) neurophysiological oddball correlate for all conditions irrespective of their complexity as assessed by repeated measures ANOVA. We attempted single-trial detection of this signal with automatic classifiers and obtained a significant balanced accuracy classification of around 79%, which is noteworthy given the amount of scene complexity. Lateralization analysis showed a specific right lateralization only for more complex realistic social scenes. In sum, complex ecological animations with social content elicit neurophysiological events which can be characterized even at the single-trial level. These signals are right lateralized. These finding paves the way for neuroscientific studies in affective neuroscience based on complex social scenes, and given the detectability at the single trial level this suggests the feasibility of brain computer interfaces that can be applied to social cognition disorders such as autism.

  16. The 2006 Bahía Asunción Earthquake Swarm: Seismic Evidence of Active Deformation Along the Western Margin of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía, Luis; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Méndez, Ignacio; González-Escobar, Mario; Luna, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The study of the Bahía Asunción earthquake swarm is important for two reasons. First, the earthquakes are clear evidence of present activity along the zone of deformation on the Pacific margin of Baja California. The swarm, with earthquakes of magnitude M w of up to 5.0, occurred on the coastline of the peninsula, showing that the Tosco-Abreojos zone of deformation is wider than previously thought. Second, the larger earthquakes in the swarm caused some damage and much concern in Bahía Asunción, a small town located in the zone of epicenters. We relocated the larger earthquakes with regional and/or local seismic data. Our results put the earthquake sources below the urban area of Bahía Asunción, at 40-50 km to the north of the teleseismically determined epicenters. In addition, these new locations are in the area of epicenters of many smaller events that were located with data from local temporary stations. This area trends in an E-W direction and has dimensions of approximately 15 km by 10 km. Most earthquakes had sources at depths that are between 4 and 9 km. A composite focal mechanism for the smaller earthquakes indicated right-lateral strike-slip motion and pure-normal faulting occurred during this swarm. Interestingly, the ANSS earthquake catalog of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) reported each one of these faulting styles for two large events of the swarm, with one of these earthquakes occurring 2 days before the other one. We associate the earthquake with strike-slip mechanism with the San Roque Fault, and the earthquake with the normal faulting style with the Asunción Fault. However, there is need of further study to verify this possible relation between the faults and the earthquakes. In addition, we recorded peak accelerations of up to 0.63 g with an accelerometer installed in Bahía Asunción. At this site, an earthquake of M w 4.9 produced those high values at a distance of 4.1 km. We also used the acceleration dataset from this site

  17. The Beni-Ilmane (Algeria) seismic sequence of May 2010: Seismic sources and stress tensor calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beldjoudi, H.; Delouis, B.; Djellit, H.; Yelles-Chaouche, A.; Gharbi, S.; Abacha, I.

    2016-02-01

    A moderate earthquake with a moment magnitude of Mw 5.5 struck the Sub-Bibanique region of eastern Algeria on 14 May 2010, killing three people, injuring hundreds of others, and causing moderate damages in the epicentral area, mainly in the villages of Beni-Ilmane and Samma. The focal mechanism of the seismic source for the first shock, obtained by near-field waveform modelling, exhibits left-lateral strike-slip faulting with the first nodal plane oriented at N345°, and right-lateral strike-slip faulting with the second nodal plane oriented at N254°. A second earthquake that struck the region on 16 May 2010, with a moment magnitude of Mw 5.1, was located 9 km SW of the first earthquake. The focal mechanism obtained by waveform modelling showed reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented NE-SW (N25° and N250°). A third earthquake that struck the region on 23 May 2010, with a moment magnitude of Mw 5.2, was located 7 km S of the first shock. The obtained focal mechanism showed a left-lateral strike-slip plane oriented at N12° and a right-lateral strike-slip plane oriented at N257°. Field investigations combined with geological and seismotectonic analyses indicate that the three earthquake shocks were generated by activity on three distinct faults. The second and third shocks were generated on faults oriented WSW-ENE and NNE-SSW, respectively. The regional stress tensor calculated in the region gives an orientation of N340° for the maximum compressive stress direction (σ1) which is close to the horizontal, with a stress shape factor indicating either a compressional or a strike-slip regime.

  18. Modeling right-lateral offset of a Late Pleistocene terrace riser along the Polaris fault using ground based LiDAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howle, J. F.; Bawden, G. W.; Hunter, L. E.; Rose, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    High resolution (centimeter level) three-dimensional point-cloud imagery of offset glacial outwash deposits were collected by using ground based tripod LiDAR (T-LiDAR) to characterize the cumulative fault slip across the recently identified Polaris fault (Hunter et al., 2009) near Truckee, California. The type-section site for the Polaris fault is located 6.5 km east of Truckee where progressive right-lateral displacement of middle to late Pleistocene deposits is evident. Glacial outwash deposits, aggraded during the Tioga glaciation, form a flat lying ‘fill’ terrace on both the north and south sides of the modern Truckee River. During the Tioga deglaciation melt water incised into the terrace producing fluvial scarps or terrace risers (Birkeland, 1964). Subsequently, the terrace risers on both banks have been right-laterally offset by the Polaris fault. By using T-LiDAR on an elevated tripod (4.25 m high), we collected 3D high-resolution (thousands of points per square meter; ± 4 mm) point-cloud imagery of the offset terrace risers. Vegetation was removed from the data using commercial software, and large protruding boulders were manually deleted to generate a bare-earth point-cloud dataset with an average data density of over 240 points per square meter. From the bare-earth point cloud we mathematically reconstructed a pristine terrace/scarp morphology on both sides of the fault, defined coupled sets of piercing points, and extracted a corresponding displacement vector. First, the Polaris fault was approximated as a vertical plane that bisects the offset terrace risers, as well as bisecting linear swales and tectonic depressions in the outwash terrace. Then, piercing points to the vertical fault plane were constructed from the geometry of the geomorphic elements on either side of the fault. On each side of the fault, the best-fit modeled outwash plane is projected laterally and the best-fit modeled terrace riser projected upward to a virtual intersection in

  19. Separation of the Guajira-Bonaire pair in the southern margin of the Caribbean: 65-50 Ma exhumation followed by 300 km right-lateral transtensional deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata Henao, S.; Cardona, A.; Montes, C.; Valencia, V.; Vervoort, J. D.; Reiners, P. W.

    2012-12-01

    Middle to upper Eocene fluvial strata in the island of Bonaire contains detrital components that were tracked to the basement massifs of the Guajira Peninsula in northern Colombia. These detrital components confirm previous hypothesis that the Guajira-Bonaire pair constitute a tectonic piercing point along the southern Caribbean plate margin that was right-laterally displaced approximately 300 km after middle Eocene times. Other possible sources, the nearby Curacao and the far away Santa Marta massif, did not pass statistical similarity and overlap tests. U-Pb LA-ICP-MS from the metamorphic boulders of the Soebi Blanco Formation in Bonaire yield Grenvillian ages (1084 Ma, 1130 Ma and 1184 Ma), while the detrital zircons recovered from the sandy matrix of the conglomerates contains populations with peaks of 1000 Ma - 1200 Ma, 750 Ma - 950 Ma, and 200 Ma - 300 Ma. Overlap and Similarity tests run between these populations and published data from Guajira yield values of 0.750 and 0.680, which are significantly higher than the same comparison against the Santa Marta Massif (0.637 and 0.522), and the Curacao island (0.629 and 0.467). Thermochronological results from the metamorphic clasts yield Paleocene-middle Eocene ages (65 - 50 Ma) that confirm not only a regional-scale cooling event in this time period, but also help constrain the maximum depositional age (50 Ma) of the poorly dated Soebi Blanco Formation. Figure 6. U-Pb results from analyzed samples and other Caribbean provinces. (A), Detrital zircons from Soebi Blanco conglomerate matrix; (B), Zircon ages from metamorphic clasts (C), detrital zircons from late Cretaceous Etpana Formation in Guajira Peninsula (Weber et al., 2010); (D), detrital zircons from late Cretaceous Santa Marta San Lorenzo schists (Cardona et al., 2010a); (E), detrital zircons from late Cretaceous Knip Group (Wrigth and Wyld, 2010); (F), overlap and similarity values.

  20. The application of active-source seismic imaging techniques to transtensional problems the Walker Lane and Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, Anna Marie

    The plate margin in the western United States is an active tectonic region that contains the integrated deformation between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly focused plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates within the northern Gulf of California gives way north of the Salton Trough to more diffuse deformation. In particular a large fraction of the slip along the southernmost San Andreas fault ultimately bleeds eastward, including about 20% of the total plate motion budget that finds its way through the transtensional Walker Lane Deformation Belt just east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Fault-bounded ranges combined with intervening low-lying basins characterize this region; the down-dropped features are often filled with water, which present opportunities for seismic imaging at unprecedented scales. Here I present active-source seismic imaging from the Salton Sea and Walker Lane Deformation Belt, including both marine applications in lakes and shallow seas, and more conventional land-based techniques along the Carson range front. The complex fault network beneath the Salton Trough in eastern California is the on-land continuation of the Gulf of California rift system, where North American-Pacific plate motion is accommodated by a series of long transform faults, separated by small pull-apart, transtensional basins; the right-lateral San Andreas fault bounds this system to the north where it carries, on average, about 50% of total plate motion. The Salton Sea resides within the most youthful and northerly "spreading center" in this several thousand-kilometer-long rift system. The Sea provides an ideal environment for the use of high-data-density marine seismic techniques. Two active-source seismic campaigns in 2010 and 2011 show progression of the development of the Salton pull-apart sub-basin and the northerly propagation of the Imperial-San Andreas system through time at varying resolutions. High fidelity seismic imagery

  1. Multistage evolution and variable motion history of Agenor Linea, Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Lauren; Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Watkeys, Michael K.

    2014-04-01

    Europa, the second Galilean moon of Jupiter, is composed of a silicate mantle and an ice shell which overlies a supposed subsurface ocean. The surface of Europa is scarred with fractures varying in morphology, dimensions, and geometry. We focus on Agenor Linea: a ∼1500 km bright band that extends across Europa’s antijovian to trailing southern hemisphere. Agenor Linea is morphologically a band-like strike-slip fault; however, it experienced at least three evolutionary growth phases marked by three zones of varying albedo, each with a different geological history. Structures within the band material and kinematic indicators are consistent with formation through oblique left-lateral dilation, followed by normal dilation and right-lateral strike-slip movement, or combinations thereof. These motions produced a cumulative maximum right-lateral offset of 29.5 km and a maximum band width of 34 km. We interpret Agenor Linea to have formed primarily in response to the combined effects of nonsynchronous rotation stress and diurnal tidal flexing. If so, its orientation is optimal for right-lateral oblique opening in the current global stress field, consistent with its most recent kinematic behavior. A small amount of offset of relatively young tension fractures that postdate cryospheric disruption by lenticulae suggest the possibility of ongoing activity along Agenor. In contrast to a previously published model in which strike-slip duplexing was the primary process of band formation, this study shows that initial dilation of three distinct morphological zones under disparate stress orientations preceded strike-slip motion that resulted in both localized and distributed deformation features within the zones across the width of the band.

  2. Reduced Activation in Right Lateral Prefrontal Cortex and Anterior Cingulate Gyrus in Medication-Naive Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder during Time Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anna B.; Taylor, Eric; Brammer, Michael; Halari, Rozmin; Rubia, Katya

    2008-01-01

    Background: Patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) under-perform when discriminating between durations differing by several hundred milliseconds. This function involves right prefrontal and anterior cingulate (AC) brain regions, which are structurally and functionally compromised in this patient group during executive tasks.…

  3. Active Deformation in the Zagros-Makran Transition Zone Inferred From GPS, Tectonic and Seismological Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Shabanian, E.; Regard, V.; Yaminifard, F.; Vernant, P.; Nilforoushan, F.; Abbassi, M.; Chery, J.; Tatar, M.; Doerflinger, E.; Peyret, M.; Daignières, M.; Bellier, O.; Hatzfeld, D.; Mokhtari, M.

    2002-12-01

    The present-day N-S convergence between the Arabian and the Eurasian plates is accommodated in Southern Iran along the Zagros fold and thrust belt (with a shortening of ~8 mm/yr)and by the subduction of the Oman oceanic lithosphere beneath the Makran (with a rate of 18mm/yr). The Bandar Abbas-Strait of Hormuz zone is considered as a transition between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. In this area, the strain is mainly accommodated along the NNW-SSE trending reverse right lateral Minab-Zendan-Palami faults and along the N-S trending faults of Sarduiyeh, Jiroft and Sabzevaran. We used GPS network measurements (carried out in 2000 and 2002) to better understand how the deformation is distributed between between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. The analysis of the velocities (together with the measurements of the global network of Iran) leads to the following conclusions : - The rate of shortening in the Eastern Zagros is < 8mm/yr. It is < 5 mm/yr between the coast and the Main Zagros Thrust. - The horizontal residual velocities of the coastal sites in Zagros relative to Musandan are < 3mm/yr, evidencing for a small deformation in the Persian Gulf. - Across the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults system GPS measurements are consistent with a N-S trending reverse right lateral motion at rate of ~ 10 mm/yr. - West of the Lut block at the latitude of Khanuj, the N-S trending Sarduiyeh-Jiroft-Sabzevaran fault system is characterized by a 2 mm/yr right strike slip motion. Local seismicity is located at an unusual depth down to 35 km. Little is associated with the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults strike slip faults. They rather suggest that they are associated with a complex transition between the Zagros collision and the Makran subduction. Times delays also suggest a large heterogeneity in the crust across the fault system. These measurements support the model that the convergence from the collision to the subduction is

  4. New GPS constraints on active deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulali, A.; Ouazar, D.; Tahayt, A.; King, R. W.; Vernant, P.; Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.; Mourabit, T.; Davila, J. M.; Amraoui, N.

    2011-08-01

    We use velocities from 65 continuous stations and 31 survey-mode GPS sites as well as kinematic modeling to investigate present day deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary zone in the western Mediterranean region. The GPS velocity field shows southwestward motion of the central part of the Rif Mountains in northern Morocco with respect to Africa varying between 3.5 and 4.0 mm/yr, consistent with prior published results. Stations in the southwestern part of the Betic Mountains of southern Spain move west-southwest with respect to Eurasia (˜ 2-3 mm/yr). The western component of Betics motion is consistent with partial transfer of Nubia-Eurasia plate motion into the southern Betics. The southward component of Betics motion with respect to Iberia is kinematically consistent with south to southwest motion of the Rif Mountains with respect to Africa. We use block modeling, constrained by mapped surface faults and seismicity to estimate the geometry and rates of strain accumulation on plate boundary structures. Our preferred plate boundary geometry includes one block between Iberia and Africa including the SW Betics, Alboran Sea, and central Rif. This geometry provides a good fit to the observed motions, suggesting a wide transpressive boundary in the westernmost Mediterranean, with deformation mainly accommodated by the Gloria-Azores fault system to the West and the Rif-Tell lineament to the East. Block boundaries encompass aspects of earlier interpretations suggesting three main deformation styles: (i) extension along the NE-SW trending Trans-Alboran shear zone, (ii) dextral strike-slip in the Betics corresponding to a well defined E-W seismic lineament, and (iii) right lateral strike-slip motion extending West to the Azores and right-lateral motion with compression extending East along the Algerian Tell. We interpret differential motion in the Rif-Alboran-Betic system to be driven both by surface processes related the Africa-Eurasia oblique convergence and

  5. Structure of the Hat Creek graben region: Implications for the structure of the Hat Creek graben and transfer of right-lateral shear from the Walker Lane north of Lassen Peak, northern California, from gravity and magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, Victoria; Jachens, Robert C.; Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L. J. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of magnetic and new gravity data provides constraints on the geometry of the Hat Creek Fault, the amount of right-lateral offset in the area between Mt. Shasta and Lassen Peak, and confirmation of the influence of pre-existing structure on Quaternary faulting. Neogene volcanic rocks coincide with short-wavelength magnetic anomalies of both normal and reversed polarity, whereas a markedly smoother magnetic field occurs over the Klamath Mountains and its Paleogene cover. Although the magnetic field over the Neogene volcanic rocks is complex, the Hat Creek Fault, which is one of the most prominent normal faults in the region and forms the eastern margin of the Hat Creek Valley, is marked by the eastern edge of a north-trending magnetic and gravity high 20-30 km long. Modeling of these anomalies indicates that the fault is a steeply dipping (~75-85°) structure. The spatial relationship of the fault as modeled by the potential-field data, the youngest strand of the fault, and relocated seismicity suggests that deformation continues to step westward across the valley, consistent with a component of right-lateral slip in an extensional environment. Filtered aeromagnetic data highlight a concealed magnetic body of Mesozoic or older age north of Hat Creek Valley. The body’s northwest margin strikes northeast and is linear over a distance of ~40 km. Within the resolution of the aeromagnetic data (1-2 km), we discern no right-lateral offset of this body. Furthermore, Quaternary faults change strike or appear to end, as if to avoid this concealed magnetic body and to pass along its southeast edge, suggesting that pre-existing crustal structure influenced younger faulting, as previously proposed based on gravity data.

  6. The Afar Depression: interpretation of the 1960-2000 earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, R.; Beyth, M.

    2003-11-01

    We studied the seismic activity of the Afar Depression (AD) and adjacent regions during the period 1960-2000. We define seven distinct seismogenic regions using geological, tectonic and seismological data. Based on the frequency-magnitude relationships we obtain b-values of about 1 for the different regions. The pattern of the distribution of the location of epicentres fits with the known active fault zone in the AD and the axial volcanic ridges. The Bab el Mandab area and the Danakil-Aysha'a blocks are less active. For 125 intermediate to strong earthquakes the seismic moment and source parameters were calculated. The results of the fault plane solutions for the Afar Depression indicate mainly strike-slip and normal sense of movement originating from fault planes striking NW-SE. These results indicate a clockwise block rotation described previously as a bookshelf model in central AD. There are a few right-lateral faults east of Massawa with E-W-striking fault planes. At the southern Red Sea, north of the Danakil block, the mixed focal mechanisms, with axial plane striking NW-SE, comprise several reverse faulting, strike-slip motion and normal faulting. Right-lateral movement was also calculated for a cluster of seismic events between the Manda Hararo and Alyata volcanic ridges along NW-SE-striking faults. Along the N-S-striking faults in the escarpment, at the western Afar margins, there are two distinct clusters of epicentres. The strong earthquakes at the southern cluster exhibit normal or strike-slip motions. The intermediate to small earthquakes in the northern cluster exhibit reverse and strike-slip motions. Mainly normal faults were calculated along NE-SW-striking faults of the Ethiopian East African Rift. Estimates of the seismic efficiency suggest that the maximal values are about 50 per cent or less, implying that most of the motion is taken aseismically.

  7. The 2003 Bam (Iran) earthquake: Rupture of a blind strike-slip fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talebian, M.; Fielding, E. J.; Funning, G. J.; Ghorashi, M.; Jackson, J.; Nazari, H.; Parsons, B.; Priestley, K.; Rosen, P. A.; Walker, R.; Wright, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    A magnitude 6.5 earthquake devastated the town of Bam in southeast Iran on 26 December 2003. Surface displacements and decorrelation effects, mapped using Envisat radar data, reveal that over 2 m of slip occurred at depth on a fault that had not previously been identified. It is common for earthquakes to occur on blind faults which, despite their name, usually produce long-term surface effects by which their existence may be recognised. However, in this case there is a complete absence of morphological features associated with the seismogenic fault that destroyed Bam.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Lithospheric Shear Zones Associated with Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, C. S.; Fialko, Y.; Sclater, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Models of earthquake cycles typically range between two idealized end members. The first holds that seismogenic faults are loaded by bottom tractions due to localized shear in the underlying aseismic medium (e.g., the Savage-Burford dislocation model). The second holds that seismogenic faults are loaded by side tractions on the elastic-brittle layer and postseismic transfer of stress from a relaxing viscoelastic substrate back to the brittle crust. Geologic and seismic observations indicate that localized shear zones do exist well below the brittle-ductile transition as deep roots of major crustal faults. We study the development of lithospheric shear zones using finite element simulations. In particular, we investigate the degree of strain localization in a ductile substrate as a function of the total fault offset. Our models incorporate quasi-periodic earthquakes in the brittle crust underlain by a viscoelastic medium with a temperature-dependent power law rheology. We use these models to test the hypothesis that young and/or infrequently slipping faults are more likely to generate broad “viscoelastic” postseismic transients whereas mature and fast-slipping faults are more likely to generate “afterslip-like” transients. We recognize that strain localization in lithospheric shear zones underlying major faults can be produced via several processes. We use thermo-mechanical coupling as a proxy for all strain-softening mechanisms by adjusting the preexponential factor in the constitutive equation for the temperature-dependent power law creep. We compare the results of our models to the postseismic transient observed following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake to place constraints on the effective rheologic parameters of the ductile substrate.

  9. Dislocation pileup as a representation of strain accumulation on a strike-slip fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The conventional model of strain accumulation on a vertical transform fault is a discrete screw dislocation in an elastic half-space with the Burgers vector of the dislocation increasing at the rate of relative plate motion. It would be more realistic to replace that discrete dislocation by a dislocation distribution, presumably a pileup in which the individual dislocations are in equilibrium. The length of the pileup depends upon the applied stress and the amount of slip that has occurred at depth. I argue here that the dislocation pileup (the transition on the fault from no slip to slip at the full plate rate) occupies a substantial portion of the lithosphere thickness. A discrete dislocation at an adjustable depth can reproduce the surface deformation profile predicted by a pileup so closely that it will be difficult to distinguish between the two models. The locking depth (dislocation depth) of that discrete dislocation approximation is substantially (???30%) larger than that (depth to top of the pileup) in the pileup model. Thus, in inverting surface deformation data using the discrete dislocation model, the locking depth in the model should not be interpreted as the true locking depth. Although dislocation pileup models should provide a good explanation of the surface deformation near the fault trace, that explanation may not be adequate at greater distances from the fault trace because approximating the expected horizontally distributed deformation at subcrustal depths by uniform slip concentrated on the fault is not justified.

  10. Inhibitory Control of Memory Retrieval and Motor Processing Associated with the Right Lateral Prefrontal Cortex: Evidence from Deficits in Individuals with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depue, B. E.; Burgess, G. C.; Willcutt, E. G.; Ruzic, L.; Banich, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of inhibitory control have focused on inhibition of motor responses. Individuals with ADHD consistently show reductions in inhibitory control and exhibit reduced activity of rLPFC activity compared to controls when performing such tasks. Recently these same brain regions have been implicated in the inhibition of memory retrieval. The…

  11. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  12. LiDAR-Assisted identification of an active fault near Truckee, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, L.E.; Howle, J.F.; Rose, R.S.; Bawden, G.W.

    2011-01-01

    We use high-resolution (1.5-2.4 points/m2) bare-earth airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) imagery to identify, map, constrain, and visualize fault-related geomorphology in densely vegetated terrain surrounding Martis Creek Dam near Truckee, California. Bare-earth LiDAR imagery reveals a previously unrecognized and apparently youthful right-lateral strike-slip fault that exhibits laterally continuous tectonic geomorphic features over a 35-km-long zone. If these interpretations are correct, the fault, herein named the Polaris fault, may represent a significant seismic hazard to the greater Truckee-Lake Tahoe and Reno-Carson City regions. Three-dimensional modeling of an offset late Quaternary terrace riser indicates a minimum tectonic slip rate of 0.4 ?? 0.1 mm/yr.Mapped fault patterns are fairly typical of regional patterns elsewhere in the northern Walker Lane and are in strong coherence with moderate magnitude historical seismicity of the immediate area, as well as the current regional stress regime. Based on a range of surface-rupture lengths and depths to the base of the seismogenic zone, we estimate a maximum earthquake magnitude (M) for the Polaris fault to be between 6.4 and 6.9.

  13. Active tectonics in Quito, Ecuador, assessed by geomorphological studies, GPS data, and crustal seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.; Nocquet, J. M.; Lagreulet, S.; Segovia, M.; Font, Y.; Lamarque, G.; Yepes, H.; Mothes, P.; Rolandone, F.; Jarrín, P.; Quidelleur, X.

    2014-02-01

    The Quito Fault System (QFS) extends over 60 km along the Interandean Depression in northern Ecuador. Multidisciplinary studies support an interpretation in which two major contemporaneous fault systems affect Quaternary volcanoclastic deposits. Hanging paleovalleys and disruption of drainage networks attest to ongoing crustal deformation and uplift in this region, further confirmed by 15 years of GPS measurements and seismicity. The resulting new kinematic model emphasizes the role of the N-S segmented, en echelon eastward migrating Quito Fault System (QFS). Northeast of this major tectonic feature, the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System (GFS) aids the eastward transfer of the regional strain toward Colombia. These two tectonic fault systems are active, and the local focal mechanisms are consistent with the direction of relative GPS velocities and the regional stress tensor. Among active features, inherited N-S direction sutures appear to play a role in confining the active deformation in the Interandean Depression. The most frontal of the Quito faults formed at the tip of a blind thrust, dipping 40°W, is most probably connected at depth to inactive suture to the west. A new GPS data set indicates active shortening rates for Quito blind thrust of up to 4 mm/yr, which decreases northward along the fold system as it connects to the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System. The proximity of these structures to the densely populated Quito region highlights the need for additional tectonic studies in these regions of Ecuador to generate further hazard assessments.

  14. Active tectonics in Quito, Ecuador, assessed by geomorphological studies, GPS data, and crustal seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Alvarado, Alexandra; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Lagreulet, Sarah; Segovia, Monica; Font, Yvonne; Yepes, Hugo; Mothes, Patricia; Rolandone, Frédérique; Jarrin, Pierre; Quidelleur, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The Quito Fault System (QFS) is an intraplate reverse fault zone, that extend over 60km along the Interandean Depression in northern Ecuador. Multidisciplinary studies coherently support an interpretation in which two major contemporaneous fault systems affect Quaternary volcanoclastic deposits. Hanging paleovalleys and disruption of drainage networks attest to ongoing crustal deformation and uplift in this region, further confirmed by 15 years of GPS measurements and seismicity. The resulting new kinematic model emphasizes the role of the NS segmented, en-echelon eastward migrating Quito Fault System (QFS). Northeast of this major tectonic feature, the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System (GFS) aids the eastward transfer of the regional strain toward Colombia. These two tectonic fault systems are active and the local focal mechanisms are consistent with the direction of relative GPS velocities and the regional stress tensor. Among active features, inherited NS direction sutures appear to play a role in confining the active deformation in the Interandean Depression. The most frontal of the Quito faults formed at the tip of a blind thrust, dipping 40°W, is most probably connected, at depth, to inactive suture to the west. A new GPS dataset indicates active shortening rates for Quito blind thrust of up to 4mm/yr, wich decreases northwards along the fold system as it connects to the strike slip Guayllabamba Fault System. The proximity of these structures to the densely-populated Quito region underlines the need of additional tectonic studies in these regions of Ecuador to generate further hazard assessments.

  15. Active Fault Geometry and Crustal Deformation Along the San Andreas Fault System Through San Gorgonio Pass, California: The View in 3D From Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the 3D geometry and deformation style of the San Andreas fault (SAF) is critical to accurate dynamic rupture and ground motion prediction models. We use 3D alignments of hypocenter and focal mechanism nodal planes within a relocated earthquake catalog (1981-2011) [Hauksson et al., 2012] to develop improved 3D fault models for active strands of the SAF and adjacent secondary structures. Through San Gorgonio Pass (SGP), earthquakes define a mechanically layered crust with predominantly high-angle strike-slip faults in the upper ~10 km, while at greater depth, intersecting sets of strike-slip, oblique slip and low-angle thrust faults define a wedge-shaped volume deformation of the lower crust. In some places, this interface between upper and lower crustal deformation may be an active detachment fault, and may have controlled the down-dip extent of recent fault rupture. Alignments of hypocenters and nodal planes define multiple principal slip surfaces through SGP, including a through-going steeply-dipping predominantly strike-slip Banning fault strand at depth that upward truncates a more moderately dipping (40°-50°) blind, oblique North Palm Springs fault. The North Palm Springs fault may be the active down-dip extension of the San Gorgonio Pass thrust offset at depth by the principal, through-going Banning strand. In the northern Coachella Valley, seismicity indicates that the Garnet Hill and Banning fault strands are most likely sub-parallel and steeply dipping (~70°NE) to depths of 8-10 km, where they intersect and merge with a stack of moderately dipping to low-angle oblique thrust faults. Gravity and water well data confirm that these faults are sub-parallel and near vertical in the upper 2-3 km. Although the dense wedge of deep seismicity below SGP and largely south of the SAF contains multiple secondary fault sets of different orientations, the predominant fault set appears to be a series of en echelon NW-striking oblique strike-slip faults

  16. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1987-01-01

    The primary effort in this study during the past year has been directed along two separate lines: (1) expanding finite element models to include the entire Anatolian plate, the Aegean Sea and the Northeastern Mediterranean Sea, and (2) investigating the relationship between fault geometry and earthquake activity for the North Anatolian and similar strike-slip faults (e.g., San Andreas Fault). Both efforts are designed to provide an improved basis for interpreting the Crustal Dynamics measurements NASA has planned for this region. The initial phases of both investigations have been completed and the results are being prepared for publication. These investigations are described briefly.

  17. A Tectonic Model for the Midcontinent U.S. Lithosphere Based on Structural Analyses of Mesoproterozoic Through Cenozoic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R.; Schultz, A.

    2008-12-01

    Insights into the tectonic fabric of the midcontinent U.S. lithosphere are provided by structural investigations of exposed basement and its supra-crustal sedimentary cover sequences. Mesoproterozoic basement rocks of the St. Francois terrane possess an orthogonal pattern of vertical NW- and NE-trending strike-slip fault zones. The NW trend dominates Mesoproterozoic deformation and is inherent from an older fabric that controlled the location of Mesoproterozoic igneous activity. Two of these NW-trending zones appear to have from 60 to 75 km and 30 to 75 km of accumulative left slip. Pre-Late Cambrian vertical, right-lateral, strike-slip faulting on NW-trending structures in the St. Francois terrane, emplacement of dominantly NE-trending, 1.33 Ga mafic dikes, and uplift and erosion of ~2 to 4 km of rocks represents the assembly and breakup of Rodinia in the rock record of the midcontinent basement. Re-activation of NE-trending structures in the Late Cambrian resulted in formation of the Reelfoot rift and was accompanied by re-activation of vertical NW- trending structures with left-lateral displacement. Faulting in the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic cover sequences document re-activation of both vertical trends as far-field strike-slip faults during the Acadian, Taconic, Ouachita, Alleghany, and Laramide orogenies. Step overs from one strike-slip fault strand to another during these orogenies produced local uplift along restraining bends and subsidence in pull-apart grabens and basins. The New Madrid seismic zone and other sites of Quaternary deformation in the midcontinent also are attributed to re-activation of inherited vertical fabric. In summary, a tectonic model of the midcontinent lithosphere is best portrayed as consisting of an orthogonal mosaic of vertical zones of shear that presumably penetrate the crust and upper mantle, and are therefore long lived and prone to reactivation under lithospheric stresses. Much worldwide intraplate seismicity is

  18. Quaternary active tectonic structures in the offshore Bajo Segura basin (SE Iberian Peninsula - Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea, H.; Gràcia, E.; Alfaro, P.; Bartolomé, R.; Lo Iacono, C.; Moreno, X.; Masana, E.; Event-Shelf Team

    2012-10-01

    The Bajo Segura fault zone (BSFZ) is the northern terminal splay of the Eastern Betic shear zone (EBSZ), a large left-lateral strike-slip fault system of sigmoid geometry stretching more than 450 km from Alicante to Almería. The BSFZ extends from the onshore Bajo Segura basin further into the Mediterranean Sea and shows a moderate instrumental seismic activity characterized by small earthquakes. Nevertheless, the zone was affected by large historical earthquakes of which the largest was the 1829 Torrevieja earthquake (IEMS98 X). The onshore area of the BSFZ is marked by active transpressive structures (faults and folds), whereas the offshore area has been scarcely explored from the tectonic point of view. During the EVENT-SHELF cruise, a total of 10 high-resolution single-channel seismic sparker profiles were obtained along and across the offshore Bajo Segura basin. Analysis of these profiles resulted in (a) the identification of 6 Quaternary seismo-stratigraphic units bounded by five horizons corresponding to regional erosional surfaces related to global sea level lowstands; and (b) the mapping of the active sub-seafloor structures and their correlation with those described onshore. Moreover, the results suggest that the Bajo Segura blind thrust fault or the Torrevieja left-lateral strike-slip fault, with prolongation offshore, could be considered as the source of the 1829 Torrevieja earthquake. These data improve our understanding of present deformation along the BSFZ and provide new insights into the seismic hazard in the area.

  19. First paleoseismological assessment of active deformation along the eastern front of the southern Alps (NE Italy, Friuli). Insights on the 1511 earthquake causative fault.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, Emanuela; Eliana Poli, Maria; Galadini, Fabrizio; Paiero, Giovanni; Scardia, Giancarlo; Zanferrari, Adriano

    2014-05-01

    The study area belongs to the Julian Prealps that represent the easternmost portion of the Plio-Quaternary front of the eastern Southalpine Chain (ESC), a south-verging polyphase fold and thrust belt, in evolution from the Middle Miocene to the Present. Here, the WSW-ENE trending, SW- verging thrusts of the ESC join the NW-SE trending, right-lateral strike slip Idrija fault system, which develops along the Italian-Slovenian boundary. The area is characterized by medium/high seismicity testified by both large historical and instrumental earthquakes. The DBMI11 (Locati et al., 2011) records the 1348 Carinzia earthquake (Mw= 7.02), the 1511 Idrija earthquake (Mw=6.98), and the 1976 Friuli earthquakes on May (Mw=6.46) and September (Mw=5.98) We studied a segment of the Susans-Tricesimo thrust system, namely the Colle Villano (CV) thrust, identified by means of geological and geophysical investigations (Galadini et al., 2005). New geological and geomorphological analyses allowed identifying the surficial geomorphic evidence of recent blind thrusting along the structure, represented by gentle scarps and surface warping. In order to characterise the Late Pleistocene-Holocene activity of this blind thrust, paleoseismological investigations were performed along one of CV thrust-related fault scarps. We dug three trenches ~1 km to the north of the Magredis village. The analysis of the trench walls allowed identifying deformation events induced by the fault activity. Two subsequent episodes of deformation are distinguished by localised warping (few metres in wave length) of the sedimentary sequences exposed by the excavations and secondary extrados faulting. One event occurred between 544-646 AD (radiocarbon cal. age, 2σ) and 526-624 AD the other - probably the last one - occurred close to 1485-1604 AD. The last displacement event is consistent with the aforementioned 1511 earthquake both in terms of chronology of the deformation and location of the causative fault. This

  20. Shallow structure and its formation process of an active flexure in the forearc basin of the central Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashi, J.; Ikehara, K.; Omura, A.; Ojima, T.; Murayama, M.

    2013-12-01

    ENE-WSW trending active faults, named Enshu fault system, are developed in the forearc basins of the eastern and central Nankai subduction zone. Three parallel faults developed in the Enshu forearc basin of the eastern Nankai have right lateral slip on the basis of dextral displacement of the canyon axis. Moreover, bathymetry data and side-scan sonar imageries indicate relative uplift of the northern region and the multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles show northward dipping fault planes. In the central Nankai subuduction zone, an ENE-WSW trending step is distributed at the northern part of the Kumano forearc basin and is regarded as the western extension of the Enshu fault system. Although MCS records show deformations including an anticlinal fold beneath the bathymetric step, they have less resolution to identify deformation of basin sequence just below the seafloor. In contrast, deformation seems to reach to the seafloor on a profile by SBP mounted on a mother ship. Investigation of shallow deformation structures is significant for understanding of recent tectonic activity. We carried out deep towed SBP survey by ROV NSS (Navigable Sampling System) during Hakuho-maru KH-11-9 cruise. High resolution mapping of shallow structures was successfully conducted by a chirp SBP system of EdgeTech DW-106. ROV NSS also has capability to take a long core with a pinpoint accuracy around complex topographic region. The Kumano forearc basin is topographically divided into the northern part at a water depth of 2038 m and the other major region at a depth of 2042 m by the ENE-WSW linear step. Three deep towed SBP lines intersected this topographical step and revealed the following structures. This step is composed of 100 m wide gentle slope with an inclination of about 8 degrees. An anticlinal axis is located beneath the upper edge of this slope. Sedimentary layers continue at this slope region without any abut/termination and rapidly increase their thickness toward the

  1. Locked and loading megathrust linked to active subduction beneath the Indo-Burman Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckler, Michael S.; Mondal, Dhiman Ranjan; Akhter, Syed Humayun; Seeber, Leonardo; Feng, Lujia; Gale, Jonathan; Hill, Emma M.; Howe, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The Indo-Burman mountain ranges mark the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates, north of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone. Whether subduction still occurs along this subaerial section of the plate boundary, with 46 mm yr-1 of highly oblique motion, is contentious. About 21 mm yr-1 of shear motion is taken up along the Sagaing Fault, on the eastern margin of the deformation zone. It has been suggested that the remainder of the relative motion is taken up largely or entirely by horizontal strike-slip faulting and that subduction has stopped. Here we present GPS measurements of plate motions in Bangladesh, combined with measurements from Myanmar and northeast India, taking advantage of a more than 300 km subaerial accretionary prism spanning the Indo-Burman Ranges to the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta. They reveal 13-17 mm yr-1 of plate convergence on an active, shallowly dipping and locked megathrust fault. Most of the strike-slip motion occurs on a few steep faults, consistent with patterns of strain partitioning in subduction zones. Our results strongly suggest that subduction in this region is active, despite the highly oblique plate motion and thick sediments. We suggest that the presence of a locked megathrust plate boundary represents an underappreciated hazard in one of the most densely populated regions of the world.

  2. Integrated analysis of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from differentially active mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Francisco J. R. C.; Louvado, António; Domingues, Patrícia M.; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; Ferreira, Marina; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Marina R.; Cunha, Ângela; Gomes, Newton C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study assesses the diversity and composition of sediment bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from deep-sea mud volcanoes (MVs) associated with strike-slip faults in the South-West Iberian Margin (SWIM). We used a 16S/18S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing approach to characterize and correlate the sediment bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from MVs with differing gas seep regimes and from an additional site with no apparent seeping activity. In general, our results showed significant compositional changes of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities in sampling sites with different seepage regimes. Sediment bacterial communities were enriched with Methylococcales (putative methanotrophs) but had lower abundances of Rhodospirillales, Nitrospirales and SAR202 in the more active MVs. Within microeukaryotic communities, members of the Lobosa (lobose amoebae) were enriched in more active MVs. We also showed a strong correlation between Methylococcales populations and lobose amoeba in active MVs. This study provides baseline information on the diversity and composition of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities in deep-sea MVs associated with strike-slip faults. PMID:27762306

  3. Integrated analysis of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from differentially active mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Francisco J. R. C.; Louvado, António; Domingues, Patrícia M.; Cleary, Daniel F. R.; Ferreira, Marina; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Marina R.; Cunha, Ângela; Gomes, Newton C. M.

    2016-10-01

    The present study assesses the diversity and composition of sediment bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from deep-sea mud volcanoes (MVs) associated with strike-slip faults in the South-West Iberian Margin (SWIM). We used a 16S/18S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing approach to characterize and correlate the sediment bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from MVs with differing gas seep regimes and from an additional site with no apparent seeping activity. In general, our results showed significant compositional changes of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities in sampling sites with different seepage regimes. Sediment bacterial communities were enriched with Methylococcales (putative methanotrophs) but had lower abundances of Rhodospirillales, Nitrospirales and SAR202 in the more active MVs. Within microeukaryotic communities, members of the Lobosa (lobose amoebae) were enriched in more active MVs. We also showed a strong correlation between Methylococcales populations and lobose amoeba in active MVs. This study provides baseline information on the diversity and composition of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities in deep-sea MVs associated with strike-slip faults.

  4. Integrated analysis of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from differentially active mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Cadiz.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Francisco J R C; Louvado, António; Domingues, Patrícia M; Cleary, Daniel F R; Ferreira, Marina; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Marina R; Cunha, Ângela; Gomes, Newton C M

    2016-10-20

    The present study assesses the diversity and composition of sediment bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from deep-sea mud volcanoes (MVs) associated with strike-slip faults in the South-West Iberian Margin (SWIM). We used a 16S/18S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing approach to characterize and correlate the sediment bacterial and microeukaryotic communities from MVs with differing gas seep regimes and from an additional site with no apparent seeping activity. In general, our results showed significant compositional changes of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities in sampling sites with different seepage regimes. Sediment bacterial communities were enriched with Methylococcales (putative methanotrophs) but had lower abundances of Rhodospirillales, Nitrospirales and SAR202 in the more active MVs. Within microeukaryotic communities, members of the Lobosa (lobose amoebae) were enriched in more active MVs. We also showed a strong correlation between Methylococcales populations and lobose amoeba in active MVs. This study provides baseline information on the diversity and composition of bacterial and microeukaryotic communities in deep-sea MVs associated with strike-slip faults.

  5. Active tectonics in Eastern Lunana (NW Bhutan): Implications for the seismic and glacial hazard potential of the Bhutan Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. C.; Wiesmayr, G.; Brauner, M.; HäUsler, H.; Wangda, D.

    2006-06-01

    Paleoseismological investigations, brittle fault analysis, and paleostrain calculations combined with the interpretation of satellite imagery and flood wave modeling were used to investigate the seismic and associated glacial hazard potential in Eastern Lunana, a remote area in NW Bhutan. Seismically induced liquefaction features, cracked pebbles, and a surface rupture of about 6.8 km length constrain the occurrence of M ≥ 6 earthquakes within this high-altitude periglacial environment, which are the strongest earthquakes ever been reported for the Kingdom of Bhutan. Seismicity occurs along conjugate sets of faults trending NE-SW to NNW-SSE by strike-slip and normal faulting mechanism indicating E-W extension and N-S shortening. The strain field for these conjugate sets of active faults is consistent with widespread observations of young E-W expansion throughout southern Tibet and the north Himalaya. We expect, however, that N-S trending active strike-slip faults may even reach much farther to the south, at least into southern Bhutan. Numerous glacial lakes exist in the investigation area, and today more than 100 × 106 m3 of water are stored in moraine-dammed and supraglacial lakes which are crosscut by active faults. Strong earthquakes may trigger glacial lake outburst floods, and the impact of such flash floods may be worst 80 km downstream where the valley is broad and densely populated. Consequently, tectonic models of active deformation have to be closely linked with glacial hazard evaluation and require rethinking and modification.

  6. The seismic interactions and spatiotemporal evolution of seismicity following the October 23, 2011 Mw 7.1 Van, Eastern Anatolia, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Işık, Sezim E.; Özgun Konca, A.; Karabulut, Hayrullah

    2017-04-01

    We studied the mechanisms and spatiotemporal distribution of aftershocks of the Mw 7.1 Van earthquake, in Eastern Turkey. The Van earthquake occurred on an E-W trending thrust fault, in a region under N-S compression due to the convergence of the Arabian plate toward Eurasia. We relocated the seismicity by combining catalogs from two agencies and studied the source mechanisms of the Mw 3.5-5.6 aftershocks using regional body and surface waves. In addition to the aftershocks with thrust mechanism on the mainshock fault, we identified three clusters with strike-slip activity. Two of the clusters are on the left-lateral faults perpendicular to the mainshock fault and are located at the lateral termination of the co-seismic rupture in each direction. Both western and eastern strike-slip clusters were triggered within the first few hours following the mainshock. They were initiated very close to the mainshock rupture plane and propagated away toward the south and north respectively. These two dominantly strike-slip zones are connected to the mainshock fault at a depth of 15 km and possibly determined the lateral extent of the 2011 rupture. This system of two bounding left lateral faults with a thrust fault in between is overall consistent with the N-S convergent tectonic regime in the region. The complex geometry explains unexpected post-seismic motion at a GPS site and can be used to improve the post-seismic slip estimate of the earthquake. The third strike-slip cluster with 17 days delay occurred on an E-W trending right-lateral fault and 40 km on the south of the mainshock. The three activated faults have experienced Coulomb stress increase due to co-seismic rupture. In addition, most of the seismicity has occurred in regions that experienced Coulomb stress increase.

  7. Surface displacements in the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA ); Lisowski, M. )

    1990-11-30

    The horizontal displacements accompanying the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are computed from geodetic survey measurements. The 1906 earthquake displacement field is entirely consistent with right-lateral strike slip on the San Andreas fault. In contrast, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake exhibited subequal components of strike slip and reverse faulting. This result, together with other seismic and geologic data, may indicate that the two earthquakes occurred on two different fault planes.

  8. Surface displacements in the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segall, P.; Lisowski, M.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontal displacements accompanying the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are computed from geodetic survey measurements. The 1906 earthquake displacement field is entirely consistent with right-lateral strike slip on the San Andreas fault. In contrast, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake exhibited subequal components of strike slip and reverse faulting. This result, together with other seismic and geologic data, may indicate that the two earthquakes occurred on two different fault planes.

  9. Surface displacements in the 1906 san francisco and 1989 loma prieta earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Segall, P; Lisowski, M

    1990-11-30

    The horizontal displacements accompanying the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are computed from geodetic survey measurements. The 1906 earthquake displacement field is entirely consistent with right-lateral strike slip on the San Andreas fault. In contrast, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake exhibited subequal components of strike slip and reverse faulting. This result, together with other seismic and geologic data, may indicate that the two earthquakes occurred on two different fault planes.

  10. Present-day Block Motions and Strain Accumulation on Active Faults in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symithe, S. J.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The quasi-frontal subduction of the north and south American plates under the Lesser Antilles and the left and right lateral strike-slip along the northern and southern margins of the Caribbean plate offer the opportunity to study the transition from subduction to strike-slip between major plates. In addition, the segmentation and degree of interplate coupling at the Lesser Antilles subduction is key to our understanding of the earthquake potential of a subduction whose length is similar to the rupture area of the Mw9.0, 2011, Tohoku earthquake in Japan. We used the block modeling approach described in Meade and Loveless (2009) to test the optimal block geometry for the northern, eastern and southern boundaries of the Caribbean plate. We solved for angular velocities for each block/plate and strain accumulation rates for all major faults in the region. Then we calculated the variations in interplate coupling along the subduction plate boundaries using the accumulated strain rates. We tested 11 different block geometries; they are all based on geological evidences unless they are suggested by discrepancies within the GPS and seismological data or by previously published results. We confirm the existence of the micro Gonave plate. The boundary between the Micro-Gonave plate and the Hispaniola crustal block is better suited along the Haitian-Thrust-Belt instead of the Neiba-Matheux fault. The interseismic GPS velocities do not show evidence for a distinct North Lesser Antilles block. We found a totally uncoupled section of the subduction starting from the Puerto-Rico trench to the end of the Lesser Antilles section. All the relative motion of the Caribbean block is lost aseismically along the boundary of that portion of the subduction. While we found strong coupling along the northern Hispaniola section, most of the deformation on this region is being accumulated along intrablock faults with very low strain (~2mm/yr) along the intraplate subduction interface. We also

  11. Seismicity of the Earth 1900–2010 Himalaya and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, Bethan; Jenkins, Jennifer; Turner, Rebecca; Parker, Amy; Sinclair, Alison; Davies, Sian; Hayes, Gavin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Dart, Rirchard L.; Tarr, Arthur C.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Benz, Harley M.

    2013-01-01

    Seismicity in the Himalaya region predominantly results from the collision of the India and Eurasia continental plates, which are converging at a relative rate of 40–50 mm/yr. Northward underthrusting of India beneath Eurasia generates numerous earthquakes and consequently makes this area one of the most seismically hazardous regions on Earth. The surface expression of the plate boundary is marked by the foothills of the north-south trending Sulaiman Range in the west, the Indo-Burmese Arc in the east, and the east-west trending Himalaya Front in the north of India. Along the western margin of the India plate, relative motions between India and Eurasia are accommodated by strike-slip, reverse, and oblique-slip faulting resulting in the complex Sulaiman Range fold and thrust belt, and the major translational Chaman Fault in Afghanistan. Beneath the Pamir‒Hindu Kush Mountains of northern Afghanistan, earthquakes occur to depths as great as 200 km as a result of remnant lithospheric subduction. Further north again, the Tian Shan is a seismically active intra-continental mountain belt defined by a series of east-west trending thrust faults thought to be related to the broad footprint of the India-Eurasia collision. Tectonics in northern India are dominated by motion along the Main Frontal Thrust and associated thrust faults of the India-Eurasia plate boundary, which have resulted in a series of large and devastating earthquakes in (and prior to) the 20th century. The Tibetan Plateau to the north of the main plate boundary is a broad region of uplift associated with the India-Eurasia collision, and is cut by a series of generally east-west trending strike-slip faults. These include the Kunlun, Haiyuan, and the Altyn Tagh faults, all of which are left-lateral structures, and the Kara-Koram right-lateral fault. Throughout the plateau, thrust faults accommodate the north-south compressional component of crustal shortening associated with the ongoing collision of India

  12. Geological interpretation of combined Seabeam, Gloria and seismic data from Anegada Passage (Virgin Islands, north Caribbean)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jany, I.; Scanlon, K.M.; Mauffret, A.

    1990-01-01

    The Anegada Passage (sensu lato) includes several basins and ridges from Southeast of Puerto Rico to the corner of the Virgin Islands Platform. Seabeam (Seacarib I) and Gloria long-range sidescan sonar surveys were carried out in this area. These new data allow us to propose an interpretation of the Anegada Passage. Most of the features described are related to wrench faulting: (a) St Croix and Virgin Islands Basins are pull-apart basins created in a right-lateral strike-slip environment based on their rhomboidal shape and seismic data (e.g. the flower structure). These two pull-aparts are divided into two sub-basins by a curvilinear normal fault in the Virgin Islands Basin and a right-lateral strike-slip fault in the St Croix Basin. (b) Tortola Ridge and a 'dog's leg' shaped structure are inferred to be restraining bends between two right-lateral strike-slip faults. (c) We identified two ENE-WSW volcanic lineaments in the eastern area and one volcano lying between Virgin Islands and St Croix Basins. (d) As shown by the seismic activity main wrench motion occurs along the north slope of Virgin Islands Basin and through Anegada Passage. A branching of this main fault transmits the transtensional motion to St Croix Basin. A two-stage story is proposed for the creation of the basins. A first extensional event during Eocene(?)-Oligocene-lower Miocene time created Virgin Islands, St Croix Basins and the tilted blocks of St Croix Ridge. A second transtensional event from Pliocene to Recent gave the present day pattern to this area. However, the displacement along the strike-slip faults is no more than 15 km long. The proposed geodynamic model is based on the separation of the northeastern Caribbean boundary into two blocks. In the West, the indenter of Beata Ridge gives a northeastern motion to Hispaniola Block. In the East, as a result of Hispaniola Block's motion, the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands Block could escape in an east-northeast direction. ?? 1990 Kluwer Academic

  13. The March 11, 2002 Masafi, United Arab Emirates Earthquake: Insights into the Seismotectonics of the Northern Oman Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Fowler, A; Al-Amri, A; Al-Enezi, A

    2005-04-26

    A moderate (M{approx}5) earthquake struck the northeastern United Arab Emirates (UAE) and northern Oman on March 11, 2002. The event was felt over a wide area of the northern Emirates and was accompanied by smaller (felt) events before and after the March 11 main shock. The event was large enough to be detected and located by global networks at teleseismic distances. We estimated focal mechanism and depth from broadband complete regional waveform modeling. We report a normal mechanism with a slight right-lateral strike-slip component consistent with the large-scale tectonics. The normal component suggests relaxation of obducted crust of the Semail Ophilite (specifically, the Khor Fakkan Block) while the right-lateral strike-slip component of the mechanism is consistent with shear across the Oman Line. Felt earthquakes are rare in the region, however no regional seismic network exists in the UAE to determine local seismicity. This event offers a unique opportunity to study the active tectonics of the region as well as inform future studies of seismic hazard in the UAE and northern Oman.

  14. Tectonic expression of an active slab tear from high-resolution seismic and bathymetric data offshore Sicily (Ionian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-André; Dominguez, Stephane; Lepinay, Bernard Mercier; Pinheiro, Luis; Gallais, Flora; Babonneau, Nathalie; Cattaneo, Antonio; Le Faou, Yann; Barreca, Giovanni; Micallef, Aaron; Rovere, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Subduction of a narrow slab of oceanic lithosphere beneath a tightly curved orogenic arc requires the presence of at least one lithospheric scale tear fault. While the Calabrian subduction beneath southern Italy is considered to be the type example of this geodynamic setting, the geometry, kinematics and surface expression of the associated lateral, slab tear fault offshore eastern Sicily remain controversial. Results from a new marine geophysical survey conducted in the Ionian Sea, using high-resolution bathymetry and seismic profiling reveal active faulting at the seafloor within a 140 km long, two-branched fault system near Alfeo Seamount. The previously unidentified 60 km long NW trending North Alfeo Fault system shows primarily strike-slip kinematics as indicated by the morphology and steep-dipping transpressional and transtensional faults. Available earthquake focal mechanisms indicate dextral strike-slip motion along this fault segment. The 80 km long SSE trending South Alfeo fault system is expressed by one or two steeply dipping normal faults, bounding the western side of a 500+ m thick, 5 km wide, elongate, syntectonic Plio-Quaternary sedimentary basin. Both branches of the fault system are mechanically capable of generating magnitude 6-7 earthquakes like those that struck eastern Sicily in 1169, 1542, and 1693.

  15. Active deformation in the Zagros-Makran transition zone inferred from GPS measurements in the interval 2000-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Shabanian, E.; Regard, V.; Doerflinger, E.; Abbassi, M.; Chery, J.; Nilforoushan, F.; Tatar, M.; Vernant, Ph.; Bellier, O.

    2003-04-01

    NNW trending Minab-Zendan-Palami faults system. West of the Lut block at the latitude of Kanujht, the N-S trending Sarduiyeh-Jiroft-Sabzevaran fault system is characterized by a right lateral strike-slip motion <5 mm/yr.

  16. The 1987 1992 Gulf of Alaska earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegler, G.; Das, S.

    1996-06-01

    We present a study of the 1987-1992 Gulf of Alaska earthquake sequence using relocated seismicity data together with body wave analysis of selected larger events. Most of the sequence is located on a N-S-trending fault, directly south of the Yakataga seismic gap and consists of four main events of Mw = 7.2, 7.8, 7.7 and 6.8 and associated aftershocks. The first earthquake is of left-lateral strike-slip type on an ENE-WSW-trending fault. The second event is a right-lateral strike-slip earthquake on the N-S-trending fault. The fault plane of the third strike-slip event was identified as an ENE-WSW-trending fault, located to the south of that for the first event, in a previous study using body wave analysis. We show that though the body wave study cannot unambiguously identify the fault plane, the temporal development of the seismicity together with the pattern of aftershock distribution on the conjugate fault suggests that this event also occurred on the N-S-trending fault and is of right-lateral type. The seismicity on the conjugate fault is interpreted as being triggered by the increase of the shear stress in the direction of the normal to the fault plane due to the main shock. The occurrence of the fourth main shock, a right-lateral strike-slip event in 1992, which itself can be considered an aftershock of the 1987-1988 sequence with epicentres distributed along a N-S-trending fault, favours this conclusion. The first three events of the sequence have been described in earlier studies as having too short a rupture length for their seismic moment. If the rupture lengths inferred from the aftershock zones in this study are used we find that this is not the case. The events in the 1987-1992 sequence lie along magnetic anomaly 13 and related conjugate fracture zones, indicating that the oceanic crust is rupturing along pre-existing zones of weakness in response to plate boundary stresses. At the southern end, the seismic activity terminates near a seamount, which

  17. Modes of active deformation in Eastern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2012-04-01

    Eastern Hispaniola and the Puerto Rico Island are the emerged part of a doubly vergent thrust wedge formed by oblique arc-continent collision with subduction and underthrusting of the North America Plate in the Puerto Rico trench and underthrusting of the Caribbean crust in The Muertos trough (Dolan et al. 1998, Mann et al., 2002, ten Brink et al. 2010). In the relatively small area of Eastern Hispaniola several types of active crustal deformation have been recognized: 1) At the prowedge of the orogene, the rear of the accretionary prism is cut by the strike-slip Septentrional Fault, bounding a sliver plate (Mann et al, 2002). Recent detailed mapping and aeromagnetic surveys in the onshore part of the prism (Samaná Peninsula and Septentrional Cordillera, Sysmin Team) revealed that the internal structure of the sliver is made of parallel bands of sigmoidal, left-lateral, NW-SE thrust splays, bounded by steep strike-slip faults. We interpreted these structures as transpressional strike-slip duplex. It is worth to note the similarity between the strike and dip of the thrust splays and the 303, 62, 74 focal mechanism calculated by Russo and Villaseñor (1995) for the thrust event of the August 4, 1946 Hispaniola earthquake. 2) The uplifted core of the orogen extends between the accretionary prism and the beginning of the Muertos retrowedge. Half of this area is occupied by the Oriental Cordillera, a recent uplift of cretaceous island-arc rocks arching the Late Neogene reef. The rest of the territory is the Caribbean Coastal Plain modelled on the Late Neogene reef. The Oriental Cordillera is made of two en echelon left-stepping uplifts: the domal-shaped Haitises and the rhombohedral-shaped Seibo (García-Senz et al, 2007); the latter share structural similarities and scaling relations with the 90° neutral stepover model of McClay and Bonora (2001). Therefore we interpret it as a restraining stepover developed over a blind splay of the Septentrional Fault, and the main

  18. Tectonic interpretation of the 13 february 2001, mw 6.6, El Salvador Earthquake: New evidences of coseismic surface rupture and paleoseismic activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Diaz, J. J.; Canora, C.; Villamor, P.; Capote, R.; Alvarez-Gomez, J. A.; Berryman, K.; Bejar, M.; Tsige, M.

    2009-04-01

    In February 2001 a major strike slip earthquake stroke the central part of El Salvador causing hundreds of people killed, thousands injured and extensive damage. After this event the scientific effort was mainly focused on the study of the enormous and catastrophic landslides triggered by this event and no evidences of surface faulting were detected. This earthquake was produced by the reactivation of the Ilopango-San Vicente segment of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Recently, a surface rupture displacement on the ground was identified. The analysis of aerial and field photographs taken few hours after the event and the mapping of the conserved ground structures shows a pure strike-slip displacement ranging from 20 to 50 cm, with secondary features indicating dextral shearing. The paleoseismic analysis made through the excavation of six trenches and Radiocarbon dating indicate a minimum slip rate of 2.0 mm/yr and a recurrence of major ruptures (Mw > 6.5) lower than 500 yr. These evidences give interesting local data to increase our understanding about the tectonic behavior and the way how active deformation develops along the northern limit of the forearc sliver related to the Centroamerican subduction area.

  19. A neotectonic tour of the Death Valley fault zone, Inyo County

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, C.J.

    1989-09-01

    The Death Valley fault zone has recently been evaluated by the Division of Mines and Geology for zoning under the Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones Act of 1972. This act requires the State Geologist to zone for special studies those faults that are sufficiently active and well defined as to constitute a potential hazard to structures from surface faulting or fault creep. The Death Valley fault zone is part of a system of faults that extends over 180 miles (300 km) from Fish Lake Valley in Nevada to the Garlock fault. The northern part of this system, the Northern Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault zone, is an active right-lateral fault zone. The southern part of the system, the Death Valley fault zone, is a right-lateral oblique-slip fault between Furnace Creek and Shoreline Butte. From Shoreline Butte to the Garlock fault, it is a right-lateral strike-slip fault. Landforms along this fault indicate that it is the source of many earthquakes and that it has been active in Holocene time. The heights of the scarps and magnitude of the smallest right-lateral offsets (4 feet; 1.2 m) suggest that the most recent of these events was M 6.5 or larger. The freshness of the geomorphic features and the youth of the offset materials suggest that event occurred late in the Holocene, and that multiple Holocene earthquakes have occurred.

  20. Earthquake depths and the relation to strain accumulation and stress near strike-slip faults in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.O. )

    1990-04-10

    Earthquakes in the major fault zones are predominantly deep. Earthquakes in the crustal blocks bounding the fault zones are predominantly shallow. In the San Jacinto fault zone, maximum earthquake depths correlate with surface heat flow. These relations together with focal mechanisms, geodetic strain measurements, and fault zone models are consistent with the following ideas: (1) Interseismic plate motion is accommodated by aseismic slip along an extension of the major fault zone below a brittle zone that is locked between large earthquakes. (2) The aseismic slip in a narrow fault zone in the brittle-plastic transition region concentrates strain at the base of the brittle fault zone. (3) Deep earthquakes occur in thelower part of the brittle fault zone due to stick-slip failure of highly stressed patches. (4) Background earhtquakes and aftershocks that occur several kilometers deeper than large earthquake hypocenters suggest that a zone of mixed slip behavior may exist between the stable sliding (deep) and stick-slip (shallow) regions of the fault zone. Furthermore, the difference in seismicity between the San Jacinto and southern San Andreas faults suggests that the nature of this mixed zone may evolve as total displacement in the fault zone increases. (5) Shear stress may be less in the crustal blocks than in the deep brittle fault zones and generally at a level sufficient to cause brittle failure only shallow in the crustal blocks. (6) In the stress field produced by plate motion and slip in the deep fault zone, the upper brittle fault zone is not oriented favorably for shear failure. Lack of shallow earthquakes in the fault zones and the predominance of shallow earthquakes on favorably oriented fractures in the adjacent crustal blocks suggest that either stress in the upper brittle fault zone is relatively low or the upper fault zone is effectively strong due to its orientation.

  1. Recent mantle degassing recorded by carbonic spring deposits along sinistral strike-slip faults, south-central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Uwe; Tonguç Uysal, I.; Yüce, Galip; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Italiano, Francesco; İmer, Ali; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-11-01

    The interior of the Australian continent shows evidence for late Quaternary to Recent fault-controlled mantle 3He and CO2 degassing. A series of interconnected NW-striking sinistral faults, the Norwest fault zone (NFZ), in south-central Australia are associated with travertine mounds, the latter show a regular spacing of 50-70 km. U-series ages on 26 samples range from 354 ± 7 to 1.19 ± 0.02ka (2σ errors) and suggest a clustering every ∼3-4 ka since ∼26 ka. Geochemical data demonstrate a remarkable mantle-to-groundwater connection. Isotopic data indicate that the groundwater is circulating to depths >3 km and interacting with Neoproterozoic/Cambrian basement and mantle volatiles. 3He/4He isotope ratios show that the He comes in part from the mantle. This demonstrates that the NFZ cuts through the entire crust and provides pathways for mantle degassing. Scaling relationships suggest that the series of sinistral faults that make up the NFZ are interconnected at depths and have a significant strike length of 60-70 km or more. The NFZ occurs where a major compositional boundary and a significant heat flow anomaly occurs, and a major step in lithospheric thickness has been mapped. We discuss a tectonic model in which recent stress field, heat flow and lithospheric structure in central Australia reactivated a set of steeply dipping Neoproterozoic faults, which may now be growing into a crustal/lithospheric-scale structure.

  2. Mantle flow beneath a continental strike-slip fault: Postseismic deformation after the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Wicks, C.; Thatcher, W.

    2001-01-01

    Two recent large earthquakes in the Mojave Desert, California - the magnitude 7.3 1992 Landers and magnitude 7.1 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes - have each been fog[owed by elevated crustal strain rates over periods of months and years. Geodetic data collected after the Hector Mine earthquake exhibit a temporaLLy decaying horizOntaL velocity field and a quadrant uplift pattern opposite to that expected for LocaLized shear beneath the earthquake rupture. We interpret the origin of this accelerated crustal deformation to be vigorous flow in the upper mantle in response to the stress changes generated by the earthquake. Our results suggest that transient flow in the upper mantle is a fundamental component of the earthquake cycle and that the Lower crust is a coherent stress guide coupling the upper crust with the upper mantle.

  3. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults - Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Olaf; Klinger, Yann; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault's rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault's offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of the latter. While slip accumulation along a fault segment may be dominated by repetition of large, nearly constant offset increments, timing of surface-rupture is less regular.

  4. The structure of the Hallstatt evaporite body (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria): A compressive diapir superposed by strike-slip shear?

    PubMed

    Schorn, Anja; Neubauer, Franz

    2014-03-01

    Based on old detailed mining maps and own observations in the Hallstatt salt mine, we reinterpret the structure of the Hallstatt evaporite body of the Upper Permian to Lower Triassic Haselgebirge Fm. within the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA). The Haselgebirge Fm. represents a rocksalt mylonite with abundant lenses of sulphates, mudstones and limestones. In comparison to published results of analogue modeling we interpret the present shape of the Hallstatt body as a WNW-ESE elongated compressive teardrop-like diapir. This is overprinted by NNE-SSW shortening and dominantly sinistral shearing along a W-trending shear zone. The internal structure shows steeply dipping rock units and foliation. Earlier dextral ductile shear fabrics of likely late Early Cretaceous age are preserved in sulphate rocks and are subsequently overprinted by mylonitic fabrics in rocksalt and cataclastic fabrics in other rocks. The low strength of halite results in recent subvertical shortening and a strain rate [Formula: see text] of 8 × 10(-10) [s(-1)] is deduced from deformed subhorizontal boreholes. This value is similar to such strain rates (10(-10) to 10(-9) s(-1)) estimated by the halite grain size distribution from other salt mines in the NCA and thus indicative of sub-recent formation of the halite microfabrics.

  5. Active deformation in Zagros-Makran transition zone inferred from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Chery, J.; Tatar, M.; Vernant, Ph.; Abbassi, M.; Masson, F.; Nilforoushan, F.; Doerflinger, E.; Regard, V.; Bellier, O.

    2006-04-01

    The Bandar Abbas-Strait of Hormuz zone is considered as a transition between the Zagros collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. We used GPS network measurements collected in 2000 and 2002 to better understand the distribution of the deformation between the collision zone and the Makran subduction. Analysing the GPS velocities, we show that transfer of the deformation is mainly accommodated along the NNW-SSE-trending reverse right-lateral Zendan-Minab-Palami (ZMP) fault system. The rate is estimated to 10 +/- 3 mm yr-1 near the faults. Assuming that the ZMP fault system transfers the motion between the Makran-Lut Block and the Arabian plate, we estimate to 15 mm yr-1 and 6 mm yr-1, respectively, the dextral strike-slip and shortening components of the long-term transpressive displacement. Our geodetic measurements suggest also a 10-15 km locking depth for the ZMP fault system. The radial velocity pattern and the orientation of compressive strain axes around the straight of Hormuz is probably the consequence of the subducting Musandam promontory. The N-S Jiroft-Sabzevaran (JS) fault system prolongates southwards the dextral shear motion of the Nayband-Gowk (NG) fault system at an apparent rate of 3.1 +/- 2.5 mm yr-1. The change from strong to weak coupling for underthrusting the Arabian plate beneath the Zagros (strong) and the Makran (weak) may explain the dextral motion along the ZMP, JS/NG and Neh-Zahedan fault systems which transfer the convergence from a broad zone in the western Iran (Zagros, Tabriz fault system, Alborz, Caucasus and Caspian sea surroundings) to Makran subduction.

  6. GPS results for Macedonia and its importance for the tectonics of the Southern Balkan extensional regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark Burchfiel, B.; King, Robert W.; Todosov, Angel; Kotzev, Valentin; Durmurdzanov, Nikola; Serafimovski, Todor; Nurce, Bilbil

    2006-02-01

    GPS results from 25 stations in Macedonia measured in 1996 and 2000 show that Macedonia moves SSE relative to Eurasia essentially as a single crustal piece along with parts of westernmost Bulgaria. Geological studies show active N-S normal faults and two NNW-striking right-lateral faults in western Macedonia, and NW-trending left-lateral faults SE Macedonia, with a region in central Macedonia essentially devoid of active faults. Distribution of seismic activity supports the geological studies. However, the GPS results cannot discriminate the active faulting, except perhaps in the northern part of Macedonia in the Skopje and adjacent areas, where active ~NS extension occurs. Slip-rates on the strike-slip faults must be low, in the range of 0-2 mm/year. There is a progressive increase in GPS velocities southward in northern Greece toward the North Anatolian fault zone, across which the velocities increase and change direction dramatically.

  7. Why does the Size of the Laacher See Magma Chamber and its Caldera Size not go together? - New Findings with regard to Active Tectonics in the East Eifel Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Berberich, Gabriele

    2013-04-01

    The East Eifel's early Cenozoic tectonic development is characterized by a main stress field trending in NW-SE direction, causing a re-organisation of postvariscan dextral strike-slip faults in approximately 105° direction, the formation of the tectonic depression of the Neuwieder Basin and small-scale transtension zones. The 105° trending strike-slip faults are staggered in equidistant intervals of several kilometers. This system continues from the Eifel to the North into the Ruhr Carboniferous, where it has been recognized due to the extensive underground coal mining first (Loos et al. 1999). Our recent research on analyses of tectonics in quarries, quartz/ore-dykes, mapping of minerals springs and gas analyses, has revealed a prominent 105° trending strike-slip fault cutting the South of Laacher See ("Laacher See Strike-slip Fault"). Within the Laacher See caldera, the "Laacher See Strike-slip Fault" can be tracked by a wide mofette zone that was mapped with a self-propelled submarine. At present, the "Laacher See Strike-slip Fault" can be tracked from Holzmühlheim in the West, Spessart, Wehrer Kessel, Laacher See, Plaidt to Bad Ems and furthermore to the South-East. Along this direction five intersections points of the "Laacher See Strike-slip Fault" with the Lahn River are documented, creating small-scale mofette fields in the Lahn River. In the Neuwied Basin, near Plaidt, the "Laacher See Strike-slip Fault" is intersected by the NW-SE-trending Ochtendung Fault. Regional strike-slip faults in combination with block rotation and uplift could have provided the voids for the magma chambers of the Wehrer Kessel and the Laacher See Caldera. Holohan et al. (2005) showed in analogue models that regional strike-slip regimes (including Riedel shears, chamber-localised graben fault, and a partial Y-shear) play a decisive role for caldera formation. In the East Eifel tectonic movement rates of active faults are approx. 1 mm/year (Meyer & Stets 2002, Cambell et al

  8. Discovery of sublacustrine hydrothermal activity and associated massive sulfides and hydrocarbons in the north Tanganyika trough, East African Rift

    SciTech Connect

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Mondeguer, A. ); Thouin, C. ); Kalala, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Massive sulfides and carbonate mineral deposits associated with sublacustrine thermal springs were recently discovered along the Zaire side of the north Tanganyika trough, western branch of the East African Rift. This hydrothermal activity, investigated by scuba diving at a maximum depth of 20 m, is located at the intersection of major north-south normal faults and northwest-southeast faults belonging to the Tanganyika-Rukwa-Malawi (TRM) strike-slip fault zone. The preliminary results presented here come from analyses of sulfide deposits, hydrothermal fluids, and associated hydrocarbons that result from geothermal activity in this part of the East African Rift filled by a thick pile of sediment, the north Tanganyika trough.

  9. GeoBioScience: Red Wood Ants as Bioindicators for Active Tectonic Fault Systems in the West Eifel (Germany)

    PubMed Central

    Berberich, Gabriele; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary In a 1.140 km² study area of the volcanic West Eifel, approx. 3,000 Red Wood Ant (RWA; Formica rufa-group) mounds had been identified and correlated with tectonically active gas-permeable faults, mostly strike-slip faults. Linear alignment of RWA mounds and soil gas anomalies distinctly indicate the course of these faults, while clusters of mounds indicate crosscut zones of fault systems, which can be correlated with voids caused by crustal block rotation. This demonstrates that RWA are bioindicators for identifying active fault systems and useful where information on the active regime is incomplete or the resolution by technical means is insufficient. Abstract In a 1.140 km² study area of the volcanic West Eifel, a comprehensive investigation established the correlation between red wood ant mound (RWA; Formica rufa-group) sites and active tectonic faults. The current stress field with a NW-SE-trending main stress direction opens pathways for geogenic gases and potential magmas following the same orientation. At the same time, Variscan and Mesozoic fault zones are reactivated. The results showed linear alignments and clusters of approx. 3,000 RWA mounds. While linear mound distribution correlate with strike-slip fault systems documented by quartz and ore veins and fault planes with slickensides, the clusters represent crosscut zones of dominant fault systems. Latter can be correlated with voids caused by crustal block rotation. Gas analyses from soil air, mineral springs and mofettes (CO2, Helium, Radon and H2S) reveal limiting concentrations for the spatial distribution of mounds and colonization. Striking is further the almost complete absence of RWA mounds in the core area of the Quaternary volcanic field. A possible cause can be found in occasionally occurring H2S in the fault systems, which is toxic at miniscule concentrations to the ants. Viewed overall, there is a strong relationship between RWA mounds and active tectonics in the West Eifel

  10. Paleostress analyses in NW Syria: constraints on the Cenozoic evolution of the northwestern margin of the Arabian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Battista Crosta, Giovanni; Nasser Darkal, Abdul

    2002-11-01

    Fault analysis between the Dead Sea Transform and the Euphrates region in northern Syria shows two main directions of compression connected to the recent evolution of the northwestern wedge of the Arabian plate. E-W open folds due to N-S compression gently deform the Cretaceous to Tortonian successions of the Aleppo Plateau and the eastern termination of the Palmyrides west of the Euphrates. Conjugate sets of strike-slip and normal faults, pre- as well as post-dating folding occur in the plateau and are still consistent with the same stress field. N-S normal faults cross recent deposits and control Quaternary volcanoes along the Euphrates, suggesting the persistence of this stress regime. A NW-SE compression related to the Syrian segment of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) was detected in the western part of the study area. The activation of large N-S left-lateral strike-slip and WNW-ESE right-lateral faults follows in time the growth of in-line folds and thrusts. Permutation of the σ1 and σ2 stress axes is related to activation of NW-SE normal faults, which generally accompany strike-slip faults and post-date E-W folds within the plateau. Recent E-W extension in the Euphrates region is consistent with a horizontal N-S maximum direction of compression and seems to be partially coeval with the stress regime induced by the DST. This stress pattern can be explained by the superposition of the northward push of the Arabian plate to the N-S left-lateral shearing along the DST.

  11. Late Palaeozoic to Triassic evolution of the Turan and Scythian platforms: The pre-history of the Palaeo-Tethyan closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natal'in, Boris A.; Şengör, A. M. Celâl

    2005-08-01

    A number of en échelon-arranged, southwest-facing arc fragments of Palaeozoic to Jurassic ages, sandwiched between two fairly straight east-northeast trending boundaries, constitute the basement of the Scythian and the Turan platforms located between the Laurasian and Tethyside units. They have until now largely escaped detection owing to extensive Jurassic and younger cover and the inaccessibility of the subsurface data to the international geological community. These units are separated from one another by linear/gently-curved faults of great length and steep dip. Those that are exposed show evidence of strike-slip motion. The arc units originally constituted parts of a single "Silk Road Arc" located somewhere south of the present-day central Asia for much of the Palaeozoic, although by the late Carboniferous they had been united into a continental margin arc south of the Tarim basin and equivalent units to the west and east. They were stacked into their present places in northern Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Caucasus and the northern Black Sea by large-scale, right-lateral strike-slip coastwise transport along arc-slicing and arc-shaving strike-slip faults in the Triassic and medial Jurassic simultaneously with the subductive elimination of Palaeo-Tethys. This gigantic dextral zone ("the Silk Road transpression") was a trans-Eurasian structure and was active simultaneously with another, similar system, the Gornostaev keirogen and greatly distorted Eurasia. The late Palaeozoic to Jurassic internal deformation of the Dniepr-Donets aulacogen was also a part of the dextral strain in southern Europe. When the emplacement of the Scythian and Turan units was completed, the elimination of Palaeo-Tethys had also ended and Neo-Tethyan arcs were constructed atop their ruins, mostly across their southern parts. The western end of the great dextral zone that emplaced the Turan and Scythian units horsetails just east of north Dobrudja and a small component goes along the

  12. The Seismotectonic Characteristics of Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poljak, M.; Živčić, M.; Zupančič, P.

    Slovenia with its neighbouring areas lies at the junction of the Alps, the Dinarides and the Pannonian basin. These belong to the three plates: Europe, Adria and Tisza. On the Slovenian territory itself converge the External Dinarides NW-SE oriented right lateral strike-slip faults, the Transdanubian Range NE-SW oriented left lateral strike-slip faults, and the Southern Alps E-W oriented thrusts. The direction of the principal stress σ1 (azimuth = 6°, dip = 8°) is determined under the assumption of uniform stress throughout the region. Dip of the least principal stress σ3 of 5° is consistent with the regional strike-slip regime. Listed structures form a pure shear structural mechanism on a regional scale.In spite of geologic evidence of tectonic displacements along mentioned structures in the past, there is no surface expression of their recent activity.The lithospheric units of the investigated area were amalgamated together during Tertiary. The seismicity is not concentrated along the primary plate boundaries but is rather spread in a broad zone along their deformed rims. The seismicity is moderate with the average depth of earthquakes in Slovenia of 6.5 km, and 9 to 20 km for stronger earthquakes (MLH > 4.2). No surface rupture related to an earthquake has been detected to date in Slovenia.The territory of Slovenia and its neighbouring regions has been delineated into five seismogenic areas, i.e., the areas with similar and among themselves differentiable tectonic and seismological characteristics. They are the Eastern Alps, the Southern Alps, with the Friuli region as a separate unit, the External Dinarides, and the Transdanubian Range.

  13. Seismicity of the Earth 1900–2010 Middle East and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jennifer; Turner, Bethan; Turner, Rebecca; Hayes, Gavin P.; Davies, Sian; Dart, Richard L.; Tarr, Arthur C.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Benz, Harley M.

    2013-01-01

    No fewer than four major tectonic plates (Arabia, Eurasia, India, and Africa) and one smaller tectonic block (Anatolia) are responsible for seismicity and tectonics in the Middle East and surrounding region. Geologic development of the region is a consequence of a number of first-order plate tectonic processes that include subduction, large-scale transform faulting, compressional mountain building, and crustal extension. In the east, tectonics are dominated by the collision of the India plate with Eurasia, driving the uplift of the Himalaya, Karakorum, Pamir and Hindu Kush mountain ranges. Beneath the Pamir‒Hindu Kush Mountains of northern Afghanistan, earthquakes occur to depths as great as 200 km as a result of remnant lithospheric subduction. Along the western margin of the India plate, relative motions between India and Eurasia are accommodated by strike-slip, reverse, and oblique-slip faulting, resulting in the complex Sulaiman Range fold and thrust belt, and the major translational Chaman Fault in Afghanistan. Off the south coasts of Pakistan and Iran, the Makran trench is the surface expression of active subduction of the Arabia plate beneath Eurasia. Northwest of this subduction zone, collision between the two plates forms the approximately 1,500-km-long fold and thrust belts of the Zagros Mountains, which cross the whole of western Iran and extend into northeastern Iraq. Tectonics in the eastern Mediterranean region are dominated by complex interactions between the Africa, Arabia, and Eurasia plates, and the Anatolia block. Dominant structures in this region include: the Red Sea Rift, the spreading center between the Africa and Arabia plates; the Dead Sea Transform, a major strike-slip fault, also accommodating Africa-Arabia relative motions; the North Anatolia Fault, a right-lateral strike-slip structure in northern Turkey accommodating much of the translational motion of the Anatolia block westwards with respect to Eurasia and Africa; and the Cyprian

  14. Tectonic features of the southern Sumatra-western Java forearc of Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, H. U.; Gaedicke, C.; Roeser, H. A.; Schreckenberger, B.; Meyer, H.; Reichert, C.; Djajadihardja, Y.; Prexl, A.

    2002-10-01

    Multichannel reflection seismic profiles along the active Sunda Arc, where the Indo-Australian plate subducts under the overriding Eurasian margin revealed two accretionary wedges: The inner wedge I is of assumed Paleogene age, and the outer wedge II is of Neogene to Recent age. The inner wedge I is composed of tectonic flakes stretching from southeast Sumatra across the Sunda Strait to northwest Java, implying a similar plate tectonic regime in these areas at the time of flake development during upper Oligocene. Today, wedge I forms the outer arc high and the backstop for the younger outer wedge II. The missing outer arc high of the southern Sunda Strait is explained by a combination of Neogene transtension due to a clockwise rotation of Sumatra with respect to Java and by arc-parallel strike-slip movements. The rotation created transtensional pull-apart basins along the western Sunda Strait (Semangka Graben) as opposed to transpression and inversion on the eastern Sunda Strait, within the new detected Krakatau Basin. The arc-parallel transpressional Mentawai strike-slip fault zone (MFZ) was correlated from the Sumatra forearc basin to the northwest Java forearc basin. Off the Sunda Strait, northward bending branches of the MFZ are connected with the right-lateral Sumatra fault zone (SFZ) along the volcanic arc segment on Sumatra. It is speculated that the SFZ was attached to the Cimandiri-Pelabuhan Ratu strike-slip fault of Java prior to the presumed rotation of Sumatra, and that since the late lower Miocene the main slip movement shifted from the volcanic arc position to the forearc basin area due to increasingly oblique plate convergence.

  15. Modeling Activities in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Kathy

    2014-05-01

    Students usually find science to be quite abstract. This is especially true of disciplines like Earth Science where it is difficult for the students to conduct and design hands-on experiments in areas such as Plate Tectonics that would allow them to develop predictive models. In the United States the new Next Generation Science Standards explicitly requires students to experience the science disciplines via modeling based activities. This poster presentation will discuss an activity that demonstrates how modeling, plate tectonics and student discourse converge in the earth science classroom. The activities featured on the poster will include using cardboard and shaving cream to demonstrate convergent plate boundaries, a Milky Way candy bar to demonstrate divergent boundaries and silly putty to demonstrate a strike slip boundary. I will discuss how students report back to the group about the findings from the lab and the techniques that can be used to heighten the student discourse. The activities outlined in this poster were originally designed for a middle school Earth Science class by Suzi Shoemaker for a graduate thesis at Arizona State University.

  16. The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence

    PubMed Central

    KATO, Aitaro; NAKAMURA, Kouji; HIYAMA, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in April 2016, a series of shallow, moderate to large earthquakes with associated strong aftershocks struck the Kumamoto area of Kyushu, SW Japan. An Mj 7.3 mainshock occurred on 16 April 2016, close to the epicenter of an Mj 6.5 foreshock that occurred about 28 hours earlier. The intense seismicity released the accumulated elastic energy by right-lateral strike slip, mainly along two known, active faults. The mainshock rupture propagated along multiple fault segments with different geometries. The faulting style is reasonably consistent with regional deformation observed on geologic timescales and with the stress field estimated from seismic observations. One striking feature of this sequence is intense seismic activity, including a dynamically triggered earthquake in the Oita region. Following the mainshock rupture, postseismic deformation has been observed, as well as expansion of the seismicity front toward the southwest and northwest. PMID:27725474

  17. FOP 2012 stop, Honey Lake fault, Doyle, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony; Angster, Steve; Compiled by Seitz, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    The Honey Lake fault system (HLFS) strikes north-northwestward across Long Valley near Doyle, CA and is part of a network of active, dextral strike-slip faults in the northern Walker Lane (Figure 1). Geologic investigations of a right-laterally offset terrace riser along the north bank of Long Valley Creek, which we refer to as site 1 (Figure 2), indicate a latest Quaternary slip rate of 1.1-2. 6 mm/yr [Wills and Borchardt, 1993] and 1.7 ± 0.6 mm/yr [Turner and others, 2008] (Table 1). These studies also document evidence of at least four post-6.8 ka surface-rupturing earthquakes at this site.

  18. Characterising Active Fault Earthquake Sources Beneath the Coastal Environments of Christchurch and Wellington Cities, New Zealand, Using Seismic Reflection Profiles and Fault Displacement Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P.; Nodder, S.; Gorman, A. R.; Woelz, S.; Orpin, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal cities of Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, lie in different tectonic settings within the obliquely convergent Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone. Both cities have experienced damaging earthquakes in the last three years, which highlight the importance of locating and characterising hidden active faults close to urban areas. The devastating and geologically complex Canterbury earthquake sequence of 2010-2012 developed on the periphery of the plate boundary, and reactivated several previously unidentified strike-slip and reverse faults. Major aftershocks initially beneath land, generally migrated eastward over time, and finally advanced offshore into Pegasus Bay. A study of active submarine faulting beneath the bay highlights the role of inherited crustal structure and inversion tectonics. Marine seismic reflection data reveals that faults have very low slip rate and negligible post-glacial (<15 ka) deformation, which is consistent with inferred long recurrence intervals between large magnitude (Mw>6) earthquakes. Wellington City is surrounded by numerous high-slip rate strike-slip faults overlying the Hikurangi subduction zone. A dense network of secondary basement structures previously recognised throughout the region, mainly from tectonic geomorphology, have, until recently, been considered mostly inactive and excluded from seismic hazard models. We used high-resolution geophysical, bathymetric and sediment-core data to determine the structure, earthquake history and earthquake potential of a newly discovered active reverse fault beneath the inner reaches of Wellington Harbour. The fault has a slip rate of ~0.6 ± 0.3 mm/y, and a vertical displacement history indicating at least two large magnitude (Mw 6.3-7.1), surface-rupturing earthquakes in the last 10 ka. We infer that the fault extends southwards onshore beneath the city and potentially into Cook Strait, and represents a significant previously unrecognised seismic hazard.

  19. Quaternary deformation along the Meeman-Shelby Fault near Memphis, Tennessee, imaged by high-resolution marine and land seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yanjun; Magnani, Maria Beatrice; McIntosh, Kirk; Waldron, Brian; Guo, Lei

    2013-06-01

    series of high-resolution seismic reflection surveys was carried out in 2008, 2010, and 2011, providing a total of five new seismic profiles constraining the location and character of the Meeman-Shelby Fault (MSF), about 9 km west of Memphis, Tennessee, in the Central U.S. The MSF is the best documented fault closest to Memphis yet discovered and shows a recurrent fault history. The fault, as imaged by the reflection profiles, is ~45 km long, strikes N25°E, and dips west-northwest ~83°, exhibiting an up-to-the-west sense of motion with a possible right-lateral strike-slip component. The data show that on average, the MSF offsets the Paleozoic unit ~77 m and folds the top of the Cretaceous unit and the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group ~44 and ~25 m, respectively. One seismic profile acquired along the Mississippi River images the bottom of the Quaternary alluvium warped up ~28 m, indicating recent activity of the MSF. Calculated vertical slip rates of the MSF during the deposition of the Upper Cretaceous, Paleocene, Eocene, and Quaternary sediments are 0.0022, 0.0010, 0.0004, and 0.2154 mm/yr, respectively, suggesting an increase in fault activity during the Quaternary. Consistent with the present stress field and the deformation of the New Madrid seismic zone fault system, we interpret the MSF as a P shear fault in the context of a left-stepping, right-lateral constraining strike-slip fault system under a nearly east-west oriented compressional stress field. Source scaling estimates indicate that the MSF is capable of generating a M6.9 earthquake if rupturing in one event.

  20. Neotectonics and Structural Development of the Northern Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, S. G.; Pierce, I. K. D.; Angster, S.; Carlson, C. W.; Louie, J. N.; Faulds, J. E.; Malawsky, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Walker Lane is a major element of the San Andreas fault system and by itself one of the most accessible and well-known intraplate shear zones in the world. This northwest trending zone of discontinuous active faults and disrupted topography that sits between the Sierra Nevada on the west and the north-northeast trending faults and ranges of the Great Basin to the east is associated with a geodetically well-defined zone of northwest-directed right-lateral shear ranging from ~ 5 to 10 mm/yr. It is the northern section of the Walker lane that includes the Lake Tahoe, Carson, Smith, Mason, Antelope, Bridgeport and Walker Lake basins and Carson and Wabuska structural lineaments that is currently the focus of our investigation. Here, right-lateral shear strain of at least 20-30 km has resulted in the development of this set of roughly en echelon normal fault basins in the absence of any major northwest-directed strike-slip faults. Synthesis of available geologic and geodetic data also shows that geodetic deformation is outpacing the late Quaternary slip rate on active faults across the region. The observations may be explained as the result of inadequate geologic fault slip rate data, by the accommodation of slip by vertical-axis block rotations, or some measure of both. The research presented here describes our initial efforts and findings resulting from collection and analysis of Lidar for evidence of strike-slip along the major structures of the region, the application of cosmogenic, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon dating to identified offset surfaces to better quantify the rate at which faults are slipping in the region, and the collection of gravity and paleomagnetic observations to clarify both the current and long-term structural development of the basins and intervening fault blocks.

  1. Imaging active faulting in a region of distributed deformation from the joint clustering of focal mechanisms and hypocentres: Application to the Azores-western Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Lima, Vânia; Vales, Dina; Cesca, Simone; Carrilho, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The matching between linear trends of hypocentres and fault planes indicated by focal mechanisms (FMs) is frequently used to infer the location and geometry of active faults. This practice works well in regions of fast lithospheric deformation, where earthquake patterns are clear and major structures accommodate the bulk of deformation, but typically fails in regions of slow and distributed deformation. We present a new joint FM and hypocentre cluster algorithm that is able to detect systematically the consistency between hypocentre lineations and FMs, even in regions of distributed deformation. We apply the method to the Azores-western Mediterranean region, with particular emphasis on western Iberia. The analysis relies on a compilation of hypocentres and FMs taken from regional and global earthquake catalogues, academic theses and technical reports, complemented by new FMs for western Iberia. The joint clustering algorithm images both well-known and new seismo-tectonic features. The Azores triple junction is characterised by FMs with vertical pressure (P) axes, in good agreement with the divergent setting, and the Iberian domain is characterised by NW-SE oriented P axes, indicating a response of the lithosphere to the ongoing oblique convergence between Nubia and Eurasia. Several earthquakes remain unclustered in the western Mediterranean domain, which may indicate a response to local stresses. The major regions of consistent faulting that we identify are the mid-Atlantic ridge, the Terceira rift, the Trans-Alboran shear zone and the north coast of Algeria. In addition, other smaller earthquake clusters present a good match between epicentre lineations and FM fault planes. These clusters may signal single active faults or wide zones of distributed but consistent faulting. Mainland Portugal is dominated by strike-slip earthquakes with fault planes coincident with the predominant NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE oriented earthquake lineations. Clusters offshore SW Iberia are

  2. Active tectonics of the Calabrian subduction revealed by new multi-beam bathymetric data and high-resolution seismic profiles in the Ionian Sea (Central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-André; Kopp, Heidrun; Krastel, Sebastian; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Garlan, Thierry; Zaragosi, Sebastien; Klaucke, Ingo; Wintersteller, Paul; Loubrieu, Benoit; Le Faou, Yann; San Pedro, Laurine; Dominguez, Stephane; Rovere, Marzia; Mercier de Lepinay, Bernard; Ranero, Cesar; Sallares, Valenti

    2017-03-01

    The detailed morphology and internal structure of the Calabrian accretionary wedge and adjacent Eastern Sicily margin are imaged in unprecedented detail by a combined dataset of multi-beam bathymetry and high-resolution seismic profiles. The bathymetric data represent the results of 6 recent marine geophysical surveys since 2010 as well as a compilation of earlier surveys presented as a 2 arc-sec (60 m) grid. Several distinct morpho-tectonic provinces are identified including: the deeply incised Malta-Hyblean Escarpment, numerous submarine canyons, broad regions of relatively flat seafloor dominated by fields of sediment waves, the gently undulating anticlinal fold-and-thrust belts of the external Calabrian accretionary wedge and the adjacent portion of the Western Mediterranean Ridge. The Calabrian arc can be divided into 4 domains (from SE to NW): 1) the undeformed Ionian abyssal plain, 2) the external evaporitic wedge, 3) the internal clastic wedge, 4) the Calabrian backstop (Variscan crystalline basement). The Calabrian accretionary wedge can also be divided laterally into two major lobes, the NE- and the SW lobes, and two minor lobes. The kinematics of the limit between the two major lobes is investigated and shown to be sinistral in the external (evaporitic) wedge. A network of radial slip lines within the southernmost external wedge unequivocally demonstrate ongoing dextral displacement of a rigid indenter (representing the corner of the clastic wedge) into the evaporitic wedge thereby confirming the geodynamic model of an active lateral slab tear fault here off eastern Sicily. The slab tear produces a series of major sub-parallel dextral strike-slip faults offshore Mt. Etna and south of the Straits of Messina consistent with the relative motions between Calabria and the Peloritan domain (NE Sicily). Abundant strike-slip faulting, and wide-spread folding and thrusting observed throughout the entire accretionary wedge, indicate regional shortening between the

  3. Armenia-To Trans-Boundary Fault: AN Example of International Cooperation in the Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanyan, A.; Avagyan, A.; Avanesyan, M.; Elashvili, M.; Godoladze, T.; Javakishvili, Z.; Korzhenkov, A.; Philip, S.; Vergino, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of a trans-boundary active fault that cuts through the border of Armenia to Georgia in the area of the Javakheti volcanic highland have been conducted since 2007. The studies have been implemented based on the ISTC 1418 and NATO SfP 983284 Projects. The Javakheti Fault is oriented to the north-northwest and consists of individual segments displaying clear left-stepping trend. Fault mechanism is represented by right-lateral strike-slip with normal-fault component. The fault formed distinct scarps, deforming young volcanic and glacial sediments. The maximum-size displacements are recorded in the central part of the fault and range up to 150-200 m by normal fault and 700-900 m by right-lateral strike-slip fault. On both flanks, fault scarps have younger appearance, and displacement size there decreases to tens of meters. Fault length is 80 km, suggesting that maximum fault magnitude is estimated at 7.3 according to the Wells and Coppersmith (1994) relation. Many minor earthquakes and a few stronger events (1088, Mw=6.4, 1899 Mw=6.4, 1912, Mw=6.4 and 1925, Mw=5.6) are associated with the fault. In 2011/2012, we conducted paleoseismological and archeoseismological studies of the fault. By two paleoseismological trenches were excavated in the central part of the fault, and on its northern and southern flanks. The trenches enabled recording at least three strong ancient earthquakes. Presently, results of radiocarbon age estimations of those events are expected. The Javakheti Fault may pose considerable seismic hazard for trans-boundary areas of Armenia and Georgia as its northern flank is located at the distance of 15 km from the Baku-Ceyhan pipeline.

  4. Active faulting, mountain growth, and erosion at the margins of the Tibetan Plateau constrained by in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The India-Asia collision zone is a key area for understanding continental plateau formation and mountain building. Two fundamental questions in this context are how the northeastward motion of India is partitioned between strike-slip and thrust faults and how mountain building is counteracted by erosion. Cosmogenic nuclides allow us to address these questions, because they provide age constraints on tectonically offset landforms and constraints on erosion rates. After considerable debate on whether or not major strike-slip faults move at high rates of up to 20-30 mm/yr and absorb most of the continental deformation, it now appears that the three largest faults (Altyn Tagh, Haiyuan, Kunlun) have millennial slip rates of no more than 8-13 mm/yr, consistent with rates of elastic strain accumulation determined by geodetic methods. Furthermore, a significant portion of the lateral slip on these faults is transferred to thrust faults within the collision zone. Both observations indicate that the eastward tectonic escape of material along these faults is less important than often assumed. With respect to mountain building and erosion, cosmogenic nuclide studies show that thrust faults at the northeastern and eastern margins of Tibet (Qilian Shan, Longmen Shan) have vertical slip rates of ~ 0.3 to ~ 2 mm/yr while catchment-wide erosion rates vary from ~ 0.02 to ~ 1.0 mm/yr, with high-relief areas eroding significantly faster than the plateau interior and growing mountains in the foreland. The deeply incised regions have apparently reached an erosional steady-state, in which rock uplift is balanced by erosion. River terraces at active mountain fronts document repeated changes between sediment deposition and fluvial incision. During the Quaternary, incision and terrace formation occurred predominantly at glacial-interglacial transitions but also during interglacial periods. Hence, flights of terraces at the fault-bounded mountain fronts record the interplay between sustained

  5. Source parameters of the 2005-2008 Balâ-Sırapınar (central Turkey) earthquakes: Implications for the internal deformation of the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çubuk, Yeşim; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2014-11-01

    Active tectonics of central Anatolia is mainly governed by the collision of the African, Arabian and Anatolian plates, which causes westward escape of Anatolia along the North and East Anatolian Fault zones, and the counterclockwise rotation of the Kırşehir block with insignificant internal deformation. The formation of the present-day tectonic processes in this region can be deduced from geophysical prospecting and seismological data. Although the seismicity in central Anatolia is distinctively lower than that in the northern and eastern parts of the Anatolian plate, small and moderate earthquakes (2.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 6.0) mostly occurred in the region in the past decades or so. For example, intense earthquake activity was observed in the Balâ-Afşar-Sırapınar (Ankara, central Anatolia) region in the period of 2005 to 2008 with destructive earthquakes of July 30, 2005 (Mw = 5.2); December 20, 2007 (Mw = 5.7) and December 26, 2007 (Mw = 5.6). Therefore, these earthquakes are crucial to analyze the shallow crustal deformation in the central Anatolian block. In the present study, we obtained source parameters of 2005-2008 earthquake sequence using the regional moment tensor (RMT) inversion method. We analyzed complete broad-band waveforms recorded at near-field distances (0.45° ≤ Δ ≤ 3.6°). Our results reveal NW-SE directed right-lateral strike-slip faulting and NE-SW directed left-lateral strike-slip faulting mechanisms, which are clearly correlated with the conjugate fault systems in the Balâ-Afşar-Sırapınar region. However, some earthquakes also have E-W directed normal faulting components. We suggest that the major characteristics of 2005-2006 and 2007-2008 earthquake activity could have been dominantly associated with left-lateral and right-lateral strike-slip faulting mechanisms, respectively. The seismogenic depth is found to be about 8-10 km. This result implies that earthquakes in the study region occurred mostly in the upper crust, which

  6. Source Parameters of Bala-Sirapinar (Central Turkey) Earthquakes of 2005-2008: Implications on Internal Deformations of the Anatolian Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubuk, Yesim; Yolsal-Cevikbilen, Seda; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    Active tectonics of central Anatolia are governed by the collision between African, Arabian and Anatolian plates which causes westwards escape of Anatolia along the North and East Anatolian fault zones, and responsible for the counterclockwise rotation of Kırşehir block with slight internal deformation. Although central Anatolia region has not been known with destructive earthquakes, many small and moderate size earthquakes (2.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 6.0) have been observed in last decade or so. These earthquakes are crucial as they also contribute to better understanding of shallow crustal deformation in the central Anatolian block. The intense earthquake activity in the Balâ-Afşar-Sırapınar (Ankara, central Turkey) region during 2005-2008 such as July 30, 2005 (Mw=5.2); December 20, 2007 (Mw=5.7) and December 26, 2007 (Mw =5.6) earthquakes are mainly correlated with mapped faults of whose lengths varies between 1-25 km. In the present study, we have obtained source parameters, and estimated centroid depths of 27 earthquakes with magnitudes ranging between 3.5 ≤ ML ≤ 5.6 by using regional moment tensor (RMT) inversion method. Complete broad-band waveforms recorded at near-field epicenter distances (0.45° ≤ Δ ≤ 3.6°) distributed by KOERI-UDIM were analyzed. The importance of moment tensor inversion arises to give faulting mechanisms of smaller to moderate size earthquakes even in case of sparse networks with reliable depth information. Our results reveal both NW-SE directed right-lateral strike slip faulting and NE-SW directed left-lateral strike-slip faulting mechanisms which are clearly correlated with the conjugate fault systems in the Balâ-Afşar-Sırapınar region. However, some earthquakes also have E-W directed normal faulting components. We conclude that the major characteristics of 2005-2008 earthquake activity have been dominantly represented by right-lateral strike slip faulting mechanism. Furthermore, our results are also consistent with the

  7. The 2015, Mw 6.5, Leucas (Ionian Sea, Greece) earthquake: Seismological and Geodetic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Taymaz, Tuncay; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Eken, Tuna; Moschas, Fanis; Stiros, Stathis

    2016-04-01

    A cluster of earthquakes (6strike slip faulting have occurred along the NW edge of the Aegean Arc in the Ionian Sea, the most seismically active region in Greece, in the last 30 years. The most recent earthquake was the 2015 (Mw 6.5) Leucas (Lefkada) earthquake. The modelling of these earthquakes, some of which are double events (2003 Leucas; 2014 Cephalonia) is a challenge for two main reasons. First, the geography of the area limits the distribution of the available seismological and GNSS stations and the correlations of INSAR data. Second, the structural pattern of the area indicates distributed thrusting but recent earthquakes are confined to the west margin of the Aegean Arc, usually assigned to the Cephalonia Transform Fault (CTF), and are dominated by strike slip faulting. In order to contribute to the understanding active tectonics along this critical region, our study was based on the independent analysis of the seismological and geodetic signature of the 2015 earthquake and the on the joint evaluation of the inferred models on the basis of the fault pattern of the area and of previous earthquakes. First, based on teleseismic long-period P- and SH- and broad-band P-waveforms a point-source solution at the SW part of Leucas yielded dominantly right-lateral strike-slip faulting mechanisms (strike: 23o, dip: 68o, rake: -170o) with a shallow focal depth (h: 9 km) and with seismic moment of Mo: 10.4x1018 Nm. Furthermore, the rupture history of the earthquake was obtained by applying a new back-projection method that uses teleseismic P-waveforms to integrate the direct P-phase with reflected phases from structural discontinuities near the source. In the slip inversion the faulting occurs on a single fault plane (strike and dip are obtained from the best fitting point-source solution) and slip (rake) angle varied during the whole rupture process. Second, co-seismic displacements were derived from eight permanent and one campaign GPS

  8. High-Precision Locations and the Stress Field from Instrumental Seismicity, Moment Tensors, and Short-Period Mechanisms through the Mina Deflection, Central Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, C. J.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Mina Deflection (MD) region of the central Walker Lane of eastern California and western Nevada, is a complex zone of northeast-trending normal, and primarily left-lateral strike-slip to oblique-slip faulting that separates the Southern Walker Lane (SWL) from a series of east-tilted normal fault blocks in the Central Walker Lane (CWL) (Faulds and Henry, 2008; Surpless, 2008). The MD accommodates the transfer of right-lateral strike-slip motion from northwest-striking faults in the SWL to a series of left-stepping northwest-striking right-lateral strike-slip faults in the CWL, east of the Wassuk Range near Hawthorne, NV. The ~50 km wide ~80 km long right-step is a distinct transition in regional physiography that has been attributed to strain accommodation through pre-Cenozoic lithospheric structures. Several slip transfer mechanisms have been proposed within the MD, from clockwise rotation of high-angle fault blocks (Wesnousky, 2005), to low-angle displacement within the Silver Peak-Lone Mountain complex (Oldow et al., 2001), and curved fault arrays associated with localized basins and tectonic depressions (Ferranti et al., 2009). The region has been a regular source of M4+ events, the most recent being an extended sequence that included twenty-seven M 3.5+ earthquakes (largest event M 4.6) south of Hawthorne in 2011. These earthquakes (< 5 km depth) define shallow W-dipping (dip ~56°) and NW-dipping (dip ~70°) normal faulting constrained by moment tensor (MT) solutions and earthquake relocations. Temporary stations deployed in the source area provide good control. A distributed sequence in 2004, between Queen Valley and Mono Lake, primarily associated with the Huntoon Valley fault, included three M 5+ left-lateral strike-slip faulting events. A 1997 sequence in northern Fish Lake Valley (east of the White Mountains), with mainshock Mw 5.3 (Ichinose et al., 2003), also showed high-angle northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip motion. Historical events

  9. Lidar-Based Mapping of Late Quaternary Faulting Along the Grizzly Valley Fault, Walker Lane Seismic Belt, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, C. S.; Hoirup, D. F.; Barry, G.; Pearce, J.; Glick, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Grizzly Valley fault (GVF) is located within the northern Walker Lane, a zone of right-lateral shear between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range in Plumas County. The GVF extends southeasterly from near Mt. Ingalls along the eastern side of Lake Davis. It may partially connect with the Hot Creek fault within Sierra Valley and extend south to Loyalton with an overall approximate length of 50 km. Comparison of high-resolution topography developed from LiDAR data with published bedrock geologic mapping documents the presence of geomorphic features that provide information on fault activity of the GVF. Field mapping verified tectonically deformed and offset late Quaternary surfaces identified on bare-earth LiDAR imagery across the GVF within glacial deposits on the eastern margin of Lake Davis, and alluvial deposits in Sierra Valley. Along the GVF, conspicuous geomorphic and hydrologic features include scarps in alluvial surfaces, elongated depressions aligned with adjacent linear escarpments, truncated bedrock spurs, closed depressions, linear swales, right-lateral deflections of creeks and river courses, and shutter ridges, as well as springs and linear seeps consistent with right-lateral strike-slip faulting. The discontinuous nature of observed fault traces combined with the apparent down-to-the-west offset of alluvial surfaces at the southern and northern ends of the eastern margin of Lake Davis are consistent with a broad bend or step over in the fault. Scarp profiles of apparently faulted surfaces extracted from LiDAR data document vertical offsets of up to 14 m. Our study suggest that the GVF is an oblique, right-lateral fault that has been active in the late Quaternary. This study complements on-going investigations by DWR to assess the impact of seismic hazards on State Water Project infrastructure.

  10. Active Tectonics and Seismic Potential of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Wesson, Robert L.; Ekström, Göran

    This multidisciplinary monograph provides the first modern integrative summary focused on the most spectacular active tectonic systems in North America. Encompassing seismology, tectonics, geology, and geodesy, it includes papers that summarize the state of knowledge, including background material for those unfamiliar with the region; address global hypotheses using data from Alaska; and test important global hypotheses using data from this region. It is organized around four major themes: • subduction and great earthquakes at the Aleutian Arc, • the transition from strike slip to accretion and subduction of the Yakutat microplate, • the Denali fault and related structures and their role in accommodating permanent deformation of the overriding plate, and • regional integration and large-scale models and the use of data from Alaska to address important global questions and hypotheses. The book's publication near the beginning of the National Science Foundation's EarthScope project makes it especially timely because Alaska is perhaps the least understood area within the EarthScope footprint, and interest in the region can be expected to rise with time as more EarthScope data become available.

  11. Late Quaternary kinematics, slip-rate and segmentation of a major Cordillera-parallel transcurrent fault: The Cayambe-Afiladores-Sibundoy system, NW South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, A.; Rovida, A.; Corazzato, C.

    2007-04-01

    We describe the recent activity of the Cayambe-Afiladores-Sibundoy Fault (CASF) and recognise it as one of the major potential active structures of northwestern South America, based on field observations, stereoscopic aerial photos of offset late Pleistocene-Holocene deposits and landforms, and crustal seismic activity. The CASF runs for at least 270 km along the sub-Andean zone of northern Ecuador and southern Colombia. We measured systematic latest Pleistocene-Holocene right-lateral strike-slip motion and right-lateral reverse motion consistent with earthquake focal mechanism solutions, and estimated a 7.7 ± 0.4 to 11.9 ± 0.7 mm/yr slip-rate. Magnitudes of the earthquakes that could be generated by possible fault-segment reactivation range up to M 7.0 ± 0.1. The CASF should be considered as a major source of possible future large magnitude earthquakes, presenting a seismic hazard for the densely populated regions to the west. The CASF is part of the tectonic boundary of the North Andean block escaping NNE-wards with respect to the stable South American plate.

  12. Pleistocene Brawley and Ocotillo Formations: Evidence for initial strike-slip deformation along the San Felipe and San Jacinto fault zonez, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.M.; Janecke, S.U.; Dorsey, R.J.; Housen, B.A.; Langenheim, V.E.; McDougall, K.A.; Steeley, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    We examine the Pleistocene tectonic reorganization of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in the Salton Trough of southern California with an integrated approach that includes basin analysis, magnetostratigraphy, and geologic mapping of upper Pliocene to Pleistocene sedimentary rocks in the San Felipe Hills. These deposits preserve the earliest sedimentary record of movement on the San Felipe and San Jacinto fault zones that replaced and deactivated the late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault. Sandstone and mudstone of the Brawley Formation accumulated between ???1.1 and ???0.6-0.5 Ma in a delta on the margin of an arid Pleistocene lake, which received sediment from alluvial fans of the Ocotillo Formation to the west-southwest. Our analysis indicates that the Ocotillo and Brawley formations prograded abruptly to the east-northeast across a former mud-dominated perennial lake (Borrego Formation) at ???1.1 Ma in response to initiation of the dextral-oblique San Felipe fault zone. The ???25-km-long San Felipe anticline initiated at about the same time and produced an intrabasinal basement-cored high within the San Felipe-Borrego basin that is recorded by progressive unconformities on its north and south limbs. A disconformity at the base of the Brawley Formation in the eastern San Felipe Hills probably records initiation and early blind slip at the southeast tip of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault zone. Our data are consistent with abrupt and nearly synchronous inception of the San Jacinto and San Felipe fault zones southwest of the southern San Andreas fault in the early Pleistocene during a pronounced southwestward broadening of the San Andreas fault zone. The current contractional geometry of the San Jacinto fault zone developed after ???0.5-0.6 Ma during a second, less significant change in structural style. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  13. (abstract) Measurement of the Deformation Field Around a Strike Slip Fault at Parkfield California from 107 Monuments using the Rapid Static Surveying Method of GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Kenneth; Blewitt, Geoff

    1993-01-01

    We have surveyed 107 monuments in a 30x45 km area around Parkfield California in June 1992 and again in May 1993. We are analyzing the data from these observations and will present the details of the method and the displacements measured from 1992 to 1993.

  14. Shallow-generated damage within non-planar strike-slip fault zones: role of sedimentary rocks in slip accommodation, SW Holy Cross Mountains, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybak-Ostrowska, Barbara; Konon, Andrzej; Domonik, Andrzej; Poszytek, Anna; Uroda, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    New field observations carried out in northeastern Tunisia (Kechabta Neogene basin) allowed us to clarify and pinpoint the chronology of the folding phases which had been the subject of contradictions in previous studies. To better understand the folding in the study area, a set of structural, lithostratigraphic and cartographic arguments are given in order to confirm the Atlassic folding phase (upper Tortonian) affecting rheologically weak and incompetent materials of the Neogene layers. In the Kechabta Neogene basin, the upper Tortonian folding is materialized by an unconformity between the Kechabta (Tortonian) and the Oued Bel Khedim (Messinian) formations. The highlight of this event allows us to identify the current fold structure of the study area as a superposition of two major folding episodes: The first one occurred during the upper Tortonian, and the second in the Early Quaternary (post-Villafranchian). The chronological consistency of the upper Tortonian folding in the Kechabta basin with the rest of the Tunisian chains allows for a better understanding of the collision context (Miocene to the Quaternary) which dominated the western Mediterranean Sea and steered the structural evolution of Tunisia.

  15. The structure of the Hallstatt evaporite body (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria): A compressive diapir superposed by strike-slip shear?☆

    PubMed Central

    Schorn, Anja; Neubauer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Based on old detailed mining maps and own observations in the Hallstatt salt mine, we reinterpret the structure of the Hallstatt evaporite body of the Upper Permian to Lower Triassic Haselgebirge Fm. within the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA). The Haselgebirge Fm. represents a rocksalt mylonite with abundant lenses of sulphates, mudstones and limestones. In comparison to published results of analogue modeling we interpret the present shape of the Hallstatt body as a WNW–ESE elongated compressive teardrop-like diapir. This is overprinted by NNE–SSW shortening and dominantly sinistral shearing along a W-trending shear zone. The internal structure shows steeply dipping rock units and foliation. Earlier dextral ductile shear fabrics of likely late Early Cretaceous age are preserved in sulphate rocks and are subsequently overprinted by mylonitic fabrics in rocksalt and cataclastic fabrics in other rocks. The low strength of halite results in recent subvertical shortening and a strain rate ε˙ of 8 × 10−10 [s−1] is deduced from deformed subhorizontal boreholes. This value is similar to such strain rates (10−10 to 10−9 s−1) estimated by the halite grain size distribution from other salt mines in the NCA and thus indicative of sub-recent formation of the halite microfabrics. PMID:26806998

  16. Spatial variations in focused exhumation along a continental-scale strike-slip fault: The Denali fault of the eastern Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benowitz, J.A.; Layer, P.W.; Armstrong, P.; Perry, S.E.; Haeussler, P.J.; Fitzgerald, P.G.; VanLaningham, S.

    2011-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission-track, and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronological techniques were used to determine the Neogene exhumation history of the topographically asymmetric eastern Alaska Range. Exhumation cooling ages range from ~33 Ma to ~18 Ma for 40Ar/39Ar biotite, ~18 Ma to ~6 Ma for K-feldspar minimum closure ages, and ~15 Ma to ~1 Ma for apatite fission-track ages, and apatite (U-Th)/He cooling ages range from ~4 Ma to ~1 Ma. There has been at least ~11 km of exhumation adjacent to the north side of Denali fault during the Neogene inferred from biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology. Variations in exhumation history along and across the strike of the fault are influenced by both far-field effects and local structural irregularities. We infer deformation and rapid exhumation have been occurring in the eastern Alaska Range since at least ~22 Ma most likely related to the continued collision of the Yakutat microplate with the North American plate. The Nenana Mountain region is the late Pleistocene to Holocene (~past 1 Ma) primary locus of tectonically driven exhumation in the eastern Alaska Range, possibly related to variations in fault geometry. During the Pliocene, a marked increase in climatic instability and related global cooling is temporally correlated with an increase in exhumation rates in the eastern Alaska Range north of the Denali fault system.

  17. Influence of fault trend, bends, and convergence on shallow structure and geomorphology of the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Watt, Janet T.

    2012-01-01

    Earthquake hazard assessments should incorporate a minimum rupture length of 110 km based on continuity of the Hosgri fault zone through this area. Lateral slip rates may vary along the fault (both to the north and south) as different structures converge and diverge but are probably in the geodetically estimated range of 2–4 mm/yr.

  18. No evidence for shallow shear motion on the Mat Fault, a prominent strike slip fault in the Indo-Burmese wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R. P.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Rao, Ch U. B.; Lalsawta, C.; Kundu, B.; Malsawmtluanga

    2015-07-01

    The motion between India and Sunda plates is accommodated along the Churachandpur Mao Fault (CMF) in the Indo-Burmese Wedge (IBW) and Sagaing Fault in the Myanmar region. Within the IBW, the Mat Fault is the most prominent transverse structure with prominent topographic and geomorphic expressions. We undertook Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements across this fault to investigate the current deformation across it. Modelling of these observations using locking depth of up to 4 km yields no resolvable slip (dextral slip rate as 0 ±5 mm/year) across the fault. Due to limited spatial extent of the GPS measurements, it is not possible to comment on the status of deeper slip, if any.

  19. Rocks usually shake when they break, but sometimes they don't (Seismic and aseismic slip of oceanic strike-slip earthquakes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aderhold, K.

    2015-12-01

    Rocks make waves and shake when they break along faults, but sometimes the fault sides move along without making waves and shaking. We don't know what controls this, but it could be what the rocks are made of, how hot they are, how much they are pressed from above, how often they move, or how fast they are moved by one another. Straight-down faults under water are usually younger and more simple than straight-down faults on land, so it is easier to tell what might make one part of the fault break and shake and one part of the fault move without shaking. There are also a lot more under water faults than land faults, so we don't have to wait around for a large one on land to break. That could cause a lot of serious problems and deaths, and we want to understand where it will break so we can warn people. To figure out what makes straight-down faults shake or not shake, I use the first couple of waves that are immediately sent through the world. When a fault breaks it sends out waves in rings and when they arrive at computers sensing in the ground very far away numbers are written down to show what the computer felt. The waves look different if the part of the fault that moved was deep or close to the top, if the slip was fast or slow, if there was a lot of slip or not very much, and if the slip was in one direction or another. I make up pretend numbers and see if they are the same as the numbers written by the computers. We can use the computers far away on land to understand what happened at the faults under the water. By studying many of these faults, we can track down what is the same about the parts of the faults that shake and what is different about the parts of the faults that don't shake.

  20. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  1. Upper Pleistocene - Holocene activity of the Carrascoy Fault (Murcia, SE Spain): preliminary results from paleoseismological research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Banda, Raquel; Garcia-Mayordomo, Julian; Insua-Arevalo, Juan M.; Salazar, Angel; Rodriguez-Escudero, Emilio; Alvarez-Gomez, Jose A.; Martinez-Diaz, Jose J.; Herrero, Maria J.; Medialdea, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    The Carrascoy Fault is located in the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera (Southern Spain). In particular, the Carrascoy Fault is one of the major faults forming the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, the main structure accommodating the convergence between Nubian and Eurasian plates in the westernmost Mediterranean. So far, the Carrascoy Fault has been defined as a left-lateral strike-slip fault. It extends for at least 31 km in a NE-SW trend from the village of Zeneta (Murcia) at its northeastern tip, to the Cañaricos village, controlling the northern edge of the Carrascoy Range and its linkage to the Guadalentin Depression towards the southwest. This is an area of moderate seismic activity, but densely populated, the capital of the region, Murcia, being settled very close to the fault. Hence, the knowledge of the structure and kinematics of the Carrascoy Fault is essential for assessing reliably the seismic hazard of the region. We present a detailed-scale geological and geomorphological map along the fault zone created from a LIDAR DEM combined with fieldwork, and geological and geophysical information. Furthermore, a number of trenches have been dug across the fault at different locations providing insights in the fault most recent activity as well as paleoseismic data. Preliminary results suggest that the Cararscoy Fault has recently changed its kinematic showing a near pure reverse motion. According to this, the fault can be divided into two distinct segments, the eastern one: Zeneta - Fuensanta, and the western one: Fuensanta - Cañaricos, each one having its own characteristic style and geodynamics. Some new active strands of the fault locate at the foot of the very first relief towards the North of the older strand, forming the current southern border of the Guadalentin Depression. These new faults show an increasingly reverse component westwards, so that the Fuensanta - Cañaricos segment is constituted by thrusts, which are blind at its western end

  2. Late Cenozoic crustal deformation of the north-central Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Eyal, Y. . Dept. of Geology); Ron, H. )

    1993-04-01

    Late Cenozoic deformation of Basin and Range in north-central Nevada is examined by small fault analysis. Consistency between fault types, fault trends and sense of displacement was found for this area in which normal faults strike N-S, and right-lateral and left-lateral faults strike NNW and NNE respectively. The existence of strike-slip faulting, mainly right-lateral, is consistent with horizontal counter clockwise rotation suggested by paleomagnetic declination data. The results of this analysis indicate that crustal deformation of this area did not occur by only simple E-W uniaxial extension but also by N-S compression and shortening, and that the contribution of strike slip faulting to the extension of this area is substantial almost similar to that of normal faulting.

  3. Structural and Sedimentological Development of Pahrump Basin, Southern Nevada with Implications for Seismic Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.; Taylor, W. J.; Luke, B.

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to (1) document potentially active faults and estimate possible earthquake magnitudes, (2) document and analyze sedimentation in a basin controlled by strike-slip and oblique faults, and (3) consider implications on regional development using Pahrump Valley, southern Nevada as a case study. The 2.5 million people living within the region would be significantly impacted by a major earthquake generated in the Valley. With an ever increasing population, the need for evaluation of seismic risk is becoming more important for land use planning in southern Nevada. Using data analysis of well logs, geophysical measurements, surface data from air photos, maps, and field observations, it is possible to document the 3D architecture of the basin-fill sediments and basin structure through abrupt changes in sedimentary facies. 3D modeling of the lithology and depositional environments of shallow basin fill improves the understanding of fault location, type, offset, and surface rupture length. Pahrump Valley is flanked by two documented Neogene (Quaternary) fault systems. The west side is dominated by the Stateline Fault zone, which is a continuous NW-striking right-lateral strike-slip fault zone extending 200 km from Mesquite Valley to Amargosa Valley, Nevada. In Pahrump Valley no fault scarp is present. The eastern side is bordered by the West Spring Mountains fault, which is a N-striking W-dipping normal fault with a right-lateral oblique component. The fault has a large scarp which is visible along the northeastern and east-central Valley border and smaller discontinuous scarps in the south. The 11-km-long central segment contains scarps up to 9.4 m high. On the basis of scarp profiles, the youngest event is estimated to be Pleistocene or early Holocene in age with a maximum fault displacement estimated at 1.8-2.0 m, which suggests an event of M 6.9. 3D basin models, derived from well log lithology, depict the locations of fault surfaces by

  4. Kinematic analysis of recent and active faults of the southern Umbria-Marche domain, Northern Apennines, Italy: geological constraints to geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqui, Valeria; Viti, Marcello; Mantovani, Enzo

    2013-04-01

    The recent and active deformation that affects the crest zone of the Umbria-Marche belt (Northern Apennines, Italy) displays a remarkable extensional character, outlined by development of normal fault sets that overprint pre-existing folds and thrusts of Late Miocene-Early Pliocene age. The main extensional fault systems often bound intermontane depressions hosting recent, mainly continental, i.e. fluvial or lacustrine deposits, separating the latter from Triassic-Miocene, mainly carbonatic and siliciclastic marine rocks that belong to the Romagna-Umbria-Marche stratigraphic succession. Stratigraphic data indicate that the extensional strain responsible for the development of normal fault-bounded continental basins in the outer zones of the Northern Apennines was active until Middle Pleistocene time. Since Middle Pleistocene time onwards a major geodynamic change has affected the Central Mediterranean region, with local reorganization of the kinematics in the Adria domain and adjacent Apennine belt. A wide literature illustrates that the overall deformation field of the Central Mediterranean area is presently governed by the relative movements between the Eurasia and Africa plates. The complex interaction of the Africa-Adria and the Anatolian-Aegean-Balkan domains has led the Adria microplate to migrate NW-ward and to collide against Eurasia along the Eastern Southern Alps. As a consequence Adria is presently moving with a general left-lateral displacement with respect to the Apennine mountain belt. The sinistral component of active deformations is also supported by analysis of earthquake focal mechanisms. A comparison between geophysical and geological evidence outlines an apparent discrepancy: most recognized recent and active faults display a remarkable extensional character, as shown by the geometry of continental basin-bounding structutes, whereas geodetic and seismologic evidence indicates the persistency of an active strike-slip, left-lateral dominated

  5. Structure of the active rift zone and margins of the northern Imperial Valley from Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, A.; Han, L.; Delph, J. R.; White-Gaynor, A. L.; Petit, R.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    First-arrival refraction data were used to create a seismic velocity model of the upper crust across the actively rifting northern Imperial Valley and its margins. The densely sampled seismic refraction data were acquired by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) , which is investigating rift processes in the northern-most rift segment of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. A 95-km long seismic line was acquired across the northern Imperial Valley, through the Salton Sea geothermal field, parallel to the five Salton Butte volcanoes and perpendicular to the Brawley Seismic Zone and major strike-slip faults. Nineteen explosive shots were recorded with 100 m seismometer spacing across the valley and with 300-500 m spacing into the adjacent ranges. First-arrival travel times were picked from shot gathers along this line and a seismic velocity model was produced using tomographic inversion. Sedimentary basement and seismic basement in the valley are interpreted to be sediment metamorphosed by the very high heat flow. The velocity model shows that this basement to the west of the Brawley Seismic Zone is at ~4-km depth. The basement shallows to ~2-km depth in the active geothermal field and Salton Buttes volcanic field which locally coincide with the Brawley Seismic Zone. At the eastern edge of the geothermal field, the basement drops off again to ~3.5-km depth. The eastern edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the along-strike extension of the Sand Hills Fault, an inactive strike-slip fault. The seismic velocities to the east of the fault correspond to metamorphic rock of the Chocolate Mountains, different from the metamorphosed basement in the valley. The western edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the active Superstition Hills Fault. To the west of the valley, >4-km deep valley basement extends to the active Superstition Hills Fault. Basement then shallows

  6. Geochemistry, geothermics and relationship to active tectonics of Gujarat and Rajasthan thermal discharges, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, A.; Chandrasekharam, D.; Vaselli, O.; Magro, G.; Tassi, F.; Pansini, G. L.; Bhramhabut, A.

    2003-09-01

    Most thermal spring discharges of Rajasthan and Gujarat in northwestern India have been sampled and analysed for major and trace elements in both the liquid and associated gas phase, and for 18O/ 16O, D/H (in water), 3He/ 4He and 13C/ 12C in CO 2 (in gas) isotopic ratios. Most thermal springs in Rajasthan are tightly associated to the several regional NE-SW strike-slip faults bordering NE-SW ridges formed by Archaean rocks at the contact with Quaternary alluvial and aeolian sedimentary deposits of the Rajasthan desert. Their Ca-HCO 3 immature character and isotopic composition reveals: (1) meteoric origin, (2) relatively shallow circulation inside the crystalline Archaean formations, (3) very fast rise along faults, and (4) deep storage temperatures of the same order of magnitude as discharging temperatures (50-90°C). Thermal spring discharges in Gujarat are spread over a larger area than in Rajasthan and are associated both with the NNW-SSE fault systems bordering the Cambay basin and the ENE-WSW strike-slip fault systems in the Saurashtra province, west of the Cambay basin. Chemical and isotopic compositions of springs in both areas suggest a meteoric origin of deep thermal waters. They mix with fresh or fossil seawater entering the thermal paths of the spring systems through both the fault systems bordering the Cambay basin, as well as faults and fractures occurring inside the permeable Deccan Basalt Trap in the Saurashtra province. The associated gas phase, at all sampled sites, shows similar features: (1) it is dominated by the presence of atmospheric components (N 2 and Ar), (2) it has high crustal 4He enrichment, (3) it shows crustal 3He/ 4He signature, (4) it has low CO 2 concentration, and (5) the only analysed sample for 13C/ 12C isotopic ratio in CO 2 suggests that CO 2 has a strong, isotopically light organic imprint. All these features and chemical geothermometer estimates of spring waters suggest that any active deep hydrothermal system at the base

  7. Crustal velocity model along the southern Cuban margin: implications for the tectonic regime at an active plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Bladimir; Grandison, Margaret; Atakan, Kuvvet

    2002-11-01

    A new 1-D velocity model along the southern Cuban margin has been determined using local earthquake data, which are the result of the merged Cuban and Jamaican catalogues. Simultaneous inversion using joint-hypocentre determination was applied to solve the coupled hypocentre-velocity model problem. We obtained a seven-layer model with an average Moho interface at 20 km. The average velocity was found to be 7.6 km s-1 on the top of the crust-mantle transition zone and 6.9 km s-1 in the basaltic layer of the crust. The improvement in the earthquake locations allowed us for the first time to use local seismicity to characterize the activity on local faults and the stress regime in the area. For this purpose, 34 earthquake focal mechanisms were determined along the eastern segments of the Oriente Fault. These solutions are consistent with the known left-lateral strike-slip motion along this major structure as well as with the stress regime of two local structures: (1) the Cabo Cruz Basin and (2) the Santiago deformed belt. The first structure is dominated by normal faults with minor strike-slip components and the second by reverse faults. The shallow seismicity in the Cabo Cruz Basin is associated with fault planes trending N55°-58°E and dipping 38°-45° to the north. The Santiago deformed belt, on the other hand, exhibits diverse fault plane orientations. These local structures account for most of the earthquake activity along the southern Cuban margin. Deep seismicity observed in the Santiago deformed belt, supported by focal mechanisms, suggests underthrusting of the Gonave Microplate beneath the Cuban Block in this area. The principal stress orientations obtained from stress inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms suggest a thrust faulting regime along the Southern Cuban margin. We obtained a nearly horizontal σ1 and nearly vertical σ3, which indicates active compressional deformation along the major Oriente transcurrent fault in agreement with the dominant

  8. Active inversion tectonics, simple shear folding and back-thrusting at Rioni Basin, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, A.; Alania, V.; Bonali, F. L.; Enukidze, O.; Tsereteli, N.; Kvavadze, N.; Varazanashvili, O.

    2017-03-01

    The Rioni Basin, located between the Greater and Lesser Caucasus in Georgia, is an outstanding example of ongoing inversion tectonics. Marine and continental deposits of Cretaceous-Neogene age have been locally uplifted since the end of Miocene. The uplifted area totals 1300 km2, and Plio-Quaternary river deposits have been raised up to 200 m above the surrounding plains. Inversion tectonics has been accompanied by the development of south-vergent asymmetrical folds and strike-slip faults along the border of the uplifted area. The folds have locally an en-échelon geometry and microtectonic data indicate rotation of the paleostress direction over time, suggesting simple shear deformation. In the interiors of the uplifted area, there are gentle symmetrical folds and one main active south-dipping reverse fault, corresponding to a backthrust. Morphostructural evidence, as well as the tilting of Quaternary strata, the offset of Quaternary alluvial deposits and the presence of crustal seismic activity, indicate that compressional tectonics is still active. The combination of field data with seismic reflection sections shows that inversion tectonics took place through a series of north-dipping blind thrusts and a wedge with passive back-thrusting. Uplift and contraction are more developed along the eastern part of the study area, suggesting the westward propagation of the closure of the Transcaucasian depression.

  9. Post-Cretaceous Sinistral Transpression in Southwest Alxa: Structural and Paleomagnetic Insights into the Long-Term Slip History of the Altyn Tagh Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumaker, L.; Lippert, P. C.; Darby, B. J.; Ritts, B. D.; Coe, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    and between faults are minor. Counter-clockwise rotations are localized to sites closest to the left-slip HSF, whereas significant clockwise rotations are restricted to right-lateral strike-slip structures and the hanging walls of NE-directed thrusts. Paleomagnetic directions from upper Neogene strata do not show significant rotations. We conclude that the orientation and kinematics of structures in the Hei Shan are most consistent with a left-lateral transpressional duplex that developed after the Cretaceous and was most active prior to the Middle Miocene. These structural and temporal relationships suggest that the HSF was kinematically linked to the ATF during Oligocene to Early Miocene time. Thus, the HSF would have partitioned some of the >310 km of pre-Early Miocene ATF slip onto strike-slip, extensional, and contractional structures within the Hei Shan while transferring the remaining slip north and eastward into the Alxa region.

  10. Active faulting in the Inner California Borderlands: new constraints from high-resolution multichannel seismic and multibeam bathymetric data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Holmes, J. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic data indicate that faults offshore of Southern California accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of dextral Pacific-North American relative plate motion. In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), modern strike-slip deformation is overprinted on topography formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Despite its proximity to urban Southern California, the hazard posed by active faults in the ICB remains poorly understood. We acquired a 4000-line-km regional grid of high-resolution, 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data and multibeam bathymetry to examine the fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We interpret the MCS data using a sequence stratigraphic approach to establish a chronostratigraphy and identify discrete episodes of deformation. We present our results in a regional fault model that distinguishes active deformation from older structures. Significant differences exist between our model of ICB deformation and existing models. Mounting evidence suggests a westward temporal migration of slip between faults in the ICB. In the eastern ICB, slip on the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault and the neighboring Coronado Bank fault (CBF) diminishes to the north and appears to decrease over time. Undeformed Late Pliocene sediments overlie the northern extent of the CBF and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, CBF slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Palos Verdes fault to the north are unwarranted. Deformation along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends is best explained as localized deformation resulting from geometrical complexities in a dextral strike-slip fault system. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the eastern margin of Avalon Knoll, where the fault is spatially coincident with the San Pedro Basin fault (SPBF). Farther west, the San Clemente fault (SCF) has a strong linear bathymetric expression. The length

  11. BOLIVAR & GEODINOS: Investigations of the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.; Working Groups, B.

    2006-12-01

    The southern Caribbean-South American plate boundary has many similarities to California's San Andreas system: 1) The CAR-SA system consists of a series of strands of active right lateral strike-slip faults extending >1000 km from the Antilles subduction zone. This system has several names and includes the El Pilar, Coche, San Sebastian, Moron, and Oca faults. 2) The CAR-SA relative velocity has been about 20 mm/yr of mostly right lateral motion since about 55 Ma, giving a total displacement on the CAR-SA plate boundary similar to that of the San Andreas system. 3) The plate boundary has about 10% convergence in western SA, with less as one moves eastward due to relative convergence between North and South America. 4) The CAR-SA system has fold and thrust belts best developed continentward of the strike-slip faults, similar to the San Andreas. 5) There is a big bend in the CAR plate boundary at approximately the same distance from the Antilles trench as the big bend in Southern California is from the Cascadia subduction zone. The tectonic origins of the CAR-SA plate boundary and the San Andreas are very different, however, despite the similarities between the systems. Rather than impingement of a ridge on a trench, the CAR-SA system is thought to have resulted from a continuous oblique collision of the southern end of a Cretaceous island arc system with the northern edge of South America. During this process the CAR island arc and the modern CAR plate overrode a proto-Caribbean plate and destroyed a Mesozoic passive margin on the northern edge of SA. BOLIVAR and GEODINOS are multi-disciplinary investigations of the lithosphere and deeper structures associated with the diffuse CAR-SA plate boundary zone. We review a number of observations regarding the plate boundary obtained or confirmed from these studies: 1) The Caribbean Large Igneous Province, being overridden by the Maracaibo block in western Venezuela, can be identified beneath Aruba and coastal Venezuela

  12. Wide-Angle Seismic Experiment Across the Oeste Fault Zone, Central Andes, Northern Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Yáñez, G. A.; Vera, E. E.; Sepúlveda, J.

    2008-12-01

    From December 6-21, 2007, we conducted a 3-component, radio-telemetric, seismic survey along a ~ 15-km wide E-W transect in the Central Andes, at a latitude of ~ 22.41° S, centered north of the city of Calama (68.9° W), Chile. The study area is sandwiched between the Central Depression in the west and the Andean Western Cordillera of Chile. Recording stations, nominally spaced at intervals of either 125 or 250 m collected up to 3.5 s of refracted seismic arrivals at maximum source-receiver offsets exceeding 15 km. Ten shothole sources, spaced 2-6 km apart focused energy on the shallow (0-3 km), crustal, Paleogene-age structures. Preliminary, tomographic inversions of refracted first arrivals show the top of a shallow (< 1km), high- velocity (VP, ~5 km/s) crust, deepening sharply eastward to at least 2 km. At the surface, this central basement step correlates to a regionally extensive (> 600 km), strike-slip fault zone known as the Oeste fault. Turning ray densities suggest the base of the overlying velocity gradient unit (VP, 2-4 km/s) dips inwardly from both east and west directions toward the Oeste fault to depths of almost 1 km. Plate reorganization commencing at least by the latter half of the Oligocene led from oblique to more orthogonal convergence between the South American and the Nazca (Farallon) Plates. We interpret previously mapped, older, minor faults as being generated within the right-lateral, orogen-parallel, Oeste strike-slip fault zone, and postdated by Neogene, N-S striking thrust faults. In this context we also interpret that the spatial distribution of velocity units requires an period of extensional activity that may (1) postdate the transpressional strike slip fault activity of the Neogene, (2) be related to a later releasing bend through the translation and interaction of rigid blocks hidden at depth or even (3) be the consequence of inelastic failure from the result of flexural loading.

  13. Dike Propagation Mechanisms from Seismicity Accompanying the 2014 Bárðarbunga-Holuhraun Fissure Eruption, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J.; Ágústsdóttir, T.; Greenfield, T. S.; Green, R. G.; White, R. S.; Brandsdottir, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present data from our dense seismic network which captured in unprecedented detail the micro-seismicity associated with the 2014 dike intrusion from the subglacial Bárðarbunga volcano in central Iceland. Over 30,000 automatically located earthquakes delineate a complex 46 km dike propagation during the days preceding the onset of effusive magmatism at the Holuhraun lava field on 29 August 2014. Approximately 1.5 km3 of lava was erupted, making this the largest eruption in Iceland for over 200 years.Micro-seismicity tracks the lateral migration of the dike, with a concentration of earthquakes in the advancing tip where stresses are greatest, and trailing zones of lesser or no seismicity behind. Onset of an initial 4 hour fissure eruption was accompanied simultaneously by a backward retreat in seismic activity, followed by a gradual re-advance prior to the onset of a second, sustained fissure eruption in the same location on 31 August. Rock fracture mechanisms are determined from fault plane solutions of these seismic events. At the tip of the advancing dike, left-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the propagation is dominant, utilising pre-existing lineations and releasing stress accumulated in the brittle layer from rift zone extension. Behind the dike tip, both right-lateral and left-lateral strike-slip earthquakes are found, marking failure of solidifying magma plugs within the dike conduit. Contrary to many models of dike propagation, both normal faulting and failure at high angles to the dike are rare. Furthermore, a distinct lack of seismicity is observed in the 3-4 km region beneath the surface rupture. This suggests that opening is occuring aseismically, with earthquakes focused at the base of the dike near the brittle-ductile boundary.

  14. Microseismicity at the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara offshore Istanbul, NW Turkey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bulut, Fatih; Bohnhoff, Marco; Ellsworth, William L.; Aktar, Mustafa; Dresen, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) below the Sea of Marmara forms a “seismic gap” where a major earthquake is expected to occur in the near future. This segment of the fault lies between the 1912 Ganos and 1999 İzmit ruptures and is the only NAFZ segment that has not ruptured since 1766. To monitor the microseismic activity at the main fault branch offshore of Istanbul below the Çınarcık Basin, a permanent seismic array (PIRES) was installed on the two outermost Prince Islands, Yassiada and Sivriada, at a few kilometers distance to the fault. In addition, a temporary network of ocean bottom seismometers was deployed throughout the Çınarcık Basin. Slowness vectors are determined combining waveform cross correlation and P wave polarization. We jointly invert azimuth and traveltime observations for hypocenter determination and apply a bootstrap resampling technique to quantify the location precision. We observe seismicity rates of 20 events per month for M < 2.5 along the basin. The spatial distribution of hypocenters suggests that the two major fault branches bounding the depocenter below the Çınarcık Basin merge to one single master fault below ∼17 km depth. On the basis of a cross-correlation technique we group closely spaced earthquakes and determine composite focal mechanisms implementing recordings of surrounding permanent land stations. Fault plane solutions have a predominant right-lateral strike-slip mechanism, indicating that normal faulting along this part of the NAFZ plays a minor role. Toward the west we observe increasing components of thrust faulting. This supports the model of NW trending, dextral strike-slip motion along the northern and main branch of the NAFZ below the eastern Sea of Marmara.

  15. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  16. Neotectonic inversion of the Hindu Kush-Pamir mountain region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruleman, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Hindu Kush-Pamir region of southern Asia is one of Earth's most rapidly deforming regions and it is poorly understood. This study develops a kinematic model based on active faulting in this part of the Trans-Himalayan orogenic belt. Previous studies have described north-verging thrust faults and some strike-slip faults, reflected in the northward-convex geomorphologic and structural grain of the Pamir Mountains. However, this structural analysis suggests that contemporary tectonics are changing the style of deformation from north-verging thrusts formed during the initial contraction of the Himalayan orogeny to south-verging thrusts and a series of northwest-trending, dextral strike-slip faults in the modern transpressional regime. These northwest-trending fault zones are linked to the major right-lateral Karakoram fault, located to the east, as synthetic, conjugate shears that form a right-stepping en echelon pattern. Northwest-trending lineaments with dextral displacements extend continuously westward across the Hindu Kush-Pamir region indicating a pattern of systematic shearing of multiple blocks to the northwest as the deformation effects from Indian plate collision expands to the north-northwest. Locally, east-northeast- and northwest-trending faults display sinistral and dextral displacement, respectively, yielding conjugate shear pairs developed in a northwest-southeast compressional stress field. Geodetic measurements and focal mechanisms from historical seismicity support these surficial, tectono-morphic observations. The conjugate shear pairs may be structurally linked subsidiary faults and co-seismically slip during single large magnitude (> M7) earthquakes that occur on major south-verging thrust faults. This kinematic model provides a potential context for prehistoric, historic, and future patterns of faulting and earthquakes.

  17. Differential activity of regions of the psoas major and quadratus lumborum during submaximal isometric trunk efforts.

    PubMed

    Park, Rachel J; Tsao, Henry; Cresswell, Andrew G; Hodges, Paul W

    2012-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the function of psoas major (PM) and quadratus lumborum (QL) at the lumbar spine. The functions of discrete regions of PM and QL were studied during trunk loading tasks. Twelve healthy participants performed isometric trunk loading tasks in various directions in upright sitting. Fine-wire electromyography (EMG) electrodes were inserted under ultrasound guidance into PM fascicles arising from the transverse process (PM-t) and vertebral body (PM-v) and the anterior (QL-a) and posterior (QL-p) layers of QL on the right side. Although right PM-t and PM-v were both active during right lateral-flexion trunk efforts, their activity was opposite in the sagittal plane, with greater PM-t towards extension and PM-v towards flexion. QL-a and QL-p were similarly active, though QL-p was active to a greater percentage of MVC during right trunk lateral-flexion efforts. Activity of QL-p was modulated with respiratory phase during the loading tasks with trunk efforts towards the right lateral-flexion/flexion and right lateral-flexion directions. These findings provide novel understanding of the unique activation of discrete regions of PM and QL. These differences must be considered in future EMG studies to better understand the function of these deeply situated trunk muscles in the control of the lumbar spine.

  18. Microearthquake activity on the Orozco Fracture Zone: Preliminary results from Project ROSE

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-10

    We present preliminary hypocenter determinations for 52 earthquakes recorded by a large multiinstitutional network of ocean bottom seismometers and ocean bottom hydrophones in the Orozco Fracture Zone in the eastern Pacific during late February to mid-March 1979. The network was deployed as part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, also known as Project ROSE. The Orozco Fracture Zone is Physiographically complex, and the pattern of microearthquake hypocenters at least partly reflects this complexity. All of the well-located epicenters lie within the active transform fault segment of the fracture zone. About half of the recorded earthquakes were aligned along a narrow trough that extends eastward from the northern rise crest intersection in the approximate direction of the Cocos-Pacific relative plate motion; these events appear to be characterized by strike-slip faulting. The second major group of activity occurred in the central portion of the transform fault; the microearthquakes in this group do not display a preferred alignment parallel to the direction of spreading, and several are not obviously associated with distinct topographic features. Hypocentral depth was well resolved for many of the earthquakes reported here. Nominal depths range from 0 to 17 km below the seafloor.

  19. Spatial stress variations in the aftershock sequence following the 2008 M6 earthquake doublet in the South Iceland Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensch, M.; Árnadóttir, Th.; Lund, B.; Brandsdóttir, B.

    2012-04-01

    The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is an approximately 80 km wide E-W transform zone, bridging the offset between the Eastern Volcanic Zone and the Hengill triple junction to the west. The plate motion is accommodated in the brittle crust by faulting on many N-S trending right-lateral strike-slip faults of 2-5 km separation. Major sequences of large earthquakes (M>6) has occurred repeatedly in the SISZ since the settlement in Iceland more than thousand years ago. On 29th May 2008, two M6 earthquakes hit the western part of the SISZ on two adjacent N-S faults within a few seconds. The intense aftershock sequence was recorded by the permanent Icelandic SIL network and a promptly installed temporary network of 11 portable seismometers in the source region. The network located thousands of aftershocks during the following days, illuminating a 12-17 km long region along both major fault ruptures as well as several smaller parallel faults along a diffuse E-W trending region west of the mainshock area without any preceding main rupture. This episode is suggested to be the continuation of an earthquake sequence which started with two M6.5 and several M5-6 events in June 2000. The time delay between the 2000 and 2008 events could be due to an inflation episode in Hengill during 1993-1998, that potentially locked N-S strike slip faults in the western part of the SISZ. Around 300 focal solutions for aftershocks have been derived by analyzing P-wave polarities, showing predominantly strike-slip movements with occasional normal faulting components (unstable P-axis direction), which suggests an extensional stress regime as their driving force. A subsequent stress inversion of four different aftershock clusters reveals slight variations of the directions of the average σ3 axes. While for both southern clusters, including the E-W cluster, the σ3 axes are rather elongated perpendicular to the overall plate spreading axis, they are more northerly trending for shallower clusters

  20. The offshore Yangsan fault activity in the Quaternary, SE Korea: Analysis of high-resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Joon; Moon, Seonghoon; Jou, Hyeong-Tae; Lee, Gwang Hoon; Yoo, Dong Geun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kwang Hee

    2016-12-01

    The NNE-trending dextral Yangsan fault is a > 190-km-long structure in the Korean Peninsula traced to the southeastern coast. The scarcity of Quaternary deposits onland precludes any detailed investigation of the Quaternary activity and structure of the Yangsan fault using seismic reflection profiling. We acquired offshore high-resolution seismic profiles to investigate the extension of the Yangsan fault and constrain its Quaternary activity using stratigraphic markers. The seismic profiles reveal a NNE-trending fault system consisting of a main fault and an array of subsidiary faults that displaced Quaternary sequences. Stratigraphic analysis of seismic profiles indicates that the offshore faults were activated repeatedly in the Quaternary. The up-to-the-east sense of throw on the main fault and plan-view pattern of the fault system are explained by dextral strike-slip faulting. The main fault, when projected toward the Korean Peninsula along its strike, aligns well with the Yangsan fault. We suggest that the offshore fault system is a continuation of the Yangsan fault and has spatial correlation with weak but ongoing seismicity.

  1. Development of a Detailed Stress Map of Oklahoma for Avoidance of Potentially Active Faults When Siting Wastewater Injection Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, R. C., II; Zoback, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report progress on a project to create a detailed map of in situ stress orientations and relative magnitudes throughout the state of Oklahoma. It is well known that the past 5 years has seen a remarkable increase in seismicity in much of the state, potentially related to waste water injection. The purpose of this project is to attempt to utilize detailed knowledge of the stress field to identify which pre-existing faults could be potentially active in response to injection-related pore pressure increases. Over 50 new stress orientations have been obtained, principally utilizing wellbore image data provided by the oil and gas industry. These data reveal a very uniform ENE direction of maximum compressive stress through much of the state. As earthquake focal plane mechanisms indicate strike-slip faulting, the stress orientation data indicate which pre-existing faults are potentially active. The data are consistent with slip on the near-vertical, NE-trending fault associated with at least one of the M 5+ earthquakes in the Prague, OK sequence in 2011. If successful, it would demonstrate that combining detailed information about pre-existing faults and the current stress field could be used to guide the siting of injection wells so as to decrease the potential for injection-related seismicity.

  2. GeoBioScience: Red Wood Ants as Bioindicators for Active Tectonic Fault Systems in the West Eifel (Germany).

    PubMed

    Berberich, Gabriele; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2013-05-17

    In a 1.140 km² study area of the volcanic West Eifel, a comprehensive investigation established the correlation between red wood ant mound (RWA; Formica rufa-group) sites and active tectonic faults. The current stress field with a NW-SE-trending main stress direction opens pathways for geogenic gases and potential magmas following the same orientation. At the same time, Variscan and Mesozoic fault zones are reactivated. The results showed linear alignments and clusters of approx. 3,000 RWA mounds. While linear mound distribution correlate with strike-slip fault systems documented by quartz and ore veins and fault planes with slickensides, the clusters represent crosscut zones of dominant fault systems. Latter can be correlated with voids caused by crustal block rotation. Gas analyses from soil air, mineral springs and mofettes (CO₂, Helium, Radon and H₂S) reveal limiting concentrations for the spatial distribution of mounds and colonization. Striking is further the almost complete absence of RWA mounds in the core area of the Quaternary volcanic field. A possible cause can be found in occasionally occurring H₂S in the fault systems, which is toxic at miniscule concentrations to the ants. Viewed overall, there is a strong relationship between RWA mounds and active tectonics in the West Eifel.

  3. A combined methodology of multiplet and composite focal mechanism techniques for identifying seismologically active zones in Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Wahed, Mohamad; Asfahani, Jamal; Al-Tahhan, Ibrahim

    2011-10-01

    This contribution is an attempt to enlarge the current knowledge about the focal mechanisms as well as the seismotectonic settings in Syria. The seismologically active zones have been identified by applying an appropriate methodology to the events recorded during the period 1995-2003 by the Syrian National Seismological Network (SNSN). The recorded events in Syria were classified as weak during the research period. It was extremely important to propose and apply an appropriate methodology to identify the focal mechanisms generating this seismic activity. The proposed methodology consists of applying a combination of two techniques: the multiplet and the composite focal mechanisms. The combination of many events in one composite focal mechanism was realized by a multiplet technique using the spectral coherence of the events as a measure of similarity. The application of the proposed methodology allows a data set of composite fault plane solutions to be obtained. Most of the composite fault plane solutions had strike-slip mechanisms which are in agreement with the configuration of seismogenic belts in Syria.

  4. Insights into the relationship between surface and subsurface activity from mechanical modeling of the 1992 Landers M7.3 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, E. H.; Pollard, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Multi-fault, strike-slip earthquakes have proved difficult to incorporate into seismic hazard analyses due to the difficulty of determining the probability of these ruptures, despite collection of extensive data associated with such events. Modeling the mechanical behavior of these complex ruptures contributes to a better understanding of their occurrence by elucidating the relationship between surface and subsurface earthquake activity along transform faults. This insight is especially important for hazard mitigation, as multi-fault systems can produce earthquakes larger than those associated with any one fault involved. We present a linear elastic, quasi-static model of the southern portion of the 28 June 1992 Landers earthquake built in the boundary element software program Poly3D. This event did not rupture the extent of any one previously mapped fault, but trended 80km N and NW across segments of five sub-parallel, N-S and NW-SE striking faults. At M7.3, the earthquake was larger than the potential earthquakes associated with the individual faults that ruptured. The model extends from the Johnson Valley Fault, across the Landers-Kickapoo Fault, to the Homestead Valley Fault, using data associated with a six-week time period following the mainshock. It honors the complex surface deformation associated with this earthquake, which was well exposed in the desert environment and mapped extensively in the field and from aerial photos in the days immediately following the earthquake. Thus, the model incorporates the non-linearity and segmentation of the main rupture traces, the irregularity of fault slip distributions, and the associated secondary structures such as strike-slip splays and thrust faults. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) images of the Landers event provided the first satellite images of ground deformation caused by a single seismic event and provide constraints on off-fault surface displacement in this six-week period. Insight is gained

  5. Active tectonics of central-western Caucasus, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, N.; Tibaldi, A.; Alania, V.; Gventsadse, A.; Enukidze, O.; Varazanashvili, O.; Müller, B. I. R.

    2016-11-01

    This work contributes to a better knowledge of potentially seismogenic faults of the Georgia Greater and Lesser Caucasus by evaluating the distribution of earthquake foci, active tectonic stress field, kinematics and geometry of main fault planes. We consider all the information coming from field structural geology, geomorphology, seismological data from historical and instrumental catalogues, seismic reflection sections, as well as new focal mechanism solutions. These data enable recognizing some active ENE-WSW reverse faults in the core of the Greater Caucasus that are parallel to the mountain range. At the southernmost front of the Greater Caucasus, a series of main thrusts dipping towards NNE are active, with up to hundreds-km-long segments; along this thrust zone, a potentially locked segment is present, about 90 km long. The studied section of the Lesser Caucasus has active structures along the northern front given by south-dipping thrusts, as well as in the central core where strike-slip and oblique faults coexist. The Transcaucasian depression between the two mountain ranges shows an ongoing inversion tectonics of the central part of the Rioni Basin where active N- to NE-dipping reverse faults are present, accompanied by clear evidence of uplift of a wide area. The data are coherent with a N-S to NNE-SSW contraction of the central-western Greater Caucasus and Lesser Caucasus. Although in general the seismicity decreases westward in terms of number of earthquakes and magnitude, seismological and geological structural data in the Rioni Basin indicate here a Quaternary propagation of deformation towards the west.

  6. Areas of Unsolved Problems in Caribbean Active Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    I review some unsolved problems in Caribbean active tectonics. At the regional and plate scale: 1) confirm the existence of intraplate deformation zones of the central Caribbean plate that are within the margin of error of ongoing GPS measurements; 2) carry out field studies to evaluate block models versus models for distributed fault shear on the densely populated islands of Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands; 3) carry out paleoseismological research of key plate boundary faults that may have accumulated large strains but have not been previously studied in detail; 4) determine the age of onset and far-field effects of the Cocos ridge and the Central America forearc sliver; 4) investigate the origin and earthquake-potential of obliquely-sheared rift basins along the northern coast of Venezuela; 5) determine the age of onset and regional active, tectonic effects of the Panama-South America collision including the continued activation of the Maracaibo block; and 6) validate longterm rates on active subduction zones with improving, tomographic maps of subducted slabs. At the individual fault scale: 1) determine the mode of termination of large and active strike -slip faults and application of the STEP model (Septentrional, Polochic, El Pilar, Bocono, Santa Marta-Bucaramanaga); 2) improve the understanding of the earthquake potential on the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone given "off-fault" events such as the 2010 Haiti earthquake; how widespread is this behavior?; and 3) estimate size of future tsunamis from studies of historic or prehistoric slump scars and mass transport deposits; what potential runups can be predicted from this information?; and 4) devise ways to keep rapidly growing, circum-Caribbean urban populations better informed and safer in the face of inevitable and future, large earthquakes.

  7. The 10 April 2014 Earthquake in Central Nicaragua: Evidence of Complex Crustal Deformation in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, G.; Muñoz, A.; Talavera, E.; Tenorio, V.; Farraz, I.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Sánchez, A.

    2014-12-01

    On 10 April 2014 a magnitude Mw 6.1 struck central Nicaragua. The main event and the aftershocks were clearly recorded by the Nicaraguan seismic network. These crustal earthquakes were strongly felt but caused relatively little damage to the city of Managua and to the surrounding cities and towns. This is in sharp contrast to the destructive effects of the 1972 earthquake in the capital city of Managua. The differences in damage stem from the fact that in 1972, the earthquake occurred on a fault beneath the city; in contrast, the 2014 event lies offshore, under Lake Managua. The distribution of aftershocks shows two clusters of seismic activity. In the northwestern part of Lake Managua, an alignment of aftershocks suggests a southeast trending fault. The reported source mechanism suggests right-lateral strike slip motion on a plane with the same azimuth as the aftershock sequence. A second cluster of seismic activity occurred simultaneously, but spatially separated, beneath Apoyeque volcano. There is no clear alignment of the epicenters in this cluster. Seismic scaling relations between magnitude and the fault length predict a length of approximately 10 km for an earthquake of this magnitude. This is in agreement with the extent of the fault defined by the aftershock sequence. The northeast - southwest trending Tiscapa and Ciudad Jardín faults that broke during the 1972 and 1931 Managua earthquakes are orthogonal to the fault where the 10 April earthquake occurred. This set of conjugate faults confirms that Central Nicaragua is being deformed in a complex tectonic style of deformation. The forearc sliver between the trench and the volcanic arc moves to the northwest relative to the Caribbean plate. This deformation, however, does not take place on a single set of faults. The motion is apparently accommodated by a system of conjugate faults: right lateral, strike-slip faults oriented parallel to the volcanic arc and another set of faults trending northeast

  8. Radiated energy and the rupture process of the Denali fault earthquake sequence of 2002 from broadband teleseismic body waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Boatwright, J.

    2004-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and velocity-squared records of P and SH body waves recorded at teleseismic distances are analyzed to determine the rupture characteristics of the Denali fault, Alaska, earthquake of 3 November 2002 (MW 7.9, Me 8.1). Three episodes of rupture can be identified from broadband (???0.1-5.0 Hz) waveforms. The Denali fault earthquake started as a MW 7.3 thrust event. Subsequent right-lateral strike-slip rupture events with centroid depths of 9 km occurred about 22 and 49 sec later. The teleseismic P waves are dominated by energy at intermediate frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) radiated by the thrust event, while the SH waves are dominated by energy at lower frequencies (0.05-0.2 Hz) radiated by the strike-slip events. The strike-slip events exhibit strong directivity in the teleseismic SH waves. Correcting the recorded P-wave acceleration spectra for the effect of the free surface yields an estimate of 2.8 ?? 1015 N m for the energy radiated by the thrust event. Correcting the recorded SH-wave acceleration spectra similarly yields an estimate of 3.3 ?? 10 16 N m for the energy radiated by the two strike-slip events. The average rupture velocity for the strike-slip rupture process is 1.1??-1.2??. The strike-slip events were located 90 and 188 km east of the epicenter. The rupture length over which significant or resolvable energy is radiated is, thus, far shorter than the 340-km fault length over which surface displacements were observed. However, the seismic moment released by these three events, 4 ?? 1020 N m, was approximately half the seismic moment determined from very low-frequency analyses of the earthquake. The difference in seismic moment can be reasonably attributed to slip on fault segments that did not radiate significant or coherent seismic energy. These results suggest that very large and great strike-slip earthquakes can generate stress pulses that rapidly produce substantial slip with negligible stress drop and little discernible radiated

  9. Andaman-Sumatra island arc: II. The December 26, 2004 earthquake as one of the key episodes in seismogenic activation of the arc in the beginning of XXI century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakina, L. M.; Moskvina, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the nature and parameters of the source for the earthquake that occurred in Sumatra on December 26, 2004 is suggested. Our study relies on a variety of data on the geological structure of the region, long-term seismicity, spatial distribution of the foreshocks and aftershocks, and focal mechanisms; and the pattern of shaking and tsunami, regularities in the occurrence of the earthquakes, and the genetic relationship between the seismic and geological parameters inherent in various types of seismogenic zones including island arcs. The source of the Sumatran earthquake is a steep reverse fault striking parallel to the island arc and dipping towards the ocean. The length of the fault is ˜450 km, and its probable bedding depth is ˜70-100 km. The magnitude of this seismic event corresponding to the length of its source is 8.9-9.0. The vertical displacement in the source probably reached 9-13 m. The fault is located near the inner boundary of the Aceh Depression between the epicenter of the earthquake and the northern tip of the depression. The strike-slip and strike-slip reverse the faults cutting the island arc form the northern and southern borders of the source. The location and source parameters in the suggested interpretation account quite well for the observed pattern of shaking and tsunami. The Aceh Depression and its environs probably also host other seismic sources in the form of large reverse faults. The Sumatran earthquake, which was the culmination of the seismogenic activation of the Andaman-Sumatra island arc in the beginning of XXI century, is a typical tsunamigenic island-arc earthquake. By its characteristics, this event is an analogue to the M W = 9 Kamchatka earthquake of November 4, 1952. The spatial distribution of the epicenters and the focal mechanisms of the aftershocks indicate that the repeated shocks during the Sumatran event were caused by the activation of a complex system of geological structures in various parts of

  10. Hanging canyons of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada: Fault-control on submarine canyon geomorphology along active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter T.; Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.; Greene, H. Gary

    2014-06-01

    Faulting commonly influences the geomorphology of submarine canyons that occur on active continental margins. Here, we examine the geomorphology of canyons located on the continental margin off Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, that are truncated on the mid-slope (1200-1400 m water depth) by the Queen Charlotte Fault Zone (QCFZ). The QCFZ is an oblique strike-slip fault zone that has rates of lateral motion of around 50-60 mm/yr and a small convergent component equal to about 3 mm/yr. Slow subduction along the Cascadia Subduction Zone has accreted a prism of marine sediment against the lower slope (1500-3500 m water depth), forming the Queen Charlotte Terrace, which blocks the mouths of submarine canyons formed on the upper slope (200-1400 m water depth). Consequently, canyons along this margin are short (4-8 km in length), closely spaced (around 800 m), and terminate uniformly along the 1400 m isobath, coinciding with the primary fault trend of the QCFZ. Vertical displacement along the fault has resulted in hanging canyons occurring locally. The Haida Gwaii canyons are compared and contrasted with the Sur Canyon system, located to the south of Monterey Bay, California, on a transform margin, which is not blocked by any accretionary prism, and where canyons thus extend to 4000 m depth, across the full breadth of the slope.

  11. HYPODD Relocations and Stress Tensor Inversion Analyses of Local Earthquake Clusters in the Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan

    2016-04-01

    Extensional focal mechanism solutions are mostly observed even in the Central Marmara by this comprehensive research although the main Marmara Fault that is the western branch of the NAF, is dominated by a right lateral strike-slip regime. Marmara Region, a seismically very active area, is located at the western section of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The 1912 Mürefte and 1999 Izmit earthquakes are the last devastating events of the western and eastern sections of this region, respectively. The region between the locations of these earthquakes, is prone to a large earthquake. Therefore, the analysis of the Sea of Marmara is significant. The main objective of this research is to determine earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanism solutions accurately, hence we obtain recent states of stresses for this region. Accordingly, this research aims to define branches of fault structures and its geometrical orientations in the Sea of Marmara. In this study, a cluster of events in the Central Marmara is analyzed using hypocenter program as a usual location technique. In addition, these events and other clustered events (Korkusuz Öztürk et al., 2015) are relocated using HYPODD relocation procedure. Even though NAF is mostly dominated by a right lateral strike slip fault, we found out many extensional source mechanisms. Also, from the comparison of relocation results of hypocenter and HYPODD programs, it is found out that most of the relocations have the same orientations and dipping angles of the segments of the main Marmara Fault are not clear. As a result, since we observe many normal faulting mechanisms in the Sea of Marmara, we expect to observe some deviations in orientations of vertical orientations of the fault segments comparing a dip-slip model. Therefore, this research will continue to clearly identify fault dip angles of main fault segments in Marmara Sea. Further, our sensitive relocation and stress analyses will make an important contribution to a

  12. Contemporary kinematics of the Ordos block, North China and its adjacent rift systems constrained by dense GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Caihong; Wang, Dongzhen; Huang, Yong; Tan, Kai; Du, Ruilin; Liu, Jingnan

    2017-03-01

    The detailed kinematic pattern of the Ordos block, North China and its surrounding rift systems remains uncertain, mainly due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of the Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity data and the lack of GPS stations in this region. In this study, we have obtained a new and dense velocity field by processing GPS data primarily collected from the Crustal Motion Observation Network of China and from other GPS networks between 1998 and 2014. The GPS velocities within the Ordos block can be interpreted as counterclockwise rotation of the block about the Euler pole with respect to the Eurasia plate. Velocity profiles across the graben-bounding faults show relatively rapid right-lateral strike-slip motion along the Yinchuan graben, with a rate of 0.8-2.6 mm/a from north to south. In addition, a right-lateral slip rate of 1.1-1.6 mm/a is estimated along the central segment of the Shanxi rift. However, strike-slip motion is not detected along the northern and southern margins of the Ordos block. Conversely, significant extension motion is detected across the northwestern corner of the block, with a value of 1.6 mm/a, and along the northern segment of the Shanxi rift, where an extensional rate of 1.3-1.7 mm/a is measured. Both the Daihai and Datong basins are experiencing crustal extension. On the southwestern margin of the block, deformation across the compressional zone of the Liupanshan range is subtle; however, the far-field shorting rate is as high as 3.0 mm/a, implying that this region is experiencing ongoing compression. The results reveal that present-day fault slip occurs mainly along the block bounding faults, with the exception of faults along the northern and southern margins of the block. These results provide new insights into the nature of tectonic deformation around the Ordos block, and are useful for assessing the seismic activity in this region.

  13. Normal block faulting in the Airport Graben, Managua pull-apart rift, Nicaragua: gravity and magnetic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Zambrana Arias, X.; Keppie, D.; Ramón Márquez, V.

    2012-12-01

    Regional scale models have been proposed for the Nicaraguan depression: 1) parallel rifting of the depression (and volcanic front) due to roll back of the underlying subducted Cocos plate; 2) right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the depression and locally offset by pull-apart basins; 3) right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the depression and offset by left-lateral transverse or bookshelf faults. At an intermediate scale, Funk et al. (2011) interpret the depression as half graben type structures. The E-W Airport graben lies in the southeastern part of the Managua graben (Nicaragua), across which the active Central American volcanic arc is dextrally offset, possibly the result of a subducted transform fault where the subduction angle changes. The Managua graben lies within the late Quaternary Nicaragua depression produced by backarc rifting during roll back of the Middle American Trench. The Managua graben formed as a pull-apart rift associated with dextral bookshelf faulting during dextral shear between the forearc and arc and is the locus of two historical, large earthquakes that destroyed the city of Managua. In order to asses future earthquake risk, four E-W gravity and magnetic profiles were undertaken to determine its structure across the Airport graben, which is bounded by the Cofradia and Airport fault zones, to the east and west, respectively. These data indicated the presence of a series of normal faults bounding down-thrown and up-thrown fault blocks and a listric normal fault, Sabana Grande Fault. The models imply that this area has been subjected to tectonic extension. These faults appear to be part of the bookshelf suite and will probably be the locus of future earthquakes, which could destroy the airport and surrounding part of Managua. Three regional SW-NE gravity profiles running from the Pacific Ocean up to the Caribbean See indicate a change in crustal structure: from north to south the crust thins. According to these regional

  14. Finding the lost segment of the North Anatolian Fault in the Bursa Basin, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutoglu, S. H.; Deguchi, T.; Gundogdu, O.; Seker, D. Z.; Kuscu, S.

    2011-12-01

    After the 1999 Golcuk Mw=7.4, the seismic stress of the North Anatolian Fault has been transferred onto the segments in the Marmara Sea. The NAF is separated to three branches around the Marmara region; one branch runs into the Marmara Sea from the Yalova-Cinarcik location in the north, the second branch runs into the Marmara Sea from the Gemlik location in the south, and the last one goes toward the Bursa basin from the Sakarya-Pamukova location in the lower south. Some researchers consider that the south branch, which experienced the last major earthquake in the year 1064, poses a danger as much as the north branch.For that reason, this study has been conducted for monitoring the fault activities around the Bursa basin. In thi