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Sample records for active ringing suppression

  1. RF probe recovery time reduction with a novel active ringing suppression circuit

    PubMed Central

    Peshkovsky, A.S.; Forguez, J.; Cerioni, L.; Pusiol, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    A simple Q-damper device for active probe recovery time reduction is introduced along with a straightforward technique for the circuit's component value optimization. The device is inductively coupled to a probe through a coupling transformer positioned away from the main coil, which makes the design independent of the coil type being used. The Q-damper is a tuned circuit, which is resonant at the same frequency as the probe and can be actively interrupted. When the circuit is interrupted, it is detuned and, thereby, is uncoupled from the probe, which operates normally. Turning the device on leads to re-coupling of the circuits and causes splitting of the probe's resonance line, which can be observed through its drive port. A resistance of an appropriate value is introduced into the Q-damper circuit, resulting in smoothing of the resonance splitting into one broad line, representing the coupled system's low-Q state, in which the energy stored in the main coil is efficiently dissipated. The circuit's component values are optimized by monitoring the shape of this low-Q state. Probe recovery time reduction by, approximately, an order of magnitude has been obtained with this device. Application of the device during an NQR experiment led to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 4.9. PMID:16111906

  2. Biological suppression of potato ring rot by fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, A R; Poplawsky, A R; Wiese, M V

    1992-01-01

    Three strains of fluorescent pseudomonads (IS-1, IS-2, and IS-3) isolated from potato underground stems with roots showed in vitro antibiosis against 30 strains of the ring rot bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. On the basis of morphological and biochemical tests and fatty acid analysis, IS-1 and IS-2 were identified as Pseudomonas aureofaciens and IS-3 was identified as P. fluorescens biovar III. IS-1 was the most inhibitory to C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus strains in vitro, followed by IS-3 and IS-2. Suppression of ring rot by these antagonists was demonstrated in greenhouse trials with stem-cultured potato (cv. Russet Burbank) seedlings. Although each antagonist significantly reduced C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus populations, only IS-1 reduced infection by C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. In a second experiment, treatment with IS-1 (10(9) CFU/ml) significantly reduced ring rot infection by 23.4 to 26.7% after 5 to 8 weeks. The average C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus population was also significantly reduced by 50 to 52%. Application of different combinations of antagonist strains was not more effective than single-strain treatment. Images PMID:1622275

  3. Suppression of parametric instabilities in future gravitational wave detectors using damping rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras, S.; Blair, D. G.; Zhao, C.

    2009-07-01

    The next generation of laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors requires optical cavities with stored power approaching 1 MW. However, such proposed cavities are subject to parametric instability where carrier power resonantly downconverts to drive a large number of test mass acoustic resonances. Damping rings on the test mass circumference have been proposed as a means of suppressing such instabilities, and in previous work, the affect of such a ring on test mass acoustic modes and thermal noise was analysed. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the general issue of parametric instability suppression with damping rings. We determine the optimal position and geometry of damping rings, so as to obtain sufficient instability suppression with the least thermal noise penalty. It is shown that unilateral stability can be attained with a ring damper alone at the expense of a 20% increase in thermal noise, while if just one optical mode is suppressed, there is only a 5% noise penalty.

  4. Adaptive center determination for effective suppression of ring artifacts in tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, D. Sørensen, H. O. Dobberschütz, S.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    2014-10-06

    Ring artifacts on tomogram slices hinder image interpretation. They are caused by minor variation in the response from individual elements in a two dimensional (2D) X-ray detector. Polar space decreases the suppression complexity by transforming the rings on the tomogram slice to linear stripes. However, it requires that the center of rings lie at the origin of polar transformation. If this is not the case, all methods employing polar space become ineffective. We developed a method based on Gaussian localization of the ring center in Hough parameter space to assign the origin for the polar transformation. Thus, obtained linear stripes can be effectively suppressed by already existing methods. This effectively suppresses ring artifacts in the data from a variety of experimental setups, sample types and also handles tomograms that are previously cropped. This approach functions automatically, avoids the need for assumptions and preserves fine details, all critical for synchrotron based nanometer resolution tomography.

  5. Suppression of decoherence in a graphene monolayer ring

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, D. Rode, J. C.; Haug, R. J.

    2014-08-25

    The influence of high magnetic fields on coherent transport is investigated. A monolayer graphene quantum ring is fabricated and the Aharonov-Bohm effect is observed. For increased magnitude of the magnetic field, higher harmonics appear. This phenomenon is attributed to an increase of the phase coherence length due to reduction of spin flip scattering.

  6. Flattening a puckered cyclohexasilane ring by suppression of the pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhodnya, Konstantin; Olson, Christopher; Dai, Xuliang; Schulz, Douglas L.; Boudjouk, Philip; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental and theoretical characterization of neutral Si6X12 (X = Cl, Br) molecules that contain D3d distorted six-member silicon rings due to a pseudo-Jahn-Teller (PJT) effect. Calculations show that filling the intervenient molecular orbitals with electron pairs of adduct suppresses the PJT effect in Si6X12, with the Si6 ring becoming planar (D6h) upon complex formation. The stabilizing role of electrostatic and covalent interactions between positively charged silicon atoms and chlorine atoms of the subject [Si6Cl14]2- dianionic complexes is discussed. The reaction of Si6Cl12 with a Lewis base (e.g., Cl-) to give planar [Si6Cl14]2- dianionic complexes presents an experimental proof that suppression of the PJT effect is an effective strategy in restoring high Si6 ring symmetry. Additionally, the proposed pathway for the PJT suppression has been proved by the synthesis and characterization of novel compounds containing planar Si6 ring, namely, [nBu4N]2[Si6Cl12I2], [nBu4N]2[Si6Br14], and [nBu4N]2[Si6Br12I2]. This work represents the first demonstration that PJT effect suppression is useful in the rational design of materials with novel properties.

  7. An active solid state ring laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of an active, solid state ring laser gyroscope were investigated. Two laser diode pumped monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators (NPRO), forced to lase in opposite directions, formed the NPRO-Gyro. It was unique in being an active ring laser gyroscope with a homogeneously broadened gain medium. This work examined sources of technical and fundamental noise. Associated calculations accounted for aspects of the NPRO-Gyro performance, suggested design improvements, and outlined limitations. The work brought out the need to stabilize the NPRO environment in order to achieve performance goals. Two Nd:YAG NPROs were mounted within an environment short term stabilized to microdegrees Celsius. The Allan variance of the NPRO-Gyro beat note was 500 Hz for a one second time delay. Unequal treatment of the NPROs appeared as noise on the beat frequency, therefore reducing its rotation sensitivity. The sensitivity to rotation was limited by technical noise sources.

  8. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  9. Suppressing irrelevant information: knowledge activation or inhibition?

    PubMed

    McNamara, Danielle S; McDaniel, Mark A

    2004-03-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not general-topic, sentences. Experiment 3 demonstrated that participants with greater general knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of the ambiguous words in general-topic sentences. As predicted by D. S. McNamara's (1997) knowledge-based account of suppression, ambiguity effects are influenced by greater activation of knowledge related to the intended meaning of the homograph. These results challenge inhibition (e.g. M. A. Gernsbacher, K. R. Varner. & M. Faust, 1990) as the sole mechanism responsible for the suppression of irrelevant information.

  10. Suppression of the coffee-ring effect by self-assembling graphene oxide and monolayer titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pengzhan; Ma, Renzhi; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wei, Jinquan; Wu, Dehai; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Zhu, Hongwei

    2013-02-01

    The in situ self-assembly of two types of typical two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials (i.e., graphene oxide (GO) and monolayer titania (TO)) is realized using a simple drop-casting method. Within the as-prepared hybrid films, the GO and TO nanosheets arrange alternately into a lamellar structure. Notably, the hybridization of GO and TO suppresses the formation of coffee-rings when drop-cast, which is attributed to the strong interactions between the GO and TO nanosheets. Finally, the mechanism for the in situ hybridization of these two types of nanosheets into heterogeneous lamellar films and the suppression of the coffee-ring effect are discussed. These results demonstrate the potential applications of drop-cast hybrid films for high-quality membrane deposition from liquid phases.

  11. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  12. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  13. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  14. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  15. Noise suppression by an acoustically treated three-ring inlet on a TF-34 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minner, G. L.; Goldman, R. G.; Heidelberg, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic performance tests were conducted with a three-ring inlet noise suppressor designed for a TF-34 engine. For all tests the aft noise sources were highly suppressed. The measured inlet suppression was large, reaching levels greater than 30 db at the peak. Comparisons of the data and the performance predictions were in reasonably good agreement. The frequency of peak attenuation was well predicted; the magnitude and spectral shape were reasonably well predicted. Agreement was best when the distribution of sound energy across the inlet was taken into account in the performance predictions. Tests in which the length of treatment was varied showed an orderly progression of attenuation with length; performance predictions for the different lengths also showed an orderly progression with length. At the highest speed of the engine, multiple pure tones were present throughout the spectrum in the source noise signature. These tones were effectively suppressed by the inlet liner, even at low frequencies, although the liner was designed to work best at the blade-passing frequency.

  16. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  17. Suppression of Beam-Ion Instability in Electron Rings with Multi-Bunch Train Beam Fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Fukuma, H.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-08-18

    The ion-caused beam instability in the future light sources and electron damping rings can be serious due to the high beam current and ultra-small emittance of picometer level. One simple and effective mitigation of the instability is a multi-bunch train beam filling pattern which can significantly reduce the ion density near the beam, and therefore reduce the instability growth rate up to two orders of magnitude. The suppression is more effective for high intensity beams with low emittance. The distribution and the field of trapped ions are benchmarked to validate the model used in the paper. The wake field of ion-cloud and the beam-ion instability is investigated both analytically and numerically. We derived a simple formula for the build-up of ion-cloud and instability growth rate with the multi-bunch-train filling pattern. The ion instabilities in ILC damping ring, SuperKEKB and SPEAR3 are used to compare with our analyses. The analyses in this paper agree well with simulations.

  18. Eigenspace techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Liebst, Bradley S.; Farm, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of eigenspace techniques for the design of an active flutter suppression system for a hypothetical research drone is discussed. One leading edge and two trailing edge aerodynamic control surfaces and four sensors (accelerometers) are available for each wing. Full state control laws are designed by selecting feedback gains which place closed loop eigenvalues and shape closed loop eigenvectors so as to stabilize wing flutter and reduce gust loads at the wing root while yielding accepatable robustness and satisfying constrains on rms control surface activity. These controllers are realized by state estimators designed using an eigenvalue placement/eigenvector shaping technique which results in recovery of the full state loop transfer characteristics. The resulting feedback compensators are shown to perform almost as well as the full state designs. They also exhibit acceptable performance in situations in which the failure of an actuator is simulated.

  19. MDMX exerts its oncogenic activity via suppression of retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Hu, L; Qiu, W; Deng, T; Zhang, Y; Bergholz, J; Xiao, Z-X

    2015-10-29

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) has a major role in the development of human malignancies. We have previously shown that MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase and major negative regulator of p53, binds to and promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of RB. MDMX, a homolog of MDM2, also binds to and inhibits p53 transactivation activity, yet it does not possess intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Here, we show that MDMX binds to and promotes RB degradation in an MDM2-dependent manner. Specifically, the MDMX C-terminal ring domain binds to the RB C-pocket and enhances MDM2-RB interaction. Silencing MDMX induces RB accumulation, cell cycle arrest and senescence-like phenotypes, which are reverted by simultaneous RB knockdown. Furthermore, MDMX ablation leads to significant retardation of xenograft tumor growth, concomitant with RB accumulation. These results demonstrate that MDMX exerts oncogenic activity via suppression of RB, and suggest that both MDM2 and MDMX could be chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:25703327

  20. Suppression of Antigen-Specific Lymphocyte Activation in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, David; Pride, Michael W.; Brown, Eric L.; Risin, Diana; Pellis, Neal R.

    1999-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in astronauts during and after spaceflight, and in isolated immune cells in true and simulated microgravity. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T cells is severely suppressed in true and simulated microgravity. These recent findings with various polyclonal activators suggests a suppression of oligoclonal lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR), as a model for a primary immune response; a tetanus toxoid (TT) response and a B. burgdorferi (Bb) response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  1. Tree-ring isotope records of tropical cyclone activity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Dana L.; Mora, Claudia I.; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Mock, Cary J.; Uhle, Maria E.; Sharp, Zachary

    2006-01-01

    The destruction wrought by North Atlantic hurricanes in 2004 and 2005 dramatically emphasizes the need for better understanding of tropical cyclone activity apart from the records provided by meteorological data and historical documentation. We present a 220-year record of oxygen isotope values of α-cellulose in longleaf pine tree rings that preserves anomalously low isotope values in the latewood portion of the ring in years corresponding with known 19th and 20th century landfalling/near-coastal tropical storms and hurricanes. Our results suggest the potential for a tree-ring oxygen isotope proxy record of tropical cyclone occurrence extending back many centuries based on remnant pine wood from protected areas in the southeastern U.S. PMID:16984996

  2. Tree-ring isotope records of tropical cyclone activity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dana L; Mora, Claudia I; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D; Mock, Cary J; Uhle, Maria E; Sharp, Zachary

    2006-09-26

    The destruction wrought by North Atlantic hurricanes in 2004 and 2005 dramatically emphasizes the need for better understanding of tropical cyclone activity apart from the records provided by meteorological data and historical documentation. We present a 220-year record of oxygen isotope values of alpha-cellulose in longleaf pine tree rings that preserves anomalously low isotope values in the latewood portion of the ring in years corresponding with known 19th and 20th century landfalling/near-coastal tropical storms and hurricanes. Our results suggest the potential for a tree-ring oxygen isotope proxy record of tropical cyclone occurrence extending back many centuries based on remnant pine wood from protected areas in the southeastern U.S.

  3. Active flutter suppression - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency in the mathematical model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a roll maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  4. Robust control design techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozbay, Hitay; Bachmann, Glen R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, an active flutter suppression problem is studied for a thin airfoil in unsteady aerodynamics. The mathematical model of this system is infinite dimensional because of Theodorsen's function which is irrational. Several second order approximations of Theodorsen's function are compared. A finite dimensional model is obtained from such an approximation. We use H infinity control techniques to find a robustly stabilizing controller for active flutter suppression.

  5. Suppression of antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pride, M. W.; Brown, E. L.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Various parameters of immune suppression are observed in lymphocytes from astronauts during and after a space flight. It is difficult to ascribe this suppression to microgravity effects on immune cells in crew specimens, due to the complex physiological response to space flight and the resultant effect on in vitro immune performance. Use of isolated immune cells in true and modeled microgravity in immune performance tests, suggests a direct effect of microgravity on in vitro cellular function. Specifically, polyclonal activation of T-cells is severely suppressed in true and modeled microgravity. These recent findings suggest a potential suppression of oligoclonal antigen-specific lymphocyte activation in microgravity. We utilized rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors as an analog of microgravity for cell cultures to analyze three models of antigen-specific activation. A mixed-lymphocyte reaction, as a model for a primary immune response, a tetanus toxoid response and a Borrelia burgdorferi response, as models of a secondary immune response, were all suppressed in the RWV bioreactor. Our findings confirm that the suppression of activation observed with polyclonal models also encompasses oligoclonal antigen-specific activation.

  6. Public key suppression and recovery using a PANDA ring resonator for high security communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juleang, Pakorn; Phongsanam, Prapas; Mitatha, Somsak; Yupapin, Preecha P.

    2011-03-01

    An interesting security technique that uses the dark-bright soliton conversion control within the microring resonator is proposed. The obtained outputs for a dark-bright soliton dynamic state can be controlled and used to form the public key suppression for communication security application. However, a good design should be possible to be fabricated; therefore, by using the parameters based on the practical device parameters, the simulation results obtained have shown that the proposed system can indeed be achieved. The public key suppression and public key recovery can be used in a highly secure communication system and has potential applications in optical cryptography.

  7. Flutter suppression by active control and its benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Townsend, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A general discussion of the airplane applications of active flutter suppression systems is presented with focus on supersonic cruise aircraft configurations. Topics addressed include a brief historical review; benefits, risks, and concerns; methods of application; and applicable configurations. Results are presented where the direct operating costs and performance benefits of an arrow wing supersonic cruise vehicle equipped with an active flutter suppression system are compared with corresponding costs and performance of the same baseline airplane where the flutter deficiency was corrected by passive methods (increases in structural stiffness). The design, synthesis, and conceptual mechanization of the active flutter suppression system are discussed. The results show that a substantial weight savings can be accomplished by using the active system. For the same payload and range, airplane direct operating costs are reduced by using the active system. The results also indicate that the weight savings translates into increased range or payload.

  8. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  9. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  10. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils.

  11. Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2004-01-01

    A method of feedback control has been proposed as a means of suppressing thermo-acoustic instabilities in a liquid- fueled combustor of a type used in an aircraft engine. The basic principle of the method is one of (1) sensing combustor pressure oscillations associated with instabilities and (2) modulating the rate of flow of fuel to the combustor with a control phase that is chosen adaptively so that the pressure oscillations caused by the modulation oppose the sensed pressure oscillations. The need for this method arises because of the planned introduction of advanced, lean-burning aircraft gas turbine engines, which promise to operate with higher efficiencies and to emit smaller quantities of nitrogen oxides, relative to those of present aircraft engines. Unfortunately, the advanced engines are more susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities. These instabilities are hard to control because they include large dead-time phase shifts, wide-band noise characterized by amplitudes that are large relative to those of the instabilities, exponential growth of the instabilities, random net phase walks, and amplitude fluctuations. In this method (see figure), the output of a combustion-pressure sensor would be wide-band-pass filtered and then further processed to generate a control signal that would be applied to a fast-actuation valve to modulate the flow of fuel. Initially, the controller would rapidly take large phase steps in order to home in, within a fraction of a second, to a favorable phase region within which the instability would be reduced. Then the controller would restrict itself to operate within this phase region and would further restrict itself to operate within a region of stability, as long as the power in the instability signal was decreasing. In the phase-shifting scheme of this method, the phase of the control vector would be made to continuously bounce back and forth from one boundary of an effective stability region to the other. Computationally

  12. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  13. Experiences with active cosmic background suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, R.M.; Lamaze, G.P.

    1994-12-31

    The dominant source of background in a bare germanium gamma-ray detector is natural radiation originating from potassium, uranium, and thorium decay in the laboratory environment and from cosmic rays. Most of the background is removed by surrounding the detector with lead shielding, which is commonly 20 cm thick. In a well-shielded detector, the largest contributor to the integral counting rate is cosmic rays, and to a lesser extent beta particles from {sup 210}Pb. Most of the counting rate in the continuum is due to highly penetrating muons. Many of the characteristic peaks in the background also originate from fast tertiary neutrons of cosmic-ray origin, which generate neutron activation products or create gamma rays from inelastic scattering in materials of the detector and shield. Very massive shielding is required to remove this penetrating component of background; we have found a fivefold reduction in the cosmic components by moving the detector into a laboratory 20 m underground. However, lacking an underground lab, we have attempted to use active shielding to reduce the background of a Ge detector located above ground. The guard detector is a proportional counter forming a roof 23 cm above the detector. The counter is placed inside the lead shielding to reduce it`s background counting rate.

  14. Enzymatic aerobic ring rearrangement of optically active furylcarbinols.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Daniel; Doknić, Diana; Deska, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic furans are currently discussed as highly attractive alternative feedstock in a post-fossil society; thus, also the creation of sustainable furan valorization pathways appears of great importance. Here an artificial Achmatowicz monooxygenase activity for the aerobic ring expansion of furans is achieved by the combination of commercial glucose oxidase as oxygen-activating biocatalyst and wild-type chloroperoxidase as oxygen-transfer mediator, providing a biological ready-to-use solution for this truly synthetic furan rearrangement. In concert with enzymatic transformations for the enantioselective preparation of optically active furylcarbinols, purely biocatalytic reaction cascades for the stereocontrolled construction of complex pyranones are obtained, exhibiting high functional group tolerance even to oxidation-sensitive moieties. PMID:25335580

  15. Modification of flower colour by suppressing β-ring carotene hydroxylase genes in Oncidium.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-M; To, K-Y; Lai, H-M; Jeng, S-T

    2016-03-01

    Oncidium 'Gower Ramsey' (Onc. GR) is a popular cut flower, but its colour is limited to bright yellow. The β-ring carotene hydroxylase (BCH2) gene is involved in carotenoid biogenesis for pigment formation. However, the role of BCH2 in Onc. GR is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functions of three BCH2 genes, BCH-A2, BCH-B2 and BCH-C2 isolated from Onc. GR, to analyse their roles in flower colour. RT-PCR expression profiling suggested that BCH2 was mainly expressed in flowers. The expression of BCH-B2 remained constant while that of BCH-A2 gradually decreased during flower development. Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens to introduce BCH2 RNA interference (RNAi), we created transgenic Oncidium plants with down-regulated BCH expression. In the transgenic plants, flower colour changed from the bright yellow of the wild type to light and white-yellow. BCH-A2 and BCH-B2 expression levels were significantly reduced in the transgenic flower lips, which make up the major portion of the Oncidium flower. Sectional magnification of the flower lip showed that the amount of pigmentation in the papillate cells of the adaxial epidermis was proportional to the intensity of yellow colouration. HPLC analyses of the carotenoid composition of the transgenic flowers suggested major reductions in neoxanthin and violaxanthin. In conclusion, BCH2 expression regulated the accumulation of yellow pigments in the Oncidium flower, and the down-regulation of BCH-A2 and BCH-B2 changed the flower colour from bright yellow to light and white-yellow. PMID:26404515

  16. Modification of flower colour by suppressing β-ring carotene hydroxylase genes in Oncidium.

    PubMed

    Wang, H-M; To, K-Y; Lai, H-M; Jeng, S-T

    2016-03-01

    Oncidium 'Gower Ramsey' (Onc. GR) is a popular cut flower, but its colour is limited to bright yellow. The β-ring carotene hydroxylase (BCH2) gene is involved in carotenoid biogenesis for pigment formation. However, the role of BCH2 in Onc. GR is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functions of three BCH2 genes, BCH-A2, BCH-B2 and BCH-C2 isolated from Onc. GR, to analyse their roles in flower colour. RT-PCR expression profiling suggested that BCH2 was mainly expressed in flowers. The expression of BCH-B2 remained constant while that of BCH-A2 gradually decreased during flower development. Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens to introduce BCH2 RNA interference (RNAi), we created transgenic Oncidium plants with down-regulated BCH expression. In the transgenic plants, flower colour changed from the bright yellow of the wild type to light and white-yellow. BCH-A2 and BCH-B2 expression levels were significantly reduced in the transgenic flower lips, which make up the major portion of the Oncidium flower. Sectional magnification of the flower lip showed that the amount of pigmentation in the papillate cells of the adaxial epidermis was proportional to the intensity of yellow colouration. HPLC analyses of the carotenoid composition of the transgenic flowers suggested major reductions in neoxanthin and violaxanthin. In conclusion, BCH2 expression regulated the accumulation of yellow pigments in the Oncidium flower, and the down-regulation of BCH-A2 and BCH-B2 changed the flower colour from bright yellow to light and white-yellow.

  17. Nitric oxide mediates caerulein-induced suppression of locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Volke, V; Soosaar, A; Kõks, S; Bourin, M; Männistö, P T; Vasar, E

    1996-08-01

    Caerulein, a non-selective agonist of cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors, is shown to suppress locomotor activity in rodents via stimulation of CCK(A) receptors. In the present study we examined the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in caerulein-induced hypolocomotion in rats. Caerulein (10 microg/kg) markedly decreased the horizontal and vertical components of locomotor activity in rats measured in dark motility boxes. Pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), at 5 mg/kg i.p., abolished the inhibiting action of caerulein on the horizontal activity, but did not affect the reduced frequency of rearing. The other doses of L-NAME (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg) were ineffective against caerulein. As L-NAME at this dose range does not stimulate locomotor activity, it is likely that NO is involved in the motor suppressant effect of systemically administered caerulein.

  18. Potent cough suppression by physiologically active substance in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Norio; Ito, Yushi; Ogawa, Sachie K; Maeda, Megumi; Wakita, Masahito; Takahama, Kazuo; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Kamei, Shintaro; Hamamoto, Takayoshi; Umehashi, Misako; Maeda, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Human plasma contains wide variety of bioactive proteins that have proved essential in therapeutic discovery. However many human plasma proteins remain orphans with unknown biological functions. Evidences suggest that some plasma components target the respiratory system. In the present study we adapted heparin affinity chromatography to fractionate human plasma for functional bioassay. Fractions from pooled human plasma yielded particular plasma fractions with strong cough suppressing effects. Purification yielded a fraction that was finally identified as an activated blood coagulation factor fXIa using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS). The fraction almost completely suppressed coughs induced by either chemical or mechanical stimulation applied to larynx or bifurcation of guinea-pig trachea. Cough suppressing effect of the fraction and commercially available fXIa were one million times stronger than codeine and codeine only partially suppressed the mechanically triggered coughing in animal model. Recent reviews highlighted prominent shortcomings of current available antitussives, including narcotic opioids such as codeine and their unpleasant or intolerable side effects. Therefore, safer and more effective cough suppressants would be welcome, and present findings indicate that fXIa in human plasma as a very promising, new therapeutic candidate for effective antitussive action.

  19. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  20. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  1. A fluorometric microarray with ZnO substrate-enhanced fluorescence and suppressed ``coffee-ring'' effects for fluorescence immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuying; Dong, Minmin; Li, Rui; Zhang, Liyan; Qiao, Yuchun; Jiang, Yao; Qi, Wei; Wang, Hua

    2015-11-01

    A glass slide was first patterned with hydrophobic hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDS) and then microspotted with hydrophilic ZnO nanoparticles in an aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) matrix. The resulting HDS-ZnO-APS microarray could present the capability of suppressing the undesirable ``coffee-ring'' effects through its hydrophobic pattern so as to allow the fabrication of ZnO-APS testing microspots with a highly dense and uniform distribution. The lotus-like ``self-cleaning'' function could also be expected to effectively curb the cross contamination of multiple sample droplets. More importantly, the introduction of ZnO nanoparticles could endow the testing microspots with substrate-enhanced fluorescence leading to signal-amplification microarray fluorometry. The practical application of the developed HDS-ZnO-APS microarray was investigated by the sandwiched fluorometric immunoassays of human IgG, showing a linear detection range from 0.010 to 10.0 ng mL-1. Such a throughput-improved fluorometric microarray could be tailored for probing multiple biomarkers in complicated media like serum or blood.A glass slide was first patterned with hydrophobic hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDS) and then microspotted with hydrophilic ZnO nanoparticles in an aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) matrix. The resulting HDS-ZnO-APS microarray could present the capability of suppressing the undesirable ``coffee-ring'' effects through its hydrophobic pattern so as to allow the fabrication of ZnO-APS testing microspots with a highly dense and uniform distribution. The lotus-like ``self-cleaning'' function could also be expected to effectively curb the cross contamination of multiple sample droplets. More importantly, the introduction of ZnO nanoparticles could endow the testing microspots with substrate-enhanced fluorescence leading to signal-amplification microarray fluorometry. The practical application of the developed HDS-ZnO-APS microarray was investigated by the sandwiched fluorometric

  2. Genipin Suppresses NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation Through Uncoupling Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Rajanbabu, Venugopal; Galam, Lakshmi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Enciso, Juan; Tadikonda, Pratima; Lane, Troy N.; Bandyopadhyay, Sayantani; Parthasarathy, Prasanna Tamarapu; Cho, Young; Cho, Seong Ho; Lee, Yong Chul; Lockey, Richard F.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2015-01-01

    Incomplete clearance of apoptotic cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) release are known to trigger inflammasome activation causing severe inflammation in acute lung injury and various metabolic and autoimmune diseases. Moreover, it has been reported that apoptotic cell clearance and ROS-mediated apoptosis critically depend on mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2). However, the relationship between UCP2 and inflammasome activation has not been studied. This report investigates the role of UCP2 in the expression and activation of NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome in human macrophages. We found that UCP2 overexpression significantly enhanced the expression levels of NLRP3. The NLRP3 expression levels were significantly suppressed in THP1 cells treated with genipin, a UCP2 inhibitor, compared to controls. In addition, genipin altered adenosine triphosphate (ATP)- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) secretion and significantly suppressed caspase-1 activity in inflammasome-activated human macrophages. Taken together, our results suggest that genipin modulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation and ATP- or H2O2-mediated IL-1β release. PMID:26123077

  3. The Lord of Rings - the mysterious case of the stolen rings: a critical analysis of an informal education activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrelli, S.

    2011-10-01

    the real physical properties of that celestial object. After collecting the ingredients, they must carry them to the "The Red Giant" and indicate their best recipe to Mr Schioppanelli. Depending on the recipe, rings can be too strict or too luminous or too fast rotating and so on. The winning group is the one which prepares the best recipe to cook the rings in the smallest amount of time. After introducing this specific (and mysterious) game, we analyze the advantage-disadvantage ratio of such an activity, which is as funny as dispersive [2]. The key expression of the whole activity is, of course, "informal education". But, as a best practice result, we organize also 1 or 2 very simple laboratories about the solar system before playing the game. One of these, called The Olmicomics, allows the pupils to understand the dimensions of the planets with respect to their distances, providing them the correct introduction to "The Lord of Rings". The pupils are simply requested to pone the planets in a correct scale on a map of the city where they live. Then we coherently calculate together dimension of the Solar System planets and the Sun, according to the scale they chose. The second activity provide the pupils hints about the physical properties of the planets, touching the points a)-d) listed above. We believe this two-faces strategy is a quite effective tool for an education suited to our target group. They really do things, touch things, use their own body as a meter to understand distances and physical properties as the gravitational force. In the meanwhile, they are also asked to think about what they are doing, to make calculation and to build a representation of the Solar System by numbers, turning it into a visual representation only after their calculation. And, finally, to play with all these conceipts.

  4. Berberine Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation via Decreasing CREB Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruyuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Yao; Liu, Yun; Li, Fengying; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Libin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, one of the major constituents of Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, has been demonstrated to lower blood glucose, blood lipid, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The anti-obesity effect of berberine has been attributed to its anti-adipogenic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that berberine significantly suppressed the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2), and other adipogenic genes in the process of adipogenesis. Berberine decreased cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression at the early stage of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and forskolin were also attenuated by berberine. The binding activities of cAMP responsive element (CRE) stimulated by IBMX and forskolin were inhibited by berberine. The binding of phosphorylated CREB to the promoter of C/EBPβ was abrogated by berberine after the induction of preadipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that berberine blocks adipogenesis mainly via suppressing CREB activity, which leads to a decrease in C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional cascades. PMID:25928058

  5. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  6. Design, test, and evaluation of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    Three control law design techniques for flutter suppression are presented. Each technique uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first method uses traditional tools (such as pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) for producing a controller that has minimal complexity and which is sufficiently robust to handle plant uncertainty. The second procedure uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals and dynamic compensation to synthesize the model rate of the critical mode for feedback to the distributed control surfaces. The third technique starts with a minimum-energy linear quadratic Gaussian controller, iteratively modifies intensity matrices corresponding to input and output noise, and applies controller order reduction to achieve a low-order, robust controller. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Only the traditional pole/zero loci design was sufficiently robust to errors in the nominal plant to successfully suppress flutter during the test. The traditional pole/zero loci design provided simultaneous suppression of symmetric and antisymmetric flutter with a 24-percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure. Posttest analyses are shown which illustrate the problems encountered with the other laws.

  7. Comparative study between two different active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    An activated leading-edge (LE)-tailing-edge (TE) control system is applied to a drone aircraft with the objective of enabling the drone to fly subsonically at dynamic pressures which are 44% above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The control synthesis approach is based on the aerodynamic energy concept and it incorporates recent developments in this area. A comparison is made between the performance of the activated LE-TE control system and the performance of a TE control system, analyzed in a previous work. The results obtained indicate that although all the control systems achieve the flutter suppression objectives, the TE control system appears to be somewhat superior to the LE-TE control system, in this specific application. This superiority is manifested through reduced values of control surface activity over a wide range of flight conditions.

  8. Transient and selective suppression of neural activity with infrared light

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Austin R.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and control of neural circuitry requires the ability to selectively activate or inhibit neurons. Previous work showed that infrared laser light selectively excited neural activity in endogenous unmyelinated and myelinated axons. However, inhibition of neuronal firing with infrared light was only observed in limited cases, is not well understood and was not precisely controlled. Using an experimentally tractable unmyelinated preparation for detailed investigation and a myelinated preparation for validation, we report that it is possible to selectively and transiently inhibit electrically-initiated axonal activation, as well as to both block or enhance the propagation of action potentials of specific motor neurons. Thus, in addition to previously shown excitation, we demonstrate an optical method of suppressing components of the nervous system with functional spatiotemporal precision. We believe this technique is well-suited for non-invasive investigations of diverse excitable tissues and may ultimately be applied for treating neurological disorders. PMID:24009039

  9. Nonexocytotic serotonin release tonically suppresses serotonergic neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Baccini, Gilda; Tatini, Francesca; Palmini, Rolando Berlinguer; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The firing activity of serotonergic neurons in raphe nuclei is regulated by negative feedback exerted by extracellular serotonin (5-HT)o acting through somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. The steady-state [5-HT]o, sensed by 5-HT1A autoreceptors, is determined by the balance between the rates of 5-HT release and reuptake. Although it is well established that reuptake of 5-HTo is mediated by 5-HT transporters (SERT), the release mechanism has remained unclear. It is also unclear how selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants increase the [5-HT]o in raphe nuclei and suppress serotonergic neuron activity, thereby potentially diminishing their own therapeutic effect. Using an electrophysiological approach in a slice preparation, we show that, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), continuous nonexocytotic 5-HT release is responsible for suppression of phenylephrine-facilitated serotonergic neuron firing under basal conditions as well as for autoinhibition induced by SSRI application. By using 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated G protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels of patched serotonergic neurons as 5-HTo sensors, we show substantial nonexocytotic 5-HT release under conditions of abolished firing activity, Ca2+ influx, vesicular monoamine transporter 2–mediated vesicular accumulation of 5-HT, and SERT-mediated 5-HT transport. Our results reveal a cytosolic origin of 5-HTo in the DRN and suggest that 5-HTo may be supplied by simple diffusion across the plasma membrane, primarily from the dense network of neurites of serotonergic neurons surrounding the cell bodies. These findings indicate that the serotonergic system does not function as a sum of independently acting neurons but as a highly interdependent neuronal network, characterized by a shared neurotransmitter pool and the regulation of firing activity by an interneuronal, yet activity-independent, nonexocytotic mechanism. PMID:25712017

  10. [Suppression of cycling activity in sheep using parenteral progestagen treatment].

    PubMed

    Janett, F; Camponovo, L; Lanker, U; Hässig, M; Thun, R

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two synthetic progestagen preparations Chlormadinone acetate (CAP, Chronosyn, Veterinaria AG Zürich) and Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, Nadigest, G Streuli & Co. Uznach) on cycling activity and fertility in sheep. A flock of 28 non pregnant white alpine sheep was randomly divided into three groups, A (n = 10), B (n = 9) and C (n = 9). During a period of 4 weeks the cycling activity was confirmed by blood progesterone analysis. Thereafter, the animals of group A were treated with 50 mg CAP, those of group B with 140 mg MPA and those of group C with physiological saline solution. All injections were given intramuscularly. Suppression of endogenous progesterone secretion lasted from 28 to 49 days (mean = 39 days) in group A and from 42 to 70 days (mean = 50 days) in group B. The synchronization effect of both preparations was unsatisfactory as the occurrence of first estrus was distributed over a period of 3 weeks in group A and 4 weeks in group B. These findings could also be confirmed by the lambing period which lasted 52 days in group A and 36 days in group B. Control animals lambed within 9 days due to the synchronizing effect of the ram. The first fertile estrus was observed 36 days (group A) and 45 days (group B) after the treatment. In group A all 10 animals and in groups B and C 8 of 9 ewes each became pregnant. Parenteral progestagen application with CAP and MPA is a simple, safe and reversible method of estrus suppression in the sheep. The minimal suppressive duration of 4 (CAP) and 5 weeks (MPA) is not sufficient when a period of 3 months (alpine pasture period) is desired.

  11. Design and test of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Adams, William M.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1991-01-01

    Three flutter suppression control law design techniques are presented. Each uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals together with dynamic compensation to synthesize the modal rate of the critical mode for feedback to distributed control surfaces. The second uses traditional tools (pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) to develop a good understanding of the flutter mechanism and produce a controller with minimal complexity and good robustness to plant uncertainty. The third starts with a minimum energy Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller, applies controller order reduction, and then modifies weight and noise covariance matrices to improve multi-variable robustness. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model. Test results presented here include plant characteristics, maximum attained closed-loop dynamic pressure, and Root Mean Square control surface activity. A key result is that simultaneous symmetric and antisymmetric flutter suppression was achieved by the second control law, with a 24 percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure.

  12. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  13. Flame-powered trigger device for activating explosion suppression barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cortese, R.A.; Sapko, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed a flame-radiation-powered trigger device to explosively activate suppression barriers to quench gas and coal dust explosions. The major component of the device is a silicon solar panel, which concerts radiation from the developing explosion into electrical energy to initiate an electric detonator, which releases an extinguishing agent into the advancing flame front. Solar panels that are rated to produce 20 W of electrical power when exposed to the sunlight are producing about 200 W when exposed to a full-scale dust explosion. The solar panel is electrically isolated from the detonator by a pressure-sensitive switch until the arrival of the precursor pressure pulse, which always precedes a deflagration. This combination of pressure arming and flame-powered photogenerator prevents false barrier activation and requires no external power supply.

  14. Active flutter suppression using optical output feedback digital controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A method for synthesizing digital active flutter suppression controllers using the concept of optimal output feedback is presented. A convergent algorithm is employed to determine constrained control law parameters that minimize an infinite time discrete quadratic performance index. Low order compensator dynamics are included in the control law and the compensator parameters are computed along with the output feedback gain as part of the optimization process. An input noise adjustment procedure is used to improve the stability margins of the digital active flutter controller. Sample rate variation, prefilter pole variation, control structure variation and gain scheduling are discussed. A digital control law which accommodates computation delay can stabilize the wing with reasonable rms performance and adequate stability margins.

  15. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of active controls on the suppression of flutter and gust alleviation of two different types of subsonic aircraft (the Arava, twin turboprop STOL transport, and the Westwind twin-jet business transport) are investigated. The active controls are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a leading-edge (LE) control and a trailing-edge (TE) control. Each control surface is allowed to be driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system, located on the activated strip. The control law, which translates the sensor signals into control surface rotations, is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy. The results indicate the extreme effectiveness of the active systems in controlling flutter. A single system spanning 10% of the wing semispan made the Arava flutter-free, and a similar active system, for the Westwind aircraft, yielded a reduction of 75% in the maximum bending moment of the wing and a reduction of 90% in the acceleration of the cg of the aircraft. Results for simultaneous activation of several LE - TE systems are presented. Further work needed to bring the investigation to completion is also discussed.

  16. Immune-suppressive activity of punicalagin via inhibition of NFAT activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Ik; Kim, Byoung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Shin; Lee, Samkeun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Lim, Jong-Soon

    2008-07-11

    Since T cell activation is central to the development of autoimmune diseases, we screened a natural product library comprising 1400 samples of medicinal herbal extracts, to identify compounds that suppress T cell activity. Punicalagin (PCG) isolated from the fruit of Punica granatum was identified as a potent immune suppressant, based on its inhibitory action on the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). PCG downregulated the mRNA and soluble protein expression of interleukin-2 from anti-CD3/anti-CD28-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells and suppressed mixed leukocytes reaction (MLR) without exhibiting cytotoxicity to the cells. In vivo, the PCG treatment inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced chronic ear edema in mice and decreased CD3+ T cell infiltration of the inflamed tissue. These results suggest that PCG could be a potential candidate for the therapeutics of various immune pathologies.

  17. Notum deacylates Wnt proteins to suppress signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Kakugawa, Satoshi; Langton, Paul F; Zebisch, Matthias; Howell, Steven A; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O'Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Jones, E Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-12

    Signalling by Wnt proteins is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnt proteins from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity, as glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which probably help Notum to co-localize with Wnt proteins. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnt proteins and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  18. Semantic activation and letter search: blocking or suppression?

    PubMed

    Cinel, Caterina; Avons, Steve E; Russo, Riccardo

    2010-03-01

    Two experiments investigated associative priming with a letter-search prime task where either the prime and letter probe were presented simultaneously, or the letter probe appeared 200 ms (Experiment 1) or 300 ms (Experiment 2) after the prime. Weak associative priming was observed in both experiments, but unlike Stolz and Besner (1996) we found no evidence that priming was increased when the probe was delayed. However, strong associative priming was observed when a semantic decision had to be made on the prime (Experiment 3). Our results are consistent with an account where semantic activation of the prime occurs but its action on the target is suppressed by the prime task. The persistence of weak priming effects with the letter search task is explained in terms of the low-frequency items used.

  19. Suppression of Nonlinear Interactions in Resonant Macroscopic Quantum Devices: The Example of the Solid-State Ring Laser Gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Sylvain; Feugnet, Gilles; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Gutty, Francois; Bouyer, Philippe

    2008-05-09

    We report fine-tuning of nonlinear interactions in a solid-state ring laser gyroscope by vibrating the gain medium along the cavity axis. We demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that nonlinear interactions vanish for some values of the vibration parameters, leading to quasi-ideal rotation sensing. We eventually point out that our conclusions can be mapped onto other subfields of physics such as ring-shaped superfluid configurations, where nonlinear interactions could be tuned by using Feshbach resonance.

  20. Hybrid Active/Passive Jet Engine Noise Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parente, C. A.; Arcas, N.; Walker, B. E.; Hersh, A. S.; Rice, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel adaptive segmented liner concept has been developed that employs active control elements to modify the in-duct sound field to enhance the tone-suppressing performance of passive liner elements. This could potentially allow engine designs that inherently produce more tone noise but less broadband noise, or could allow passive liner designs to more optimally address high frequency broadband noise. A proof-of-concept validation program was undertaken, consisting of the development of an adaptive segmented liner that would maximize attenuation of two radial modes in a circular or annular duct. The liner consisted of a leading active segment with dual annuli of axially spaced active Helmholtz resonators, followed by an optimized passive liner and then an array of sensing microphones. Three successively complex versions of the adaptive liner were constructed and their performances tested relative to the performance of optimized uniform passive and segmented passive liners. The salient results of the tests were: The adaptive segmented liner performed well in a high flow speed model fan inlet environment, was successfully scaled to a high sound frequency and successfully attenuated three radial modes using sensor and active resonator arrays that were designed for a two mode, lower frequency environment.

  1. Exogenous melatonin inhibits neutrophil migration through suppression of ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Long; Sun, Ai-Ai; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Min; Ge, Shu-Chao; Hu, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Neutrophil migration to inflammatory sites is the fundamental process of innate immunity among organisms against pathogen invasion. As a major sleep adjusting hormone, melatonin has also been proved to be involved in various inflammatory events. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of exogenous melatonin on neutrophil migration to the injury site in live zebrafish and further investigate whether ERK signaling is involved in this process. Using the tail fin transection model, the fluorescently labeled neutrophil was in vivo visualized in transgenic Tg(lyz:EGFP), Tg(lyz:DsRed) zebrafish. We found that exogenous melatonin administration dramatically inhibited the injury-induced neutrophil migration in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. The inhibited effect of melatonin on neutrophil migration could be attenuated by melatonin receptor 1, 2, and 3 antagonists. The ERK phosphorylation level was significantly decreased post injury when treated with melatonin. The blocking of ERK activation with inhibitor PD0325901 suppressed the number of migrated neutrophils in response to injury. However, the activation of ERK with the epidermal growth factor could impair the inhibited effect of melatonin on neutrophil migration. We also detected that PD0325901 significantly suppressed the in vivo neutrophils transmigrating over the vessel endothelial cell using the transgenic Tg(flk:EGFP);(lyz:DsRed) line labeled as both vessel and neutrophil. Taking all of these data together, the results indicated that exogenous melatonin had an anti-migratory effect on neutrophils by blocking the ERK phosphorylation signal, and it led to the subsequent adhesion molecule expression. Thus, the crossing of the vessel endothelial cells of neutrophils became difficult.

  2. Optimized geometric configuration of active ring laser gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, John; Salloum, Tony

    2016-05-01

    We present a thorough derivation of the Sagnac effect for a ring laser gyroscope of any arbitrary polygonal configuration. We determine optimized alternative geometric configurations for the mirrors. The simulations incur the implementation of a lasing medium with the standard square system, triangular, pentagonal, and oblongated square configuration (diamond). Simulations of possible new geometric configurations are considered, as well as the possibility of adjusting the concavity of the mirrors.

  3. Synthesis, insecticidal activity, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of anthranilic diamides analogs containing oxadiazole rings.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhao; Zhu, Hongjun; Chen, Kai; Liu, Rui; Khallaf, Abdalla; Zhang, Xiangning; Ni, Jueping

    2013-06-28

    A series of anthranilic diamides analogs (3–11, 16–24) containing 1,2,4- or 1,3,4-oxadiazole rings were synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, MS and elemental analyses. The structure of 3-bromo-N-(2-(3-(4-bromophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)-4-chloro-6-methylphenyl)-1-(3-chloropyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide (18, CCDC-) was determined by X-ray diffraction crystallography. The insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella and Spodoptera exigua were evaluated. The results showed that most of title compounds displayed good larvicidal activities against P. xylostella, especially compound 3-bromo-N-(4-chloro-2-methyl-6-(5-(methylthio)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)phenyl)-1-(3-chloropyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide (6), which displayed 71.43% activity against P. xylostella at 0.4 μg mL(-1) and 33.33% against S. exigua at 1 μg mL(-1). The structure-activity relationship showed that compounds decorated with a 1,3,4-oxadiazole were more potent than compounds decorated with a 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and different substituents attached to the oxadiazole ring also affected the insecticidal activity. This work provides some hints for further structure modification and the enhancement of insecticidal activity.

  4. Synthesis, insecticidal activity, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of anthranilic diamides analogs containing oxadiazole rings.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhao; Zhu, Hongjun; Chen, Kai; Liu, Rui; Khallaf, Abdalla; Zhang, Xiangning; Ni, Jueping

    2013-06-28

    A series of anthranilic diamides analogs (3–11, 16–24) containing 1,2,4- or 1,3,4-oxadiazole rings were synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, MS and elemental analyses. The structure of 3-bromo-N-(2-(3-(4-bromophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)-4-chloro-6-methylphenyl)-1-(3-chloropyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide (18, CCDC-) was determined by X-ray diffraction crystallography. The insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella and Spodoptera exigua were evaluated. The results showed that most of title compounds displayed good larvicidal activities against P. xylostella, especially compound 3-bromo-N-(4-chloro-2-methyl-6-(5-(methylthio)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)phenyl)-1-(3-chloropyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide (6), which displayed 71.43% activity against P. xylostella at 0.4 μg mL(-1) and 33.33% against S. exigua at 1 μg mL(-1). The structure-activity relationship showed that compounds decorated with a 1,3,4-oxadiazole were more potent than compounds decorated with a 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and different substituents attached to the oxadiazole ring also affected the insecticidal activity. This work provides some hints for further structure modification and the enhancement of insecticidal activity. PMID:23657615

  5. Inhibiting Delta-6 Desaturase Activity Suppresses Tumor Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Chengwei; Qu, Xiying; Wan, Jianbo; Rong, Rong; Huang, Lili; Cai, Chun; Zhou, Keyuan; Gu, Yan; Qian, Steven Y.; Kang, Jing X.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a tumor-supportive microenvironment is characterized by high levels of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic eicosanoids derived from omega-6 (n−6) arachidonic acid (AA). Although the metabolic pathways (COX, LOX, and P450) that generate these n−6 AA eicosanoids have been targeted, the role of endogenous AA production in tumorigenesis remains unexplored. Delta-6 desaturase (D6D) is the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for the synthesis of n−6 AA and increased D6D activity can lead to enhanced n−6 AA production. Here, we show that D6D activity is upregulated during melanoma and lung tumor growth and that suppressing D6D activity, either by RNAi knockdown or a specific D6D inhibitor, dramatically reduces tumor growth. Accordingly, the content of AA and AA-derived tumor-promoting metabolites is significantly decreased. Angiogenesis and inflammatory status are also reduced. These results identify D6D as a key factor for tumor growth and as a potential target for cancer therapy and prevention. PMID:23112819

  6. Thermally activated phase slips from metastable states in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Ivana; Lollo, Anthony; Harris, Jack

    In equilibrium, a flux-biased superconducting ring at low temperature can occupy any of several metastable states. The particular state that the ring occupies depends on the history of the applied flux, as different states are separated from each other by flux-dependent energy barriers. There is a critical value of the applied flux at which a given barrier goes to zero, the state becomes unstable, and the system transition into another state. In recent experiments performed on arrays of rings we showed that this transition occurs close to the critical flux predicted by Ginzburg-Landau theory. Here, we will describe experiments in which we have extended these measurements to an individual ring in order to study the thermal activation of the ring over a barrier that has been tuned close to zero. We measure the statistics of transitions as function of temperature and ramp rate.

  7. Monetary reward suppresses anterior insula activity during social pain.

    PubMed

    Cristofori, Irene; Harquel, Sylvain; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François; Sirigu, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Social pain after exclusion by others activates brain regions also involved in physical pain. Here we evaluated whether monetary reward could compensate for the negative feeling of social pain in the brain. To address this question we used the unique technique of intracranial electroencephalography in subjects with drug resistant epilepsy. Specifically, we recorded theta activity from intracranial electrodes implanted in the insular cortex while subjects experienced conditions of social inclusion and exclusion associated with monetary gain and loss. Our study confirmed that theta rhythm in the insular cortex is the neural signature of social exclusion. We found that while monetary gain suppresses the effect of social pain in the anterior insula, there is no such effect in the posterior insula. These results imply that the anterior insula can use secondary reward signals to compensate for the negative feeling of social pain. Hence, here we propose that the anterior insula plays a pivotal role in integrating contingencies to update social pain feelings. Finally, the possibility to modulate the theta rhythm through the reward system might open new avenues of research for treating pathologies related to social exclusion. PMID:25964499

  8. Monetary reward suppresses anterior insula activity during social pain.

    PubMed

    Cristofori, Irene; Harquel, Sylvain; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François; Sirigu, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Social pain after exclusion by others activates brain regions also involved in physical pain. Here we evaluated whether monetary reward could compensate for the negative feeling of social pain in the brain. To address this question we used the unique technique of intracranial electroencephalography in subjects with drug resistant epilepsy. Specifically, we recorded theta activity from intracranial electrodes implanted in the insular cortex while subjects experienced conditions of social inclusion and exclusion associated with monetary gain and loss. Our study confirmed that theta rhythm in the insular cortex is the neural signature of social exclusion. We found that while monetary gain suppresses the effect of social pain in the anterior insula, there is no such effect in the posterior insula. These results imply that the anterior insula can use secondary reward signals to compensate for the negative feeling of social pain. Hence, here we propose that the anterior insula plays a pivotal role in integrating contingencies to update social pain feelings. Finally, the possibility to modulate the theta rhythm through the reward system might open new avenues of research for treating pathologies related to social exclusion.

  9. Cytokine treatment of macrophage suppression of T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2010-01-01

    High Mphi:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNgamma-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mphi expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mphi:T cell ratios found in many tumors.

  10. A convergent ring-closing metathesis approach to carbohydrate-based macrolides with potential antibiotic activity.

    PubMed

    Blom, Petra; Ruttens, Bart; Van Hoof, Steven; Hubrecht, Idzi; Van der Eycken, Johan; Sas, Benedikt; Van hemel, Johan; Vandenkerckhove, Jan

    2005-11-25

    [reaction: see text] An efficient convergent approach has been developed for the construction of novel, non-natural, carbohydrate-based macrolides. The key step in the synthesis is the formation of the macrocyclic ring via a ring-closing metathesis reaction. The obtained macrolide analogues have been screened for biological activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including resistant strains, yeasts, and molds.

  11. IL-27 suppresses antimicrobial activity in human leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Rosane M. B.; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Cheng, Genhong; Modlin, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens trigger immunosuppressive pathways are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of microbial infection. One pathway that inhibits host defense responses involves the induction of type I interferons and subsequently IL-10, yet the mechanism by which type I IFN induces IL-10 remains unclear. Our studies of gene expression profiles derived from leprosy skin lesions suggested a link between IL-27 and the IFN-β induced IL-10 pathway. Here, we demonstrate that the IL-27p28 subunit is upregulated following treatment of monocytes with IFN-β and Mycobacterium leprae, the intracellular bacterium that causes leprosy. The ability of IFN-β and M. leprae to induce IL-10 was diminished by IL-27 knockdown. Additionally, treatment of monocytes with recombinant IL-27 was sufficient to induce the production of IL-10. Functionally, IL-27 inhibited the ability of IFN-γ to trigger antimicrobial activity against M. leprae in infected monocytes. At the site of disease, IL-27 was more strongly expressed in skin lesions of patients with progressive lepromatous leprosy, correlating and colocalizing with IFN-β and IL-10 in macrophages. Together, these data provide evidence that in the human cutaneous immune responses to microbial infection, IL-27 contributes to the suppression of host antimicrobial responses. PMID:26030183

  12. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-09

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  13. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  14. Micro-adhesion rings surrounding TCR microclusters are essential for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Sakuma, Machie; Ike, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Kimura, Yayoi; Ohara, Osamu; Saito, Takashi

    2016-07-25

    The immunological synapse (IS) formed at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells represents a hallmark of initiation of acquired immunity. T cell activation is initiated at T cell receptor (TCR) microclusters (MCs), in which TCRs and signaling molecules assemble at the interface before IS formation. We found that each TCR-MC was transiently bordered by a ring structure made of integrin and focal adhesion molecules in the early phase of activation, which is similar in structure to the IS in microscale. The micro-adhesion ring is composed of LFA-1, focal adhesion molecules paxillin and Pyk2, and myosin II (MyoII) and is supported by F-actin core and MyoII activity through LFA-1 outside-in signals. The formation of the micro-adhesion ring was transient but especially sustained upon weak TCR stimulation to recruit linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and SLP76. Perturbation of the micro-adhesion ring induced impairment of TCR-MC development and resulted in impaired cellular signaling and cell functions. Thus, the synapse-like structure composed of the core TCR-MC and surrounding micro-adhesion ring is a critical structure for initial T cell activation through integrin outside-in signals.

  15. [Suppression of sexual activity and reproduction in male small ruminants].

    PubMed

    Mihsler, Lisa; Wagner, Henrik; Wehrend, Axel

    2016-06-16

    Handling and husbandry of male small ruminants after sexual maturity often become difficult. Castration is currently the most reliable solution to this problem. Medicinal procedures for temporary inhibition of the gonad function could provide an alternative. Following a short overview of surgical castration, the current knowledge on the application of vaccines against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH agonist in rams and billy goats is presented in a literature overview. In rams, GnRH vaccination has been used successfully for temporary suppression of the reproduction function, regardless of an animal's age at the time of therapy initiation. Fewer investigations are available for the billy goat. A complete suppression of spermatogenesis was not achieved in all cases. Currently, treatment with GnRH agonists does not represent a relible method for the suppression of gonad function. PMID:27189125

  16. Adaptive top-down suppression of hippocampal activity and the purging of intrusive memories from consciousness.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Roland G; Hulbert, Justin C; Huddleston, Ean; Anderson, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    When reminded of unwanted memories, people often attempt to suppress these experiences from awareness. Prior work indicates that control processes mediated by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) modulate hippocampal activity during such retrieval suppression. It remains unknown whether this modulation plays a role in purging an intrusive memory from consciousness. Here, we combined fMRI and effective connectivity analyses with phenomenological reports to scrutinize a role for adaptive top-down suppression of hippocampal retrieval processes in terminating mnemonic awareness of intrusive memories. Participants either suppressed or recalled memories of pictures depicting faces or places. After each trial, they reported their success at regulating awareness of the memory. DLPFC activation was greatest when unwanted memories intruded into consciousness and needed to be purged, and this increased engagement predicted superior control of intrusive memories over time. However, hippocampal activity was decreased during the suppression of place memories only. Importantly, the inhibitory influence of the DLPFC on the hippocampus was linked to the ensuing reduction in intrusions of the suppressed memories. Individuals who exhibited negative top-down coupling during early suppression attempts experienced fewer involuntary memory intrusions later on. Over repeated suppressions, the DLPFC-hippocampus connectivity grew less negative with the degree that they no longer had to purge unwanted memories from awareness. These findings support a role of DLPFC in countermanding the unfolding recollection of an unwanted memory via the suppression of hippocampal processing, a mechanism that may contribute to adaptation in the aftermath of traumatic experiences.

  17. Nucleotide-induced asymmetry within ATPase activator ring drives σ54-RNAP interaction and ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2013-12-10

    It is largely unknown how the typical homomeric ring geometry of ATPases associated with various cellular activities enables them to perform mechanical work. Small-angle solution X-ray scattering, crystallography, and electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions revealed that partial ATP occupancy caused the heptameric closed ring of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) NtrC1 to rearrange into a hexameric split ring of striking asymmetry. The highly conserved and functionally crucial GAFTGA loops responsible for interacting with σ54–RNA polymerase formed a spiral staircase. We propose that splitting of the ensemble directs ATP hydrolysis within the oligomer, and the ring's asymmetry guides interaction between ATPase and the complex of σ54 and promoter DNA. Similarity between the structure of the transcriptional activator NtrC1 and those of distantly related helicases Rho and E1 reveals a general mechanism in homomeric ATPases whereby complex allostery within the ring geometry forms asymmetric functional states that allow these biological motors to exert directional forces on their target macromolecules.

  18. Cell Phone Ring Suppression and HUD Caller ID: Effectiveness in Reducing Momentary Driver Distraction under Varying Workload Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, C.; Friedman, D.; Green, P.

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of the current experiment is to provide a preliminary driving simulator assessment of several hands-free design solutions with regard to the task of answering the phone while driving. Specifically, the following questions were examined: (1) Does the location of a caller ID display and the phone buttons (two HUD (Head Up Display) locations vs. phone cradle) affect either the time to answer the phone or driving performance; (2) Does the presence or absence of a ring affect either the time to answer the phone or driving performance; (3) Does increased driving workload (visual demand) affect either the time to answer the phone or driving performance; (4) What were the initial driver reactions to a HUD-based call timer.

  19. Reconstruction of landslide activity by tree-ring analysis - a case study for Jiufangshan landslide, Gansu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.; Bai, S. B.; Wang, J.; Thiebes, B.; Zhang, Z. G.

    2012-04-01

    The understanding of geomorphic processes and knowledge of past events are important elements for the assessment of natural hazards. With the increased damage due to landslides and debris-flows in recent years, risk management and evaluation of geological disasters received more attention. The analysis of tree-ring data has widely been used to facilitate landslide research, and in particular the dating of previous process activations. Tree-ring analysis has been proven to be able to precisely determine the time of landslide failure in previous studies. The main goal of this research is the investigations of previous reactivation phases for the large Jiufangshan landslide using tree-ring analysis. The study area of the described investigations is located in Wudu District of south of Gansu Province in Northwestern China. The landslide has a length of 1050 m and a width of 400 m. The maximum elevation is 1320 m while the lowest elevation is 876 m. The mean slope angle is 40°. Local archives report several reactivation phases of Jiufangshan landslide which mostly occurred in the rainy season. In addition to heavy precipitation, seismic shaking and poorly adapted irrigation activities are likely triggers. In the field, a standard borer was used to drill pine trees on the landslide body and to extract samples. Samples were taken to the laboratory and tree-rings were measured by microscope analysis. To distinguish regular years from years with growth anomalies the following method was applied: every year with a 40% smaller or 50% larger tree ring than observed in the four previous years was determined as a year of growth reduction or growth recovery, respectively. Growth anomalies which could be observed for three or more successive years, were interpreted as a result of landslide activity. The preliminary results show eccentric wood and false rings in the tree-ring samples. Particular periods of abrupt growth reduction or growth recovery can be found for 1980-1982, 1984

  20. Role of activation in alveolar macrophage-mediated suppression of the plaque-forming cell response.

    PubMed Central

    Mbawuike, I N; Herscowitz, H B

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are highly suppressive of the in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) response of spleen cells obtained from mice primed with sheep erythrocytes. Comparison of macrophage populations obtained from disparate anatomical sites revealed that although in both cases there was a cell-concentration-dependent suppression of the PFC response, resident AM or AM activated as a result of intravenous injection of Mycobacterium bovis BCG were equally suppressive at the doses examined. Although there was a similar dose-dependent suppression with peritoneal macrophages, BCG-activated cells were more suppressive of the PFC response than were resident cells. In contrast, splenic macrophages at comparable concentrations were not at all suppressive. Resident AM exhibited significantly lower levels of 5'-nucleotidase activity than did resident peritoneal macrophages. Macrophage-mediated suppression of the in vitro PFC response could not be attributed to the release of toxic oxygen metabolites (H2O2, O2- ,and .OH) or prostaglandins, since the addition of catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2-mercaptoethanol, or indomethacin did not completely reverse suppression. These results suggest that the lung microenvironment may maintain AM in an activated state which contributes to their potential immunoregulatory functions. PMID:2830191

  1. Appetite suppression and weight reduction by a centrally active aminosterol.

    PubMed

    Ahima, Rexford S; Patel, Hiralben R; Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Qi, Yong; Hileman, Stanley M; Zasloff, Michael A

    2002-07-01

    The rise in obesity and its complications has generated enormous interest in the regulation of feeding and body weight. We show that a spermine metabolite of cholesterol (MSI-1436) decreases body weight, specifically fat, by suppressing feeding and preventing the reduction in energy expenditure, hormonal changes, and patterns of neuropeptide expression normally associated with weight loss. MSI-1436 enters the brain after peripheral injection and is more potent when injected into the cerebral ventricle (intracerebroventricular [ICV]). Systemic or ICV MSI-1436 administration induced similar patterns of Fos immunoreactivity in the brain, especially the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). This brain region integrates neural signals from hypothalamic and brain stem nuclei and regulates feeding behavior, autonomic function, and neuroendocrine function. Microinjection of MSI-1436 into the PVN potently suppressed feeding and reduced body weight for several days. Unlike caloric restriction, MSI-1436 decreased mRNA levels of agouti-related peptide and neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that MSI-1436 acts in the brain to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, likely through suppression of orexigenic hypothalamic pathways. PMID:12086938

  2. Mechanisms underlying the active self-assembly of microtubule rings and spools

    DOE PAGES

    VanDelinder, Virginia; Brener, Stephanie; Bachand, George D.

    2016-02-04

    Here, active self-assembly offers a powerful route for the creation of dynamic multiscale structures that are presently inaccessible with standard microfabrication techniques. One such system uses the translation of microtubule filaments by surface-tethered kinesin to actively assemble nanocomposites with bundle, ring, and spool morphologies. Attempts to observe mechanisms involved in this active assembly system have been hampered by experimental difficulties with performing observation during buffer exchange and photodamage from fluorescent excitation. In the present work, we used a custom microfluidic device to remove these limitations and directly study ring/spool formation, including the earliest events (nucleation) that drive subsequent nanocomposite assembly.more » Three distinct formation events were observed: pinning, collisions, and induced curvature. Of these three, collisions accounted for the majority of event leading to ring/spool formation, while the rate of pinning was shown to be dependent on the amount of photodamage in the system. We further showed that formation mechanism directly affects the diameter and rotation direction of the resultant rings and spools. Overall, the fundamental understanding described in this work provides a foundation by which the properties of motor-driven, actively assembled nanocomposites may be tailored toward specific applications.« less

  3. Vitamin K2 stimulates osteoblastogenesis and suppresses osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Weitzmann, M Neale

    2011-01-01

    Several bone protective factors are reported to exhibit stimulatory activities on bone formation coupled with inhibitory effects on bone resorption; one such factor is vitamin K2. Vitamin K species [K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinone)] have long been associated with bone protective activities and are receiving intense interest as nutritional supplements for the prevention or amelioration of bone disease in humans. However, the mechanisms of vitamin K action on the skeleton are poorly defined. Activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal transduction pathway is essential for osteoclast formation and resorption. By contrast, NF-κB signaling potently antagonizes osteoblast differentiation and function, prompting us to speculate that NF-κB antagonists may represent a novel class of dual anti-catabolic and pro-anabolic agents. We now show that vitamin K2 action on osteoblast and osteoclast formation and activity is accomplished by down-regulating basal and cytokine-induced NF-κB activation, by increasing IκB mRNA, in a γ-carboxylation-independent manner. Furthermore, vitamin K2 prevented repression by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) of SMAD signaling induced by either transforming growth factor ß (TGFß) or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Vitamin K2 further antagonized receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced NF-κB activation in osteoclast precursors. Our data provide a novel mechanism to explain the dual pro-anabolic and anti-catabolic activities of vitamin K2, and may further support the concept that pharmacological modulation of NF-κB signal transduction may constitute an effective mechanism for ameliorating pathological bone loss and for promoting bone health. PMID:21072493

  4. Mastering tricyclic ring systems for desirable functional cannabinoid activity

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Knight, Lindsay; Chen, Shao-Rui; Wager-Miller, Jim; McDaniel, Steven W.; Diaz, Fanny; Barth, Francis; Pan, Hui-Lin; Mackie, Ken; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Diaz, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in using cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain and other indications. In continuation of our ongoing program aiming for the development of new small molecule cannabinoid ligands, we have synthesized a novel series of carbazole and γ-carboline derivatives. The affinities of the newly synthesized compounds were determined by a competitive radioligand displacement assay for human CB2 cannabinoid receptor and rat CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Functional activity and selectivity at human CB1 and CB2 receptors were characterized using receptor internalization and [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies of the carbazole series have led to the discovery of a non-selective CB1 and CB2 agonist, compound 4. Our subsequent research efforts to increase CB2 selectivity of this lead compound have led to the discovery of CB2 selective compound 64, which robustly internalized CB2 receptors. Compound 64 had potent inhibitory effects on pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Other potent and CB2 receptor–selective compounds, including compounds 63 and 68, and a selective CB1 agonist, compound 74 were also discovered. In addition, we identified the CB2 ligand 35 which failed to promote CB2 receptor internalization and inhibited compound CP55,940-induced CB2 internalization despite a high CB2 receptor affinity. The present study provides novel tricyclic series as a starting point for further investigations of CB2 pharmacology and pain treatment. PMID:24125850

  5. Design and experimental validation of a flutter suppression controller for the active flexible wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and extensive simulation based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite modeling errors in predicted flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with another controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  6. Flutter suppression for the Active Flexible Wing - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of a control law for an active flutter suppression system for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design was accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach relied on a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple control law structure. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in the design model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a rolling maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  7. Long-cavity all-fiber ring laser actively mode locked with an in-fiber bandpass acousto-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Bello-Jiménez, M; Díez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate low-frequency active mode locking of an erbium-doped all-fiber ring laser. As the mode locker, we used a new in-fiber bandpass acousto-optic modulator showing 74% modulation depth, 3.7 dB power insertion losses, 4.5 nm of optical bandwidth, and 20 dB of nonresonant light suppression. The laser generates 330 ps mode-locked pulses over a 10 ns pedestal, at a 1.538 MHz frequency, with 130 mW of pump power.

  8. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  9. Tree-ring based reconstruction of past lahar activity at Popocat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollschweiler, M.; Stoffel, M.; Vázquez Selem, L.; Palacios, D.

    2009-04-01

    Lahars are rapid, saturated flows of water and rock fragments that occur on volcanoes and that can be triggered either by volcanic activity or by intense precipitation falling on unconsolidated volcanic deposits. As their occurrence is unpredictable, as the flow contains sometimes considerably large rock fragments and as the flow is able to travel long distances even on gentle gradients, lahars represent one of the most destructive natural disasters in terms of loss of human lives and property damage. In order to realistically assess hazards, knowledge on the occurrence and timing of past lahar activity is of crucial importance. However, archival data on past events is usually scarce or completely missing. Tree-ring records have repeatedly proved to be a reliable data source for the reconstruction of past geomorphic events. However, tree rings have hardly ever been applied for the identification of past lahars. Therefore, it was the aim of this study (i) to identify and describe disturbances in tree growth induced by well-documented lahar events and on this basis (ii) to recognize older, unknown lahar events with tree-ring analyses. Based on these goals, we collected 140 tree-ring series from 62 trees (Abies religiosa, Pinus hartwegii, Pinus ayacahuite) standing inside or adjacent to the lahar channel in the Huiloac gorge at Popocatépetl volcano, central Mexico. Most commonly, the known lahar events of 1997 and 2001 resulted in abrupt changes in tree-ring width as well as injuries. The same growth disturbances could be identified in the tree-ring series, indicating that five previously unknown lahar events would have occurred during the 20th century. Popocatépetl is one of the best surveyed volcanoes in the world and past eruptions are precisely noted in archives. As most of these unknown events occurred during periods with no volcanic activity, we believe that they were rainfall-induced rather than related to volcanic activity. This study revealed the potential

  10. Suppression of Active-Region CME Production by the Presence of Other Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Khazanov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    From the SOHO mission s data base of MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning solar cycle 23, we have obtained a set of 40,000 magnetograms of 1,300 active regions, tracking each active region across the 30 degree central solar disk. Each active region magnetogram is cropped from the full-disk magnetogram by an automated code. The cadence is 96 minutes. From each active-region magnetogram, we have measured two whole-active-region magnetic quantities: (1) the magnetic size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux), and (2) a gauge of the active region s free magnetic energy (part of the free energy is released in the production of a flare and/or CME eruption). From NOAA Flare/CME catalogs, we have obtained the event (Flare/CME/SEP event) production history of each active region. Using all these data, we find that for each type of eruptive event, an active region s expected rate of event production increases as a power law of our gauge of active-region free magnetic energy. We have also found that, among active regions having nearly the same free energy, the rate of the CME production is less when there are many other active regions on the disk than when there are few or none, but there is no significant discernible suppression of the rate of flare production. This indicates that the presence of other active regions somehow tends to inhibit an active region s flare-producing magnetic explosions from becoming CMEs, contrary to the expectation from the breakout model for the production of CMEs.

  11. Suppression of Myc oncogenic activity by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Barna, Maria; Pusic, Aya; Zollo, Ornella; Costa, Maria; Kondrashov, Nadya; Rego, Eduardo; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Ruggero, Davide

    2008-12-18

    The Myc oncogene regulates the expression of several components of the protein synthetic machinery, including ribosomal proteins, initiation factors of translation, RNA polymerase III and ribosomal DNA. Whether and how increasing the cellular protein synthesis capacity affects the multistep process leading to cancer remains to be addressed. Here we use ribosomal protein heterozygote mice as a genetic tool to restore increased protein synthesis in Emu-Myc/+ transgenic mice to normal levels, and show that the oncogenic potential of Myc in this context is suppressed. Our findings demonstrate that the ability of Myc to increase protein synthesis directly augments cell size and is sufficient to accelerate cell cycle progression independently of known cell cycle targets transcriptionally regulated by Myc. In addition, when protein synthesis is restored to normal levels, Myc-overexpressing precancerous cells are more efficiently eliminated by programmed cell death. Our findings reveal a new mechanism that links increases in general protein synthesis rates downstream of an oncogenic signal to a specific molecular impairment in the modality of translation initiation used to regulate the expression of selective messenger RNAs. We show that an aberrant increase in cap-dependent translation downstream of Myc hyperactivation specifically impairs the translational switch to internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-dependent translation that is required for accurate mitotic progression. Failure of this translational switch results in reduced mitotic-specific expression of the endogenous IRES-dependent form of Cdk11 (also known as Cdc2l and PITSLRE), which leads to cytokinesis defects and is associated with increased centrosome numbers and genome instability in Emu-Myc/+ mice. When accurate translational control is re-established in Emu-Myc/+ mice, genome instability is suppressed. Our findings demonstrate how perturbations in translational control provide a highly specific outcome

  12. Influence of ring size on the cognition-enhancing activity of DM235 and MN19, two potent nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, L; Martini, E; Di Cesare Mannelli, L; Dei, S; Manetti, D; Scapecchi, S; Teodori, E; Ghelardini, C; Romanelli, M N

    2012-03-01

    A series of analogs of DM235 and MN19, characterized by rings with different size, have been prepared and evaluated for their nootropic activity in the mouse passive-avoidance test. It was found that the optimal ring size for the analogs of DM235, showing endocyclic both amidic groups, is 6 or 7 atoms. For the compounds structurally related to MN19, carrying an exocyclic amide group, the piperidine ring is the moiety which gives the most interesting compounds.

  13. Suppression of ventilatory muscle activity in healthy subjects and COPD patients with negative pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, F; Duranti, R; Fabiani, A; Schiavina, M; Scano, G

    1991-05-01

    We evaluated the ability of NPV to suppress EMGd and EMGint in seven patients with severe COPD and five normal subjects. Subjects were studied either without (A) or with mouthpiece and nose clip (B). Electromyographic suppression was assessed comparing EMG activity during NPV with the control activity without a mouthpiece and prior to the initiation of the NPV run. In normal subjects, in A, NPV resulted in a partial suppression of EMGd; in B, prior to NPV, EMGd rose compared with A prior to NPV. In patients, in A, NPV resulted in a suppression of both EMGd and EMGint. In B, prior to NPV, both EMGd and EMGint rose compared with A prior to NPV. Thus, it seems that NPV is able to produce a consistent reduction in inspiratory muscle EMG activity. This variable NPV ability would have to be assessed for better selection criteria for patient candidates in a rehabilitation program.

  14. SIRT1 Suppresses Activator Protein-1 Transcriptional Activity and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ran; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, Jin-Jing; Jia, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Yang, Rui-Feng; Zhang, Yuan; Xu, Jing; Wei, Yu-Sheng; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    SIRT1 (Sirtuin type 1), a mammalian orthologue of yeast SIR2 (silent information regulator 2), has been shown to mediate a variety of calorie restriction (CR)-induced physiological events, such as cell fate regulation via deacetylation of the substrate proteins. However, whether SIRT1 deacetylates activator protein-1 (AP-1) to influence its transcriptional activity and target gene expression is still unknown. Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 directly interacts with the basic leucine zipper domains of c-Fos and c-Jun, the major components of AP-1, by which SIRT1 suppressed the transcriptional activity of AP-1. This process requires the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Notably, SIRT1 reduced the expression of COX-2, a typical AP-1 target gene, and decreased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production of peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs). pMΦs with SIRT1 overexpression displayed improved phagocytosis and tumoricidal functions, which are associated with depressed PGE2. Furthermore, SIRT1 protein level was up-regulated in CR mouse pMΦs, whereas elevated SIRT1 decreased COX-2 expression and improved PGE2-related macrophage functions that were reversed following inhibition of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Thus, our results indicate that SIRT1 may be a mediator of CR-induced macrophage regulation, and its deacetylase activity contributes to the inhibition of AP-1 transcriptional activity and COX-2 expression leading to amelioration of macrophage function. PMID:20042607

  15. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  16. Platelet activating factor receptor binding plays a critical role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gerardo; Kazimi, Nasser; Nghiem, Dat X; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2004-03-15

    Applying military jet fuel (JP-8) or commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) to the skin of mice suppresses the immune response in a dose-dependent manner. The release of biological response modifiers, particularly prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), is a critical step in activating immune suppression. Previous studies have shown that injecting selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors into jet fuel-treated mice blocks immune suppression. Because the inflammatory phospholipid mediator, platelet-activating factor (PAF), up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 production and PGE2 synthesis by keratinocytes, we tested the hypothesis that PAF-receptor binding plays a role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression. Treating keratinocyte cultures with PAF and/or jet fuel (JP-8 and Jet-A) stimulates PGE2 secretion. Jet fuel-induced PGE2 production was suppressed by treating the keratinocytes with specific PAF-receptor antagonists. Injecting mice with PAF, or treating the skin of the mice with JP-8, or Jet-A, induced immune suppression. Jet fuel-induced immune suppression was blocked when the jet fuel-treated mice were injected with PAF-receptor antagonists before treatment. Jet fuel treatment has been reported to activate oxidative stress and treating the mice with anti-oxidants (Vitamins C, or E or beta-hydroxy toluene), before jet fuel application, interfered with immune suppression. These findings confirm previous studies showing that PAF-receptor binding can modulate immune function. Furthermore, they suggest that PAF-receptor binding may be an early event in the induction of immune suppression by immunotoxic environmental agents that target the skin. PMID:15020195

  17. Rotation sensing with Er3+-doped active ring resonator slow light structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hong; Liu, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-01

    An optical gyroscope, which is constituted by Er3+-doped active ring resonator (EDARR) slow light structure, is presented for the first time. The principle of improving the sensitivity of the detection of angular velocity is analysed in detail. The expression of the rotation phase difference of EDARR between the counter-propagating waves is derived and discussed. At the resonant frequency, the phase shift difference has the maximum value when the light power in the cavity is far greater than the input light power. We designed an experimental scheme of Er3+-doped active ring resonator slow light system. Two additional bias phases ϕb = ±π/2 were introduced in the optical path, by recording the light intensity difference ? and I0 at the resonant frequency ?, the input angular velocity can be obtained. The slow light structure based on EDARR can enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the angular velocity by three orders of magnitude.

  18. Self-generation of dissipative solitons in magnonic quasicrystal active ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Grishin, S. V. Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2014-02-07

    Self-generation of dissipative solitons in the magnonic quasicrystal (MQC) active ring resonator is studied theoretically and experimentally. The developed magnonic crystal has quasiperiodic Fibonacci type structure. Frequency selectivity of the MQC together with the parametric three-wave decay of magnetostatic surface spin wave (MSSW) leads to the dissipative soliton self-generation. The transfer matrix method is used to describe MQC transmission responses. Besides, the model of MQC active ring resonator is suggested. The model includes three coupled differential equations describing the parametric decay of MSSW and two differential equations of linear oscillators describing the frequency selectivity of MQC. Numerical simulation results of dissipative soliton self-generation are in a fair agreement with experimental data.

  19. Oscillation regimes of a solid-state ring laser with active beat-note stabilization: From a chaotic device to a ring-laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Sylvain; Feugnet, Gilles; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Lariontsev, Evguenii

    2007-08-15

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of a rotating diode-pumped Nd-YAG ring laser with active beat-note stabilization. Our experimental setup is described in the usual Maxwell-Bloch formalism. We analytically derive a stability condition and some frequency response characteristics for the solid-state ring-laser gyroscope, illustrating the important role of mode coupling effects on the dynamics of such a device. Experimental data are presented and compared with the theory on the basis of realistic laser parameters, showing very good agreement. Our results illustrate the duality between the very rich nonlinear dynamics of the diode-pumped solid-state ring laser (including chaotic behavior) and the possibility to obtain a very stable beat note, resulting in a potentially new kind of rotation sensor.

  20. Active vertical tail buffeting suppression based on macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chengzhe; Li, Bin; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic buffet is unsteady airflow exerting forces onto a surface, which can lead to premature fatigue damage of aircraft vertical tail structures, especially for aircrafts with twin vertical tails at high angles of attack. In this work, Macro Fiber Composite (MFC), which can provide strain actuation, was used as the actuator for the buffet-induced vibration control, and the positioning of the MFC patches was led by the strain energy distribution on the vertical tail. Positive Position Feedback (PPF) control algorithm has been widely used for its robustness and simplicity in practice, and consequently it was developed to suppress the buffet responses of first bending and torsional mode of vertical tail. However, its performance is usually attenuated by the phase contributions from non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration and plants. The phase lag between the input and output signals of the control system was identified experimentally, and the phase compensation was considered in the PPF control algorithm. The simulation results of the amplitude frequency of the closed-loop system showed that the buffet response was alleviated notably around the concerned bandwidth. Then the wind tunnel experiment was conducted to verify the effectiveness of MFC actuators and compensated PPF, and the Root Mean Square (RMS) of the acceleration response was reduced 43.4%, 28.4% and 39.5%, respectively, under three different buffeting conditions.

  1. Active Suppression of Drilling System Vibrations For Deep Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, David W.; Blankenship, Douglas A.; Buerger, Stephen; Mesh, Mikhail; Radigan, William Thomas; Su, Jiann-Cherng

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic stability of deep drillstrings is challenged by an inability to impart controllability with ever-changing conditions introduced by geology, depth, structural dynamic properties and operating conditions. A multi-organizational LDRD project team at Sandia National Laboratories successfully demonstrated advanced technologies for mitigating drillstring vibrations to improve the reliability of drilling systems used for construction of deep, high-value wells. Using computational modeling and dynamic substructuring techniques, the benefit of controllable actuators at discrete locations in the drillstring is determined. Prototype downhole tools were developed and evaluated in laboratory test fixtures simulating the structural dynamic response of a deep drillstring. A laboratory-based drilling applicability demonstration was conducted to demonstrate the benefit available from deployment of an autonomous, downhole tool with self-actuation capabilities in response to the dynamic response of the host drillstring. A concept is presented for a prototype drilling tool based upon the technical advances. The technology described herein is the subject of U.S. Patent Application No. 62219481, entitled "DRILLING SYSTEM VIBRATION SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS AND METHODS", filed September 16, 2015.

  2. High-Q active ring microwave resonators based on ferrite-ferroelectric layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, Alexey B.; Srinivasan, G.; Kalinikos, Boris A.

    2008-05-01

    An electric and magnetic field tunable (dual-tunable) microwave active ring resonator is designed and characterized. The device structure is implemented with a microwave amplifier and a ferrite-ferroelectric delay line in the feedback loop. At 8GHz, an effective Q factor of 50 000 and tuning by 5MHz with an electric field are achieved. The performance characteristics of the resonator are presented and discussed.

  3. Structural Insights into NEDD8 Activation of Cullin-RING Ligases: Conformational Control of Conjugation

    SciTech Connect

    Duda,D.; Borg, L.; Scott, D.; Hunt, H.; Hammel, M.; Schulman, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) comprise the largest ubiquitin E3 subclass, in which a central cullin subunit links a substrate-binding adaptor with an E2-binding RING. Covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to a conserved C-terminal domain (ctd) lysine stimulates CRL ubiquitination activity and prevents binding of the inhibitor CAND1. Here we report striking conformational rearrangements in the crystal structure of NEDD8{approx}Cul5ctd-Rbx1 and SAXS analysis of NEDD8{approx}Cul1ctd-Rbx1 relative to their unmodified counterparts. In NEDD8ylated CRL structures, the cullin WHB and Rbx1 RING subdomains are dramatically reoriented, eliminating a CAND1-binding site and imparting multiple potential catalytic geometries to an associated E2. Biochemical analyses indicate that the structural malleability is important for both CRL NEDD8ylation and subsequent ubiquitination activities. Thus, our results point to a conformational control of CRL activity, with ligation of NEDD8 shifting equilibria to disfavor inactive CAND1-bound closed architectures, and favor dynamic, open forms that promote polyubiquitination.

  4. Robust Multivariable Flutter Suppression for the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) project is part of NASA Langley Research Center s Benchmark Models Program for studying transonic aeroelastic phenomena. In January of 1996 the BACT wind-tunnel model was used to successfully demonstrate the application of robust multivariable control design methods (H and -synthesis) to flutter suppression. This paper addresses the design and experimental evaluation of robust multivariable flutter suppression control laws with particular attention paid to the degree to which stability and performance robustness was achieved.

  5. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  6. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression.

  7. Somatosensory Anticipatory Alpha Activity Increases to Suppress Distracting Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haegens, Saskia; Luther, Lisa; Jensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Effective processing of sensory input in daily life requires attentional selection and amplification of relevant input and, just as importantly, attenuation of irrelevant information. It has been proposed that top-down modulation of oscillatory alpha band activity (8-14 Hz) serves to allocate resources to various regions, depending on task…

  8. Hysteresis Control for Current Harmonics Suppression Using Shunt Active Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Rajesh Kr; Chauhan, Aasha; Sharma, Sachin

    2012-11-01

    Recently wide spread of power electronic equipment has caused an increase of the harmonic disturbances in the power systems. The nonlinear loads draw harmonic and reactive power components of current from ac mains. Current harmonics generated by nonlinear loads such as adjustable speed drives,static powersupplies and UPS. Thus a perfect compensator is required to avoid the consequences due to harmonics. To overcome problems due to harmonics, Shunt Active Power Filter (SAPF) has been considered extensively. SAPF has better harmonic compensation than the other approaches used for solving the harmonic related problems. The performance of the SAPF depends upon different control strategies. This paper presents the performance analysis of SAPF under most important control strategy namely instantaneous real active and reactive power method (p-q) for extracting reference currents of shunt active filters under unbalanced load condition. Detailed simulations have been carried out considering this control strategy and adequate results were presented. In this paper, harmonic control strategy is applied to compensate the current harmonics in the system. A detailed study about the harmonic control method has been used using shunt active filter technique.

  9. Miltefosine Suppresses Hepatic Steatosis by Activating AMPK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yaqin; Tong, Xing; Li, Kexue; Bai, Hui; Li, Xiaoyu; Ben, Jingjing; Zhang, Hanwen; Yang, Qing; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been accepted that AMPK (Adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase) activation exhibits many beneficial effects on glucolipid metabolism. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an important lysophospholipid which can improve blood glucose levels in diabetic mice and attenuate inflammation by activating AMPK signal pathway in macrophages. Synthetic alkylphospholipids (ALPs), such as miltefosine, is used as an alternate of LPC for the clinical application. Here, we investigated whether miltefosine could have an impact on hepatic steatosis and related metabolic disorders. Experimental Approach Mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks to generate an obese model. Next, the obese mice were randomly divided into three groups: saline-treated and miltefosine-treated (2.5 or 5 mg/kg/d) groups. Miltefosine was intraperitoneally administrated into mice for additional 4 weeks plus HFD treatment. Key Results It was shown that miltefosine treatment could substantially improve glucose metabolism, prevented hepatic lipid accumulation, and inhibited liver inflammation in HFD-fed mice by activating AMPK signal pathway. In vitro, miltefosine stimulated AMPKα phosphorylation both in time and dose dependent manner and decreased lipid accumulation in liver cells. When a specific AMPK inhibitor compound C was used to treat mice, the antagonistic effects of miltefosine on HFD-induced mouse hyperlipidaemia and liver steatosis were abolished. Treatment with miltefosine also dramatically inhibited the HFD-induced liver inflammation in mice. Conclusions and Implications Here we demonstrated that miltefosine might be a new activator of AMPK signal pathway in vivo and in vitro and be useful for treatment of hepatic steatosis and related metabolic disorders. PMID:27681040

  10. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bojak, Ingo; Stoyanov, Zhivko V.; Liley, David T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is a well-described phenomenon that occurs during deep anesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterization as a “global brain state” has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterization. Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex. PMID:25767438

  11. MLS-2384, a new 6-bromoindirubin derivative with dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitory activity, suppresses growth of diverse cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lucy; Gaboriaud, Nicolas; Vougogianopoulou, Konstantina; Tian, Yan; Wu, Jun; Wen, Wei; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Jove, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) and Src kinase are the two major tyrosine kinase families upstream of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT). Among the seven STAT family proteins, STAT3 is constitutively activated in many diverse cancers. Upon activation, JAK and Src kinases phosphorylate STAT3, and thereby promote cell growth and survival. MLS-2384 is a novel 6-bromoindirubin derivative with a bromo-group at the 6-position on one indole ring and a hydrophilic group at the 3'-position on the other indole ring. In this study, we investigated the kinase inhibitory activity and anticancer activity of MLS-2384. Our data from in vitro kinase assays, cell viability analyses, western blotting analyses, and animal model studies, demonstrate that MLS-2384 is a dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitor, and suppresses growth of various human cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, skin, ovarian, lung, and liver. Consistent with the inactivation of JAK and Src kinases, phosphorylation of STAT3 was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in the cancer cells treated with MLS-2384. STAT3 downstream proteins involved in cell proliferation and survival, such as c-Myc and Mcl-1, are downregulated by MLS-2384 in prostate cancer cells, whereas survivin is downregulated in A2058 cells. In these two cancer cell lines, PARP is cleaved, indicating that MLS-2384 induces apoptosis in human melanoma and prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MLS-2384 suppresses tumor growth with low toxicity in a mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. Taken together, MLS-2384 demonstrates dual JAK/Src inhibitory activity and suppresses tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings support further development of MLS-2384 as a potential small-molecule therapeutic agent that targets JAK, Src, and STAT3 signaling in multiple human cancer cells.

  12. Optimal area of retinal photocoagulation necessary for suppressing active iris neovascularisation associated with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Shiraya, Tomoyasu; Kato, Satoshi; Shigeeda, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    To determine the optimal area of retinal photocoagulation required for suppressing active neovascularisation (NVI) associated with diabetic retinopathy. We studied 1 eye each of 4 patients in whom active NVI was ophthalmoscopically shown to have been suppressed by additional photocoagulation. These patients initially underwent pan-retinal photocoagulation for diabetic retinopathy at another hospital, but NVI developed subsequently. We compared the areas of photocoagulation before and after additional photocoagulation and compared the area of retinal photocoagulation. The photocoagulated areas before and after additional photocoagulation in the four eyes were 20.7 and 45.2, 36.6 and 56.3, 30.4 and 67.4, and 11.7 and 53.4 %, respectively. The area of retinal photocoagulation required to suppress active NVI is calculated to be ~50 %.

  13. Tracing footprints of environmental events in tree ring chemistry using neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Dagistan

    The aim of this study is to identify environmental effects on tree-ring chemistry. It is known that industrial pollution, volcanic eruptions, dust storms, acid rain and similar events can cause substantial changes in soil chemistry. Establishing whether a particular group of trees is sensitive to these changes in soil environment and registers them in the elemental chemistry of contemporary growth rings is the over-riding goal of any Dendrochemistry research. In this study, elemental concentrations were measured in tree-ring samples of absolutely dated eleven modern forest trees, grown in the Mediterranean region, Turkey, collected and dated by the Malcolm and Carolyn Wiener Laboratory for Aegean and Near Eastern Dendrochronology laboratory at Cornell University. Correlations between measured elemental concentrations in the tree-ring samples were analyzed using statistical tests to answer two questions. Does the current concentration of a particular element depend on any other element within the tree? And, are there any elements showing correlated abnormal concentration changes across the majority of the trees? Based on the detailed analysis results, the low mobility of sodium and bromine, positive correlations between calcium, zinc and manganese, positive correlations between trace elements lanthanum, samarium, antimony, and gold within tree-rings were recognized. Moreover, zinc, lanthanum, samarium and bromine showed strong, positive correlations among the trees and were identified as possible environmental signature elements. New Dendrochemistry information found in this study would be also useful in explaining tree physiology and elemental chemistry in Pinus nigra species grown in Turkey. Elemental concentrations in tree-ring samples were measured using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) at the Pennsylvania State University Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC). Through this study, advanced methodologies for methodological, computational and

  14. Full p53 transcriptional activation potential is dispensable for tumor suppression in diverse lineages.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dadi; Brady, Colleen A; Johnson, Thomas M; Lee, Eunice Y; Park, Eunice J; Scott, Matthew P; Attardi, Laura D

    2011-10-11

    Over half of all human cancers, of a wide variety of types, sustain mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Although p53 limits tumorigenesis through the induction of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, its molecular mechanism of action in tumor suppression has been elusive. The best-characterized p53 activity in vitro is as a transcriptional activator, but the identification of numerous additional p53 biochemical activities in vitro has made it unclear which mechanism accounts for tumor suppression. Here, we assess the importance of transcriptional activation for p53 tumor suppression function in vivo in several tissues, using a knock-in mouse strain expressing a p53 mutant compromised for transcriptional activation, p53(25,26). p53(25,26) is severely impaired for the transactivation of numerous classical p53 target genes, including p21, Noxa, and Puma, but it retains the ability to activate a small subset of p53 target genes, including Bax. Surprisingly, p53(25,26) can nonetheless suppress tumor growth in cancers derived from the epithelial, mesenchymal, central nervous system, and lymphoid lineages. Therefore, full transactivation of most p53 target genes is dispensable for p53 tumor suppressor function in a range of tissue types. In contrast, a transcriptional activation mutant that is completely defective for transactivation, p53(25,26,53,54), fails to suppress tumor development. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional activation is indeed broadly critical for p53 tumor suppressor function, although this requirement reflects the limited transcriptional activity observed with p53(25,26) rather than robust transactivation of a full complement of p53 target genes.

  15. Generation of picosecond pulses and frequency combs in actively mode locked external ring cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, Aleksander K.; Belyanin, Alexey; Malara, Pietro; Blanchard, Romain; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Capasso, Federico

    2013-12-02

    We propose a robust and reliable method of active mode locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and develop its theoretical description. Its key element is the use of an external ring cavity, which circumvents fundamental issues undermining the stability of mode locking in quantum cascade lasers. We show that active mode locking can give rise to the generation of picosecond pulses and phase-locked frequency combs containing thousands of the ring cavity modes.

  16. Citral, a component of lemongrass oil, activates PPARα and γ and suppresses COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Katsukawa, Michiko; Nakata, Rieko; Takizawa, Yoshie; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-11-01

    Lemongrass is a widely used herb as a food flavoring, as a perfume, and for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory purposes; however, the molecular mechanisms of these effects have not been elucidated. Previously, we identified carvacrol from the essential oil of thyme as a suppressor of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, a key enzyme for prostaglandin synthesis, and also an activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a molecular target for "lifestyle-related" diseases. In this study, we evaluated the essential oil of lemongrass using our established assays for COX-2 and PPARs. We found that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by lemongrass oil in cell-based transfection assays, and we identified citral as a major component in the suppression of COX-2 expression and as an activator of PPARα and γ. PPARγ-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to citral treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, citral suppressed both LPS-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, dose-dependently. Moreover, citral induced the mRNA expression of the PPARα-responsive carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 gene and the PPARγ-responsive fatty acid binding protein 4 gene, suggesting that citral activates PPARα and γ, and regulates COX-2 expression. These results are important for understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-lifestyle-related disease properties of lemongrass.

  17. Blue light irradiation suppresses dendritic cells activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael R; Abel, Manuela; Lopez Kostka, Susanna; Rudolph, Berenice; Becker, Detlef; von Stebut, Esther

    2013-08-01

    Blue light is a UV-free irradiation suitable for treating chronic skin inflammation, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and hand- and foot eczema. However, a better understanding of the mode of action is still missing. For this reason, we investigated whether dendritic cells (DC) are directly affected by blue light irradiation in vitro. Here, we report that irradiation neither induced apoptosis nor maturation of monocyte-derived and myeloid DC. However, subsequent DC maturation upon LPS/IFNγ stimulation was impaired in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by maturation markers and cytokine release. Moreover, the potential of this DC to induce cytokine secretion from allogeneic CD4 T cells was reduced. In conclusion, unlike UV irradiation, blue light irradiation at high and low doses only resulted in impaired DC maturation upon activation and a reduced subsequent stimulatory capacity in allogeneic MLRs with strongest effects at higher doses. PMID:23879817

  18. Myristoleic acid inhibits osteoclast formation and bone resorption by suppressing the RANKL activation of Src and Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Zang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Cytoskeletal changes in osteoclasts such as formation of actin ring is required for bone-resorbing activity. The tyrosine kinase Src is a key player in massive cytoskeletal change of osteoclasts, thereby in bone destruction. In order for Src to be activated, trafficking to the inner plasma membrane via myristoylation is of importance. A previous study reported that myristoleic acid derived from myristic acid, inhibited N-myristoyl-transferase, an essential enzyme for myristoylation process. This prompted us to investigate whether myristoleic acid could affect osteoclastogenesis. Indeed, we observed that myristoleic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in vitro, especially, at later stages of differentiation. Myristoleic acid attenuated the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src and Pyk2, which associates with Src, by RANKL. When myristoleic acid was co-administered with soluble RANKL into mice, RANKL-induced bone loss was substantially prevented. Bone dissection clearly revealed that the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly diminished by myristoleic acid. On the other hand, myristoleic acid treatment had little or no influence on early osteoclast differentiation markers, such as c-Fos and NFATc1, and proteins related to cytoskeletal rearrangement, including DC-STAMP, integrin αv and integrin β3 in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that myristoleic acid is capable of blocking the formation of large multinucleated osteoclasts and bone resorption likely through suppressing activation of Src and Pyk2.

  19. An active feedback system to control synchrotron oscillations in the SLC Damping Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.L.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1989-03-01

    Initially the SLC Damping Rings accomplished Robinson instability damping by operating the RF accelerating cavities slightly detuned. In order to be able to run the cavities tuned and achieve damping for Robinson instability and synchrotron oscillations at injection an active feedback system has been developed. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the feedback system and the development of the hardware. Extensive measurements of the loop response including stored beam were performed. Overall performance of the system is also reported. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  20. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  1. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings

    PubMed Central

    Steinhilber, Friedhelm; Beer, Jürg; Brunner, Irene; Christl, Marcus; Fischer, Hubertus; Heikkilä, Ulla; Kubik, Peter W.; Mann, Mathias; McCracken, Ken G.; Miller, Heinrich; Miyahara, Hiroko; Oerter, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential for studies of the solar-terrestrial relationship. Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as 10Be and 14C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different archives basically agree, they also show some deviations during certain periods. So far most reconstructions were based on only one single radionuclide record, which makes detection and correction of these deviations impossible. Here we combine different 10Be ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica with the global 14C tree ring record using principal component analysis. This approach is only possible due to a new high-resolution 10Be record from Dronning Maud Land obtained within the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica in Antarctica. The new cosmic radiation record enables us to derive total solar irradiance, which is then used as a proxy of solar activity to identify the solar imprint in an Asian climate record. Though generally the agreement between solar forcing and Asian climate is good, there are also periods without any coherence, pointing to other forcings like volcanoes and greenhouse gases and their corresponding feedbacks. The newly derived records have the potential to improve our understanding of the solar dynamics and to quantify the solar influence on climate. PMID:22474348

  2. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings.

    PubMed

    Steinhilber, Friedhelm; Abreu, Jose A; Beer, Jürg; Brunner, Irene; Christl, Marcus; Fischer, Hubertus; Heikkilä, Ulla; Kubik, Peter W; Mann, Mathias; McCracken, Ken G; Miller, Heinrich; Miyahara, Hiroko; Oerter, Hans; Wilhelms, Frank

    2012-04-17

    Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential for studies of the solar-terrestrial relationship. Cosmic-ray produced radionuclides, such as (10)Be and (14)C which are stored in polar ice cores and tree rings, offer the unique opportunity to reconstruct the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different archives basically agree, they also show some deviations during certain periods. So far most reconstructions were based on only one single radionuclide record, which makes detection and correction of these deviations impossible. Here we combine different (10)Be ice core records from Greenland and Antarctica with the global (14)C tree ring record using principal component analysis. This approach is only possible due to a new high-resolution (10)Be record from Dronning Maud Land obtained within the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica in Antarctica. The new cosmic radiation record enables us to derive total solar irradiance, which is then used as a proxy of solar activity to identify the solar imprint in an Asian climate record. Though generally the agreement between solar forcing and Asian climate is good, there are also periods without any coherence, pointing to other forcings like volcanoes and greenhouse gases and their corresponding feedbacks. The newly derived records have the potential to improve our understanding of the solar dynamics and to quantify the solar influence on climate.

  3. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:27517893

  4. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  5. Azithromycin suppresses CD4+ T-cell activation by direct modulation of mTOR activity

    PubMed Central

    Ratzinger, F.; Haslacher, H.; Poeppl, W.; Hoermann, G.; Kovarik, J. J.; Jutz, S.; Steinberger, P.; Burgmann, H.; Pickl, W. F.; Schmetterer, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced macrolides, such as azithromycin (AZM) or clarithromycin (CLM), are antibiotics with immunomodulatory properties. Here we have sought to evaluate their in vitro influence on the activation of CD4+ T-cells. Isolated CD4+ T-cells were stimulated with agonistic anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies in the presence of 0.6 mg/L, 2.5 mg/L, 10 mg/L or 40 mg/L AZM or CLM. Cell proliferation, cytokine level in supernatants and cell viability was assessed. Intracellular signaling pathways were evaluated using reporter cell lines, FACS analysis, immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. AZM inhibited cell proliferation rate and cytokine secretion of CD4+ T-cells in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, high concentrations of CLM (40 mg/L) also suppressed these T-cell functions. Analysis of molecular signaling pathways revealed that exposure to AZM reduced the phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein, a downstream target of mTOR. This effect was also observed at 40 mg/L CLM. In vitro kinase studies using recombinant mTOR showed that AZM inhibited mTOR activity. In contrast to rapamycin, this inhibition was independent of FKBP12. We show for the first time that AZM and to a lesser extent CLM act as immunosuppressive agents on CD4+ T-cells by inhibiting mTOR activity. Our results might have implications for the clinical use of macrolides. PMID:25500904

  6. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of C-ring-functionalized prodigiosin analogues.

    PubMed

    Regourd, Jasmine; Ali, Adeeb Al-Sheikh; Thompson, Alison

    2007-04-01

    Prodigiosin is the parent member of the 4-methoxypyrrolyldipyrromethene family of natural products and is known for its anti-cancer activity. A new series of analogues was synthesized, incorporating pendent functional esters and beta-carbonyl substituents on the C-ring. The beta-carbonyl group allowed for the facile isolation of the prodigiosenes, and the pendent esters allow for further derivatization. The novel prodigiosenes generally retain the anti-cancer activity of prodigiosin in 60 human cell lines derived from nine cancer cell types, with neither the conjugated beta-carbonyl group, as either ketone or ester, nor the pendent ester significantly reducing the anti-cancer activity of the core skeleton.

  7. EGFR activation suppresses respiratory virus-induced IRF1-dependent CXCL10 production.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, April; Ueki, Iris; Min-Oo, Gundula; Ballon-Landa, Eric; Knoff, David; Galen, Benjamin; Lanier, Lewis L; Nadel, Jay A; Koff, Jonathan L

    2014-07-15

    Airway epithelial cells are the primary cell type involved in respiratory viral infection. Upon infection, airway epithelium plays a critical role in host defense against viral infection by contributing to innate and adaptive immune responses. Influenza A virus, rhinovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) represent a broad range of human viral pathogens that cause viral pneumonia and induce exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These respiratory viruses induce airway epithelial production of IL-8, which involves epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. EGFR activation involves an integrated signaling pathway that includes NADPH oxidase activation of metalloproteinase, and EGFR proligand release that activates EGFR. Because respiratory viruses have been shown to activate EGFR via this signaling pathway in airway epithelium, we investigated the effect of virus-induced EGFR activation on airway epithelial antiviral responses. CXCL10, a chemokine produced by airway epithelial cells in response to respiratory viral infection, contributes to the recruitment of lymphocytes to target and kill virus-infected cells. While respiratory viruses activate EGFR, the interaction between CXCL10 and EGFR signaling pathways is unclear, and the potential for EGFR signaling to suppress CXCL10 has not been explored. Here, we report that respiratory virus-induced EGFR activation suppresses CXCL10 production. We found that influenza virus-, rhinovirus-, and RSV-induced EGFR activation suppressed IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1-dependent CXCL10 production. In addition, inhibition of EGFR during viral infection augmented IRF1 and CXCL10. These findings describe a novel mechanism that viruses use to suppress endogenous antiviral defenses, and provide potential targets for future therapies.

  8. Effect of ring substitution on the metabolic fate and anti-inflammatory activity of some prodolic acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Robinson, W T; Martel, R R; Ferdinandi, E; Kraml, M

    1977-12-01

    Prodolic acid, 1-n-propyl-1,3,4,9-tetrahydropyrano[3,4-b]indole-1-acetic acid, exhibits potent anti-inflammatory activity in adjuvant arthritic rats. The potency of prodolic acid is enhanced by indole ring substitution. This increase correlated well with higher and sustained drug concentrations in the serum of normal animals. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that ring substitution prolonged the serum half-life without affecting the absorption or volume of distribution. Because, in the rat, indole ring hydroxylation is a major pathway for the disposition of prodolic acid, we ascribe the increased pharmacological activity of ring substituted derivatives to the interference of substituents with the hydroxylation reaction. PMID:925966

  9. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  10. Improving the vibration suppression capabilities of a magneto-rheological damper using hybrid active and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Irfan; Wagg, David; Sims, Neil D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid active and semi-active control method for vibration suppression in flexible structures. The method uses a combination of a semi-active device and an active control actuator situated elsewhere in the structure to suppress vibrations. The key novelty is to use the hybrid controller to enable the magneto-rheological damper to achieve a performance as close to a fully active device as possible. This is achieved by ensuring that the active actuator can assist the magneto-rheological damper in the regions where energy is required. In addition, the hybrid active and semi-active controller is designed to minimize the switching of the semi-active controller. The control framework used is the immersion and invariance control technique in combination with sliding mode control. A two degree-of-freedom system with lightly damped resonances is used as an example system. Both numerical and experimental results are generated for this system, and then compared as part of a validation study. The experimental system uses hardware-in-the-loop to simulate the effect of both the degrees-of-freedom. The results show that the concept is viable both numerically and experimentally, and improved vibration suppression results can be obtained for the magneto-rheological damper that approach the performance of an active device.

  11. Comparison of analysis and flight test data for a drone aircraft with active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Pototzky, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of analysis and flight test data for a drone aircraft equipped with an active flutter suppression system. Emphasis is placed on the comparison of modal dampings and frequencies as a function of Mach number. Results are presented for both symmetric and antisymmetric motion with flutter suppression off. Only symmetric results are presented for flutter suppression on. Frequency response functions of the vehicle are presented from both flight test data and analysis. The analysis correlation is improved by using an empirical aerodynamic correction factor which is proportional to the ratio of experimental to analytical steady-state lift curve slope. In addition to presenting the mathematical models and a brief description of existing analytical techniques, an alternative analytical technique for obtaining closed-loop results is presented.

  12. Comparison of analysis and flight test data for a drone aircraft with active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Pototzky, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    A drone aircraft equipped with an active flutter suppression system is considered with emphasis on the comparison of modal dampings and frequencies as a function of Mach number. Results are presented for both symmetric and antisymmetric motion with flutter suppression off. Only symmetric results are given for flutter suppression on. Frequency response functions of the vehicle are presented from both flight test data and analysis. The analysis correlation is improved by using an empirical aerodynamic correction factor which is proportional to the ratio of experimental to analytical steady-state lift curve slope. The mathematical models are included and existing analytical techniques are described as well as an alternative analytical technique for obtaining closed-loop results.

  13. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  14. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi

    2012-11-06

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  15. Suppression of SOS-inducing activity of chemical mutagens by metabolites from microbial transformation of (+)-longicyclene.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Kazuki; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2010-08-25

    In this study, biotransformation of (+)-longicyclene (1) by Aspergillus niger (NBRC 4414) and the suppressive effect on umuC gene expression by chemical mutagens 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (furylfuramide) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) of the SOS response in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 were investigated. Initially, compound 1 was converted to three new terpenoids, (-)-(10R)-10-hydroxy-longicyclic acid (2), (+)-(10S)-10-hydroxy-longicyclic acid (3), and (+)-10-oxo-longicyclic acid (4) by A. niger , and their conversion rates were 27, 23, and 30%, respectively. The metabolites suppressed the SOS-inducing activity of furylfuramide and AFB1 in the umu test. Compounds 1-4 were hardly showing a suppressive effect on umu gene expression of the SOS responses in S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 against furylfuramid. However, metabolites showed a suppressive effect against AFB1. Compound 4 had gene expression by chemical mutagen AFB1, was suppressed 53% at <1.0 mM, and was the most effective compound in this experiment. PMID:20662538

  16. ESCRT-0 is not required for ectopic Notch activation and tumor suppression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Emiliana; Wollscheid, Nadine; Cortese, Katia; Tacchetti, Carlo; Vaccari, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multivesicular endosome (MVE) sorting depends on proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) family. These are organized in four complexes (ESCRT-0, -I, -II, -III) that act in a sequential fashion to deliver ubiquitylated cargoes into the internal luminal vesicles (ILVs) of the MVE. Drosophila genes encoding ESCRT-I, -II, -III components function in sorting signaling receptors, including Notch and the JAK/STAT signaling receptor Domeless. Loss of ESCRT-I, -II, -III in Drosophila epithelia causes altered signaling and cell polarity, suggesting that ESCRTs genes are tumor suppressors. However, the nature of the tumor suppressive function of ESCRTs, and whether tumor suppression is linked to receptor sorting is unclear. Unexpectedly, a null mutant in Hrs, encoding one of the components of the ESCRT-0 complex, which acts upstream of ESCRT-I, -II, -III in MVE sorting is dispensable for tumor suppression. Here, we report that two Drosophila epithelia lacking activity of Stam, the other known components of the ESCRT-0 complex, or of both Hrs and Stam, accumulate the signaling receptors Notch and Dome in endosomes. However, mutant tissue surprisingly maintains normal apico-basal polarity and proliferation control and does not display ectopic Notch signaling activation, unlike cells that lack ESCRT-I, -II, -III activity. Overall, our in vivo data confirm previous evidence indicating that the ESCRT-0 complex plays no crucial role in regulation of tumor suppression, and suggest re-evaluation of the relationship of signaling modulation in endosomes and tumorigenesis. PMID:24718108

  17. Active suppression of vortex-driven combustion instability using controlled liquid-fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Bin

    Combustion instabilities remain one of the most challenging problems encountered in developing propulsion and power systems. Large amplitude pressure oscillations, driven by unsteady heat release, can produce numerous detrimental effects. Most previous active control studies utilized gaseous fuels to suppress combustion instabilities. However, using liquid fuel to suppress combustion instabilities is more realistic for propulsion applications. Active instability suppression in vortex-driven combustors using a direct liquid fuel injection strategy was theoretically established and experimentally demonstrated in this dissertation work. Droplet size measurements revealed that with pulsed fuel injection management, fuel droplet size could be modulated periodically. Consequently, desired heat release fluctuation could be created. If this oscillatory heat release is coupled with the natural pressure oscillation in an out of phase manner, combustion instabilities can be suppressed. To identify proper locations of supplying additional liquid fuel for the purpose of achieving control, the natural heat release pattern in a vortex-driven combustor was characterized in this study. It was found that at high Damkohler number oscillatory heat release pattern closely followed the evolving vortex front. However, when Damkohler number became close to unity, heat release fluctuation wave no longer coincided with the coherent structures. A heat release deficit area was found near the dump plane when combustor was operated in lean premixed conditions. Active combustion instability suppression experiments were performed in a dump combustor using a controlled liquid fuel injection strategy. High-speed Schlieren results illustrated that vortex shedding plays an important role in maintaining self-sustained combustion instabilities. Complete combustion instability control requires total suppression of these large-scale coherent structures. The sound pressure level at the excited dominant

  18. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  19. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power.

  20. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  1. Global suppression of mitogen-activated ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by surface protein activity from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, W; Ajuwape, Adebowale Titilayo Phillip; Rosenbusch, Ricardo Francisco

    2010-07-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is associated with chronic non-progressive pneumonia of sheep and goats. As with many other mycoplasmas involved in animal diseases, protective immune responses have not been achieved with vaccines, even though antibody responses can be obtained. This study focuses on characterizing the interaction of M. ovipneumoniae with ovine PBMC using carboxy-fluorescein-succinimidyl-ester (CFSE) loading and flow cytometry to measure lymphoid cell division. M. ovipneumoniae induced a strong in vitro polyclonal suppression of CD4(+), CD8(+), and B blood lymphocyte subsets. The suppressive activity could be destroyed by heating to 60 degrees C, and partially impaired by formalin and binary ethyleneimine treatment that abolished its viability. The activity resided on the surface-exposed membrane protein fraction of the mycoplasma, since mild trypsin treatment not affecting viability was shown to reduce suppressive activity. Trypsin-treated mycoplasma regained suppressive activity once the mycoplasma was allowed to re-synthesize its surface proteins. Implications for the design of vaccines against M. ovipneumoniae are discussed.

  2. Design for active and passive flutter suppression and gust alleviation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, M.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical design techniques for active and passive control of aeroelastic systems are based on a rational approximation of the unsteady aerodynamic loads in the entire Laplace domain, which yields matrix equations of motion with constant coefficients. Some existing schemes are reviewed, the matrix Pade approximant is modified, and a technique which yields a minimal number of augmented states for a desired accuracy is presented. The state-space aeroelastic model is used to design an active control system for simultaneous flutter suppression and gust alleviation. The design target is for a continuous controller which transfers some measurements taken on the vehicle to a control command applied to a control surface. Structural modifications are formulated in a way which enables the treatment of passive flutter suppression system with the same procedures by which active control systems are designed.

  3. Trunk postures and upper-body muscle activations during physically demanding wildfire suppression tasks.

    PubMed

    Neesham-Smith, Daniel; Aisbett, Brad; Netto, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the trunk postures and upper-body muscle activations during four physically demanding wildfire suppression tasks. Bilateral, wireless surface electromyography was recorded from the trapezius and erector spinae muscles of nine experienced, wildfire fighters. Synchronised video captured two retroreflective markers to allow for quantification of two-dimensional sagittal trunk flexion. In all tasks, significantly longer time was spent in the mild and severe trunk flexion (p ≤ 0.002) compared to the time spent in a neutral posture. Mean and peak muscle activation in all tasks exceeded previously established safe limits. These activation levels also significantly increased through the performance of each task (p < 0.001). The results suggest that the wildfire suppression tasks analysed impose significant musculoskeletal demand on firefighters. Fire agencies should consider developing interventions to reduce the exposure of their personnel to these potentially injurious musculoskeletal demands.

  4. Trunk postures and upper-body muscle activations during physically demanding wildfire suppression tasks.

    PubMed

    Neesham-Smith, Daniel; Aisbett, Brad; Netto, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the trunk postures and upper-body muscle activations during four physically demanding wildfire suppression tasks. Bilateral, wireless surface electromyography was recorded from the trapezius and erector spinae muscles of nine experienced, wildfire fighters. Synchronised video captured two retroreflective markers to allow for quantification of two-dimensional sagittal trunk flexion. In all tasks, significantly longer time was spent in the mild and severe trunk flexion (p ≤ 0.002) compared to the time spent in a neutral posture. Mean and peak muscle activation in all tasks exceeded previously established safe limits. These activation levels also significantly increased through the performance of each task (p < 0.001). The results suggest that the wildfire suppression tasks analysed impose significant musculoskeletal demand on firefighters. Fire agencies should consider developing interventions to reduce the exposure of their personnel to these potentially injurious musculoskeletal demands. PMID:24365452

  5. Maturational Patterns of Iodothyronine Phenolic and Tyrosyl Ring Deiodinase Activities in Rat Cerebrum, Cerebellum, and Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Michael M.; Yaskoski, Kimberlee A.

    1981-01-01

    To explore the control of thyroid hormone metabolism in brain during maturation, we have measured iodothyronine deiodination in homogenates of rat cerebrum, cerebellum, and hypothalamus from 1 d postnatally through adulthood. Homogenates were incubated with 125I-l-thyroxine (T4) + [131I]3,5,3′-l-triiodothyronine (T3) + 100 mM dithiothreitol. Nonradioactive T4, T3, and 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine (rT3) were included, as appropriate. The net production rate of [125I]T3 from T4 in 1-d cerebral homogenates was similar to the rate in adult cerebral homogenates (9.9±2.5[SEM]% vs. 8.9±1.2% T4 to T3 conversion in 2 h). Production of T3 was not detectable in 1-d cerebellar and hypothalamic homogenates. The net T3 production rate in adult cerebellar homogenates was twice as great as, and that in adult hypothalamic homogenates similar to, the rate in cerebral homogenates. Tyrosyl ring deiodination rates of T4 and T3 were more than three times as great in cerebral homogenates from 1-d-old rats as in adult cerebral homogenates. In cerebellar homogenates from 1-d-old rats, tyrosyl ring deiodination rates were much greater than the rates in adult cerebellar homogenates, but less than those in 1-d cerebral homogenates. In 1-d hypothalamic homogenates, tyrosyl ring deiodination rates were the highest of all the tissues tested, whereas rates in adult hypothalamic homogenates were similar to those in adult cerebral homogenates. During maturation, T4 5′-deiodination rates increased after 7 d and exceeded adult rates between 14 and 35 d in cerebral and cerebellar homogenates, and at 28 and 35 d in hypothalamic homogenates. In cerebral homogenates, the peak in reaction rate at 28 d reflected an increase in the maximum enzyme activity (Vmax) of the reaction. T4 and T3 tyrosyl ring deiodination rates decreased progressively with age down to adult rates, which were attained at 14 d for cerebrum and cerebellum and at 28 d for hypothalamus. These studies demonstrate quantitative

  6. Cationic chlorophyl derivatives with SOD mimicking activity suppress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Maniki, M; Nakamura, K

    1996-06-01

    Derivatives of chlorophyl, e.g. Fe-chlorin e6-Na, alpha, beta, gamma, delta-Tetraphenylporphine-tetrasulfonic acid disulfonic acid salt tetrahydrate (Fe-TPPTS) and alpha, beta, gamma, delta-Tetrakis (4-N-trimethylaminophenyl) porphine, tetra (p-toluensulfonate (Fe-TTMAPP), express SOD mimicking activity. Examination was made of suppressive effects of human cancer cell lines by derivatives of chlorophyl. Fe-TPPTS and Fe-TTMAPP suppressed proliferation of the human ovarian cancer cell lines but Fe-chlorin e6-Na failed to suppress the proliferation. Lipid peroxide was increased by application of Fe-TPPTS and Fe-TTMAPP, but decreased by application of Fe-chlorin e6-Na. SOD activity of the cancer cells did not change by application of these drugs. TPPTS and TTMAPP have a cationic charge but Fe-chlorin e6-Na has an anionic charge. It is suggested that charge of these drugs relates to the suppressive effects of the cancer cell proliferation. PMID:10851538

  7. Pairing broadband noise with cortical stimulation induces extensive suppression of ascending sensory activity

    PubMed Central

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Hogan, Patrick S.; Wesen, Kyle A.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The corticofugal system can alter coding along the ascending sensory pathway. Within the auditory system, electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex (AC) paired with a pure tone can cause egocentric shifts in the tuning of auditory neurons, making them more sensitive to the pure tone frequency. Since tinnitus has been linked with hyperactivity across auditory neurons, we sought to develop a new neuromodulation approach that could suppress a wide range of neurons rather than enhance specific frequency-tuned neurons. Approach We performed experiments in the guinea pig to assess the effects of cortical stimulation paired with broadband noise (PN-Stim) on ascending auditory activity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), a widely studied region for AC stimulation paradigms. Main results All eight stimulated AC regions induced extensive suppression of activity across the CNIC that was not possible with noise stimulation alone. This suppression built up over time and remained after the PN-Stim paradigm. Significance We propose that the corticofugal system is designed to decrease the brain’s input gain to irrelevant stimuli and PN-Stim is able to artificially amplify this effect to suppress neural firing across the auditory system. The PN-Stim concept may have potential for treating tinnitus and other neurological disorders. PMID:25686163

  8. Broad-spectrum therapeutic suppression of metastatic melanoma through nuclear hormone receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, Nora; Buss, Colin G; Posada, Jessica; Merghoub, Taha; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2014-02-27

    Melanoma metastasis is a devastating outcome lacking an effective preventative therapeutic. We provide pharmacologic, molecular, and genetic evidence establishing the liver-X nuclear hormone receptor (LXR) as a therapeutic target in melanoma. Oral administration of multiple LXR agonists suppressed melanoma invasion, angiogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. Molecular and genetic experiments revealed these effects to be mediated by LXRβ, which elicits these outcomes through transcriptional induction of tumoral and stromal apolipoprotein-E (ApoE). LXRβ agonism robustly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis across a diverse mutational spectrum of melanoma lines. LXRβ targeting significantly prolonged animal survival, suppressed the progression of established metastases, and inhibited brain metastatic colonization. Importantly, LXRβ activation displayed melanoma-suppressive cooperativity with the frontline regimens dacarbazine, B-Raf inhibition, and the anti-CTLA-4 antibody and robustly inhibited melanomas that had acquired resistance to B-Raf inhibition or dacarbazine. We present a promising therapeutic approach that uniquely acts by transcriptionally activating a metastasis suppressor gene.

  9. Pairing broadband noise with cortical stimulation induces extensive suppression of ascending sensory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Hogan, Patrick S.; Wesen, Kyle A.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The corticofugal system can alter coding along the ascending sensory pathway. Within the auditory system, electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex (AC) paired with a pure tone can cause egocentric shifts in the tuning of auditory neurons, making them more sensitive to the pure tone frequency. Since tinnitus has been linked with hyperactivity across auditory neurons, we sought to develop a new neuromodulation approach that could suppress a wide range of neurons rather than enhance specific frequency-tuned neurons. Approach. We performed experiments in the guinea pig to assess the effects of cortical stimulation paired with broadband noise (PN-Stim) on ascending auditory activity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), a widely studied region for AC stimulation paradigms. Main results. All eight stimulated AC subregions induced extensive suppression of activity across the CNIC that was not possible with noise stimulation alone. This suppression built up over time and remained after the PN-Stim paradigm. Significance. We propose that the corticofugal system is designed to decrease the brain’s input gain to irrelevant stimuli and PN-Stim is able to artificially amplify this effect to suppress neural firing across the auditory system. The PN-Stim concept may have potential for treating tinnitus and other neurological disorders.

  10. G protein β interacts with the glucocorticoid receptor and suppresses its transcriptional activity in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Tiulpakov, Anatoly; Ichijo, Takamasa; Chheng, Ly; Kozasa, Tohru; Chrousos, George P.

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular stimuli that activate cell surface receptors modulate glucocorticoid actions via as yet unclear mechanisms. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptor-activated WD-repeat Gβ interacts with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), comigrates with it into the nucleus and suppresses GR-induced transactivation of the glucocorticoid-responsive genes. Association of Gγ with Gβ is necessary for this action of Gβ. Both endogenous and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)–fused Gβ2 and Gγ2 proteins were detected in the nucleus at baseline, whereas a fraction of EGFP-Gβ2 and DsRed2-GR comigrated to the nucleus or the plasma membrane, depending on the exposure of cells to dexamethasone or somatostatin, respectively. Gβ2 was associated with GR/glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) in vivo and suppressed activation function-2–directed transcriptional activity of the GR. We conclude that the Gβγ complex interacts with the GR and suppresses its transcriptional activity by associating with the transcriptional complex formed on GR-responsive promoters. PMID:15955845

  11. Oral progestin induces rapid, reversible suppression of ovarian activity in the cat.

    PubMed

    Stewart, R A; Pelican, K M; Brown, J L; Wildt, D E; Ottinger, M A; Howard, J G

    2010-04-01

    The influence of oral progestin (altrenogest; ALT) on cat ovarian activity was studied using non-invasive fecal steroid monitoring. Queens were assigned to various ALT dosages: (1) 0mg/kg (control; n=5 cats); (2) 0.044 mg/kg (LOW; n=5); (3) 0.088 mg/kg (MID; n=6); or (4) 0.352 mg/kg (HIGH; n=6). Fecal estrogen and progestagen concentrations were quantified using enzyme immunoassays for 60 days before, 38 days during and 60 days after ALT treatment. Initiation of follicular activity was suppressed in all cats during progestin treatment, whereas controls continued to cycle normally. Females (n=6) with elevated fecal estrogens at treatment onset completed a normal follicular phase before returning to baseline and remained suppressed until treatment withdrawal. All cats receiving oral progestin re-initiated follicular activity after treatment, although MID cats experienced the most synchronized return (within 10-16 days). Mean baseline fecal estrogens and progestagens were higher (P<0.05) after treatment in HIGH, but not in LOW or MID cats compared to pre-treatment values. The results demonstrate that: (1) oral progestin rapidly suppresses initiation of follicular activity in the cat, but does not influence a follicular phase that exists before treatment initiation; and (2) queens return to normal follicular activity after progestin withdrawal. This study provides foundational information for research aimed at using progestin priming to improve ovarian response in felids scheduled for ovulation induction and assisted breeding. PMID:20051246

  12. The serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram suppresses activity in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akhmetshina, Dinara; Zakharov, Andrei; Vinokurova, Daria; Nasretdinov, Azat; Valeeva, Guzel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake, which causes an increase in extracellular serotonin levels, disrupts the development of thalamocortical barrel maps in neonatal rodents. Previous in vitro studies have suggested that the disruptive effect of excessive serotonin on barrel map formation involves a depression at thalamocortical synapses. However, the effects of serotonin uptake inhibitors on the early thalamocortical activity patterns in the developing barrel cortex in vivo remain largely unknown. Here, using extracellular recordings of the local field potentials and multiple unit activity (MUA) we explored the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10-20mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on sensory evoked activity in the barrel cortex of neonatal (postnatal days P2-5) rats in vivo. We show that administration of citalopram suppresses the amplitude and prolongs the delay of the sensory evoked potentials, reduces the power and frequency of the early gamma oscillations, and suppresses sensory evoked and spontaneous neuronal firing. In the adolescent P21-29 animals, citalopram affected neither sensory evoked nor spontaneous activity in barrel cortex. We suggest that suppression of the early thalamocortical activity patterns contributes to the disruption of the barrel map development caused by SSRIs and other conditions elevating extracellular serotonin levels. PMID:27016034

  13. Triterpenoid Saponin W3 from Anemone flaccida Suppresses Osteoclast Differentiation through Inhibiting Activation of MAPKs and NF-κB Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangying; Yang, Yue; Wu, Wenbin; Wan, Hongye; Li, Xiaomin; Zhong, Michun; Su, Xiaohui; Jia, Shiwei; Lin, Na

    2015-01-01

    Excessive bone resorption by osteoclasts within inflamed joints is the most specific hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis. A. flaccida has long been used for the treatment of arthritis in folk medicine of China; however, the active ingredients responsible for the anti-arthritis effects of A. flaccida are still elusive. In this study, W3, a saponin isolated from the extract of A. flaccida was identified as the major active ingredient by using an osteoclast formation model induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). W3 dose-dependently suppressed the actin ring formation and lacunar resorption. Mechanistic investigation revealed that W3 inhibited the RANKL-induced TRAF6 expression, decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and IκB-α, and suppressed NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity. Furthermore, W3 almost abrogated the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1). Therefore, our results suggest that W3 is a potential agent for treating lytic bone diseases although further evaluation in vivo and in clinical trials is needed. PMID:26327814

  14. Evidence that displacement activities facilitate behavioural transitions in ring-tailed lemurs.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Victoria; Semple, Stuart

    2012-07-01

    Displacement activities are behavioural patterns defined by their apparent irrelevance to an animal's ongoing actions. Despite being identified in diverse taxa, their function remains poorly understood. One hypothesis posits that displacement activities facilitate transitions between different behaviours by mediating changes in animals' motivational state. Under this hypothesis, it is predicted that displacement activities will occur more frequently around changes in behaviour than at other times, and also that rates of displacement activities will be higher before than after such behavioural transitions. We tested these two predictions in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). During focal observations, animals' behavioural state was continuously recorded, as were all occurrences of self-scratching, a common displacement activity in this species. Self-scratching rates were found to be significantly elevated both before and after behavioural transitions. Furthermore, self-scratching rates were significantly higher before behavioural transitions occurred than after. These results, therefore, provide support for the hypothesis that displacement activities facilitate behavioural transitions in L. catta. PMID:22561968

  15. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  16. Synthesis and biological activity of the C'D'E'F' ring system of maitotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, Masahiro; Oshima, Takahiro; Konoki, Keiichi; Ebine, Makoto; Torikai, Kohei; Murata, Michio; Oishi, Tohru

    2014-06-01

    Stereoselective synthesis of the C'D'E'F' ring system of maitotoxin was achieved starting from the E' ring through successive formation of the D' and C' rings based on SmI2-mediated reductive cyclization. Construction of the F' ring was accomplished via Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling with a side chain fragment and Pd(II)-catalyzed cyclization of an allylic alcohol. The C'D'E'F' ring system inhibited maitotoxin-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat glioma C6 cells with an IC50 value of 59 μM.

  17. Comparative study of two structures of shunt active filter suppressing particular harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchaita, L.; Salem Nia, A.; Saadate, S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper deals with the study of shunt active filters used for suppressing particular harmonics generated by nonlinear loads in utility distribution power systems. Both structures of shunt active filter, voltage source active filter (VSAF) and current source active filter (CSAF), are considered. The analytical study of specific harmonics identification in a given spectrum is first presented. For simulation as well as experimentation the nonlinear load is a conventional three phase thyristor rectifier and harmonics 5 and 7 are selected to be eliminated by active filter. The whole system consisting of the ac power supply network, the SCR rectifier and the shunt active filter (VSAF/CSAF) is then simulated. The simulation results are discussed and the efficiency of the two kinds of active filter are compared. Finally, for the first structure, VSAF, the simulation results are confirmed by experimental test realized by means of a fully digital control active power filter developed in our laboratory.

  18. Omega-3 Free Fatty Acids Suppress Macrophage Inflammasome Activation by Inhibiting NF-κB Activation and Enhancing Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Bey, Yolanda; Boularan, Cedric; Vural, Ali; Huang, Ning-Na; Hwang, Il-Young; Shan-Shi, Chong; Kehrl, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The omega-3 (ω3) fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can suppress inflammation, specifically IL-1β production through poorly understood molecular mechanisms. Here, we show that DHA reduces macrophage IL-1β production by limiting inflammasome activation. Exposure to DHA reduced IL-1β production by ligands that stimulate the NLRP3, AIM2, and NAIP5/NLRC4 inflammasomes. The inhibition required Free Fatty Acid Receptor (FFAR) 4 (also known as GPR120), a G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) known to bind DHA. The exposure of cells to DHA recruited the adapter protein β-arrestin1/2 to FFAR4, but not to a related lipid receptor. DHA treatment reduced the initial inflammasome priming step by suppressing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. DHA also reduced IL-1β levels by enhancing autophagy in the cells. As a consequence macrophages derived from mice lacking the essential autophagy protein ATG7 were partially resistant to suppressive effects of DHA. Thus, DHA suppresses inflammasome activation by two distinct mechanisms, inhibiting the initial priming step and by augmenting autophagy, which limits inflammasome activity. PMID:24911523

  19. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARalpha and gamma and suppresses COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARalpha and gamma. PPARgamma-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARgamma. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  20. Active concentric ring electrode for non-invasive detection of intestinal myoelectric signals.

    PubMed

    Prats-Boluda, Gema; Garcia-Casado, Javier; Martinez-de-Juan, Jose L; Ye-Lin, Yiyao

    2011-05-01

    Although the surface electroenterogram (EEnG) is a weak signal contaminated by strong physiological interference, such as ECG and respiration, abdominal surface recordings of the EEnG could provide a non-invasive method of studying intestinal activity. The goal of this work was to develop a modular, active, low-cost and easy-to-use sensor to obtain a direct estimation of the Laplacian of the EEnG on the abdominal surface in order to enhance the quality of bipolar surface monitoring of intestinal activity. The sensor is made up of a set of 3 concentric dry Ag/AgCl ring electrodes and a battery-powered signal-conditioning circuit. Each section is etched on a different printed circuit board (PCB) and the sections are joined to each other by surface mount technology connectors. This means the sensing electrodes can be treated independently for purposes of maintenance and replacement and the signal conditioning circuit can be re-used. A total of ten recording sessions were carried out on humans. The results show that the surface recordings of the EEnG obtained by the active sensor present significantly less ECG and respiration interference than those obtained by bipolar recordings. In addition, bioelectrical sources whose frequency fitted with the slow wave component of the EEnG (SW) were identified by parametric spectral analysis in the surface signals picked up by the active sensors.

  1. Deep brain stimulation suppresses pallidal low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonic movements.

    PubMed

    Barow, Ewgenia; Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Brücke, Christof; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Brown, Peter; Krauss, Joachim K; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus alleviates involuntary movements in patients with dystonia. However, the mechanism is still not entirely understood. One hypothesis is that deep brain stimulation suppresses abnormally enhanced synchronized oscillatory activity within the motor cortico-basal ganglia network. Here, we explore deep brain stimulation-induced modulation of pathological low frequency (4-12 Hz) pallidal activity that has been described in local field potential recordings in patients with dystonia. Therefore, local field potentials were recorded from 16 hemispheres in 12 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for severe dystonia using a specially designed amplifier allowing simultaneous high frequency stimulation at therapeutic parameter settings and local field potential recordings. For coherence analysis electroencephalographic activity (EEG) over motor areas and electromyographic activity (EMG) from affected neck muscles were recorded before and immediately after cessation of high frequency stimulation. High frequency stimulation led to a significant reduction of mean power in the 4-12 Hz band by 24.8 ± 7.0% in patients with predominantly phasic dystonia. A significant decrease of coherence between cortical EEG and pallidal local field potential activity in the 4-12 Hz range was revealed for the time period of 30 s after switching off high frequency stimulation. Coherence between EMG activity and pallidal activity was mainly found in patients with phasic dystonic movements where it was suppressed after high frequency stimulation. Our findings suggest that high frequency stimulation may suppress pathologically enhanced low frequency activity in patients with phasic dystonia. These dystonic features are the quickest to respond to high frequency stimulation and may thus directly relate to modulation of pathological basal ganglia activity, whereas improvement in tonic features may depend on long-term plastic changes within the

  2. Multirate flutter suppression system design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Martin C.; Mason, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies will be applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing (also called the PAPA wing). Eventually, the designs will be implemented in hardware and tested on the BACT wing in a wind tunnel. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing. The contributions of this project are (1) development of an algorithm for synthesizing robust low order multirate control laws (the algorithm is capable of synthesizing a single compensator which stabilizes both the nominal plant and multiple plant perturbations; (2) development of a multirate design methodology, and supporting software, for modeling, analyzing and synthesizing multirate compensators; and (3) design of a multirate flutter suppression system for NASA's BACT wing which satisfies the specified design criteria. This report describes each of these contributions in detail. Section 2.0 discusses our design methodology. Section 3.0 details the results of our multirate flutter suppression system design for the BACT wing. Finally, Section 4.0 presents our conclusions and suggestions for future research. The body of the report focuses primarily on the results. The associated theoretical background appears in the three technical papers that are included as Attachments 1-3. Attachment 4 is a user's manual for the software that is key to our design methodology.

  3. Chaotic parametric soliton-like pulses in ferromagnetic-film active ring resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Grishin, S. V. Golova, T. M.; Morozova, M. A.; Romanenko, D. V.; Seleznev, E. P.; Sysoev, I. V.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.

    2015-10-15

    The generation of quasi-periodic sequences of parametric soliton-like pulses in an active ring resonator with a ferromagnetic film via the three-wave parametric instability of a magnetostatic surface wave is studied theoretically and experimentally. These dissipative structures form in time due to the competition between the cubic nonlinearity caused by parametric coupling between spin waves and the time dispersion caused by the resonant cavity that is present in a self-oscillatory system. The development of dynamic chaos due to the parametric instability of a magnetostatic surface wave results in irregular behavior of a phase. However, this behavior does not break a quasi-periodic pulse sequence when the gain changes over a wide range. The generated soliton-like pulses have a chaotic nature, which is supported by the maximum Lyapunov exponent estimated from experimental time series.

  4. Active damping of the e-p instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R. J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Deibele, C. E.; Henderson, S. D.; Lee, S. Y.; McCrady, R. C.; Pivi, M. F. T.; Plum, M. A.; Walbridge, S. B.; Zaugg, T. J.

    2007-12-15

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  5. Active Damping of the E-P Instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J.M.; Deibele, C.E.; Henderson, S.D.; Lee, S.Y.; McCrady, R.C.; Pivi, M.F.T.; Plum, M.A.; Walbridge, S.B.; Zaugg, T.J.; /Los Alamos

    2008-03-17

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  6. Marijuana effects on immunity: suppression of human natural killer cell activity of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Specter, S C; Klein, T W; Newton, C; Mondragon, M; Widen, R; Friedman, H

    1986-01-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana, was tested for its ability to modulate human natural killer (NK) cell function. THC was toxic for peripheral blood lymphocytes at 20 micrograms/ml but not at 10 micrograms/ml or less. This component of marijuana also was inhibitory for NK activity against K562, a human tumor cell line at concentrations down to 5 micrograms/ml when pre-incubated with the effector cells. Suppression of NK function was dependent upon the concentration of THC and the length of time of pre-incubation but was independent of the ratio of effector to target cells. Prostaglandins were not involved in suppression of NK activity.

  7. Does adrenergic activity suppress insulin secretion during surgery? A clinical experiment with halothane anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Aärimaa, M; Syvälahti, E; Ovaska, J

    1978-01-01

    Peroperative inhibition of insulin release is widely attributed to increased alpha-adrenergic activity. To test this hypothesis serum insulin and glucose concentrations were measured at short intervals in 11 patients who underwent major surgery. Five patients were anesthetized with halothane and six with general anesthesia without halothane. The results were similar in both patient groups; halothane had no effect on insulin. This suggests that suppression of insulin under operations is probably not due to activation of the alpha-adrenergic receptors of the pancreatic beta-cells. The authors propose that suppression of insulin secretion during surgery may be caused by adrenaline, which, in competing for the glucose receptors, insensitizes the pancreatic beta-cells. PMID:202205

  8. Synthesis of active controls for flutter suppression on a flight research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Perry, B., III; Murrow, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some activities associated with the preliminary design of an active control system for flutter suppression capable of demonstrating a 20% increase in flutter velocity. Results from two control system synthesis techniques are given. One technique uses classical control theory, and the other uses an 'aerodynamic energy method' where control surface rates or displacements are minimized. Analytical methods used to synthesize the control systems and evaluate their performance are described. Some aspects of a program for flight testing the active control system are also given. This program, called DAST (Drones for Aerodynamics and Structural Testing), employs modified drone-type vehicles for flight assessments and validation testing.

  9. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 6; Theoretical Analysis for Coupling of Active Noise Control Actuator Ring Sources to an Annular Duct with Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an analytical model for the coupling of active noise control (ANC) piston-type actuators that are mounted flush to the inner and outer walls of an annular duct to the modes in the duct generated by the actuator motion. The analysis will be used to couple the ANC actuators to the modal analysis propagation computer program for the annular duct, to predict the effects of active suppression of fan-generated engine noise sources. This combined program will then be available to assist in the design or evaluation of ANC systems in fan engine annular exhaust ducts. An analysis has been developed to predict the modes generated in an annular duct due to the coupling of flush-mounted ring actuators on the inner and outer walls of the duct. The analysis has been combined with a previous analysis for the coupling of modes to a cylindrical duct in a FORTRAN computer program to perform the computations. The method includes the effects of uniform mean flow in the duct. The program can be used for design or evaluation purposes for active noise control hardware for turbofan engines. Predictions for some sample cases modeled after the geometry of the NASA Lewis ANC Fan indicate very efficient coupling in both the inlet and exhaust ducts for the m = 6 spinning mode at frequencies where only a single radial mode is cut-on. Radial mode content in higher order cut-off modes at the source plane and the required actuator displacement amplitude to achieve 110 dB SPL levels in the desired mode were predicted. Equivalent cases with and without flow were examined for the cylindrical and annular geometry, and little difference was found for a duct flow Mach number of 0.1. The actuator ring coupling program will be adapted as a subroutine to the cylindrical duct modal analysis and the exhaust duct modal analysis. This will allow the fan source to be defined in terms of characteristic modes at the fan source plane and predict the propagation to the

  10. Troglitazone inhibits endothelial cell proliferation through suppression of casein kinase 2 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuy-Sook; Park, Jin-Hee; Lee, Seahyoung; Lim, Hyun-Joung; Jang, Yangsoo; Park, Hyun-Young . E-mail: hypark65@nih.go.kr

    2006-07-21

    Troglitazone, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), has been reported to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation by suppressing Akt activation. Recently, it has been also proposed that phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) plays an important role in such effect of troglitazone. However, the mechanism of how troglitazone regulates PTEN remains to be elucidated. We therefore investigated the effects of troglitazone on casein kinase 2 (CK2), which is known to negatively regulate PTEN activity. Troglitazone significantly inhibited serum-induced proliferation of HUVEC in a concentration dependent manner. Serum-induced Akt and its downstream signaling pathway activation was attenuated by troglitazone (10 {mu}M) pretreatment. The phosphorylation of PTEN, which was directly related to Akt activation, was decreased with troglitazone pretreatment and was inversely proportional to CK2 activity. DRB, a CK2 inhibitor, also showed effects similar to that of troglitazone on Akt and its downstream signaling molecules. In conclusion, our results suggest that troglitazone inhibits proliferation of HUVECs through suppression of CK2 activity rendering PTEN to remain activated, and this effect of troglitazone in HUVECs seems to be PPAR{gamma} independent.

  11. Influence of mineral amendment on disease suppressive activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens to Fusarium wilt of chickpea.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Ratul; Varghese, Saju; Singh, Bhim Pratap; Arora, Dilip K

    2009-01-01

    Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri causes considerable yield loss of chickpea. Pseudomonas fluorescens4-92 (Pf4-92) strain can suppress the disease. Amendment of zinc EDTA and copper EDTA could not suppress the disease significantly when used alone; however, they significantly suppressed the disease in presence of Pf4-92. In vitro observation showed that at 40, 30 and 20microgml(-1) concentrations of these minerals, i.e. Zn, Cu and Zn plus Cu, respectively, completely repressed the production of the phytotoxin, fusaric acid (FA). FA concentration (0.5microgml(-1)) has been shown to suppress the production of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) by Pf4-92, and DAPG, salicylic acid, pyochelin and pyoluteorin production was enhanced by these mineral amendments. In rockwool bioassays, Zn, Cu and Zn plus Cu amendments reduced FA production and enhanced DAPG production. This study demonstrates that Zn and Cu enhance biocontrol activity by reducing FA produced by the pathogen, F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceri. PMID:17604612

  12. Active matter beyond mean-field: Ring-kinetic theory for self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yen-Liang; Ihle, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Recently, Hanke et al. [Phys. Rev. E 88, 052309 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.052309] showed that mean-field kinetic theory fails to describe collective motion in soft active colloids and that correlations must not be neglected. Correlation effects are also expected to be essential in systems of biofilaments driven by molecular motors and in swarms of midges. To obtain correlations in an active matter system from first principles, we derive a ring-kinetic theory for Vicsek-style models of self-propelled agents from the exact N -particle evolution equation in phase space. The theory goes beyond mean-field and does not rely on Boltzmann's approximation of molecular chaos. It can handle precollisional correlations and cluster formation, which are both important to understand the phase transition to collective motion. We propose a diagrammatic technique to perform a small-density expansion of the collision operator and derive the first two equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy. An algorithm is presented that numerically solves the evolution equation for the two-particle correlations on a lattice. Agent-based simulations are performed and informative quantities such as orientational and density correlation functions are compared with those obtained by ring-kinetic theory. Excellent quantitative agreement between simulations and theory is found at not-too-small noises and mean free paths. This shows that there are parameter ranges in Vicsek-like models where the correlated closure of the BBGKY hierarchy gives correct and nontrivial results. We calculate the dependence of the orientational correlations on distance in the disordered phase and find that it seems to be consistent with a power law with an exponent around -1.8 , followed by an exponential decay. General limitations of the kinetic theory and its numerical solution are discussed.

  13. Active matter beyond mean-field: ring-kinetic theory for self-propelled particles.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yen-Liang; Ihle, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Recently, Hanke et al. [Phys. Rev. E 88, 052309 (2013)] showed that mean-field kinetic theory fails to describe collective motion in soft active colloids and that correlations must not be neglected. Correlation effects are also expected to be essential in systems of biofilaments driven by molecular motors and in swarms of midges. To obtain correlations in an active matter system from first principles, we derive a ring-kinetic theory for Vicsek-style models of self-propelled agents from the exact N-particle evolution equation in phase space. The theory goes beyond mean-field and does not rely on Boltzmann's approximation of molecular chaos. It can handle precollisional correlations and cluster formation, which are both important to understand the phase transition to collective motion. We propose a diagrammatic technique to perform a small-density expansion of the collision operator and derive the first two equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy. An algorithm is presented that numerically solves the evolution equation for the two-particle correlations on a lattice. Agent-based simulations are performed and informative quantities such as orientational and density correlation functions are compared with those obtained by ring-kinetic theory. Excellent quantitative agreement between simulations and theory is found at not-too-small noises and mean free paths. This shows that there are parameter ranges in Vicsek-like models where the correlated closure of the BBGKY hierarchy gives correct and nontrivial results. We calculate the dependence of the orientational correlations on distance in the disordered phase and find that it seems to be consistent with a power law with an exponent around -1.8, followed by an exponential decay. General limitations of the kinetic theory and its numerical solution are discussed.

  14. Daughter cell separation is controlled by cytokinetic ring-activated cell wall hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Parzych, Katherine R; Dinh, Thuy; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2010-04-21

    During bacterial cytokinesis, hydrolytic enzymes are used to split wall material shared by adjacent daughter cells to promote their separation. Precise control over these enzymes is critical to prevent breaches in wall integrity that can cause cell lysis. How these potentially lethal hydrolases are regulated has remained unknown. Here, we investigate the regulation of cell wall turnover at the Escherichia coli division site. We show that two components of the division machinery with LytM domains (EnvC and NlpD) are direct regulators of the cell wall hydrolases (amidases) responsible for cell separation (AmiA, AmiB and AmiC). Using in vitro cell wall cleavage assays, we show that EnvC activates AmiA and AmiB, whereas NlpD activates AmiC. Consistent with these findings, we show that an unregulated EnvC mutant requires functional AmiA or AmiB but not AmiC to induce cell lysis, and that the loss of NlpD phenocopies an AmiC(-) defect. Overall, our results suggest that cellular amidase activity is regulated spatially and temporally by coupling their activation to the assembly of the cytokinetic ring.

  15. Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J.; Boasso, Alyssa M.; Mortimore, Hailey M.; Silva, Rhonda S.; Charlesworth, Jonathan D.; Marlin, Michelle A.; Aebersold, Kirsten; Aven, Linh; Wetmore, Daniel Z.; Pal, Sumon K.

    2015-01-01

    We engineered a transdermal neuromodulation approach that targets peripheral (cranial and spinal) nerves and utilizes their afferent pathways as signaling conduits to influence brain function. We investigated the effects of this transdermal electrical neurosignaling (TEN) method on sympathetic physiology under different experimental conditions. The TEN method involved delivering high-frequency pulsed electrical currents to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the right trigeminal nerve and cervical spinal nerve afferents. Under resting conditions, TEN significantly suppressed basal sympathetic tone compared to sham as indicated by functional infrared thermography of facial temperatures. In a different experiment, subjects treated with TEN reported significantly lower levels of tension and anxiety on the Profile of Mood States scale compared to sham. In a third experiment when subjects were experimentally stressed TEN produced a significant suppression of heart rate variability, galvanic skin conductance, and salivary α-amylase levels compared to sham. Collectively these observations demonstrate TEN can dampen basal sympathetic tone and attenuate sympathetic activity in response to acute stress induction. Our physiological and biochemical observations are consistent with the hypothesis that TEN modulates noradrenergic signaling to suppress sympathetic activity. We conclude that dampening sympathetic activity in such a manner represents a promising approach to managing daily stress. PMID:26353920

  16. Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Tyler, William J; Boasso, Alyssa M; Mortimore, Hailey M; Silva, Rhonda S; Charlesworth, Jonathan D; Marlin, Michelle A; Aebersold, Kirsten; Aven, Linh; Wetmore, Daniel Z; Pal, Sumon K

    2015-01-01

    We engineered a transdermal neuromodulation approach that targets peripheral (cranial and spinal) nerves and utilizes their afferent pathways as signaling conduits to influence brain function. We investigated the effects of this transdermal electrical neurosignaling (TEN) method on sympathetic physiology under different experimental conditions. The TEN method involved delivering high-frequency pulsed electrical currents to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the right trigeminal nerve and cervical spinal nerve afferents. Under resting conditions, TEN significantly suppressed basal sympathetic tone compared to sham as indicated by functional infrared thermography of facial temperatures. In a different experiment, subjects treated with TEN reported significantly lower levels of tension and anxiety on the Profile of Mood States scale compared to sham. In a third experiment when subjects were experimentally stressed TEN produced a significant suppression of heart rate variability, galvanic skin conductance, and salivary α-amylase levels compared to sham. Collectively these observations demonstrate TEN can dampen basal sympathetic tone and attenuate sympathetic activity in response to acute stress induction. Our physiological and biochemical observations are consistent with the hypothesis that TEN modulates noradrenergic signaling to suppress sympathetic activity. We conclude that dampening sympathetic activity in such a manner represents a promising approach to managing daily stress. PMID:26353920

  17. Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Tyler, William J; Boasso, Alyssa M; Mortimore, Hailey M; Silva, Rhonda S; Charlesworth, Jonathan D; Marlin, Michelle A; Aebersold, Kirsten; Aven, Linh; Wetmore, Daniel Z; Pal, Sumon K

    2015-01-01

    We engineered a transdermal neuromodulation approach that targets peripheral (cranial and spinal) nerves and utilizes their afferent pathways as signaling conduits to influence brain function. We investigated the effects of this transdermal electrical neurosignaling (TEN) method on sympathetic physiology under different experimental conditions. The TEN method involved delivering high-frequency pulsed electrical currents to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the right trigeminal nerve and cervical spinal nerve afferents. Under resting conditions, TEN significantly suppressed basal sympathetic tone compared to sham as indicated by functional infrared thermography of facial temperatures. In a different experiment, subjects treated with TEN reported significantly lower levels of tension and anxiety on the Profile of Mood States scale compared to sham. In a third experiment when subjects were experimentally stressed TEN produced a significant suppression of heart rate variability, galvanic skin conductance, and salivary α-amylase levels compared to sham. Collectively these observations demonstrate TEN can dampen basal sympathetic tone and attenuate sympathetic activity in response to acute stress induction. Our physiological and biochemical observations are consistent with the hypothesis that TEN modulates noradrenergic signaling to suppress sympathetic activity. We conclude that dampening sympathetic activity in such a manner represents a promising approach to managing daily stress.

  18. The Effect of Gas Ion Bombardment on the Secondary Electron Yield of TiN, TiCN and TiZrV Coatings For Suppressing Collective Electron Effects in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; Kirby, R.E.; King, F.K.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2006-01-25

    In many accelerator storage rings running positively charged beams, ionization of residual gas and secondary electron emission (SEE) in the beam pipe will give rise to an electron cloud which can cause beam blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. A preventative measure that suppresses electron cloud formation is to ensure that the vacuum wall has a low secondary emission yield (SEY). The SEY of thin films of TiN, sputter deposited Non-Evaporable Getters and a novel TiCN alloy were measured under a variety of conditions, including the effect of re-contamination from residual gas.

  19. Chronic activation of pattern recognition receptors suppresses brown adipogenesis of multipotent mesodermal stem cells and brown pre-adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jiyoung; Chen, Jiangang; Zhao, Ling

    2015-06-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) holds promise to combat obesity through energy-spending, non-shivering thermogenesis. Understanding of regulation of BAT development can lead to novel strategies to increase BAT mass and function for obesity treatment and prevention. Here, we report the effects of chronic activation of PRR on brown adipogenesis of multipotent mesodermal stem C3H10T1/2 cells and immortalized brown pre-adipocytes from the classical interscapular BAT of mice. Activation of NOD1, TLR4, or TLR2 by their respective synthetic ligand suppressed brown marker gene expression and lipid accumulation during differentiation of brown-like adipocytes of C3H10T1/2. Activation of the PRR only during the commitment was sufficient to suppress the differentiation. PRR activation suppressed PGC-1α mRNA, but induced PRDM16 mRNA at the commitment. Consistently, PRR activation suppressed the differentiation of immortalized brown pre-adipocytes. Activation of PRR induced NF-κB activation in both cells, which correlated with their abilities to suppress PPARγ transactivation, a critical event for brown adipogenesis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that chronic PRR activation suppressed brown adipogenesis of multipotent mesodermal stem cells and brown pre-adipocytes, possibly through suppression of PPARγ transactivation. The results suggest that anti- inflammatory therapies targeting PRRs may be beneficial for the BAT development.

  20. The impact of active site protonation on substrate ring conformation in Melanocarpus albomyces cellobiohydrolase Cel7B.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Timothy C; Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Granum, David M; Maupin, C Mark

    2015-07-14

    The ability to utilize biomass as a feedstock for liquid fuel and value-added chemicals is dependent on the efficient and economic utilization of lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose. In current bioreactors, cellulases are used to convert crystalline and amorphous cellulose to smaller oligomers and eventually glucose by means of cellulase enzymes. A critical component of the enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis reaction is the degree to which the enzyme can facilitate substrate ring deformation from the chair to a more catalytically active conformation (e.g. skewed boat) at the -1 subsite. Presented here is an evaluation of the impact of the protonation state for critical active site residues (i.e. Glu212, Asp214, Glu217, and His228) in Melanocarpus albomyces (Ma) Cellobiohydrolase Cel7B on the substrate's orientation and ring conformation. It is found that the protonation state of the active site can disrupt the intra-enzyme hydrogen bonding network and enhance the sampling of various ring puckering conformations for the substrate ring at the +1 and -1 subsites. In particular it is observed that the protonation state of Asp214 dictates the accessibility of the glycosidic bond to the catalytic acid/base Glu217 by influencing the φ/ψ dihedral angles and the puckering of the ring structure. The protonation-orientation-conformation analysis has revealed an active site that primarily utilizes two highly coupled protonation schemes; one protonation scheme to orient the substrate and generate catalytically favorable substrate geometries and ring puckering conformations and another protonation scheme to hydrolyze the glycosidic bond. In addition to identifying how enzymes utilize protonation state to manipulate substrate geometry, this study identifies possible directions for improving catalytic activity through protein engineering. PMID:26061383

  1. PML suppresses oncogenic transformation of NIH/3T3 cells by activated neu

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The chromosomal translocation t(15;17)(q22;q12) is a consistent feature of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) that results in the disruption of genes for the zinc finger transcription factor PML and the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha). We have previously shown that PML is a growth suppressor and is able to suppress transformation of NIH/3T3 by activated neu oncogene. In the study presented here, the full-length PML cDNA was transfected into B104-1-1 cells (NIH/3T3 cells transformed by the activated neu oncogene) by retrovirally mediated gene transfer. We found that expression of PML could reverse phenotypes of B104-1-1 including morphology, contact-limiting properties, and growth rate in both transient-expression and stable transfectants. We also demonstrated that PML is able to suppress clonogenicity of B104-1-1 in soft agar assay and tumorigenicity in nude mice. These results strongly support our previous finding that PML is a transformation or growth suppressor. Our results further demonstrate that expression of PML in B104-1-1 cells has little effect on cell cycle distribution. Western blot analysis demonstrated that suppression of neu expression in B104-1- 1 by PML was insignificant in the transient transfection experiment but significant in the PML stable transfectants. This study suggests that PML may suppress neu expression and block signaling events associated with activated neu. This study supports our hypothesis that disruption of the normal function of PML, a growth or transformation suppressor, is a critical event in APL leukomogenesis. PMID:7759992

  2. GBF-dependent family genes morphologically suppress the partially active Dictyostelium STATa strain.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nao; Kanno-Tanabe, Naoko; Minemura, Kakeru; Kawata, Takefumi

    2008-02-01

    Transcription factor Dd-STATa, a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins, is necessary for culmination during development. We have isolated more than 18 putative multicopy suppressors of Dd-STATa using genetic screening. One was hssA gene, whose expression is known to be G-box-binding-factor-dependent and which was specific to prestalk A (pstA) cells, where Dd-STATa is activated. Also, hssA mRNA was expressed in pstA cells in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. At least 40 hssA-related genes are present in the genome and constitute a multigene family. The tagged HssA protein was translated; hssA encodes an unusually high-glycine-serine-rich small protein (8.37 kDa), which has strong homology to previously reported cyclic-adenosine-monophosphate-inducible 2C and 7E proteins. Overexpression of hssA mRNA as well as frame-shifted versions of hssA RNA suppressed the phenotype of the partially active Dd-STATa strain, suggesting that translation is not necessary for suppression. Although overexpression of prespore-specific genes among the family did not suppress the parental phenotype, prestalk-specific family members did. Although overexpression of the hssA did not revert the expression of Dd-STATa target genes, and although its suppression mechanism remains unknown, morphological reversion implies functional relationships between Dd-STATa and hssA.

  3. Physicochemically and pharmacokinetically stable nonapeptide KISS1 receptor agonists with highly potent testosterone-suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Asami, Taiji; Nishizawa, Naoki; Matsui, Hisanori; Takatsu, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Atsuko; Kiba, Atsushi; Terada, Michiko; Nishibori, Kimiko; Nakayama, Masaharu; Ban, Junko; Matsumoto, Shin-ichi; Tarui, Naoki; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Kusaka, Masami; Ohtaki, Tetsuya; Kitada, Chieko

    2014-07-24

    Modifications of metastin(45-54) produced peptide analogues with higher metabolic stability than metastin(45-54). N-terminally truncated nonapeptide 4 ([D-Tyr46,D-Pya(4)47,azaGly51,Arg(Me)53]metastin(46-54)) is a representative compound with both potent agonistic activity and metabolic stability. Although 4 had more potent testosterone-suppressant activity than metastin, it possessed physicochemical instability at pH 7 and insufficient in vivo activity. Instability at pH 7 was dependent upon Asn48 and Ser49; substitution of Ser49 with Thr49 reduced this instability and maintained KISS1 receptor agonistic activity. Furthermore, [D-Tyr46,D-Trp47,Thr49,azaGly51,Arg(Me)53,Trp54]metastin(46-54) (14) showed 2-fold greater [Ca2+]i-mobilizing activity than metastin(45-54) and an apparent increase in physicochemical stability. N-terminal acetylation of 14 resulted in the most potent analogue, 22 (Ac-[D-Tyr46,D-Trp47,Thr49,azaGly51,Arg(Me)53,Trp54]metastin(46-54)). With continuous administration, 22 possessed 10-50-fold more potent testosterone-suppressive activity in rats than 4. These results suggested that a controlled release of short-length KISS1 receptor agonists can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and reduce testosterone levels. Compound 22 was selected for further preclinical evaluation for hormone-dependent diseases.

  4. Silica nanoparticles in E ring ice grains as an indicator for hydrothermal activities at Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, F.; Hsu, H. W.; Sekine, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Since 2004 the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on board the Cassini spacecraft detects nano-meter sized dust particles, so called stream particles, in the Saturnian system. Recently it has been shown that they are released from E ring ice grains in which they were previously embedded [1]. As a consequence the nanograins must have been generated at Saturns active moon Enceladus which feeds the E ring by its spectacular jets of vapour and ice grains. Liquid water below the moons icy crust is known to be the dominant source of these jets [2, 3]. New results from CDA presented here indicate that stream particles actually are nano-silica grains. The most prominent geological process which produces nano-phase silica are hydrothermal rock-water interactions. This process has recently been intensely studied for hydrothermal systems on Earth [e.g. 4, 5]. The measured concentration, composition and size range observed at in the Saturnian system precisely matches a hydrothermal synthesis origin. Thus, we propose nano-colloidal silica to be present at mMol concentrations in Enceladus' subsurface waters. We were able to reproduce the proposed hydrothermal serpentinisation processes in a geochemical long term experiment in the laboratory. As there are no alternative formation scenarios which are in agreement with the CDA observations our results indicate ongoing rock-water interactions inside Enceladus at temperatures clearly exceeding 100°C. We discuss implications for Enceladus geochemistry, like salinity, possible ranges of temperature and pH, as well as the mineral composition of the Enceladian rock core.

  5. Tumor Suppressive Function of p21-activated Kinase 6 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weisi; Liu, Yidong; Liu, Haiou; Zhang, Weijuan; Fu, Qiang; Xu, Jiejie; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-11-20

    Our previous studies identified the oncogenic role of p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Contrarily, PAK6 was found to predict a favorable prognosis in RCC patients. Nevertheless, the ambiguous tumor suppressive function of PAK6 in hepatocarcinogenesis remains obscure. Herein, decreased PAK6 expression was found to be associated with tumor node metastasis stage progression and unfavorable overall survival in HCC patients. Additionally, overexpression and silence of PAK6 experiments showed that PAK6 inhibited xenografted tumor growth in vivo, and restricted cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and promoted cell apoptosis and anoikis in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of kinase dead and nuclear localization signal deletion mutants of PAK6 experiments indicated the tumor suppressive function of PAK6 was partially dependent on its kinase activity and nuclear translocation. Furthermore, gain or loss of function in polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) components, including EZH2, SUZ12, and EED, elucidated epigenetic control of H3K27me3-arbitrated PAK6 down-regulation in hepatoma cells. More importantly, negative correlation between PAK6 and EZH2 expression was observed in hepatoma tissues from HCC patients. These data identified the tumor suppressive role and potential underlying mechanism of PAK6 in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  6. Cilnidipine but not amlodipine suppresses sympathetic activation elicited by isometric exercise in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yumi; Kawabe, Tetsuya; Nishihara, Kanami; Iwane, Naomi; Hano, Takuzo

    2015-01-01

    Pupillometry was used to evaluate the effects of the calcium channel blockers cilnidipine (CL) and amlodipine (AM) on changes in autonomic nervous activity induced by isometric exercise in patients with hypertension. After handgrip exercise, the velocity of miosis increased in both the CL and AM groups. However, the velocity of mydriasis increased in only the AM group. Velocity slopes of miosis and mydriasis were smaller in the CL group than in the AM group. The low-to-high frequency ratio obtained from pulse wave analysis increased in only the AM group. Sympathetic activation elicited by isometric exercise was suppressed more effectively by CL than by AM. PMID:25977982

  7. Nucleotide-induced asymmetry within ATPase activator ring drives σ54–RNAP interaction and ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; Nixon, B. Tracy

    2013-01-01

    It is largely unknown how the typical homomeric ring geometry of ATPases associated with various cellular activities enables them to perform mechanical work. Small-angle solution X-ray scattering, crystallography, and electron microscopy (EM) reconstructions revealed that partial ATP occupancy caused the heptameric closed ring of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) NtrC1 to rearrange into a hexameric split ring of striking asymmetry. The highly conserved and functionally crucial GAFTGA loops responsible for interacting with σ54–RNA polymerase formed a spiral staircase. We propose that splitting of the ensemble directs ATP hydrolysis within the oligomer, and the ring's asymmetry guides interaction between ATPase and the complex of σ54 and promoter DNA. Similarity between the structure of the transcriptional activator NtrC1 and those of distantly related helicases Rho and E1 reveals a general mechanism in homomeric ATPases whereby complex allostery within the ring geometry forms asymmetric functional states that allow these biological motors to exert directional forces on their target macromolecules. PMID:24240239

  8. Flutter suppression control law synthesis for the active flexible wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    The Active Flexible Wing Project is a collaborative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center and Rockwell International. The objectives are the validation of methodologies associated with mathematical modeling, flutter suppression control law development and digital implementation of the control system for application to flexible aircraft. A flutter suppression control law synthesis for this project is described. The state-space mathematical model used for the synthesis included ten flexible modes, four control surface modes and rational function approximation of the doublet-lattice unsteady aerodynamics. The design steps involved developing the full-order optimal control laws, reducing the order of the control law, and optimizing the reduced-order control law in both the continuous and the discrete domains to minimize stochastic response. System robustness was improved using singular value constraints. An 8th order robust control law was designed to increase the symmetric flutter dynamic pressure by 100 percent. Preliminary results are provided and experiences gained are discussed.

  9. Flutter suppression control law synthesis for the Active Flexible Wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Perry, Boyd, III; Noll, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    The Active Flexible Wing Project is a collaborative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center and Rockwell International. The objectives are the validation of methodologies associated with mathematical modeling, flutter suppression control law development and digital implementation of the control system for application to flexible aircraft. A flutter suppression control law synthesis for this project is described. The state-space mathematical model used for the synthesis included ten flexible modes, four control surface modes and rational function approximation of the doublet-lattice unsteady aerodynamics. The design steps involved developing the full-order optimal control laws, reducing the order of the control law, and optimizing the reduced-order control law in both the continuous and the discrete domains to minimize stochastic response. System robustness was improved using singular value constraints. An 8th order robust control law was designed to increase the symmetric flutter dynamic pressure by 100 percent. Preliminary results are provided and experiences gained are discussed.

  10. USP10 antagonizes c-Myc transcriptional activation through SIRT6 stabilization to suppress tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenghong; Yang, Heeyoung; Tan, Can; Li, Jinping; Liu, Zhaojian; Quan, Qiu; Kong, Sinyi; Ye, Junsheng; Gao, Beixue; Fang, Deyu

    2013-12-26

    The reduced protein expression of SIRT6 tumor suppressor is involved in tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT6 protein downregulation in human cancers remain unknown. Using a proteomic approach, we have identified the ubiquitin-specific peptidase USP10, another tumor suppressor, as one of the SIRT6-interacting proteins. USP10 suppresses SIRT6 ubiquitination to protect SIRT6 from proteasomal degradation. USP10 antagonizes the transcriptional activity of the c-Myc oncogene through SIRT6, as well as p53, to inhibit cell-cycle progression, cancer cell growth, and tumor formation. To support this conclusion, we detected significant reductions in both USP10 and SIRT6 protein expression in human colon cancers. Our study discovered crosstalk between two tumor-suppressive genes in regulating cell-cycle progression and proliferation and showed that dysregulated USP10 function promotes tumorigenesis through SIRT6 degradation.

  11. Influence of FtsZ GTPase activity and concentration on nanoscale Z-ring structure in vivo revealed by three-dimensional Superresolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Zhixin; Coltharp, Carla; Yang, Xinxing; Xiao, Jie

    2016-10-01

    FtsZ is an essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein that assembles into a ring-like structure (Z-ring) at midcell to carry out cytokinesis. In vitro, FtsZ exhibits polymorphism in polymerizing into different forms of filaments based on its GTPase activity, concentration, and buffer condition. In vivo, the Z-ring appeared to be punctate and heterogeneously organized, although continuous, homogenous Z-ring structures have also been observed. Understanding how the Z-ring is organized in vivo is important because it provides a structural basis for the functional role of the Z-ring in cytokinesis. Here, we assess the effects of both GTPase activity and FtsZ concentration on the organization of the Z-ring in vivo using three-dimensional (3D) superresolution microscopy. We found that the Z-ring became more homogenous when assembled in the presence of a GTPase-deficient mutant, and upon overexpression of either wt or mutant FtsZ. These results suggest that the in vivo organization of the Z-ring is largely dependent on the intrinsic polymerization properties of FtsZ, which are significantly influenced by the GTPase activity and concentration of FtsZ. Our work provides a unifying theme to reconcile previous observations of different Z-ring structures, and supports a model in which the wt Z-ring comprises loosely associated, heterogeneously distributed FtsZ clusters. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 725-734, 2016. PMID:27310678

  12. Influence of FtsZ GTPase activity and concentration on nanoscale Z-ring structure in vivo revealed by three-dimensional Superresolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Zhixin; Coltharp, Carla; Yang, Xinxing; Xiao, Jie

    2016-10-01

    FtsZ is an essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein that assembles into a ring-like structure (Z-ring) at midcell to carry out cytokinesis. In vitro, FtsZ exhibits polymorphism in polymerizing into different forms of filaments based on its GTPase activity, concentration, and buffer condition. In vivo, the Z-ring appeared to be punctate and heterogeneously organized, although continuous, homogenous Z-ring structures have also been observed. Understanding how the Z-ring is organized in vivo is important because it provides a structural basis for the functional role of the Z-ring in cytokinesis. Here, we assess the effects of both GTPase activity and FtsZ concentration on the organization of the Z-ring in vivo using three-dimensional (3D) superresolution microscopy. We found that the Z-ring became more homogenous when assembled in the presence of a GTPase-deficient mutant, and upon overexpression of either wt or mutant FtsZ. These results suggest that the in vivo organization of the Z-ring is largely dependent on the intrinsic polymerization properties of FtsZ, which are significantly influenced by the GTPase activity and concentration of FtsZ. Our work provides a unifying theme to reconcile previous observations of different Z-ring structures, and supports a model in which the wt Z-ring comprises loosely associated, heterogeneously distributed FtsZ clusters. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 725-734, 2016.

  13. Effective ATPase activity and moderate chaperonin-cochaperonin interaction are important for the functional single-ring chaperonin system.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, Melissa; Salisbury, Jared; Li, Wenqian; Lin, Donghai; Chen, Lingling

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli chaperonin GroEL and its cochaperonin GroES are essential for cell growth as they assist folding of cellular proteins. The double-ring assembly of GroEL is required for the chaperone function, and a single-ring variant GroEL(SR) is inactive with GroES. Mutations in GroEL(SR) (A92T, D115N, E191G, and A399T) have been shown to render GroEL(SR)-GroES functional, but the molecular mechanism of activation is unclear. Here we examined various biochemical properties of these functional GroEL(SR)-GroES variants, including ATP hydrolysis rate, chaperonin-cochaperonin interaction, and in vitro protein folding activity. We found that, unlike the diminished ATPase activity of the inactive GroEL(SR)-GroES, all four single-ring variants hydrolyzed ATP at a level comparable to that of the double-ring GroEL-GroES. The chaperonin-cochaperonin interaction in these single-ring systems was weaker, by at least a 50-fold reduction, than the highly stable inactive GroEL(SR)-GroES. Strikingly, only GroEL(SR)D115N-GroES and GroEL(SR)A399T-GroES assisted folding of malate dehydrogenase (MDH), a commonly used folding substrate. These in vitro results are interesting considering that all four of the single-ring systems were able to substitute GroEL-GroES to support cell growth, suggesting that the precise action of chaperonin on MDH folding may not represent that on the intrinsic cellular substrates. Our findings that both effective ATP hydrolysis rate and moderate chaperonin-cochaperonin interaction are important factors for functional single-ring GroEL(SR)-GroES are reminiscent of the naturally occurring single-ring human mitochondrial chaperonin mtHsp60-mtHsp10. Differences in biochemical properties between the single- and double-ring chaperonin systems may be exploited in designing molecules for selective targeting. PMID:26271593

  14. Functional clonal deletion versus active suppression in transplantation tolerance induced by total-lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morecki, S.; Leshem, B.; Weigensberg, M.; Bar, S.; Slavin, S.

    1985-08-01

    Transplantation tolerance and stable chimerism were established in adult mice conditioned with a short course of total-lymphoid irradiation (TLI) followed by infusion of 30 X 10(6) allogeneic bone marrow cells. Spleen cells of tolerant mice could not exert a proliferative or cytotoxic response against host-type cells in vitro and were unable to induce graft-versus-host reaction in secondary host-type recipients. The degree of suppression assessed by coculturing tolerant splenocytes in vitro in the one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction was quite variable--and, in some cases, was not at all demonstrable, although tolerance was clearly maintained. Suppression, when apparent, could not be ascribed to T lymphocytes. Suppressor cells were found to bind soybean agglutinin and could be separated from the nonsuppressive cells by means of this lectin. Dissociation of the suppressive population (SBA+ cells) from that which is normally alloreactive (SBA- cells) resulted in a suppressor cell-depleted fraction that was still unable to respond to host-type cells but regained reactivity to unrelated cells. Limiting dilution analysis of chimeric splenocytes revealed markedly reduced frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (CTL-P) directed against host-type cells, as compared with normal splenocytes reacting against the same target cells. This difference was accentuated when these cells were sensitized to host-type target cells prior to plating in limiting dilution cultures. In 1:1 mixing experiments of normal and chimeric splenocytes, there was no evidence of any in vitro suppressive activity to account for hyporeactivity of chimeric cells against host-type cells. Thus, maintenance of TLI-induced tolerance seemed not to be mediated primarily through an active suppressor cell mechanism.

  15. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls - Review of developments and applications based on the aerodynamic energy concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    The state of the art of the aerodynamic energy concept, involving the use of active controls for flutter suppression, is reviewed. Applications of the concept include the suppression of external-store flutter of three different configurations of the YF-17 flutter model using a single trailing edge control surface activated by a single fixed-gain control law. Consideration is also given to some initial results concerning the flutter suppression of the 1/20 scale low speed wind-tunnel model of the Boeing 2707-300 supersonic transport using an activated trailing edge control surface.

  16. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. PMID:25904246

  17. Antiosteoclastic activity of milk thistle extract after ovariectomy to suppress estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Lye; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Min-Kyung; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Han, Seoung-Jun; Kang, Young-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Bone integrity abnormality and imbalance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts are known to result in metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Silymarin-rich milk thistle extract (MTE) and its component silibinin enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts but reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity of osteoclasts. The osteoprotective effects of MTE were comparable to those of estrogenic isoflavone. Low-dose combination of MTE and isoflavone had a pharmacological synergy that may be useful for osteogenic activity. This study attempted to reveal the suppressive effects of MTE on bone loss. C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized (OVX) as a model for postmenopausal osteopenia and orally administered 10 mg/kg MTE or silibinin for 8 weeks. The sham-operated mice served as estrogen controls. The treatment of ovariectomized mice with nontoxic MTE and silibinin improved femoral bone mineral density and serum receptor activator of nuclear factor- κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulus. In addition, the administration of MTE or silibinin inhibited femoral bone loss induced by ovariectomy and suppressed femoral TRAP activity and cathepsin K induction responsible for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Collectively, oral dosage of MTE containing silibinin in the preclinical setting is effective in preventing estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss.

  18. Ion channel TRPV1-dependent activation of PTP1B suppresses EGFR-associated intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Petrus R.; Takahashi, Naoki; Harris, Alexandra R.; Lee, Jihyung; Bertin, Samuel; Jeffries, James; Jung, Michael; Duong, Jen; Triano, Amy I.; Lee, Jongdae; Niv, Yaron; Herdman, David S.; Taniguchi, Koji; Kim, Chang-Whan; Dong, Hui; Eckmann, Lars; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Bottini, Nunzio; Corr, Maripat; Raz, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a high rate of turnover, and dysregulation of pathways that regulate regeneration can lead to tumor development; however, the negative regulators of oncogenic events in the intestinal epithelium are not fully understood. Here we identified a feedback loop between the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known mediator of proliferation, and the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We found that TRPV1 was expressed by IECs and was intrinsically activated upon EGFR stimulation. Subsequently, TRPV1 activation inhibited EGFR-induced epithelial cell proliferation via activation of Ca2+/calpain and resulting activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). In a murine model of multiple intestinal neoplasia (ApcMin/+ mice), TRPV1 deficiency increased adenoma formation, and treatment of these animals with an EGFR kinase inhibitor reversed protumorigenic phenotypes, supporting a functional association between TRPV1 and EGFR signaling in IECs. Administration of a TRPV1 agonist suppressed intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice, similar to — as well as in conjunction with — a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, which suggests that targeting both TRPV1 and COX-2 has potential as a therapeutic approach for tumor prevention. Our findings implicate TRPV1 as a regulator of growth factor signaling in the intestinal epithelium through activation of PTP1B and subsequent suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:25083990

  19. Synthesis, fungicidal activity, and structure-activity relationship of spiro-compounds containing macrolactam (macrolactone) and thiadiazoline rings.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Jun; Liang, Xiao-Mei; Jin, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Yuan, Hui-Zhu; Qi, Shu-Hua; Chen, Fu-Heng; Wang, Dao-Quan

    2010-03-10

    Two series of novel spiro-compounds containing macrolactam or macrolactone and thiadiazoline rings, 1-thia-2-alkylimino-3,4,9-triaza-10-oxospiro[4.15]eicosyl-3-ene (4F) and 1-thia-2-alkylimino-3,4-diaza-9-oxa-10-oxospiro[4.15]eicosyl-3-ene (4G), were synthesized from 12-oxo-1,15-pentadecanlactam and 12-oxo-1,15-pentadecanlactone, respectively. Their structures were confirmed by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR. The conformation of compounds 4F was determined via the crystal structure of a representative compound (4F(6)). The bioassay showed that compounds 4F have much better fungicidal activity against five fungi ( Botrytis cinerea Pers., Sclerotinia sclerotiorum , Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn., Phomopsis asparagi Sacc., and Pyricularia oryzae Cav.) than compounds 4G. The fact above showed that the presence of a hydrogen-bonding donor for the fungicidal activity of macrocyclic compounds is very important. 4F(6) showed excellent fungicidal activity against P. oryzae, which is much better than the commercial fungicide isoprothiolane, and 4F(13) showed excellent fungicidal activity against P. oryzae and good fungicidal activity against P. asparagi. PMID:20041703

  20. Withaferin A inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity by suppressing the Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Hyung; Lim, In-Hye; Sung, Eon-Gi; Kim, Joo-Young; Song, In-Hwan; Park, Yoon Ki; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2013-08-01

    Withaferin A (Wit A), a steroidal lactone isolated from Withania somnifera, exhibits anti-inflammatory, immuno-modulatory and anti-angiogenic properties and antitumor activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Wit A on protease-mediated invasiveness of the human metastatic cancer cell lines Caski and SK-Hep1. We found that treatment with Wit A resulted in marked inhibition of the TGF‑β‑induced increase in expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑9 in Caski cell line. These effects of Wit A were dose-dependent and showed a correlation with suppression of MMP‑9 mRNA expression levels. Treatment with Wit A resulted in an ~1.6-fold induction of MMP-9 promoter activity, which was also suppressed by treatment with Wit A in Caski cells. We found that treatment with Wit A resulted in inhibition of TGF‑β‑induced phosphorylation of Akt, which was involved in the downregulation of expression of MMP-9 at the protein level. Introduction with constitutively active (CA)‑Akt resulted in a partial increase in the secretion of TGF-β-induced MMP-9 blocked by treatment with Wit A in Caski cells. According to these results, Wit A may inhibit the invasive and migratory abilities of Caski cells through a reduction in MMP-9 expression through suppression of the pAkt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that use of Wit A may be an effective strategy for control of metastasis and invasiveness of tumors.

  1. Ketamine suppresses intestinal NF-kappa B activation and proinflammatory cytokine in endotoxic rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Hong; Xu, Jian-Guo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effect of ketamine on the endotoxin-induced proinflammatory cytokines and NF-kappa B activation in the intestine. METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 6 groups: (a) normal saline control, (b) challenged with endotoxin (5 mg/kg) and treated by saline, (c) challenged with endotoxin (5 mg/kg) and treated by ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), (d) challenged with endotoxin (5 mg/kg) and treated by ketamine (5 mg/kg ), (e) challenged with endotoxin (5 mg/kg) and treated by ketamine (50 mg/kg), and (f) saline injected and treated by ketamine (50 mg/kg). After 1, 4 or 6 h, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA were investigated in the tissues of the intestine (jejunum) by RT-PCR. TNF-α and IL-6 were measured by ELISA. We used electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) to investigate NF-kappa B activity in the intestine. RESULTS: NF-kappa B activity, the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 were enhanced in the intestine by endotoxin. Ketamine at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg could suppress endotoxin-induced TNF-α mRNA and protein elevation and inhibit NF-kappa B activation in the intestine. However the least dosage of ketamine to inhibit IL-6 was 5 mg/kg in our experiment. CONCLUSION: Ketamine can suppress endotoxin-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 production in the intestine. This suppressive effect may act through inhibiting NF-kappa B. PMID:15052687

  2. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  3. Melatonin suppresses hypoxia-induced migration of HUVECs via inhibition of ERK/Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Zheng, Jianchao; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Yujie; Gu, Luo; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Yichao; Zhou, Ruijue; Zheng, Lu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Du, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin, a naturally-occurring hormone, possesses antioxidant properties and ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we evaluate the impact of melatonin on the migratory capability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to hypoxia and further investigate whether ERK/Rac1 signaling is involved in this process. Here, we found that melatonin inhibited hypoxia-stimulated hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression and cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, melatonin inhibited Rac1 activation and suppressed the co-localized Rac1 and F-actin on the membrane of HUVECs under hypoxic condition. In addition, the blockade of Rac1 activation with ectopic expression of an inactive mutant form of Rac1-T17N suppressed HIF-1α expression and cell migration in response to hypoxia, as well, but constitutive activation of Rac1 mutant Rac1-V12 restored HIF-1α expression, preventing the inhibition of melatonin on cell migration. Furthermore, the anti-Rac1 effect of melatonin in HUVECs appeared to be associated with its inhibition of ERK phosphorylation, but not that of the PI3k/Akt signaling pathway. Taken together, our work indicates that melatonin exerts an anti-migratory effect on hypoxic HUVECs by blocking ERK/Rac1 activation and subsequent HIF-1α upregulation. PMID:25123138

  4. Nobiletin suppresses MMP-9 expression through modulation of p38 MAPK activity in human dermal fibrobalsts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Ju; Korm, Sovannarith; Kim, Won-Seok; Kim, Ok-Seon; Lee, Ji-Seon; Min, Hyung-Geun; Chin, Young-Won; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify a novel flavonoid from the in-house natural products to suppress matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), which is responsible for degradation of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins. Total eight natural products were screened for identification of a novel MMP-9 suppressor using MMP-9 reporter system, where the prompt initial screening with multiple samples is readily examined. Among the extracts used in the present study, one extract (Citrus unshiu) was found active in this assay system. Furthermore, three representative flavonoids in this active extract of Citrus unshiu peel were tested in MMP-9 reporter system. Nobiletin (NB) of the tested flavonoids suppressed MMP-9 expression without cytotoxicity, which was validated by both real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and zymography analyses. Sustained p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, closely associated with induction of MMP-9 under stress condition, was markedly reduced by NB treatment, which implies that modulation of p38MAPK by nobiletin is responsible for reduction of MMP9 expression. Hence, nobiletin, identified from MMP-9 reporter system based screening, may be further applied for the purpose of delaying collagen degradation in skin fibroblasts.

  5. Fear conditioning suppresses large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in lateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Zhang, Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, L; Yamamoto, R; Sugai, T; Kato, N

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that depression-like behavior is accompanied with suppression of the large-conductance calcium activated potassium (BK) channel in cingulate cortex pyramidal cells. To test whether BK channels are also involved in fear conditioning, we studied neuronal properties of amygdala principal cells in fear conditioned mice. After behavior, we made brain slices containing the amygdala, the structure critically relevant to fear memory. The resting membrane potential in lateral amygdala (LA) neurons obtained from fear conditioned mice (FC group) was more depolarized than in neurons from naïve controls. The frequencies of spikes evoked by current injections were higher in neurons from FC mice, demonstrating that excitability of LA neurons was elevated by fear conditioning. The depolarization in neurons from FC mice was shown to depend on BK channels by using the BK channel blocker charybdotoxin. Suppression of BK channels in LA neurons from the FC group was further confirmed on the basis of the spike width, since BK channels affect the descending phase of spikes. Spikes were broader in the FC group than those in the naïve control in a manner dependent on BK channels. Consistently, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decreased expression of BK channel mRNA. The present findings suggest that emotional disorder manifested in the forms of fear conditioning is accompanied with BK channel suppression in the amygdala, the brain structure critical to this emotional disorder.

  6. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea.

    PubMed

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Iceman, Kimberly E; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B; Bolser, Donald C; Baekey, David M; Dick, Thomas E; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2015-10-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04-0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity. PMID:26203111

  7. Activation of the alphavirus spike protein is suppressed by bound E3.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Mathilda; Lindqvist, Birgitta; Garoff, Henrik

    2011-06-01

    Alphaviruses are taken up into the endosome of the cell, where acidic conditions activate the spikes for membrane fusion. This involves dissociation of the three E2-E1 heterodimers of the spike and E1 interaction with the target membrane as a homotrimer. The biosynthesis of the heterodimer as a pH-resistant p62-E1 precursor appeared to solve the problem of premature activation in the late and acidic parts of the biosynthetic transport pathway in the cell. However, p62 cleavage into E2 and E3 by furin occurs before the spike has left the acidic compartments, accentuating the problem. In this work, we used a furin-resistant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) mutant, SFV(SQL), to study the role of E3 in spike activation. The cleavage was reconstituted with proteinase K in vitro using free virus or spikes on SFV(SQL)-infected cells. We found that E3 association with the spikes was pH dependent, requiring acidic conditions, and that the bound E3 suppressed spike activation. This was shown in an in vitro spike activation assay monitoring E1 trimer formation with liposomes and a fusion-from-within assay with infected cells. Furthermore, the wild type, SFV(wt), was found to bind significant amounts of E3, especially if produced in dense cultures, which lowered the pH of the culture medium. This E3 also suppressed spike activation. The results suggest that furin-cleaved E3 continues to protect the spike from premature activation in acidic compartments of the cell and that its release in the neutral extracellular space primes the spike for low-pH activation.

  8. Mechanism of PTC124 activity in cell-based luciferase assays of nonsense codon suppression.

    PubMed

    Auld, Douglas S; Thorne, Natasha; Maguire, William F; Inglese, James

    2009-03-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays used in drug discovery frequently use reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (FLuc) as indicators of target activity. An important caveat to consider, however, is that compounds can directly affect the reporter, leading to nonspecific but highly reproducible assay signal modulation. In rare cases, this activity appears counterintuitive; for example, some FLuc inhibitors, acting through posttranslational Fluc reporter stabilization, appear to activate gene expression. Previous efforts to characterize molecules that influence luciferase activity identified a subset of 3,5-diaryl-oxadiazole-containing compounds as FLuc inhibitors. Here, we evaluate a number of compounds with this structural motif for activity against FLuc. One such compound is PTC124 {3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid}, a molecule originally identified in a cell-based FLuc assay as having nonsense codon suppression activity [Welch EM, et al., Nature (2007) 447:87-91]. We find that the potency of FLuc inhibition for the tested compounds strictly correlates with their activity in a FLuc reporter cell-based nonsense codon assay, with PTC124 emerging as the most potent FLuc inhibitor (IC(50) = 7 +/- 1 nM). However, these compounds, including PTC124, fail to show nonsense codon suppression activity when Renilla reniformis luciferase (RLuc) is used as a reporter and are inactive against the RLuc enzyme. This suggests that the initial discovery of PTC124 may have been biased by its direct effect on the FLuc reporter, implicating firefly luciferase as a molecular target of PTC124. Our results demonstrate the value of understanding potential interactions between reporter enzymes and chemical compounds and emphasize the importance of implementing the appropriate control assays before interpreting HTS results.

  9. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea

    PubMed Central

    Nuding, Sarah C.; Segers, Lauren S.; Iceman, Kimberly E.; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B.; Bolser, Donald C.; Baekey, David M.; Dick, Thomas E.; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04–0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity. PMID:26203111

  10. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea.

    PubMed

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Iceman, Kimberly E; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B; Bolser, Donald C; Baekey, David M; Dick, Thomas E; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2015-10-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04-0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity.

  11. Dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages via activation of Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Abdalrahman, Akram; Lai, Yimu; Janicki, Joseph S.; Ward, Keith W.; Meyer, Colin J.; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Dh404 suppresses the expression of a selected set of pro-inflammatory cytokines in inflamed macrophages via activating Nrf2. • Dh404 activates Nrf2 while keeping Keap1 function intact in macrophages. • Dh404 minimally regulates NF-κB pathway in macrophages. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular defenses against various pathological stresses in a variety of organ systems, thus Nrf2 has evolved to be an attractive drug target for the treatment and/or prevention of human disease. Several synthetic oleanolic triterpenoids including dihydro-CDDO-trifluoroethyl amide (dh404) appear to be potent activators of Nrf2 and exhibit chemopreventive promises in multiple disease models. While the pharmacological efficacy of Nrf2 activators may be dependent on the nature of Nrf2 activation in specific cell types of target organs, the precise role of Nrf2 in mediating biological effects of Nrf2 activating compounds in various cell types remains to be further explored. Herein we report a unique and Nrf2-dependent anti-inflammatory profile of dh404 in inflamed macrophages. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inflamed RAW264.7 macrophages, dh404 dramatically suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), while minimally regulating the expression of interleulin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Dh404 potently activated Nrf2 signaling; however, it did not affect LPS-induced NF-κB activity. Dh404 did not interrupt the interaction of Nrf2 with its endogenous inhibitor Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1) in macrophages. Moreover, knockout of Nrf2 blocked the dh404-induced anti-inflammatory responses in LPS-inflamed macrophages. These results demonstrated that dh404 suppresses pro-inflammatory responses in macrophages via an activation

  12. Active Suppression Induced by Repetitive Self-Epitopes Protects against EAE Development

    PubMed Central

    Puentes, Fabiola; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria; Falk, Kirsten; Rötzschke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Background Autoimmune diseases result from a breakdown in self-tolerance to autoantigens. Self-tolerance is induced and sustained by central and peripheral mechanisms intended to deviate harmful immune responses and to maintain homeostasis, where regulatory T cells play a crucial role. The use of self-antigens in the study and treatment of a range of autoimmune diseases has been widely described; however, the mechanisms underlying the induced protection by these means are unclear. This study shows that protection of experimental autoimmune disease induced by T cell self-epitopes in a multimerized form (oligomers) is mediated by the induction of active suppression. Principal Findings The experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model for multiple sclerosis was used to study the mechanisms of protection induced by the treatment of oligomerized T cell epitope of myelin proteolipid protein (PLP139–151). Disease protection attained by the administration of oligomers was shown to be antigen specific and effective in both prevention and treatment of ongoing EAE. Oligomer mediated tolerance was actively transferred by cells from treated mice into adoptive hosts. The induction of active suppression was correlated with the recruitment of cells in the periphery associated with increased production of IL-10 and reduction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The role of suppressive cytokines was demonstrated by the reversion of oligomer-induced protection after in vivo blocking of either IL-10 or TGF-β cytokines. Conclusions This study strongly supports an immunosuppressive role of repeat auto-antigens to control the development of EAE with potential applications in vaccination and antigen specific treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23738007

  13. Conical Euler simulation and active suppression of delta wing rocking motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A conical Euler code was developed to study unsteady vortex-dominated flows about rolling highly-swept delta wings, undergoing either forced or free-to-roll motions including active roll suppression. The flow solver of the code involves a multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme which uses a finite volume spatial discretization of the Euler equations on an unstructured grid of triangles. The code allows for the additional analysis of the free-to-roll case, by including the rigid-body equation of motion for its simultaneous time integration with the governing flow equations. Results are presented for a 75 deg swept sharp leading edge delta wing at a freestream Mach number of 1.2 and at alpha equal to 10 and 30 deg angle of attack. A forced harmonic analysis indicates that the rolling moment coefficient provides: (1) a positive damping at the lower angle of attack equal to 10 deg, which is verified in a free-to-roll calculation; (2) a negative damping at the higher angle of attack equal to 30 deg at the small roll amplitudes. A free-to-roll calculation for the latter case produces an initially divergent response, but as the amplitude of motion grows with time, the response transitions to a wing-rock type of limit cycle oscillation. The wing rocking motion may be actively suppressed, however, through the use of a rate-feedback control law and antisymmetrically deflected leading edge flaps. The descriptions of the conical Euler flow solver and the free-to-roll analysis are presented. Results are also presented which give insight into the flow physics associated with unsteady vortical flows about forced and free-to-roll delta wings, including the active roll suppression of this wing-rock phenomenon.

  14. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 1; Theory and Design Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing.

  15. The anatomical relationships between the avian eye, orbit and sclerotic ring: implications for inferring activity patterns in extinct birds

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Margaret I

    2008-01-01

    Activity pattern, or the time of day when an animal is awake and active, is highly associated with that animal's ecology. There are two principal activity patterns: diurnal, or awake during the day in a photopic, or high light level, environment; and nocturnal, awake at night in scotopic, or low light level, conditions. Nocturnal and diurnal birds exhibit characteristic eye shapes associated with their activity pattern, with nocturnal bird eyes optimized for visual sensitivity with large corneal diameters relative to their eye axial lengths, and diurnal birds optimized for visual acuity, with larger axial lengths of the eye relative to their corneal diameters. The current study had three aims: (1) to quantify the nature of the relationship between the avian eye and its associated bony anatomy, the orbit and the sclerotic ring; (2) to investigate how activity pattern is reflected in that bony anatomy; and (3) to identify how much bony anatomy is required to interpret activity pattern reliably for a bird that does not have the soft tissue available for study, specifically, for a fossil. Knowledge of extinct avian activity patterns would be useful in making palaeoecological interpretations. Here eye, orbit and sclerotic ring morphologies of 140 nocturnal and diurnal bird species are analysed in a phylogenetic context. Although there is a close relationship between the avian eye and orbit, activity pattern can only be reliably interpreted for bony-only specimens, such as a fossil, that include both measurements of the sclerotic ring and orbit depth. Any missing data render the fossil analysis inaccurate, including fossil specimens that are flat and therefore do not have an orbit depth available. For example, activity pattern cannot be determined with confidence for Archaeopteryx lithographica, which has a complete sclerotic ring but no orbit depth measurement. Many of the bird fossils currently available that retain a good sclerotic ring tend to be flat specimens

  16. The anatomical relationships between the avian eye, orbit and sclerotic ring: implications for inferring activity patterns in extinct birds.

    PubMed

    Hall, Margaret I

    2008-06-01

    Activity pattern, or the time of day when an animal is awake and active, is highly associated with that animal's ecology. There are two principal activity patterns: diurnal, or awake during the day in a photopic, or high light level, environment; and nocturnal, awake at night in scotopic, or low light level, conditions. Nocturnal and diurnal birds exhibit characteristic eye shapes associated with their activity pattern, with nocturnal bird eyes optimized for visual sensitivity with large corneal diameters relative to their eye axial lengths, and diurnal birds optimized for visual acuity, with larger axial lengths of the eye relative to their corneal diameters. The current study had three aims: (1) to quantify the nature of the relationship between the avian eye and its associated bony anatomy, the orbit and the sclerotic ring; (2) to investigate how activity pattern is reflected in that bony anatomy; and (3) to identify how much bony anatomy is required to interpret activity pattern reliably for a bird that does not have the soft tissue available for study, specifically, for a fossil. Knowledge of extinct avian activity patterns would be useful in making palaeoecological interpretations. Here eye, orbit and sclerotic ring morphologies of 140 nocturnal and diurnal bird species are analysed in a phylogenetic context. Although there is a close relationship between the avian eye and orbit, activity pattern can only be reliably interpreted for bony-only specimens, such as a fossil, that include both measurements of the sclerotic ring and orbit depth. Any missing data render the fossil analysis inaccurate, including fossil specimens that are flat and therefore do not have an orbit depth available. For example, activity pattern cannot be determined with confidence for Archaeopteryx lithographica, which has a complete sclerotic ring but no orbit depth measurement. Many of the bird fossils currently available that retain a good sclerotic ring tend to be flat specimens

  17. A monoclonal antibody to alpha 4 integrin suppresses and reverses active experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kent, S J; Karlik, S J; Cannon, C; Hines, D K; Yednock, T A; Fritz, L C; Horner, H C

    1995-04-01

    In experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), circulating leukocytes enter the central nervous system (CNS) producing inflammation, myelin damage and paralysis. Prevention of leukocyte infiltration by an antibody against alpha 4 integrin suppressed clinical and pathological features of EAE in the guinea pig. Rapid clearance of leukocytes from the CNS and reversal of clinical findings were observed when anti-alpha 4 treatment was administered during active disease. Clinical improvement was accompanied by a marked decrease in abnormal pathological findings, including demyelination. Therefore anti-alpha 4 is an effective treatment of EAE and may be similarly useful in the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  18. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses transcriptional activity of human estrogen and androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Mafuvadze, Benford; Liang, Yayun; Hyder, Salman M

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer cells express enzymes that convert cholesterol, the synthetic precursor of steroid hormones, into estrogens and androgens, which then drive breast cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we sought to determine whether oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC), an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, may be targeted to suppress progression of breast cancer cells. In previous studies, we showed that the OSC inhibitor RO 48-8071 (RO) may be a ligand which could potentially be used to control the progression of estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer cells. Herein, we showed, by real-time PCR analysis of mRNA from human breast cancer biopsies, no significant differences in OSC expression at various stages of disease, or between tumor and normal mammary cells. Since the growth of hormone-responsive tumors is ERα-dependent, we conducted experiments to determine whether RO affects ERα. Using mammalian cells engineered to express human ERα or ERβ protein, together with an ER-responsive luciferase promoter, we found that RO dose-dependently inhibited 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced ERα responsive luciferase activity (IC50 value, ~10 µM), under conditions that were non-toxic to the cells. RO was less effective against ERβ-induced luciferase activity. Androgen receptor (AR) mediated transcriptional activity was also reduced by RO. Notably, while ERα activity was reduced by atorvastatin, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor did not influence AR activity, showing that RO possesses broader antitumor properties. Treatment of human BT-474 breast cancer cells with RO reduced levels of estrogen-induced PR protein, confirming that RO blocks ERα activity in tumor cells. Our findings demonstrate that an important means by which RO suppresses hormone-dependent growth of breast cancer cells is through its ability to arrest the biological activity of ERα. This warrants further investigation of RO as a potential therapeutic agent for use against hormone

  19. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 2; Methodology Application Software Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes the user's manual and software toolbox developed at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression control law for the BACT wing.

  20. MHC-derived allopeptide activates TCR-biased CD8+ Tregs and suppresses organ rejection

    PubMed Central

    Picarda, Elodie; Bézie, Séverine; Venturi, Vanessa; Echasserieau, Klara; Mérieau, Emmanuel; Delhumeau, Aurélie; Renaudin, Karine; Brouard, Sophie; Bernardeau, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2014-01-01

    In a rat heart allograft model, preventing T cell costimulation with CD40Ig leads to indefinite allograft survival, which is mediated by the induction of CD8+CD45RClo regulatory T cells (CD8+CD40Ig Tregs) interacting with plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). The role of TCR-MHC-peptide interaction in regulating Treg activity remains a topic of debate. Here, we identified a donor MHC class II–derived peptide (Du51) that is recognized by TCR-biased CD8+CD40Ig Tregs and activating CD8+CD40Ig Tregs in both its phenotype and suppression of antidonor alloreactive T cell responses. We generated a labeled tetramer (MHC-I RT1.Aa/Du51) to localize and quantify Du51-specific T cells within rat cardiac allografts and spleen. RT1.Aa/Du51-specific CD8+CD40Ig Tregs were the most suppressive subset of the total Treg population, were essential for in vivo tolerance induction, and expressed a biased, restricted Vβ11-TCR repertoire in the spleen and the graft. Finally, we demonstrated that treatment of transplant recipients with the Du51 peptide resulted in indefinite prolongation of allograft survival. These results show that CD8+CD40Ig Tregs recognize a dominant donor antigen, resulting in TCR repertoire alterations in the graft and periphery. Furthermore, this allopeptide has strong therapeutic activity and highlights the importance of TCR-peptide-MHC interaction for Treg generation and function. PMID:24789907

  1. Identification of Small Molecules That Suppress Ricin-Induced Stress-Activated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wahome, Paul G.; Ahlawat, Sarita; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Ricin is a member of the ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) family of plant and bacterial toxins. In this study we used a high-throughput, cell-based assay to screen more than 118,000 compounds from diverse chemical libraries for molecules that reduced ricin-induced cell death. We describe three compounds, PW66, PW69, and PW72 that at micromolar concentrations significantly delayed ricin-induced cell death. None of the compounds had any demonstrable effect on ricin's ability to arrest protein synthesis in cells or on ricin's enzymatic activity as assessed in vitro. Instead, all three compounds appear to function by blocking downstream stress-induced signaling pathways associated with the toxin-mediated apoptosis. PW66 virtually eliminated ricin-induced TNF-α secretion by J774A.1 macrophages and concomitantly blocked activation of the p38 MAPK and JNK signaling pathways. PW72 suppressed ricin-induced TNF-α secretion, but not p38 MAPK and JNK signaling. PW69 suppressed activity of the executioner caspases 3/7 in ricin toxin- and Shiga toxin 2-treated cells. While the actual molecular targets of the three compounds have yet to be identified, these data nevertheless underscore the potential of small molecules to down-regulate inflammatory signaling pathways associated with exposure to the RIP family of toxins. PMID:23133670

  2. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  3. Pyruvate kinase M2 activators promote tetramer formation and suppress tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Yu, Yimin; Israelsen, William J.; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Boxer, Matthew B.; Hong, Bum Soo; Tempel, Wolfram; Dimov, Svetoslav; Shen, Min; Jha, Abhishek; Yang, Hua; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Metallo, Christian M.; Fiske, Brian P.; Courtney, Kevin D.; Malstrom, Scott; Khan, Tahsin M.; Kung, Charles; Skoumbourdis, Amanda P.; Veith, Henrike; Southall, Noel; Walsh, Martin J.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Leister, William; Lunt, Sophia Y.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Yen, Katharine E.; Kunii, Kaiko; Davidson, Shawn M.; Christofk, Heather R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Inglese, James; Harris, Marian H.; Asara, John M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Salituro, Francesco G.; Jin, Shengfang; Dang, Lenny; Auld, Douglas S.; Park, Hee-Won; Cantley, Lewis C.; Thomas, Craig J.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2012-08-26

    Cancer cells engage in a metabolic program to enhance biosynthesis and support cell proliferation. The regulatory properties of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) influence altered glucose metabolism in cancer. The interaction of PKM2 with phosphotyrosine-containing proteins inhibits enzyme activity and increases the availability of glycolytic metabolites to support cell proliferation. This suggests that high pyruvate kinase activity may suppress tumor growth. We show that expression of PKM1, the pyruvate kinase isoform with high constitutive activity, or exposure to published small-molecule PKM2 activators inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. Structural studies reveal that small-molecule activators bind PKM2 at the subunit interaction interface, a site that is distinct from that of the endogenous activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). However, unlike FBP, binding of activators to PKM2 promotes a constitutively active enzyme state that is resistant to inhibition by tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. This data supports the notion that small-molecule activation of PKM2 can interfere with anabolic metabolism.

  4. Shigella flexneri suppresses NF-κB activation by inhibiting linear ubiquitin chain ligation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Maarten F; Liu, Zixu; Chen, Didi; Alto, Neal M

    2016-01-01

    The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is a multimeric E3 ligase that catalyses M1 or linear ubiquitination of activated immune receptor signalling complexes (RSCs). Mutations that disrupt linear ubiquitin assembly lead to complex disease pathologies including immunodeficiency and autoinflammation in both humans and mice, but microbial toxins that target LUBAC function have not yet been discovered. Here, we report the identification of two homologous Shigella flexneri type III secretion system effector E3 ligases IpaH1.4 and IpaH2.5, which directly interact with LUBAC subunit Heme-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase-1 (HOIL-1L) and conjugate K48-linked ubiquitin chains to the catalytic RING-between-RING domain of HOIL-1-interacting protein (HOIP). Proteasomal degradation of HOIP leads to irreversible inactivation of linear ubiquitination and blunting of NF-κB nuclear translocation in response to tumour-necrosis factor (TNF), IL-1β and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Loss of function studies in mammallian cells in combination with bacterial genetics explains how Shigella evades a broad spectrum of immune surveillance systems by cooperative inhibition of receptor ubiquitination and reveals the critical importance of LUBAC in host defence against pathogens. PMID:27572974

  5. Transgenic songbirds with suppressed or enhanced activity of CREB transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kentaro; Matsui, Sumiko; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds postnatally develop their skill to utter and to perceive a vocal signal for communication. How genetic and environmental influences act in concert to regulate the development of such skill is not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotype of transgenic songbirds with altered intrinsic activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. By viral vector-mediated modification of genomic DNA, we established germ line-transmitted lines of zebra finches, which exhibited enhanced or suppressed activity of CREB. Although intrinsically acquired vocalizations or their hearing ability were not affected, the transgenic birds showed reduced vocal learning quality of their own songs and impaired audio-memory formation against conspecific songs. These results thus demonstrate that appropriate activity of CREB is necessary for the postnatal acquisition of learned behavior in songbirds, and the CREB transgenic birds offer a unique opportunity to separately manipulate both genetic and environmental factors that impinge on the postnatal song learning. PMID:26048905

  6. Suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation by microRNA-29b

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, Yumiko; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kawada, Norifumi

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during the activation of hepatic stellate cells in primary culture. {yields} Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs. {yields} It blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-b mRNAs essential for stellate cell activation. {yields} miR-29b overexpression led stellate cells to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their star-like morphology. {yields} miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in the regulation of cellular functions including proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. It has been previously shown that the miR-29 family is involved in regulating type I collagen expression by interacting with the 3'UTR of its mRNA. Here, we investigated the roles of miR-29b in the activation of mouse primary-cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a principal collagen-producing cell in the liver. Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during HSC activation in primary culture. Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs and additionally blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-{beta}, which are key genes involved in the activation of HSCs. Further, overexpression of miR-29b led HSCs to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their quiescent star-like cell morphology. Although phosphorylation of FAK, ERK, and Akt, and the mRNA expression of c-jun was unaffected, miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. These results suggested that miR-29b is involved in the activation of HSCs and could be a candidate molecule for suppressing their activation and consequent liver fibrosis.

  7. Structural and kinetic analysis of the COP9-Signalosome activation and the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase deneddylation cycle

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghi, Ruzbeh; Reichermeier, Kurt M; Winkler, Martin; Schreiber, Anne; Reitsma, Justin M; Zhang, Yaru; Stengel, Florian; Cao, Junyue; Kim, Minsoo; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hess, Sonja; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Peter, Matthias; Deshaies, Raymond J; Enchev, Radoslav I

    2016-01-01

    The COP9-Signalosome (CSN) regulates cullin–RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL) activity and assembly by cleaving Nedd8 from cullins. Free CSN is autoinhibited, and it remains unclear how it becomes activated. We combine structural and kinetic analyses to identify mechanisms that contribute to CSN activation and Nedd8 deconjugation. Both CSN and neddylated substrate undergo large conformational changes upon binding, with important roles played by the N-terminal domains of Csn2 and Csn4 and the RING domain of Rbx1 in enabling formation of a high affinity, fully active complex. The RING domain is crucial for deneddylation, and works in part through conformational changes involving insert-2 of Csn6. Nedd8 deconjugation and re-engagement of the active site zinc by the autoinhibitory Csn5 glutamate-104 diminish affinity for Cul1/Rbx1 by ~100-fold, resulting in its rapid ejection from the active site. Together, these mechanisms enable a dynamic deneddylation-disassembly cycle that promotes rapid remodeling of the cellular CRL network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12102.001 PMID:27031283

  8. A novel telomerase activator suppresses lung damage in a murine model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Davy, Philip; Brampton, Christopher; Ahuja, Seema S; Fauce, Steven; Shivshankar, Pooja; Nguyen, Hieu; Ramaseshan, Mahesh; Tressler, Robert; Pirot, Zhu; Harley, Calvin B; Allsopp, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of diseases associated with telomere dysfunction, including AIDS, aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis, has bolstered interest in telomerase activators. We report identification of a new small molecule activator, GRN510, with activity ex vivo and in vivo. Using a novel mouse model, we tested the potential of GRN510 to limit fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mTERT heterozygous mice. Treatment with GRN510 at 10 mg/kg/day activated telomerase 2-4 fold both in hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo and in bone marrow and lung tissue in vivo, respectively. Telomerase activation was countered by co-treatment with Imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor. In this model of bleomycin-induced fibrosis, treatment with GRN510 suppressed the development of fibrosis and accumulation of senescent cells in the lung via a mechanism dependent upon telomerase activation. Treatment of small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) or lung fibroblasts ex vivo with GRN510 revealed telomerase activating and replicative lifespan promoting effects only in the SAEC, suggesting that the mechanism accounting for the protective effects of GRN510 against induced lung fibrosis involves specific types of lung cells. Together, these results support the use of small molecule activators of telomerase in therapies to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M; van der Linden, Wouter A; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S

    2015-09-29

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis.

  10. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E.; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M.; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis. PMID:26308073

  11. Forest response to increasing typhoon activity on the Korean peninsula: evidence from oak tree-rings.

    PubMed

    Altman, Jan; Doležal, Jiří; Cerný, Tomáš; Song, Jong-Suk

    2013-02-01

    The globally observed trend of changing intensity of tropical cyclones over the past few decades emphasizes the need for a better understanding of the effects of such disturbance events in natural and inhabited areas. On the Korean Peninsula, typhoon intensity has increased over the past 100 years as evidenced by instrumental data recorded from 1904 until present. We examined how the increase in three weather characteristics (maximum hourly and daily precipitation, and maximum wind speed) during the typhoon activity affected old-growth oak forests. Quercus mongolica is a dominant species in the Korean mountains and the growth releases from 220 individuals from three sites along a latitudinal gradient (33-38°N) of decreasing typhoon activity were studied. Growth releases indicate tree-stand disturbance and improved light conditions for surviving trees. The trends in release events corresponded to spatiotemporal gradients in maximum wind speed and precipitation. A high positive correlation was found between the maximum values of typhoon characteristics and the proportion of trees showing release. A higher proportion of disturbed trees was found in the middle and southern parts of the Korean peninsula where typhoons are most intense. This shows that the releases are associated with typhoons and also indicates the differential impact of typhoons on the forests. Finally, we present a record of the changing proportion of trees showing release based on tree-rings for the period 1770-1979. The reconstruction revealed no trend during the period 1770-1879, while the rate of forest disturbances increased rapidly from 1880 to 1979. Our results suggest that if typhoon intensity rises, as is projected by some climatic models, the number of forest disturbance events will increase thus altering the disturbance regime and ecosystem processes.

  12. Inhibition of NF-kappa B activity by thalidomide through suppression of IkappaB kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Keifer, J A; Guttridge, D C; Ashburner, B P; Baldwin, A S

    2001-06-22

    The sedative and anti-nausea drug thalidomide, which causes birth defects in humans, has been shown to have both anti-inflammatory and anti-oncogenic properties. The anti-inflammatory effect of thalidomide is associated with suppression of cytokine expression and the anti-oncogenic effect with inhibition of angiogenesis. It is presently unclear whether the teratogenic properties of thalidomide are connected in any way to the beneficial, anti-disease characteristics of this drug. The transcription factor NF-kappaB has been shown to be a key regulator of inflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-8. Inhibition of NF-kappaB is associated with reduced inflammation in animal models, such as those for rheumatoid arthritis. We show here that thalidomide can block NF-kappaB activation through a mechanism that involves the inhibition of activity of the IkappaB kinase. Consistent with the observed inhibition of NF-kappaB, thalidomide blocked the cytokine-induced expression of NF-kappaB-regulated genes such as those encoding interleukin-8, TRAF1, and c-IAP2. These data indicate that the therapeutic potential for thalidomide may be based on its ability to block NF-kappaB activation through suppression of IkappaB kinase activity.

  13. Oolong, black and pu-erh tea suppresses adiposity in mice via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Wang, Liuqing; Wang, Lihua; Tanaka, Yuki; Zhang, Tianshun; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that tea has a variety of beneficial impacts on human health, including anti-obesity effects. It is well documented that green tea and its constituent catechins suppress obesity, but the effects of other types of tea on obesity and the potential mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated the suppression of adiposity by oolong, black and pu-erh tea and characterized the underlying molecular mechanism in vivo. We found that the consumption of oolong, black or pu-erh tea for a period of one week significantly decreased visceral fat without affecting body weight in male ICR mice. On a mechanistic level, the consumption of tea enhanced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in white adipose tissue (WAT). This was accompanied by the induction of WAT protein levels of uncoupling protein 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1. Our results indicate that oolong, black and pu-erh tea, and in particular, black tea, suppresses adiposity via phosphorylation of the key metabolic regulator AMPK and increases browning of WAT. PMID:25098399

  14. Oolong, black and pu-erh tea suppresses adiposity in mice via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Wang, Liuqing; Wang, Lihua; Tanaka, Yuki; Zhang, Tianshun; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that tea has a variety of beneficial impacts on human health, including anti-obesity effects. It is well documented that green tea and its constituent catechins suppress obesity, but the effects of other types of tea on obesity and the potential mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated the suppression of adiposity by oolong, black and pu-erh tea and characterized the underlying molecular mechanism in vivo. We found that the consumption of oolong, black or pu-erh tea for a period of one week significantly decreased visceral fat without affecting body weight in male ICR mice. On a mechanistic level, the consumption of tea enhanced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in white adipose tissue (WAT). This was accompanied by the induction of WAT protein levels of uncoupling protein 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1. Our results indicate that oolong, black and pu-erh tea, and in particular, black tea, suppresses adiposity via phosphorylation of the key metabolic regulator AMPK and increases browning of WAT.

  15. Increased Intrathecal Immune Activation in Virally Suppressed HIV-1 Infected Patients with Neurocognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Edén, Arvid; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Franklin, Donald; Price, Richard W.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Gisslén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remain prevalent, a correlation to neuronal injury has not been established in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between mild HAND and CSF neurofilament light protein (NFL), a biomarker of neuronal injury; and CSF neopterin, a biomarker of CNS immunoactivation, in virally suppressed patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design and Methods We selected 99 subjects on suppressive ART followed longitudinally from the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Based on standardized comprehensive neurocognitive performance (NP) testing, subjects were classified as neurocognitively normal (NCN; n = 29) or impaired (NCI; n = 70). The NCI group included subjects with asymptomatic (ANI; n = 37) or mild (MND; n = 33) HAND. CSF biomarkers were analyzed on two occasions. Results Geometric mean CSF neopterin was 25% higher in the NCI group (p = 0.04) and NFL and neopterin were significantly correlated within the NCI group (r = 0.30; p<0.001) but not in the NCN group (r = -0.13; p = 0.3). Additionally, a trend towards higher NFL was seen in the NCI group (p = 0.06). Conclusions Mild HAND was associated with increased intrathecal immune activation, and the correlation between neopterin and NFL found in NCI subjects indicates an association between neurocognitive impairment, CNS inflammation and neuronal damage. Together these findings suggest that NCI despite ART may represent an active pathological process within the CNS that needs further characterization in prospective studies. PMID:27295036

  16. Genetic Suppression of Transgenic APP Rescues Hypersynchronous Network Activity in a Mouse Model of Alzeimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Born, Heather A.; Kim, Ji-Yoen; Savjani, Ricky R.; Das, Pritam; Dabaghian, Yuri A.; Guo, Qinxi; Yoo, Jong W.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Cirrito, John R.; Zheng, Hui; Golde, Todd E.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with an elevated risk for seizures that may be fundamentally connected to cognitive dysfunction. Supporting this link, many mouse models for AD exhibit abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in addition to the expected neuropathology and cognitive deficits. Here, we used a controllable transgenic system to investigate how network changes develop and are maintained in a model characterized by amyloid β (Aβ) overproduction and progressive amyloid pathology. EEG recordings in tet-off mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) from birth display frequent sharp wave discharges (SWDs). Unexpectedly, we found that withholding APP overexpression until adulthood substantially delayed the appearance of epileptiform activity. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile APP overexpression altered cortical development to favor synchronized firing. Regardless of the age at which EEG abnormalities appeared, the phenotype was dependent on continued APP overexpression and abated over several weeks once transgene expression was suppressed. Abnormal EEG discharges were independent of plaque load and could be extinguished without altering deposited amyloid. Selective reduction of Aβ with a γ-secretase inhibitor has no effect on the frequency of SWDs, indicating that another APP fragment or the full-length protein was likely responsible for maintaining EEG abnormalities. Moreover, transgene suppression normalized the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory innervation in the cortex, whereas secretase inhibition did not. Our results suggest that APP overexpression, and not Aβ overproduction, is responsible for EEG abnormalities in our transgenic mice and can be rescued independently of pathology. PMID:24623762

  17. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Application to Flutter Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind-tunnel model for application to design and analysis of flutter suppression controllers. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind-tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind-tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this paper is the development of the equations of motion from first principles using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated using values for parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. A unique aspect of the BACT wind-tunnel model is that it has upper- and lower-surface spoilers for active control. Comparisons with experimental frequency responses and other data show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind-tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to assist the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  18. C6-ceramide nanoliposome suppresses tumor metastasis by eliciting PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities and regulating integrin affinity modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pu; Fu, Changliang; Hu, Yijuan; Dong, Cheng; Song, Yang; Song, Erqun

    2015-01-01

    Nanoliposomal formulation of C6-ceramide, a proapoptotic sphingolipid metabolite, presents an effective way to treat malignant tumor. Here, we provide evidence that acute treatment (30 min) of melanoma and breast cancer cells with nanoliposomal C6-ceramide (NaL-C6) may suppress cell migration without inducing cell death. By employing a novel flow migration assay, we demonstrated that NaL-C6 decreased tumor extravasation under shear conditions. Compared with ghost nanoliposome, NaL-C6 triggered phosphorylation of PI3K and PKCζ and dephosphorylation of PKCα. Concomitantly, activated PKCζ translocated into cell membrane. siRNA knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PKCζ or PI3K rescued NaL-C6-mediated suppression of tumor migration. By inducing dephosphorylation of paxillin, PKCζ was responsible for NaL-C6-mediated stress fiber depolymerization and focal adhesion disassembly in the metastatic tumor cells. PKCζ and PI3K regulated cell shear-resistant adhesion in a way that required integrin αvβ3 affinity modulation. In conclusion, we identified a novel role of acute nanoliposomal ceramide treatment in reducing integrin affinity and inhibiting melanoma metastasis by conferring PI3K and PKCζ tumor-suppressive activities. PMID:25792190

  19. Planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.; Brahic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of planetary ring research, the view of planetary rings in astronomy and cosmology over the period 1600-1900, the characteristics of the ring systems of Saturn and Uranus, the ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn, dust-magnetosphere interactions, the effects of radiation forces on dust particles, the collisional interactions and physical nature of ring particles, transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms, and collision-induced transport processes in planetary rings. Also discussed are planetary ring waves, ring particle dynamics in resonances, the dynamics of narrow rings, the origin and evolution of planetary rings, the solar nebula and planetary disk, future studies of the planetary rings by space probes, ground-based observatories and earth-orbiting satellites, and unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics.

  20. Associations between firefighters' physical activity across multiple shifts of wildfire suppression.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Grace E; Ridgers, Nicola D; Ferguson, Sally A; Aisbett, Brad

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between firefighters' physical activity levels across consecutive wildfire suppression shifts and to determine whether sleep duration moderated these associations. Forty volunteer firefighters (31 males, 9 females) wore an activity monitor to concurrently measure physical activity and sleep duration. Sedentary time and time spent in light- (LPA), moderate- (MPA), and vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA) during each shift were determined using monitor-specific cut points. During any given shift, every additional 60 min spent in LPA was associated with 7.2 min more LPA and 27.6 min MPA the following shift. There were no other significant positive or negative associations. No significant moderating effect of total sleep time was observed. Firefighters are able to maintain and/or increase their physical activity intensity between consecutive shifts. Further research is needed to understand firefighters pacing and energy conservation strategies during emergency wildfire deployments. Practitioner Summary: To examine associations between firefighters' physical activity levels across consecutive shifts during a multi-day emergency wildfire and determine whether sleep duration moderated these associations. Firefighters are able to maintain and/or increase their physical activity intensity between consecutive shifts. No significant moderating effect of total sleep time was observed.

  1. A superoxide anion-scavenger, 1,3-selenazolidin-4-one suppresses serum deprivation-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells by activating MAP kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nishina, Atsuyoshi; Kimura, Hirokazu; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Sommen, Geoffroy; Nakamura, Takao; Heimgartner, Heinz; Koketsu, Mamoru; Furukawa, Shoei

    2011-12-15

    Synthetic organic selenium compounds, such as ebselen, may show glutathione peroxidase-like antioxidant activity and have a neurotrophic effect. We synthesized 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones, new types of synthetic organic selenium compounds (five-member ring compounds), to study their possible applications as antioxidants or neurotrophic-like molecules. Their superoxide radical scavenging effects were assessed using the quantitative, highly sensitive method of real-time kinetic chemiluminescence. At 166 {mu}M, the O{sub 2}{sup -} scavenging activity of 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones ranged from 0 to 66.2%. 2-[3-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,3-selenazolidin-2-ylidene]malononitrile (compound b) showed the strongest superoxide anion-scavenging activity among the 6 kinds of 2-methylene-1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones examined. Compound b had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) at 92.4 {mu}M and acted as an effective and potentially useful O{sub 2}{sup -} scavenger in vitro. The effect of compound b on rat pheochromocytome cell line PC12 cells was compared with that of ebselen or nerve growth factor (NGF) by use of the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay. When ebselen was added at 100 {mu}M or more, toxicity toward PC12 cells was evident. On the contrary, compound b suppressed serum deprivation-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells more effectively at a concentration of 100 {mu}M. The activity of compound b to phosphorylate mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 (MAP kinase) in PC12 cells was higher than that of ebselen, and the former at 100 {mu}M induced the phosphorylation of MAP kinase to a degree similar to that induced by NGF. From these results, we conclude that this superoxide anion-scavenger, compound b, suppressed serum deprivation-induced apoptosis by promoting the phosphorylation of MAP kinase. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We newly synthesized 1,3-selenazolidin-4-ones to

  2. In-vitro suppression of metabolic activity in malignant human glioblastomas due to pulsed - low frequency electric potential exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Abby; Waynant, Ronald W.; Tata, Darrell B.

    2010-02-01

    The role of pulsed - low repetition frequency electric potential was investigated in suppressing the metabolic activities of aggressive human brain cancer cells. Twenty four hours post exposure the glioblastomas were found to be significantly inhibited in their metabolic activity. The findings herein reveal a near complete inhibition of glioblastoma's metabolic activity through selective applications of low frequency pulsed electric potentials.

  3. Knockdown of Pokemon protein expression inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by suppression of AKT activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosan; Dai, Yichen; Chen, Zhangxin; Xie, Junpei; Zeng, Wei; Lin, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of Pokemon, which is an erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor protein, occurs in different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pokemon is also reported to have an oncogenic activity in various human cancers. This study investigated the effect of Pokemon knockdown on the regulation of HCC growth. POK shRNA suppressed the expression of Pokemon protein in HepG2 cells compared to the negative control vector-transfected HCC cells. Pokemon knockdown also reduced HCC cell viability and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. AKT activation and the expression of various cell cycle-related genes were inhibited following Pokemon knockdown. These data demonstrate that Pokemon may play a role in HCC progression, suggesting that inhibition of Pokemon expression using Pokemon shRNA should be further evaluated as a novel target for the control of HCC. PMID:23924858

  4. Tumor suppression by miR-26 overrides potential oncogenic activity in intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeitels, Lauren R.; Acharya, Asha; Shi, Guanglu; Chivukula, Divya; Chivukula, Raghu R.; Anandam, Joselin L.; Abdelnaby, Abier A.; Balch, Glen C.; Mansour, John C.; Yopp, Adam C.; Richardson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Down-regulation of miR-26 family members has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple malignancies. In some settings, including glioma, however, miR-26-mediated repression of PTEN promotes tumorigenesis. To investigate the contexts in which the tumor suppressor versus oncogenic activity of miR-26 predominates in vivo, we generated miR-26a transgenic mice. Despite measureable repression of Pten, elevated miR-26a levels were not associated with malignancy in transgenic animals. We documented reduced miR-26 expression in human colorectal cancer and, accordingly, showed that miR-26a expression potently suppressed intestinal adenoma formation in Apcmin/+ mice, a model known to be sensitive to Pten dosage. These studies reveal a tumor suppressor role for miR-26 in intestinal cancer that overrides putative oncogenic activity, highlighting the therapeutic potential of miR-26 delivery to this tumor type. PMID:25395662

  5. Knockdown of Pokemon protein expression inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by suppression of AKT activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosan; Dai, Yichen; Chen, Zhangxin; Xie, Junpei; Zeng, Wei; Lin, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of Pokemon, which is an erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor protein, occurs in different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pokemon is also reported to have an oncogenic activity in various human cancers. This study investigated the effect of Pokemon knockdown on the regulation of HCC growth. POK shRNA suppressed the expression of Pokemon protein in HepG2 cells compared to the negative control vector-transfected HCC cells. Pokemon knockdown also reduced HCC cell viability and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. AKT activation and the expression of various cell cycle-related genes were inhibited following Pokemon knockdown. These data demonstrate that Pokemon may play a role in HCC progression, suggesting that inhibition of Pokemon expression using Pokemon shRNA should be further evaluated as a novel target for the control of HCC.

  6. Flame-powered trigger device for activating explosion-suppression barrier. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Cortese, R.A.; Sapko, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed a flame-radiation-powered trigger device to explosively activate suppression barriers to quench gas and coal dust explosions. The major component of the device is a silicon solar panel, which converts radiation from the developing explosion into electrical energy to initiate an electric detonator, which releases an extinguishing agent into the advancing flame front. Solar panels that are rated to produce 20 W of electrical power when exposed to the sunlight are producing about 200 W when exposed to a full-scale dust explosion. The solar panel is electrically isolated from the detonator by a pressure-sensitive switch until the arrival of the precursor pressure pulse, which always precedes a deflagration. The combination of pressure arming and flame-powered photogenerator prevents false barrier activation and requires no external power supply.

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator suppresses activated stellate cells through low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Liang-I; Isse, Kumiko; Koral, Kelly; Bowen, William C; Muratoglu, Selen; Strickland, Dudley K; Michalopoulos, George K; Mars, Wendy M

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and trans-differentiation into myofibroblast (MFB)-like cells is key for fibrogenesis after liver injury and a potential therapeutic target. Recent studies demonstrated that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent signaling by tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is a pro-fibrotic regulator of the MFB phenotype in kidney. This study investigated whether LRP1 signaling by t-PA is also relevant to HSC activation following injury. Primary and immortalized rat HSCs were treated with t-PA and assayed by western blot, MTT, and TUNEL. In vitro results were then verified using an in vivo, acute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injury model that examined the phenotype and recovery kinetics of MFBs from wild-type animals vs mice with a global (t-PA) or HSC-targeted (LRP1) deletion. In vitro, in contrast to kidney MFBs, exogenous, proteolytically inactive t-PA suppressed, rather than induced, activation markers in HSCs following phosphorylation of LRP1. This process was mediated by LRP1 as inhibition of t-PA binding to LRP1 blocked the effects of t-PA. In vivo, following acute injury, phosphorylation of LRP1 on activated HSCs occurred immediately prior to their disappearance. Mice lacking t-PA or LRP1 retained higher densities of activated HSCs for a longer time period compared with control mice after injury cessation. Hence, t-PA, an FDA-approved drug, contributes to the suppression of activated HSCs following injury repair via signaling through LRP1. This renders t-PA a potential target for exploitation in treating patients with fibrosis.

  8. Activated protein C suppresses adrenomedullin and ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypotension.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akanksha; Berg, David T; Gerlitz, Bruce; Richardson, Mark A; Galbreath, Elizabeth; Syed, Samreen; Sharma, Avadhesh C; Lowry, Stephen F; Grinnell, Brian W

    2007-10-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is an important modulator of vascular function that has antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Studies in humans have shown modulation of endotoxin-induced hypotension by recombinant human APC, drotrecogin alfa (activated), however, the mechanism for this effect is unclear. We have found that APC suppresses the induction of the potent vasoactive peptide adrenomedullin (ADM) and could downregulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ADM messenger RNA (mRNA) and nitrite levels in cell culture. This effect was dependent on signaling through protease-activated receptor 1. Addition of 1400W, an irreversible inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, inhibited LPS-induced ADM mRNA, suggesting that ADM induction is NO mediated. Furthermore, in a rat model of endotoxemia, APC (100 microg/kg, i.v.) prevented LPS (10 mg/kg, i.v.)-induced hypotension, and suppressed ADM mRNA and protein expression. APC also inhibited iNOS mRNA and protein levels along with reduction in NO by-products (NOx). We also observed a significant reduction in iNOS-positive leukocytes adhering to vascular endothelium after APC treatment. Moreover, we found that APC inhibited the expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), a potent activator of iNOS. In a human study of LPS-induced hypotension, APC reduced the upregulation of plasma ADM levels, coincident with protection against the hypotensive response. Overall, we demonstrate that APC blocks the induction of ADM, likely mediated by IFN-gamma and iNOS, and suggests a mechanism that may account for ameliorating LPS-induced hypotension. Furthermore, our data provide a new understanding for the role of APC in modulating vascular response to insult.

  9. Papaverine inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced microglial activation by suppressing NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yalong; Mu, Yalin; Wang, Kun; Xu, Ke; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Yu; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of papaverine (PAP) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation and its possible mechanisms. Materials and methods BV2 microglial cells were first pretreated with PAP (0, 0.4, 2, 10, and 50 μg/mL) and then received LPS stimulation. Transcription and production of proinflammatory factors (IL1β, TNFα, iNOS, and COX-2) were used to evaluate microglial activation. The transcriptional changes undergone by M1/M2a/M2b markers were used to evaluate phenotype transformation of BV2 cells. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were used to detect the location and expression of P65 and p-IKK in the presence or absence of PAP pretreatment. Results Pretreatment with PAP significantly inhibited the expression of IL1β and TNFα, and suppressed the transcription of M1/M2b markers Il1rn, Socs3, Nos2 and Ptgs2, but upregulated the transcription of M2a markers (Arg1 and Mrc1) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PAP pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of p-IKK and inhibited the nuclear translocation of P65 after LPS stimulation. Conclusion PAP not only suppressed the LPS-induced microglial activity by inhibiting transcription/production of proinflammatory factors, but also promoted the transformation of activated BV2 cells from cytotoxic phenotypes (M1/M2b) to a neuroprotective phenotype (M2a). These effects were probably mediated by NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, it would be a promising candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27013863

  10. Autoantibodies to the functionally active RING-domain of Ro52/SSA are associated with disease activity in patients with lupus.

    PubMed

    Kvarnström, M; Dzikaite-Ottosson, V; Ottosson, L; Gustafsson, J T; Gunnarsson, I; Svenungsson, E; Wahren-Herlenius, M

    2013-04-01

    The Ro52 protein of the Ro/SSA antigen was recently defined as an E3 ligase controlling cytokine production. Autoantibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients targeting the Ro52-RING domain, containing the E3 ligase activity, have been shown to inhibit the E3 ligase activity of Ro52. The objective of the present study was to investigate correlations between clinical parameters in patients with SLE and levels of Ro/SSA (Ro52 and Ro60) and La/SSB autoantibodies, including autoantibodies directed towards the functional RING and B-box domains of the Ro52 protein. SLE patients (n=232) were clinically examined and disease activity indices collected concurrently to blood sampling. The samples were analyzed for immunological parameters including autoantibodies. Ro52 autoantibody levels were associated with more variables than the other analyzed antibodies and were significantly associated with several individual items related to sSS and the diagnosis of sSS itself (p=0.004). Other associated variables were high sedimentation rate (p=0.0003), levels of immunoglobulins (p=0.0003), and an inverse correlation with levels of lymphocytes (p=0.003) and leukocytes (p=0.01). Antibodies to the RING domain of Ro52, which is the functionally active domain with E3 ligase activity, were significantly correlated with disease activity as measured by the SLAM score. We conclude that autoantibodies against Ro52 and in particular its functional RING domain are important in lupus patients and associated with several clinical and laboratory features of the disease. The impact on disease activity of Ro52-RING specific antibodies was especially noted, and could imply a functional role for these autoantibodies in inhibiting Ro52 activity, which is important for the control of proinflammatory cytokine production, including type 1 interferons.

  11. SESN2/sestrin2 suppresses sepsis by inducing mitophagy and inhibiting NLRP3 activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Bae, Soo Han; Ryu, Jae-Chan; Kwon, Younghee; Oh, Ji-Hwan; Kwon, Jeongho; Moon, Jong-Seok; Kim, Kyubo; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Lee, Min Goo; Shin, Jaekyoon; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K; Rhee, Sue Goo; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2016-08-01

    Proper regulation of mitophagy for mitochondrial homeostasis is important in various inflammatory diseases. However, the precise mechanisms by which mitophagy is activated to regulate inflammatory responses remain largely unknown. The NLRP3 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome serves as a platform that triggers the activation of CASP1 (caspase 1) and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we demonstrate that SESN2 (sestrin 2), known as stress-inducible protein, suppresses prolonged NLRP3 inflammasome activation by clearance of damaged mitochondria through inducing mitophagy in macrophages. SESN2 plays a dual role in inducing mitophagy in response to inflammasome activation. First, SESN2 induces "mitochondrial priming" by marking mitochondria for recognition by the autophagic machinery. For mitochondrial preparing, SESN2 facilitates the perinuclear-clustering of mitochondria by mediating aggregation of SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1) and its binding to lysine 63 (Lys63)-linked ubiquitins on the mitochondrial surface. Second, SESN2 activates the specific autophagic machinery for degradation of primed mitochondria via an increase of ULK1 (unc-51 like kinase 1) protein levels. Moreover, increased SESN2 expression by extended LPS (lipopolysaccharide) stimulation is mediated by NOS2 (nitric oxide synthase 2, inducible)-mediated NO (nitric oxide) in macrophages. Thus, Sesn2-deficient mice displayed defective mitophagy, which resulted in hyperactivation of inflammasomes and increased mortality in 2 different sepsis models. Our findings define a unique regulatory mechanism of mitophagy activation for immunological homeostasis that protects the host from sepsis. PMID:27337507

  12. Profilin-PTEN interaction suppresses NF-κB activation via inhibition of IKK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Adeel H; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of Profilin for its tumour suppressor activity is still unknown. Nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) is known to activate many target genes involved in cell proliferation. In the present study, we provide evidence that supports the involvement of Profilin in regulation of NF-κB, which might repress the tumorigenic response. Profilin overexpressing cells show low basal activity of IκBα kinase (IKK), high amounts of cytoplasmic inhibitory subunit of NF-κB (IκBα) and p65, and low nuclear NF-κB DNA binding activity. Co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) studies suggest that Profilin interacts with a protein phosphatase, phosphatase and tension homologue (PTEN), and protects it from degradation. In turn, PTEN interacts physically and maintains a low phosphorylated state of the IKK complex and thereby suppresses NF-κB signalling. Thus, Profilin overexpressing cells show a decrease in NF-κB activation mediated by most of the inducers and potentiate cell death by repressing NF-κB-dependent genes involved in cell cycle progression. For the first time, we provide evidence, which suggests that Profilin increases tumour suppressor activity by regulating NF-κB. PMID:26787927

  13. Nonstructural protein p39 of feline calicivirus suppresses host innate immune response by preventing IRF-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Yumiketa, Yo; Narita, Takanori; Inoue, Yosuke; Sato, Go; Kamitani, Wataru; Oka, Tomoichiro; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Tohya, Yukinobu

    2016-03-15

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an important veterinary pathogen that causes acute upper respiratory tract diseases and, occasionally, highly contagious febrile hemorrhagic syndrome in cats. Many viruses have adopted mechanisms for evading IFN-α/β signaling, particularly by directly or indirectly suppressing activation of IRF-3. In this study, we investigated whether nonstructural proteins of FCV possess these mechanisms. When p39, a nonstructural protein of FCV, was transiently expressed in 293T cells, it suppressed IFN-β and ISG15 mRNA production induced by dsRNA. Expression of p39 also suppressed phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF-3 induced by dsRNA. These results suggest that p39 suppresses type 1 IFN production by preventing IRF-3 activation. This may become an important factor in understanding the pathogenesis and virulence of FCV. PMID:26931393

  14. Active manipulation of native soil microbial community structure and function to suppress soilborne diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reality of naturally occurring biologically-induced disease suppressive soils suggests opportunity for managing resident soil microbial communities as a disease control method. Disease suppressive soils have yielded a significant body of knowledge concerning operative mechanisms leading to t...

  15. Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent erythropoietin expression by indoxyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hirobumi; Hirata, Junya; Hirano, Ayumi; Hirai, Kazuya; Seki, Sayaka; Watanabe-Akanuma, Mie

    2016-01-15

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a representative uremic toxin that accumulates in the blood of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In addition to the involvement in the progression of CKD, a recent report indicates that IS suppresses hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-dependent erythropoietin (EPO) production, suggesting that IS may also contribute to the progression of renal anemia. In this report, we provide evidence that aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates IS-induced suppression of HIF activation and subsequent EPO production. In HepG2 cells, IS at concentrations similar to the blood levels in CKD patients suppressed hypoxia- or cobalt chloride-induced EPO mRNA expression and transcriptional activation of HIF. IS also induced AhR activation, and AhR blockade resulted in abolishment of IS-induced suppression of HIF activation. The HIF transcription factor is a heterodimeric complex composed of HIF-α subunits (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT). IS suppressed nuclear accumulation of the HIF-α-ARNT complex accompanied by an increase of the AhR-ARNT complex in the nucleus, implying the involvement of interactions among AhR, HIF-α, and ARNT in the suppression mechanism. In rats, oral administration of indole, a metabolic precursor of IS, inhibited bleeding-induced elevation of renal EPO mRNA expression and plasma EPO concentration and strongly induced AhR activation in the liver and renal cortex tissues. Collectively, this study is the first to elucidate the detailed mechanism by which AhR plays an indispensable role in the suppression of HIF activation by IS. Hence, IS-induced activation of AhR may be a potential therapeutic target for treating renal anemia. PMID:26561638

  16. Suppression of aromatase activity in populations of bream (Abramis brama) from the river Elbe, Germany.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Markus; Sanderson, J Thomas; Karbe, Ludwig

    2007-01-01

    Aromatase activity was determined in brain and gonads of wild bream collected along the river Elbe, Germany, and correlated with other endocrine and reproductive endpoints such as plasma sex steroid concentrations, secondary sex characteristics (STI), plasma vitellogenin, gonad size (GSI), and maturation stages of germ cells (MS) that were reported for the same fish in a previous study. Furthermore, regional patterns of aromatase activity were correlated to a number of environmental factors such as exposure to environmental contaminants and parasitism. While aromatase activity was not detectable in the gonads of male and female fish with the assay used, fish of both genders revealed relatively great brain enzyme activities. As for most of the endocrine and reproductive parameters, with the exception of plasma testosterone (T), aromatase activities were significantly less in fish from a river stretch characterized by elevated exposures to organic contaminants and metals. Brain aromatase activity was positively and significantly correlated with plasma estradiol (E2) and MS in females, and showed a similar trend with plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11KT) and STI in males. No comparable trend occurred for T. This decrease of the reproductively relevant hormones 11KT and E2 may be indicative of a disruption of the last step in sex hormone synthesis, a hypothesis that was supported for E2 by the strong (R2=0.78, p<0.05) linear regression between aromatase activity and E2 in female bream. It is also hypothesized that the effects on brain aromatase activity were likely to be related to the disruption of other reproductive parameters including sexual maturity and expression of secondary sex characteristics. Although a number of factors such as exposure to pollutants and prevalence of the tapeworm Ligula intestinalis correlated with the suppression of aromatase activity, the exact causes for the regional decrease in brain aromatase activity remain unclear due to inconsistencies

  17. Ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone catalyzed by sulfonic acids: computational evidence for bifunctional activation.

    PubMed

    Susperregui, Nicolas; Delcroix, Damien; Martin-Vaca, Blanca; Bourissou, Didier; Maron, Laurent

    2010-10-01

    The mechanism of ring-opening of ε-caprolactone by methanol catalyzed by trifluoromethane and methane sulfonic acids has been studied computationally at the DFT level of theory. For both elementary steps, the sulfonic acid was predicted to behave as a bifunctional catalyst. The nucleophilic addition proceeds via activation of both the monomer and the alcohol. The ring-opening involves the cleavage of the endo C-O bond of the tetrahedral intermediate with concomitant proton transfer. In both cases, the sulfonic acid acts as a proton shuttle via its acidic hydrogen atom and basic oxygen atoms. The computed activation barriers are consistent with the relatively fast polymerizations observed experimentally at room temperature with both catalysts.

  18. H-reflex suppression and autonomic activation during lucid REM sleep: a case study.

    PubMed

    Brylowski, A; Levitan, L; LaBerge, S

    1989-08-01

    A single subject, a proficient lucid dreamer experienced with signaling the onset of lucidity (reflective consciousness of dreaming) by means of voluntary eye movements, spent 4 nonconsecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. The subject reported becoming lucid and signaling in 8 of the 18 rapid-eye movement (REM) periods recorded. Ten lucid dream reports were verified by polygraphic examination of signals, providing a total of 12.5 min of signal-verified lucid REM. H-Reflex amplitude was recorded every 5 s, along with continuous recording of electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromyogram, electrocardiogram, finger pulse, and respiration. Significant findings included greater mean H-reflex suppression during lucid REM sleep than during nonlucid REM and correlations of H-reflex suppression with increased eye movement density, heart rate, and respiration rate. These results support previous studies reporting that lucid REM is not, as might be supposed, a state closer to awakening than ordinary, or nonlucid, REM; rather, lucid dreaming occurs during unequivocal REM sleep and is characteristically associated with phasic REM activation. PMID:2762692

  19. GADD34 suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis and tissue injury through the regulation of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Tanaka, Y; Oshino, R; Okado, S; Hori, M; Isobe, K-I

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 34 (GADD34) is induced by various cellular stresses, such as DNA damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and amino-acid deprivation. Although the major roles of GADD34 are regulating ER stress responses and apoptosis, a recent study suggested that GADD34 is linked to innate immune responses. In this report, we investigated the roles of GADD34 in inflammatory responses against bacterial infection. To explore the effects of GADD34 on systemic inflammation in vivo, we employed a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine sepsis model and assessed the lethality, serum cytokine levels, and tissue injury in the presence or absence of GADD34. We found that GADD34 deficiency increased the lethality and serum cytokine levels in LPS-induced sepsis. Moreover, GADD34 deficiency enhanced tissue destruction, cell death, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in LPS-induced acute liver injury. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation is regulated by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. In vitro experiments revealed that GADD34 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages through dephosphorylation of IKKβ. In conclusion, GADD34 attenuates LPS-induced sepsis and acute tissue injury through suppressing macrophage activation. Targeting this anti-inflammatory role of GADD34 may be a promising area for the development of therapeutic agents to regulate inflammatory disorders. PMID:27171261

  20. H-reflex suppression and autonomic activation during lucid REM sleep: a case study.

    PubMed

    Brylowski, A; Levitan, L; LaBerge, S

    1989-08-01

    A single subject, a proficient lucid dreamer experienced with signaling the onset of lucidity (reflective consciousness of dreaming) by means of voluntary eye movements, spent 4 nonconsecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. The subject reported becoming lucid and signaling in 8 of the 18 rapid-eye movement (REM) periods recorded. Ten lucid dream reports were verified by polygraphic examination of signals, providing a total of 12.5 min of signal-verified lucid REM. H-Reflex amplitude was recorded every 5 s, along with continuous recording of electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromyogram, electrocardiogram, finger pulse, and respiration. Significant findings included greater mean H-reflex suppression during lucid REM sleep than during nonlucid REM and correlations of H-reflex suppression with increased eye movement density, heart rate, and respiration rate. These results support previous studies reporting that lucid REM is not, as might be supposed, a state closer to awakening than ordinary, or nonlucid, REM; rather, lucid dreaming occurs during unequivocal REM sleep and is characteristically associated with phasic REM activation.

  1. The Ustilago maydis effector Pep1 suppresses plant immunity by inhibition of host peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Hemetsberger, Christoph; Herrberger, Christian; Zechmann, Bernd; Hillmer, Morten; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    The corn smut Ustilago maydis establishes a biotrophic interaction with its host plant maize. This interaction requires efficient suppression of plant immune responses, which is attributed to secreted effector proteins. Previously we identified Pep1 (Protein essential during penetration-1) as a secreted effector with an essential role for U. maydis virulence. pep1 deletion mutants induce strong defense responses leading to an early block in pathogenic development of the fungus. Using cytological and functional assays we show that Pep1 functions as an inhibitor of plant peroxidases. At sites of Δpep1 mutant penetrations, H₂O₂ strongly accumulated in the cell walls, coinciding with a transcriptional induction of the secreted maize peroxidase POX12. Pep1 protein effectively inhibited the peroxidase driven oxidative burst and thereby suppresses the early immune responses of maize. Moreover, Pep1 directly inhibits peroxidases in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Using fluorescence complementation assays, we observed a direct interaction of Pep1 and the maize peroxidase POX12 in vivo. Functional relevance of this interaction was demonstrated by partial complementation of the Δpep1 mutant defect by virus induced gene silencing of maize POX12. We conclude that Pep1 acts as a potent suppressor of early plant defenses by inhibition of peroxidase activity. Thus, it represents a novel strategy for establishing a biotrophic interaction.

  2. An aza-anthrapyrazole negatively regulates Th1 activity and suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Matthew P; Leaman, Douglas W; Hazelhurst, Lori A; Hwang, Eun S; Quinn, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Previously we showed that BBR3378, a novel analog of the anticancer drug mitoxantrone, had the ability to ameliorate ascending paralysis in MOG35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of human multiple sclerosis, without the drug-induced cardiotoxicity or lymphopenia associated with mitoxantrone therapy. Chemotherapeutic drugs like mitoxantrone, a topoisomerase inhibitor, are thought to provide protection in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like EAE by inducing apoptosis in rapidly proliferating autoreactive lymphocytes. Here, we show that while BR3378 blocked cell division, T cells were still able to respond to antigenic stimulation and upregulate surface molecules indicative of activation. However, in contrast to mitoxantrone, BBR3378 inhibited the production of the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ both in recently activated T cell blasts and established Th1 effectors, while sparing the activities of IL-13-producing Th2 cells. IFN-γ is known to be regulated by the transcription factor T-bet. In addition to IFN-γ, in vitro and in vivo exposure to BBR3378 suppressed the expression of other T-bet regulated proteins, including CXCR3 and IL-2Rβ. Microarray analysis revealed BBR3378-induced suppression of additional T-bet regulated genes, suggesting that the drug might disrupt global Th1 programming. Importantly, BBR3378 antagonized ongoing Th1 autoimmune responses in vivo, modulated clinical disease and CNS inflammation in acute and relapsing forms of EAE. Therefore, BBR3378 may be a unique inhibitor of T-bet regulated genes and may have potential as a therapeutic intervention in human autoimmune disease. PMID:26709219

  3. Active suppression of diabetes after oral administration of insulin is determined by antigen dosage.

    PubMed

    Bergerot, I; Fabien, N; Mayer, A; Thivolet, C

    1996-02-13

    We have previously demonstrated that feeding six-week-old female mice with 20 units of human insulin every 2 - 3 days for 15 or 30 days induced an active mechanism of suppression through the generation of regulatory T cells that reduced the number of successful diabetic transfers in irradiated NOD recipients. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of antigen dosage and the critical period of cell injection to obtain protection. The effects of the dose of insulin feeding were therefore compared during cotransfer experiments of 5 x 10(6) T cells from diabetic mice and 5 x 10(6) T cells from the spleen of mice receiving 10 units, 20 units, or 40 units of insulin or saline every 2 - 3 days for 15 days. Only T lymphocytes from mice fed with 20 units conferred active cellular protection during adoptive transfer with a significant delay in diabetes onset (p = 0.002). No significant difference was noticed during histological analysis of pancreatic glands, indicating tha insulitis was not prevented. However, mice receiving T lymphocytes from the 20 units of insulin-fed animals had a milder form of inflammation, with a significantly lower percentage of severely infiltrated islets. Injecting regulatory T cells 7 days and 14 days after iv injection of diabetogenic T cells did not modify the incidence curves of diabetes in the recipients, suggesting that cellular interactions and delay in cell trafficking were determinants. These results may have important clinical implications in humans. In conclusion, this study indicates the importance but also the limits of antigen therapy in type I diabetes. Antigen dosage is a critical element for active suppression. Such analysis is important to perform in humans before the initiation of a large-scale prevention trial in prediabetic individuals. PMID:8610991

  4. Suppression of Na+/K+-ATPase activity during estivation in the land snail Otala lactea.

    PubMed

    Ramnanan, Christopher J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-02-01

    Entry into the hypometabolic state of estivation requires a coordinated suppression of the rate of cellular ATP turnover, including both ATP-generating and ATP-consuming reactions. As one of the largest consumers of cellular ATP, the plasma membrane Na+/K+-ATPase is a potentially key target for regulation during estivation. Na+/K+-ATPase was investigated in foot muscle and hepatopancreas of the land snail Otala lactea, comparing active and estivating states. In both tissues enzyme properties changed significantly during estivation: maximal activity was reduced by about one-third, affinity for Mg.ATP was reduced (Km was 40% higher), and activation energy (derived from Arrhenius plots) was increased by approximately 45%. Foot muscle Na+/K+-ATPase from estivated snails also showed an 80% increase in Km Na+ and a 60% increase in Ka Mg2+ as compared with active snails, whereas hepatopancreas Na+/K+-ATPase showed a 70% increase in I50 K+ during estivation. Western blotting with antibodies recognizing the alpha subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase showed no change in the amount of enzyme protein during estivation. Instead, the estivation-responsive change in Na+/K+-ATPase activity was linked to posttranslational modification. In vitro incubations manipulating endogenous kinase and phosphatase activities indicated that Na+/K+-ATPase from estivating snails was a high phosphate, low activity form, whereas dephosphorylation returned the enzyme to a high activity state characteristic of active snails. Treatment with protein kinases A, C or G could all mediate changes in enzyme properties in vitro that mimicked the effect of estivation, whereas treatments with protein phosphatase 1 or 2A had the opposite effect. Reversible phosphorylation control of Na+/K+-ATPase can provide the means of coordinating ATP use by this ion pump with the rates of ATP generation by catabolic pathways in estivating snails. PMID:16449562

  5. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Biosynthesis of Glucosylceramide by Reducing Intracellular Sugar Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The membrane glycolipid glucosylceramide (GlcCer) plays a critical role in cellular homeostasis. Its intracellular levels are thought to be tightly regulated. How cells regulate GlcCer levels remains to be clarified. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a crucial cellular energy sensor, regulates glucose and lipid metabolism to maintain energy homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether AMPK affects GlcCer metabolism. AMPK activators (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside and metformin) decreased intracellular GlcCer levels and synthase activity in mouse fibroblasts. AMPK inhibitors or AMPK siRNA reversed these effects, suggesting that GlcCer synthesis is negatively regulated by an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Although AMPK did not affect the phosphorylation or expression of GlcCer synthase, the amount of UDP-glucose, an activated form of glucose required for GlcCer synthesis, decreased under AMPK-activating conditions. Importantly, the UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase Nudt14, which degrades UDP-glucose, generating UMP and glucose 1-phosphate, was phosphorylated and activated by AMPK. On the other hand, suppression of Nudt14 by siRNA had little effect on UDP-glucose levels, indicating that mammalian cells have an alternative UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase that mainly contributes to the reduction of UDP-glucose under AMPK-activating conditions. Because AMPK activators are capable of reducing GlcCer levels in cells from Gaucher disease patients, our findings suggest that reducing GlcCer through AMPK activation may lead to a new strategy for treating diseases caused by abnormal accumulation of GlcCer. PMID:26048992

  6. Bub1 kinase activity drives error correction and mitotic checkpoint control but not tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ricke, Robin M.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Malureanu, Liviu; Harrison, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint protein Bub1 is essential for embryogenesis and survival of proliferating cells, and bidirectional deviations from its normal level of expression cause chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and cancer predisposition in mice. To provide insight into the physiological significance of this critical mitotic regulator at a modular level, we generated Bub1 mutant mice that lack kinase activity using a knockin gene-targeting approach that preserves normal protein abundance. In this paper, we uncover that Bub1 kinase activity integrates attachment error correction and mitotic checkpoint signaling by controlling the localization and activity of Aurora B kinase through phosphorylation of histone H2A at threonine 121. Strikingly, despite substantial chromosome segregation errors and aneuploidization, mice deficient for Bub1 kinase activity do not exhibit increased susceptibility to spontaneous or carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. These findings provide a unique example of a modular mitotic activity orchestrating two distinct networks that safeguard against whole chromosome instability and reveal the differential importance of distinct aneuploidy-causing Bub1 defects in tumor suppression. PMID:23209306

  7. Conical Euler analysis and active roll suppression for unsteady vortical flows about rolling delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1993-01-01

    A conical Euler code was developed to study unsteady vortex-dominated flows about rolling, highly swept delta wings undergoing either forced motions or free-to-roll motions that include active roll suppression. The flow solver of the code involves a multistage, Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme that uses a cell-centered, finite-volume, spatial discretization of the Euler equations on an unstructured grid of triangles. The code allows for the additional analysis of the free to-roll case by simultaneously integrating in time the rigid-body equation of motion with the governing flow equations. Results are presented for a delta wing with a 75 deg swept, sharp leading edge at a free-stream Mach number of 1.2 and at 10 deg, 20 deg, and 30 deg angle of attack alpha. At the lower angles of attack (10 and 20 deg), forced-harmonic analyses indicate that the rolling-moment coefficients provide a positive damping, which is verified by free-to-roll calculations. In contrast, at the higher angle of attack (30 deg), a forced-harmonic analysis indicates that the rolling-moment coefficient provides negative damping at the small roll amplitudes. A free-to-roll calculation for this case produces an initially divergent response, but as the amplitude of motion grows with time, the response transitions to a wing-rock type of limit cycle oscillation, which is characteristic of highly swept delta wings. This limit cycle oscillation may be actively suppressed through the use of a rate-feedback control law and antisymmetrically deflected leading-edge flaps. Descriptions of the conical Euler flow solver and the free-to roll analysis are included in this report. Results are presented that demonstrate how the systematic analysis of the forced response of the delta wing can be used to predict the stable, neutrally stable, and unstable free response of the delta wing. These results also give insight into the flow physics associated with unsteady vortical flows about delta wings undergoing forced

  8. XR5967, a novel modulator of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity, suppresses tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Teresa D; Wang, Shouming W; Brünner, Nils; Charlton, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 may contribute to tumor progression. We have recently shown that antibodies to PAI-1 block the invasive and migratory potential of human fibrosarcoma cells and suppress angiogenesis in vitro. Here we report the in vitro evaluation of a low-molecular-weight modulator of PAI-1, XR5967, on invasion, migration and angiogenesis. XR5967, a diketopiperazine, dose-dependently inhibited the activity of human and murine PAI-1, towards urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), with IC50 values of 800 nM and 8.3 microM, respectively. This was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, revealing that XR5967 inhibited complex formation between PAI-1 and uPA. This suppression may be caused by XR5967 promoting insertion of the reactive center loop within PAI-1. XR5967 dose-dependently inhibited the invasion of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells through Matrigel. Their invasion was reduced by 57% (p<0.001) at 5 microM. HT1080 cell migration was inhibited in a similar manner, indicating that PAI-1 may play an additional role in invasion, which is distinct to its role in the regulation of proteolysis. The potential of XR5967 to inhibit the invasion/migration of human endothelial cells was investigated in an in vitro model of angiogenesis. In this model XR5967 reduced tubule formation by 77% at 5 microM (p<0.001), highlighting a crucial role for PAI-1 in angiogenesis. These data stress the importance of a balanced proteolysis in the processes of invasion, migration and angiogenesis. Our results support the clinical findings and indicate that modulation of PAI-1 activity, with low-molecular-weight inhibitor of PAI-1 activity, may be of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of cancer.

  9. Application of Semi Active Control Techniques to the Damping Suppression Problem of Solar Sail Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.; Whorton, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Solar sails provide a propellant free form for space propulsion. These are large flat surfaces that generate thrust when they are impacted by light. When attached to a space vehicle, the thrust generated can propel the space vehicle to great distances at significant speeds. For optimal performance the sail must be kept from excessive vibration. Active control techniques can provide the best performance. However, they require an external power-source that may create significant parasitic mass to the solar sail. However, solar sails require low mass for optimal performance. Secondly, active control techniques typically require a good system model to ensure stability and performance. However, the accuracy of solar sail models validated on earth for a space environment is questionable. An alternative approach is passive vibration techniques. These do not require an external power supply, and do not destabilize the system. A third alternative is referred to as semi-active control. This approach tries to get the best of both active and passive control, while avoiding their pitfalls. In semi-active control, an active control law is designed for the system, and passive control techniques are used to implement it. As a result, no external power supply is needed so the system is not destabilize-able. Though it typically underperforms active control techniques, it has been shown to out-perform passive control approaches and can be unobtrusively installed on a solar sail boom. Motivated by this, the objective of this research is to study the suitability of a Piezoelectric (PZT) patch actuator/sensor based semi-active control system for the vibration suppression problem of solar sail booms. Accordingly, we develop a suitable mathematical and computer model for such studies and demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach with computer simulations.

  10. Active control for vibration suppression in a flexible beam using a modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Lindner, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the use of a modal-domain (MD) fiber-optic sensor as an active control system component for vibration suppression, whose output is proportional to the integral of the axial strain along the optical fiber. When an MD sensor is attached to, or embedded in, a flexible structure, it senses the strain in the structure along its gage length. On the basis of the present integration of the sensor model into a flexible-structure model, it becomes possible to design a control system with a dynamic compensator which adds damping to the low-order modes of the flexible structure. This modeling procedure has been experimentally validated.

  11. Activating the Microscale Edge Effect in a Hierarchical Surface for Frosting Suppression and Defrosting Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Ruiyuan; Zhou, Hongbo; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Che, Lufeng; Yao, Shuhuai; Wang, Zuankai

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive progress, current icephobic materials are limited by the breakdown of their icephobicity in the condensation frosting environment. In particular, the frost formation over the entire surface is inevitable as a result of undesired inter-droplet freezing wave propagation initiated by the sample edges. Moreover, the frost formation directly results in an increased frost adhesion, posing severe challenges for the subsequent defrosting process. Here, we report a hierarchical surface which allows for interdroplet freezing wave propagation suppression and efficient frost removal. The enhanced performances are mainly owing to the activation of the microscale edge effect in the hierarchical surface, which increases the energy barrier for ice bridging as well as engendering the liquid lubrication during the defrosting process. We believe the concept of harnessing the surface morphology to achieve superior performances in two opposite phase transition processes might shed new light on the development of novel materials for various applications. PMID:23981909

  12. Mechanical overstimulation of hair bundles: suppression and recovery of active motility.

    PubMed

    Kao, Albert; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W F; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of high-amplitude mechanical stimuli on hair bundles of the bullfrog sacculus. Under in vitro conditions, these bundles exhibit spontaneous limit cycle oscillations. Prolonged deflection exerted two effects. First, it induced an offset in the position of the bundle. Recovery to the original position displayed two distinct time scales, suggesting the existence of two adaptive mechanisms. Second, the stimulus suppressed spontaneous oscillations, indicating a change in the hair bundle's dynamic state. After cessation of the stimulus, active bundle motility recovered with time. Both effects were dependent on the duration of the imposed stimulus. External calcium concentration also affected the recovery to the oscillatory state. Our results indicate that both offset in the bundle position and calcium concentration control the dynamic state of the bundle. PMID:23505461

  13. Mechanical Overstimulation of Hair Bundles: Suppression and Recovery of Active Motility

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Albert; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    We explore the effects of high-amplitude mechanical stimuli on hair bundles of the bullfrog sacculus. Under in vitro conditions, these bundles exhibit spontaneous limit cycle oscillations. Prolonged deflection exerted two effects. First, it induced an offset in the position of the bundle. Recovery to the original position displayed two distinct time scales, suggesting the existence of two adaptive mechanisms. Second, the stimulus suppressed spontaneous oscillations, indicating a change in the hair bundle’s dynamic state. After cessation of the stimulus, active bundle motility recovered with time. Both effects were dependent on the duration of the imposed stimulus. External calcium concentration also affected the recovery to the oscillatory state. Our results indicate that both offset in the bundle position and calcium concentration control the dynamic state of the bundle. PMID:23505461

  14. Biochemistry and therapeutic implications of mechanisms involved in FOXP3 activity in immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Saouaf, Sandra J; Samanta, Arabinda; Shen, Yuan; Hancock, Wayne W; Greene, Mark I

    2007-10-01

    While mutations in human FOXP3 predispose individuals to autoimmune conditions, it is unclear how the mutant protein fails to function as a transcriptional regulator. There is also limited detail of how FOXP3 itself interacts with the transcriptional machinery and which components of the FOXP3 ensembles exert phenotypic changes to render cells able to mediate suppression. Increasing evidence indicates that the level and duration of FOXP3 expression plays a crucial role in the development and function of natural regulatory T cells (Tregs). Our studies focus on the post-translational modification of the FOXP3 protein, and how the FOXP3 complex ensemble, containing histone modification and chromatin-remodeling enzymes, defines its functional role in regulatory T cells. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying FOXP3 activity will provide therapeutic implications for transplantation, allergy, autoimmune disease and cancer. PMID:17703930

  15. Suppression of two-dimensional vortex-induced vibration with active velocity feedback controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Srinil, N.

    2016-09-01

    Vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) establish key design parameters for offshore and subsea structures subject to current flows. Understanding and predicting VIV phenomena have been improved in recent years. Further, there is a need to determine how to effectively and economically mitigate VIV effects. In this study, linear and nonlinear velocity feedback controllers are applied to actively suppress the combined cross-flow and in-line VIV of an elastically-mounted rigid circular cylinder. The strongly coupled fluid-structure interactions are numerically modelled and investigated using a calibrated reduced-order wake oscillator derived from the vortex strength concept. The importance of structural geometrical nonlinearities is studied which highlights the model ability in matching experimental results. The effectiveness of linear vs nonlinear controllers are analysed with regard to the control direction, gain and power. Parametric studies are carried out which allow us to choose the linear vs nonlinear control, depending on the target controlled amplitudes and associated power requirements.

  16. Vitamin K2 suppresses rotenone-induced microglial activation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan-xia; Li, Yi-pei; Gao, Feng; Hu, Qing-song; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Dong; Wang, Guang-hui

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Increasing evidence has shown that environmental factors such as rotenone and paraquat induce neuroinflammation, which contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the repression by menaquinone-4 (MK-4), a subtype of vitamin K2, of rotenone-induced microglial activation in vitro. Methods: A microglial cell line (BV2) was exposed to rotenone (1 μmol/L) with or without MK-4 treatment. The levels of TNF-α or IL-1β in 100 μL of cultured media of BV2 cells were measured using ELISA kits. BV2 cells treated with rotenone with or without MK4 were subjected to mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS production, immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays. The neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were treated with conditioned media (CM) of BV2 cells that were exposed to rotenone with or without MK-4 treatment, and the cell viability was assessed using MTT assay. Results: In rotenone-treated BV2 cells, MK-4 (0.5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed the upregulation in the expression of iNOS and COX-2 in the cells, as well as the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in the cultured media. MK-4 (5–20 μmol/L) significantly inhibited rotenone-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB in BV2 cells. MK-4 (5–20 μmol/L) significantly inhibited rotenone-induced p38 activation, ROS production, and caspase-1 activation in BV2 cells. MK-4 (5–20 μmol/L) also restored the mitochondrial membrane potential that had been damaged by rotenone. Exposure to CM from rotenone-treated BV2 cells markedly decreased the viability of SH-SY5Y cells. However, this rotenone-activated microglia-mediated death of SH-SY5Y cells was significantly attenuated when the BV2 cells were co-treated with MK-4 (5–20 μmol/L). Conclusion: Vitamin K2 can directly suppress rotenone-induced activation of microglial BV2 cells in vitro by repressing ROS production and p38 activation. PMID:27498777

  17. Suppression of B-Raf(V600E) cancers by MAPK hyper-activation

    PubMed Central

    Eldad, Sophia; Smeir, Elia; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf(V600E) activates MEK/MAPK signalling and acts as oncogenic driver of a variety of cancers, including melanoma, colorectal and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Specific B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors (e.g., Vemurafenib) prove initial efficacy in melanoma followed shortly by acquired resistance, while failing in most other B-Raf(V600E) cancers due to primary resistance. Resistance is due to acquired mutations in the Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway and/or other oncogenic drivers that bypass B-Raf(V600E). Surprisingly, hyper-activation of MAPK by inhibiting its protein phosphatase 2A by a synthetic long-chain fatty acid analogue (MEDICA), results in oncogene-induced growth arrest and apoptosis of B-Raf(V600E) cancer cells. Growth arrest is accompanied by MAPK-mediated serine/threonine phosphorylation and suppression of a variety of oncogenic drivers that resist treatment by B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors, including ErbB members, c-Met, IGFR, IRS, STAT3 and Akt. The combined activities of mutated B-Raf and MEDICA are required for generating hyper-activated MAPK, growth arrest and apoptosis, implying strict specificity for mutated B-Raf cancer cells. PMID:26959890

  18. Suppression of B-Raf(V600E) cancers by MAPK hyper-activation.

    PubMed

    Atiq, Rawan; Hertz, Rachel; Eldad, Sophia; Smeir, Elia; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    B-Raf(V600E) activates MEK/MAPK signalling and acts as oncogenic driver of a variety of cancers, including melanoma, colorectal and papillary thyroid carcinoma. Specific B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors (e.g., Vemurafenib) prove initial efficacy in melanoma followed shortly by acquired resistance, while failing in most other B-Raf(V600E) cancers due to primary resistance. Resistance is due to acquired mutations in the Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK pathway and/or other oncogenic drivers that bypass B-Raf(V600E). Surprisingly, hyper-activation of MAPK by inhibiting its protein phosphatase 2A by a synthetic long-chain fatty acid analogue (MEDICA), results in oncogene-induced growth arrest and apoptosis of B-Raf(V600E) cancer cells. Growth arrest is accompanied by MAPK-mediated serine/threonine phosphorylation and suppression of a variety of oncogenic drivers that resist treatment by B-Raf(V600E) kinase inhibitors, including ErbB members, c-Met, IGFR, IRS, STAT3 and Akt. The combined activities of mutated B-Raf and MEDICA are required for generating hyper-activated MAPK, growth arrest and apoptosis, implying strict specificity for mutated B-Raf cancer cells. PMID:26959890

  19. Bidirectional Transcription Directs Both Transcriptional Gene Activation and Suppression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin V.; Santoso, Sharon; Turner, Anne-Marie; Pastori, Chiara; Hawkins, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    Small RNAs targeted to gene promoters in human cells have been shown to modulate both transcriptional gene suppression and activation. However, the mechanism involved in transcriptional activation has remained poorly defined, and an endogenous RNA trigger for transcriptional gene silencing has yet to be identified. Described here is an explanation for siRNA-directed transcriptional gene activation, as well as a role for non-coding antisense RNAs as effector molecules driving transcriptional gene silencing. Transcriptional activation of p21 gene expression was determined to be the result of Argonaute 2–dependent, post-transcriptional silencing of a p21-specific antisense transcript, which functions in Argonaute 1–mediated transcriptional control of p21 mRNA expression. The data presented here suggest that in human cells, bidirectional transcription is an endogenous gene regulatory mechanism whereby an antisense RNA directs epigenetic regulatory complexes to a sense promoter, resulting in RNA-directed epigenetic gene regulation. The observations presented here support the notion that epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes, such as p21, may be the result of an imbalance in bidirectional transcription levels. This imbalance allows the unchecked antisense RNA to direct silent state epigenetic marks to the sense promoter, resulting in stable transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:19008947

  20. Heterogeneity of dynein structure implies coordinated suppression of dynein motor activity in the axoneme.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditi; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Axonemal dyneins provide the driving force for flagellar/ciliary bending. Nucleotide-induced conformational changes of flagellar dynein have been found both in vitro and in situ by electron microscopy, and in situ studies demonstrated the coexistence of at least two conformations in axonemes in the presence of nucleotides (the apo and the nucleotide-bound forms). The distribution of the two forms suggested cooperativity between adjacent dyneins on axonemal microtubule doublets. Although the mechanism of such cooperativity is unknown it might be related to the mechanism of bending. To explore the mechanism by which structural heterogeneity of axonemal dyneins is induced by nucleotides, we used cilia from Tetrahymena thermophila to examine the structure of dyneins in a) the intact axoneme and b) microtubule doublets separated from the axoneme, both with and without additional pure microtubules. We also employed an ATPase assay on these specimens to investigate dynein activity functionally. Dyneins on separated doublets show more activation by nucleotides than those in the intact axoneme, both structurally and in the ATPase assay, and this is especially pronounced when the doublets are coupled with added microtubules, as expected. Paralleling the reduced ATPase activity in the intact axonemes, a lower proportion of these dyneins are in the nucleotide-bound form. This indicates a coordinated suppression of dynein activity in the axoneme, which could be the key for understanding the bending mechanism.

  1. Queen signals in a stingless bee: suppression of worker ovary activation and spatial distribution of active compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Túlio M.; Mateus, Sidnei; Favaris, Arodi P.; Amaral, Mônica F. Z. J.; von Zuben, Lucas G.; Clososki, Giuliano C.; Bento, José M. S.; Oldroyd, Benjamin P.; Silva, Ricardo; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Silva, Denise B.; Lopes, Norberto P.

    2014-01-01

    In most species of social insect the queen signals her presence to her workers via pheromones. Worker responses to queen pheromones include retinue formation around the queen, inhibition of queen cell production and suppression of worker ovary activation. Here we show that the queen signal of the Brazilian stingless bee Friesella schrottkyi is a mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons. Stingless bees are therefore similar to ants, wasps and bumble bees, but differ from honey bees in which the queen's signal mostly comprises volatile compounds originating from the mandibular glands. This shows that cuticular hydrocarbons have independently evolved as the queen's signal across multiple taxa, and that the honey bees are exceptional. We also report the distribution of four active queen-signal compounds by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. The results indicate a relationship between the behavior of workers towards the queen and the likely site of secretion of the queen's pheromones. PMID:25502598

  2. Queen signals in a stingless bee: suppression of worker ovary activation and spatial distribution of active compounds.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Túlio M; Mateus, Sidnei; Favaris, Arodi P; Amaral, Mônica F Z J; von Zuben, Lucas G; Clososki, Giuliano C; Bento, José M S; Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Silva, Ricardo; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Silva, Denise B; Lopes, Norberto P

    2014-12-12

    In most species of social insect the queen signals her presence to her workers via pheromones. Worker responses to queen pheromones include retinue formation around the queen, inhibition of queen cell production and suppression of worker ovary activation. Here we show that the queen signal of the Brazilian stingless bee Friesella schrottkyi is a mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons. Stingless bees are therefore similar to ants, wasps and bumble bees, but differ from honey bees in which the queen's signal mostly comprises volatile compounds originating from the mandibular glands. This shows that cuticular hydrocarbons have independently evolved as the queen's signal across multiple taxa, and that the honey bees are exceptional. We also report the distribution of four active queen-signal compounds by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. The results indicate a relationship between the behavior of workers towards the queen and the likely site of secretion of the queen's pheromones.

  3. Serotonin suppresses β-casein expression via PTP1B activation in human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takeshi; Maeda, Tomoji; Sanbe, Atsushi; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-04-22

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytriptamine, 5-HT) has an important role in milk volume homeostasis within the mammary gland during lactation. We have previously shown that the expression of β-casein, a differentiation marker in mammary epithelial cells, is suppressed via 5-HT-mediated inhibition of signal transduction and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) phosphorylation in the human mammary epithelial MCF-12A cell line. In addition, the reduction of β-casein in turn was associated with 5-HT7 receptor expression in the cells. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanisms underlying the 5-HT-mediated suppression of β-casein and STAT5 phosphorylation. The β-casein level and phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5)/STAT5 ratio in the cells co-treated with 5-HT and a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (KT5720) were significantly higher than those of cells treated with 5-HT alone. Exposure to 100 μM db-cAMP for 6 h significantly decreased the protein levels of β-casein and pSTAT5 and the pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio, and significantly increased PTP1B protein levels. In the cells co-treated with 5-HT and an extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK) inhibitor (FR180294) or Akt inhibitor (124005), the β-casein level and pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio were equal to those of cells treated with 5-HT alone. Treatment with 5-HT significantly induced PTP1B protein levels, whereas its increase was inhibited by KT5720. In addition, the PTP1B inhibitor sc-222227 increased the expression levels of β-casein and the pSTAT5/STAT5 ratio. Our observations indicate that PTP1B directly regulates STAT5 phosphorylation and that its activation via the cAMP/PKA pathway downstream of the 5-HT7 receptor is involved in the suppression of β-casein expression in MCF-12A cells.

  4. HSP60 mediates the neuroprotective effects of curcumin by suppressing microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Feijia; Li, Fan; Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Nan; Ma, Jiao; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Bing; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and has been widely used to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of curcumin are not well known. In the present study, the effect of curcumin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 mouse microglia cells was investigated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of the culture medium and western blotting of cell lysates. The results showed that curcumin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced expression and release of heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) in the BV2 cells. The level of heat shock factor (HSF)-1 was upregulated in LPS-activated BV2 microglia, indicating that the increased expression of HSP60 was driven by HSF-1 activation. However, the increased HSF-1 level was downregulated by curcumin. Extracellular HSP60 is a ligand of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), and the level of the latter was increased in the LPS-activated BV2 microglia and inhibited by curcumin. The activation of TLR-4 is known to be associated with the activation of myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, with the subsequent production of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors. In the present study, curcumin demonstrated marked suppression of the LPS-induced expression of MyD88, NF-κB, caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in the microglia. These results indicate that curcumin may exert its neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting microglial activation through the HSP60/TLR-4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling wpathway. Therefore, curcumin may be useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with microglial activation. PMID:27446282

  5. Final design and fabrication of an active control system for flutter suppression on a supercritical aeroelastic research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, G. E.; Mcgehee, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The final design and hardware fabrication was completed for an active control system capable of the required flutter suppression, compatible with and ready for installation in the NASA aeroelastic research wing number 1 (ARW-1) on Firebee II drone flight test vehicle. The flutter suppression system uses vertical acceleration at win buttock line 1.930 (76), with fuselage vertical and roll accelerations subtracted out, to drive wing outboard aileron control surfaces through appropriate symmetric and antisymmetric shaping filters. The goal of providing an increase of 20 percent above the unaugmented vehicle flutter velocity but below the maximum operating condition at Mach 0.98 is exceeded by the final flutter suppression system. Results indicate that the flutter suppression system mechanical and electronic components are ready for installation on the DAST ARW-1 wing and BQM-34E/F drone fuselage.

  6. A novel 7-bromoindirubin with potent anticancer activity suppresses survival of human melanoma cells associated with inhibition of STAT3 and Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lucy; Kritsanida, Marina; Magiatis, Prokopios; Gaboriaud, Nicolas; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jun; Buettner, Ralf; Yang, Fan; Nam, Sangkil; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Jove, Richard

    2012-11-01

    STAT3 and Akt signaling have been validated as potential molecular targets for treatment of cancers including melanoma. These small molecule inhibitors of STAT3 or Akt signaling are promising for developing anti-melanoma therapeutic agents. MLS-2438, a novel 7-bromoindirubin, a derivative of the natural product indirubin, was synthesized with a bromo-group at the 7-position on one indole ring and a hydrophilic group at the 3'-position on the other indole ring. We tested the anticancer activity of MLS-2438 and investigated its mechanism of action in human melanoma cell lines. Here, we show that MLS-2438 inhibits viability and induces apoptosis of human melanoma cells associated with inhibition of STAT3 and Akt signaling. Several pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins are involved in the MLS-2438 mediated apoptosis. MLS-2438 inhibits Src kinase activity in vitro and phosphorylation of JAK2, Src, STAT3 and Akt in cultured cancer cells. In contrast to the decreased phosphorylation levels of JAK2, Src, STAT3 and Akt, phosphorylation levels of the MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling protein were not reduced in cells treated with MLS-2438. These results demonstrate that MLS-2438, a novel natural product derivative, is a Src inhibitor and potentially regulates kinase activity of JAK2 and Akt in cancer cells. Importantly, MLS-2438 suppressed tumor growth with low toxicity in a mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. Our findings support further development of MLS-2438 as a potential small-molecule therapeutic agent that targets both STAT3 and Akt signaling in human melanoma cells.

  7. Suppression of rotary unbalance spin-up vibration using passive and semi-active vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begg, Colin Duncan

    Rotating machine unbalance can be the source of unwanted vibrations in many mechanical systems. One problematic form of unbalance force is generated by machine start-up or shut-down. Start-up/shut-down unbalance induces a harmonic excitation force with a varying frequency that is directly proportional to rotor speed, and an amplitude that is proportional to the square of the frequency. When the frequency of a start-up/shut-down unbalance approaches or passes a system resonant frequency, large amplitude vibrations can occur. These vibrations generate greater than normal system operating forces, which could accelerate cumulative part wear and damage internal components. Such degradation could significantly reduce a mechanical system's life. This thesis presents a passive and a semi-active control method for the suppression of vibrations caused by unbalance spin-up excitation (focusing on the start-up scenario) in a mechanical structure. Both methods employ dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). A passive control method using dual mechanical DVAs has been previously proposed (Bursal, 1995). As a basis for design, Bursal (1995) made a conjecture that shaping the system's frequency response function (FRF) by using DVAs to provide a low, flattened, FRF curve over the excitation spin-up frequency range, would minimize the structural vibration response for an unbalance spin-up event. Although the method has been shown to be effective for a few sets of conditions, the conjecture of using steady-state-based FRF-Shaping to suppress transient responses (spin-up unbalance generates a transient response) has not been substantiated. This thesis validates the dual absorber design conjecture and provides additional information regarding the optimal design of such a system. The parametric studies compare the performances between an optimal design (minimum peak response) and the FRF-Shaping design. It is shown that the performances of the two designs are similar for very slow spin

  8. Pioglitazone Suppresses CXCR7 Expression To Inhibit Human Macrophage Chemotaxis through Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Duo; Zhu, Zhicheng; Li, Dan; Xu, Rihao; Wang, Tiance; Liu, Kexiang

    2015-11-17

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Pioglitazone, the widely used thiazolidinedione, is shown to be efficient in the prevention of cardiovascular complications of T2DM. In this study, we report that pioglitazone inhibits CXCR7 expression and thus blocks chemotaxis in differentiated macrophage without perturbing cell viability or macrophage differentiation. In addition, pioglitazone-mediated CXCR7 suppression and chemotaxis inhibition occur via activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) but not PPARα in differentiated macrophage. More importantly, pioglitazone therapy-induced PPARγ activation suppresses CXCR7 expression in human carotid atherosclerotic lesions. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pioglitazone suppresses CXCR7 expression to inhibit human macrophage chemotaxis through PPARγ.

  9. MPTP/MPP+ suppresses activation of protein C in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng; Hou, Ruihua; Li, Chao; Wu, Chengyuan; Xu, Shujun

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and disruption of the blood-brain barrier have been found to be associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the mechanisms underlying these effects have yet to be elucidated. It has also been found that activated protein C (APC) displays neuroprotective properties. Presently, the effects of APC on PD remain unknown. Using a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxin rodent model of PD, we found that administration of MPTP can reduce expression of endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), an N-glycosylated type I membrane protein that has the ability to enhance protein C activation. However, the use of MPTP does not alter levels of thrombomodulin. These findings were verified in an in vitro study showing that 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) treatment leads to suppression of EPCR along with reduction of protein C activation in human primary endothelial cells. Importantly, our results display that activation of the transcriptional factor SP1 is involved in the inhibitory effects of MPTP/MPP+ on EPCR expression. We found that using 300 nM of the SP1 inhibitor MIT can abolish the effects of MPP+ on EPCR expression. Consistently, SP1 silencing using small RNA interference was able to prevent the inhibitory effects of MPTP/MPP+ on the reduction of EPCR expression and impairment of protein C activation. Importantly, our results indicate that overexpression of SP1 inhibits EPCR promoter activity. Our study suggests that EPCR-APC may be a potential therapeutic target for endothelial dysfunction in PD. PMID:25061051

  10. Novel biologically active series of N-acetylglucosamine derivatives for the suppressive activities on GAG release.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Li, Yong; Jiang, Lijuan; Yuan, Li; Dong, Lin; Li, Ying; Yin, Shufan

    2016-10-01

    (d)-Glucosamine and other nutritional supplements have emerged as safe alternative therapies for osteoarthritis, a chronic and degenerative articular joint disease. N-acetyl-(d)-glucosamine, a compound that can be modified at the N position, is considered to improve the oral bioavailability of (d)-glucosamine and has been proven to possess greater in vitro chondroprotective activity compared with the parent agent. In this study, to further utilize these properties, we focus on the modification of the N position with a benzenesulfonyl and different isoxazole formyl groups. Among these compounds, the 3-(2-chlorobenzene)-5-methyl-isoxazole formyl chloride and p-methoxybenzenesulfonyl chloride modifying structures proved to be the most active of the series and efficiently processed the chondrocytes in vitro. These novel N-position substitution compounds may represent promising leads for osteoarthritis drug development. PMID:27454655

  11. Copper suppresses abscisic acid catabolism and catalase activity, and inhibits seed germination of rice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Nenghui; Li, Haoxuan; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Liu, Rui; Xu, Weifeng; Jing, Yu; Peng, Xinxiang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-11-01

    Although copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, a slight excess of Cu in soil can be harmful to plants. Unfortunately, Cu contamination is a growing problem all over the world due to human activities, and poses a soil stress to plant development. As one of the most important biological processes, seed germination is sensitive to Cu stress. However, little is known about the mechanism of Cu-induced inhibition of seed germination. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between Cu and ABA which is the predominant regulator of seed germination. Cu at a concentration of 30 µM effectively inhibited germination of rice caryopsis. ABA content in germinating seeds under copper stress was also higher than that under control conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that Cu treatment reduced the expression of OsABA8ox2, a key gene of ABA catabolism in rice seeds. In addition, both malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 contents were increased by Cu stress in the germinating seeds. Antioxidant enzyme assays revealed that only catalase activity was reduced by excess Cu, which was consistent with the mRNA profile of OsCATa during seed germination under Cu stress. Together, our results demonstrate that suppression of ABA catabolism and catalase (CAT) activity by excess Cu leads to the inhibition of seed germination of rice.

  12. BARP suppresses voltage-gated calcium channel activity and Ca2+-evoked exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Béguin, Pascal; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Mahalakshmi, Ramasubbu N.; Vigot, Réjan; Matsunaga, Atsuko; Miki, Takafumi; Ng, Mei Yong; Ng, Yu Jin Alvin; Lim, Chiaw Hwee; Tay, Hock Soon; Hwang, Le-Ann; Firsov, Dmitri; Tang, Bor Luen; Inagaki, Nobuya; Mori, Yasuo; Seino, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are key regulators of cell signaling and Ca2+-dependent release of neurotransmitters and hormones. Understanding the mechanisms that inactivate VGCCs to prevent intracellular Ca2+ overload and govern their specific subcellular localization is of critical importance. We report the identification and functional characterization of VGCC β-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP), a previously uncharacterized integral membrane glycoprotein expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neurons. BARP interacts via two cytosolic domains (I and II) with all Cavβ subunit isoforms, affecting their subcellular localization and suppressing VGCC activity. Domain I interacts at the α1 interaction domain–binding pocket in Cavβ and interferes with the association between Cavβ and Cavα1. In the absence of domain I binding, BARP can form a ternary complex with Cavα1 and Cavβ via domain II. BARP does not affect cell surface expression of Cavα1 but inhibits Ca2+ channel activity at the plasma membrane, resulting in the inhibition of Ca2+-evoked exocytosis. Thus, BARP can modulate the localization of Cavβ and its association with the Cavα1 subunit to negatively regulate VGCC activity. PMID:24751537

  13. BARP suppresses voltage-gated calcium channel activity and Ca2+-evoked exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Béguin, Pascal; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Mahalakshmi, Ramasubbu N; Vigot, Réjan; Matsunaga, Atsuko; Miki, Takafumi; Ng, Mei Yong; Ng, Yu Jin Alvin; Lim, Chiaw Hwee; Tay, Hock Soon; Hwang, Le-Ann; Firsov, Dmitri; Tang, Bor Luen; Inagaki, Nobuya; Mori, Yasuo; Seino, Susumu; Launey, Thomas; Hunziker, Walter

    2014-04-28

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are key regulators of cell signaling and Ca(2+)-dependent release of neurotransmitters and hormones. Understanding the mechanisms that inactivate VGCCs to prevent intracellular Ca(2+) overload and govern their specific subcellular localization is of critical importance. We report the identification and functional characterization of VGCC β-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP), a previously uncharacterized integral membrane glycoprotein expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neurons. BARP interacts via two cytosolic domains (I and II) with all Cavβ subunit isoforms, affecting their subcellular localization and suppressing VGCC activity. Domain I interacts at the α1 interaction domain-binding pocket in Cavβ and interferes with the association between Cavβ and Cavα1. In the absence of domain I binding, BARP can form a ternary complex with Cavα1 and Cavβ via domain II. BARP does not affect cell surface expression of Cavα1 but inhibits Ca(2+) channel activity at the plasma membrane, resulting in the inhibition of Ca(2+)-evoked exocytosis. Thus, BARP can modulate the localization of Cavβ and its association with the Cavα1 subunit to negatively regulate VGCC activity.

  14. Volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng-Feng; Pan, Shi-Shi; Ou, Rong-Ying; Zheng, Zhen-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Xiu; Jian, Meng-Ting; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Yang; Li, Wen-Feng; Shi, Zhi; Yan, Xiao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Volasertib (BI 6727), a highly selective and potent inhibitor of PLK1, has shown broad antitumor activities in the preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of several types of cancers. However, the anticancer effect of volasertib on cervical cancer cells is still unknown. In the present study, we show that volasertib can markedly induce cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis with the decreased protein expressions of PLK1 substrates survivin and wee1 in human cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, volasertib also enhances the intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) levels, and pretreated with ROS scavenger N-acety-L-cysteine totally blocks ROS generation but partly reverses volasertib-induced apoptosis. In addition, volasertib significantly potentiates the activity of cisplatin to inhibit the growth of cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. In brief, volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer, suggesting the combination of volasertib and cisplatin may be a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. PMID:26885445

  15. Volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng-Feng; Pan, Shi-Shi; Ou, Rong-Ying; Zheng, Zhen-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Xiu; Jian, Meng-Ting; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Yang; Li, Wen-Feng; Shi, Zhi; Yan, Xiao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Volasertib (BI 6727), a highly selective and potent inhibitor of PLK1, has shown broad antitumor activities in the preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of several types of cancers. However, the anticancer effect of volasertib on cervical cancer cells is still unknown. In the present study, we show that volasertib can markedly induce cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis with the decreased protein expressions of PLK1 substrates survivin and wee1 in human cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, volasertib also enhances the intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) levels, and pretreated with ROS scavenger N-acety-L-cysteine totally blocks ROS generation but partly reverses volasertib-induced apoptosis. In addition, volasertib significantly potentiates the activity of cisplatin to inhibit the growth of cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. In brief, volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer, suggesting the combination of volasertib and cisplatin may be a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. PMID:26885445

  16. New hybrid active power filter for harmonic current suppression and reactive power compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biricik, Samet; Cemal Ozerdem, Ozgur; Redif, Soydan; Sezai Dincer, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In the case of undistorted and balanced grid voltages, low ratio shunt active power filters (APFs) can give unity power factors and achieve current harmonic cancellation. However, this is not possible when source voltages are distorted and unbalanced. In this study, the cost-effective hybrid active power filter (HAPF) topology for satisfying the requirements of harmonic current suppression and non-active power compensation for industry is presented. An effective strategy is developed to observe the effect of the placement of power capacitors and LC filters with the shunt APF. A new method for alleviating the negative effects of a nonideal grid voltage is proposed that uses a self-tuning filter algorithm with instantaneous reactive power theory. The real-time control of the studied system was achieved with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture, which was developed using the OPAL-RT system. The performance result of the proposed HAPF system is tested and presented under nonideal supply voltage conditions.

  17. The Flavone Luteolin Suppresses SREBP-2 Expression and Post-Translational Activation in Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tsz Yan; Lin, Shu-mei; Leung, Lai K.

    2015-01-01

    High blood cholesterol has been associated with cardiovascular diseases. The enzyme HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR) is responsible for cholesterol synthesis, and inhibitors of this enzyme (statins) have been used clinically to control blood cholesterol. Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) -2 is a key transcription factor in cholesterol metabolism, and HMGCR is a target gene of SREBP-2. Attenuating SREBP-2 activity could potentially minimize the expression of HMGCR. Luteolin is a flavone that is commonly detected in plant foods. In the present study, Luteolin suppressed the expression of SREBP-2 at concentrations as low as 1 μM in the hepatic cell lines WRL and HepG2. This flavone also prevented the nuclear translocation of SREBP-2. Post-translational processing of SREBP-2 protein was required for nuclear translocation. Luteolin partially blocked this activation route through increased AMP kinase (AMPK) activation. At the transcriptional level, the mRNA and protein expression of SREBP-2 were reduced through luteolin. A reporter gene assay also verified that the transcription of SREBF2 was weakened in response to this flavone. The reduced expression and protein processing of SREBP-2 resulted in decreased nuclear translocation. Thus, the transcription of HMGCR was also decreased after luteolin treatment. In summary, the results of the present study showed that luteolin modulates HMGCR transcription by decreasing the expression and nuclear translocation of SREBP-2. PMID:26302339

  18. Involvement of intracellular labile zinc in suppression of DEVD-caspase activity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, L H; Ratnaike, R N; Zalewski, P D

    2000-02-01

    Age-related tissue Zn deficiency may contribute to neuronal and glial cell death by apoptosis in Alzheimer's dementia. To investigate this, we studied the effects of increasing or decreasing the levels of intracellular labile Zn on apoptosis of human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C cells in vitro. BE(2)-C cells were primed for 18 h with butyrate (1 mM) before addition of staurosporine (1 microM), an effector enzyme of apoptosis, for a further 3 h to induce DEVD-caspase activity. An increase in intracellular Zn using Zn ionophore pyrithione suppressed DEVD-caspase activity, while a decrease in intracellular Zn induced by Zn chelator TPEN mimicked staurosporine by activating DEVD-caspase in butyrate-primed cells. The distribution of intracellular Zn in the cells was demonstrated with the UV-excitable Zn-specific fluorophore Zinquin. Confocal images showed distinct cytoplasmic and cytoskeletal fluorescence. We propose that Zn decreases the level of apoptosis in neuronal cells exposed to toxins, possibly by stabilizing their cytoskeleton.

  19. MK-886, an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, inhibits cyclooxygenase-1 activity and suppresses platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, Andreas; Siemoneit, Ulf; Northoff, Hinnak; Hofmann, Bettina; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2009-04-17

    MK-886, an inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP), potently suppresses leukotriene biosynthesis in intact cells and is frequently used to define a role of the 5-lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34) pathway in cellular or animal models of inflammation, allergy, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Here we show that MK-886 also interferes with the activities of cyclooxygenases (COX, EC 1.14.99.1). MK-886 inhibited isolated COX-1 (IC(50)=8 microM) and blocked the formation of the COX-1-derived products 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT) and thromboxane B(2) in washed human platelets in response to collagen as well as from exogenous arachidonic acid (IC(50)=13-15 microM). Isolated COX-2 was less affected (IC(50)=58 microM), and in A549 cells, MK-886 (33 microM) failed to suppress COX-2-dependent 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F(1alpha) formation. The distinct susceptibility of MK-886 towards COX-1 and -2 is apparent in automated molecular docking studies that indicate a preferred binding of MK-886 to COX-1 into the active site. MK-886 (10 microM) inhibited COX-1-mediated platelet aggregation induced by collagen or arachidonic acid whereas thrombin- or U-46619-induced (COX-independent) aggregation was not affected. Since leukotrienes and prostaglandins share (patho)physiological properties in the development and regulation of carcinogenesis, inflammation, and vascular functions, caution should be used when interpreting data where MK-886 is used as tool to determine the involvement of FLAP and/or the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in respective experimental models.

  20. Increased cerebral activity suppresses baroreflex control of heart rate in freely moving mice.

    PubMed

    Masuki, Shizue; Nose, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    We assessed whether increased cerebral activity suppressed baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and, if so, whether this occurred prior to the onset of locomotion in daily activity of mice. We measured mean arterial pressure (MAP, arterial catheter), cerebral blood flow in the motor cortex (CBF, laser-Doppler flowmetry), and electroencephalogram in free-moving mice (n = 8) during 12 daytime hours. The contribution of baroreflex control of HR to MAP regulation was determined during a total resting period for approximately 8 h from the cross-correlation function (R(t)) between spontaneous changes in HR (HR) and MAP (MAP) every 4 s and the sensitivity was determined from HR/MAP where R(t) was significant (P < 0.05). The power density ratio of theta to delta wave band in electroencephalogram (theta/delta), determined every 4 s as an index of cerebral activity, was positively correlated with CBF during 73 +/- 3% of the total resting period (P < 0.05) and with R(t) during 59 +/- 2% (P < 0.05). When each measurement during the resting period was divided into seven bins according to the level of theta/delta, CBF was 91 +/- 2% in the lowest bin and 118 +/- 3% in the highest bin (P < 0.001), R(t) was 0.69 +/- 0.06 and 0.27 +/- 0.04 (P < 0.001) and HR/MAP (beats min(1) mmHg(1)) was 12.4 +/- 0.9 and 7.5 +/- 0.9 (P < 0.001), respectively, with significant correlations with theta/delta (all P < 0.002). Moreover, mice started to move in approximately 30 sec after the sequential increases of theta/delta and R(t), mice started to move at 5 times higher probability than after a given time, followed by a rapid increase in MAP by approximately 10 mmHg. These results suggest that increased cerebral activity suppresses baroreflex control of HR and this might be related to the start of voluntary locomotion with a rapid increase in MAP. PMID:19805749

  1. Increased cerebral activity suppresses baroreflex control of heart rate in freely moving mice.

    PubMed

    Masuki, Shizue; Nose, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    We assessed whether increased cerebral activity suppressed baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and, if so, whether this occurred prior to the onset of locomotion in daily activity of mice. We measured mean arterial pressure (MAP, arterial catheter), cerebral blood flow in the motor cortex (CBF, laser-Doppler flowmetry), and electroencephalogram in free-moving mice (n = 8) during 12 daytime hours. The contribution of baroreflex control of HR to MAP regulation was determined during a total resting period for approximately 8 h from the cross-correlation function (R(t)) between spontaneous changes in HR (HR) and MAP (MAP) every 4 s and the sensitivity was determined from HR/MAP where R(t) was significant (P < 0.05). The power density ratio of theta to delta wave band in electroencephalogram (theta/delta), determined every 4 s as an index of cerebral activity, was positively correlated with CBF during 73 +/- 3% of the total resting period (P < 0.05) and with R(t) during 59 +/- 2% (P < 0.05). When each measurement during the resting period was divided into seven bins according to the level of theta/delta, CBF was 91 +/- 2% in the lowest bin and 118 +/- 3% in the highest bin (P < 0.001), R(t) was 0.69 +/- 0.06 and 0.27 +/- 0.04 (P < 0.001) and HR/MAP (beats min(1) mmHg(1)) was 12.4 +/- 0.9 and 7.5 +/- 0.9 (P < 0.001), respectively, with significant correlations with theta/delta (all P < 0.002). Moreover, mice started to move in approximately 30 sec after the sequential increases of theta/delta and R(t), mice started to move at 5 times higher probability than after a given time, followed by a rapid increase in MAP by approximately 10 mmHg. These results suggest that increased cerebral activity suppresses baroreflex control of HR and this might be related to the start of voluntary locomotion with a rapid increase in MAP.

  2. Suppressed PHA activation of T lymphocytes in simulated microgravity is restored by direct activation of protein kinase C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Utilizing clinostatic rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity, we found phytohemagglutinin (PHA) responsiveness to be almost completely diminished. Activation marker expression was significantly reduced in RWV cultures. Furthermore, cytokine secretion profiles suggested that monocytes are not as adversely affected by simulated microgravity as T cells. Reduced cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions may play a role in the loss of PHA responsiveness because placing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) within small collagen beads did partially restore PHA responsiveness. However, activation of purified T cells with cross-linked CD2/CD28 and CD3/CD28 antibody pairs was completely suppressed in the RWV, suggesting a defect in signal transduction. Activation of purified T cells with PMA and ionomycin was unaffected by RWV culture. Furthermore, sub-mitogenic doses of PMA alone but not ionomycin alone restored PHA responsiveness of PBMC in RWV culture. Thus our data indicate that during polyclonal activation the signaling pathways upstream of PKC activation are sensitive to simulated microgravity.

  3. NO CLEAR SUBMILLIMETER SIGNATURE OF SUPPRESSED STAR FORMATION AMONG X-RAY LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Del Moro, A.; Rovilos, E.; Altieri, B.; Coia, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Daddi, E.; Le Floc'h, E.; Leiton, R.; Dasyra, K.; Dickinson, M.; Kartaltepe, J.; Hickox, R. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Rosario, D.; and others

    2012-11-20

    Many theoretical models require powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress star formation in distant galaxies and reproduce the observed properties of today's massive galaxies. A recent study based on Herschel-SPIRE submillimeter observations claimed to provide direct support for this picture, reporting a significant decrease in the mean star formation rates (SFRs) of the most luminous AGNs (L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3 in the Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N). In this Letter, we extend these results using Herschel-SPIRE 250 {mu}m data in the COSMOS and Chandra Deep Field-South fields to achieve an order-of-magnitude improvement in the number of sources at L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. On the basis of our analysis, we find no strong evidence for suppressed star formation in L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} AGNs at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3. The mean SFRs of the AGNs are constant over the broad X-ray luminosity range of L{sub X} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 43}-10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} (with mean SFRs consistent with typical star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2; (SFRs) Almost-Equal-To 100-200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). We suggest that the previous CDF-N results were likely due to low number statistics. We discuss our results in the context of current theoretical models.

  4. Suppressing the Coffee-Ring Effect in Semitransparent MnO2 Film for a High-Performance Solar-Powered Energy Storage Window.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huanyu; Qian, Jiasheng; Zhou, Limin; Yuan, Jikang; Huang, Haitao; Wang, Yu; Tang, Wing Man; Chan, Helen Lai Wa

    2016-04-13

    We introduce a simple and effective method to deposit a highly uniform and semitransparent MnO2 film without coffee-ring effect (CRE) by adding ethanol into MnO2 ink for transparent capacitive energy storage devices. By carefully controlling the amount of ethanol added in the MnO2 droplet, we could significantly reduce the CRE and thus improve the film uniformity. The electrochemical properties of supercapacitor (SC) devices using semitransparent MnO2 film electrodes with or without CRE were measured and compared. The SC device without CRE shows a superior capacitance, high rate capability, and lower contact resistance. The CRE-free device could achieve a considerable volumetric capacitance of 112.2 F cm(-3), resulting in a high volumetric energy density and power density of 10 mWh cm(-3) and 8.6 W cm(-3), respectively. For practical consideration, both flexible SC and large-area rigid SC devices were fabricated to demonstrate their potential for flexible transparent electronic application and capacitive energy-storage window application. Moreover, a solar-powered energy storage window which consists of a commercial solar cell and our studied semitransparent MnO2-film-based SCs was assembled. These SCs could be charged by the solar cell and light up a light emitting diode (LED), demonstrating their potential for self-powered systems and energy-efficient buildings.

  5. Suppressing the Coffee-Ring Effect in Semitransparent MnO2 Film for a High-Performance Solar-Powered Energy Storage Window.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huanyu; Qian, Jiasheng; Zhou, Limin; Yuan, Jikang; Huang, Haitao; Wang, Yu; Tang, Wing Man; Chan, Helen Lai Wa

    2016-04-13

    We introduce a simple and effective method to deposit a highly uniform and semitransparent MnO2 film without coffee-ring effect (CRE) by adding ethanol into MnO2 ink for transparent capacitive energy storage devices. By carefully controlling the amount of ethanol added in the MnO2 droplet, we could significantly reduce the CRE and thus improve the film uniformity. The electrochemical properties of supercapacitor (SC) devices using semitransparent MnO2 film electrodes with or without CRE were measured and compared. The SC device without CRE shows a superior capacitance, high rate capability, and lower contact resistance. The CRE-free device could achieve a considerable volumetric capacitance of 112.2 F cm(-3), resulting in a high volumetric energy density and power density of 10 mWh cm(-3) and 8.6 W cm(-3), respectively. For practical consideration, both flexible SC and large-area rigid SC devices were fabricated to demonstrate their potential for flexible transparent electronic application and capacitive energy-storage window application. Moreover, a solar-powered energy storage window which consists of a commercial solar cell and our studied semitransparent MnO2-film-based SCs was assembled. These SCs could be charged by the solar cell and light up a light emitting diode (LED), demonstrating their potential for self-powered systems and energy-efficient buildings. PMID:26953596

  6. Synthesis and antifungal activity of C-21 steroids with an aromatic D ring.

    PubMed

    Sonego, Juan M; Cirigliano, Adriana M; Cabrera, Gabriela M; Burton, Gerardo; Veleiro, Adriana S

    2013-07-01

    Six analogues of salpichrolides with a simplified side chain (6-11) were synthesized using a new methodology to obtain steroids with an aromatic D-ring. The key step was the elimination of HBr in a vicinal dibromo D-homosteroid by treatment with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO). All new compounds were completely characterized by 2D NMR techniques and tested on two fungal pathogenic species, Fusarium virguliforme and Fusarium solani.

  7. Organic amendments to avocado crops induce suppressiveness and influence the composition and activity of soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Nuria; Vida, Carmen; Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Landa, Blanca B; Gaju, Nuria; Cazorla, Francisco M; de Vicente, Antonio

    2015-05-15

    One of the main avocado diseases in southern Spain is white root rot caused by the fungus Rosellinia necatrix Prill. The use of organic soil amendments to enhance the suppressiveness of natural soil is an inviting approach that has successfully controlled other soilborne pathogens. This study tested the suppressive capacity of different organic amendments against R. necatrix and analyzed their effects on soil microbial communities and enzymatic activities. Two-year-old avocado trees were grown in soil treated with composted organic amendments and then used for inoculation assays. All of the organic treatments reduced disease development in comparison to unamended control soil, especially yard waste (YW) and almond shells (AS). The YW had a strong effect on microbial communities in bulk soil and produced larger population levels and diversity, higher hydrolytic activity and strong changes in the bacterial community composition of bulk soil, suggesting a mechanism of general suppression. Amendment with AS induced more subtle changes in bacterial community composition and specific enzymatic activities, with the strongest effects observed in the rhizosphere. Even if the effect was not strong, the changes caused by AS in bulk soil microbiota were related to the direct inhibition of R. necatrix by this amendment, most likely being connected to specific populations able to recolonize conducive soil after pasteurization. All of the organic amendments assayed in this study were able to suppress white root rot, although their suppressiveness appears to be mediated differentially. PMID:25769825

  8. Organic Amendments to Avocado Crops Induce Suppressiveness and Influence the Composition and Activity of Soil Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Nuria; Vida, Carmen; Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Landa, Blanca B.; Gaju, Nuria; Cazorla, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main avocado diseases in southern Spain is white root rot caused by the fungus Rosellinia necatrix Prill. The use of organic soil amendments to enhance the suppressiveness of natural soil is an inviting approach that has successfully controlled other soilborne pathogens. This study tested the suppressive capacity of different organic amendments against R. necatrix and analyzed their effects on soil microbial communities and enzymatic activities. Two-year-old avocado trees were grown in soil treated with composted organic amendments and then used for inoculation assays. All of the organic treatments reduced disease development in comparison to unamended control soil, especially yard waste (YW) and almond shells (AS). The YW had a strong effect on microbial communities in bulk soil and produced larger population levels and diversity, higher hydrolytic activity and strong changes in the bacterial community composition of bulk soil, suggesting a mechanism of general suppression. Amendment with AS induced more subtle changes in bacterial community composition and specific enzymatic activities, with the strongest effects observed in the rhizosphere. Even if the effect was not strong, the changes caused by AS in bulk soil microbiota were related to the direct inhibition of R. necatrix by this amendment, most likely being connected to specific populations able to recolonize conducive soil after pasteurization. All of the organic amendments assayed in this study were able to suppress white root rot, although their suppressiveness appears to be mediated differentially. PMID:25769825

  9. Organic amendments to avocado crops induce suppressiveness and influence the composition and activity of soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Nuria; Vida, Carmen; Martínez-Alonso, Maira; Landa, Blanca B; Gaju, Nuria; Cazorla, Francisco M; de Vicente, Antonio

    2015-05-15

    One of the main avocado diseases in southern Spain is white root rot caused by the fungus Rosellinia necatrix Prill. The use of organic soil amendments to enhance the suppressiveness of natural soil is an inviting approach that has successfully controlled other soilborne pathogens. This study tested the suppressive capacity of different organic amendments against R. necatrix and analyzed their effects on soil microbial communities and enzymatic activities. Two-year-old avocado trees were grown in soil treated with composted organic amendments and then used for inoculation assays. All of the organic treatments reduced disease development in comparison to unamended control soil, especially yard waste (YW) and almond shells (AS). The YW had a strong effect on microbial communities in bulk soil and produced larger population levels and diversity, higher hydrolytic activity and strong changes in the bacterial community composition of bulk soil, suggesting a mechanism of general suppression. Amendment with AS induced more subtle changes in bacterial community composition and specific enzymatic activities, with the strongest effects observed in the rhizosphere. Even if the effect was not strong, the changes caused by AS in bulk soil microbiota were related to the direct inhibition of R. necatrix by this amendment, most likely being connected to specific populations able to recolonize conducive soil after pasteurization. All of the organic amendments assayed in this study were able to suppress white root rot, although their suppressiveness appears to be mediated differentially.

  10. Extra-broadband wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked short-cavity fiber ring laser using a bismuth-based highly nonlinear erbium-doped fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Yutaka; Hirata, Kouji; Ikeoka, Hiroshi

    We demonstrate an ultra-wideband wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked short-cavity laser employing a 151-cm-long bismuth-based highly nonlinear erbium-doped fiber (Bi-HNL-EDF). A wavelength tuning range of 87 nm from 1533 nm to 1620 nm can be achieved because the Bi-HNL-EDF has an ultra-wide gain bandwidth. High nonlinearity of the Bi-HNL-EDF also collaborates with spectral filtering by an optical bandpass filter to suppress the supermode noise quite effectively. Total length of the fiber ring cavity is as short as 16 m. Thus, stable and clean 5.6-6.1 ps pulses with a repetition rate of 10 GHz are successfully obtained over the wavelength tuning range almost completely covering both the conventional wavelength band (1530-1565 nm) and the longer wavelength band (1565-1625 nm). The bismuth-based short-cavity fiber laser also shows good performance in the back-to-back bit-error-rate measurements, and maintains bit-error-free mode-locking operation throughout the entire wavelength tuning range.

  11. Versatile members of the DNAJ family show Hsp70 dependent anti-aggregation activity on RING1 mutant parkin C289G

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Kuiper, E. F. Elsiena; Pandey, Abhinav; Braakman, Ineke; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders and several mutations in different genes have been identified to contribute to the disease. A loss of function parkin RING1 domain mutant (C289G) is associated with autosomal-recessive juvenile-onset Parkinsonism (AR-JP) and displays altered solubility and sequesters into aggregates. Single overexpression of almost each individual member of the Hsp40 (DNAJ) family of chaperones efficiently reduces parkin C289G aggregation and requires interaction with and activity of endogenously expressed Hsp70 s. For DNAJB6 and DNAJB8, potent suppressors of aggregation of polyglutamine proteins for which they rely mainly on an S/T-rich region, it was found that the S/T-rich region was dispensable for suppression of parkin C289G aggregation. Our data implies that different disease-causing proteins pose different challenges to the protein homeostasis system and that DNAJB6 and DNAJB8 are highly versatile members of the DNAJ protein family with multiple partially non-overlapping modes of action with respect to handling disease-causing proteins, making them interesting potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27713507

  12. Highly Active Chiral Ruthenium Catalysts for Asymmetric Ring-Closing Olefin Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Timothy W.; Berlin, Jacob M.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of olefin metathesis catalysts containing chiral, monodentate N-heterocyclic carbenes and their application to asymmetric ring-closing metathesis (ARCM) is reported. These catalysts retain the high levels of reactivity found in the related achiral variants (1a and 1b). Using the parent chiral catalysts 2a and 2b and derivatives that contain steric bulk in the meta positions of the N-bound aryl rings (catalysts 3-5), five- through seven-membered rings were formed in up to 92% ee. The addition of sodium iodide to catalysts 2a-4a (to form 2b-4bin situ) caused a dramatic increase in enantioselectivity for many substrates. Catalyst 5a, which gave high enantiomeric excesses for certain substrates without the addition of NaI, could be used in loadings of ≤1 mol %. Mechanistic explanations for the large sodium iodide effect as well as possible mechanistic pathways leading to the observed products are discussed. PMID:16464082

  13. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  14. Planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the Rings of Saturn from the Pioneer spacecraft, discovery of the Ring of Jupiter, ground based polarimetry of the Rings of Saturn and some theoretical studies may be combined to markedly advance our understanding of the Rings of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. In particular, narrow rings can be self-gravitatingly stable inside Roche's limit and outside another closer limit. They can be created from a satellite which evolves across its Roche limit either by inward tidal drift or by growth of the planet by accretion. These considerations suggest that Neptune may well be surrounded by one or more narrow rings like those of Uranus.

  15. Suppression of ischaemia-induced injuries in rat brain by protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) activating peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xia; Ng, Ethel Sau Kuen; Lam, Francis Fu Yuen

    2016-09-01

    Ischaemic stroke has become one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. The role of protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) in this disease is uncertain. In the present study, the actions of a protease activated receptor-1 activating peptide (PAR-1 AP) SFLLRN-NH2 were investigated in an in vivo rat model of ischaemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and in an in vitro model induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in primary cultured rat embryonic cortical neurones. Rats subjected to MCAO exhibited increased brain infarct volume, oedema, and neurological deficit. Rat cortical neurones subjected to OGD showed increased lactate dehydrogenase, caspase-3 activity and TUNEL positive cells, whereas, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell viability were decreased. Furthermore, both models had elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, nitrite, and malondialdehyde, while anti-oxidant enzymes and bcl-2/bax ratio were decreased. These detrimental changes were suppressed by SFLLRN-NH2, and its protective actions were inhibited by a PAR-1 antagonist (BMS-200261). In summary, SFLLRN-NH2 was found to possess anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, and it produced marked inhibition on the detrimental effects of ischaemia in in vivo and in vitro models of ischaemic stroke. The present findings suggest PAR-1 is a promising target for development of novel treatments of ischaemic brain disease. PMID:27238976

  16. RING domain is essential for the antiviral activity of TRIM25 from orange spotted grouper.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Min; Zhou, Sheng; Qin, Qiwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 25 (TRIM25) has been demonstrated to exert crucial roles in the regulation of innate immune signaling. However, the roles of fish TRIM25 in antiviral immune response still remained uncertain. Here, a novel fish TRIM25 gene from orange spotted grouper (EcTRIM25) was cloned and its roles in grouper virus infection were elucidated. EcTRIM25 encoded a 734-aa protein which shared 68% identity to large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). Amino acid alignment showed that EcTRIM25 contained three conserved domains, including a RING-finger domain, a B box/coiled-coil domain and a SPRY domain. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcTRIM25 was predominantly detected in skin, spleen and intestine. After stimulation with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or poly I:C, the relative expression of EcTRIM25 in grouper spleen was significantly increased at the early stage of injection. Subcellular localization analysis showed that EcTRIM25 distributed throughout the cytoplasm in grouper cells. Notably, the deletion RING domain affected its accurate localization and displayed microtubule like structures or bright aggregates in GS cells. After incubation with SGIV or red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), overexpression of full length of EcTRIM25 in vitro significantly decreased the viral gene transcription of SGIV and RGNNV. Consistently, the deletion of RING domain obviously affected the inhibitory effect of EcTRIM25. Furthermore, overexpression of EcTRIM25 significantly increased the expression level of interferon related signaling molecules, including interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3, interferon-induced 35-kDa protein (IFP35), MXI, IRF7 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), suggesting that the positive regulation of interferon immune response by EcTRIM25 might affected RGNNV replication directly. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines were differently regulated by the ectopic expression of EcTRIM25

  17. RING domain is essential for the antiviral activity of TRIM25 from orange spotted grouper.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Min; Zhou, Sheng; Qin, Qiwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 25 (TRIM25) has been demonstrated to exert crucial roles in the regulation of innate immune signaling. However, the roles of fish TRIM25 in antiviral immune response still remained uncertain. Here, a novel fish TRIM25 gene from orange spotted grouper (EcTRIM25) was cloned and its roles in grouper virus infection were elucidated. EcTRIM25 encoded a 734-aa protein which shared 68% identity to large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). Amino acid alignment showed that EcTRIM25 contained three conserved domains, including a RING-finger domain, a B box/coiled-coil domain and a SPRY domain. In healthy grouper, the transcript of EcTRIM25 was predominantly detected in skin, spleen and intestine. After stimulation with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) or poly I:C, the relative expression of EcTRIM25 in grouper spleen was significantly increased at the early stage of injection. Subcellular localization analysis showed that EcTRIM25 distributed throughout the cytoplasm in grouper cells. Notably, the deletion RING domain affected its accurate localization and displayed microtubule like structures or bright aggregates in GS cells. After incubation with SGIV or red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), overexpression of full length of EcTRIM25 in vitro significantly decreased the viral gene transcription of SGIV and RGNNV. Consistently, the deletion of RING domain obviously affected the inhibitory effect of EcTRIM25. Furthermore, overexpression of EcTRIM25 significantly increased the expression level of interferon related signaling molecules, including interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3, interferon-induced 35-kDa protein (IFP35), MXI, IRF7 and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), suggesting that the positive regulation of interferon immune response by EcTRIM25 might affected RGNNV replication directly. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pro-inflammation cytokines were differently regulated by the ectopic expression of EcTRIM25

  18. A thermal active restrained shrinkage ring test to study the early age concrete behaviour of massive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Briffaut, M.; Benboudjema, F.; Nahas, G.

    2011-01-15

    In massive concrete structures, cracking may occur during hardening, especially if autogenous and thermal strains are restrained. The concrete permeability due to this cracking may rise significantly and thus increase leakage (in tank, nuclear containment...) and reduce the durability. The restrained shrinkage ring test is used to study the early age concrete behaviour (delayed strains evolution and cracking). This test shows, at 20 {sup o}C and without drying, for a concrete mix which is representative of a French nuclear power plant containment vessel (w/c ratio equal to 0.57), that the amplitude of autogenous shrinkage (about 40 {mu}m/m for the studied concrete mix) is not high enough to cause cracking. Indeed, in this configuration, thermal shrinkage is not significant, whereas this is a major concern for massive structures. Therefore, an active test has been developed to study cracking due to restrained thermal shrinkage. This test is an evolution of the classical restrained shrinkage ring test. It allows to take into account both autogenous and thermal shrinkages. Its principle is to create the thermal strain effects by increasing the temperature of the brass ring (by a fluid circulation) in order to expand it. With this test, the early age cracking due to restrained shrinkage, the influence of reinforcement and construction joints have been experimentally studied. It shows that, as expected, reinforcement leads to an increase of the number of cracks but a decrease of crack widths. Moreover, cracking occurs preferentially at the construction joint.

  19. μ suppression as an indicator of activation of the perceptual-motor system by smoking-related cues in smokers.

    PubMed

    Dickter, Cheryl L; Kieffaber, Paul D; Kittel, Julie A; Forestell, Catherine A

    2013-07-01

    The goal of the current study was to determine whether activation of the mirror neuron system, as measured by mu rhythm desynchronization, varied as a function of image content in smokers compared with nonsmokers. EEG activity was recorded while participants passively viewed images depicting smoking-related and nonsmoking-related stimuli. In half of the images, cues were depicted alone (inactive), while for the remaining images, cues were depicted with humans interacting with them (active). For the nonsmoking stimuli, smokers and nonsmokers showed greater mu suppression to the active cues compared to the inactive cues. However, for the smoking-related stimuli, smokers showed greater perception-action coupling for the active cues as reflected in their enhanced mu suppression, compared to nonsmokers. The results of the current study support the involvement of the perceptual-motor system in the activation of motivated drug use behaviors.

  20. Genipin inhibits NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome activation via autophagy suppression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shui-Xing; Du, Chong-Tao; Chen, Wei; Lei, Qian-Qian; Li, Ning; Qi, Shuai; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Deng, Xu-Ming; Han, Wen-Yu; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic, multiprotein complexes that trigger caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation in response to diverse stimuli. Although inflammasomes play important roles in host defense against microbial infection, overactive inflammasomes are deleterious and lead to various autoinflammatory diseases. In the current study, we demonstrated that genipin inhibits the induction of IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. Furthermore, genipin specifically prevented NLRP3-mediated, but not NLRC4-mediated, ASC oligomerization. Notably, genipin inhibited autophagy, leading to NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome inhibition. UCP2-ROS signaling may be involved in inflammasome suppression by genipin. In vivo, we showed that genipin inhibited NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production and neutrophil flux in LPS- and alum-induced murine peritonitis. Additionally, genipin provided protection against flagellin-induced lung inflammation by reducing IL-1β production and neutrophil recruitment. Collectively, our results revealed a novel role in inhibition of inflammatory diseases for genipin that has been used as therapeutics for centuries in herb medicine. PMID:26659006

  1. Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pols, Thijs W.H.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Vos, Mariska; Levels, Johannes H.M.; Quax, Paul H.A.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Pannekoek, Hans; Groen, Albert K.; Vries, Carlie J.M. de

    2008-02-22

    NR4A nuclear receptors are induced in the liver upon fasting and regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we studied the role of nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) in hepatic lipid metabolism. We generated mice expressing hepatic Nur77 using adenoviral vectors, and demonstrate that these mice exhibit a modulation of the plasma lipid profile and a reduction in hepatic triglyceride. Expression analysis of >25 key genes involved in lipid metabolism revealed that Nur77 inhibits SREBP1c expression. This results in decreased SREBP1c activity as is illustrated by reduced expression of its target genes stearoyl-coA desaturase-1, mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, fatty acid synthase and the LDL receptor, and provides a mechanism for the physiological changes observed in response to Nur77. Expression of LXR target genes Abcg5 and Abcg8 is reduced by Nur77, and may suggest involvement of LXR in the inhibitory action of Nur77 on SREBP1c expression. Taken together, our study demonstrates that Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity.

  2. Evodia alkaloids suppress gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis by activating the constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lushan; Wang, Zhangting; Huang, Minmin; Li, Yingying; Zeng, Kui; Lei, Jinxiu; Hu, Haihong; Chen, Baian; Lu, Jing; Xie, Wen; Zeng, Su

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key sensor in xenobiotic detoxification and endobiotic metabolism. Increasing evidence suggests that CAR also plays a role in energy metabolism by suppressing the hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of two evodia alkaloids, rutaecarpine (Rut) and evodiamine (Evo), on gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis through their activation of the human CAR (hCAR). We found that both Rut and Evo exhibited anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects in the hyperlipidemic HepG2 cells. Both compounds can potently activate hCAR, and treatment of cells with hCAR antagonists reversed the anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects of Rut and Evo. The anti-gluconeogenic effect of Rut and Evo was due to the CAR-mediated inhibition of the recruitment of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) onto the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) gene promoters. In vivo, we showed that treatment of mice with Rut improved glucose tolerance in a CAR-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the evodia alkaloids Rut and Evo may have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26455953

  3. Genipin inhibits NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome activation via autophagy suppression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shui-Xing; Du, Chong-Tao; Chen, Wei; Lei, Qian-Qian; Li, Ning; Qi, Shuai; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Deng, Xu-Ming; Han, Wen-Yu; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2015-12-11

    Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic, multiprotein complexes that trigger caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation in response to diverse stimuli. Although inflammasomes play important roles in host defense against microbial infection, overactive inflammasomes are deleterious and lead to various autoinflammatory diseases. In the current study, we demonstrated that genipin inhibits the induction of IL-1β production and caspase-1 activation by NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. Furthermore, genipin specifically prevented NLRP3-mediated, but not NLRC4-mediated, ASC oligomerization. Notably, genipin inhibited autophagy, leading to NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasome inhibition. UCP2-ROS signaling may be involved in inflammasome suppression by genipin. In vivo, we showed that genipin inhibited NLRP3-dependent IL-1β production and neutrophil flux in LPS- and alum-induced murine peritonitis. Additionally, genipin provided protection against flagellin-induced lung inflammation by reducing IL-1β production and neutrophil recruitment. Collectively, our results revealed a novel role in inhibition of inflammatory diseases for genipin that has been used as therapeutics for centuries in herb medicine.

  4. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  5. RAG-induced DNA lesions activate proapoptotic BIM to suppress lymphomagenesis in p53-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Delbridge, Alex R D; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Grabow, Stephanie; Aubrey, Brandon J; Tai, Lin; Herold, Marco J; Strasser, Andreas

    2016-09-19

    Neoplastic transformation is driven by oncogenic lesions that facilitate unrestrained cell expansion and resistance to antiproliferative signals. These oncogenic DNA lesions, acquired through errors in DNA replication, gene recombination, or extrinsically imposed damage, are thought to activate multiple tumor suppressive pathways, particularly apoptotic cell death. DNA damage induces apoptosis through well-described p53-mediated induction of PUMA and NOXA. However, loss of both these mediators (even together with defects in p53-mediated induction of cell cycle arrest and cell senescence) does not recapitulate the tumor susceptibility observed in p53(-/-) mice. Thus, potentially oncogenic DNA lesions are likely to also trigger apoptosis through additional, p53-independent processes. We found that loss of the BH3-only protein BIM accelerated lymphoma development in p53-deficient mice. This process was negated by concomitant loss of RAG1/2-mediated antigen receptor gene rearrangement. This demonstrates that BIM is critical for the induction of apoptosis caused by potentially oncogenic DNA lesions elicited by RAG1/2-induced gene rearrangement. Furthermore, this highlights the role of a BIM-mediated tumor suppressor pathway that acts in parallel to the p53 pathway and remains active even in the absence of wild-type p53 function, suggesting this may be exploited in the treatment of p53-deficient cancers. PMID:27621418

  6. Ring current activity during the early Bz<0 phase of the January 1997 magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Foster, J. C.

    1999-11-01

    The passage at Earth of the January 10-11, 1997, magnetic cloud induced a storm of moderate geomagnetic activity with Dst index reaching minimum values of about -83 nT. We study ring current formation during the early Bz negative phase of this magnetic cloud, using energetic particle data from three instruments on the Polar spacecraft and geosynchronous plasma data from the LANL spacecraft. We use our kinetic drift-loss model to simulate the evolution of ring current H+, He+, and O+ ion distributions and associated aeronomical effects during this period. The results from two Volland-Stern type magnetospheric electric field model formulations are compared: (1) Kp-dependent and (2) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) dependent. We demonstrate that while both electric field models reproduce well the main trends of ring current formation and decay during the storm, the IMF-dependent model reproduces the rapidity of the main storm growth phase and its strength better. Comparing model results during the main phase of the storm with HYDRA, TIMAS, and CAMMICE data we find that the model reproduces very well the ring current distributions near dawn. The formation of the nose event, i.e., the rise of the 10-30 keV energy particles near dusk due to abruptly increased convection is, however, overestimated by the model. We compute plasmaspheric heating through Coulomb collisions as the storm evolves and find that maximum heating occurs initially on the nightside near L~3.5 and subsequently moves earthward to L~2.75, in agreement with Millstone Hill radar observations of midlatitude electron temperature enhancement on January 10. However, the magnitude of the energy transferred to plasmaspheric electrons through Coulomb collisions appears to be not sufficient to yield the observed elevated electron temperature at ~0830 UT, suggesting that additional energy sources should be considered during this event.

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 suppresses profibrotic responses in fibroblasts from fibrotic lungs.

    PubMed

    Marudamuthu, Amarnath S; Shetty, Shwetha K; Bhandary, Yashodhar P; Karandashova, Sophia; Thompson, Michael; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Florova, Galina; Hogan, Taryn B; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Fu, Jian; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Idell, Steven; Shetty, Sreerama

    2015-04-10

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disease characterized by progressive interstitial scarification. A hallmark morphological lesion is the accumulation of myofibroblasts or fibrotic lung fibroblasts (FL-fibroblasts) in areas called fibroblastic foci. We previously demonstrated that the expression of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and the uPA receptor are elevated in FL-fibroblasts from the lungs of patients with IPF. FL-fibroblasts isolated from human IPF lungs and from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis showed an increased rate of proliferation compared with normal lung fibroblasts (NL-fibroblasts) derived from histologically "normal" lung. Basal expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in human and murine FL-fibroblasts was reduced, whereas collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin were markedly elevated. Conversely, alveolar type II epithelial cells surrounding the fibrotic foci in situ, as well as those isolated from IPF lungs, showed increased activation of caspase-3 and PAI-1 with a parallel reduction in uPA expression. Transduction of an adenovirus PAI-1 cDNA construct (Ad-PAI-1) suppressed expression of uPA and collagen-I and attenuated proliferation in FL-fibroblasts. On the contrary, inhibition of basal PAI-1 in NL-fibroblasts increased collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin. Fibroblasts isolated from PAI-1-deficient mice without lung injury also showed increased collagen-I and uPA. These changes were associated with increased Akt/phosphatase and tensin homolog proliferation/survival signals in FL-fibroblasts, which were reversed by transduction with Ad-PAI-1. This study defines a new role of PAI-1 in the control of fibroblast activation and expansion and its role in the pathogenesis of fibrosing lung disease and, in particular, IPF.

  8. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  9. Longan seed extract reduces hyperuricemia via modulating urate transporters and suppressing xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chien-Wei; Lee, Ying-Chung; Hung, Hsiao-Fang; Fu, Hua-Wen; Jeng, Kee-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Hyperuricemia causes gouty arthritis, kidney disease, heart disease, and other diseases. Xanthine oxidase (XOD) and urate transporters play important roles in urate homeostasis. Numerous plants have been identified as XOD inhibitors. Longan seeds are known to contain high levels of polyphenols such as corilagin, gallic acid and ellagic acid. We examined the effect of longan seed extract on XOD inhibition and urate transporters GLUT1 and GLUT9 using both in vitro and in vivo assays. The results showed that dried longan seed extract (LSE) and its active components inhibited XOD dose-dependently in vitro. LSE inhibited uric acid production and XOD activity in normal liver cells (clone-9 cells) and was not cytotoxic under the concentration of 200 μg/ml. For the in vivo study, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were given intraperitoneally for thirty minutes with or without allopurinol (a XOD inhibitor, 3.5 mg/kg) or LSE (80 mg/kg) and then injected intraperitioneally with 250 mg/kg of oxonic acid and 300 mg/kg of hypoxanthine intragastrically. LSE was able to reduce serum uric acid level and XOD activity in hyperuricemic rats. However, LSE or allopurinol did not inhibit the liver XOD activities. On the other hand, GLUT1 protein was suppressed in kidney and GLUT9 was induced in liver from experimental rats and LSE or allopurinol decreased GLUT9 but increased GLUT1 protein level in the liver and kidney, respectively. These results confirmed the claimed effect of longan seeds on gout and other complications and suggested that its urate reducing effect might be due to modulation of urate transporters and inhibition of circulating xanthine oxidase.

  10. Vesnarinone suppresses TNF-induced activation of NF-kappa B, c-Jun kinase, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Manna, S K; Aggarwal, B B

    2000-06-01

    Vesnarinone, a synthetic quinolinone derivative used in the treatment of cardiac failure, exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and cell growth regulatory properties. The mechanisms underlying these properties are not understood, but due to the critical role of nuclear transcription factor NF-kappa B in these responses, we hypothesized that vesnarinone must modulate NF-kappa B activation. We investigated the effect of vesnarinone on NF-kappa B activation induced by inflammatory agents. Vesnarinone blocked TNF-induced activation of NF-kappa B in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect was mediated through inhibition of phosphorylation and degradation of I kappa B alpha, an inhibitor of NF-kappa B. The effects of vesnarinone were not cell type specific, as it blocked TNF-induced NF-kappa B activation in a variety of cells. NF-kappa B-dependent reporter gene transcription activated by TNF was also suppressed by vesnarinone. The TNF-induced NF-kappa B activation cascade involving TNF receptor 1-TNF receptor associated death domain-TNF receptor associated factor 2 NF-kappa B-inducing kinase-IKK was interrupted at the TNF receptor associated factor 2 and NF-kappa B-inducing kinase sites by vesnarinone, thus suppressing NF-kappa B reporter gene expression. Vesnarinone also blocked NF-kappa B activation induced by several other inflammatory agents, inhibited the TNF-induced activation of transcription factor AP-1, and suppressed the TNF-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase. TNF-induced cytotoxicity, caspase activation, and lipid peroxidation were also abolished by vesnarinone. Overall, our results indicate that vesnarinone inhibits activation of NF-kappa B and AP-1 and their associated kinases. This may provide a molecular basis for vesnarinone's ability to suppress inflammation, immunomodulation, and growth regulation.

  11. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  12. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  13. Synthesis and biological activity of new (E)-alpha-(Methoxyimino)benzeneacetate derivatives containing a substituted pyrazole ring.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Liu, Chang-Ling; Yang, Ji-Chun; Zhang, Jin-Bo; Li, Zhi-Nian; Zhang, Hong; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2010-03-10

    Strobilurins are one of the most important classes of agricultural fungicides. To discover new strobilurin analogues with high activity, a series of new strobilurin derivatives containing a substituted pyrazole in the side chain were synthesized and their biological activities were tested. The compounds were identified by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and elemental analysis. The test results indicated that the compounds exhibited strong fungicidal activities against Pyricularia oryzae , Phytophthora infestans , Pseudoperonospora cubensis , and Erysiphe graminis . The relationship between structure and biological activity is discussed in terms of the effects of the substituents on the pyrazole ring. The present work demonstrates that strobilurin analogues with a 3-(substituted phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-5-oxy side chain can be used as possible lead compounds for the development of potential agrochemicals. PMID:19961182

  14. Sodium butyrate suppresses the transforming activity of an activated N-ras oncogene in human colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddart, J.H.; Niles, R.M. ); Lane, M.A. )

    1989-09-01

    The transforming activity of DNA from a newly established undifferentiated human colon carcinoma cell line (MIP-101) was tested in the NIH-3T3 transfection assay. Southern blot analysis of the transfectant DNA revealed the presence of a human N-ras oncogene. Here the authors report that there is a significant reduction in the transforming efficiency of the DNA from butyrate-treated MIP-101 cells. A nonspecific reduction in total DNA uptake as an explanation for these findings was eliminated by showing that there was similar uptake and expression of the thymidine kinase gene from the DNA of butyrate-treated and control MIP cells. An NIH-3T3 transformant carrying the human N-ras gene was evaluated for phenotypic reversion and DNA transforming ability after treatment with sodium butyrate. Although butyrate suppressed several transformed properties similar to MIP-101 cells, DNA from control and treated cultures had an identical level of transforming activity. The results suggest that the environment of the MIP cells may contain additional elements not present in the NIH-3T3 transformants which are required to observe the effect of butyrate on reduction of transforming activity.

  15. Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tetramethylpyrazine Is Mediated through Suppression of NF-k

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Weixiong; Zhu, Jinshui; Chen, Niwei; Lu, Yunmin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of tetramethlpyrazine on oxazolone-induced colitis mice. Spleen mononuclear cells (SMC), lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from oxazolone-induced colitis and normal mice. The colitis cells treated by oxazolone were randomly divided into model, low dose, middle dose and high dose groups treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/L tetramethlpyrazine, respectively. The apoptotic rate of SMC and LPMC in the oxazolone-induced group was lower than that in the normal group. Compared with model group, apoptotic rate of SMC was significantly increased in the high dose group, while the apoptotic rate of LPMC in the middle dose group was increased. Compared with SMC, LPMC and PBMC of normal group, the mRNA level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), transcription factor-activated protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) were higher in model group. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibited the increase of NF-kB, AP-1 and NF-AT mRNA induced by oxazolone. For SMC, LPMC and PBMC there was significant difference in the mRNA level of AP-1 among the three different doses of tetramethylpyrazine treated groups. However, no significant difference was observed in the mRNA levels of NF-AT and NF-κB between normal and middle groups. Tetramethylpyrazine promoted the apoptotic rate of SMC and LPMC in-vitro, and suppressed the expression of transcription factors in SMC, LPMC and PBMC isolated from oxazolone-induced colitis mice. The study provides a novel insight into the mechanism behind the effect of etramethylpyrazine on colitis. PMID:27610159

  16. Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tetramethylpyrazine Is Mediated through Suppression of NF-k.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Weixiong; Zhu, Jinshui; Chen, Niwei; Lu, Yunmin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of tetramethlpyrazine on oxazolone-induced colitis mice. Spleen mononuclear cells (SMC), lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from oxazolone-induced colitis and normal mice. The colitis cells treated by oxazolone were randomly divided into model, low dose, middle dose and high dose groups treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/L tetramethlpyrazine, respectively. The apoptotic rate of SMC and LPMC in the oxazolone-induced group was lower than that in the normal group. Compared with model group, apoptotic rate of SMC was significantly increased in the high dose group, while the apoptotic rate of LPMC in the middle dose group was increased. Compared with SMC, LPMC and PBMC of normal group, the mRNA level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), transcription factor-activated protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) were higher in model group. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibited the increase of NF-kB, AP-1 and NF-AT mRNA induced by oxazolone. For SMC, LPMC and PBMC there was significant difference in the mRNA level of AP-1 among the three different doses of tetramethylpyrazine treated groups. However, no significant difference was observed in the mRNA levels of NF-AT and NF-κB between normal and middle groups. Tetramethylpyrazine promoted the apoptotic rate of SMC and LPMC in-vitro, and suppressed the expression of transcription factors in SMC, LPMC and PBMC isolated from oxazolone-induced colitis mice. The study provides a novel insight into the mechanism behind the effect of etramethylpyrazine on colitis. PMID:27610159

  17. Tuning the size of a redox-active tetrathiafulvalene-based self-assembled ring

    PubMed Central

    Bivaud, Sébastien; Croué, Vincent; Allain, Magali; Pop, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of a new Pd coordination-driven self-assembled ring M6L3 constructed from a concave tetrapyridyl π-extended tetrathiafulvalene ligand (exTTF) is described. The same ligand is also able to self-assemble in a M4L2 mode as previously described. Herein, we demonstrate that the bulkiness of the ancillary groups in the Pd complex allows for modulating the size and the shape of the resulting discrete self-assembly, which therefore incorporate two (M4L2) or three (M6L3) electroactive exTTF sidewalls. PMID:26124899

  18. Antitumor activity of 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde for human colon cancer cells through suppression of β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ai; Park, Hyen Joo; Chung, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Won Kyung; Lee, Sang Kook

    2013-07-26

    The antiproliferative and antitumor activities of 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (1), a phenylpropanoid isolated from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia, were investigated using human colorectal cancer cells. Compound 1 exhibited antiproliferative effects in HCT116 colon cancer cells, accompanied by modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin cell signaling pathway. This substance was found also to inhibit β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigations in human colon cancer cells with aberrantly activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling showed that 1 significantly suppressed the binding of β-catenin/TCF complexes to their specific genomic targets in the nucleus and led to the down-regulation of Wnt target genes such as c-myc and cyclin D1. In an in vivo xenograft model, the intraperitoneal administration of 1 (10 or 20 mg/kg body weight, three times/week) for four weeks suppressed tumor growth in athymic nude mice implanted with HCT116 colon cancer cells significantly, without any apparent toxicity. In an ex vivo biochemical analysis of the tumors, compound 1 was also found to suppress Wnt target genes associated with tumor growth including β-catenin, c-myc, cyclin D1, and survivin. The suppression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a plausible mechanism of action underlying the antiproliferative and antitumor activity of 1 in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:23855266

  19. DNA interaction, antitumor and antimicrobial activities of three-dimensional chitosan ring produced from the body segments of a diplopod.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Akyuz, Bahar; Bulut, Esra; Sargin, Idris; Tan, Gamze; Erdonmez, Demet; Maheta, Mansi; Satkauskas, Saulius; Mickevičius, Saulius

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available chitins and the chitin isolated from mushrooms, insect cuticles, shells of shrimp, crab and crayfish reported in the literature are in forms of powder, flake or granule. Three-dimensional chitins have been only known from the sponges but still three-dimensional chitosan has not been reported yet. In this study, we produced three-dimensional chitin and chitosan rings from the body segments of a diplopod species (Julus terrestris). Obtained chitin and chitosan rings were characterized (by FT-IR, SEM, TGA, XRD, dilute solution viscometry and EA) and compared with commercial chitin and chitosan. The interactions with plasmid DNA was studied at varying concentrations of chitosan (0.04, 0.4 and 4mg/mL). Antitumor activity tests were conducted (L929 and HeLa), low cytotoxicity and high antiproliferative activity was observed. Antimicrobial activities of J. terrestris chitosan were investigated on twelve microorganisms and maximum inhibition (15.6±1.154mm) was recorded for common human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:27112853

  20. DNA interaction, antitumor and antimicrobial activities of three-dimensional chitosan ring produced from the body segments of a diplopod.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Akyuz, Bahar; Bulut, Esra; Sargin, Idris; Tan, Gamze; Erdonmez, Demet; Maheta, Mansi; Satkauskas, Saulius; Mickevičius, Saulius

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available chitins and the chitin isolated from mushrooms, insect cuticles, shells of shrimp, crab and crayfish reported in the literature are in forms of powder, flake or granule. Three-dimensional chitins have been only known from the sponges but still three-dimensional chitosan has not been reported yet. In this study, we produced three-dimensional chitin and chitosan rings from the body segments of a diplopod species (Julus terrestris). Obtained chitin and chitosan rings were characterized (by FT-IR, SEM, TGA, XRD, dilute solution viscometry and EA) and compared with commercial chitin and chitosan. The interactions with plasmid DNA was studied at varying concentrations of chitosan (0.04, 0.4 and 4mg/mL). Antitumor activity tests were conducted (L929 and HeLa), low cytotoxicity and high antiproliferative activity was observed. Antimicrobial activities of J. terrestris chitosan were investigated on twelve microorganisms and maximum inhibition (15.6±1.154mm) was recorded for common human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

  1. DYNAMO Convective System Structure During Active and Suppressed Phases of the MJO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, D. P.; Guy, N.; Chen, S. S.; Wang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the DYNAMO project (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation -MJO) are to better understand the structure of convective cloud systems and their large-scale environment in the MJO region to improve MJO forecasts within the climate-system models. During the MJO field campaign of 2011-12 (CINDY2011-DYNAMO-AMIE-LASP) one of the NOAA P-3 instrumented aircraft was deployed to Diego Garcia, a small island in the British Indian Ocean Territories, to gather data on cloud systems within the DYNAMO domain. In particular, the vertically scanning tail-mounted X-band radar and GPS dropwindsones, are used to document the structures of various mesoscale convective systems (MCS) observed during phases of the MJO. An overview of the convective structures seen during the project will be given and a few selected case studies will be presented to illustrate typical MCS structures seen in the airborne Doppler and dropsonde data sets. Bulk characteristics of MCSs in various MJO phases will be shown such as reflectivity and airflow relative to convective features, the depth and strength of near-surface cold pools from dropsonde data, and typical environmental proximity soundings of the MCSs. From a statistical viewpoint, various contoured frequency by altitude diagrams of reflectivity and vertical velocity derived from the 3-D Doppler winds will be shown that will characterize the convective systems in suppressed and active phases of the MJO.

  2. Macrolide analog F806 suppresses esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by blocking β1 integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Yan; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Yang-Min; Liao, Lian-Di; Cao, Hui-Hui; Xu, Xiu-E; Chen, Bo; Zeng, Fa-Min; Zhang, Ying-Li; Du, Ze-Peng; Chen, Hong; Huang, Wei; Jia, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Xie, Jian-Jun; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2015-06-30

    The paucity of new drugs for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) limits the treatment options. This study characterized the therapeutic efficacy and action mechanism of a novel natural macrolide compound F806 in human ESCC xenograft models and cell lines. F806 inhibited growth of ESCC, most importantly, it displayed fewer undesirable side effects on normal tissues in two human ESCC xenograft models. F806 inhibited proliferation of six ESCC cells lines, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging from 9.31 to 16.43 μM. Furthermore, F806 induced apoptosis of ESCC cells, contributing to its growth-inhibitory effect. Also, F806 inhibited cell adhesion resulting in anoikis. Mechanistic studies revealed that F806 inhibited the activation of β1 integrin in part by binding to a novel site Arg610 of β1 integrin, suppressed focal adhesion formation, decreased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and eventually triggered apoptosis. We concluded that F806 would potentially be a well-tolerated anticancer drug by targeting β1 integrin, resulting in anoikis in ESCC cells.

  3. Neuronal TRPV1 activation regulates alveolar bone resorption by suppressing osteoclastogenesis via CGRP.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuda, Yumi; Sato, Keisuke; de Jong, Petrus R; Bertin, Samuel; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is abundantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons where it acts as an important polymodal cellular sensor for heat, acidic pH, capsaicin, and other noxious stimuli. The oral cavity is densely innervated by afferent sensory neurons and is a highly specialized organ that protects against infections as well as physical, chemical, and thermal stresses in its capacity as the first part of the digestive system. While the function of TRPV1 in sensory neurons has been intensively studied in other organs, its physiological role in periodontal tissues is unclear. In this study we found that Trpv1(-/-) mice developed severe bone loss in an experimental model of periodontitis. Chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons recapitulated the phenotype of Trpv1(-/-) mice, suggesting a functional link between neuronal TRPV1 signaling and periodontal bone loss. TRPV1 activation in gingival nerves induced production of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and CGRP treatment inhibited osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Oral administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, suppressed ligature-induced bone loss in mice with fewer tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone. These results suggest that neuronal TRPV1 signaling in periodontal tissue is crucial for the regulation of osteoclastogenesis via the neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27388773

  4. Activation and suppression of the trapezius muscle induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Jahns, R

    1998-01-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and silent periods (SPs) in the trapezius muscle induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were investigated in 15 healthy subjects. Stimuli were applied with a Novametrix Magnetic stimulator using a 14 cm circular coil 4 cm lateral to the vertex on the biauricular line. Surface electrodes were used for simultaneous bilateral electromyographic recordings of the trapezius. TMS invariably induced contralateral MEPs (latency 10.5 +/- 1.3 ms, mean +/- SD), with ipsilateral responses in 53% of the subjects (latency 11.1 +/- 2.5 ms). The mean duration of the SPs was approximately 90 ms on both sides. There were no significant side differences between any of the MEP or SP parameters. To study the influence of subcortical inhibition phenomena TMS induced responses were assessed following electrical mental nerve stimulation with interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 0-100 ms. MEP latencies significantly increased at ISI of 10-100 ms, whereas MEP amplitudes and SPs did not change. These findings may reflect a trigeminal induced exteroceptive suppression of trapezius muscle activity. PMID:9637939

  5. Neuronal TRPV1 activation regulates alveolar bone resorption by suppressing osteoclastogenesis via CGRP

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuda, Yumi; Sato, Keisuke; de Jong, Petrus R.; Bertin, Samuel; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is abundantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons where it acts as an important polymodal cellular sensor for heat, acidic pH, capsaicin, and other noxious stimuli. The oral cavity is densely innervated by afferent sensory neurons and is a highly specialized organ that protects against infections as well as physical, chemical, and thermal stresses in its capacity as the first part of the digestive system. While the function of TRPV1 in sensory neurons has been intensively studied in other organs, its physiological role in periodontal tissues is unclear. In this study we found that Trpv1−/− mice developed severe bone loss in an experimental model of periodontitis. Chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons recapitulated the phenotype of Trpv1−/− mice, suggesting a functional link between neuronal TRPV1 signaling and periodontal bone loss. TRPV1 activation in gingival nerves induced production of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and CGRP treatment inhibited osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Oral administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, suppressed ligature-induced bone loss in mice with fewer tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone. These results suggest that neuronal TRPV1 signaling in periodontal tissue is crucial for the regulation of osteoclastogenesis via the neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27388773

  6. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-04-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN-RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  7. MUC1 oncoprotein suppresses activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Deepak; Ahmad, Rehan; Chen, Dongshu; Kumar, Shailendra; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The MUC1 oncoprotein interacts with the c-Abl tyrosine kinase and blocks nuclear targeting of c-Abl in the apoptotic response to DNA damage. Mutation of the MUC1 cytoplasmic domain at Tyr-60 disrupts the MUC1-c-Abl interaction. The present results demonstrate that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant is a potent inducer of the ARF tumor suppressor. MUC1(Y60F) induces transcription of the ARF locus by a c-Abl-dependent mechanism that promotes CUL-4A-mediated nuclear export of the replication protein Cdc6. The functional significance of these findings is that MUC1(Y60F)-induced ARF expression and thereby inhibition of MDM2 results in the upregulation of p53 and the homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) serine/threonine kinase. HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-46 was further associated with a shift from expression of the cell cycle arrest-related p21 gene to the apoptosis-related PUMA gene. We also show that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant functions as dominant negative inhibitor of tumorigenicity. These findings indicate that the oncogenic function of MUC1 is conferred by suppressing activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. PMID:18981727

  8. Highly active antiretroviral therapy potently suppresses HIV infection in humanized Rag2-/-gammac-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Sango, Kaori; Joseph, Aviva; Patel, Mahesh; Osiecki, Kristin; Dutta, Monica; Goldstein, Harris

    2010-07-01

    Humanized Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice (Hu-DKO mice) become populated with functional human T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells following transplantation with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and represent an improved model for studying HIV infection in vivo. In the current study we demonstrated that intrasplenic inoculation of hu-DKO mice with HIV-1 initiated a higher level of HIV infection than intravenous or intraperitoneal inoculation, associated with a reciprocal decrease in peripheral CD4(+) T cells and increase in peripheral CD8(+) T cells. HIV infection by intrasplenic injection increased serum levels of human IgG and IgM including human IgM and IgG specific for HIV-1 gp120. There was a significant inverse correlation between the level of HIV-1 infection and the extent of CD4(+) T cell depletion. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiated 1 week after HIV-1 inoculation markedly suppressed HIV-1 infection and prevented CD4(+) T cell depletion. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that intrasplenic injection of hu-DKO mice with HIV is a more efficient route of HIV infection than intravenous or intraperitoneal injection and generates increased infection associated with an increased anti-HIV humoral response. This animal model can serve as a valuable in vivo model to study the efficacy of anti-HIV therapies.

  9. miR-203 downregulates Yes-1 and suppresses oncogenic activity in human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seul-Ah; Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Chun, Hong Sung; Kim, Jeongsun; Park, Jong-Tae; Go, Daesan; Kim, Do Kyung

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of microRNA-203 (miR-203) as a tumor suppressor in KB human oral cancer cells. MicroRNA microarray results showed that the expression of miR-203 was significantly down-regulated in KB cells compared with normal human oral keratinocytes. The viability of KB cells was decreased by miR-203 in the time- and dose-dependent manners. In addition, over-expressed miR-203 not only increased the nuclear condensation but also significantly increased the apoptotic population of KB cells. These results indicated that the over-expression of miR-203 induced apoptosis of KB cells. Furthermore, the target gene array analyses revealed that the expression of Yes-1, a member of the Src family kinases (SFKs), was significantly down-regulated by miR-203 in KB cells. Moreover, both the mRNA and protein levels of Yes-1 were strongly reduced in KB cells transfected with miR-203. Therefore, these results indicated that Yes-1 is predicted to be a potential target gene of miR-203. Through a luciferase activity assay, miR-203 was confirmed to directly targets the Yes-1 3' untranslated region (UTR) to suppress gene expression. Therefore, our findings indicate that miR-203 induces the apoptosis of KB cells by directly targeting Yes-1, suggesting its application in anti-cancer therapeutics.

  10. SIRT6 suppresses glioma cell growth via induction of apoptosis, inhibition of oxidative stress and suppression of JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Yan, Peng-Fei; Zhao, Hong-Yang; Zhang, Fang-Cheng; Zhao, Wo-Hua; Feng, Min

    2016-03-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a member of the mammalian NAD+‑dependent deacetylase sirtuin family that acts to maintain genomic stability and to repress genes. SIRT6 has recently been reported to be a tumor suppressor that controls cancer metabolism, although this effect of SIRT6 is still in dispute. Moreover, the role of SIRT6 in glioma is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that overexpression of SIRT6 using an adenovirus inhibited glioma cell growth and induced marked cell injury in two glioma cell lines (U87‑MG and T98G). Fluorescent terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TdT)‑mediated biotin‑16‑dUTP nick‑end labelling (TUNEL) assay showed that SIRT6 overexpression induced obvious apoptosis in the T98G glioma cells. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that SIRT6 overexpression promoted the mitochondrial-to‑nuclear translocation of apoptosis‑inducing factor (AIF), a potent apoptosis inducer. Moreover, we found that SIRT6 overexpression largely reduced oxidative stress and suppressed the activation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in glioma cells. Finally, we showed that SIRT6 mRNA and protein levels in human glioblastoma multiforme tissues were significantly lower than the levels in peritumor tissues. In summary, our data suggest that SIRT6 suppresses glioma cell growth via induction of apoptosis, inhibition of oxidative stress and inhibition of the activation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. These results indicate that SIRT6 may be a promising therapeutic target for glioma treatment. PMID:26648570

  11. Evidence of solar activity and El Niño signals in tree rings of Araucaria araucana and A. angustifolia in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perone, A.; Lombardi, F.; Marchetti, M.; Tognetti, R.; Lasserre, B.

    2016-10-01

    Tree rings reveal climatic variations through years, but also the effect of solar activity in influencing the climate on a large scale. In order to investigate the role of solar cycles on climatic variability and to analyse their influences on tree growth, we focused on tree-ring chronologies of Araucaria angustifolia and Araucaria araucana in four study areas: Irati and Curitiba in Brazil, Caviahue in Chile, and Tolhuaca in Argentina. We obtained an average tree-ring chronology of 218, 117, 439, and 849 years for these areas, respectively. Particularly, the older chronologies also included the period of the Maunder and Dalton minima. To identify periodicities and trends observable in tree growth, the time series were analysed using spectral, wavelet and cross-wavelet techniques. Analysis based on the Multitaper method of annual growth rates identified 2 cycles with periodicities of 11 (Schwebe cycle) and 5.5 years (second harmonic of Schwebe cycle). In the Chilean and Argentinian sites, significant agreement between the time series of tree rings and the 11-year solar cycle was found during the periods of maximum solar activity. Results also showed oscillation with periods of 2-7 years, probably induced by local environmental variations, and possibly also related to the El-Niño events. Moreover, the Morlet complex wavelet analysis was applied to study the most relevant variability factors affecting tree-ring time series. Finally, we applied the cross-wavelet spectral analysis to evaluate the time lags between tree-ring and sunspot-number time series, as well as for the interaction between tree rings, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) and temperature and precipitation. Trees sampled in Chile and Argentina showed more evident responses of fluctuations in tree-ring time series to the variations of short and long periodicities in comparison with the Brazilian ones. These results provided new evidence on the solar activity-climate pattern-tree ring connections over

  12. The fate and efficacy of benomyl applied to field soils to suppress activity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patrick; Manjarrez, Maria; Smith, Sally E

    2009-07-01

    A systematic application of the fungicide benomyl was used to follow up the suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and to determine its fungitoxic activity and persistence at different depths. Repeated applications of benomyl reduced AM colonization mainly in the upper 0-4 cm layer of the treated soils. Furthermore, AM colonization decreased with soil depth. The activity and persistence of this fungicide was reduced over small changes in depth in the first 10 cm of the soil profile beneath a semiarid herbland at Brookfield Conservation Park (South Australia). Repeated applications of the fungicide only slightly increased the levels of toxicity in the soils, probably because of biodegradation of the fungicide in soils with a recent history of exposure to the fungicide. The decline in fungicide activity at depth was correlated with a decline in the suppressive effect of the fungicide on the activity of AM fungi.

  13. Activation of mesenchymal stem cells by macrophages promotes tumor progression through immune suppressive effects

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-hua; Feng, Guo-wei; Wang, Zhong-liang; Du, Yang; Shen, Chen; Hui, Hui; Peng, Dong; Li, Zong-jin; Kong, De-ling; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development and progression is linked to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Distinct TAMs subsets perform either protective or pathogenic effects in cancer. A protective role in carcinogenesis has been described for M1 macrophages, which activate antitumor mechanisms. By comparison, TAMs isolated from solid and metastatic tumors have a suppressive M2-like phenotype, which could support multiple aspects of tumor progression. Currently, it has not been clearly understood how macrophages in tumor-associated stroma could be hijacked to support tumor growth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) actively interact with components of the innate immune system and display both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory effects. Here, we tested whether MSCs could favor the tumor to escape from immunologic surveillance in the presence of M1 macrophages. We found that MSCs educated by M1 condition medium (cMSCs) possessed a greatly enhanced ability in promoting tumor growth in vivo. Examination of cytokines/chemokines showed that the cMSCs acquired a regulatory profile, which expressed high levels of iNOS and MCP1. Consistent with an elevated MCP1 expression in cMSCs, the tumor-promoting effect of the cMSCs depended on MCP1 mediated macrophage recruitment to tumor sites. Furthermore, IL-6 secreted by the cMSCs could polarize infiltrated TAMs into M2-like macrophages. Therefore, when macrophages changed into M1 pro-inflammation type in tumor microenvironment, the MSCs would act as poor sensors and switchers to accelerate tumor growth. PMID:26988913

  14. Heat transfer model to characterize the focal cooling necessary to suppress spontaneous epileptiform activity (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Reynaldo G.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Garcia, Paul A.; Rubinsky, Boris; Berger, Mitchel

    2005-04-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by paroxysmal transient disturbances of the electrical activity of the brain. Symptoms are manifested as impairment of motor, sensory, or psychic function with or without loss of consciousness or convulsive seizures. This paper presents an initial post-operative heat transfer analysis of surgery performed on a 41 year-old man with medically intractable Epilepsy. The surgery involved tumor removal and the resection of adjacent epileptogenic tissue. Electrocorticography was performed before resection. Cold saline was applied to the resulting interictal spike foci resulting in transient, complete cessation of spiking. A transient one dimensional semi-infinite finite element model of the surface of the brain was developed to simulate the surgery. An approximate temperature distribution of the perfused brain was developed by applying the bioheat equation. The model quantifies the surface heat flux reached in achieving seizure cessation to within an order of magnitude. Rat models have previously shown that the brain surface temperature range to rapidly terminate epileptogenic activity is 20-24°C. The developed model predicts that a constant heat flux of approximately -13,000W/m2, applied at the surface of the human brain, would achieve a surface temperature in this range in approximately 3 seconds. A parametric study was subsequently performed to characterize the effects of brain metabolism and brain blood perfusion as a function of the determined heat flux. The results of these findings can be used as a first approximation in defining the specifications of a cooling device to suppress seizures in human models.

  15. Nuclear heparanase-1 activity suppresses melanoma progression via its DNA-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Gorzelanny, C; Bauer, A T; Halter, N; Komljenovic, D; Bäuerle, T; Borsig, L; Roblek, M; Schneider, S W

    2015-11-19

    Heparanase-1 (HPSE) plays a pivotal role in structural remodeling of the ECM and the glycocalyx, thus conferring protumorigenic, proangiogenic and prometastatic properties to many cancer entities. In addition to its extracellular function, recent studies suggest an intracellular activity of HPSE with a largely unknown significance during tumor progression. Therefore, we investigated the relevance of the dual functions of HPSE to malignant melanoma in vitro, as well as in different mouse melanoma models based on the intradermal or intravenous injection of melanoma cells. Consistent with its extracellular action, an HPSE deficiency led to a reduced shedding of the glycocalyx accompanied by a reduced availability of vascular endothelial growth factor, affecting tumor growth and vascularization. In contrast, we measured an elevated expression of the protumorigenic factors pentraxin-3, tissue factor, TNF-α and most prominently, MMP-9, upon HPSE knockdown. In vivo, an HPSE deficiency was related to increased lymph node metastasis. Since the inhibition of its extracellular function with heparin was unable to block the gene regulatory impact of HPSE, we proposed an intracellular mechanism. Immunostaining revealed a counter-staining of HPSE and NF-κB in the nucleus, suggesting a close relationship between both proteins. This finding was further supported by the discovery of a direct charge-driven molecular interaction between HPSE and DNA by using atomic force microscopy and a co-precipitation approach. Our findings are novel and point towards a dual function for HPSE in malignant melanoma with a protumorigenic extracellular activity and a tumor-suppressive nuclear action. The identification of molecular strategies to shuttle extracellular HPSE into the nuclei of cancer cells could provide new therapeutic options. PMID:25745999

  16. Chronic hypoxia suppresses pregnancy-induced upregulation of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel activity in uterine arteries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang-Qun; Xiao, Daliao; Zhu, Ronghui; Huang, Xiaohui; Yang, Shumei; Wilson, Sean M; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-07-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that increased Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel activity played a key role in the normal adaptation of reduced myogenic tone of uterine arteries in pregnancy. The present study tested the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia during gestation inhibits pregnancy-induced upregulation of BK(Ca) channel function in uterine arteries. Resistance-sized uterine arteries were isolated from nonpregnant and near-term pregnant sheep maintained at sea level (≈ 300 m) or exposed to high-altitude (3801 m) hypoxia for 110 days. Hypoxia during gestation significantly inhibited pregnancy-induced upregulation of BK(Ca) channel activity and suppressed BK(Ca) channel current density in pregnant uterine arteries. This was mediated by a selective downregulation of BK(Ca) channel β1 subunit in the uterine arteries. In accordance, hypoxia abrogated the role of the BK(Ca) channel in regulating pressure-induced myogenic tone of uterine arteries that was significantly elevated in pregnant animals acclimatized to chronic hypoxia. In addition, hypoxia abolished the steroid hormone-mediated increase in the β1 subunit and BK(Ca) channel current density observed in nonpregnant uterine arteries. Although the activation of protein kinase C inhibited BK(Ca) channel current density in pregnant uterine arteries of normoxic sheep, this effect was ablated in the hypoxic animals. The results demonstrate that selectively targeting BK(Ca) channel β1 subunit plays a critical role in the maladaption of uteroplacental circulation caused by chronic hypoxia, which contributes to the increased incidence of preeclampsia and fetal intrauterine growth restriction associated with gestational hypoxia. PMID:22665123

  17. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecific potassium channel blocker (tetraethylammonium chloride [TEA]), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine [L-NMMA]), and a store-operated calcium entry inhibitor (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-APB]). Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation was also completely abolished by an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase, which suggests that the Pro C1 effects observed involved cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. Interestingly, Pro C1 significantly enhanced basal cGMP levels. Taken together, these results indicate that Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation is associated with the activation of the calcium-dependent NO/cGMP pathway, involving potassium channel activation. Thus, Pro C1 may represent a novel and potentially therapeutically relevant compound for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24971771

  18. Cancer-associated fibroblast suppresses killing activity of natural killer cells through downregulation of poliovirus receptor (PVR/CD155), a ligand of activating NK receptor

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tomoko; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Kawana, Kei; Taguchi, Ayumi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Asaha; Tomio, Kensuke; Yamashita, Aki; Eguchi, Satoko; Nishida, Haruka; Nakamura, Hiroe; Sato, Masakazu; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Arimoto, Takahide; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play an important role in cancer expansion and progression in tumor microenvironment (TME), via both direct and indirect interactions. Natural killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in anticancer immunity. We investigated the inhibitory effects of CAFs on NK cell activity. CAFs were isolated from endometrial cancer tissue, while normal endometrial fibroblasts (NEFs) were obtained from normal endometrium with no pathological abnormality. NK cells were obtained from allogenic healthy volunteers. CAFs or NEFs were co-cultured at an NK/fibroblast ratio of 1:1 with or without inserted membrane. For NK cell activity, K562 cells were cultured as target cells. NK cell-killing activity was determined by calculating the ratio of PI-positive K562 cells in the presence of NK cells co-cultured with fibroblasts versus NK cells alone. To examine whether NK cell activity was suppressed by IDO pathway, we inhibited IDO activity using the IDO inhibitor 1-MT. We demonstrated that CAFs derived from endometrial cancer induced greater suppression of the killing activity of allogenic NK cells compared with normal endometrial fibroblasts (NEFs). The suppression of NK cell activity by CAFs was inhibited when a membrane was inserted between the CAFs and NK cells, but not by 1-MT, an inhibitor of IDO. We focused on receptor-ligand interactions between CAFs and NK cell and found that cell-surface poliovirus receptor (PVR/CD155), a ligand of activating NK receptor DNAM-1, was downregulated in the CAFs compared with NEFs. To confirm whether PVR downregulation results in the decrease of NK cell-killing activity, PVR expression in NEFs was knocked down using siRNA against PVR (PVRsi). NK cell activity was suppressed by co-culture with PVR-knockdown NEFs, to a similar extent than CAF-induced suppression. CAFs showed increased suppression of NK cell-killing activity compared with NEFs, due to decreased PVR cell surface expression, a ligand of an NK activating

  19. Synthesis of macrolones with central piperazine ring in the linker and its influence on antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kapić, Samra; Cipčić Paljetak, Hana; Palej Jakopović, Ivana; Fajdetić, Andrea; Ilijaš, Marina; Stimac, Vlado; Brajša, Karmen; Holmes, David J; Berge, John; Alihodžić, Sulejman

    2011-12-01

    Three macrolides, clarithromycin, azithromycin and 11-O-Me-azithromycin have been selected for the construction of a series of new macrolone derivatives. Quinolone-linker intermediates are prepared by Sonogashira-type C(6)-alkynylation of 6-iodoquinolone precursors. The final macrolones, differing by macrolide moiety and substituents at the position N-1 of the quinolone or by the presence of an ethyl ester or free acid on the quinolone unit attached via a linker. The linker comprises of a central piperazine ring bonded to the 4″-O position of cladinose by 3-carbon ester or ether functionality. Modifications of the linker did not improve antibacterial properties compared to the previously reported macrolone compounds. Linker flexibility seems to play an important role for potency against macrolide resistant respiratory pathogens.

  20. Suppression of fibroblast proliferation by activated macrophages: involvement of H2O2 and a non-prostaglandin E product of the cyclooxygenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Z; Hoffeld, J T; Oppenheim, J J

    1986-07-01

    Macrophages are considered promoters of fibroblast proliferation; however, suppression by activated macrophages may outweigh this effect. Activated murine peritoneal macrophages obtained by in vivo exposure to C. parvum or by in vitro LPS-activation of thioglycollate-induced macrophages, were tested for their effect on normal syngeneic dermal fibroblasts. C. parvum-activated macrophages, but not resident peritoneal macrophages suppressed fibroblast proliferation. Similarly, macrophages activated in vitro by LPS, but not those unexposed to LPS, suppressed fibroblast proliferation. Catalase partially protected fibroblasts from suppression by either activated macrophage population, suggesting involvement of H2O2 in the suppression. The effect of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on the suppression was also tested. Indomethacin, acetylsalicyclic acid, or eicosatetraynoic acid, all partially protected the fibroblasts from macrophage-mediated suppression. Prostaglandins E2, E1, and F2 alpha, added exogenously at concentrations as high as 10(-6) M, failed to suppress the proliferation of the fibroblasts. These findings suggest that a non-prostaglandin product of the cyclooxygenase pathway is involved in macrophage-mediated suppression of fibroblast proliferation.

  1. Pathological glycogenesis through glycogen synthase 1 and suppression of excessive AMP kinase activity in myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, H; Reddy, M M; Nonami, A; Weisberg, E L; Bonal, D; Kirschmeier, P T; Salgia, S; Podar, K; Galinsky, I; Chowdary, T K; Neuberg, D; Tonon, G; Stone, R M; Asara, J; Griffin, J D; Sattler, M

    2015-07-01

    The rapid proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells is highly dependent on increased glucose metabolism. Through an unbiased metabolomics analysis of leukemia cells, we found that the glycogenic precursor UDP-D-glucose is pervasively upregulated, despite low glycogen levels. Targeting the rate-limiting glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) not only decreased glycolytic flux but also increased activation of the glycogen-responsive AMP kinase (AMPK), leading to significant growth suppression. Further, genetic and pharmacological hyper-activation of AMPK was sufficient to induce the changes observed with GYS1 targeting. Cancer genomics data also indicate that elevated levels of the glycogenic enzymes GYS1/2 or GBE1 (glycogen branching enzyme 1) are associated with poor survival in AML. These results suggest a novel mechanism whereby leukemic cells sustain aberrant proliferation by suppressing excess AMPK activity through elevated glycogenic flux and provide a therapeutic entry point for targeting leukemia cell metabolism.

  2. High resolution tree-ring based spatial reconstructions of snow avalanche activity in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pederson, Gregory T.; Reardon, Blase; Caruso, C.J.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    Effective design of avalanche hazard mitigation measures requires long-term records of natural avalanche frequency and extent. Such records are also vital for determining whether natural avalanche frequency and extent vary over time due to climatic or biophysical changes. Where historic records are lacking, an accepted substitute is a chronology developed from tree-ring responses to avalanche-induced damage. This study evaluates a method for using tree-ring chronologies to provide spatially explicit differentiations of avalanche frequency and temporally explicit records of avalanche extent that are often lacking. The study area - part of John F. Stevens Canyon on the southern border of Glacier National Park – is within a heavily used railroad and highway corridor with two dozen active avalanche paths. Using a spatially geo-referenced network of avalanche-damaged trees (n=109) from a single path, we reconstructed a 96-year tree-ring based chronology of avalanche extent and frequency. Comparison of the chronology with historic records revealed that trees recorded all known events as well as the same number of previously unidentified events. Kriging methods provided spatially explicit estimates of avalanche return periods. Estimated return periods for the entire avalanche path averaged 3.2 years. Within this path, return intervals ranged from ~2.3 yrs in the lower track, to ~9-11 yrs and ~12 to >25 yrs in the runout zone, where the railroad and highway are located. For avalanche professionals, engineers, and transportation managers this technique proves a powerful tool in landscape risk assessment and decision making.

  3. Osthole decreases renal ischemia-reperfusion injury by suppressing JAK2/STAT3 signaling activation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lin-Na; Xie, De Qiong; Zhang, Xiao Gang; Jiang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major cause of acute kidney injury. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying renal I/R injury involve inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Osthole is a coumarin derivative that exhibits potential anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of osthole in renal I/R injury and its underlying mechanism. Renal I/R injury was induced by clamping the left renal artery for 45 min followed by 24 h reperfusion with the contralateral nephrectomy. A total of 70 rats were randomly assigned to seven groups (n=10 per group): Sham; IRI; and osthole (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) groups. Rats were administered intraperitoneally with osthole 45 min prior to renal ischemia. Serum and renal tissue were harvested 24 h after reperfusion. Renal function and histological changes were assessed. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in renal tissue and serum were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ELISA assays, respectively. The protein expression levels of p65, p-p65, janus kinase 2 (JAK2), p-JAK2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and p-STAT3 were measured using western blot analysis. The results indicate that osthole pretreatment was able to significantly attenuate the renal dysfunction in a dose-dependent manner, histological changes and the expression of TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, p-JAK2, p-STAT3 and p-p65 induced by renal I/R injury. However, neither osthole or I/R injury affected the expression p65, JAK2 and STAT3. Osthole pretreatment is able to reduce renal I/R injury by abrogating inflammation and the mechanism is partially involved in suppressing JAK2/STAT3 activation. Thus, osthole may be a novel practical strategy for the mitigation of renal I/R injury. PMID:27698686

  4. Osthole decreases renal ischemia-reperfusion injury by suppressing JAK2/STAT3 signaling activation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lin-Na; Xie, De Qiong; Zhang, Xiao Gang; Jiang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major cause of acute kidney injury. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying renal I/R injury involve inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Osthole is a coumarin derivative that exhibits potential anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of osthole in renal I/R injury and its underlying mechanism. Renal I/R injury was induced by clamping the left renal artery for 45 min followed by 24 h reperfusion with the contralateral nephrectomy. A total of 70 rats were randomly assigned to seven groups (n=10 per group): Sham; IRI; and osthole (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) groups. Rats were administered intraperitoneally with osthole 45 min prior to renal ischemia. Serum and renal tissue were harvested 24 h after reperfusion. Renal function and histological changes were assessed. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in renal tissue and serum were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ELISA assays, respectively. The protein expression levels of p65, p-p65, janus kinase 2 (JAK2), p-JAK2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and p-STAT3 were measured using western blot analysis. The results indicate that osthole pretreatment was able to significantly attenuate the renal dysfunction in a dose-dependent manner, histological changes and the expression of TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, p-JAK2, p-STAT3 and p-p65 induced by renal I/R injury. However, neither osthole or I/R injury affected the expression p65, JAK2 and STAT3. Osthole pretreatment is able to reduce renal I/R injury by abrogating inflammation and the mechanism is partially involved in suppressing JAK2/STAT3 activation. Thus, osthole may be a novel practical strategy for the mitigation of renal I/R injury.

  5. hnRNP G elicits tumor-suppressive activity in part by upregulating the expression of Txnip

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ki-Hyuk Kim, Reuben H.; Kim, Roy H.; Kang, Mo K.; Park, No-Hee

    2008-08-08

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclearproteins (hnRNPs) are nucleic acid-binding proteins and have critical roles in DNA repair, telomere regulation, and transcriptional gene regulation. Previously, we showed that hnRNP G has tumor-suppressive activity in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Therefore, the identification of hnRNP G target genes is important for understanding the function of hnRNP G and its tumor-suppressive activity. In this study, we identify a known tumor suppressor gene, thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) gene as a novel target of hnRNP G. Expression of Txnip is upregulated by wild-type (wt) hnRNP G but not by a suppression-defective mutant hnRNP G (K22R) in human squamous cell carcinoma. Wt hnRNP G binds and transactivates the Txnip promoter in vivo, whereas the K22R mutant does not. Furthermore, overexpression of Txnip alone in cancer cells leads to the inhibition of anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumorigenicity in immunocompromised mice, suggesting a reversion of the transformation phenotype. These studies indicate that hnRNP G promotes the expression of Txnip and mediates its tumor-suppressive effect.

  6. Suppression of Langerhans cell activation is conserved amongst human papillomavirus α and β genotypes, but not a µ genotype.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Diane M; Movius, Carly A; Raff, Adam B; Brand, Heike E; Skeate, Joseph G; Wong, Michael K; Kast, W Martin

    2014-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has evolved mechanisms that allow it to evade the human immune system. Studies have shown HPV-mediated suppression of activation of Langerhans cells (LC) is a key mechanism through which HPV16 evades initial immune surveillance. However, it has not been established whether high- and low-risk mucosal and cutaneous HPV genotypes share a common mechanism of immune suppression. Here, we demonstrate that LC exposed to capsids of HPV types 18, 31, 45, 11, (alpha-papillomaviruses) and HPV5 (beta-papillomavirus) similarly suppress LC activation, including lack of costimulatory molecule expression, lack of cytokine and chemokine secretion, lack of migration, and deregulated cellular signaling. In contrast, HPV1 (mu-papillomavirus) induced costimulatory molecule and cytokine upregulation, but LC migration and cellular signaling was suppressed. These results suggest that alpha and beta HPV genotypes, and partially a mu genotype, share a conserved mechanism of immune escape that enables these viruses to remain undetected in the absence of other inflammatory events.

  7. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  8. Olesoxime suppresses calpain activation and mutant huntingtin fragmentation in the BACHD rat.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Laura E; Weber, Jonasz J; Wlodkowski, Tanja T; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Michaud, Magali; Calaminus, Carsten; Eckert, Schamim H; Gaca, Janett; Weiss, Andreas; Magg, Janine C D; Jansson, Erik K H; Eckert, Gunter P; Pichler, Bernd J; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu P

    2015-12-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal human neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which translates into a mutant huntingtin protein. A key event in the molecular pathogenesis of Huntington's disease is the proteolytic cleavage of mutant huntingtin, leading to the accumulation of toxic protein fragments. Mutant huntingtin cleavage has been linked to the overactivation of proteases due to mitochondrial dysfunction and calcium derangements. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of olesoxime, a mitochondria-targeting, neuroprotective compound, in the BACHD rat model of Huntington's disease. BACHD rats were treated with olesoxime via the food for 12 months. In vivo analysis covered motor impairments, cognitive deficits, mood disturbances and brain atrophy. Ex vivo analyses addressed olesoxime's effect on mutant huntingtin aggregation and cleavage, as well as brain mitochondria function. Olesoxime improved cognitive and psychiatric phenotypes, and ameliorated cortical thinning in the BACHD rat. The treatment reduced cerebral mutant huntingtin aggregates and nuclear accumulation. Further analysis revealed a cortex-specific overactivation of calpain in untreated BACHD rats. Treated BACHD rats instead showed significantly reduced levels of mutant huntingtin fragments due to the suppression of calpain-mediated cleavage. In addition, olesoxime reduced the amount of mutant huntingtin fragments associated with mitochondria, restored a respiration deficit, and enhanced the expression of fusion and outer-membrane transport proteins. In conclusion, we discovered the calpain proteolytic system, a key player in Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, as a target of olesoxime. Our findings suggest that olesoxime exerts its beneficial effects by improving mitochondrial function, which results in reduced calpain activation. The observed alleviation of behavioural and neuropathological phenotypes encourages further

  9. Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani on Impatiens by Enhanced Microbial Activity in Composted Swine Waste-Amended Potting Mixes.

    PubMed

    Diab, H G; Hu, S; Benson, D M

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT Peat moss-based potting mix was amended with either of two composted swine wastes, CSW1 and CSW2, at rates from 4 to 20% (vol/vol) to evaluate suppression of pre-emergence damping-off of impatiens (Impatiens balsamina) caused by Rhizoctonia solani (anastomosis group-4). A cucumber bioassay was used prior to each impatiens experiment to monitor maturity of compost as the compost aged in a curing pile by evaluating disease suppression toward both Pythium ultimum and R. solani. At 16, 24, 32, and 37 weeks after composting, plug trays filled with compost-amended potting mix were seeded with impatiens and infested with R. solani to determine suppression of damping-off. Pre-emergence damping-off was lower for impatiens grown in potting mix amended with 20% CSW1 than in CSW2-amended and nonamended mixes. To identify relationships between disease suppression and microbial parameters, samples of mixes were collected to determine microbial activity, biomass carbon and nitrogen, functional diversity, and population density. Higher rates of microbial activity were observed with increasing rates of CSW1 amendment than with CSW2 amendments. Microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen also were higher in CSW1-amended mixes than in CSW2-amended potting mixes 1 day prior to seeding and 5 weeks after seeding. Principal component analysis of Biolog-GN2 profiles showed different functional diversities between CSW1- and CSW2-amended mixes. Furthermore, mixes amended with CSW1 had higher colony forming units of fungi, endospore-forming bacteria, and oligotrophic bacteria. Our results suggest that enhanced microbial activity, functional and population diversity of stable compost-amended mix were associated with suppressiveness to Rhizoctonia damping-off in impatiens. PMID:18944095

  10. Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani on Impatiens by Enhanced Microbial Activity in Composted Swine Waste-Amended Potting Mixes.

    PubMed

    Diab, H G; Hu, S; Benson, D M

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT Peat moss-based potting mix was amended with either of two composted swine wastes, CSW1 and CSW2, at rates from 4 to 20% (vol/vol) to evaluate suppression of pre-emergence damping-off of impatiens (Impatiens balsamina) caused by Rhizoctonia solani (anastomosis group-4). A cucumber bioassay was used prior to each impatiens experiment to monitor maturity of compost as the compost aged in a curing pile by evaluating disease suppression toward both Pythium ultimum and R. solani. At 16, 24, 32, and 37 weeks after composting, plug trays filled with compost-amended potting mix were seeded with impatiens and infested with R. solani to determine suppression of damping-off. Pre-emergence damping-off was lower for impatiens grown in potting mix amended with 20% CSW1 than in CSW2-amended and nonamended mixes. To identify relationships between disease suppression and microbial parameters, samples of mixes were collected to determine microbial activity, biomass carbon and nitrogen, functional diversity, and population density. Higher rates of microbial activity were observed with increasing rates of CSW1 amendment than with CSW2 amendments. Microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen also were higher in CSW1-amended mixes than in CSW2-amended potting mixes 1 day prior to seeding and 5 weeks after seeding. Principal component analysis of Biolog-GN2 profiles showed different functional diversities between CSW1- and CSW2-amended mixes. Furthermore, mixes amended with CSW1 had higher colony forming units of fungi, endospore-forming bacteria, and oligotrophic bacteria. Our results suggest that enhanced microbial activity, functional and population diversity of stable compost-amended mix were associated with suppressiveness to Rhizoctonia damping-off in impatiens.

  11. TM-25659 enhances osteogenic differentiation and suppresses adipogenic differentiation by modulating the transcriptional co-activator TAZ

    PubMed Central

    Jang, EJ; Jeong, H; Kang, JO; Kim, NJ; Kim, MS; Choi, SH; Yoo, SE; Hong, JH; Bae, MA; Hwang, ES

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) is characterized as a transcriptional modulator of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Moreover, increased TAZ activity in the nucleus enhances osteoblast differentiation and suppresses adipocyte development by interacting with runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and PPARγ, respectively. Therefore, it would be of interest to identify low MW compounds that modulate nuclear TAZ activity. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH High-throughput screening was performed using a library of low MW compounds in order to identify TAZ modulators that enhance nuclear TAZ localization. The effects and molecular mechanisms of a TAZ modulator have been characterized in osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. KEY RESULTS We identified 2-butyl-5-methyl-6-(pyridine-3-yl)-3-[2′-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl]-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine] (TM-25659) as a TAZ modulator. TM-25659 enhanced nuclear TAZ localization in a dose-dependent manner and attenuated PPARγ-mediated adipocyte differentiation by facilitating PPARγ suppression activity of TAZ. In addition, TAZ-induced RUNX2 activity activation was further increased in osteoblasts, causing increased osteoblast differentiation. Accordingly, TM-25659 suppressed bone loss in vivo and decreased weight gain in an obesity model. After oral administration, TM-25659 had a favourable pharmacokinetic profile. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS TM-25659 stimulated nuclear TAZ localization and thus caused TAZ to suppress PPARγ-dependent adipogenesis and enhance RUNX2-induced osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that TM-25659 could be beneficial in the control of obesity and bone loss. PMID:21913895

  12. Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa (Rv3780) Is a Novel Ring-Shaped Interactor of the Mycobacterial Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Delley, Cyrille L.; Laederach, Juerg; Ziemski, Michal; Bolten, Marcel; Boehringer, Daniel; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of the proteasome in bacteria is limited to the phylum of actinobacteria, where it is maintained in parallel to the usual bacterial compartmentalizing proteases. The role it plays in these organisms is still not fully understood, but in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) the proteasome supports persistence in the host. In complex with the ring-shaped ATPase Mpa (called ARC in other actinobacteria), the proteasome can degrade proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup. Unlike for the eukaryotic proteasome core particle, no other bacterial proteasome interactors have been identified to date. Here we describe and characterize a novel bacterial proteasome activator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis we termed Bpa (Rv3780), using a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods. Bpa features a canonical C-terminal proteasome interaction motif referred to as the HbYX motif, and its orthologs are only found in those actinobacteria encoding the proteasomal subunits. Bpa can inhibit degradation of Pup-tagged substrates in vitro by competing with Mpa for association with the proteasome. Using negative-stain electron microscopy, we show that Bpa forms a ring-shaped homooligomer that can bind coaxially to the face of the proteasome cylinder. Interestingly, Bpa can stimulate the proteasomal degradation of the model substrate β-casein, which suggests it could play a role in the removal of non-native or damaged proteins. PMID:25469515

  13. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARα and γ and suppresses COX-2 expression[S

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARα and γ. PPARγ-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARγ. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  14. 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through inhibition of microglia activation and promotion of remyelination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jieru; Cai, Wei; Jin, Min; Xu, Jingwei; Wang, Yanan; Xiao, Yichuan; Hao, Li; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Yanyun; Han, Jie; Huang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are intrinsic immune cells in the central nervous system (CNS). The under controlled microglia activation plays important roles in inflammatory demyelination diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the means to modulate microglia activation as a therapeutic modality and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we show that administration of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA), by using both preventive and therapeutic treatment protocols, significantly suppresses disease severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. The treatment effect of GRA on EAE is attributed to its regulatory effect on microglia. GRA-modulated microglia significantly decreased pro-inflammatory profile in the CNS through suppression of MAPK signal pathway. The ameliorated CNS pro-inflammatory profile prevented the recruitment of encephalitogenic T cells into the CNS, which alleviated inflammation-induced demyelination. In addition, GRA treatment promoted remyelination in the CNS of EAE mice. The induced remyelination can be mediated by the overcome of inflammation-induced blockade of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in microglia, as well as enhancing oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that GRA-modulated microglia suppresses EAE through inhibiting microglia activation-mediated CNS inflammation, and promoting neuroprotective effect of microglia, which represents a potential therapeutic strategy for MS and maybe other neuroinflammatory diseases associated with microglia activation.

  15. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy and vibronic activity of benzo[ghi]perylene.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaofeng; Salama, Farid

    2005-07-01

    Gas-phase cavity ring-down spectroscopy of jet-cooled benzo[ghi]perylene (C22H12) in the 26 950-28 600-cm(-1) spectral range is reported for the first time. This study is part of our extensive laboratory astrophysics program for the study of interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The observed spectrum shows an intermediate level structure and significant broadening and is associated with the vibronically coupled S1(1A1)<--S0(1A1) and S2(1B1)<--S0(1A1) electronic transitions. Time-dependent density-functional calculations were performed to calculate the energetics, vibrational frequencies, and normal coordinates of the S1 and S2 states. A simple vibronic model was employed to account for the vibronic interaction between the vibronic levels of the S1 and S2 states. The calculated vibronic spectrum is found to be in good agreement with the experimental spectrum. PMID:16035840

  16. Suppression of polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase in vitro: a study of the mechanisms and the correlation with ring abscess in pseudomonal keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ijiri, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Kamata, R.; Nishino, N.; Okamura, R.; Kambara, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria, or the culture supernatants of an elastase non-producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, elicited a chemotactic response from polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) in vitro. The chemoattractive capacity was diminished under the presence of Boc-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe, a receptor antagonist of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) which is a bacterial chemotactic peptide to PMN. This indicated that the chemoattractant derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was a fMLP-like molecule(s). In contrast, culture supernatants of an elastase producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced negligible chemotactic response from PMN. Indeed, an inhibitory effect of the culture supernatants or of purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE) on PMN chemotaxis was observed when fMLP was used as a chemoattractant. Another fMLP-induced function of PMN, respiratory burst activation, was also diminished by pretreatment of PMN with PAE. PAE hydrolysed fMLP at the Met-Leu bond and diminished the chemoattractant capacity. In addition, a receptor analysis with fML-3H-P demonstrated a decrease in numbers of fMLP receptors on PMN without changing the dissociation constant values after the treatment of the cells with PAE. In the primary structure of the fMLP receptor previously reported, a preferential amino acid sequence for cleavage by PAE was identified in what was believed to be an extracellular portion of the receptor molecule. These results suggested that PAE could diminish PMN infiltration in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo by cleavage of the fMLP-like pseudomonal chemotactic ligand and the receptors on PMN. Images Figure 4 PMID:7734333

  17. Equilibrium Sequences and Gravitational Instability of Rotating Isothermal Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Moon, Sanghyuk

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear rings at the centers of barred galaxies exhibit strong star formation activities. They are thought to undergo gravitational instability when they are sufficiently massive. We approximate them as rigidly rotating isothermal objects and investigate their gravitational instability. Using a self-consistent field method, we first construct their equilibrium sequences specified by two parameters: α corresponding to the thermal energy relative to gravitational potential energy, and {\\widehat{R}}{{B}} measuring the ellipticity or ring thickness. Unlike in the incompressible case, not all values of {\\widehat{R}}{{B}} yield an isothermal equilibrium, and the range of {\\widehat{R}}{{B}} for such equilibria shrinks with decreasing α. The density distributions in the meridional plane are steeper for smaller α, and well approximated by those of infinite cylinders for slender rings. We also calculate the dispersion relations of non-axisymmetric modes in rigidly rotating slender rings with angular frequency Ω0 and central density {ρ }c. Rings with smaller α are found more unstable with a larger unstable range of the azimuthal mode number. The instability is completely suppressed by rotation when Ω0 exceeds the critical value. The critical angular frequency is found to be almost constant at ∼ 0.7{(G{ρ }c)}1/2 for α ≳ 0.01 and increases rapidly for smaller α. We apply our results to a sample of observed star-forming rings and confirm that rings without a noticeable azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters are indeed gravitationally unstable.

  18. Mating-type suppression of the DNA-repair defect of the yeast rad6 delta mutation requires the activity of genes in the RAD52 epistasis group.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y X; Schiestl, R H; Prakash, L

    1995-06-01

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for post-replication repair of UV-damaged DNA, UV mutagenesis, and sporulation. Here, we show that the radiation sensitivity of a MATa rad6 delta strain can be suppressed by the MAT alpha 2 gene carried on a multicopy plasmid. The a1-alpha 2 suppression is specific to the RAD6 pathway, as mutations in genes required for nucleotide excision repair or for recombinational repair do not show such mating-type suppression. The a1-alpha 2 suppression of the rad6 delta mutation requires the activity of the RAD52 group of genes, suggesting that suppression occurs by channelling of post-replication gaps present in the rad6 delta mutant into the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway. The a1-alpha 2 repressor could mediate this suppression via an enhancement in the expression, or the activity, of recombination genes.

  19. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor regulates vascular endothelial activations via suppression of the voltage-dependent anion channel-1.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Lim, Sun Young; Lee, Eun Ji; Choi, Sunga; Cho, Eun Jung; Park, Myoung Soo; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2012-05-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a multifunctional protein mainly found on the outer mitochondrial membrane. PBR expression is increased by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in endothelial cells. Adenoviral overexpression of PBR inhibits monocyte adhesion, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 expression in TNF-α-activated endothelial cells. Rotenone, cyclosporine A, and bongkrekic acid suppress TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. Overexpression of PBR inhibits voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC-1) expression and the silencing of PBR increases VDAC-1 expression in endothelial cells. Moreover, TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression is suppressed by VDAC-1 gene silencing. PBR overexpression significantly decreases TNF-α-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and MnSOD expression. These results suggest that PBR can inhibit endothelial activation and this action is related to the inhibition of mitochondrial ROS and/or VDAC-1 expression in endothelial cells.

  20. Structure-plant phytotoxic activity relationship of 7,7'-epoxylignanes, (+)- and (-)-verrucosin: simplification on the aromatic ring substituents.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Satoshi; Nakayama, Kumiko; Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Shuto, Yoshihiro

    2014-10-15

    The synthesized 7-aryl derivatives of (7R,7'S,8S,8'S)-(+)-verrucosin were applied to growth inhibitory activity test against ryegrass at 1mM. 7-(3-Ethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl) derivative 12 and 7-(2-hydroxyphenyl) derivative 4 showed comparable activity to those of (+)-verrucosin against the root (-95%) and the shoot (-60%), respectively. The growth inhibitory activity test against lettuce using synthesized 7-aryl derivatives of (7S,7'R,8R,8'R)-(-)-verrucosin at 1mM showed that the activities of 7-(3-hydroxyphenyl) derivative 20 and 7-(3-ethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl) derivative 28 are similar to that of (-)-verrucosin against the root (-95%). Against the shoot, 7-(3-hydroxyphenyl) derivative 20 showed higher activity (-80%) than that of (-)-verrucosin (-60%). As the next step, (7S,7'R,8R,8'R)-7-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-7'-aryl-(-)-verrucosin derivatives, in which the most effective 3-hydroxyphenyl group is employed as 7-aromatic ring, were synthesized for the assay against lettuce. In this experiment, 7'-(2-hydroxyphenyl) derivative 37 and 7'-(3-hydroxyphenyl) derivative 38 showed similar activity to that of derivative 20. The effect of 7- and 7'-aryl structures of 7,7'-epoxylignanes on the plant growth inhibitory activity was clarified. The 7- and 7'-aryl structures were simplified to show comparable activity to or higher activity than that of (-)-verrucosin. The plant growth inhibitory activity of a nutmeg component, (+)-fragransin C3b, was estimated as -80% inhibition at 1mM against ryegrass roots. PMID:25248684

  1. mTOR signaling promotes stem cell activation via counterbalancing BMP-mediated suppression during hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Huishan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Qi; Hu, Huimin; Wang, Xinyue; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Tongbiao; Zhou, Jiaxi; Chen, Ting; Duan, Enkui

    2015-02-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cycles of degeneration (catagen), rest (telogen), and regeneration (anagen) phases. Anagen begins when the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) obtain sufficient activation cues to overcome suppressive signals, mainly the BMP pathway, from their niche cells. Here, we unveil that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is activated in HFSCs, which coincides with the HFSC activation at the telogen-to-anagen transition. By using both an inducible conditional gene targeting strategy and a pharmacological inhibition method to ablate or inhibit mTOR signaling in adult skin epithelium before anagen initiation, we demonstrate that HFs that cannot respond to mTOR signaling display significantly delayed HFSC activation and extended telogen. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling activity is dramatically prolonged in mTOR signaling-deficient HFs. Through both gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro, we show that mTORC1 signaling negatively affects BMP signaling, which serves as a main mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling facilitates HFSC activation. Indeed, in vivo suppression of BMP by its antagonist Noggin rescues the HFSC activation defect in mTORC1-null skin. Our findings reveal a critical role for mTOR signaling in regulating stem cell activation through counterbalancing BMP-mediated repression during hair regeneration. PMID:25609845

  2. mTOR signaling promotes stem cell activation via counterbalancing BMP-mediated suppression during hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Huishan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Qi; Hu, Huimin; Wang, Xinyue; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Tongbiao; Zhou, Jiaxi; Chen, Ting; Duan, Enkui

    2015-02-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cycles of degeneration (catagen), rest (telogen), and regeneration (anagen) phases. Anagen begins when the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) obtain sufficient activation cues to overcome suppressive signals, mainly the BMP pathway, from their niche cells. Here, we unveil that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is activated in HFSCs, which coincides with the HFSC activation at the telogen-to-anagen transition. By using both an inducible conditional gene targeting strategy and a pharmacological inhibition method to ablate or inhibit mTOR signaling in adult skin epithelium before anagen initiation, we demonstrate that HFs that cannot respond to mTOR signaling display significantly delayed HFSC activation and extended telogen. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling activity is dramatically prolonged in mTOR signaling-deficient HFs. Through both gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro, we show that mTORC1 signaling negatively affects BMP signaling, which serves as a main mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling facilitates HFSC activation. Indeed, in vivo suppression of BMP by its antagonist Noggin rescues the HFSC activation defect in mTORC1-null skin. Our findings reveal a critical role for mTOR signaling in regulating stem cell activation through counterbalancing BMP-mediated repression during hair regeneration.

  3. Regulatory T cells with multiple suppressive and potentially pro-tumor activities accumulate in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Timperi, Eleonora; Pacella, Ilenia; Schinzari, Valeria; Focaccetti, Chiara; Sacco, Luca; Farelli, Francesco; Caronna, Roberto; Del Bene, Gabriella; Longo, Flavia; Ciardi, Antonio; Morelli, Sergio; Vestri, Anna Rita; Chirletti, Piero; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Piconese, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Tregs can contribute to tumor progression by suppressing antitumor immunity. Exceptionally, in human colorectal cancer (CRC), Tregs are thought to exert beneficial roles in controlling pro-tumor chronic inflammation. The goal of our study was to characterize CRC-infiltrating Tregs at multiple levels, by phenotypical, molecular and functional evaluation of Tregs from the tumor site, compared to non-tumoral mucosa and peripheral blood of CRC patients. The frequency of Tregs was higher in mucosa than in blood, and further significantly increased in tumor. Ex vivo, those Tregs suppressed the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. A differential compartmentalization was detected between Helios(high) and Helios(low) Treg subsets (thymus-derived versus peripherally induced): while Helios(low) Tregs were enriched in both sites, only Helios(high) Tregs accumulated significantly and specifically in tumors, displayed a highly demethylated TSDR region and contained high proportions of cells expressing CD39 and OX40, markers of activation and suppression. Besides the suppression of T cells, Tregs may contribute to CRC progression also through releasing IL-17, or differentiating into Tfr cells that potentially antagonize a protective Tfh response, events that were both detected in tumor-associated Tregs. Overall, our data indicate that Treg accumulation may contribute through multiple mechanisms to CRC establishment and progression. PMID:27622025

  4. Identification and biological activities of a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Ju Yeol; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} YCG063 was screened as a new angiogenesis inhibitor which suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library. {yields} The compound inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with multiple cellular functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In particular, high levels of mitochondrial ROS in hypoxic cells regulate many angiogenesis-related diseases, including cancer and ischemic disorders. Here we report a new angiogenesis inhibitor, YCG063, which suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library with an ArrayScan HCS reader. YCG063 suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation under a hypoxic condition in a dose-dependent manner, leading to the inhibition of in vitro angiogenic tube formation and chemoinvasion as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) at non-toxic doses. In addition, YCG063 decreased the expression levels of HIF-1{alpha} and its target gene, VEGF. Collectively, a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial ROS was identified. This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions.

  5. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme.

  6. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme. PMID:27273563

  7. Broccoli and watercress suppress matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity and invasiveness of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rose, Peter; Huang, Qing; Ong, Choon Nam; Whiteman, Matt

    2005-12-01

    A high dietary intake of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with a reduction in numerous human pathologies particularly cancer. In the current study, we examined the inhibitory effects of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) and watercress (Rorripa nasturtium aquaticum) extracts on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cancer cell invasion and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity using human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Aberrant overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases, including metalloproteinase-9, is associated with increased invasive potential in cancer cell lines. Our results demonstrate that extracts of broccoli and Rorripa suppressed TPA-induced MMP-9 activity and invasiveness in a concentration dependent manner as determined by zymographic analysis. Furthermore, fractionation of individual extracts followed by liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy analysis (LC-MS) revealed that the inhibitory effects of each vegetable were associated with the presence of 4-methysulfinylbutyl (sulforaphane) and 7-methylsulphinylheptyl isothiocyanates. Taken together, our data indicate that isothiocyanates derived form broccoli and Rorripa inhibit metalloproteinase 9 activities and also suppress the invasive potential of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro. The inhibitory effects observed in the current study may contribute to the suppression of carcinogenesis by diets high in cruciferous vegetables.

  8. Broccoli and watercress suppress matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity and invasiveness of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Peter . E-mail: bchpcr@nus.edu.sg; Huang, Qing; Ong, Choon Nam; Whiteman, Matt

    2005-12-01

    A high dietary intake of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with a reduction in numerous human pathologies particularly cancer. In the current study, we examined the inhibitory effects of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) and watercress (Rorripa nasturtium aquaticum) extracts on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cancer cell invasion and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity using human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Aberrant overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases, including metalloproteinase-9, is associated with increased invasive potential in cancer cell lines. Our results demonstrate that extracts of broccoli and Rorripa suppressed TPA-induced MMP-9 activity and invasiveness in a concentration dependant manner as determined by zymographic analysis. Furthermore, fractionation of individual extracts followed by liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy analysis (LC-MS) revealed that the inhibitory effects of each vegetable were associated with the presence of 4-methysulfinylbutyl (sulforaphane) and 7-methylsulphinylheptyl isothiocyanates. Taken together, our data indicate that isothiocyanates derived form broccoli and Rorripa inhibit metalloproteinase 9 activities and also suppress the invasive potential of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro. The inhibitory effects observed in the current study may contribute to the suppression of carcinogenesis by diets high in cruciferous vegetables.

  9. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  10. Cooperative activation of cyclobutanones and olefins leads to bridged-ring systems by a catalytic [4+2] coupling

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Haye Min; Dong, Guangbin

    2014-01-01

    Bridged-ring systems are widely found in natural products and successful syntheses of them frequently feature intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reactions. These reactions are subclassified as either type I or type II IMDAs depending on how the diene motif is tethered to the rest of the substrate - type I are tethered at the 1-position of the diene and type II at the 2-position. While the type I IMDA has been used to great success, the molecular scaffolds accessible by type II IMDAs are limited by the strain inherent in the formation of a sp2-carbon at a bridgehead position. Here, we describe a complementary approach that provides access to these structures through the C−C activation of cyclobutanones and their coupling with olefins. Various alkenes have been coupled with cyclobutanones to provide a range of bridged skeletons. The ketone group of the products serves as a convenient handle for downstream functionalization. PMID:25054946

  11. A MAPK-Driven Feedback Loop Suppresses Rac Activity to Promote RhoA-Driven Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hetmanski, Joseph H. R.; Zindy, Egor; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Caswell, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration in 3D microenvironments is fundamental to development, homeostasis and the pathobiology of diseases such as cancer. Rab-coupling protein (RCP) dependent co-trafficking of α5β1 and EGFR1 promotes cancer cell invasion into fibronectin (FN) containing extracellular matrix (ECM), by potentiating EGFR1 signalling at the front of invasive cells. This promotes a switch in RhoGTPase signalling to inhibit Rac1 and activate a RhoA-ROCK-Formin homology domain-containing 3 (FHOD3) pathway and generate filopodial actin-spike protrusions which drive invasion. To further understand the signalling network that drives RCP-driven invasive migration, we generated a Boolean logical model based on existing network pathways/models, where each node can be interrogated by computational simulation. The model predicted an unanticipated feedback loop, whereby Raf/MEK/ERK signalling maintains suppression of Rac1 by inhibiting the Rac-activating Sos1-Eps8-Abi1 complex, allowing RhoA activity to predominate in invasive protrusions. MEK inhibition was sufficient to promote lamellipodia formation and oppose filopodial actin-spike formation, and led to activation of Rac and inactivation of RhoA at the leading edge of cells moving in 3D matrix. Furthermore, MEK inhibition abrogated RCP/α5β1/EGFR1-driven invasive migration. However, upon knockdown of Eps8 (to suppress the Sos1-Abi1-Eps8 complex), MEK inhibition had no effect on RhoGTPase activity and did not oppose invasive migration, suggesting that MEK-ERK signalling suppresses the Rac-activating Sos1-Abi1-Eps8 complex to maintain RhoA activity and promote filopodial actin-spike formation and invasive migration. Our study highlights the predictive potential of mathematical modelling approaches, and demonstrates that a simple intervention (MEK-inhibition) could be of therapeutic benefit in preventing invasive migration and metastasis. PMID:27138333

  12. High activity of an indium alkoxide complex toward ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters.

    PubMed

    Quan, Stephanie M; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-06-14

    An indium complex supported by a ferrocene-derived Schiff base ligand has an unprecedented high activity toward ε-caprolactone, δ-valerolactone, and β-butyrolactone. l-Lactide, d,l-lactide, and trimethylene carbonate polymerizations also showed moderate to high activity.

  13. Comparative analysis of RNA silencing suppression activities between viral suppressors and an endogenous plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Park, Han-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in eukaryotes, including higher plants. To counteract this, several plant viruses express silencing suppressors that inhibit RNA silencing in host plants. Here, we show that both 2b protein from peanut stunt virus (PSV) and a hairpin construct (designated hp-RDR6) that silences endogenous RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) strongly suppress RNA silencing. The Agrobacterium infiltration system was used to demonstrate that both PSV 2b and hp-RDR6 suppressed local RNA silencing as strongly as helper component (HC-Pro) from potato virus Y (PVY) and P19 from tomato bush stunt virus (TBSV). The 2b protein from PSV eliminated the small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with RNA silencing and prevented systemic silencing, similar to 2b protein from cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). On the other hand, hp-RDR6 suppressed RNA silencing by inhibiting the generation of secondary siRNAs. The small coat protein (SCP) of squash mosaic virus (SqMV) also displayed weak suppression activity of RNA silencing. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer was used to investigate whether viral silencing suppressors or hp-RDR6 enhanced accumulations of green fluorescence protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as markers of expression in leaf tissues of Nicotina benthamiana. Expression of both GFP and GUS was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSV 2b or CMV 2b, compared to no suppression or the weak SqMV SCP suppressor. Co-expression with hp-RDR6 also significantly increased the expression of GFP and GUS to levels similar to those induced by PVY HC-Pro and TBSV P19.

  14. RING E3-Catalyzed E2 Self-Ubiquitination Attenuates the Activity of Ube2E Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Banka, Prerana Agarwal; Behera, Adaitya Prasad; Sarkar, Sayani; Datta, Ajit B

    2015-07-01

    Ubiquitination of a target protein is accomplished through sequential actions of the E1, E2s, and the E3s. E2s dictate the modification topology while E3 ligases confer substrate specificity and recruit the cognate E2. Human genome codes for ~35 different E2 proteins; all of which contain the characteristic ubiquitin-conjugating UBC core domain sufficient for catalysis. Many of these E2 enzymes also have N- or C-terminal extensions; roles of which are not very well understood. We show that the N-terminal extension of Ube2E1 undergoes intramolecular auto-ubiquitination. This self-ubiquitination activity is enhanced in the presence of interacting RING E3 ligases and results in a progressive attenuation of the E2 activity toward substrate/E3 modification. We also find that the N-terminal ubiquitination sites are conserved in all the three Ube2Es and replacing them with arginine renders all three full-length Ube2Es equally active as their core UBC domains. Based on these results, we propose that E3-catalyzed self-ubiquitination acts as a key regulatory mechanism that controls the activity of Ube2E class of ubiquitin E2s.

  15. DY determinants, possibly associated with novel class II molecules, stimulate autoreactive CD4+ T cells with suppressive activity

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    A set of T cell clones (TCC) isolated from HLA-DR-, Dw-, DQ-matched allogeneic MLCs was found to proliferate autonomously when stimulated with cells carrying a wide range of class I or II specificities. This apparently unrestricted proliferation was relatively weak, and only low levels of IL-2 were present in the supernatants of stimulated cells. Autologous as well as allogeneic PBMC and B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) were capable of stimulating such clones, which were also restimulated by suppressive, but not by helper, TCC. Moreover, such clones displayed the unusual property of autostimulation. mAb inhibition experiments suggested that class II- or class II-restricted antigens were involved in stimulation. Thus, certain "broad" mAbs (TU39, SG520) reacting with multiple locus products inhibited activation of these reagents, but none of those reacting more specifically with DR (TU34, TU37, L243, Q2/70, SG157), DQ (TU22, SPV- L3, Leu 10), or DP (B7/21), or mixtures of these mAbs, were able to do so. Evidence from sequential immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that mAb TU39 bound class II-like molecules other than DR, DQ, and DP on TCC and B-LCL, and it is therefore proposed that such putative novel class II-like molecules may carry the stimulating determinants for these autoreactive clones. DY-reactive clones lacked helper activity for B cells but mediated potent suppressive activity on T cell proliferative responses that was not restricted by the HLA type of the responding cells. Suppressive activity was induced in normal PBMC by such clones, as well as by independent suppressive clones, which was also inhibited only by mAb TU39. These findings lead to the proposal that DY-reactive autostimulatory cells may constitute a self- maintaining suppressive circuit, the level of activity of which would be regulated primarily by the availability of IL-2 in the microenvironment. PMID:2450156

  16. Probing the correlations between the defects in metal-organic frameworks and their catalytic activity by an epoxide ring-opening reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Klet, Rachel C; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar

    2016-06-14

    Seven Zr/Hf-based MOFs with different degrees of defects were obtained by modulating the synthetic conditions. The number of missing linkers in these MOFs was calculated based on potentiometric acid-base titration. The number of defects was found to correlate quantitatively with the catalytic activity of UiO-type MOFs for an acid-catalyzed epoxide ring-opening reaction. More importantly, we were able to identify a MOF with inherent defective Zr6 nodes, which showed great activity and regio-selectivity for the epoxide ring-opening reaction. PMID:27229848

  17. Emodin ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats by suppressing epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibroblast activation

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ruijuan; Wang, Xia; Zhao, Xiaomei; Song, Nana; Zhu, Jimin; Wang, Jijiang; Wang, Jin; Xia, Chunmei; Chen, Yonghua; Zhu, Danian; Shen, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of TGF-β1 is frequently encountered and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and fibroblast activation in pulmonary fibrosis. The present study investigated whether emodin mediates its effect via suppressing TGF-β1-induced EMT and fibroblast activation in bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Here, we found that emodin induced apoptosis and inhibited cellular proliferation, migration and differentiation in TGF-β1-stimulated human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELFs). Emodin suppressed TGF-β1-induced EMT in a dose- and time-dependent manner in alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Emodin also inhibited TGF-β1-induced Smad2, Smad3 and Erk1/2 activation, suggesting that Smad2/3 and Erk1/2 inactivation mediated the emodin-induced effects on TGF-β1-induced EMT. Additionally, we provided in vivo evidence suggesting that emodin apparently alleviated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and improved pulmonary function by inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling and subsequently repressing EMT, fibroblast activation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Taken together, our data suggest that emodin mediates its effects mainly via inhibition of EMT and fibroblast activation and thus has a potential for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27774992

  18. Application of the aerodynamic energy concept to flutter suppression and gust alleviation by use of active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Caspi, A.; Lottati, I.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of active controls on flutter suppression and gust alleviation of the Arava twin turboprop STOL transport and the Westwind twinjet business transport are investigated. The active control surfaces are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a 20-percent chord leading-edge control and a 20-percent chord trailing-edge control. Each control surface is driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system located on the activated strip. The control law is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy and utilizes previously optimized control law parameters based on two-dimensional aerodynamic theory. The best locations of the activated system along the span of the wing are determined for bending-moment alleviation, reduction in fuselage accelerations, and flutter suppression. The effectiveness of the activated system over a wide range of maximum control deflections is also determined. Two control laws are investigated. The first control law utilizes both rigid-body and elastic contributions of the motion. The second control law employs primarily the elastic contribution of the wing and leads to large increases in the activated control effectiveness as compared with the basic control law. The results indicate that flutter speed can be significantly increased (over 70 percent increase) and that the bending moment due to gust loading can be almost totally eliminated by a control system of about 10 to 20 percent span with reasonable control-surface rotations.

  19. Antiproliferative effects of Dangyuja (Citrus grandis Osbeck) leaves through suppression of constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation in human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Shu Yuan; Kim, Sung-Moo; Kim, Chulwon; Um, Jae-Young; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Seong Won; Lee, Seok-Geun; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Nam, Dongwoo; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Na, Yun-Cheol; Jeong, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Somi K; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2012-02-01

    Although Dangyuja (Citrus grandis Osbeck) exhibits anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities, its molecular targets and pathways, especially in human prostate cancer cells, are not fully understood. In this study, the antiproliferative effect of Dangyuja leaves through the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 signaling pathway was investigated in human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells. The solvent fractions (n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol) were obtained from a crude extract (80% methanol extract) of Dangyuja leaves. We first found that the chloroform fraction of Dangyuja leaves (DCF) was the most cytotoxic against DU145 cells. DCF inhibited constitutive STAT3 activation through blocking upstream Janus-like kinase 2 and c-Src. Consistent with STAT3 inactivation, DCF down-regulated the expression of STAT3 target genes, including bcl-2, bcl-xl, and cyclin D1; this correlated with the suppression of proliferation, the accumulation of cell cycle at the sub-G(1) phase, and the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, DCF exerted a relatively minor effect on the growth of human prostate noncancerous RWPE-1 cells. Nobiletin, a major active constituent of DCF, could induce apoptosis via the suppression of constitutive STAT3 activation. Overall, our results indicate that the anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities previously assigned to DCF may be mediated partially through the suppression of the STAT3 signaling. PMID:22273151

  20. Experimental results of active control on a large structure to suppress vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Three design methods, Linear Quadratic Gaussian with Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR), H-infinity, and mu-synthesis, are used to obtain compensators for suppressing the vibrations of a 10-bay vertical truss structure, a component typical of what may be used to build a large space structure. For the design process the plant dynamic characteristics of the structure were determined experimentally using an identification method. The resulting compensators were implemented on a digital computer and tested for their ability to suppress the first bending mode response of the 10-bay vertical truss. Time histories of the measured motion are presented, and modal damping obtained during the experiments are compared with analytical predictions. The advantages and disadvantages of using the various design methods are discussed.

  1. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process. PMID:27323202

  2. Innovative Adaptive Control Method Demonstrated for Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2005-01-01

    This year, an improved adaptive-feedback control method was demonstrated that suppresses thermoacoustic instabilities in a liquid-fueled combustor of a type used in aircraft engines. Extensive research has been done to develop lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems. However, these lean-burning combustors are susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities (high-frequency pressure waves), which can fatigue combustor components and even downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating life of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppressing the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for meeting the low-emission goals of the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project.

  3. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-06-17

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process.

  4. Micropower non-contact EEG electrode with active common-mode noise suppression and input capacitance cancellation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu M; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2009-01-01

    A non-contact EEG electrode with input capacitance neutralization and common-mode noise suppression circuits is presented. The coin sized sensor capacitively couples to the scalp without direct contact to the skin. To minimize the effect of signal attenuation and channel gain mismatch, the input capacitance of each sensor is actively neutralized using positive feedback and bootstrapping. Common-mode suppression is achieved through a single conductive sheet to establish a common mode reference. Each sensor electrode provides a differential gain of 60 dB. Signals are transmitted in a digital serial daisy-chain directly from a local 16-bit ADC, minimizing the number of wires required to establish a high density EEG sensor network. The micropower electrode consumes only 600 microW from a single 3.3 V supply.

  5. Prenylated Flavonoids from Cudrania tricuspidata Suppress Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuroinflammatory Activities in BV2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Cheol; Yoon, Chi-Su; Quang, Tran Hong; Ko, Wonmin; Kim, Jong-Su; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2016-01-01

    In Korea and China, Cudrania tricuspidata Bureau (Moraceae) is an important traditional medicinal plant used to treat lumbago, hemoptysis, and contusions. The C. tricuspidata methanol extract suppressed both production of NO and PGE2 in BV2 microglial cells. Cudraflavanone D (1), isolated from this extract, remarkably suppressed the protein expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, and decreased the levels of NO and PGE2 in BV2 microglial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide. Cudraflavanone D (1) also decreased IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-1β production, blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB heterodimers (p50 and p65) by interrupting the degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitor of IκB-α, and inhibited NF-κB binding. In addition, cudraflavanone D (1) suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK pathways. This study indicated that cudraflavanone D (1) can be a potential drug candidate for the cure of neuroinflammation. PMID:26907256

  6. Assessment of Parasitic Activity of Fusarium Strains Obtained from a Heterodera schachtii-Suppressive Soil

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xuebiao; Yin, Bei; Borneman, James; Becker, J. Ole

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the potential impact of various Fusarium strains on the population development of sugarbeet cyst nematodes. Fungi were isolated from cysts or eggs of Heterodera schachtii Schmidt that were obtained from a field suppressive to that nematode. Twenty-six strains of Fusarium spp. were subjected to a phylogenic analysis of their rRNA-ITS nucleotide sequences. Seven genetically distinct Fusarium strains were evaluated for their ability to influence population development of H. schachtii and crop performance in greenhouse trials. Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris) seedlings were transplanted into fumigated field soil amended with a single fungal strain at 1,000 propagules/g soil. One week later, the soil was infested with 250 H. schachtii J2/100 cm3 soil. Parasitized eggs were present in all seven Fusarium treatments at 1,180 degree-days after fungal infestation. The percentage of parasitism ranged from 17 to 34%. Although the most efficacious F. oxysporum strain 471 produced as many parasitized eggs as occurred in the original suppressive soil, none of the Fusarium strains reduced the population density of H. schachtii compared to the conducive check. This supports prior results that Fusarium spp. were not the primary cause of the population suppression of sugarbeet cyst nematodes at this location. PMID:19259511

  7. Talus cone activity recorded by tree-rings of Arctic dwarf shrubs: a study case from SW Spitsbergen, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, Piotr

    2010-12-01

    Dendrochronological methods were used to determine talus cone activity in the Arctic area. Talus cones are one of the most characteristic geomorphological features of the Svalbad Archipelago. Two species of dwarf shrubs, Salix polaris and Salix reticulata, which belong to the Willow family (Salicaceae), were collected from two talus cones located in the SW Spitsbergen Island. These small creeping shrubs (less than 10 cm tall with stem diameters ranging from 0.5 cm to 1.1 cm) have well developed tree-rings which allow them to be used for dendrochronological research. The age of the dwarf shrubs showed the minimum time during which the cones were disturbed by mass movements. Observations and material analysis indicate that currently the talus cones are active, but their development through debris flow, creep and rock particle slide is observed only episodically. An increased rate of vegetation colonization during the 1980s indicates that geomorphic events were less active in the talus cone area during this time.

  8. Humulus scandens exhibits immunosuppressive effects in vitro and in vivo by suppressing CD4(+) T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinjin; Wu, Yingchun; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Weiqi; Hu, Shaoping; Li, Yiming; Yang, Yifu

    2014-01-01

    Humulus scandens, rich in flavonoids, is a traditional Chinese medicine. It is widely used in China to treat tuberculosis, dysentery and chronic colitis. In this study, the major active faction of Humulus scandens (H.S) was prepared. Then, its immunosuppressive effects and underlying mechanisms on T cell activation were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that H.S significantly inhibited the proliferation of splenocytes induced by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharides, and mixed-lymphocyte reaction in vitro. Additionally, H.S could dramatically suppress the proliferation and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production from T cells stimulated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28. Flow cytometric results confirmed that H.S could suppress the differentiation of IFN-γ-producing type 1 helper T cells (Th1). Furthermore, using ovalbumin immunization-induced T cell reaction and CD4(+) T-cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity reaction, H.S the immunosuppressive effects of H.S was also demonstrated in vivo. Western blot results showed that H.S could impede the activation of both Erk1/2 and P38 in primary T cells triggered by anti-CD3/28. Collectively, the active fraction of H.S showed promising immunosuppressive activities both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25004883

  9. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  10. Before the School Bell Rings: How a Before-School Physical Activity Program Improves Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Georgia; Poston, Kristen Fay; Harris, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Across the country, school administrators and educators struggle to find time for children to engage in physical activity while still giving them enough time in academic instruction. The steep rise in childhood obesity in the U.S. (National Center for Health Statistics, 2011; Ogden, Carroll, Kit, & Flegal, 2014) suggests that the concern is…

  11. β₂ adrenergic receptor activation suppresses bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in osteoblast-like MC3T3E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takayuki; Ezura, Yoichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Moriya, Shuichi; Shirakawa, Jumpei; Notomi, Takuya; Arayal, Smriti; Kawasaki, Makiri; Izu, Yayoi; Harada, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    β adrenergic stimulation suppresses bone formation in vivo while its actions in osteoblastic differentiation are still incompletely understood. We therefore examined the effects of β2 adrenergic stimulation on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells focusing on BMP-induced alkaline phosphatase expression. Morphologically, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced increase in the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive small foci in the cultures of MC3T3-E1 cells. Biochemically, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase in a dose-dependent manner. Isoproterenol suppression of alkaline phosphatase activity is observed even when the cells are treated with high concentrations of BMP. With respect to cell density, isoproterenol treatment tends to suppress BMP-induced increase in alkaline phosphatase expression more in osteoblasts cultured at higher cell density. In terms of treatment protocol, continuous isoproterenol treatment is compared to cyclic treatment. Continuous isoproterenol treatment is more suppressive against BMP-induced increase in alkaline phosphatase expression than cyclic regimen. At molecular level, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced enhancement of alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression. Regarding the mode of isoproterenol action, isoproterenol suppresses BMP-induced BRE-luciferase activity. These data indicate that isoproterenol regulates BMP-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in osteoblast-like MC3T3E1 cells.

  12. Ring flips revisited: (13)C relaxation dispersion measurements of aromatic side chain dynamics and activation barriers in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Ulrich; Modig, Kristofer; Akke, Mikael

    2014-07-22

    Intramolecular motions of proteins are critical for biological function. Transient structural fluctuations underlie a wide range of processes, including enzyme catalysis, ligand binding to buried sites, and generic protein motions, such as 180° rotation of aromatic side chains in the protein interior, but remain poorly understood. Understanding the dynamics and molecular nature of concerted motions requires characterization of their rates and energy barriers. Here we use recently developed (13)C transverse relaxation dispersion methods to improve our current understanding of aromatic ring flips in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). We validate these methods by benchmarking ring-flip rates against the three previously characterized cases in BPTI, namely, Y23, Y35, and F45. Further, we measure conformational exchange for one additional aromatic ring, F22, which can be interpreted in terms of a flip rate of 666 s(-1) at 5 °C. Upon inclusion of our previously reported result that Y21 also flips slowly [Weininger, U., et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 9241-9247], the (13)C relaxation dispersion experiments thus reveal relatively slow ring-flip rates for five of eight aromatic residues in BPTI. These results are in contrast with previous reports, which have estimated that all rings, except Y23, Y35, and F45, flip with a high rate at ambient temperature. The (13)C relaxation dispersion data result in an updated rank order of ring-flip rates in BPTI, which agrees considerably better with that estimated from a recent 1 ms molecular dynamics trajectory than do previously published NMR data. However, significant quantitative differences remain between experiment and simulation, in that the latter yields flip rates that are in many cases too fast by 1-2 orders of magnitude. By measuring flip rates across a temperature range of 5-65 °C, we determined the activation barriers of ring flips for Y23, Y35, and F45. Y23 and F45 have identical activation parameters

  13. Imprint of Climate Variability on Mesozoic Fossil Tree Rings: Evidences of Solar Activity Signals on Environmental Records Around 200 Million Years Ago?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestes, A.; Rigozo, N. R.; Nordemann, D. J. R.; Echer, E.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Souza Echer, M. P.; Wrasse, C. M.; Guarnieri, F. L.

    2014-08-01

    Evidence of the solar activity modulation of the Earth's climate has been observed on several parameters, from decadal to millennial time scales. Several proxies have been used to reconstruct the paleoclimate as well as the solar activity. The paleoclimate reconstructions are based on direct and/or indirect effects of global and regional climate conditions. The solar activity reconstructions are based on the production of the 14C isotope due to the interaction of cosmic ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere. Because trees respond to climate conditions and store 14C, they have been used as proxies for both for climate and solar activity reconstructions. The imprints of solar activity cycles dating back to 10,000 years ago have been observed on tree-ring samples using 14C data, and those dating back to 20 million years ago have been analyzed using fossil tree-growth rings. All this corresponds to the Cenozoic era. However, solar activity imprints on tree rings from earlier than that era have not been investigated yet. In this work, we showed that tree rings from the Mesozoic Era (of ~200 million years ago) recorded 11- and 22-year cycles, which may be related to solar activity cycles, and that were statistically significant at the 95 % confidence level. The fossil wood was collected in the southern region of Brazil. Our analysis of the fossils' tree-ring width series power spectra showed characteristics similar to the modern araucaria tree, with a noticeable decadal periodicity. Assuming that the Earth's climate responds to solar variability and that responses did not vary significantly over the last ~200 million years, we conclude that the solar-climate connection was likely present during the Mesozoic era.

  14. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors in Müller glia is protective to retinal neurons and suppresses microglial reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Donika; Zelinka, Christopher Paul; Cebulla, Colleen; Fischer, Andy J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Glucocorticoid signaling is known to suppress inflammation and the reactivity of microglia and macrophages. In the vertebrate retina, the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) is known to be activated and localized to the nuclei of Müller glia (Gallina et al., 2014). Accordingly, we investigated how signaling through GCR influences the survival of neurons using the chick retina in vivo as a model system. We applied intraocular injections of GCR agonist or antagonist, assessed microglial reactivity, and the survival of retinal neurons following different damage paradigms. Microglial reactivity was increased in retinas from eyes that were injected with vehicle, and this reactivity was decreased by GCR-agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and increased by GCR-antagonist RU486. We found that activation of GCR suppresses the reactivity of microglia and inhibited the loss of retinal neurons resulting from excitotoxicity. We provide evidence that the protection-promoting effects of Dex were maintained when the microglia were selectively ablated. Similarly, intraocular injections of Dex protected ganglion cells from colchicine-treatment and protected photoreceptors from damage caused by retinal detachment. We conclude that activation of GCR promotes the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas, promotes the survival of amacrine and bipolar cells in excitotoxin-damaged retinas, and promotes the survival of photoreceptors in detached retinas. We propose that suppression of microglial reactivity is secondary to activation of GCR in Müller glia, and this mode of signaling is an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from different types of retinal damage. PMID:26272753

  15. Ring finger protein 10 is a novel synaptonuclear messenger encoding activation of NMDA receptors in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Margarita C; Guzzetti, Francesca; Karpova, Anna; Lim, Dmitry; Mitro, Nico; Musardo, Stefano; Mellone, Manuela; Marcello, Elena; Stanic, Jennifer; Samaddar, Tanmoy; Burguière, Adeline; Caldarelli, Antonio; Genazzani, Armando A; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Kreutz, Michael R; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Luca, Monica Di

    2016-01-01

    Synapses and nuclei are connected by bidirectional communication mechanisms that enable information transfer encoded by macromolecules. Here, we identified RNF10 as a novel synaptonuclear protein messenger. RNF10 is activated by calcium signals at the postsynaptic compartment and elicits discrete changes at the transcriptional level. RNF10 is enriched at the excitatory synapse where it associates with the GluN2A subunit of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDARs and induction of long term potentiation (LTP) lead to the translocation of RNF10 from dendritic segments and dendritic spines to the nucleus. In particular, we provide evidence for importin-dependent long-distance transport from synapto-dendritic compartments to the nucleus. Notably, RNF10 silencing prevents the maintenance of LTP as well as LTP-dependent structural modifications of dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12430.001 PMID:26977767

  16. Jupiter's ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    First evidence of a ring around the planet Jupiter is seen in this photograph taken by Voyager 1 on March 4, 1979. The multiple exposure of the extremely thin faint ring appears as a broad light band crossing the center of the picture. The edge of the ring is 1,212,000 km from the spacecraft and 57,000 km from the visible cloud deck of Jupiter. The background stars look like broken hair pins because of spacecraft motion during the 11 minute 12 second exposure. The wavy motion of the star trails is due to the ultra-slow natural oscillation of the spacecraft (with a period of 78 seconds). The black dots are geometric calibration points in the camera. The ring thickness is estimated to be 30 km or less. The photograph was part of a sequence planned to search for such rings in Jupiter's equatorial plane. The ring has been invisible from Earth because of its thinness and its transparency when viewed at any angle except straight on. JPL manages and controls the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  17. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  18. Harpagoside suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression through inhibition of NF-kappa B activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Tran, Van H; Duke, Rujee K; Tan, Sharon; Chrubasik, Sigrun; Roufogalis, Basil D; Duke, Colin C

    2006-03-01

    Preparations of Harpagophytum procumbens, known as devil's claw, are used as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of pain and osteoarthritis. Pharmacological evaluations have proven the effectiveness of this herbal drug as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic agent. The present study has investigated the mechanism of action of harpagoside, one of the major components of Harpagophytum procumbens, using human HepG2 hepatocarcinoma and RAW 264.7 macrophage cell lines. Harpagoside inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced mRNA levels and protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide in HepG2 cells. These inhibitions appeared to correlate with the suppression of NF-kappaB activation by harpagoside, as pre-treating cells with harpagoside blocked the translocation of NF-kappaB into the nuclear compartments and degradation of the inhibitory subunit IkappaB-alpha. Furthermore, harpagoside dose-dependently inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-kappaB promoter activity in a gene reporter assay in RAW 264.7 cells, indicating that harpagoside interfered with the activation of gene transcription. These results suggest that the inhibition of the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide by harpagoside involves suppression of NF-kappaB activation, thereby inhibiting downstream inflammation and subsequent pain events. PMID:16203115

  19. Silibinin suppresses astroglial activation in a mouse model of acute Parkinson's disease by modulating the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujeong; Chun, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kyung Moon; Jung, Young-Suk; Lee, Jaewon

    2015-11-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, and is characterized by dopaminergic neuronal loss in midbrain. The MPTP-induced PD model has been well characterized by motor deficits and selective dopaminergic neuronal death accompanied by glial activation. Silibinin is a constituent of silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and has been proposed to have hepatoprotective, anti-cancer, anti-oxidative, and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, the authors studied the neuroprotective effects of silibinin in an acute MPTP model of PD. Silibinin was administered for 2 weeks, and then MPTP was administered to mice over 1 day (acute MPTP induced PD). Silibinin pretreatment effectively ameliorated motor dysfunction, dopaminergic neuronal loss, and glial activations caused by MPTP. In addition, an in vitro study demonstrated that silibinin suppressed astroglial activation and ERK and JNK phosphorylation in primary astrocytes in response to MPP(+) treatment. These findings show silibinin protected dopaminergic neurons in an acute MPTP-induced mouse model of PD, and suggest its neuroprotective effects might be mediated by the suppression of astrocyte activation via the inhibition of ERK and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the study indicates silibinin should be viewed as a potential treatment for PD and other neurodegenerative diseases associated with neuroinflammation. PMID:26434409

  20. Morusin induces apoptosis and suppresses NF-{kappa}B activity in human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.-C.; Won, S.-J.; Chao, C.-L.; Wu, F.-L.; Liu, H.-S.; Ling Pin; Lin, C.-N.; Su, C.-L.

    2008-07-18

    Morusin is a pure compound isolated from root bark of Morusaustralis (Moraceae). In this study, we demonstrated that morusin significantly inhibited the growth and clonogenicity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells. Apoptosis induced by morusin was characterized by accumulation of cells at the sub-G{sub 1} phase, fragmentation of DNA, and condensation of chromatin. Morusin also inhibited the phosphorylation of IKK-{alpha}, IKK-{beta} and I{kappa}B-{alpha}, increased expression of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, and suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and its DNA binding activity. Dephosphorylation of NF-{kappa}B upstream regulators PI3K, Akt and PDK1 was also displayed. In addition, activation of caspase-8, change of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, and activation of caspase-9 and -3 were observed at the early time point. Downregulation in the expression of Ku70 and XIAP was exhibited afterward. Caspase-8 or wide-ranging caspase inhibitor suppressed morusin-induced apoptosis. Therefore, the antitumor mechanism of morusin in HT-29 cells may be via activation of caspases and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B.

  1. Plasma-activated medium suppresses choroidal neovascularization in mice: a new therapeutic concept for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fuxiang; Kaneko, Hiroki; Nagasaka, Yosuke; Ijima, Ryo; Nakamura, Kae; Nagaya, Masatoshi; Takayama, Kei; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Senga, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which leads to severe vision loss in many aged patients in most advanced country. CNV compromises vision via hemorrhage and retinal detachment on account of pathological neovascularization penetrating the retina. Plasma medicine represents the medical application of ionized gas "plasma" that is typically studied in the field of physical science. Here we examined the therapeutic ability of plasma-activated medium (PAM) to suppress CNV. The effect of PAM on vascularization was assessed on the basis of human retinal endothelial cell (HREC) tube formation. In mice, laser photocoagulation was performed to induce CNV (laser-CNV), followed by intravitreal injection of PAM. N-Acetylcysteine was used to examine the role of reactive oxygen species in PAM-induced CNV suppression. Fundus imaging, retinal histology examination, and electroretinography (ERG) were also performed to evaluate PAM-induced retinal toxicity. Interestingly, HREC tube formation and laser-CNV were both reduced by treatment with PAM. N-acetylcysteine only partly neutralized the PAM-induced reduction in laser-CNV. In addition, PAM injection had no effect on regular retinal vessels, nor did it show retinal toxicity in vivo. Our findings indicate the potential of PAM as a novel therapeutic agent for suppressing CNV.

  2. Spermidine Suppresses Age-Associated Memory Impairment by Preventing Adverse Increase of Presynaptic Active Zone Size and Release

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun K.; Pech, Ulrike; Fulterer, Andreas; Ender, Anatoli; Mauermann, Stephan F.; Andlauer, Till F. M.; Beuschel, Christine; Thriene, Kerstin; Quentin, Christine; Schwärzel, Martin; Mielke, Thorsten; Madeo, Frank; Dengjel, Joern; Fiala, André; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2016-01-01

    Memories are assumed to be formed by sets of synapses changing their structural or functional performance. The efficacy of forming new memories declines with advancing age, but the synaptic changes underlying age-induced memory impairment remain poorly understood. Recently, we found spermidine feeding to specifically suppress age-dependent impairments in forming olfactory memories, providing a mean to search for synaptic changes involved in age-dependent memory impairment. Here, we show that a specific synaptic compartment, the presynaptic active zone (AZ), increases the size of its ultrastructural elaboration and releases significantly more synaptic vesicles with advancing age. These age-induced AZ changes, however, were fully suppressed by spermidine feeding. A genetically enforced enlargement of AZ scaffolds (four gene-copies of BRP) impaired memory formation in young animals. Thus, in the Drosophila nervous system, aging AZs seem to steer towards the upper limit of their operational range, limiting synaptic plasticity and contributing to impairment of memory formation. Spermidine feeding suppresses age-dependent memory impairment by counteracting these age-dependent changes directly at the synapse. PMID:27684064

  3. Active suppression of D. melanogaster immune response by long gland products of the parasitic wasp Leptopilina boulardi.

    PubMed

    Labrosse, C; Carton, Y; Dubuffet, A; Drezen, J M; Poirie, M

    2003-05-01

    To develop inside their insect hosts, endoparasitoid wasps must either evade or overcome the host's immune system. Several ichneumonid and braconid wasps inject polydnaviruses that display well-studied immune suppressive effects. However, little is known about the strategies of immunoevasion used by other parasitoid families, such as figitid wasps. The present study provides experimental evidence, based on superparasitism and injection experiments, that the figitid species Leptopilina boulardi uses an active mechanism to suppress the Drosophila melanogaster host immune response, i.e. the encapsulation of the parasitoid eggs. The immune suppressive factors are localised in the long gland and reservoir of the female genital tractus, where virus-like particles (VLPs) have been observed. Parasitism experiments using a host tumorous strain indicate that these factors do not destroy host lamellocytes but that they impair the melanisation pathway. Interestingly, they are not susceptible to heating and are not depleted with prolonged oviposition experience, in contrast to observations reported for L. heterotoma, another figitid species. The mechanisms that prevent encapsulation of eggs from L. boulardi and L. heterotoma differ in several respects, suggesting that different physiological strategies of immunosuppression might be used by specialised and generalist parasitoids. PMID:12770630

  4. Suppression of the Barley uroporphyrinogen III synthase Gene by a Ds Activation Tagging Element Generates Developmental Photosensitivity[W

    PubMed Central

    Ayliffe, Michael A.; Agostino, Anthony; Clarke, Bryan C.; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Pryor, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorophyll production involves the synthesis of photoreactive intermediates that, when in excess, are toxic due to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A novel, activation-tagged barley (Hordeum vulgare) mutant is described that results from antisense suppression of a uroporphyrinogen III synthase (Uros) gene, the product of which catalyzes the sixth step in the synthesis of chlorophyll and heme. In homozygous mutant plants, uroporphyrin(ogen) I accumulates by spontaneous cyclization of hydroxyl methylbilane, the substrate of Uros. Accumulation of this tetrapyrrole intermediate results in photosensitive cell death due to the production of ROS. The efficiency of Uros gene suppression is developmentally regulated, being most effective in mature seedling leaves compared with newly emergent leaves. Reduced transcript accumulation of a number of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis genes occurs in the mutant, even under 3% light conditions, consistent with a retrograde plastid-nuclear signaling mechanism arising from Uros gene suppression. A similar set of nuclear genes was repressed in wild-type barley following treatment with a singlet oxygen-generating herbicide, but not by a superoxide generating herbicide, suggesting that the retrograde signaling apparent in the mutant is specific to singlet oxygen. PMID:19336693

  5. Butyrate enhances antibacterial effects while suppressing other features of alternative activation in IL-4-induced macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Maria R; Saxena, Alpana; Reyes, José-Luis; McKay, Derek M

    2016-05-15

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate is produced by fermentation of dietary fiber by the intestinal microbiota; butyrate is the primary energy source of colonocytes and has immunomodulatory effects. Having shown that macrophages differentiated with IL-4 [M(IL-4)s] can suppress colitis, we hypothesized that butyrate would reinforce an M(IL-4) phenotype. Here, we show that in the presence of butyrate M(IL-4)s display reduced expression of their hallmark markers Arg1 and Ym1 and significantly suppressed LPS-induced nitric oxide, IL-12p40, and IL-10 production. Butyrate treatment likely altered the M(IL-4) phenotype via inhibition of histone deacetylation. Functionally, M(IL-4)s treated with butyrate showed increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria, compared with M(IL-4) and this was not accompanied by enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production. Culture of regulatory T cells with M(IL-4)s and M(IL-4 + butyrate)s revealed that both macrophage subsets suppressed expression of the regulatory T-cell marker Foxp3. However, Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4 + butyrate) produced less IL-17A than Tregs cocultured with M(IL-4). These data illustrate the importance of butyrate, a microbial-derived metabolite, in the regulation of gut immunity: the demonstration that butyrate promotes phagocytosis in M(IL-4)s that can limit T-cell production of IL-17A reveals novel aspects of bacterial-host interaction in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis.

  6. Fatty acid synthesis and pyruvate metabolism pathways remain active in dihydroartemisinin-induced dormant ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nanhua; LaCrue, Alexis N; Teuscher, Franka; Waters, Norman C; Gatton, Michelle L; Kyle, Dennis E; Cheng, Qin

    2014-08-01

    Artemisinin (ART)-based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria worldwide. However, despite high potency and rapid action, there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy or ACT long before the recent emergence of ART resistance. ART-induced ring-stage dormancy and recovery have been implicated as possible causes of recrudescence; however, little is known about the characteristics of dormant parasites, including whether dormant parasites are metabolically active. We investigated the transcription of 12 genes encoding key enzymes in various metabolic pathways in P. falciparum during dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-induced dormancy and recovery. Transcription analysis showed an immediate downregulation for 10 genes following exposure to DHA but continued transcription of 2 genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins. Transcription of several additional genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins, particularly of genes encoding enzymes in pyruvate metabolism and fatty acid synthesis pathways, was also maintained. Additions of inhibitors for biotin acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase and enoyl-acyl carrier reductase of the fatty acid synthesis pathways delayed the recovery of dormant parasites by 6 and 4 days, respectively, following DHA treatment. Our results demonstrate that most metabolic pathways are downregulated in DHA-induced dormant parasites. In contrast, fatty acid and pyruvate metabolic pathways remain active. These findings highlight new targets to interrupt recovery of parasites from ART-induced dormancy and to reduce the rate of recrudescence following ART treatment.

  7. 5-HT1A receptor-responsive pedunculopontine tegmental neurons suppress REM sleep and respiratory motor activity.

    PubMed

    Grace, Kevin P; Liu, Hattie; Horner, Richard L

    2012-02-01

    Serotonin type 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor-responsive neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTn) become maximally active immediately before and during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. A prevailing model of REM sleep generation indicates that activation of such neurons contributes significantly to the generation of REM sleep, and if correct then inactivation of such neurons ought to suppress REM sleep. We test this hypothesis using bilateral microperfusion of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 10 μm) into the PPTn; this tool has been shown to selectively silence REM sleep-active PPTn neurons while the activity of wake/REM sleep-active PPTn neurons is unaffected. Contrary to the prevailing model, bilateral microperfusion of 8-OH-DPAT into the PPTn (n = 23 rats) significantly increased REM sleep both as a percentage of the total recording time and sleep time, compared with both within-animal vehicle controls and between-animal time-controls. This increased REM sleep resulted from an increased frequency of REM sleep bouts but not their duration, indicating an effect on mechanisms of REM sleep initiation but not maintenance. Furthermore, an increased proportion of the REM sleep bouts stemmed from periods of low REM sleep drive quantified electrographically. Targeted suppression of 5-HT(1A) receptor-responsive PPTn neurons also increased respiratory rate and respiratory-related genioglossus activity, and increased the frequency and amplitude of the sporadic genioglossus activations occurring during REM sleep. These data indicate that 5-HT(1A) receptor-responsive PPTn neurons normally function to restrain REM sleep by elevating the drive threshold for REM sleep induction, and restrain the expression of respiratory rate and motor activities.

  8. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor suppresses osteoblast proliferation and differentiation through the activation of the ERK signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Haitao; Du, Yuxuan; Zhang, Xulong; Sun, Ying; Li, Shentao; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2014-11-01

    Ahr activation is known to be associated with synovitis and exacerbated rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but its contributions to bone loss have not been completely elucidated. Osteoblast proliferation and differentiation are abnormal at the erosion site in RA. Here, we reported that the expression of Ahr was increased in the hind paws' bone upon collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice, and the levels of Ahr were negatively correlated with bone mineral density (BMD). In addition, immunofluorescent staining showed that the high expression of Ahr was mainly localized in osteoblasts from the CIA mice compared to normal controls. Moreover, the luciferase intensity of Ahr in the nucleus increased by 12.5% in CIA osteoblasts compared to that in normal controls. In addition, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) activation of the Ahr inhibited pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cellular proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA expression in the osteoblasts of CIA mice were reduced compared to normal controls. In contrast, decreased ALP expression by activated Ahr was completely reversed after pretreatment with an Ahr inhibitor (CH-223191) in MC3T3-E1 cell lines and primary osteoblasts on day 5. Our data further showed that activation of Ahr promoted the phosphorylation of ERK after 5 days. Moreover, Ahr-dependent activation of the ERK signaling pathway decreased the levels of proliferation cells and inhibited ALP activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. These results demonstrated that the high expression of Ahr may suppress osteoblast proliferation and differentiation through activation of the ERK signaling pathway, further enabling bone erosion in CIA mice. - Highlights: • The upregulation of Ahr was localized in osteoblasts of CIA mice. • The overexpression of Ahr suppressed osteoblast development. • The Ahr activated ERK signaling pathway to exacerbate bone erosion.

  9. Synthesis, activity and pharmacokinetics of novel antibacterial 15-membered ring macrolones.

    PubMed

    Fajdetić, Andrea; Vinter, Adrijana; Paljetak, Hana Čipčić; Padovan, Jasna; Jakopović, Ivana Palej; Kapić, Samra; Alihodžić, Sulejman; Filić, Darko; Modrić, Marina; Košutić-Hulita, Nada; Antolović, Roberto; Schoenfeld, Zrinka Ivezić; Mutak, Stjepan; Eraković Haber, Vesna; Spaventi, Radan

    2011-08-01

    Synthesis, antibacterial activity and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel class of macrolide antibiotics-macrolones-derived from azithromycin, comprising oxygen atom(s) in the linker and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, are reported. Selected compounds showed excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin resistant respiratory pathogens. However, the majority of compounds lacked good bioavailability. The isopropyl ester, compound 35, and a macrolone derivative with an elongated linker 29 showed the best oral bioavailability in rats, both accompanied with an excellent overall microbiology profile addressing inducible and constitutive MLSb as well as efflux mediated macrolide resistance in streptococci, while compound 29 is more potent against staphylococci.

  10. Highly active and stereoselective zirconium and hafnium alkoxide initiators for solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide.

    PubMed

    Chmura, Amanda J; Davidson, Matthew G; Frankis, Catherine J; Jones, Matthew D; Lunn, Matthew D

    2008-03-21

    Under solvent-free conditions (at 130 degrees C), zirconium and hafnium amine tris(phenolate) alkoxides are extremely active, well-controlled, single-site initiators for the ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide, yielding highly heterotactic polylactide.

  11. Respective roles and interactions of T-lymphocyte and PGE2-mediated monocyte suppressive activities in human newborns and mothers at the time of delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Mamas, S.; Dray, F.; Griscelli, C.

    1982-06-01

    Recently the concept of a poorly functional humoral immune response in the newborn was proposed. Data have been presented indicating that the impaired newborn B cell maturation, as shown in vitro in a pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell maturation system, is due both to an immaturity of lymphocyte subsets and to an increased suppressive T activity. In the present work, we present evidence that there exists a predominance of a naturally occurring T lymphocyte suppressive activity in the cord blood in that the removal of the suppressive activity by irradiation allows a normal maturation of newborn B cells. Such normal maturation of newborn B cells can also be obtained using mixed cultures of adult T cells and newborn B cells. Newborn suppressor T cells belong to both EA gamma (+) and EA gamma (-) fractions, and it is not known whether these two groups do or do not belong to different subsets. The PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activity does not play any role in the suppression observed in newborns since newborn monocytes are poorly suppressive and since they produce a smaller amount of PGE2 than adult monocytes. Some observations suggest, on the contrary, that the suppressive T lymphocytes can regulate the level of the PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activity. It should be noticed that similar observations about T lymphocyte and PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activities have been made at the same time using mothers' cells. These observations suggest the possibility that such changes in B cell immune regulation may result from an interaction between maternal and fetal lymphoid cells.

  12. Osteogenic activities of genistein derivatives were influenced by the presence of prenyl group at ring A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiao-Li; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Wong, Man-Sau

    2008-12-01

    Our recent report indicated that the crude extract from stem bark of Erythrina variegata L. (Leguminosae) (EV) exerted beneficial effects against osteoporosis induced by estrogen deficiency in vivo. Follow-up phytochemical study has isolated genistein-derivatives mainly in the form of prenylgenistein from this extract, including 6-prenylgenistein, 8-prenylgenistein, and 6, 8-diprenylgenistein. The present study was performed to investigate the structure-function relationship of these compounds on osteoblastic proliferation, differentiation and mineralization in UMR 106 cells. Our results showed that genistein did not stimulate cell growth while 8-prenylgenistein promoted cell growth significantly by 10 approximately 23%. In contrast, the treatment by 6-prenylgenistein for 48 h reduced UMR 106 cell proliferation when compared to cells treated with genistein. The proliferation of 6,8-diprenylgenistein-treated cells was greater than those treated by 6-prenylgenistein at all testing concentrations. For ALP activity, significant increase was found in cells treated by either 8-prenylgenistein or 6,8-diprenylgenistein for 48 h at the concentration of 10(-10) M. In mineralization study, the content of Ca and P in extracellular matrix were significantly increased in 8-prenylgenistein treated cells. The results showed that genistein derivatives isolated from EV demonstrated stimulatory effects on osteogenesis in UMR 106 cells. Based on the study of structure-activity relationship, it appears that prenylation at C-8, but not at C-6, could increase the bone-protective effect of genistein. PMID:19099220

  13. Study on real-time wear measurement of piston-ring and cylinder-bore in an engine using thin layer activation method.

    PubMed

    Donghui, Huang; Pingsheng, Wang; Weizhi, Tian; Dequan, Zhao; Guangzhou, Cao; Bangfa, Ni; Xiuhua, Zhang; Lin, Li; Guiying, Zhang; Cunxiong, Liu; Dehong, Li

    2008-08-01

    The instantaneous wear rates for both the top compression piston-ring and the cylinder-bore, in a ZS1105 diesel engine, were measured in situ using the method of thin layer activation (TLA). The experimental arrangement and methods for calibrating the test specimens are described. During a 300 s counting interval, the minimum detectable wear depths for the cylinder-bore and piston-ring were 9 and 75 nm, respectively. These values reflect average recession depths and may not reflect localized differences in wear damage. Nevertheless, such in situ techniques can be usefully employed in engine development. PMID:18424051

  14. Fbxw5 suppresses nuclear c-Myb activity via DDB1-Cul4-Rbx1 ligase-mediated sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanei-Ishii, Chie; Nomura, Teruaki; Egoh, Ayako; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fbxw5 enhances sumoylation of c-Myb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex mediates c-Myb sumoylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Fbxw5-DDB1-Cul4A-Rdx1 complex is a dual SUMO/ubiquitin ligase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fbxw5 suppresses the c-Myb trans-activating capacity. -- Abstract: The c-myb proto-oncogene product (c-Myb) is degraded in response to Wnt-1 signaling. In this process, Fbxw7{alpha}, the F-box protein of the SCF complex, binds to c-Myb via its C-terminal WD40 domain, and induces the ubiquitination of c-Myb. Here, we report that Fbxw5, another F-box protein, enhances sumoylation of nuclear c-Myb. Fbxw5 enhanced c-Myb sumoylation via the DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex. Since the Fbxw5-DDB1-Cul4A-Rbx1 complex was shown to act as a ubiquitin ligase for tumor suppressor TSC2, our results suggest that this complex can function as a dual SUMO/ubiquitin ligase. Fbxw5, which is localized to both nucleus and cytosol, enhanced sumoylation of nuclear c-Myb and induced the localization of c-Myb to nuclear dot-like domains. Co-expression of Fbxw5 suppressed the trans-activation of c-myc promoter by wild-type c-Myb, but not by v-Myb, which lacks the sumoylation sites. These results suggest that multiple E3 ligases suppress c-Myb activity through sumoylation or ubiquitination, and that v-Myb is no longer subject to these negative regulations.

  15. Suppression of preoptic sleep-regulatory neuronal activity during corticotropin-releasing factor-induced sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gvilia, Irma; Suntsova, Natalia; Kumar, Sunil; McGinty, Dennis; Szymusiak, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is implicated in sleep and arousal regulation. Exogenous CRF causes sleep suppression that is associated with activation of at least two important arousal systems: pontine noradrenergic and hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons. It is not known whether CRF also impacts sleep-promoting neuronal systems. We hypothesized that CRF-mediated changes in wake and sleep involve decreased activity of hypothalamic sleep-regulatory neurons localized in the preoptic area. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of CRF on sleep-wake measures and c-Fos expression in GABAergic neurons in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPN) and ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) in different experimental conditions. Administration of CRF (0.1 nmol) during baseline rest phase led to delayed sleep onset and decreases in total amount and mean duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Administration of CRF during acute sleep deprivation (SD) resulted in suppression of recovery sleep and decreased c-Fos expression in MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons. Compared with vehicle controls, intracerebroventricular CRF potentiated disturbances of both NREM and REM sleep in rats exposed to a species-specific psychological stressor, the dirty cage of a male conspecific. The number of MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons expressing c-Fos was reduced in the CRF-treated group of dirty cage-exposed rats. These findings confirm the involvement of CRF in wake-sleep cycle regulation and suggest that increased CRF signaling in the brain 1) negatively affects homeostatic responses to sleep loss, 2) exacerbates stress-induced disturbances of sleep, and 3) suppresses the activity of sleep-regulatory neurons of the MnPN and VLPO. PMID:26333784

  16. Analytical modeling and active vibration suppression of adaptive composite panels with optimal actuator configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Su; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, models of adaptive composite panels with surface-mounted/embedded piezoelectric patches are analytically built using the Lagrange-Rayleigh-Ritz method (LRRM), verified through experiments and finite element method (FEM), and used in piezoelectric actuator placement optimization and vibration control. Two panels are considered: a cantilevered adaptive composite beam (ACB) and an adaptive circular composite plate (ACCP) with complex boundaries. The inertia and stiffness of the surface-mounted/embedded piezoelectric patches are included in the developed models. To obtain the mode shapes of the ACCP, which are essential to the LRRM modeling, the method of separation of variables is employed and Bessel series and modified Bessel series are introduced. The built models are verified by experiments for the ACB and by the FEM for the ACCP. The actuation configurations of the piezoelectric patches in the panels are optimized based on the introduced analytical model. Finally, with the optimal locations of the piezoelectric patches, the vibration suppression of the ACB and the ACCP is experimentally and numerically carried out, and excellent vibration suppressions for both adaptive panels are obtained.

  17. Adaptive Controls Method Demonstrated for the Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive feedback control method was demonstrated that suppresses thermoacoustic instabilities in a liquid-fueled combustor of a type used in aircraft engines. Extensive research has been done to develop lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems. However, these lean-burning combustors are susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities (high-frequency pressure waves), which can fatigue combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating lives of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppressing the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors under NASA's Propulsion and Power Program. This control methodology has been developed and tested in a partnership of the NASA Glenn Research Center, Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and the Georgia Institute of Technology. Initial combustor rig testing of the controls algorithm was completed during 2002. Subsequently, the test results were analyzed and improvements to the method were incorporated in 2003, which culminated in the final status of this controls algorithm. This control methodology is based on adaptive phase shifting. The combustor pressure oscillations are sensed and phase shifted, and a high-frequency fuel valve is actuated to put pressure oscillations into the combustor to cancel pressure oscillations produced by the instability.

  18. Nardo Ring, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Nardo Ring is a striking visual feature from space, and astronauts have photographed it several times. The Ring is a race car test track; it is 12.5 kilometers long and steeply banked to reduce the amount of active steering needed by drivers. The Nardo Ring lies in a remote area on the heel of Italy's 'boot,' 50 kilometers east of the naval port of Taranto. The Ring encompasses a number of active (green) and fallow (brown to dark brown) agricultural fields. In this zone of intensive agriculture, farmers gain access to their fields through the Ring via a series of underpasses. Winding features within the southern section of the Ring appear to be smaller, unused race tracks.

    The image covers an area of 18.8 x 16.4 km, was acquired on August 17. 2007, and is located at 49.3 degrees north latitude, 17.8 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Revin, D G; Hemingway, M; Wang, Y; Cockburn, J W; Belyanin, A

    2016-05-05

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  20. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    PubMed Central

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  1. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  2. Active suppression of air refractive index fluctuation using a Fabry-Perot cavity and a piezoelectric volume actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Banh, Tuan Quoc; Ohkubo, Yuria; Murai, Yoshinosuke; Aketagawa, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Air refractive index fluctuation ({Delta}n{sub air}) is one of the largest uncertainty sources in precision interferometry systems that require a resolution of nanometer order or less. We introduce a method for the active suppression of {Delta}n{sub air} inside a normal air-environment chamber using a Fabry-Perot cavity and a piezoelectric volume actuator. The temporal air refractive index (n{sub air}) at a local point is maintained constant with an expanded uncertainty of {approx}4.2x10{sup -9} (k=2), a sufficiently low uncertainty for precise measurements unaffected by {Delta}n{sub air} to be made inside a chamber.

  3. Characterization of the RNA Silencing Suppression Activity of the Ebola Virus VP35 Protein in Plants and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yali; Cherukuri, Nil Celebi; Jackel, Jamie N.; Wu, Zetang; Crary, Monica; Buckley, Kenneth J.; Bisaro, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a lethal hemorrhagic fever for which there is no approved effective treatment or prevention strategy. EBOV VP35 is a virulence factor that blocks innate antiviral host responses, including the induction of and response to alpha/beta interferon. VP35 is also an RNA silencing suppressor (RSS). By inhibiting microRNA-directed silencing, mammalian virus RSSs have the capacity to alter the cellular environment to benefit replication. A reporter gene containing specific microRNA target sequences was used to demonstrate that prior expression of wild-type VP35 was able to block establishment of microRNA silencing in mammalian cells. In addition, wild-type VP35 C-terminal domain (CTD) protein fusions were shown to bind small interfering RNA (siRNA). Analysis of mutant proteins demonstrated that reporter activity in RSS assays did not correlate with their ability to antagonize double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase R (PKR) or bind siRNA. The results suggest that enhanced reporter activity in the presence of VP35 is a composite of nonspecific translational enhancement and silencing suppression. Moreover, most of the specific RSS activity in mammalian cells is RNA binding independent, consistent with VP35's proposed role in sequestering one or more silencing complex proteins. To examine RSS activity in a system without interferon, VP35 was tested in well-characterized plant silencing suppression assays. VP35 was shown to possess potent plant RSS activity, and the activities of mutant proteins correlated strongly, but not exclusively, with RNA binding ability. The results suggest the importance of VP35-protein interactions in blocking silencing in a system (mammalian) that cannot amplify dsRNA. PMID:22238300

  4. Curcumin Modulates the Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells by Suppressing Constitutive and Inducible NF-{kappa}B Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sandur, Santosh K.; Deorukhkar, Amit; Pandey, Manoj K.; Pabon, Ana Maria B.S.; Shentu, Shujun; Guha, Sushovan; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is an integral part of the preoperative treatment of rectal cancers. However, only a minority of patients achieve a complete pathologic response to therapy because of resistance of these tumors to radiation therapy. This resistance may be mediated by constitutively active pro-survival signaling pathways or by inducible/acquired mechanisms in response to radiation therapy. Simultaneous inhibition of these pathways can sensitize these tumors to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal cancer cells were exposed to clinically relevant doses of gamma rays, and the mechanism of their radioresistance was investigated. We characterized the transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activation as a mechanism of inducible radioresistance in colorectal cancer and used curcumin, the active ingredient in the yellow spice turmeric, to overcome this resistance. Results: Curcumin inhibited the proliferation and the post-irradiation clonogenic survival of multiple colorectal cancer cell lines. Radiation stimulated NF-{kappa}B activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas curcumin suppressed this radiation-induced NF-{kappa}B activation via inhibition of radiation-induced phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of {kappa}B alpha, inhibition of inhibitor of {kappa}B kinase activity, and inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Curcumin also suppressed NF-{kappa}B-regulated gene products (Bcl-2, Bcl-x{sub L}, inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2, cyclooxygenase-2, and cyclin D1). Conclusions: Our results suggest that transient inducible NF-{kappa}B activation provides a prosurvival response to radiation that may account for development of radioresistance. Curcumin blocks this signaling pathway and potentiates the antitumor effects of radiation therapy.

  5. Pyrrolidinium fullerene induces apoptosis by activation of procaspase-9 via suppression of Akt in primary effusion lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Shigeo; Ono, Toshiya; Ui, Sadaharu; Yagi, Syota; Kagawa, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hisami; Ohe, Tomoyuki; Mashino, Tadahiko; Fujimuro, Masahiro

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Seven fullerenes were evaluated in terms of their cytotoxic effects on B-lymphomas. • Pyrrolidinium fullerene induced apoptosis of KSHV-infected B-lymphoma PEL cells. • The activation of Akt is essential for PEL cell survival. • Pyrrolidinium fullerene activated caspase-9 by inactivating Akt in PEL cells. • Pyrrolidinium fullerene have potential as novel drugs for the treatment of PEL. - Abstract: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a subtype of non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma and is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in immunosuppressed patients. In general, PEL cells are derived from post-germinal center B-cells and are infected with KSHV. To evaluate potential novel anti-tumor compounds against KSHV-associated PEL, seven water-soluble fullerene derivatives were evaluated as potential drug candidates for the treatment of PEL. Herein, we discovered a pyrrolidinium fullerene derivative, 1,1,1′,1′-tetramethyl [60]fullerenodipyrrolidinium diiodide, which induced apoptosis of PEL cells via a novel mechanism, the caspase-9 activation by suppressing the caspase-9 phosphorylation, causing caspase-9 inactivation. Pyrrolidinium fullerene treatment reduced significantly the viability of PEL cells compared with KSHV-uninfected lymphoma cells, and induced the apoptosis of PEL cells by activating caspase-9 via procaspase-9 cleavage. Pyrrolidinium fullerene additionally reduced the Ser473 phosphorylation of Akt and Ser196 of procaspase-9. Ser473-phosphorylated Akt (i.e., activated Akt) phosphorylates Ser196 in procaspase-9, causing inactivation of procaspase-9. We also demonstrated that Akt inhibitors suppressed the proliferation of PEL cells compared with KSHV-uninfected cells. Our data therefore suggest that Akt activation is essential for cell survival in PEL and a pyrrolidinium fullerene derivative induced apoptosis by activating caspase-9 via suppression of Akt in PEL cells. In addition, we evaluated

  6. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    system’s orbital elements and structure. Our work concludes that rings may exist in Earth’s equatorial plane and in the plane of the lunar orbit, that such rings are filamentary structures comprising segments of geologically homogeneous material flung into earth’s orbit at distinct periods of lunar volcanism, and that earth’s weather may indeed be very strongly affected by the rings. In closing, until the time of the lunar landing in 1969, the moon was considered geologically dead. But today, we have multiple lines of evidence that the Moon is still volcanically active. According to our study, this volcanism may affect weather and climate considerably. If lunar volcanism and weather on Earth are linked, then a satisfactory understanding of lunar volcanism is called for by considerations of human welfare. The subsistence farmer has an immediate need to know what is true about our Moon; food security depends on it.

  7. Three novel acetylation sites in the Foxp3 transcription factor regulate the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye-Sook; Lim, Hyung W.; Wu, Jessica; Schnoelzer, Martina; Verdin, Eric; Ott, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The Foxp3 transcription factor is the master regulator of regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation and function. Its activity is regulated by reversible acetylation. Using mass spectrometry of immunoprecipitated proteins, we identify three novel acetylation sites in murine Foxp3 (K31, K262, and K267) and the corresponding sites in human FoxP3 proteins. Newly raised modification-specific antibodies against acetylated K31 and K267 confirm acetylation of these residues in murine Tregs. Mutant Foxp3 proteins carrying arginine substitutions at the three acetylation sites (3KR) accumulate in T cells to higher levels than wildtype Foxp3 and exert better suppressive activity in co-culture experiments. Acetylation and stability of wildtype, but not mutant, Foxp3 is enhanced when cells are treated with Ex-527, an inhibitor of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1. Treatment with Ex-527 promotes Foxp3 expression during induced Treg differentiation, enhances Foxp3 levels in natural Tregs, and prevents loss of Foxp3 expression in adoptively transferred Tregs in mice. Our data identify SIRT1 as a negative regulator of Treg function via deacetylation of three novel target sites in Foxp3. SIRT1 inhibitors strengthen the suppressive activity of Tregs and may be useful in enhancing Treg-based therapeutic approaches to autoimmune diseases or graft rejections. PMID:22312127

  8. Increased Histone Deacetylase Activity Involved in the Suppressed Invasion of Cancer Cells Survived from ALA-Mediated Photodynamic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Tzu; Tsai, Yi-Jane; Lee, Ming-Jen; Chen, Chin-Tin

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have found that cancer cells survived from 5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) have abnormal mitochondrial function and suppressed cellular invasiveness. Here we report that both the mRNA expression level and enzymatic activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) were elevated in the PDT-derived variants with dysfunctional mitochondria. The activated HDAC deacetylated histone H3 and further resulted in the reduced migration and invasion, which correlated with the reduced expression of the invasion-related genes, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), paternally expressed gene 1 (PEG1), and miR-355, the intronic miRNA. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further demonstrate the reduced amount of acetylated histone H3 on the promoter regions of MMP9 and PEG1, supporting the down-regulation of these two genes in PDT-derived variants. These results indicate that HDAC activation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction could modulate the cellular invasiveness and its related gene expression. This argument was further verified in the 51-10 cybrid cells with the 4977 bp mtDNA deletion and A375 ρ0 cells with depleted mitochondria. These results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction might suppress tumor invasion through modulating histone acetylation. PMID:26473836

  9. Suppression of Tumor Growth in Mice by Rationally Designed Pseudopeptide Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase1

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kenneth W.; Christiansen, Victoria J.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Zhang, Roy R.; McKee, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments (TMEs) are composed of cancer cells, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix, microvessels, and endothelial cells. Two prolyl endopeptidases, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), are commonly overexpressed by epithelial-derived malignancies, with the specificity of FAP expression by cancer stromal fibroblasts suggesting FAP as a possible therapeutic target. Despite overexpression in most cancers and having a role in angiogenesis, inhibition of POP activity has received little attention as an approach to quench tumor growth. We developed two specific and highly effective pseudopeptide inhibitors, M83, which inhibits FAP and POP proteinase activities, and J94, which inhibits only POP. Both suppressed human colon cancer xenograft growth > 90% in mice. By immunohistochemical stains, M83- and J94-treated tumors had fewer microvessels, and apoptotic areas were apparent in both. In response to M83, but not J94, disordered collagen accumulations were observed. Neither M83- nor J94-treated mice manifested changes in behavior, weight, or gastrointestinal function. Tumor growth suppression was more extensive than noted with recently reported efforts by others to inhibit FAP proteinase function or reduce FAP expression. Diminished angiogenesis and the accompanying profound reduction in tumor growth suggest that inhibition of either FAP or POP may offer new therapeutic approaches that directly target TMEs. PMID:25622898

  10. Synthesis and in vivo diuretic activity of some new benzothiazole sulfonamides containing quinoxaline ring system.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif; Madhesia, Diwakar; Rashid, Mohd; Ahmad, Aftab; Khan, Shah Alam

    2016-12-01

    A series of new 6-substituted-N-[3-{2-(substituted phenyl)-ethenyl} quinoxaline-2(1H)-ylidene]-1,3-benzothiazole-2-amine (4a-f) were designed and synthesized by condensing 2-amino-benzothiazole-6-sulfonic acid amide (1) with chalcones of quinoxaline-2-one (3a-f) in a hope to obtain promising and a new class of diuretic agents. Structures of all the newly synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral data and elemental analysis. The pharmacological studies in experimental rats indicates that compound 4c possesses excellent in vivo diuretic activity of 1.13 and appears to be a better diuretic agent than the reference drugs, acetazolamide (1.0) and urea (0.88). Insight of the binding mode of the synthesized compounds (ligand) into the binding sites of carbonic anhydrase enzyme (PDF code: 4KUV) was provided by docking studies, performed with the help of Maestro 9.0 docking software. Further pharmacokinetic and toxicological studies are needed to confirm the safety of compound 4c which emerged as a lead diuretic compound.

  11. 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A, two diterpenes isolated from Euphorbia helioscopia suppress microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jingling; Xu, Jing; Cui, Chun-Ai; Guo, Yuanqiang; Jin, Da-Qing

    2016-01-26

    Microglia activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases by producing neurotoxic factors. In the present study, we found that two diterpenes isolated from Euphorbia helioscopia, 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A suppressed NO and PGE2 production by inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia cells. The diterpenes also inhibited the production of ROS and proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the mechanism involved the NF-κB but not Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Moreover, the two diterpenes also attenuate microglia activation-mediated neuronal death. These results suggest that 15-O-Acetyl-3-O-benzoylcharaciol and helioscopinolide A may provide potential therapeutic strategy for various neuroinflammatory diseases.

  12. Arctigenin promotes degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase through CHIP-associated proteasome pathway and suppresses its enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangyang; Li, Guilan; Lü, Chaotian; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Arctigenin, a natural dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Previous works showed that arctigenin decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced iNOS at transcription level. However, whether arctigenin could regulate iNOS at the post-translational level is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that arctigenin promoted the degradation of iNOS which is expressed under LPS stimulation in murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. Such degradation of iNOS protein is due to CHIP-associated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependency. Furthermore, arctigenin decreased iNOS phosphorylation through inhibiting ERK and Src activation, subsequently suppressed iNOS enzyme activity. In conclusion, our research displays a new finding that arctigenin can promote the ubiqitination and degradation of iNOS after LPS stimulation. iNOS activity regulated by arctigenin is likely to involve a multitude of crosstalking mechanisms.

  13. Drosophila Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) Promotes Warts Protein to Suppress Yorkie Protein Activity for Growth Control*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lianxin; Huang, Hongling; Li, Jinhui; Yin, Meng-Xin; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Zeng, Rong; Jiang, Jin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Hippo signaling regulates Wts activity to phosphorylate and inhibit Yki in order to control tissue growth. CK2 is widely expressed and involved in a variety of signaling pathways. In this study we report that Drosophila CK2 promotes Wts activity to phosphorylate and inhibit Yki activity, which is independent of Hpo-induced Wts promotion. In vivo, CK2 overexpression suppresses hpo mutant-induced expanded (Ex) up-regulation and overgrowth phenotype, whereas it cannot affect wts mutant. Consistent with this, knockdown of CK2 up-regulates Hpo pathway target expression. We also found that Drosophila CK2 is essential for tissue growth as a cell death inhibitor as knockdown of CK2 in the developing disc induces severe growth defects as well as caspase3 signals. Taken together, our results uncover a dual role of CK2; although its major role is promoting cell survive, it may potentially be a growth inhibitor as well. PMID:25320084

  14. A Testa Extract of Black Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) suppresses Adipogenic Activity of Adipose-derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younmi; Lee, Myoungsook; Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2015-01-01

    Black soybean teata is helpful to preventing obesity through enhancing energy expenditure and suppressing accumulation in mesenteric adipose tissue. The ethanol testa-extract of Cheongja #3 black soybean (ETCBS) is also have similar effects on obesity. So far, it is not clear whether the ethanol testa extract of black soybean can have effect on the characters of subcutaneous adipose stem cells such as proliferation, activity, and adipogenicity. The doubling time was different between subcutaneous adipose-derived stem (ADS) and visceral ADS cells. By the in vitro culture and passage, the doubling time was increased both of them. The shape was not different between groups and their passages were not cause the change of shapes. In the case of visceral ADS cells, the doubling time was 62.3 h or 40.3 h in control or high fat diet administrated mice, respectively, but not modified in subcutaneous ADS cells. ETCBS administration caused of increased the doubling time from 62.3 h to 84.2 h. ETCBS had suppressive effects on the cellular activity of subcutaneous ADS cells. The intensity of Oil Red O staining was very faint in 100 and 200 μg/mL ETCBS treated groups. The amounts of accumulated triglyceride were also significantly low in 100 and 200 μg/mL treated groups. From these results we know that the doubling times and the effects of ETCBS are different by the anatomical origin of ADS cells. It also suggested that ETCBS may suppress the differentiation of subcutaneous ADS cells into the precursors and maturing of adipocytes. PMID:26973975

  15. A Testa Extract of Black Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) suppresses Adipogenic Activity of Adipose-derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Younmi; Lee, Myoungsook; Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2015-12-01

    Black soybean teata is helpful to preventing obesity through enhancing energy expenditure and suppressing accumulation in mesenteric adipose tissue. The ethanol testa-extract of Cheongja #3 black soybean (ETCBS) is also have similar effects on obesity. So far, it is not clear whether the ethanol testa extract of black soybean can have effect on the characters of subcutaneous adipose stem cells such as proliferation, activity, and adipogenicity. The doubling time was different between subcutaneous adipose-derived stem (ADS) and visceral ADS cells. By the in vitro culture and passage, the doubling time was increased both of them. The shape was not different between groups and their passages were not cause the change of shapes. In the case of visceral ADS cells, the doubling time was 62.3 h or 40.3 h in control or high fat diet administrated mice, respectively, but not modified in subcutaneous ADS cells. ETCBS administration caused of increased the doubling time from 62.3 h to 84.2 h. ETCBS had suppressive effects on the cellular activity of subcutaneous ADS cells. The intensity of Oil Red O staining was very faint in 100 and 200 μg/mL ETCBS treated groups. The amounts of accumulated triglyceride were also significantly low in 100 and 200 μg/mL treated groups. From these results we know that the doubling times and the effects of ETCBS are different by the anatomical origin of ADS cells. It also suggested that ETCBS may suppress the differentiation of subcutaneous ADS cells into the precursors and maturing of adipocytes.

  16. Urinary bladder instability induced by selective suppression of the murine small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK3) channel

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Gerald M; Pozo, Maria J; Zvara, Peter; Petkov, Georgi V; Bond, Chris T; Adelman, John P; Nelson, Mark T

    2003-01-01

    Small conductance, calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels have an important role in determining the excitability and contractility of urinary bladder smooth muscle. Here, the role of the SK isoform SK3 was examined by altering expression levels of the SK3 gene using a mouse model that conditionally overexpresses SK3 channels (SK3T/T). Prominent SK3 immunostaining was found in both the smooth muscle (detrusor) and urothelium layers of the urinary bladder. SK currents were elevated 2.4-fold in isolated myocytes from SK3T/T mice. Selective suppression of SK3 expression by dietary doxycycline (DOX) decreased SK current density in isolated myocytes, increased phasic contractions of isolated urinary bladder smooth muscle strips and exposed high affinity effects of the blocker apamin of the SK isoforms (SK1–3), suggesting an additional participation from SK2 channels. The role of SK3 channels in urinary bladder function was assessed using cystometry in conscious, freely moving mice. The urinary bladders of SK3T/T had significantly greater bladder capacity, and urine output exceeded the infused saline volume. Suppression of SK3 channel expression did not alter filling pressure, threshold pressure or bladder capacity, but micturition pressure was elevated compared to control mice. However, SK3 suppression did eliminate excess urine production and caused a marked increase in non-voiding contractions. The ability to examine bladder function in mice in which SK3 channel expression is selectively altered reveals that these channels have a significant role in the control of non-voiding contractions in vivo. Activation of these channels may be a therapeutic approach for management of non-voiding contractions, a condition which characterizes many types of urinary bladder dysfunctions including urinary incontinence. PMID:12813145

  17. Suppressive effect of β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin on activated dendritic cells in an imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Jingxia; Zhang, Lu; Di, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Lin, Yan; Zeng, Zuping; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin, a main component of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, on activated dendritic cells (DCs) in a psoriasis mouse model. Methods: BALB/c mice were used to establish the animal model for psoriasis-like skin lesion; alkannin at 10 mg/kg (high), 5 mg/kg (medium), 2.5 mg/kg (low), respectively, were intragastrically administered. Psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) was used to evaluate the skin lesions. Histological changes, the thickness of epidermis, and the quantity of interleukin (IL)-23 in skin lesion were measured. In in vitro experiments, mononuclear cells in peripheral blood from healthy people were isolated, and monocytes were obtained. DCs with a mature state in differentiation and function were obtained through in vitro induction with several cytokines, and identified by flow cytometry. The influence of DCs on proliferation of allogenic lymphocytes was analyzed. The influence of alkannin on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression of pro-inflammatory factors by mature DCs was evaluated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Mice treated with alkannin at varying concentration showed obvious remission in psoriasis-like skin lesion compared to control group, with decreased PASI score, obviously reduced vertical thickness of epidermis. Besides, alkannin treatment decreased the expression of IL-23 in skin lesion. Alkannin (12.5 μg/mL) suppressed the ability of DCs to stimulate the proliferation of allogenic lymphocytes, and suppressed the expression and secretion of IL-6, IL-12 p40, IL-23, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA and proteins, respectively. Conclusions: β, β-dimethylacryloyl alkannin could suppress the function of activated DCs in imiquimod-induced psoriasis mouse model. PMID:26261548

  18. Celastrol inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammation in orbital fibroblasts through the suppression of NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Yuan, Yifei; Zhang, Yali; He, Qianwen; Xu, Rongjuan; Ge, Fangfang; Wu, Chen

    2016-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland, which is characterized by hyperthyroidism, diffuse goiter and Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). Although several therapeutic strategies for the treatment of GO have been developed, the effectiveness and the safety profile of these therapies remain to be fully elucidated. Therefore, examination of novel GO therapies remains an urgent requirement. Celastrol, a triterpenoid isolated from traditional Chinese medicine, is a promising drug for the treatment of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. CCK‑8 and apoptosis assays were performed to investigate cytotoxicity of celastrol and effect on apoptosis on orbital fibroblasts. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and ELISAs were performed to examine the effect of celastrol on interleukin (IL)‑1β‑induced inflammation in orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO. The results demonstrated that celastrol significantly attenuated the expression of IL‑6, IL‑8, cyclooxygenase (COX)‑2 and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1), and inhibited IL‑1β‑induced increases in the expression of IL‑6, IL‑8, ICAM‑1 and COX‑2. The levels of prostaglandin E2 in orbital fibroblasts induced by IL‑1β were also suppressed by celastrol. Further investigation revealed that celastrol suppressed the IL‑1β‑induced inflammatory responses in orbital fibroblasts through inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB. Taken together, these results suggested that celastrol attenuated the IL‑1β‑induced pro‑inflammatory pathway in orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO, which was associated with the suppression of NF-κB activation. PMID:27484716

  19. Molecular Determinants of Resistance Activation and Suppression by Phytophthora infestans Effector IPI-O

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Liu, Zhenyu; Halterman, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite intensive breeding efforts, potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, remains a threat to potato production worldwide because newly evolved pathogen strains have consistently overcome major resistance genes. The potato RB gene, derived from the wild species Solanum bulbocastanum, confers resistance to most P. infestans strains through recognition of members of the pathogen effector family IPI-O. While the majority of IPI-O proteins are recognized by RB to elicit resistance (e.g. IPI-O1, IPI-O2), some family members are able to elude detection (e.g. IPI-O4). In addition, IPI-O4 blocks recognition of IPI-O1, leading to inactivation of RB-mediated programmed cell death. Here, we report results that elucidate molecular mechanisms governing resistance elicitation or suppression of RB by IPI-O. Our data indicate self-association of the RB coiled coil (CC) domain as well as a physical interaction between this domain and the effectors IPI-O4 and IPI-O1. We identified four amino acids within IPI-O that are critical for interaction with the RB CC domain and one of these amino acids, at position 129, determines hypersensitive response (HR) elicitation in planta. IPI-O1 mutant L129P fails to induce HR in presence of RB while IPI-O4 P129L gains the ability to induce an HR. Like IPI-O4, IPI-O1 L129P is also able to suppress the HR mediated by RB, indicating a critical step in the evolution of this gene family. Our results point to a model in which IPI-O effectors can affect RB function through interaction with the RB CC domain. PMID:22438813

  20. Suppression of autophagic activation in the mouse uterus by estrogen and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soyoung; Shin, Hyejin; Song, Haengseok; Lim, Hyunjung Jade

    2014-04-01

    Autophagy is a major cellular catabolic pathway tightly associated with cell survival. The involvement of autophagy in the prolonged survival of blastocysts in the uterus is well established, and it was assumed that ovarian steroid hormones - progesterone (P4) and estrogens - have important roles in the regulation of autophagy. However, information is scarce regarding whether these hormones regulate autophagy in certain hormone-responsive cellular systems. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen and P4 on autophagic response in the uteri of pregnant mice and in ovariectomized (OVX) mice treated with hormones. During pregnancy, autophagic response is high on days 1 and 2 when the uterus shows an inflammatory response to mating, but it subsides around the time of implantation. Dexamethasone treatment to day 1 pregnant mice reduced autophagy in the uterus. In OVX mouse uteri, estrogen or P4 reduces autophagic response within 6 h. Glycogen content in OVX uteri was increased by 3-methyladenine treatment, suggesting that autophagy is involved in glycogen breakdown in the hormone-deprived uterus. The classical nuclear receptor antagonists, ICI 182 780 or mifepristone, lead to the recovery of the autophagic response in OVX uteri. The suppression of autophagy by 17β-estradiol is inversely correlated with the accumulation of phospho-mouse target of rapamycin, and rapamycin treatment is moderately effective in the upregulation of autophagic response in OVX mouse uteri. Collectively, this study establishes that the uterine autophagy is induced in hormone-derived environment and is suppressed by hormone treatment. Uterine autophagy may have multiple functions as a responsive mechanism to acute inflammation and as an energy provider by breaking down glycogen under hormone deprivation.

  1. Targeting RING domains of Mdm2-MdmX E3 complex activates apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Xu, C; Ling, X; Fan, C; Buckley, B P; Chernov, M V; Ellis, L; Li, F; Muñoz, I G; Wang, X

    2015-12-31

    Reactivation of tumor-suppressor p53 for targeted cancer therapy is an attractive strategy for cancers bearing wild-type (WT) p53. Targeting the Mdm2-p53 interface or MdmX ((MDM4), mouse double minute 4)-p53 interface or both has been a focus in the field. However, targeting the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2-MdmX really interesting new gene (RING)-RING interaction as a novel anticancer strategy has never been explored. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors targeting Mdm2-MdmX RING-RING interaction as a new class of E3 ligase inhibitors. With a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based E3 activity assay in high-throughput screening of a chemical library, we identified inhibitors (designated as MMRis (Mdm2-MdmX RING domain inhibitors)) that specifically inhibit Mdm2-MdmX E3 ligase activity toward Mdm2 and p53 substrates. MMRi6 and its analog MMRi64 are capable of disrupting Mdm2-MdmX interactions in vitro and activating p53 in cells. In leukemia cells, MMRi64 potently induces downregulation of Mdm2 and MdmX. In contrast to Nutlin3a, MMRi64 only induces the expression of pro-apoptotic gene PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) with minimal induction of growth-arresting gene p21. Consequently, MMRi64 selectively induces the apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells. Owing to the distinct mechanisms of action of MMRi64 and Nutlin3a, their combination synergistically induces p53 and apoptosis. Taken together, this study reveals that Mdm2-MdmX has a critical role in apoptotic response of the p53 pathway and MMRi64 may serve as a new pharmacological tool for p53 studies and a platform for cancer drug development.

  2. EphB and Ephrin-B Interactions Mediate Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Suppression of Activated T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao M.; Arthur, Agnes; Hayball, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) express the contact-dependent erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) receptor tyrosine kinase family and their cognate ephrin ligands, which are known to regulate thymocyte maturation and selection, T-cell transendothelial migration, activation, co-stimulation, and proliferation. However, the contribution of Eph/ephrin molecules in mediating human MSC suppression of activated T-cells remains to be determined. In the present study, we showed that EphB2 and ephrin-B2 are expressed by ex vivo expanded MSC, while the corresponding ligands, ephrin-B1 and EphB4, respectively, are highly expressed by T-cells. Initial studies demonstrated that EphB2-Fc and ephrin-B2-Fc molecules suppressed T-cell proliferation in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assays compared with human IgG-treated controls. While the addition of a third-party MSC population demonstrated dramatic suppression of T-cell proliferation responses in the MLR, blocking the function of EphB2 or EphB4 receptors using inhibitor binding peptides significantly increased T-cell proliferation. Consistent with these observations, shRNA EphB2 or ephrin-B2 knockdown expression in MSC reduced their ability to inhibit T-cell proliferation. Importantly, the expression of immunosuppressive factors, indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, transforming growth factor-β1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expressed by MSC, was up-regulated after stimulation with EphB4 and ephrin-B1 in the presence of interferon (IFN)-γ, compared with untreated controls. Conversely, key factors involved in T-cell activation and proliferation, such as interleukin (IL)-2, IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-17, were down-regulated by T-cells treated with EphB2 or ephrin-B2 compared with untreated controls. Studies utilizing signaling inhibitors revealed that inhibition of T-cell proliferation is partly mediated through EphB2-induced ephrin-B1 reverse signaling or ephrin-B2-mediated EphB4 forward

  3. An Allergic Lung Microenvironment Suppresses Carbon Nanotube-Induced Inflammasome Activation via STAT6-Dependent Inhibition of Caspase-1

    PubMed Central

    Shipkowski, Kelly A.; Taylor, Alexia J.; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Glista-Baker, Ellen E.; Sayers, Brian C.; Messenger, Zachary J.; Bauer, Rebecca N.; Jaspers, Ilona; Bonner, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) represent a human health risk as mice exposed by inhalation display pulmonary fibrosis. Production of IL-1β via inflammasome activation is a mechanism of MWCNT-induced acute inflammation and has been implicated in chronic fibrogenesis. Mice sensitized to allergens have elevated T-helper 2 (Th2) cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, and are susceptible to MWCNT-induced airway fibrosis. We postulated that Th2 cytokines would modulate MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL-1β release in vitro and in vivo during allergic inflammation. Methods THP-1 macrophages were primed with LPS, exposed to MWCNTs and/or IL-4 or IL-13 for 24 hours, and analyzed for indicators of inflammasome activation. C57BL6 mice were sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) allergen and MWCNTs were delivered to the lungs by oropharyngeal aspiration. Mice were euthanized 1 or 21 days post-MWCNT exposure and evaluated for lung inflammasome components and allergic inflammatory responses. Results Priming of THP-1 macrophages with LPS increased pro-IL-1β and subsequent exposure to MWCNTs induced IL-1β secretion. IL-4 or IL-13 decreased MWCNT-induced IL-1β secretion by THP-1 cells and reduced pro-caspase-1 but not pro-IL-1β. Treatment of THP-1 cells with STAT6 inhibitors, either Leflunomide or JAK I inhibitor, blocked suppression of caspase activity by IL-4 and IL-13. In vivo, MWCNTs alone caused neutrophilic infiltration into the lungs of mice 1 day post-exposure and increased IL-1β in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and pro-caspase-1 immuno-staining in macrophages and airway epithelium. HDM sensitization alone caused eosinophilic inflammation with increased IL-13. MWCNT exposure after HDM sensitization increased total cell numbers in BALF, but decreased numbers of neutrophils and IL-1β in BALF as well as reduced pro-caspase-1 in lung tissue. Despite reduced IL-1β mice exposed to MWCNTs after HDM developed more severe airway fibrosis by 21 days and

  4. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  5. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) suppresses postprandial lipidemia through fatty acid oxidation in enterocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rino; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Murota, Kaeko; Yamada, Yuko; Niiya, Saori; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Murakami, Yoko; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased oxygen consumption rate and CO{sub 2} production and decreased secretion of triglyceride and ApoB from Caco-2 cells. {yields} Orally administration of bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and CO{sub 2} production in small intestinal epithelial cells. {yields} Treatment with bezafibrate decreased postprandial serum concentration of triglyceride after oral injection of olive oil in mice. {yields} It suggested that intestinal lipid metabolism regulated by PPAR{alpha} activation suppresses postprandial lipidemia. -- Abstract: Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha} which regulates lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues such as the liver and skeletal muscle, decreases circulating lipid levels, thus improving hyperlipidemia under fasting conditions. Recently, postprandial serum lipid levels have been found to correlate more closely to cardiovascular diseases than fasting levels, although fasting hyperlipidemia is considered an important risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of PPAR{alpha} activation on postprandial lipidemia has not been clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of PPAR{alpha} activation in enterocytes on lipid secretion and postprandial lipidemia. In Caco-2 enterocytes, bezafibrate, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes, such as acyl-CoA oxidase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, and acyl-CoA synthase, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and suppressed secretion levels of both triglycerides and apolipoprotein B into the basolateral side. In vivo experiments revealed that feeding high-fat-diet containing bezafibrate increased mRNA expression levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and

  6. The Conversion and operation of the Cornell electron storage ring as a test accelerator (cesrta) for damping rings research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.A.; Alexander, J.; Byrd, J.; Celata, C.M.; Corlett, J.; De Santis, S.; Furman, M.; Jackson, A.; Kraft, R.; Munson, D.; Penn, G.; Plate, D.; Rawlins, A.; Venturini, M.; Zisman, M.; Billing, M.; Calvey, J.; Chapman, S.; Codner, G.; Conolly, C.; Crittenden, J.; Dobbins, J.; Dugan, G.; Fontes, E.; Forster, M.; Gallagher, R.; Gray, S.; Greenwald, S.; Hartill, D.; Hopkins, W.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Livezey, J.; Lyndaker, A.; Medjidzade, V.; Meller, R.; Peck, S.; Peterson, D.; Rendina, M.; Revesz, P.; Rice, D.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Savino, J.; Seeley, R.; Sexton, J.; Shanks, J.; Sikora, J.; Smolenski, K.; Strohman, C.; Temnykh, A.; tigner, M.; Whitney, W.; Williams, H.; Vishniakou, S.; Wilkens, T.; Harkay, K.; Holtzapple, R.; Smith, E.; Jones, J.; Wolski, A.; He, Y.; Ross, M.; Tan, C.Y.; Zwaska, R.; Flanagan, J.; Jain, P.; Kanazawa, K.; Ohmi, K.; Sakai, H.; Shibata, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Kharakh, D.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    In March of 2008, the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) concluded twenty eight years of colliding beam operations for the CLEO high energy physics experiment. We have reconfigured CESR as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R&D. The primary goals of the CesrTA program are to achieve a beam emittance approaching that of the ILC Damping Rings with a positron beam, to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with both low emittance positron and electron beams, to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, and to develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies (in particular a fast x-ray beam size monitor capable of single pass measurements of individual bunches). We report on progress with the CESR conversion activities, the status and schedule for the experimental program, and the first experimental results that have been obtained.

  7. The mRNA-edited form of GABRA3 suppresses GABRA3-mediated Akt activation and breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Sakurai, Masayuki; Yan, Jinchun; Li, Yan; Xu, Hua; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Paul J.; Zhang, Lin; Showe, Louise C.; Nishikura, Kazuko; Huang, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is a critical event affecting breast cancer patient survival. To identify molecules contributing to the metastatic process, we analysed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer data and identified 41 genes whose expression is inversely correlated with survival. Here we show that GABAA receptor alpha3 (Gabra3), normally exclusively expressed in adult brain, is also expressed in breast cancer, with high expression of Gabra3 being inversely correlated with breast cancer survival. We demonstrate that Gabra3 activates the AKT pathway to promote breast cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Importantly, we find an A-to-I RNA-edited form of Gabra3 only in non-invasive breast cancers and show that edited Gabra3 suppresses breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. A-to-I-edited Gabra3 has reduced cell surface expression and suppresses the activation of AKT required for cell migration and invasion. Our study demonstrates a significant role for mRNA-edited Gabra3 in breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26869349

  8. Slimming and Appetite-Suppressing Effects of Caraway Aqueous Extract as a Natural Therapy in Physically Active Women.

    PubMed

    Kazemipoor, Mahnaz; Hamzah, Sareena; Hajifaraji, Majid; Radzi, Che Wan Jasimah Bt Wan Mohamed; Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Following the current 'Globesity' trend, there is an increasing demand for alternative natural therapies for weight management. Numerous phytoconstituents reduce body weight through suppressing appetite and reducing food intake. Caraway (Carum carvi L.) is one of the medicinal plants that is traditionally used for weight loss. In this study, the appetite-suppressing effects of caraway aqueous extract (CAE) on 70 aerobically trained, overweight, and obese women were examined in a triple-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study. Subjects were randomly allocated into placebo and experimental groups and consumed either 30 mL/day of CAE or placebo without changing their diet or physical activity over a period of 90 days. Calorie and macronutrient intake and anthropometric indices were measured before and after the intervention. In addition, appetite changes were assessed through a visual analog scale and an ad libitum pizza test. After the intervention, the results showed a significant reduction in appetite levels and carbohydrate intake of the experimental group compared with the placebo group. All of the anthropometric indices were reduced significantly in CAE compared with placebo group (p < 0.01). These preliminary outcomes suggest that a dietary CAE might be effective in weight management of physically active, adult females, reducing their body size and hunger level. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Slimming and Appetite-Suppressing Effects of Caraway Aqueous Extract as a Natural Therapy in Physically Active Women.

    PubMed

    Kazemipoor, Mahnaz; Hamzah, Sareena; Hajifaraji, Majid; Radzi, Che Wan Jasimah Bt Wan Mohamed; Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2016-06-01

    Following the current 'Globesity' trend, there is an increasing demand for alternative natural therapies for weight management. Numerous phytoconstituents reduce body weight through suppressing appetite and reducing food intake. Caraway (Carum carvi L.) is one of the medicinal plants that is traditionally used for weight loss. In this study, the appetite-suppressing effects of caraway aqueous extract (CAE) on 70 aerobically trained, overweight, and obese women were examined in a triple-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study. Subjects were randomly allocated into placebo and experimental groups and consumed either 30 mL/day of CAE or placebo without changing their diet or physical activity over a period of 90 days. Calorie and macronutrient intake and anthropometric indices were measured before and after the intervention. In addition, appetite changes were assessed through a visual analog scale and an ad libitum pizza test. After the intervention, the results showed a significant reduction in appetite levels and carbohydrate intake of the experimental group compared with the placebo group. All of the anthropometric indices were reduced significantly in CAE compared with placebo group (p < 0.01). These preliminary outcomes suggest that a dietary CAE might be effective in weight management of physically active, adult females, reducing their body size and hunger level. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26988309

  10. Acetylshikonin Inhibits Human Pancreatic PANC-1 Cancer Cell Proliferation by Suppressing the NF-κB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seok-Cheol; Choi, Bu Young

    2015-01-01

    Acetylshikonin, a natural naphthoquinone derivative compound, has been used for treatment of inflammation and cancer. In the present study, we have investigated whether acetylshikonin could regulate the NF-κB signaling pathway, thereby leading to suppression of tumorigenesis. We observed that acetylshikonin significantly reduced proliferation of several cancer cell lines, including human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, acetylshikonin inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or tumor necrosis-α (TNF-α)-induced NF-κB reporter activity. Proteome cytokine array and real-time RT-PCR results illustrated that acetylshikonin inhibition of PMA-induced production of cytokines was mediated at the transcriptional level and it was associated with suppression of NF-κB activity and matrix metalloprotenases. Finally, we observed that an exposure of acetylshikonin significantly inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of PANC-1 cells. Together, our results indicate that acetylshikonin could serve as a promising therapeutic agent for future treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26336582

  11. RNA-binding motif protein 47 inhibits Nrf2 activity to suppress tumor growth in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, T; Isogaya, K; Sakai, S; Morikawa, M; Morishita, Y; Ehata, S; Miyazono, K; Koinuma, D

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins provide a new layer of posttranscriptional regulation of RNA during cancer progression. We identified RNA-binding motif protein 47 (RBM47) as a target gene of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG cells) that have undergone the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. TGF-β repressed RBM47 expression in NMuMG cells and lung cancer cell lines. Expression of RBM47 correlated with good prognosis in patients with lung, breast and gastric cancer. RBM47 suppressed the expression of cell metabolism-related genes, which were the direct targets of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2; also known as NFE2L2). RBM47 bound to KEAP1 and Cullin 3 mRNAs, and knockdown of RBM47 inhibited their protein expression, which led to enhanced binding of Nrf2 to target genomic regions. Knockdown of RBM47 also enhanced the expression of some Nrf2 activators, p21/CDKN1A and MafK induced by TGF-β. Both mitochondrial respiration rates and the side population cells in lung cancer cells increased in the absence of RBM47. Our findings, together with the enhanced tumor formation and metastasis of xenografted mice by knockdown of the RBM47 expression, suggested tumor-suppressive roles for RBM47 through the inhibition of Nrf2 activity. PMID:26923328