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Sample records for active river channel

  1. Human activities impact on mountain river channels (case study of Kamchatka peninsula rivers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Aleksandra S.

    2010-05-01

    Human-induced driving factors along with natural environmental changes greatly impact on fluvial regime of rivers. On mountain and semi-mountain territories these processes are developed in the most complicated manner due to man-made activities diversity throughout river basins. Besides these processes are significantly enhanced because of the disastrous natural processes (like volcanic and mud-flow activity) frequent occurrences in mountainous regions. On of the most striking example on the matter is Kamchatka peninsula which is located at the North-West part of Russian Federation. This paper contributes to the study of human activities impact on fluvial systems in this volcanic mountain region. Human effects on rivers directly alter channel morphology and deformations, dynamics of water and sediment movement, aquatic communities or indirectly affect streams by altering the movement of water and sediment into the channel. In case study of Kamchatka peninsula human activities affect fluvial systems through engineering works including construction of bridges, dams and channel diversions and placer mining. These processes are characterized by spatial heterogeneity because of irregular population distribution. Due to specific natural conditions of the peninsula the most populated areas are the valleys of big rivers (rivers Kamchatka, Avacha, Bistraya (Bolshaya), etc) within piedmont and plain regions. These rivers are characterized by very unstable channels. Both with man-made activities this determines wide range of fluvial system changes. Firstly bridges construction leads to island and logjam formation directly near their piers and intensification of channels patterns shifts. Furthermore rivers of the peninsula are distinguished for high water flow velocities and water rate. Incorrect bridge constructions both with significant channel deformations lead to the destructions of the bridges themselves due to intensive bank erosion. Secondly, intensive water flow

  2. Observations of the Behavior and Distribution of Fish in Relation to the Columbia River Navigation Channel and Channel Maintenance Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, R. L.; Mueller, Robert P.; Weiland, Mark A.; Johnson, P. N.

    2001-10-19

    This report is a compilation of 7 studies conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers between 1995 and 1998 which used hydroacoustic methods to study the behavior of migrating salmon in response to navigation channel maintenance activities in the lower Columbia River near river mile 45. Differences between daytime and nighttime behavior and fish densities were noted. Comparisons were made of fish distribution across the river (in the channel, channel margin or near shore) and fish depth upstream and downstream of dikes, dredges, and pile driving areas.

  3. Hepatic monooxygenase induction and promutagen activation in channel catfish from a contaminated river basin

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, G.W.; Shane, B.S.; Henry, C.B.

    1988-12-01

    To better understand the etiology of cancer in fish from polluted waters, the impact of environmental contaminants on xenobiotic metabolism of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) from a highly polluted water body, Devil's Swamp in southeastern Louisiana, has been investigated. Fish from Devil's Swamp bioaccumulated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides (CHI), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in fat tissue, the latter exceeding 7000 ppb. Reference catfish from the University farm, Ben Hur, were virtually devoid of PAH, CHI, and PCB. Liver microsomal enzymes (MFO) from Devil's Swamp fish were markedly induced. The specific content of cytochromes P450 and b5 and the specific activities of NAD(P)H-cytochrome c reductase were two to three times higher than those of Ben Hur fish. Consistent with this induction, a 9000g supernatant from Devil's Swamp but not Ben Hur fish activated 2-aminofluorene and benzo(a)pyrene (BP) to mutagens in the Ames test. BP metabolism by Devil's Swamp fish liver microsomes was inhibited to a greater extent by alpha-naphthoflavone than was BP metabolism by Ben Hur fish microsomes. This finding indicates that the induced activity in the Devil's Swamp fish liver was the result of P450 isozymes characteristic of PAH/PCB induction. Thus, exposure of fish to environmental pollutants can alter MFO leading to enhanced metabolic activation of promutagens to mutagens.

  4. Channel Morphology and Bed Sediment Characteristics Before and After Habitat Enhancement Activities in the Uridil Property, Platte River, Nebraska, Water Years 2005-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzel, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Fluvial geomorphic data were collected by the United States Geological Survey from July 2005 to June 2008 (a time period within water years 2005 to 2008) to monitor the effects of habitat enhancement activities conducted in the Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust's Uridil Property, located along the Platte River, Nebraska. The activities involved the removal of vegetation and sand from the tops of high permanent islands and the placement of the sand into the active river channel. This strategy was intended to enhance habitat for migratory water birds by lowering the elevations of the high islands, thereby eliminating a visual obstruction for roosting birds. It was also thought that the bare sand on the lowered island surfaces could serve as potential habitat for nesting water birds. Lastly, the project supplied a local source of sediment to the river to test the hypothesis that this material could contribute to the formation of lower sandbars and potential nesting sites downstream. Topographic surveys on the islands and along river transects were used to quantify the volume of removed sand and track the storage and movement of the introduced sand downstream. Sediment samples were also collected to map the spatial distribution of river bed sediment sizes before and after the management activities. While the project lowered the elevation of high islands, observations of the sand addition indicated the relatively fine-grained sand that was placed in the active river channel was rapidly transported by the flowing water. Topographic measurements made 3 months after the sand addition along transects in the area of sediment addition showed net aggradation over measurements made in 2005. In the year following the sand addition, 2007, elevated river flows from local rain events generally were accompanied by net degradation along transects within the area of sediment addition. In the spring of 2008, a large magnitude flow event of approximately 360 cubic meters per

  5. Defining large river channel patterns: Alluvial exchange and plurality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, John; Ashworth, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Large rivers have anabranching channels with components that may be defined as braided, meandering or straight. This paper shows that application of such holistic terminologies is complicated by recognition of within-type and transitional-type variety, a confusingly varied use of terms, and a coverage of pattern characteristics that for many large rivers is incomplete. In natural states, big rivers can be plural systems in which main, accessory, tributary and floodplain channels and lakes differ functionally and vary in terms of morphological dynamics. A distinction is drawn between the hydrological and geomorphological connectivity of components in big river plural systems. At any one time, even at flood stage, only some channels are geomorphologically active. Six types of geomorphological connectivity are described that range from coupled, through to partially-coupled and decoupled. The interplay between geomorphological and hydrological connectivity in large rivers is shown to determine habitat status and therefore ecological diversity. For improved understanding of the dynamics as well as the forms of these large composite systems, it is helpful to: (1) adopt element-level specification, not only for sediment bodies, but also for functioning channels; (2) track the sediment transfer processes and exchanges that produce channel forms over the highly varied timescales operating within large rivers; and (3) recognise the ways in which partially coupled and connected geomorphological systems produce naturally a composite set of forms at different rates. Such augmenting information will provide an improved platform for both river management and ecological understanding.

  6. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  7. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels.

  8. River meanders and channel size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    This study uses an enlarged data set to (1) compare measured meander geometry to that predicted by the Langbein and Leopold (1966) theory, (2) examine the frequency distribution of the ratio radius of curvature/channel width, and (3) derive 40 empirical equations (31 of which are original) involving meander and channel size features. The data set, part of which comes from publications by other authors, consists of 194 sites from a large variety of physiographic environments in various countries. The Langbein-Leopold sine-generated-curve theory for predicting radius of curvature agrees very well with the field data (78 sites). The ratio radius of curvature/channel width has a modal value in the range of 2 to 3, in accordance with earlier work; about one third of the 79 values is less than 2.0. The 40 empirical relations, most of which include only two variables, involve channel cross-section dimensions (bankfull area, width, and mean depth) and meander features (wavelength, bend length, radius of curvature, and belt width). These relations have very high correlation coefficients, most being in the range of 0.95-0.99. Although channel width traditionally has served as a scale indicator, bankfull cross-sectional area and mean depth also can be used for this purpose. ?? 1986.

  9. Transient river response, captured by channel steepness and its concavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacker, Veerle; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Govers, Gerard; Molina, Armando; Campforts, Benjamin; Kubik, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain rivers draining tropical regions are known to be great conveyor belts carrying efficiently more than half of the global sediment flux to the oceans. Many tropical mountain areas are located in tectonically active belts where the hillslope and stream channel morphology are rapidly evolving in response to changes in base level. Here, we report basin-wide denudation rates for an east-west transect through the tropical Andes. Hillslope and channel morphology vary systematically from east to west, reflecting the transition from high relief, strongly dissected topography in the escarpment zones into relatively low relief topography in the inter-Andean valley. The spatial pattern of differential denudation rates reflects the transient adjustment of the landscape to rapid river incision following tectonic uplift and river diversion. In the inter-Andean valley, upstream of the wave of incision, slopes and river channels display a relatively smooth, concave-up morphology and denudation rates (time scale of 104-105 a) are consistently low (3 to 200 mm/ka). In contrast, slopes and river channels of rejuvenated basins draining the eastern cordillera are steep to very steep; and the studied drainage basins show a wide range of denudation rate values (60 to 400 mm/ka) that increase systematically with increasing basin mean slope gradient, channel steepness, and channel convexity. Drainage basins that are characterised by strong convexities in their river longitudinal profiles systematically have higher denudation rates. As such, this is one of the first studies that provides field-based evidence of a correlation between channel concavity and basin mean denudation rates, consistent with process-based fluvial incision models.

  10. Transverse Mixing in a Natural River Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swick, W. A.; Macmahan, J. H.; Reniers, A. J.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.

    2010-12-01

    Transverse mixing in a river channel is investigated using field observations and a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic model, Delft3D. Six fluorescent Rhodamine dye releases were conducted in a 30 m wide, 500 m long, and 2 m deep relatively straight reach in the Kootenai River, ID on 12-16 August 2010. The study reach contained a number of natural channel features, such as a pool-riffle sequence and bank irregularities, which influence transverse mixing. The dye was released at a constant rate for one hour from a kayak fixed in the center of the channel. River discharge was steady and all releases were conducted in the morning hours to avoid diurnal wind effects. Vertical dye concentrations and velocity profiles were measured near the source and four downstream locations: 25m, 100m, 300m and 500m. In addition to the stationary observations, two different roving dye sampling schemes were performed to increase the spatial dye concentration resolution. The first sampling scheme consisted of 5 evenly-spaced dye sensors being slowly moved upstream. The second scheme consisted of 3 dye sensors moved transversely across the channel at various streamwise channel locations. These observations provide the horizontal and vertical extent of the dye plume and the spatial and temporal variability of the dye concentration. Local flow structures, produced by the separation of flow over riffles and bank irregularities, strongly control the observed local concentration distributions. Qualitative calculations highlight the influence of channel irregularities on the rate of transverse mixing and quantitative inferences shed light on the dominant mixing processes operating within different parts of the channel. 1D analytical and 3D numerical model are used to assess the relative importance of turbulent diffusion and local flow structure on predicted spatial dye concentrations.

  11. River channel patterns: Braided, meandering, and straight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Wolman, M. Gordon

    1957-01-01

    Channel pattern is used to describe the plan view of a reach of river as seen from an airplane, and includes meandering, braiding, or relatively straight channels.Natural channels characteristically exhibit alternating pools or deep reaches and riffles or shallow reaches, regardless of the type of pattern. The length of the pool or distance between riffles in a straight channel equals the straight line distance between successive points of inflection in the wave pattern of a meandering river of the same width. The points of inflection are also shallow points and correspond to riffles in the straight channel. This distance, which is half the wavelength of the meander, varies approximately as a linear function of channel width. In the data we analysed the meander wavelength, or twice the distance between successive riffles, is from 7 to 12 times the channel width. It is concluded that the mechanics which may lead to meandering operate in straight channels.River braiding is characterized by channel division around alluvial islands. The growth of an island begins as the deposition of a central bar which results from sorting and deposition of the coarser fractions of the load which locally cannot be transported. The bar grows downstream and in height by continued deposition on its surface, forcing the water into the flanking channels, which, to carry the flow, deepen and cut laterally into the original banks. Such deepening locally lowers the water surface and the central bar emerges as an island which becomes stabilized by vegetation. Braiding was observed in a small river in a laboratory. Measurements of the adjustments of velocity, depth, width, and slope associated with island development lead to the conclusion that braiding is one of the many patterns which can maintain quasi-equilibrium among discharge, load, and transporting ability. Braiding does not necessarily indicate an excess of total load.Channel cross section and pattern are ultimately controlled by the

  12. Impact of a large flood on mountain river habitats, channel morphology, and valley infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukiewicz, Hanna; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Mikuś, Paweł; Zawiejska, Joanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2016-11-01

    The Biała River, Polish Carpathians, was considerably modified by channelization and channel incision in the twentieth century. To restore the Biała, establishing an erodible corridor was proposed in two river sections located in its mountain and foothill course. In these sections, longer, unmanaged channel reaches alternate with short, channelized reaches; and channel narrowing and incision increases in the downstream direction. In June 2010 an 80-year flood occurred on the river; and this study aims at determining its effects on physical habitat conditions for river biota, channel morphology, and valley-floor infrastructure. Surveys of 10 pairs of closely located, unmanaged and channelized cross sections, performed in 2009 and in the late summer 2010, allowed us to assess the flood-induced changes to physical habitat conditions. A comparison of channel planforms determined before (2009) and after (2012) the flood provided information on the degree of channel widening as well as changes in the width of particular elements of the river's active zone in eight stretches of the Biała. The impact of the flood on valley-floor infrastructure was confronted with the degree of river widening in unmanaged and channelized river reaches. Before the flood, unmanaged cross sections were typified by finer bed material and greater lateral variability in depth-averaged and near-bed flow velocity than channelized cross sections. The flood tended to equalize habitat conditions in both types of river cross sections, obliterating differences (in particular physical habitat parameters) between channelized and unmanaged channel reaches. River widening mostly reflected an increase in the area of channel bars, whereas the widening of low-flow channels was less pronounced. A comparison of channel planform from 2009 and 2012 indicated that intense channel incision typical of downstream sections limited river widening by the flood. Active channel width increased by half in the unmanaged

  13. A channel transmission losses model for different dryland rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A. C.; Bronstert, A.; de Araújo, J. C.

    2011-10-01

    between the model units. Moreover, the saturated-part-based parameters (active in the larger river) produced much smaller variation in the sensitivity coefficient than those (active in the smaller river) which drive the unsaturated part of the channel transmission losses model.

  14. 8. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OLD SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OLD SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL FROM THE DOWNSTREAM FACE OF THE DAM WITH POND A IN THE BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  15. River channel adjustments in Southern Italy over the past 150 years and implications for channel recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorpio, Vittoria; Aucelli, Pietro P. C.; Giano, Salvatore I.; Pisano, Luca; Robustelli, Gaetano; Rosskopf, Carmen M.; Schiattarella, Marcello

    2015-12-01

    Multi-temporal GIS analysis of topographic maps and aerial photographs along with topographic and geomorphological surveys are used to assess evolutionary trends and key control factors of channel adjustments for five major rivers in southern Italy (the Trigno, Biferno, Volturno, Sinni and Crati rivers) to support assessment of channel recovery and river restoration. Three distinct phases of channel adjustment are identified over the past 150 years primarily driven by human disturbances. Firstly, slight channel widening dominated from the last decades of the nineteenth century to the 1950s. Secondly, from the 1950s to the end of the 1990s, altered sediment fluxes induced by in-channel mining and channel works brought about moderate to very intense incision (up to 6-7 m) accompanied by strong channel narrowing (up to 96%) and changes in channel configuration from multi-threaded to single-threaded patterns. Thirdly, the period from around 2000 to 2015 has been characterized by channel stabilization and local widening. Evolutionary trajectories of the rivers studied are quite similar to those reconstructed for other Italian rivers, particularly regarding the second phase of channel adjustments and ongoing transitions towards channel recovery in some reaches. Analyses of river dynamics, recovery potential and connectivity with sediment sources of the study reaches, framed in their catchment context, can be used as part of a wider interdisciplinary approach that views effective river restoration alongside sustainable and risk-reduced river management.

  16. 76 FR 40616 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Old River Channel of the Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... regulations governing the operation of the Willow Street Bridge at mile 1.02 across the Old River Channel of... INFORMATION: The Willow Street Bridge, at mile 1.02 across the Old River Channel of the Cuyahoga River, at... deviation to be the least disruptive to their operations. Under this temporary deviation, the Willow...

  17. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL WITH CRIB STRUCTURE IN CENTER. BRIDGE FOOTING CRIB STRUCTURE AT RIGHT (Upstream face of Kachess Dam in foreground) - Kachess Dam, Cutoff Channel and Crib Structures, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  18. Groundwater controls on biogeomorphic succession and river channel morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bätz, N.; Colombini, P.; Cherubini, P.; Lane, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    Biogeomorphic succession describes feedbacks between vegetation succession and fluvial processes that, at the decadal timescale, lead to a transition from bare river-deposited sediment to fully developed riparian forest. Where the rate of stabilization by biogeomorphic succession is greater than the rate of ecological disturbance by fluvial processes, a river is likely to evolve into less dynamic states. While river research has frequently considered the physical dimensions of morphodynamics, less is known about physical controls on succession rates, and how these impact stream morphodynamics. Here we test the hypothesis that groundwater dynamics influence morphodynamics via the rate of biogeomorphic succession. We applied historic imagery analysis in combination with dendroecological methods for willows growing on young gravelly fluvial landforms along a steep groundwater-depth gradient. We determined the following: floodplain morphodynamics and plant encroachment at the decadal scale, pioneer willow growth rates, and their relationships to hydrological variables. Willow growth rates were correlated with moisture availability (groundwater, discharge, and precipitation variability) in the downwelling reach, while little correlation was found in the upwelling reach. After a reduction in ecological disturbance frequency, data suggest that where groundwater is upwelling, biogeomorphic succession is fast, the engineering effect of vegetation is quickly established, and hence channel stability increased and active channel width reduces. Where groundwater is downwelling, deeper and more variable, biogeomorphic succession is slower, the engineering effect is reduced, and a wider active width is maintained. Thus, groundwater is an important control on biogeomorphic feedbacks intensity and, through the stabilizing effect of vegetation, may drive long-term river channel morphodynamics.

  19. Hungry water: Effects of dams and gravel mining on river channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kondolf, G.M.

    1997-07-01

    Rivers transport sediment from eroding uplands to depositional areas near sea level. If the continuity of sediment transport is interrupted by dams or removal of sediment from the channel by gravel mining, the flow may become sediment-starved (hungry water) and prone to erode the channel bed and banks, producing channel incision (downcutting), coarsening of bed material, and loss of spawning gravels for salmon and trout (as smaller gravels are transported without replacement from upstream), Gravel is artificially added to the River Rhine to prevent further incision and to many other rivers in attempts to restore spawning habitat. It is possible to pass incoming sediment through some small reservoirs, thereby maintaining the continuity of sediment transport through the system. Damming and mining have reduced sediment delivery from rivers to many coastal areas, leading to accelerated beach erosion. Sand and gravel are mined for construction aggregate from river channel and floodplains. In-channel mining commonly causes incision, which may propagate up- and downstream of the mine, undermining bridges, inducing channel instability, and lowering alluvial water tables. Floodplain gravel pits have the potential to become wildlife habitat upon reclamation, but may be captured by the active channel and thereby become instream pits. Management of sand and gravel in rivers must be done on a regional basis, restoring the continuity of sediment transport where possible and encouraging alternatives to river-derived aggregate sources. 80 refs., 17 figs.

  20. PROFILE: Hungry Water: Effects of Dams and Gravel Mining on River Channels

    PubMed

    Kondolf

    1997-07-01

    / Rivers transport sediment from eroding uplands to depositional areas near sea level. If the continuity of sediment transport is interrupted by dams or removal of sediment from the channel by gravel mining, the flow may become sediment-starved (hungry water) and prone to erode the channel bed and banks, producing channel incision (downcutting), coarsening of bed material, and loss of spawning gravels for salmon and trout (as smaller gravels are transported without replacement from upstream). Gravel is artificially added to the River Rhine to prevent further incision and to many other rivers in attempts to restore spawning habitat. It is possible to pass incoming sediment through some small reservoirs, thereby maintaining the continuity of sediment transport through the system. Damming and mining have reduced sediment delivery from rivers to many coastal areas, leading to accelerated beach erosion. Sand and gravel are mined for construction aggregate from river channel and floodplains. In-channel mining commonly causes incision, which may propagate up- and downstream of the mine, undermining bridges, inducing channel instability, and lowering alluvial water tables. Floodplain gravel pits have the potential to become wildlife habitat upon reclamation, but may be captured by the active channel and thereby become instream pits. Management of sand and gravel in rivers must be done on a regional basis, restoring the continuity of sediment transport where possible and encouraging alternatives to river-derived aggregate sources.KEY WORDS: Dams; Aquatic habitat; Sediment transport; Erosion; Sedimentation; Gravel mining

  1. GEOMORPHIC THRESHOLDS AND CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY IN LARGE RIVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systematic changes in channel morphology occur as channel gradient, streamflow, and sediment character change and interact. Geomorphic thresholds of various kinds are useful metrics to define these changes along the river network, as they are based on in-channel processes that d...

  2. River channel morphology and hydraulics properties due to introduction of plant basket hydraulic structures for river channel management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kałuża, Tomasz; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Plesiński, Karol; Walczak, Natalia; Szoszkiewicz, Krzysztof; Radecki-Pawlik, Bartosz

    2016-04-01

    In the present time integrated water management is directly connected with management and direct works in river channels themselves which are taking into account morphological processes in rivers and improve flow conditions. Our work focused on the hydraulic and hydrodynamic consequences upon the introduction of the concept of the improvement of the hydromorphological conditions of the Flinta River in a given reach following river channel management concept. Based on a comprehensive study of the hydromorphological state of the river, four sections were selected where restoration measures can efficiently improve river habitat conditions in the river. For each section a set of technical and biological measures were proposed and implemented in practice. One of the proposed solutions was to construct plant basket hydraulic structures (PBHS) within the river channel, which are essentially plant barriers working as sediment traps, changing river channel morphology and are in line with concepts of Water Framework Directive. These relatively small structures work as crested weirs and unquestionably change the channel morphology. Along our work we show the results of three-year long (2013-2015) systematic measurements that provided information on the morphological consequences of introducing such structures into a river channel. Our main conclusions are as follows: 1. Plant basket hydraulic structures cause changes in hydrodynamic conditions and result in sediment accumulation and the formation of river backwaters upstream and downstream the obstacle; 2. The introduced plant basket hydraulic structures cause plant debris accumulation which influences the hydrodynamic flow conditions; 3. The installation of plant basket hydraulic structures on the river bed changes flow pattern as well as flow hydrodynamic conditions causing river braiding process; 4. The erosion rate below the plant basket hydraulic structures is due to the hydraulic work conditions of the PBHS and its

  3. Channel evolution on the dammed Elwha River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, A.E.; Logan, J.B.; Mastin, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    Like many rivers in the western U.S., the Elwha River, Washington, has changed substantially over the past century in response to natural and human forcing. The lower river is affected by two upstream dams that are slated for removal as part of a major river restoration effort. In preparation for studying the effects of dam removal, we present a comprehensive field and aerial photographic analysis of dam influence on an anabranching, gravel-bed river. Over the past century with the dams in place, loss of the upstream sediment supply has caused spatial variations in the sedimentary and geomorphic character of the lower Elwha River channel. Bed sediment is armored and better sorted than on the naturally evolving bed upstream of the dams. On time scales of flood seasons, the channel immediately below the lower dam is fairly stable, but progresses toward greater mobility downstream such that the lowermost portion of the river responded to a recent 40-year flood with bank erosion and bed-elevation changes on a scale approaching that of the natural channel above the dams. In general, channel mobility in the lowest 4 km of the Elwha River has not decreased substantially with time. Enough fine sediment remains in the floodplain that – given sufficient flood forcing – the channel position, sinuosity, and braiding index change substantially. The processes by which this river accesses new fine sediment below the dams (rapid migration into noncohesive banks and avulsion of new channels) allow it to compensate for loss of upstream sediment supply more readily than would a dammed river with cohesive banks or a more limited supply of alluvium. The planned dam removal will provide a valuable opportunity to evaluate channel response to the future restoration of natural upstream sediment supply.

  4. 76 FR 14924 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management Activities AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... incidental to Russian River estuary management activities. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA... Channel Adaptive Management Plan. NMFS' Environmental Assessment (2010) and associated Finding of...

  5. Channel Evolution on the Lower Elwha River, Washington, 1939-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Logan, Joshua B.; McCoy, Randall E.; McHenry, Michael; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of historical aerial photographs of the lower Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington, reveal rates and patterns of channel change in this dammed, anabranching river between 1939 and 2006. Absolute positional changes of the active-floodplain margins, which commonly exceeded 50 m over that interval, have exceeded 400 m locally. Annualized rates of channel movement were typically ~2 to 10 m/yr; higher annualized rates over some time intervals are attributable to the formation of new channels by episodic avulsion. Channel movement by more gradual lateral meander migration was also common. Anthropogenic modification of the floodplain between the 1940s and 1980s substantially altered channel form and position. This analysis of rates and patterns of channel change over nearly 70 years on the lower Elwha River is intended to characterize the evolution of the river throughout most of the time interval when two large dams have been in place upstream. Channel morphology and rates of channel movement are expected to change significantly in response to removal of the dams and re-establishment of the upstream sediment supply during a major river-restoration project.

  6. The role of river trajectories and channel recovery potential within sustainable river management: some case studies from southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosskopf, Carmen Maria; Scorpio, Vittoria; Patrizio Ciro Aucelli, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    ongoing narrowing. The assessment of evolutionary trajectories and current states of the study reaches coupled with the analysis of their connectivity at the reach to basin scale, has allowed to identify the reaches whose recovery potential and/or good ecological values maximizes the likelihood of success of future river restoration interventions. Nevertheless, as the study highlights, the widespread anthropization of river segments, including/connected to the study reaches, has to be taken in account. Therefore, any attempt to promote their natural dynamics and channel recovery, has to be accurately assessed in the framework of sustainable and risk-reduced river management according to implemented basin plans and other territorial constraints. Conversely, the obtained knowledge on the present status of river reaches and their potential near-future changes is fundamental in considering revising actual basin plans and/or programming monitoring activities.

  7. Analysis of the effects of human activities on the hydromorphological evolution channel of the Saint-Maurice River downstream from La Gabelle dam (Quebec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadnais, Marie-Ève; Assani, Ali A.; Landry, Raphaëlle; Leroux, Denis; Gratton, Denis

    2012-11-01

    During the first half of the twentieth century, many hydroelectric facilities were built in the Saint-Maurice River watershed, followed by other human activities in the second half of the century (pleasure boating, boom dismantling, urbanization, etc.). The goal of the study is to constrain the effects of these various types of human activities, particularly those of the many dams in the watershed, on the hydromorphological evolution of the Saint-Maurice River downstream from the La Gabelle (dam) power plant (43,000 km2). Comparison of specific discharge in this river with streamflow measured in a natural river setting reveals a significant decrease in seasonal maximum flows, aside from winter, when daily maximum flows increased significantly. Also, unlike natural rivers, the long-term trend in spring flows is not characterized by a significant change in mean downstream from the La Gabelle plant. These hydrological changes are linked to the inversion-type management mode of the reservoirs built downstream from the plant. As for the morphological evolution, the longitudinal variability of bankfull width downstream from the plant shows two significant shifts in mean: the first, which was quasi-abrupt, took place downstream of the des Forges rapid; and the second, which was gradual, occurred upstream from the confluence of the Saint-Maurice River with the St. Lawrence River, above the point where the Saint-Maurice splits into two branches. Comparison of aerial photographs taken at various times (1948, 1964, 1975, 1996, and 2008) reveals no significant change in the mean of bankfull width over time. However, a significant increase in the surface area of islets located at the confluence was observed, which is caused by sediment accumulation. These sediments were likely derived from local bank erosion resulting from anthropogenic changes.

  8. Large flood on a mountain river subjected to restoration: effects on aquatic habitats, channel morphology and valley infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukiewicz, Hanna; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Mikuś, Paweł; Zawiejska, Joanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2016-04-01

    The Biała River, Polish Carpathians, was considerably modified by channelization and channel incision in the twentieth century. To restore the Biała, establishing an erodible corridor was proposed in two river sections located in its mountain and foothill course. In these sections, longer, unmanaged channel reaches alternate with short, channelized reaches; and channel narrowing and incision increases in the downstream direction. In June 2010 an 80-year flood occurred on the river; and this study aims at determining its effects on physical habitat conditions for river biota, channel morphology, and valley-floor infrastructure. Surveys of 10 pairs of closely located, unmanaged and channelized cross sections, performed in 2009 and in the late summer 2010, allowed us to assess the flood-induced changes to physical habitat conditions. A comparison of channel planforms determined before (2009) and after (2012) the flood provided information on the degree of channel widening as well as changes in the width of particular elements of the river's active zone in eight stretches of the Biała. The impact of the flood on valley-floor infrastructure was confronted with the degree of river widening in unmanaged and channelized river reaches. Before the flood, unmanaged cross sections were typified by finer bed material and greater lateral variability in depth-averaged and near-bed flow velocity than channelized cross sections. The flood tended to equalize habitat conditions in both types of river cross sections, obliterating differences (in particular physical habitat parameters) between channelized and unmanaged channel reaches. River widening mostly reflected an increase in the area of channel bars, whereas the widening of low-flow channels was less pronounced. A comparison of channel planform from 2009 and 2012 indicated that intense channel incision typical of downstream sections limited river widening by the flood. Active channel width increased by half in the unmanaged

  9. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  10. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  11. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  12. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  13. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  14. Stochastic Evaluation of Riparian Vegetation Dynamics in River Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Kimura, R.; Toshimori, N.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation overgrowth in sand bars and floodplains has been a serious problem for river management in Japan. From the viewpoints of flood control and ecological conservation, it would be necessary to accurately predict the vegetation dynamics for a long period of time. In this study, we have developed a stochastic model for predicting the dynamics of trees in floodplains with emphasis on the interaction with flood impacts. The model consists of the following four processes in coupling ecohydrology with biogeomorphology: (i) stochastic behavior of flow discharge, (ii) hydrodynamics in a channel with vegetation, (iii) variation of riverbed topography and (iv) vegetation dynamics on the floodplain. In the model, the flood discharge is stochastically simulated using a Poisson process, one of the conventional approaches in hydrological time-series generation. The model for vegetation dynamics includes the effects of tree growth, mortality by flood impacts, and infant tree invasion. To determine the model parameters, vegetation conditions have been observed mainly before and after flood impacts since 2008 at a field site located between 23.2-24.0 km from the river mouth in Kako River, Japan. This site is one of the vegetation overgrowth locations in Kako River floodplains, where the predominant tree species are willows and bamboos. In this presentation, sensitivity of the vegetation overgrowth tendency is investigated in Kako River channels. Through the Monte Carlo simulation for several cross sections in Kako River, responses of the vegetated channels are stochastically evaluated in terms of the changes of discharge magnitude and channel geomorphology. The expectation and standard deviation of vegetation areal ratio are compared in the different channel cross sections for different river discharges and relative floodplain heights. The result shows that the vegetation status changes sensitively in the channels with larger discharge and insensitive in the lower floodplain

  15. Channel Pattern and the Dynamics of River-floodplain Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T.; Pollock, M.; Baker, S.; Morley, S.; Pess, G.

    2006-05-01

    Channel pattern is both a reflection of fluvial geomorphic processes and a predictor of ecological diversity in river-floodplain ecosystems. Channel slope, discharge, sediment supply, and sediment size are dominant drivers of channel pattern (straight, meandering, island-braided, or braided), and the spatial distribution of channel patterns in Pacific Northwest River networks typically reflects downstream declines in channel slope and ratio of bed load to suspended load. Straight channels are least dynamic, with relatively slow floodplain turnover and floodplains dominated by old surfaces. Braided channels are most dynamic, with floodplain turnover as low as 25 years and predominantly young floodplain surfaces. Island-braided and meandering channels have intermediate dynamics and a mix of young and old patches. Floodplain erosion return intervals increase in the order of braided, island-braided, meandering, and straight (8, 33, 60, and 89 years, respectively). These dynamics drive two important aspects of environmental complexity, which in turn drive biological diversity in river floodplain ecosystems: diversity of patch ages, and diversity of patch types. High diversity of patch ages in island-braided channels predicts high forest diversity, following the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH). Diversity of aquatic invertebrates should also be highest in island-braided channels, in part due to shifting composition of detrital resources entering floodplain channels of varying ages. Diversity of habitat types is also highest in island-braided channels, where side channel lengths can be as much as five times greater than main channel length. We expect highest fish diversity where varied size and connectivity of side channels is greatest.

  16. 33 CFR 117.631 - Detroit River (Trenton Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Detroit River (Trenton Channel). 117.631 Section 117.631 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Channel). (a) The draw of the Grosse Ile Toll bridge (Bridge Road), mile 8.8, at Grosse Ile, shall...

  17. 33 CFR 117.631 - Detroit River (Trenton Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detroit River (Trenton Channel). 117.631 Section 117.631 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Channel). (a) The draw of the Grosse Ile Toll bridge (Bridge Road), mile 8.8, at Grosse Ile, shall...

  18. 33 CFR 117.953 - Brazos River (Diversion Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brazos River (Diversion Channel). 117.953 Section 117.953 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Channel). (a) The draw of the S36 highway bridge, mile 4.4 at Freeport, shall open on signal if at...

  19. 33 CFR 117.953 - Brazos River (Diversion Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brazos River (Diversion Channel). 117.953 Section 117.953 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Channel). (a) The draw of the S36 highway bridge, mile 4.4 at Freeport, shall open on signal if at...

  20. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  1. Bed-material, channel stability, and regional gravel production dynamics in Oregon coastal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. L.; O'Connor, J. E.; Wallick, R.; Anderson, S.; Keith, M. K.; Mangano, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Along the Oregon coast, gravel-bed rivers of various basin sizes and network topologies carve their way to the Pacific Ocean through a suite of geologic formations and land-use activities. To date, we have initiated assessments of bed-material condition and channel stability for seven coastal Oregon rivers (from north to south: Nehalem, Tillamook, Umpqua, Coquille, Rogue, Hunter, and Chetco). These river channels are of interest, in part, due to historic and on-going removal of gravels for commercial aggregate. Gravel extraction alone or in conjunction with the effects of other land uses may initiate a variety of channel changes, leading to channel instability. For each river, we synthesize multiple lines of evidence (including field observations, particle measurements, GIS analyses, specific gage analyses, and previous studies) to determine if the river channels are in equilibrium, degrading, or aggrading and if bed-material transport is likely limited by transport capacity or sediment supply. Initial field observations include the presence of reaches with some channel instability (mainly aggradation and channel widening) in the Hunter, Rogue, and Coquille basins. Our preliminary specific gage analyses indicate changes in the stage-discharge relationships at several gages, including a long-term gage on Rogue River near Grants Pass, where the channel has either incised or widened, resulting in a lowering of stage over time and different discharges. Building on our preliminary findings and review of the literature, we postulate that gravel production in coastal Oregon rivers is a function of the surrounding geology, basin slope, annual precipitation rates, channel bed elevation patterns (e.g., the length of the channel bed at sea level), and network structure. Bed-material supply tends to be greatest for rivers draining the Klamath terrane. Preliminary statistical analyses also show that the product of basin slope and mean annual precipitation describes 57% of the

  2. Evaluation of Logjam Scour in the Context of Reach-scale River Channel Adjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrahan, T. P.; Vernon, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    River channel modifications for protection, enhancement and restoration often include flow resistance elements such as large wood and rock structures. Evaluating the effectiveness of these modifications in achieving design objectives can be confounded by river channel adjustments occurring at larger spatial scales throughout the reach of interest. Engineered logjams are one example where the design objectives typically include riverbed scour and the creation of pools. We surveyed riverbed elevations before and after the installation of engineered logjams, and compared those measurements to predictions from empirical scour equations. Riverbed elevations throughout the reach were also surveyed along cross-sections before and after restoration activities. River channel expansion and contraction throughout the reach was measured by mapping the unvegetated channel boundary for a period of years before and after restoration. Maximum riverbed scour immediately adjacent to the engineered logjams was 1.27 m, while maximum riverbed aggradation was 1.88 m. General riverbed scour and aggradation throughout the study reached was much larger, ranging from 2.71 m of scour to 2.96 m of aggradation. Over a period of 4 years, the channel expanded throughout the area of logjam installation, with increases in channel width ranging from 25.2 m to 58.2 m. Results from this study highlight the importance of considering large scale interactions between vegetation and river morphodynamics in the planning and implementation of river channel modifications.

  3. Flood plain and channel dynamics of the Quinault and Queets Rivers, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, J. E.; Jones, M.A.; Haluska, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    Observations from this study and previous studies on the Queets River show that channel and flood-plain dynamics and morphology are affected by interactions between flow, sediment, and standing and entrained wood, some of which likely involve time frames similar to 200–500-year flood-plain half-lives. On the upper Quinault River and Queets River, log jams promote bar growth and consequent channel shifting, short-distance avulsions, and meander cutoffs, resulting in mobile and wide active channels. On the lower Quinault River, large portions of the channel are stable and flow within vegetated flood plains. However, locally, channel-spanning log jams have caused channel avulsions within reaches that have been subsequently mobile for several decades. In all three reaches, log jams appear to be areas of conifer germination and growth that may later further influence channel and flood-plain conditions on long time scales by forming flood-plain areas resistant to channel migration and by providing key members of future log jams. Appreciation of these processes and dynamics and associated temporal and spatial scales is necessary to formulate effective long-term approaches to managing fluvial ecosystems in forested environments.

  4. Spatial and temporal variability in sedimentation rates associated with cutoff channel infill deposits: Ain River, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piegay, H.; Hupp, C.R.; Citterio, A.; Dufour, S.; Moulin, B.; Walling, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Floodplain development is associated with lateral accretion along stable channel geometry. Along shifting rivers, the floodplain sedimentation is more complex because of changes in channel position but also cutoff channel presence, which exhibit specific overflow patterns. In this contribution, the spatial and temporal variability of sedimentation rates in cutoff channel infill deposits is related to channel changes of a shifting gravel bed river (Ain River, France). The sedimentation rates estimated from dendrogeomorphic analysis are compared between and within 14 cutoff channel infills. Detailed analyses along a single channel infill are performed to assess changes in the sedimentation rates through time by analyzing activity profiles of the fallout radionuclides 137Cs and unsupported 210Pb. Sedimentation rates are also compared within the channel infills with rates in other plots located in the adjacent floodplain. Sedimentation rates range between 0.65 and 2.4 cm a -1 over a period of 10 to 40 years. The data provide additional information on the role of distance from the bank, overbank flow frequency, and channel geometry in controlling the sedimentation rate. Channel infills, lower than adjacent floodplains, exhibit higher sedimentation rates and convey overbank sediment farther away within the floodplain. Additionally, channel degradation, aggradation, and bank erosion, which reduce or increase the distance between the main channel and the cutoff channel aquatic zone, affect local overbank flow magnitude and frequency and therefore sedimentation rates, thereby creating a complex mosaic of sedimentation zones within the floodplain and along the cutoff channel infills. Last, the dendrogeomorphic and 137Cs approaches are cross validated for estimating the sedimentation rate within a channel infill. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Linking channel hydrology with riparian wetland accretion in tidal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    hydrologic processes by which tide affects river channel and riparian morphology within the tidal freshwater zone are poorly understood yet are fundamental to predicting the fate of coastal rivers and wetlands as sea level rises. We investigated patterns of sediment accretion in riparian wetlands along the nontidal through oligohaline portion of two coastal plain rivers in Maryland, U.S., and how flow velocity, water level, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel may have contributed to those patterns. Sediment accretion was measured over a 1 year period using artificial marker horizons, channel hydrology was measured over a 1 month period using acoustic Doppler current profilers, and SSC was predicted from acoustic backscatter. Riparian sediment accretion was lowest at the nontidal sites (mean and standard deviation = 8 ± 8 mm yr-1), highest at the upstream tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) (33 ± 28 mm yr-1), low at the midstream TFFW (12 ± 9 mm yr-1), and high at the oligohaline (fresh-to-brackish) marshes (19 ± 8 mm yr-1). Channel maximum flood and ebb velocity was twofold faster at the oligohaline than tidal freshwater zone on both tidal rivers, corresponding with the differences in in-channel SSC: The oligohaline zone's SSC was more than double the tidal freshwater zone's and was greater than historical SSC at the nontidal gages. The tidal wave characteristics differed between rivers, leading to significantly greater in-channel SSC during floodplain inundation in the weakly convergent than the strongly convergent tidal river. High sediment accretion at the upstream TFFW was likely due to high river discharge following a hurricane.

  6. Linking channel hydrology with riparian wetland accretion in tidal rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrologic processes by which tide affects river channel and riparian morphology within the tidal freshwater zone are poorly understood, yet are fundamental to predicting the fate of coastal rivers and wetlands as sea level rises. We investigated patterns of sediment accretion in riparian wetlands along the non-tidal through oligohaline portion of two coastal plain rivers in Maryland, U.S.A., and how flow velocity, water level, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel may have contributed to those patterns. Sediment accretion was measured over a one year period using artificial marker horizons, channel hydrology was measured over a one month period using acoustic Doppler current profilers, and SSC was predicted from acoustic backscatter. Riparian sediment accretion was lowest at the non-tidal sites (mean and standard deviation = 8 ± 8 mm yr-1), highest at the upstream tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) (33 ± 28 mm yr-1), low at the midstream TFFW (12 ± 9 mm yr-1), and high at the oligohaline (fresh-to-brackish) marshes (19 ± 8 mm yr-1). Channel maximum flood and ebb velocity was 2-fold faster at the oligohaline than tidal freshwater zone on both tidal rivers, corresponding with the differences in in-channel SSC: the oligohaline zone's SSC was more than double the tidal freshwater zone's, and was greater than historical SSC at the non-tidal gages. The tidal wave characteristics differed between rivers, leading to significantly greater in-channel SSC during floodplain inundation in the weakly convergent than the strongly convergent tidal river. Overall sediment accretion was higher in the embayed river likely due to a single storm discharge and associated sedimentation.

  7. Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

  8. Predictive techniques for river channel evolution and maintenance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Predicting changes in alluvial channel morphology associated with anthropogenic and natural changes in flow and/or sediment supply is a critical part of the management of riverine systems. Over the past few years, advances in the understanding of the physics of sediment transport in conjunction with rapidly increasing capabilities in computational fluid dynamics have yielded now approaches to problems in river mechanics. Techniques appropriate for length scales ranging from reaches to bars and bedforms are described here. Examples of the use of these computational approaches are discussed for three cases: (1) the design of diversion scenarios that maintain channel morphology in steep cobble-bedded channels in Colorado, (2) determination of channel maintenance flows for the preservation of channel islands in the Snake River in Idaho, and (3) prediction of the temporal evolution of deposits in lateral separation zones for future assessment of the impacts of various dam release scenarios on lateral separation deposits in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. With continued development of their scientific and technical components, the methodologies described here can provide powerful tools for the management of river environments in the future.

  9. Morphological changes of Gumara River channel over 50 years, upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Mengiste; Nyssen, Jan; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Moges, Michael M.; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Enku, Temesgen; Adgo, Enyew

    2015-06-01

    Gumara River. Direct anthropogenic impacts (irrigation activities and building of dykes along the river banks) have contributed to the huge deposition in the river bed. Where the abstraction of water for irrigation is intensive, seepage water through the banks has contributed to river bank failure. In general, this study showed that changes to the planform at the mouth of the river and to the riverbed level are substantial. Moreover, the study indicated that the flood carrying capacity of the Gumara River channel has diminished in recent times.

  10. Anabranching Channel Patterns: the Kingdom of Large Alluvial Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo

    2015-04-01

    For a long time anabranching patterns were primarily restricted to "exotic and remote" zones in arid systems such as Australia. For that reason, they were not accepted as a major topic of discussion in our discipline, which was based on concepts principally derived from case studies in braided and meandering rivers of the Northern Hemisphere. However, anabranching alluvial patterns are widespread in a variety of environments and scales, from arid small rivers to alluvial reaches of giant rivers such as the Amazon, Congo, and Negro. The largest rivers of the world in water discharge are anabranching, and the majority of the forty-five largest rivers (water discharges >5000m3s-1) are dominantly anabranching systems. Only a small number of rivers with meandering patterns, or sinuous with branches (meandering-tendency to anabranch) are part of the largest rivers group. The present large anabranching rivers flowing on lowlands and well developed floodplains have in common a characteristic very slow slopes, specific stream power of < 25 Wm-2 and sandy bed load with sand sizes dominantly ranging from 0.1 < D50 <0.5 mm. The diversity of planforms and island morphologies in large anabranching rivers result from autogenic adjustments to millennial scales in broad valleys and to century-decadal scale channel-floodplain processes. The variety of anabranching styles are not specifically related to a single explanatory "physically based theory" but to a variety of morphological processes, complex-channel floodplain interactions and the geologic characteristics of the valleys. Once considered a kind of oddity, anabranching rivers must be considered major and fundamental representatives of the fluvial world.

  11. Anabranching Channel Patterns: the Kingdom of Large Alluvial Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    For a long time anabranching patterns were primarily restricted to "exotic and remote" zones in arid systems such as Australia. For that reason, they were not accepted as a major topic of discussion in our discipline, which was based on concepts principally derived from case studies in the Northern Hemisphere. However, anabranching alluvial patterns are widespread in a variety of environments and scales, from arid small rivers to alluvial reaches of giant rivers such as the Amazon, Congo, and Negro. The largest rivers of the world in water discharge are anabranching, and the majority of the forty-five largest rivers (water discharges >5000m3s-1) are dominantly anabranching systems. Only a small number of rivers with meandering patterns, or sinuous with branches (meandering-tendency to anabranch) are part of the largest rivers group. The present large anabranching rivers with well developed floodplains flowing on lowlands have in common a characteristic very slow slopes, specific stream power of < 25 Wm-2 and sandy bed load with sand sizes dominantly ranging from 0.1 < D50 <0.5 mm. Large axial anabranching rivers also contain the largest floodplains. The diversity of planforms and island morphologies in large anabranching rivers result from autogenic adjustments to millennial scales in broad valleys and to century-decadal scale channel-floodplain processes. The variety of anabranching styles are not specifically related to a single explanatory "physically based theory" but to a variety of morphological processes, complex-channel floodplain interactions and the geologic characteristics of the valleys. Once considered a kind of oddity, anabranching rivers must be considered major and fundamental representatives of the fluvial world.

  12. Quantifying habitat benefits of channel reconfigurations on a highly regulated river system, Lower Missouri River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, Susannah O.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of habitat availability in a highly regulated lowland river, comparing a restored reach with two reference reaches: an un-restored, channelized reach, and a least-altered reach. We evaluate the effects of channel modifications in terms of distributions of depth and velocity as well as distributions and availability of habitats thought to be supportive of an endangered fish, the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). It has been hypothesized that hydraulic conditions that support food production and foraging may limit growth and survival of juvenile pallid sturgeon. To evaluate conditions that support these habitats, we constructed two-dimensional hydrodynamic models for the three study reaches, two located in the Lower Missouri River (channelized and restored reaches) and one in the Yellowstone River (least-altered reach). Comparability among the reaches was improved by scaling by bankfull discharge and bankfull channel area. The analysis shows that construction of side-channel chutes and increased floodplain connectivity increase the availability of foraging habitat, resulting in a system that is more similar to the reference reach on the Yellowstone River. The availability of food-producing habitat is low in all reaches at flows less than bankfull, but the two reaches in the Lower Missouri Riverchannelized and restored – display a threshold-like response as flows overtop channel banks, reflecting the persistent effects of channelization on hydraulics in the main channel. These high lateral gradients result in punctuated ecological events corresponding to flows in excess of bankfull discharge. This threshold effect in the restored reach remains distinct from that of the least-altered reference reach, where hydraulic changes are less abrupt and overbank flows more gradually inundate the adjacent floodplain. The habitat curves observed in the reference reach on the Yellowstone River may not be attainable within the

  13. Lubiprostone: a chloride channel activator.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Levy, L Campbell

    2007-04-01

    In January 2006 the Food and Drug Administration approved lubiprostone for the treatment of chronic constipation in men and women aged 18 and over. Lubiprostone is categorized as a prostone, a bicyclic fatty acid metabolite of prostaglandin E1. Lubiprostone activates a specific chloride channel (ClC-2) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to enhance intestinal fluid secretion, which increases GI transit and improves symptoms of constipation. This article reviews the role of chloride channels in the GI tract, describes the structure, function, and pharmacokinetics of lubiprostone, and discusses clinically important data on this new medication.

  14. Dynamic aspects of large woody debris in river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaro, Alexandra; Caporali, Enrica; Becchi, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    Large Woody Debris (LWD) are an integral component of the fluvial environment. They represent an environmental resource, but without doubt they represent also a risk factor for the amplification that could give to the destructive power of a flood event. While countless intervention in river channels have reintroduced wood in rivers with restoration and banks protection aims, during several flash flood events LWD have had a great part in catastrophic consequences, pointing out the urgency of an adequate risk assessment procedure. At present wood dynamics in rivers is not systematically considered within the procedures for the elaboration of hazard maps resulting in loss of prediction accuracy and underestimation of hazard impacts. The assessment inconsistency comes from the complexity of the question: several aspects in wood processes are not yet well known and the superposition of different physical phenomena results in great difficulty to predict critical scenarios. The presented research activity has been aimed to improve management skills for the assessment of the hydrologic risk associated to the presence of large woody debris in rivers, improving knowledge about LWD dynamic processes and proposing effective tools for monitoring and mapping river catchments vulnerability. Utilizing critical review of the published works, field surveys and experimental investigations LWD damaging potential has been analysed to support the identification of the exposed sites and the redaction of hazard maps, taking into account that a comprehensive procedure has to involve: a) Identification of the critical cross sections; b) Evaluation of wood availability in the river catchment; c) Prediction of hazard scenarios through the estimation of water discharge, wood recruitment and entrainment, wood transport and destination. Particularly, a survey sheets form for direct measurements has been implemented and tested in field to provide an investigation instruments for wood and river

  15. Controls on the Evolution of River Channel Morphology on Volcanic Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlquist, M. P.; West, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    River channel morphology is thought to record the interaction of climatic and tectonic drivers of erosion, together with material properties of bedrock and the temporal changes in each of these parameters. However, unraveling the geophysical story told by river networks is complicated by the complexity of the interactions involved and the impracticality of making observations of river network evolution in situ over geological time scales. In this work, we exploit spatial gradients in an effort to understand fundamental controls on river channel morphology in volcanic terrains. We focus primarily on the Banda Arc, a complex tectonic domain with tectonic, volcanic, and climatic gradients that produce islands with river network geometries in a variety of stages and styles of evolution. We compute the Χ statistic - an integration of upstream drainage area over the length of a river - for rivers draining the Banda Arc islands, focusing on the currently and formerly active volcanic islands of the Arc. We compare Χ plots from across the Banda Arc with those from the Hawaiian Islands, which offer a time series of evolving river networks on volcanic islands of similar composition and a more stable tectonic domain to gain improved understanding of the role of tectonics and time in river network evolution. We find major disequilibria across main drainage divides in extinct volcanic terrains with little tectonic activity, as networks are forced away from their initial radial patterns by variations in lithology and/or climate. Tectonically active islands in the Banda Arc have generally smaller disequilibria across divides and produce more regular drainage patterns, indicating that, at the scale of individual volcanic islands, the tectonic signal may dominate in channel morphology.

  16. 76 FR 11679 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Belmar, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Belmar... operation of the S71 Bridge across Shark River (South Channel), mile 0.8, at Belmar, NJ. The deviation is... INFORMATION: The S71 Bridge, a bascule lift drawbridge, across Shark River (South Channel), at mile 0.8,...

  17. Forming of single-thread channels and multiple channel rivers on Titan and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiura, Katarzyna; Czechowski, Leszek

    2016-10-01

    In our research we use numerical model of the river to determine the limits of different fluvial parameters that play important roles in evolution of the rivers on Titan and on Earth. We have found that transport of sediments as suspended load is the main way of transport for Titan [1]. We also determined the range of the river's parameters for which multiple channel rivers are developed rather than single channel. This work is aimed to investigate the similarity and differences between these processes on Titan and the Earth.Numerical modelThe dynamical analysis of the considered rivers is performed using the package CCHE modified for the specific conditions on Titan. The package is based on the Navier-Stokes equations for depth-integrated two dimensional, turbulent flow and three dimensional convection-diffusion equation of sediment transport. We use the same numerical package that in our previous work [1] and [2], i.e. CCHE2D package.Parameters of the modelFor Titan we consider liquid corresponding to a Titan's rain (75% methane, 25% nitrogen) and water ice as material transported in rivers, for Earth the water and the quartz. We model evolution of the river for at least 100-200 days.Results and ConclusionsOur preliminary results indicate that suspended load is the main way of transport in simulated Titan's conditions. We also indicate that multiple channel rivers appears for larger range of slope on Titan (e.g. S=0.01-0.04) than on Earth (e.g. S=0.004-0.009). Also, for the same type of river, the grain size on Titan is at least 10 times larger than on Earth (1 cm for Titan versus 1 mm for the Earth). It is very interesting that on Titan multiple channel rivers appear even for very little discharge (e.g. Q=30m3/s) and for very large grain size (e.g. 10 cm). In the future we plan the experimental modelling in sediment basin to confirm results from computer modelling.References[1] Misiura, K., Czechowski, L., 2015. Numerical modelling of sedimentary structures in

  18. Use of main channel and two backwater habitats by larval fishes in the Detroit River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Erik A.; McNaught, A. Scott; Roseman, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations in the Detroit River have revealed renewed spawning activity by several important fishes, but little is known about their early life history requirements. We surveyed two main channel and two backwater areas in the lower Detroit River weekly from May to July 2007 to assess habitat use by larval fishes. Backwater areas included a soft-sediment embayment (FI) and a hard-sediment area (HIW). Main channel sites were located adjacent to each backwater area. Water temperature, velocity and clarity measurements and zooplankton samples were collected weekly. A macrophyte assessment was conducted in July. Growth and diet of larval yellow perch (Perca flavescens), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) were used to assess habitat quality. Macrophyte diversity and percent cover were higher and velocity lower at FI than HIW. Although larval fish diversity was highest in the main channel, yellow perch and bluegill larvae only grew beyond the yolk stage at FI, where they preferentially selected copepods, while Daphnia were selected in the main channel. Round goby ate harpacticoid copepods and Daphnia and grew at similar rates in HIW and the main channel. These data indicate that FI was a valuable nursery area for yellow perch and bluegill, whereas HIW was better suited to round goby. We only assessed two backwater areas, thus a complete census of wetland areas in the Detroit River is needed to identify valuable habitats. Restoration of shallow backwater areas is essential for rehabilitating fish populations and should be a priority in the Detroit River.

  19. Neotectonic effects on sinuosity and channel migration, Belle Fourche River, Western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, Basil; Marron, Donna C.

    1991-01-01

    Short-term instability in the behaviour of a small, meandering alluvial channel is identified from the relation between sinuosity and either floodplain slope or channel slope within 17 reaches along an 81-kilometre section of the Belle Fourche River in western South Dakota. In reaches 1 to 4 and 11 to 17 the channel is relatively stable and sinuosity varies inversely with channel slope. In reaches 5 to 10, sinuosity is positively related to floodplain slope. Sinuosity increases markedly in reaches 5, 6, and 7 (which are immediately downstream from a discontinuity in the long profile of the floodplain) in association with an increase in floodplain slope. Immediately upstream from the discontinuity, bankfull channel depth and sinuosity decrease and the area of the floodplain reworked by meander migration between 1939 and 1981 increases, in association with a decrease in floodplain slope. Channel behaviour in reaches 5 to 10 is best explained as a consequence of neotectonic activity, as indicated by changes in elevation recorded along geodetic survey lines that cross lineaments that may delimit the eastern boundary of the Black Hills uplift. Sinuosity acts as a barometer of the effects of neotectonic activity on alluvial channels. Initial indications of channel and floodplain instability due to neotectonic activity may be derived from evidence of anomalously active channel migration, as documented from photographic or topographic sources.

  20. River channel's predisposition to ice jams: a geospatial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Munck, S.; Gauthier, Y.; Bernier, M.; Légaré, S.

    2012-04-01

    When dynamic breakup occurs on rivers, ice moving downstream may eventually stop at an obstacle when the volume of moving ice exceeds the transport capacity of the river, resulting into an ice jam. The suddenness and unpredictability of these ice jams are a constant danger to local population. Therefore forecasting methods are necessary to provide an early warning to these population. Nonetheless the morphological and hydrological factors controlling where and how the ice will jam are numerous and complex. Existing studies which exist on this topic are highly site specific. Therefore, the goal of this work is to develop a simplified geospatial model that would estimate the predisposition of any river channel to ice jams. The question here is not to predict when the ice will break up but rather to know where the released ice would be susceptible to jam. This paper presents the developments and preliminary results of the proposed approach. The initial step was to document the main factors identified in the literature, as potential cause for an ice jam. First, several main factors identified in the literature as potential cause for an ice jam have been selected: presence of an island, narrowing of the channel, sinuosity, presence of a bridge, confluence of rivers and slope break. The second step was to spatially represent, in 2D, the physical characteristics of the channel and to translate these characteristics into potential ice jamming factors. The Chaudiere River, south of Quebec City (Canada), was chosen as a test site. Tools from the GIS-based FRAZIL system have been used to generate these factors from readily available geospatial data and calcutate an "ice jam predisposition index" over regular-spaced segments along the entire channel. The resulting map was validated upon historical observations and local knowledge, collected in relationship with the Minister of Public Security.

  1. Sediment supply controls equilibrium channel geometry in gravel rivers.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Allison M; Finnegan, Noah J; Willenbring, Jane K

    2017-03-28

    In many gravel-bedded rivers, floods that fill the channel banks create just enough shear stress to move the median-sized gravel particles on the bed surface (D50). Because this observation is common and is supported by theory, the coincidence of bankfull flow and the incipient motion of D50 has become a commonly used assumption. However, not all natural gravel channels actually conform to this simple relationship; some channels maintain bankfull stresses far in excess of the critical stress required to initiate sediment transport. We use a database of >300 gravel-bedded rivers and >600 (10)Be-derived erosion rates from across North America to explore the hypothesis that sediment supply drives the magnitude of bankfull shear stress relative to the critical stress required to mobilize the median bed surface grain size ([Formula: see text]). We find that [Formula: see text] is significantly higher in West Coast river reaches (2.35, n = 96) than in river reaches elsewhere on the continent (1.03, n = 245). This pattern parallels patterns in erosion rates (and hence sediment supplies). Supporting our hypothesis, we find a significant correlation between upstream erosion rate and local [Formula: see text] at sites where this comparison is possible. Our analysis reveals a decrease in bed surface armoring with increasing [Formula: see text], suggesting channels accommodate changes in sediment supply through adjustments in bed surface grain size, as also shown through numerical modeling. Our findings demonstrate that sediment supply is encoded in the bankfull hydraulic geometry of gravel bedded channels through its control on bed surface grain size.

  2. Calcium Activation of Mougeotia Potassium Channels 1

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Roger R.; Serlin, Bruce S.; Schauf, Charles L.; Stockton, Marsha E.

    1990-01-01

    Phytochrome mediates chloroplast movement in the alga Mougeotia, possibly via changes in cytosolic calcium. It is known to regulate a calcium-activated potassium channel in the algal plasma membrane. As part of a characterization of the potassium channel, we examined the properties of calcium activation. The calcium ionophore A23187 activates the channel at external [Ca2+] as low as 20 micromolar. However, external [Ca2+] is not required for activation of the channel by photoactivated phytochrome. Furthermore, when an inhibitor of calcium release from internal stores, 8-(diethylamino)-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, hydrochloride (TMB-8), is present, red light no longer stimulates channel activity. We conclude that phytochrome activates the plasma membrane potassium channel by releasing calcium from intracellular calcium vesicles; the elevated cytosolic calcium then stimulates channel activity by an unknown mechanism. In the presence of TMB-8, red light does induce chloroplast rotation; thus, potassium channel activation may not be coupled to chloroplast rotation. PMID:16667356

  3. Linking Upstream Channel Instability to Downstream Degradation: Grenada Lake and the Skuna and Yalobusha River Basins, Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In north-central Mississippi, unstable, deeply incised streams with actively calving banks can dominate total sediment loads within these watersheds. The Yalobusha River is one such system having a long history of channelization, excessive stream channel and bank erosion, and large woody debris rec...

  4. Spatial variability in river sediments and its link with river channel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Yoram; Lunt, Ian A.; Bridge, John S.

    2006-06-01

    This study explores the link between spatial variability within fluvial sedimentary strata and river channel geometry. This link is then used to determine the macrodispersion coefficients for solute transport in groundwater flow in river deposits. In doing that we combine concepts from sedimentology, geostatistics, and the stochastic-Lagrangian theory of subsurface transport. It is proposed to analyze the spatial variability of river sediments in terms of transition probabilities. The transition probabilities can be determined from the averages and variances of the lengths of stratasets and their volumetric fractions using concepts developed by Carle and Fogg (1996) and Ritzi (2000). Strataset length scales are shown to correlate well with the geometry of the river channel and its bed forms and can be determined indirectly from aerial photogrammetry, and, more directly, through surface ground penetrating radar surveys. Stratal dimensions can also be related, using Lagrangian transport analysis, to macrodispersivity of subsurface transport. This allows relationships between the geometry of river channels and subsurface transport parameters of associated fluvial deposits. For demonstration the longitudinal macrodispersivity in a compound bar deposit in the gravelly, braided Sagavanirktok River was investigated.

  5. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  6. Thermally activated TRPV3 channels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jialie; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    TRPV3 is a temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel. The TRPV3 protein functions as a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel with six transmembrane domains forming a tetrameric complex. TRPV3 is known to be activated by warm temperatures, synthetic small-molecule chemicals, and natural compounds from plants. Its function is regulated by a variety of physiological factors including extracellular divalent cations and acidic pH, intracellular adenosine triphosphate, membrane voltage, and arachidonic acid. TRPV3 shows a broad expression pattern in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues including epidermal keratinocytes, epithelial cells in the gut, endothelial cells in blood vessels, and neurons in dorsal root ganglia and CNS. TRPV3 null mice exhibit abnormal hair morphogenesis and compromised skin barrier function. Recent advances suggest that TRPV3 may play critical roles in inflammatory skin disorders, itch, and pain sensation. Thus, identification of selective TRPV3 activators and inhibitors could potentially lead to beneficial pharmacological interventions in several diseases. The intent of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the tissue expression, structure, function, and mechanisms of activation of TRPV3.

  7. Reach-Scale Channel Geometry of a Mountain River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.; Kuzma, J.; Brown, N.

    2002-12-01

    N. St. Vrain Creek drains 250 km2 of the Colorado Front Range. The basin is underlain by granitic rocks, and the upper half was glaciated. We used 25 study reaches to examine controls on reach-scale channel geometry. Variables measured included channel geometry (width, depth, gradient, bedforms), grain size, and mean velocity. Drainage area at each study reach ranged from 2.2-245 km2, and gradient from 0.013-0.147 m/m. The increase in discharge with drainage area is strongly linear. Channel types included cascade, step-pool, plane-bed and pool-riffle. We examined correlations among (1) the reach-scale response variables bankfull width (w), hydraulic radius (R), mean velocity (v), Darcy-Weisbach ff, bedform wavelength (bw) and amplitude (a), grain size, relative roughness (R/D84) and shear stress (ss), and (2) potential control variables that change progressively downstream (drainage area, discharge) or that are reach-specific (bed gradient). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that response variables correlate most strongly with local gradient because of the segmented nature of mountain channels. Results from linear regression analyses indicate that most response variables(R/D84, D50, D84, ff, ss) correlate best with gradient, although w, w/d ratio, and bw correlate best with discharge. Multiple regression analyses using Mallow's Cp selection criterion produced similar results in that most response variables correlate strongly with gradient, although the specific variables differ from those selected with linear regressions: w, a, v, ff and ss correlate with gradient, whereas R, bw and v correlate with discharge. These results suggest that the hypothesis is partially supported: channel bed gradient is likely to be a good predictor for many reach-scale response variables along mountain rivers, but discharge is also a good predictor for some response variables. Thus, although subject to strong constraints imposed by changes in gradient and grain size supplied by

  8. Applying fluvial geomorphology to river channel management: Background for progress towards a palaeohydrology protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, K. J.; Benito, G.; Downs, P. W.

    2008-06-01

    Significant developments have been achieved in applicable and applied fluvial geomorphology as shown in publications of the last three decades, analyzed as the basis for using results of studies of environmental change as a basis for management. The range of types of publications and of activities are more pertinent to river channel management as a result of concern with sustainability, global climate change, environmental ethics, ecosystem health concepts and public participation. Possible applications, with particular reference to river channel changes, include those concerned with form and process, assessment of channel change, urbanization, channelization, extractive industries, impact of engineering works, historical changes in land use, and restoration with specific examples illustrated in Table 1. In order to achieve general significance for fluvial geomorphology, more theory and extension by modelling methods is needed, and examples related to morphology and process characteristics, integrated approaches, and changes of the fluvial system are collected in Table 2. The ways in which potential applications are communicated to decision-makers range from applicable outputs including publications ranging from review papers, book chapters, and books, to applied outputs which include interdisciplinary problem solving, educational outreach, and direct involvement, with examples summarized in Table 3. On the basis of results gained from investigations covering periods longer than continuous records, a protocol embracing palaeohydrological inputs for application to river channel management is illustrated and developed as a synopsis version (Table 4), demonstrating how conclusions from geomorphological research can be expressed in a format which can be considered by managers.

  9. Pike Esox Lucius Distribution and Feeding Comparisons in Natural and Historically Channelized River Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovs, Kaspars

    2016-12-01

    During the last century a large portion of small and medium-sized rivers in Latvia were channelized, hydroelectric power stations were also built, which led to changes in the hydrodynamic conditions, geomorphological structure, as well as a change in the fish fauna. Fish are an integral part of any community in natural or man-made bodies of water. They actively participate in maintaining the system, balancing/equilibrium, energy, substance transformation and biomass production. They are able to influence other organisms in the ecosystem in which they live. The aim of the paper "Pike distribution and feeding comparisons in natural and historically channelized river sections" is to find out what pike feed on in different environments in Latvian rivers, such as natural and straightened river sections, as well as what main factors determine the composition of their food. Several points were assessed during the course of the study: the impact of environmental conditions on the feeding habits and the distribution of pike; the general feeding habits of predators in Latvian rivers; the feeding differences of predators in natural and straightened river sections; and lastly, rhithral and pothamal habitats were compared. The study was based on data from 2014 and 2015 on fish fauna monitoring. During the study, 347 pike were collected from 136 plots using electrofishing method.

  10. Evolution of channel morphology in a large river subject to rectification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Proto, Matteo; Zen, Simone; Bertoldi, Walter; Prà, Elena Dai; Comiti, Francesco; Surian, Nicola; Zolezzi, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Many large rivers in Europe have been subject to heavy modifications for land reclamation and flood mitigation through centuries. As a consequence, the study of the pre-alteration morphological patterns and of the related channel evolution following the anthropic modifications is rather challenging. The Adige River is the second longest river in Italy and drains 12,100 km2 of the Eastern Italian Alps. Currently, it features a straight to sinuous pattern and an average channel width of 40-60 m. A massive rectification scheme aiming at land reclamation of the Adige valley bottom was planned in the late 18th century, and implemented starting in the first decades of 19th century. Nowadays, it can be considered one of the most altered rivers in Italy, not only due to channelization but also to the presence of many hydropower reservoirs and check-dams along its tributaries. This study aims to the reconstruction of the Adige River's evolutionary trajectory over the last 250 years, and comprehension of key control factors driving channel evolution. A multi-temporal analysis of historical maps and orthophotos from 1776, to 2006 was performed in order to assess channel modifications. In addition, land use changes at the basin scale, years of occurrence of most relevant flood events, and climate variability over the investigated period were analyzed. The detailed topographical map surveyed in 1803 was taken as a reference, and the study sector (115 km long) was divided into 39 reaches. Active channel, bars, riparian vegetation and channel control works were geo-processed. Results show that the Adige River suffered the most intense alteration from 1803 to 1855, and especially from 1847 to 1855. During this period channel narrowing ranged from 14% to 70%, coupled with pattern changes and decreases in the braiding, sinuosity and anabrancing indices. Most important alterations occurred in the reaches presenting a multi-thread morphology in 1803, as their average width declined

  11. Effects of river restoration on riparian biodiversity in secondary channels of the Pite River, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Helfield, James M; Engström, Johanna; Michel, James T; Nilsson, Christer; Jansson, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Between 1850 and 1970, rivers throughout Sweden were channelized to facilitate timber floating. Floatway structures were installed to streamline banks and disconnect flow to secondary channels, resulting in simplified channel morphologies and more homogenous flow regimes. In recent years, local authorities have begun to restore channelized rivers. In this study, we examined the effects of restoration on riparian plant communities at previously disconnected secondary channels of the Pite River. We detected no increase in riparian diversity at restored sites relative to unrestored (i.e., disconnected) sites, but we did observe significant differences in species composition of both vascular plant and bryophyte communities. Disconnected sites featured greater zonation, with mesic-hydric floodplain species represented in plots closest to the stream and mesic-xeric upland species represented in plots farthest from the stream. In contrast, restored sites were most strongly represented by upland species at all distances relative to the stream. These patterns likely result from the increased water levels in reconnected channels where, prior to restoration, upland plants had expanded toward the stream. Nonetheless, the restored fluvial regime has not brought about the development of characteristic flood-adapted plant communities, probably due to the short time interval (ca. 5 years) since restoration. Previous studies have demonstrated relatively quick responses to similar restoration in single-channel tributaries, but secondary channels may respond differently due to the more buffered hydrologic regimes typically seen in anabranching systems. These findings illustrate how restoration outcomes can vary according to hydrologic, climatic and ecological factors, reinforcing the need for site-specific restoration strategies.

  12. Historical Channel Adjustment and Estimates of Selected Hydraulic Values in the Lower Sabine River and Lower Brazos River Basins, Texas and Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Greene, Lauren E.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, evaluated historical channel adjustment and estimated selected hydraulic values at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in the lower Sabine River Basin in Texas and Louisiana and lower Brazos River Basin in Texas to support geomorphic assessments of the Texas Instream Flow Program. Channel attributes including cross-section geometry, slope, and planform change were evaluated to learn how each river's morphology changed over the years in response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Historical and contemporary cross-sectional channel geometries at several gaging stations on each river were compared, planform changes were assessed, and hydraulic values were estimated including mean flow velocity, bed shear stress, Froude numbers, and hydraulic depth. The primary sources of historical channel morphology information were U.S. Geological Survey hard-copy discharge-measurement field notes. Additional analyses were done using computations of selected flow hydraulics, comparisons of historical and contemporary aerial photographs, comparisons of historical and contemporary ground photographs, evaluations of how frequently stage-discharge rating curves were updated, reviews of stage-discharge relations for field measurements, and considerations of bridge and reservoir construction activities. Based on historical cross sections at three gaging stations downstream from Toledo Bend Reservoir, the lower Sabine River is relatively stable, but is subject to substantial temporary scour-and-fill processes during floods. Exceptions to this characterization of relative stability include an episode of channel aggradation at the Sabine River near Bon Wier, Texas, during the 1930s, and about 2 to 3 feet of channel incision at the Sabine River near Burkeville, Texas, since the late 1950s. The Brazos River, at gaging stations downstream from Waco, Texas, has adjusted to a combination of

  13. 75 FR 18755 - Security Zone; Calcasieu River and Ship Channel, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Calcasieu River and Ship Channel, LA..., LA. The Coast Guard is also disestablishing the Calcasieu River ship channel moving safety zone and... a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled ``Security Zone; Calcasieu River and Ship...

  14. 77 FR 42464 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Proposed rule; withdrawal... ``Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD'' in the... Channel, in Prince George's County, MD, effective from 5 a.m. until 11 a.m. on August 5, 2012....

  15. Life in the fast lane: fish and foodweb structure in the main channel of large rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettmers, J.M.; Wahl, David H.; Soluk, D.A.; Gutreuter, S.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the main channel of the lower Illinois River and of the Mississippi River just upstream and downstream of its confluence with the Illinois River to describe the abundance, composition, and/or seasonal appearance of components of the main-channel community. Abundance of fishes in the main channel was high, especially adults. Most adult fishes were present in the main channel for either 3 or 4 seasons/y, indicating that fishes regularly reside in the main channel. We documented abundant zooplankton and benthic invertebrates in the main channel, and the presence of these food types in the diets of channel catfish and freshwater drum. All trophic levels were well represented in the main channel, indicating that the main channel supports a unique food web. The main channel also serves as an important energetic link with other riverine habitats (e.g., floodplains, secondary channels, backwater lakes) because of the mobility of resident fishes and because of the varied energy sources supplying this food web. It may be more realistic to view energy flow in large-river systems as a combination of 3 existing concepts, the river continuum concept (downstream transport), the flood pulse concept (lateral transport to the floodplain), and the riverine productivity model (autochthonous production). We urge additional research to quantify the links between the main channel and other habitat types in large rivers because of the apparent importance of main-channel processes in the overall structure and function of large-river ecosystems.

  16. Channel change and bed-material transport in the Umpqua River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallick, J. Rose; O'Connor, Jim E.; Anderson, Scott; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Cannon, Charles; Risley, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers of western Oregon; with headwaters in the Cascade Range, the river flows through portions of the Klamath Mountains and Oregon Coast Range before entering the Pacific Ocean. Above the head of tide, the Umpqua River, along with its major tributaries, the North and South Umpqua Rivers, flows on a mixed bedrock and alluvium bed, alternating between bedrock rapids and intermittent, shallow gravel bars composed of gravel to cobble-sized clasts. These bars have been a source of commercial aggregate since the mid-twentieth century. Below the head of tide, the Umpqua River contains large bars composed of mud and sand. Motivated by ongoing permitting and aquatic habitat concerns related to in-stream gravel mining on the fluvial reaches, this study evaluated spatial and temporal trends in channel change and bed-material transport for 350 kilometers of river channel along the Umpqua, North Umpqua, and South Umpqua Rivers. The assessment produced (1) detailed mapping of the active channel, using aerial photographs and repeat surveys, and (2) a quantitative estimation of bed-material flux that drew upon detailed measurements of particle size and lithology, equations of transport capacity, and a sediment yield analysis. Bed-material transport capacity estimates at 45 sites throughout the South Umpqua and main stem Umpqua Rivers for the period 1951-2008 result in wide-ranging transport capacity estimates, reflecting the difficulty of applying equations of bed-material transport to a supply-limited river. Median transport capacity values calculated from surface-based equations of bedload transport for each of the study reaches provide indications of maximum possible transport rates and range from 8,000 to 27,000 metric tons per year (tons/yr) for the South Umpqua River and 20,000 to 82,000 metric tons/yr for the main stem Umpqua River upstream of the head of tide; the North Umpqua River probably contributes little bed material. A

  17. Flow-Dependent Topographic and Hydrodynamic Variability Control Channel Change in Mountain Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. A.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2013-12-01

    An emerging view in fluvial geomorphology is that rivers are systems with multiple scales of variability. This is especially true in mountain rivers that have spatially variable alluvial-bedrock boundaries as multiple scales of topography, from individual boulders to valley scale deposits, can steer flow paths affecting the erosion and deposition patterns of transported sediments. We hypothesize that depending on flow discharge and stage, different scales of channel topography can become dominant in routing sediment such that the resulting topography is a layered sequence of past flows. Here we evaluate gravel and cobble channel change associated with hydraulic unit to reach scale (e.g. 10-1-102 channel widths) changes in topographic and stage-dependent hydrodynamic variability in a mixed alluvial-bedrock river canyon. This study takes advantage of a unique opportunity where 4,535 metric tons of gravel ranging from 6-128 mm was augmented directly below a dam for spawning habitat rehabilitation in a 1,200 m long mountain river reach with no other sources of gravel sediment supply and an existing substrate of bedrock, large cobbles (>250mm), angular shot rock (>0.5m) and boulders (>1m). While the study site is a regulated river flows above 117 m3/s, just below the bankfull discharge, still overtop the dam so natural aspects of the hydrograph are still retained such that the reach still experiences large floods capable of considerable topographic change. We utilize kite-blimp aerial photography, kayak-based surveying, topographic change detection, and 2D modeling to understand how flow discharge can activate topographic features that ultimately control channel change following a controlled gravel injection upstream of a mountain river with no other gravel or cobble sediment inputs. The spatial covariance of flow width and bed elevation are strongly associated with the volume of gravel deposition and erosion, but this also changes depending on flow discharge as

  18. Distribution and characterization of in-channel large wood in relation to geomorphic patterns on a low-gradient river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moulin, Bertrand; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2011-01-01

    A 177 river km georeferenced aerial survey of in-channel large wood (LW) on the lower Roanoke River, NC was conducted to determine LW dynamics and distributions on an eastern USA low-gradient large river. Results indicate a system with approximately 75% of the LW available for transport either as detached individual LW or as LW in log jams. There were approximately 55 individual LW per river km and another 59 pieces in log jams per river km. Individual LW is a product of bank erosion (73% is produced through erosion) and is isolated on the mid and upper banks at low flow. This LW does not appear to be important for either aquatic habitat or as a human risk. Log jams rest near or at water level making them a factor in bank complexity in an otherwise homogenous fine-grained channel. A segmentation test was performed using LW frequency by river km to detect breaks in longitudinal distribution and to define homogeneous reaches of LWfrequency. Homogeneous reaches were then analyzed to determine their relationship to bank height, channel width/depth, sinuosity, and gradient. Results show that log jams are a product of LW transport and occur more frequently in areas with high snag concentrations, low to intermediate bank heights, high sinuosity, high local LW recruitment rates, and narrow channel widths. The largest concentration of log jams (21.5 log jams/km) occurs in an actively eroding reach. Log jam concentrations downstream of this reach are lower due to a loss of river competency as the channel reaches sea level and the concurrent development of unvegetated mudflats separating the active channel from the floodplain forest. Substantial LW transport occurs on this low-gradient, dam-regulated large river; this study, paired with future research on transport mechanisms should provide resource managers and policymakers with options to better manage aquatic habitat while mitigating possible negative impacts to human interests.

  19. Agonist-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at ion channels as an example of the pharmacologist's stock in trade, the action of an agonist on a receptor to produce a response. Looked at in this way, ion channels have been helpful because they are still the only system which is simple enough for quantitative investigation of transduction mechanisms. A short history is given of attempts to elucidate what happens between the time when agonist first binds, and the time when the channel opens. PMID:16402101

  20. Channel Stability and Water Quality of the Alagnak River, Southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.

    2003-01-01

    The Alagnak River, a National Wild River located in southwestern Alaska, drains an area of 3,600 square kilometers and is used for recreational and subsistence activities, primarily angling, camping, rafting, and hunting by visitors and seasonal residents, and for commercial guiding by several lodges. Increases in visitor use in the 1990s included an increase in the use of high-horsepower motorboats on the river, primarily for angling, and raised concerns regarding human impacts on water quality. Downstream from its confluence with the Nonvianuk River at river kilometer (RK) 93, the Alagnak River is formed in glacial drift and outwash with a single, low bedrock outcrop. Analysis of aerial photography from 1951, 1982, and 2001 shows that the river's multiple channels from RK 57 to 93 have been relatively stable. In contrast, long reaches of multiple channels from RK 35 to 57 changed substantially between 1951 and 1982, creating a new complex of channels. Downstream from RK 35, channel changes in the past 50 years consist largely of minor meander migration. Analysis of water samples collected during this study at RK 21, 46, and 93 and in the Alagnak and Nonvianuk Rivers at the outlets of the lakes that form their source shows that the Alagnak River is a nutrient-poor, calcium-bicarbonate water with low suspended-sediment concentrations. Water chemistry changes little over time or in a downstream direction. Weak patterns over time include high late May/early June concentrations of some nutrients, carbon, and iron. Weak patterns over distance include downstream increases in iron, manganese, and phosphorous. No pervasive human impacts on Alagnak River water chemistry were detected. Local effects that could be diluted within a kilometer downstream of the source were not detectable by this study. Data collected at three continuously recording wake gaging stations at RK 21, 46, and 93 showed that 1999-2000 motorboat use was heaviest in the lower reaches of the river

  1. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of channel incision on the hydraulics of flood flows: Examples from Polish Carpathian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Zawiejska, Joanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Channel deepening may result from channel incision or river metamorphosis changing a wide and shallow channel to a narrow and deep one. As only the first type of channel change leads to increased flow capacity of the channel, a lowering of water stage associated with a given discharge rather than a lowering of river bed should be used to identify channel incision. A lowering of minimum annual stage at gauging stations is typically used to assess the relative importance of channel incision along a river or within a particular region. Rivers of the Polish Carpathians incised by 0.5-3.8 m over the twentieth century, with the amount of incision being greater in their lower and middle courses than in the upper ones. Variability in the hydraulic importance of channel incision with increasing river size is analysed by comparing changes in the frequency of valley floor inundation at gauging stations located along the seventh-order Dunajec River. Despite a lower absolute amount of channel incision in the upper river course, here incision has increased channel conveyance and reduced the frequency of valley floor inundation considerably more than in the lower course. Hydraulic effects of channel incision depend also on lateral stability of an incising river. Low-energy rivers from the eastern part of the Polish Carpathians remained laterally stable during channel incision. This has resulted in substantial lowering of stages for low flood discharges and markedly smaller one for high-magnitude floods, whereas velocity of the flows conveyed over the highly elevated floodplains has decreased considerably. In high-energy rivers from the western part of the Polish Carpathians, alternation of incision and lateral channel migration has led to the formation of incised meander belts, with substantially lowered stages for all flood discharges and increased velocity of the flows conveyed over the newly-formed, low-lying floodplains.

  3. Flows and hypoxic blackwater events in managed ephemeral river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyz, Sally; Watkins, Susanne C.; Whitworth, Kerry L.; Baldwin, Darren S.

    2011-04-01

    SummaryAs pressure increases on the availability of water resources worldwide, especially in the face of climatic change, it is probable that the likelihood of streams undergoing at least some periods of drying will increase in arid and semi-arid regions. This has implications for the ongoing management of waterways in these areas. One area of concern is the potential occurrence of hypoxic blackwater events upon re-instatement of flows in creek and river channels following periods of drying. Hypoxic blackwater events are characterised by high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the metabolism of which results in low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the water column, which can cause fish and crustacean mortality. Therefore, understanding hypoxic blackwater events is important in order to reduce the potential for fish mortalities and other water quality impacts from both managed and natural flows. In this study, we set out to determine the factors that influenced the occurrence of a hypoxic blackwater event in the Edward-Wakool river system, in southern NSW, Australia during the previous austral summer (2008-2009). Standing stocks of plant litter, emergent macrophytes and river red gum saplings ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn.), as well as rates of litterfall, were determined in dry and inundated channels. A series of mesocosm experiments were undertaken to determine which carbon source was the greatest contributor to DOC and to DO depletion, and what loadings could result in hypoxia. These experiments were then used to create a simple algorithm relating carbon loading in a dry channel to DOC in the overlying water column following inundation. Results revealed that plant litter was the main contributor to water column DOC and to DO depletion. Litter loadings equal to or greater than 370 g m -2 were found to cause DO in a shallow (20 cm) water column at 20 °C to fall to zero within two days. This loading was approximately half of that found in dry channels in the

  4. GWD-LR: a satellite-based global database of river channel width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai; O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Trigg, Mark; Bates, Paul

    2015-04-01

    River width is a fundamental parameter of river hydrodynamic simulations, but no global-scale river width database based on observed water bodies has yet been developed. Here we present a new algorithm that automatically calculates river width from satellite-based water masks and flow direction maps. The Global Width Database for Large Rivers (GWD-LR) is developed by applying the algorithm to the SRTM Water Body Database and the HydroSHEDS flow direction map. Both bank-to-bank river width and effective river width excluding islands are calculated for river channels between 60S and 60N. The effective river width of GWD-LR is compared with existing river width databases for the Congo and Mississippi Rivers. The effective river width of the GWD-LR is slightly narrower compared to the existing databases, but the relative difference is within +/-20% for most river channels. As the river width of the GWD-LR is calculated along the river channels of the HydroSHEDS flow direction map, it is relatively straightforward to apply the GWD-LR to global- and continental-scale river modeling.

  5. Human-induced stream channel abandonment/capture and filling of floodplain channels within the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroes, Daniel E.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The Atchafalaya River Basin is a distributary system of the Mississippi River containing the largest riparian area in the lower Mississippi River Valley and the largest remaining forested bottomland in North America. Reductions in the area of open water in the Atchafalaya have been occurring over the last 100 years, and many historical waterways are increasingly filled by sediment. This study examines two cases of swamp channels (3/s) that are filling and becoming unnavigable as a result of high sediment loads and slow water velocities. The water velocities in natural bayous are further reduced because of flow capture by channels constructed for access. Bathymetry, flow, suspended sediment, deposited bottom-material, isotopes, and photointerpretation were used to characterize the channel fill. On average, water flowing through these two channels lost 23% of the suspended sediment load in the studied reaches. Along one of the studied reaches, two constructed access channels diverted significant flow out of the primary channel and into the adjacent swamp. Immediately downstream of each of the two access channels, the cross-sectional area of the studied channel was reduced. Isotopic analyses of bottom-material cores indicate that bed filling has been rapid and occurred after detectable levels of Cesium-137 were no longer being deposited. Interpretation of aerial photography indicates that water is bypassing the primary channels in favor of the more hydraulically efficient access channels, resulting in low or no-velocity flow conditions in the primary channel. These swamp channel conditions are typical in the Atchafalaya River Basin where relict large channel dimensions result in flow velocities that are normally too low to carry fine-grained sediment. Constructed channels increase the rate of natural channel avulsion and abandonment as a result of flow capture.

  6. Human-induced stream channel abandonment/capture and filling of floodplain channels within the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroes, Daniel E.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    2013-11-01

    The Atchafalaya River Basin is a distributary system of the Mississippi River containing the largest riparian area in the lower Mississippi River Valley and the largest remaining forested bottomland in North America. Reductions in the area of open water in the Atchafalaya have been occurring over the last 100 years, and many historical waterways are increasingly filled by sediment. This study examines two cases of swamp channels (< 85 m3/s) that are filling and becoming unnavigable as a result of high sediment loads and slow water velocities. The water velocities in natural bayous are further reduced because of flow capture by channels constructed for access. Bathymetry, flow, suspended sediment, deposited bottom-material, isotopes, and photointerpretation were used to characterize the channel fill. On average, water flowing through these two channels lost 23% of the suspended sediment load in the studied reaches. Along one of the studied reaches, two constructed access channels diverted significant flow out of the primary channel and into the adjacent swamp. Immediately downstream of each of the two access channels, the cross-sectional area of the studied channel was reduced. Isotopic analyses of bottom-material cores indicate that bed filling has been rapid and occurred after detectable levels of Cesium-137 were no longer being deposited. Interpretation of aerial photography indicates that water is bypassing the primary channels in favor of the more hydraulically efficient access channels, resulting in low or no-velocity flow conditions in the primary channel. These swamp channel conditions are typical in the Atchafalaya River Basin where relict large channel dimensions result in flow velocities that are normally too low to carry fine-grained sediment. Constructed channels increase the rate of natural channel avulsion and abandonment as a result of flow capture.

  7. Historical perspectives on channel pattern in the Clark Fork River, Montana and implications for post-dam removal restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woelfle-Erskine, C. A.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2009-12-01

    Active restoration approaches such as channel reconstruction have moved beyond the realm of small streams and are being applied to larger rivers. Uncertainties arising from limited knowledge, fluvial and ecosystem variability, and contaminants are especially significant in restoration of large rivers, where project costs and the social, infrastructural, and ecological costs of failure are high. We use the case of Milltown Dam removal on the Clark Fork River, Montana and subsequent channel reconstruction in the former reservoir to examine the use of historical research and uncertainty analysis in river restoration. At a cost of approximately $120 million, the Milltown Dam removal involves the mechanical removal of approximately 2 million cubic meters of sediments contaminated by upstream mining, followed by restoration of the former reservoir reach in which a single-thread meandering channel is being constructed. Historical maps, surveys, photographs, and accounts suggest a conceptual model of a multi-thread, anastomosing river in the reach targeted for channel reconstruction, upstream of the confluence of the Clark Fork and Blackfoot Rivers. We supplemented historical research with analysis of aerial photographs, topographic data, and USGS stage-discharge measurements in a lotic but reservoir-influenced reach of the Clark Fork River within our study area to estimate avulsion frequency (0.8 avulsions/year over a 70-year period) and average rates of lateral migration and aggradation. These were used to calculate the mobility number, a dimensionless relationship between channel filling and lateral migration timescales that can be used to predict whether a river’s planform is single or multi-threaded. The mobility number within our study reach ranged from 0.6 (multi-thread channel) to 1.7 (transitional channel). We predict that, in the absence of active channel reconstruction, the post-dam channel pattern would evolve to one that alternates between single and multi

  8. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Rogue River basin, southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary assessment of bed-material transport, vertical and lateral channel changes, and existing datasets for the Rogue River basin, which encompasses 13,390 square kilometers (km2) along the southwestern Oregon coast. This study, conducted to inform permitting decisions regarding instream gravel mining, revealed that: * The Rogue River in its lowermost 178.5 kilometers (km) alternates between confined and unconfined segments, and is predominately alluvial along its lowermost 44 km. The study area on the mainstem Rogue River can be divided into five reaches based on topography, hydrology, and tidal influence. The largely confined, active channel flows over bedrock and coarse bed material composed chiefly of boulders and cobbles in the Grants Pass (river kilometers [RKM] 178.5-152.8), Merlin (RKM 152.8-132.7), and Galice Reaches (RKM 132.7-43.9). Within these confined reaches, the channel contains few bars and has stable planforms except for locally wider segments such as the Brushy Chutes area in the Merlin Reach. Conversely, the active channel flows over predominately alluvial material and contains nearly continuous gravel bars in the Lobster Creek Reach (RKM 43.9-6.7). The channel in the Tidal Reach (RKM 6.7-0) is also alluvial, but tidally affected and unconfined until RKM 2. The Lobster Creek and Tidal Reaches contain some of the most extensive bar deposits within the Rogue River study area. * For the 56.6-km-long segment of the Applegate River included in this study, the river was divided into two reaches based on topography. In the Upper Applegate River Reach (RKM 56.6-41.6), the confined, active channel flows over alluvium and bedrock and has few bars. In the Lower Applegate River Reach (RKM 41.6-0), the active channel alternates between confined and unconfined segments, flows predominantly over alluvium, shifts laterally in unconfined sections, and contains more numerous and larger bars. * The 6.5-km segment of the lower

  9. River sedimentation and channel bed characteristics in northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Biadgilgn; Billi, Paolo; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Lanckriet, Sil; Nyssen, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Excessive sedimentation and flood hazard are common in ephemeral streams which are characterized by flashy floods. The purposes of this study was to investigate the temporal variability of bio-climatic factors in controlling sediment supply to downstream channel reaches and the effect of bridges on local hydro-geomorphic conditions in causing the excess sedimentation and flood hazard in ephemeral rivers of the Raya graben (northern Ethiopia). Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was analyzed for the study area using Landsat imageries of 1972, 1986, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2012). Middle term, 1993-2011, daily rainfall data of three meteorological stations, namely, Alamata, Korem and Maychew, were considered to analyse the temporal trends and to calculate the return time intervals of rainfall intensity in 24 hours for 2, 5, 10 and 20 years using the log-normal and the Gumbel extreme events method. Streambed gradient and bed material grain size were measured in 22 river reaches (at bridges and upstream). In the study catchments, the maximum NDVI values were recorded in the time interval from 2000 to 2010, i.e. the decade during which the study bridges experienced the most severe excess sedimentation problems. The time series analysis for a few rainfall parameters do not show any evidence of rainfall pattern accountable for an increase in sediment delivery from the headwaters nor for the generation of higher floods with larger bedload transport capacities. Stream bed gradient and bed material grain size data were measured in order to investigate the effect of the marked decrease in width from the wide upstream channels to the narrow recently constructed bridges. The study found the narrowing of the channels due to the bridges as the main cause of the thick sedimentation that has been clogging the study bridges and increasing the frequency of overbank flows during the last 15 years. Key terms: sedimentation, ephemeral streams, sediment size, bridge clogging

  10. Comparison of planform multi-channel network characteristics of alluvial and bedrock constrained large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, P. A.; Meshkova, L.; Robinson, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Mekong River in northern Cambodia is an multi-channel mixed bedrock-alluvial river but it was poorly researched until present. Preliminary study of the Mekong geomorphology was conducted by gathering existing knowledge of its geological and tectonic settings, specific riparian vegetation and ancient alluvial terraces in which the river has incised since the Holocene. Altogether this process has allowed a geomorphological portrait of the river to be composed within the Quaternary context. Following this outline, the planform characteristics of the Mekong River network are compared, using analysis of channel network and islands configurations, with the fluvial patterns of the Orange River (South Africa), Upper Columbia River (Canada) and the Ganga River (India, Bangladesh). These rivers are selected as examples of multi-channel mixed bedrock alluvial, anastomosed alluvial and braided alluvial rivers respectively. Network parameters such as channel bifurcation angles asymmetry, sinuosity, braid intensity and island morphometric shape metrics are compared and contrasted between bedrock and alluvial systems. In addition, regional and local topographic trend surfaces produced for each river planform help explain the local changes in river direction and the degree of anastomosis, and distinguish the bedrock-alluvial rivers from the alluvial rivers. Variations between planform characteristics are to be explained by channel forming processes and in the case of mixed bedrock-alluvial rivers mediated by structural control. Channel metrics (derived at the reach-scale) provide some discrimination between different multi-channel patterns but are not always robust when considered singly. In contrast, island shape metrics (obtained at subreach-scale) allow robust discrimination between alluvial and bedrock systems.

  11. The resilience of river valleys to deformation in experiments: competition between tectonic advection and channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerit, Laure; Dominguez, Stéphane; Castelltort, Sébastien; Malavielle, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    In oblique collision settings, parallel and perpendicular components of the relative plate motion can be partitioned into different structures of deformation and may be localized close to the plate boundary, or distributed on a wider region. In the Southern Alps of New Zealand, it has been proposed that two-third of the regional convergence was accommodated by the Alpine Fault, while the remaining motion was distributed in a broad area along the Southern Alps orogenic wedge. To better document and understand the regional dynamics of such systems, reliable markers of the horizontal tectonic motion over geological time scales are needed. In numerical models, it has been shown that river networks are able to record a large amount of distributed strain, and that they can thus be used to reconstruct the mode and rate of distribution away from major active structures (Castelltort et al, NGeo, 2012). In order to explore the controls on river resilience to deformation in a less constrained system, we developed an experimental model to investigate river pattern evolution over a doubly-vergent orogenic wedge growing in a context of oblique convergence. We use a rain-fall system to activate erosion, sediment transport and river development on the model surface. The evolution of the wedge is fully recorded through space and time so we are able to follow the drainage geometry deformation. These experiments confirm that rivers record the distribution of motion along the wedge. Image analysis of channel time-space evolution shows how the fault-parallel and fault-perpendicular components of motion decrease toward the fault and impose rotation to the main trunk valleys. However, the capacity of rivers to act as passive markers of deformation competes with the natural lateral channel dynamics and hillslope-channel couplings which both modify the valleys boundaries. In this sense rivers are dynamic markers, which write both a story of passive rotation imposed by the tectonic velocity

  12. BK channel activation: structural and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Urvi S.; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The voltage and Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Structurally, BK channels are homologous to voltage- and ligand-gated K+ channels, having a voltage sensor and pore as the membrane-spanning domain and a cytosolic domain containing metal binding sites. Recently published electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallographic structures of the BK channel provided the first look into the assembly of these domains, corroborating the close interactions among these domains during channel gating that have been suggested by functional studies. This review discusses these latest findings and an emerging new understanding about BK channel gating and implications for diseases such as epilepsy, in which mutations in BK channel genes have been associated. PMID:20663573

  13. Channel change on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Santa Cruz River, an ephemeral river that drains 8,581 square miles in southeastern Arizona, has a long history of channel instability. Since the late 19th century, lateral channel erosion has caused extensive property damage, particularly in Pima County. During the flood of 1983, about $100 million damage was caused in the Tucson area alone; most damage resulted from bank erosion on the Santa Cruz River and its tributaries. The nature, magni- tude, location, and frequency of channel change on the Santa Cruz River were highly variable in time and space from 1936 through 1986 along a 70-mile reach in Pima County, Arizona. Four mechanisms of lateral channel change--channel migration, avulsion and meander cutoff, channel widening, and arroyo widening--were identified on the Santa Cruz River. The dominant mechanism in a reach depends on channel morphology and flood magnitude. The dominant vertical change has been degradation. The timing and magnitude of channel change at a particular location are controlled primarily by hydroclimatic factors such as magnitude, duration, intensity, and frequency of precipitation and floods. The location of channel change and its magnitude in response to a given discharge are controlled largely by topographic, geologic, hydraulic, and artificial factors. Although much of the present morphology of the Santa Cruz River is the result of recent large floods, a direct link between hydroclimatic con- ditions and channel change is not always evident because resistance of the channel to erosion varies with time. (USGS)

  14. BK channel activators and their therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bentzen, Bo H.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Rønn, Lars C. B.; Grunnet, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated K+ channel (KCa1.1, BK, MaxiK) is ubiquitously expressed in the body, and holds the ability to integrate changes in intracellular calcium and membrane potential. This makes the BK channel an important negative feedback system linking increases in intracellular calcium to outward hyperpolarizing potassium currents. Consequently, the channel has many important physiological roles including regulation of smooth muscle tone, neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Additionally, cardioprotective roles have been revealed in recent years. After a short introduction to the structure, function and regulation of BK channels, we review the small organic molecules activating BK channels and how these tool compounds have helped delineate the roles of BK channels in health and disease. PMID:25346695

  15. 33 CFR 165.508 - Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. 165.508 Section 165.508 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.508 Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. (a) Definitions. (1)...

  16. 33 CFR 165.508 - Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. 165.508 Section 165.508 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.508 Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. (a) Definitions. (1)...

  17. 33 CFR 165.508 - Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. 165.508 Section 165.508 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.508 Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. (a) Definitions. (1)...

  18. 33 CFR 165.508 - Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. 165.508 Section 165.508 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.508 Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. (a) Definitions. (1)...

  19. 33 CFR 165.508 - Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. 165.508 Section 165.508 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.508 Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. (a) Definitions. (1)...

  20. Autogenic Scour and Channel Widening in Sharp Bends of the River Mahakam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, T.; Vermeulen, B.; van Berkum, S.; Hidayat, H.; Labeur, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Field evidence of the River Mahakam reveals autogenic scour and channel widening in a series of sharp bends. An integral analysis of a 300 km reach of the river is presented, including a comprehensive survey of the river banks, delineation of the river corridor from radar observations, Large Eddy Simulations of observed flow patterns, and a geometric analysis of planform and depth information. Scour depths strongly exceed what can be expected based on existing understanding of sharp bends, and are highly correlated with curvature. Histograms of the occurrence of erosive, stable, advancing, and bar-type banks as a function of curvature quantify the switch from a mildly curved bend regime to a sharp bend regime. In mild bends, outer banks erode and inner banks advance. In sharp bends the erosion pattern inverts. Outer banks stabilize or advance, while inner banks erode. In sharply curved river bends, bars occur near the outer banks that become less erosive for higher curvatures. Inner banks become more erosive for higher curvatures, but nevertheless accommodate the larger portion of exposed bars. Soil processes may play a crucial role in the formation of sharp bends, which is inferred from iron and manganese concretions observed in the riverbanks, indicating ferric horizons and early stages of the formation of plinthic horizons. Historical topographic maps show the planform activity of the river is low, which may relate to the scours slowing down planimetric development. The occurrence of exceptionally deep scours is attributed to downflow near the scour exceeding 12 cm/s, increasing the bed shear stress. The downflow, in turn, is explained from the cross-sectional area increase, which is shown to be important in generating adverse surface gradients driving flow recirculation in the Large Eddy Simulations. Strong secondary flow distorts the vertical pressure distribution that is no longer hydrostatic. The downflow advects longitudinal momentum, moving the core of the

  1. Quantifying downstream impacts of impoundment on flow regime and channel planform, lower Trinity River, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Slattery, Michael C.; Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2005-07-01

    As human population worldwide has grown, so has interest in harnessing and manipulating the flow of water for the benefit of humans. The Trinity River of eastern Texas is one such watershed greatly impacted by engineering and urbanization. Draining the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, just under 30 reservoirs are in operation in the basin, regulating flow while containing public supplies, supporting recreation, and providing flood control. Lake Livingston is the lowest, as well as largest, reservoir in the basin, a mere 95 km above the Trinity's outlet near Galveston Bay. This study seeks to describe and quantify channel activity and flow regime, identifying effects of the 1968 closure of Livingston dam. Using historic daily and peak discharge data from USGS gauging stations, flow duration curves are constructed, identifying pre- and post-dam flow conditions. A digital historic photo archive was also constructed using six sets of aerial photographs spanning from 1938 to 1995, and three measures of channel activity applied using a GIS. Results show no changes in high flow conditions following impoundment, while low flows are elevated. However, the entire post-dam period is characterized by significantly higher rainfall, which may be obscuring the full impact of flow regulation. Channel activity rates do not indicate a more stabilized planform following dam closure; rather they suggest that the Trinity River is adjusting itself to the stress of Livingston dam in a slow, gradual process that may not be apparent in a modern time scale.

  2. 77 FR 70372 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Avon Township, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South..., across Shark River (South Channel) at Avon Township, NJ. The existing regulation contains a drawbridge... Transportation (NJDOT) to replace the existing bascule bridge, which carries S35 over Shark River (South...

  3. Channel change on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.

    1995-01-01

    The Santa Cruz River in southeastern Arizona has a long history of channel instability. Since the late 19th century, lateral channel erosion has caused extensive property damage, particularly in Pima County. The dominant mechanism of channel change in a reach depends on channel morphology and flood magnitude. The timing and magnitude of channel change are controlled primarily by hydroclimatic factors. The location of change is controlled largely by topographic, geologic, hydraulic, and artificial factors.

  4. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate.

  5. Characterizing and modelling river channel migration rates at a regional scale: Case study of south-east France.

    PubMed

    Alber, Adrien; Piégay, Hervé

    2016-11-23

    An increased awareness by river managers of the importance of river channel migration to sediment dynamics, habitat complexity and other ecosystem functions has led to an advance in the science and practice of identifying, protecting or restoring specific erodible corridors across which rivers are free to migrate. One current challenge is the application of these watershed-specific goals at the regional planning scales (e.g., the European Water Framework Directive). This study provides a GIS-based spatial analysis of the channel migration rates at the regional-scale. As a case study, 99 reaches were sampled in the French part of the Rhône Basin and nearby tributaries of the Mediterranean Sea (111,300 km(2)). We explored the spatial correlation between the channel migration rate and a set of simple variables (e.g., watershed area, channel slope, stream power, active channel width). We found that the spatial variability of the channel migration rates was primary explained by the gross stream power (R(2) = 0.48) and more surprisingly by the active channel width scaled by the watershed area. The relationship between the absolute migration rate and the gross stream power is generally consistent with the published empirical models for freely meandering rivers, whereas it is less significant for the multi-thread reaches. The discussion focused on methodological constraints for a regional-scale modelling of the migration rates, and the interpretation of the empirical models. We hypothesize that the active channel width scaled by the watershed area is a surrogate for the sediment supply which may be a more critical factor than the bank resistance for explaining the regional-scale variability of the migration rates.

  6. The influence of river training on mountain channel changes (Polish Carpathian Mountains)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpak, Joanna

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain the influence of river training on channel changes in mountain rivers. Also considered are the causes of failure of different training schemes. The research was conducted on the regulated Mszanka and Porębianka Rivers, belonging to the Raba River drainage basin in the Polish Flysh Carpathian Mountains. Channel mapping carried out in 2004 drew attention to the contemporary morphology of the channels and the development of their dynamic typology. General changes in channel morphometry and land cover were identified by comparing cartographic sources from various years. Archive material from Cracow's Regional Water Management Authority (RZGW) was used to analyse the detailed channel changes caused by each regulation structure. The material consisted of technical designs of individual training works, as well as plans, longitudinal profiles and cross-sections of trained channel reaches. A series of minimum annual water stages at the Mszana Dolna gauging station was used to determine the tendency of channel bed degradation over 53 years. During the first half of the 20th century, the middle and lower courses of the Mszanka and Porębianka Rivers had braided patterns. The slopes, mostly covered with crops, were an important source of sediment delivery to the river channels. Today, both channels are single-threaded, narrow and sinuous. Downcutting is the leading process transforming the channels. They cut down to bedrock along about 60% of their lengths. The main type of channel is an erosion channel, which occurs also in the middle and lower courses of the rivers. The channel sediment deficit is an important cause for river incision. Sediment supply to the channels was reduced after a replacement of crops on the slopes by meadows or forests. Gravel mining has also caused channel downcutting. The rapid channel changes began after 1959, as systematic training was introduced. Channel regulation seems therefore to be a major factor

  7. The case of the shrinking channels; the North Platte and Platte rivers in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Garnett P.

    1978-01-01

    Since the latter part of the 19th century, channels of North Platte and Platte Rivers in western and central Nebraska have changed considerably. In the 365-km reach from Minatare to Overton, the channel by 2969 ws only about 0.1-0.2 as wide in 1865. The 1969 channel for this reach was less braided and slightly more sinuous than the 1938 channel. (No data are available for braiding and sinuosity prior to 1938.) From Overton to lGrand Island the 1969 channel was about o.6-0.7 as wide as in 1865, and various changes in braiding and sinuosity took place between 1938 and 1969. The decreases in channel width are related to decreases in water discharge. Such flow reductions have resulted primarily from regulating effects of major upstream dams and greater use of the river water. Much of the former river channel is now overgrown with vegetation. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Evaluating the impact of a wide range of vegetation densities on river channel pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Roucou, Ron

    2016-04-01

    Braided rivers are very dynamic systems which have complex controls over their planform and flow dynamics. Vegetation is one variable which influences channel geometry and pattern, through its effect on local flow hydraulics and the process continuum of sediment erosion-transport-deposition. Furthermore, where in the braided floodplain stable vegetation develops depends on the temporal sequencing of the river discharge i.e. floods. Understanding the effect of vegetation in these highly dynamic systems has multiple consequences for human activity and floodplain management. This paper focusses on the specific role of vegetation density in controlling braided river form and processes. Previous research in this field has been contradictory; with Gran and Paola (2001) finding that increasing vegetation density decreased the number of active channels. In contrast, Coulthard (2005] observed that as vegetation become denser there was an increase in the number of channels. This was hypothesized to be caused by flow separation around vegetation and the development of bars immediately downstream of the plant. This paper reports the results from a set of experiments in a 4m by 1m flume, where discharge, slope and sediment size were kept constant. Artificial grass was used to represent vegetation with a density ranging from 50 plants/m2 to 400 plants/m2. Digital photographs, using a GoPro camera with a fish eye lens, were taken from ~1m above the flume at an interval of 30 seconds during the 3 hour experiment. The experiments showed that as the vegetation density increased from 50 to 150 plants/m2, the number of channel bars developing doubled from 12 to 24. At vegetation densities greater than 150 plants/m2 there was a decline in the number of bars created to a minimum of 8 bars for a density of 400 plants/m2. We attribute these patterns to the effect that the vegetation has on flow hydraulics, sediment transport processes and the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition. We

  9. SEASONAL FORAGING BY CHANNEL CATFISH ON TERRESTRIALLY BURROWING CRAYFISH IN A FLOODPLAIN-RIVER ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The seasonal use of terrestrially burrowing crayfish as a food item by channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was studied in channelized and non-channelized sections of the Yockanookany River (Mississippi, USA). During seasonal inundation of the floodplains, the crayfish occupied o...

  10. Channel-conveyance capacity, channel change, and sediment transport in the lower Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers, western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Chistopher S.; Voss, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    Draining the volcanic, glaciated terrain of Mount Rainier, Washington, the Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers convey copious volumes of water and sediment down to Commencement Bay in Puget Sound. Recent flooding in the lowland river system has renewed interest in understanding sediment transport and its effects on flow conveyance throughout the lower drainage basin. Bathymetric and topographic data for 156 cross sections were surveyed in the lower Puyallup River system by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and were compared with similar datasets collected in 1984. Regions of significant aggradation were measured along the Puyallup and White Rivers. Between 1984 and 2009, aggradation totals as measured by changes in average channel elevation were as much as 7.5, 6.5, and 2 feet on the Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers, respectively. These aggrading river sections correlated with decreasing slopes in riverbeds where the rivers exit relatively confined sections in the upper drainage and enter the relatively unconstricted valleys of the low-gradient Puget Lowland. Measured grain-size distributions from each riverbed showed a progressive fining downstream. Analysis of stage-discharge relations at streamflow-gaging stations along rivers draining Mount Rainier demonstrated the dynamic nature of channel morphology on river courses influenced by glaciated, volcanic terrain. The greatest rates of aggradation since the 1980s were in the Nisqually River near National (5.0 inches per year) and the White River near Auburn (1.8 inches per year). Less pronounced aggradation was measured on the Puyallup River and the White River just downstream of Mud Mountain Dam. The largest measured rate of incision was measured in the Cowlitz River at Packwood (5.0 inches per year). Channel-conveyance capacity estimated using a one-dimensional hydraulic model decreased in some river reaches since 1984. The reach exhibiting the largest decrease (about 20-50 percent) in channel

  11. Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: river channel and floodplain geomorphic change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Amy E.; Pess, George R.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Logan, Joshua; Randle, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Minear, Justin T.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Liermann, Martin C.; McHenry, Michael L.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-01-01

    As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of ~ 1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool–riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to tenfold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (in terms of bed elevation change magnitude) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through deposits of the initial sediment wave, ~ 1.2 million t of new sediment (~ 10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed sediment grain size along the Elwha River have important ecological implications, affecting aquatic habitat structure, benthic fauna, salmonid fish spawning and rearing potential, and riparian vegetation. The response of the river to dam removal represents a unique opportunity to observe and quantify fundamental geomorphic processes associated with a massive sediment influx, and also provides important lessons for future river-restoration endeavors.

  12. Spatial and temporal variations of the Longxi river channel in Sichuan province after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Xie, T.; Liu, G.

    2015-12-01

    Biyun Guo1,21College of Marine Science and Technology, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316004,China; 2State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China Abstract: The great Wenchuan earthquake(Ms=8.0) occurred on May 12, 2008 in the southwestern China which triggerednumerous landslides and collapses that providedflows of an abundant unconsolidated material of debris. Landslides and debris flows were very active and caused river channel change over the affected mountain area. River channel changes due to the earthquake.Many potentially dangerous debris filledgullies have yet to be identified. In this paper,we present a study in the Longxi river watershed of the upper Min River located in Dujiangyan, discussingthe unconsolidated deposits and debris flows and their relationship with the riverbed changes. The secondary geological disasters triggered by this earthquake is delineated across the Longxi Rvier basin. Based on remote sensing and image interpretation of two QuickBird panchromatic images and comparison between two DEM data of different time periods, wevalidatedthe data with field survey by a differential GPS and laser rangefinder. Several variables were systematically measured (width, slope, bed level change, sediment size) along an18.22 km stretch of the river for specific sites. We have found from the study that: (1) the significant feature of geological disaster was near the Longxi river, where it had the mostintensity; (2) the longitudinal profile of channel bed was changed; (3) channel changes were associated with the land use and cover change, especially with the forest degradation and reforest, and post-quake reconstruction;(4)the landslide and debris flows caused the morphology changes in the Longxi River watershed, leading to sharp changes of the riverbed profiles and the slope in the upper and lower reaches. Keywords: Earthquake ;landslides; debris flows; channel change; riverbed evolution

  13. The Interaction between Logjams, Channel Evolution, and Sports Fisheries on a Dam Regulated Low Gradient River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, E.; Hupp, C. R.; Moulin, B.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the interaction between in-stream large wood (LW), bank erosion, and sports fisheries in the 210 river kilometer (km) Coastal Plain segment of the dam-regulated Roanoke River, North Carolina. Methods included collecting background geomorphic data including a 200 km channel geometry survey and measurements from 701 bank erosion pins at 36 cross-sections over 132 km. LW concentrations were evaluated over a 177 km reach using georeferenced aerial video taken during regulated low flow (56 m3/s). LW transport was measured using 290 radio tagged LW pieces (mean diameter = 35.0 cm, length = 9.3 m) installed between 2008 and 2010. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were surveyed in 2010 at 29 sites using a boat mounted electroshock unit. The abundance of LW in logjams was 59 pieces/km and these were concentrated (21.5 logjams/km) in an actively eroding reach with relatively high sinuosity, high local LW production rates, and narrow channel widths. Most jams (70%) are available nearly year round as aquatic habitat, positioned either on the lower bank or submerged at low-water flows. The actively eroding reach is adjusting to upstream dam regulation by channel widening. The channel upstream of this reach has widened and stabilized while the channel downstream of the eroding reach is still relatively narrow but with lower bank erosion rates. Repeat surveys of radio tagged LW determined that transport was common throughout the study area despite dam regulation and a low channel gradient (0.0016). The mean distance travelled by a radio tagged piece of LW was 11.9 km with a maximum of 101 km (84 tags moved, 96 stationary, 110 not found). Radio tagged LW that moved during the study was found at low flow either in logjams (44%), as individual LW (43%), or submerged mid-channel (14%). Largemouth bass biomass density (g/hr effort) was highest in the actively eroding reach where logjams were most common. Our results support the

  14. Association of ice and river channel morphology determined using ground-penetrationg radar in the Kuparuk River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Best, Heather; McNamara, J.P.; Liberty, Lee M.

    2005-01-01

    We collected ground-penetrating radar data at 10 sites along the Kuparuk River and its main tributary, the Toolik River, to detect unfrozen water beneath river ice. We used 250 MHz and 500 MHz antennas to image both the ice-water interface and the river channel in late April 2001, when daily high temperatures were consistently freezing and river ice had attained its maximum seasonal thickness. The presence of water below the river ice appears as a strong, horizontal reflection observed in the radar data and is confirmed by drill hole data. A downstream transition occurs from ice that is frozen to the bed, called bedfast ice, to ice that is floating on unfrozen water, called floating ice. This transition in ice type corresponds to a downstream change in channel size that was detected in previously conducted hydraulic geometry surveys of the Kuparuk River. We propose a conceptual model wherein the downstream transition from bedfast ice to floating ice is responsible for an observed step change in channel size due to enhanced bank erosion in large channels by floating ice.

  15. Constitutive Activation of the Shaker Kv Channel

    PubMed Central

    Sukhareva, Manana; Hackos, David H.; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2003-01-01

    In different types of K+ channels the primary activation gate is thought to reside near the intracellular entrance to the ion conduction pore. In the Shaker Kv channel the gate is closed at negative membrane voltages, but can be opened with membrane depolarization. In a previous study of the S6 activation gate in Shaker (Hackos, D.H., T.H. Chang, and K.J. Swartz. 2002. J. Gen. Physiol. 119:521–532.), we found that mutation of Pro 475 to Asp results in a channel that displays a large macroscopic conductance at negative membrane voltages, with only small increases in conductance with membrane depolarization. In the present study we explore the mechanism underlying this constitutively conducting phenotype using both macroscopic and single-channel recordings, and probes that interact with the voltage sensors or the intracellular entrance to the ion conduction pore. Our results suggest that constitutive conduction results from a dramatic perturbation of the closed-open equilibrium, enabling opening of the activation gate without voltage-sensor activation. This mechanism is discussed in the context of allosteric models for activation of Kv channels and what is known about the structure of this critical region in K+ channels. PMID:14557403

  16. Investigating the accuracy of photointerpreted unvegetated channel widths in a braided river system: a Platte River case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbylo, Kevin L.; Farnsworth, Jason M.; Baasch, David M.; Farrell, Patrick D.

    2017-02-01

    The central Platte River in Nebraska, USA, has undergone substantial channel narrowing since basin settlement in the mid-nineteenth century. Many researchers have studied the causes of channel narrowing and its implications for endangered species that use wide, shallow channel segments with barren sandbars. As a result, changes in metrics such as unvegetated channel width have been studied. With few exceptions, these measures are estimated from aerial imagery without mention of error in relation to actual channel conditions and/or investigator bias. This issue is not unique to central Platte River studies, as a general lack of commentary is apparent regarding the direct comparison of channel planform characteristics interpreted from aerial imagery relative to those measured in the field. Here we present a case study where data collected by the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program was used to make multiple comparisons using three years of field-measured unvegetated channel widths and those photointerpreted from aerial imagery. Widths were interpreted by three investigators, who identified similar widths in almost all cases. Photointerpretation from imagery collected during the fall resulted in unvegetated width estimates that were more consistent with field measurments than estimates derived using imagery collected in June. Differences were attributed to three main factors: (1) influences of discharge on photointerpretation of unvegetated channel width; (2) increases in vegetative cover throughout the growing season; and (3) resolution of imagery. Most importantly, we concluded that photointerpretation of unvegetated widths from imagery collected during high flows can result in significant over estimation of unvegetated channel width.

  17. Estimating changes in riparian and channel features along the Trinity River downstream of Lewiston Dam, California, 1980 to 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Dam construction, flow diversion, and legacy landuse effects reduced the transport capacity, sediment supply, channel complexity and floodplain-connectivity along the Trinity River, CA below Lewiston Dam. This study documents the geomorphic evolution of the Trinity River Restoration Program’s intensively managed 65-km long restoration reach from 1980 to 2011. The nature and extent of riparian and channel changes were assessed using a series of geomorphic feature maps constructed from ortho-rectified photography acquired at low flow conditions in 1980, 1997, 2001, 2006, 2009, and 2011. Since 1980 there has been a general conversion of riparian to channel features and expansion of the active channel area. The primary mechanism for expansion of the active channel was bank erosion from 1980 to 1997 and channel widening was well distributed longitudinally throughout the study reach. Subsequent net bar accretion from 1997 to 2001, followed by slightly higher net bar scour from 2001 to 2006, occurred primarily in the central and lower reaches of the study area. In comparison, post-2006 bank and bar changes were spatially-limited to reaches with sufficient local transport capacity or sediment supply supported by gravel augmentation, mechanical channel rehabilitation, and tributary contributions to flow and sediment supply. A series of tributary floods in 1997, 1998 and 2006 were the primary factors leading to documented increases in channel complexity and floodplain connectivity. During the post-2006 period managed flow releases, in the absence of large magnitude tributary flooding, combined with gravel augmentation and mechanical restoration caused localized increases in sediment supply and transport capacity leading to smaller but measurable increases in channel complexity and floodplain connectivity primarily in the upper river below Lewiston Dam.

  18. Legacy Sediments and Channel Morphology in the Feather and Yuba Rivers, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, A.; Ghoshal, S.; Megison, M. E.; Singer, M. B.; Aalto, R.

    2007-12-01

    Channel aggradation and morphologic change following 19th century hydraulic gold-mining in the Sierra Nevada, California, differed substantially between the lower Feather and Yuba Rivers. These differences can be explained in part by topographic position in the Sacramento Valley but also by differences in early 20th century engineering structures and management policies. Both rivers experienced extreme aggradation by mining sediment and substantial avulsions but the timing and mechanics of channel adjustments were dissimilar, in part due to varying strategies in river-training and flood control. River engineering and management in the late 19th century identified the lower Yuba River as a repository zone where mining sediment could be sequestered to reduce deliveries to navigable rivers downstream. Levees were set back up to 4 km allowing formation of a multi-thread channel system across a broad floodplain that is now deeply buried by mining sediment. In contrast, levees along the lower Feather were given narrow spacings to encourage self-scouring of channels and promote navigability of channels. The lower Feather River drains a larger basin and has a lower gradient than the Yuba River. Construction of Fremont Weir across the mouth of the Yolo Basin raised flood levels in the lower Feather River and may have reduced transport of bed sediment. This could explain the persistence of large sand sheets at and below the Bear River confluence. Data from historical maps, topographic surveys, aerial photographs, and 1999 LiDAR swath mapping are used to document and contrast channel changes and floodplain evolution between these two rivers. Topographic changes derived by differencing detailed 1906-1909 topographic maps and 1999 LiDAR data indicate substantial channel morphologic changes including channel filling, lateral migration, and evolution towards single-thread channel systems. Modern streambank stratigraphy reflects the differences in channel responses. Sites where

  19. Co-evolution of Riparian Vegetation and Channel Dynamics in an Aggrading Braided River System, Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, K. B.; Michal, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increased bank stability by riparian vegetation in braided rivers can decrease bed reworking rates and focus the flow. The magnitude of influence and resulting channel morphology are functions of vegetation strength vs. channel dynamics, a concept encapsulated in a dimensionless ratio between timescales for vegetation growth and channel reworking known as T*. We investigate this relationship in an aggrading braided river at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, and compare results to numerical and physical models. Gradual reductions in post-eruption sediment loads have reduced bed reworking rates, allowing vegetation to persist year-round and impact channel dynamics on the Pasig-Potrero and Sacobia Rivers. From 2009-2011, we collected data detailing vegetation extent, type, density, and root strength. Incorporating these data into RipRoot and BSTEM models shows cohesion due to roots increased from zero in unvegetated conditions to >10.2 kPa in densely-growing grasses. Field-based parameters were incorporated into a cellular model comparing vegetation growth and sediment mobility effects on braided channel dynamics. The model shows that both low sediment mobility and high vegetation strength lead to less active systems, reflecting trends observed in the field. An estimated T* between 0.8 - 2.3 for the Pasig-Potrero River suggests channels were mobile enough to maintain the braidplain width clear of vegetation and even experience slight gains in area through annual removal of existing vegetation. However, persistent vegetation focused flow and thus aggradation over the unvegetated fraction of braidplain, leading to an aggradational imbalance and transition to a more avulsive state. While physical models predict continued narrowing of the active braidplain as T* declines, the future trajectory of channel-vegetation interactions at Pinatubo as sedimentation rates decline appears more complicated due to strong seasonal variability in precipitation and sediment loads. By 2011

  20. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin.

  1. Reprint of: Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and floodplain geomorphic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, Amy E.; Pess, George R.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Logan, Joshua B.; Randle, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Minear, Justin T.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Liermann, Martin C.; McHenry, Michael L.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-10-01

    A substantial increase in fluvial sediment supply relative to transport capacity causes complex, large-magnitude changes in river and floodplain morphology downstream. Although sedimentary and geomorphic responses to sediment pulses are a fundamental part of landscape evolution, few opportunities exist to quantify those processes over field scales. We investigated the downstream effects of sediment released during the largest dam removal in history, on the Elwha River, Washington, USA, by measuring changes in riverbed elevation and topography, bed sediment grain size, and channel planform as two dams were removed in stages over two years. As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of 1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool-riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to tenfold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (in terms of bed elevation change magnitude) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through deposits of the initial sediment wave, 1.2 million t of new sediment ( 10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed sediment grain size along the

  2. Large-Scale Dam Removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River Channel and Floodplain Geomorphic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, A. E.; Pess, G. R.; Bountry, J.; Magirl, C. S.; Ritchie, A. C.; Logan, J. B.; Randle, T. J.; Mastin, M. C.; Duda, J.; Liermann, M. C.; McHenry, M. L.; Beechie, T. J.; Shafroth, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    A substantial increase in fluvial sediment supply causes complex, large-magnitude changes in river and floodplain morphology. Although sedimentary and geomorphic responses to sediment influx are a fundamental part of landscape evolution, few opportunities exist to quantify those processes over field scales. We investigated downstream effects of sediment released during the largest dam removal in history, on the Elwha River, WA, USA, by measuring changes in riverbed elevation and topography, bed-sediment grain size, and channel planform as two dams were removed in stages over two years. As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of ~1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool-riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to ten-fold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (bed-elevation change) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through the new deposits, approximately 1.2 million t of new sediment (~10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed-sediment grain size along the Elwha River have important ecological implications, affecting aquatic habitat

  3. Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and floodplain geomorphic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, Amy E.; Pess, George R.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Logan, Joshua B.; Randle, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Minear, Justin T.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Liermann, Martin C.; McHenry, Michael L.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-01-01

    A substantial increase in fluvial sediment supply relative to transport capacity causes complex, large-magnitude changes in river and floodplain morphology downstream. Although sedimentary and geomorphic responses to sediment pulses are a fundamental part of landscape evolution, few opportunities exist to quantify those processes over field scales. We investigated the downstream effects of sediment released during the largest dam removal in history, on the Elwha River, Washington, USA, by measuring changes in riverbed elevation and topography, bed sediment grain size, and channel planform as two dams were removed in stages over two years. As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of ~ 1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool-riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to tenfold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (in terms of bed elevation change magnitude) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through deposits of the initial sediment wave, ~ 1.2 million t of new sediment (~ 10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed sediment grain size along

  4. Channel Change and Bed-Material Transport in the Lower Chetco River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallick, J. Rose; Anderson, Scott W.; Cannon, Charles; O'Connor, Jim E.

    2010-01-01

    The lower Chetco River is a wandering gravel-bed river flanked by abundant and large gravel bars formed of coarse bed-material sediment. Since the early twentieth century, the large gravel bars have been a source of commercial aggregate for which ongoing permitting and aquatic habitat concerns have motivated this assessment of historical channel change and sediment transport rates. Analysis of historical channel change and bed-material transport rates for the lower 18 kilometers shows that the upper reaches of the study area are primarily transport zones, with bar positions fixed by valley geometry and active bars mainly providing transient storage of bed material. Downstream reaches, especially near the confluence of the North Fork Chetco River, are zones of active sedimentation and channel migration. Multiple analyses, supported by direct measurements of bedload during winter 2008-09, indicate that since 1970 the mean annual flux of bed material into the study reach has been about 40,000-100,000 cubic meters per year. Downstream tributary input of bed-material sediment, probably averaging 5-30 percent of the influx coming into the study reach from upstream, is approximately balanced by bed-material attrition by abrasion. Probably little bed material leaves the lower river under natural conditions, with most net influx historically accumulating in wider and more dynamic reaches, especially near the North Fork Chetco River confluence, 8 kilometers upstream from the Pacific Ocean. The year-to-year flux, however, varies tremendously. Some years may have less than 3,000 cubic meters of bed material entering the study area; by contrast, some high-flow years, such as 1982 and 1997, likely have more than 150,000 cubic meters entering the reach. For comparison, the estimated annual volume of gravel extracted from the lower Chetco River for commercial aggregate during 2000-2008 has ranged from 32,000 to 90,000 cubic meters and averaged about 59,000 cubic meters per year

  5. Channel Change and Bed-Material Transport in the Lower Chetco River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallick, J. Rose; Anderson, Scott W.; Cannon, Charles; O'Connor, Jim E.

    2009-01-01

    The lower Chetco River is a wandering gravel-bed river flanked by abundant and large gravel bars formed of coarse bed-material sediment. The large gravel bars have been a source of commercial aggregate since the early twentieth century for which ongoing permitting and aquatic habitat concerns have motivated this assessment of historical channel change and sediment transport rates. Analysis of historical channel change and bed-material transport rates for the lower 18 kilometers show that the upper reaches of the study area are primarily transport zones, with bar positions fixed by valley geometry and active bars mainly providing transient storage of bed material. Downstream reaches, especially near the confluence of the North Fork Chetco River, have been zones of active sedimentation and channel migration. Multiple analyses, supported by direct measurements of bedload during winter 2008-09, indicate that since 1970 the mean annual flux of bed material into the study reach has been about 40,000-100,000 cubic meters per year. Downstream tributary input of bed-material sediment, probably averaging 5-30 percent of the influx coming into the study reach from upstream, is approximately balanced by bed-material attrition by abrasion. Probably very little bed material leaves the lower river under natural conditions, with most of the net influx historically accumulating in wider and more dynamic reaches, especially near the North Fork Chetco River confluence, 8 kilometers upstream from the Pacific Ocean. The year-to-year flux, however, varies tremendously. Some years probably have less than 3,000 cubic meters of bed-material entering the study area; by contrast, some high-flow years, such as 1982 and 1997, likely have more than 150,000 cubic meters entering the reach. For comparison, the estimated annual volume of gravel extracted from the lower Chetco River for commercial aggregate during 2000-2008 has ranged from 32,000 to 90,000 cubic meters and averaged about 59

  6. Tracing the contribution of debris flow-dominated channels to gravel-bed torrential river channel: implementing pit-tags in the upper Guil River (French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud-Fassetta, Gilles; Lissak, Candide; Fort, Monique; Bétard, François; Carlier, Benoit; Cossart, Etienne; Madelin, Malika; Viel, Vincent; Charnay, Bérengère; Bletterie, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    In the upper, wider reaches of Alpine valleys, shaping of active channels is usually subject to rapid change. It mostly depends upon hydro-climatic variability, runoff concentration and sediment supply, and may result in alternating sequences of fluvial and debris-flow pulses, as recorded in alluvial fans and terraces. Our study, carried in the frame of SAMCO (ANR) project, focuses on the upper Guil River Valley (Queyras, Southern French Alps) cut into the slaty shale "schistes lustrés". Steep, lower order drains carry a contrasted solid discharge, including predominantly sandy-loam particles mixed with gravels and boulders (sandstone schists, ophiolites). Abundant sediment supply by frost shattering, snow avalanche and landslides is then reworked during snowmelt or summer storm runoff events, and may result in catastrophic, very destructive floods along the main channel, as shown by historical records. Following the RI-30 year 2000 flood, our investigations included sediment budgets, i.e. balance of erosion and deposition, and the mapping of the source, transport and storage of various sediments (talus, colluvium, torrential fans, terraces). To better assess sediment fluxes and sediment delivery into the main channel network, we implemented tracers (pit-tags) in selected sub-catchments, significantly contributing to the sediment yield of the valley bottoms during the floods and/or avalanches: Maloqueste, Combe Morel, Bouchouse and Peyronnelle catchments. The first three are direct tributaries of the Guil River whereas the Peyronnelle is a left bank tributary of the Peynin River, which joins the Guil River via an alluvial cone with high human and material stakes. The Maloqueste and the Combe Morel are two tributaries facing each other in the Guil valley, representing a double lateral constraint for the road during flood events of the Guil River. After pit-tag initialisation in laboratory, we set them up along the four tributaries: Maloqueste (20 pit-tags), Combe

  7. A Hot Knife Through Ice-Cream: Earthflow Response to Channel Incision (Or Channel Response to Earthflows?), Eel River Canyon, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, B. H.; Roering, J. J.; McKean, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Abundant glacier-like earthflow features are recognized as a primary erosional process in the highly erodable Franciscan Melange of the Eel River Basin, CA. Despite their prominence in this "melting ice-cream" topography, many questions regarding their effects on the long term sediment flux from this rapidly eroding basin remain unresolved. For example, does an earthflow's basal shear zone propagate vertically downwards with vertical river incision? What controls the upslope and lateral extent of individual earthflows? How does the erosive power of a river influence the rate of earthflow movement, or conversely do earthflow toe deposits regulate the rate of river incision? Here we present preliminary findings derived from study of 200km2 of lidar data (1m resolution) covering hillslopes adjacent to 30km of the Eel River. Lidar allows detailed analysis of the interaction between earthflows and the drainage network, and we document how inferred changes in local base level are propagated throughout adjacent hillslopes via earthflow movement. The most active earthflows (determined by field surveying and analysis of aerial photos rectified using lidar- generated digital topography) coincide with locally steep sections of channel, while downstream of the most active flows we frequently observe less-active or dormant earthflows. This observation supports the idea that the locations of the most active earthflows coincide with headward propagating knickpoints in the channel. The rate of earthflow movement appears to slow when an earthflow exhausts the upslope area of easily mobilized sediment. Earthflow toes can protrude directly into the channel, causing the channel to narrow and steepen, and even undercut the opposite bank. Large resistant boulders (>2m diameter) transported by the earthflow accumulate in the streambed and appear to both act as a check on further channel incision and earthflow movement. In contrast, areas adjacent to active earthflows exhibit smooth

  8. Channel bifurcation and adjustment on the upper Yadkin River, North Carolina (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrells, Robert M.; Royall, Dan

    2014-10-01

    The bifurcation of river flow around large stable islands, also known as anabranching, represents a distinctive form of river adjustment that is uncommon in the Appalachian Piedmont province of the eastern U.S. Within this province, highly localized river branching similar to classical anabranching forms exists in one area near the foot of the Blue Ridge Escarpment. This paper examines channel form and processes along a reach of the upper Yadkin River in North Carolina (USA) before and after a flood-induced division of its flow into two subparallel branches, both of which remain active 35 years later. The research draws on aerial photograph analyses, channel surveying, and observations of inset channel benches, flood frequency analysis, and discharge monitoring and modeling to analyze planform history and to track and explain changes in newly excised and losing channels along the bifurcated reach. The characterization of this branched reach resembles some descriptions of gravel-dominated laterally active anabranching, although the match is imperfect. Reductions in valley slope and confinement and the presence of local valley constrictions near the base of the escarpment steeplands have been conducive to long-term sedimentation and a greater likelihood of branching. A period of relatively rapid cross section adjustment occurred on both branches soon after bifurcation, and this may have permitted the losing branch to remain open. Well-stratified benches currently observed along the losing branch are interpreted to be largely the late product of a waning early major adjustment phase and moderate, recent, and perhaps ongoing variations in flow division and appear to be not fully adjusted to prevailing discharges. Coarse benches along the newly excised branch are better-adjusted inset floodplain fragments created primarily by lateral migration and point accretion. Patterns of benchfull flow frequency variation are interpreted to indicate that the flow bifurcation ratio

  9. River channel width change: Dynamics and scaling relationships in the upper Midwestern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notebaert, Bastiaan; Belmont, Patrick; Donovan, Mitchell

    2016-04-01

    The width of alluvial river channels varies as a function of multiple variables, including flow, sediment supply, bed roughness and riparian vegetation. Changes in channel width are highly variable in space and time, but few have characterized and/or explained the structure and scaling relationships of that variability. Increasing availability of remote sensing data and computational power allows us to measure landscape changes at more detailed spatial and temporal scales than ever. In this study we use historic air photos to study patterns of channel width change and examine the effects data resolution on measurements of channel width change. We digitized 129 km of (vegetated) channel banks for the Root River in Minnesota, USA, for nearly every decade (excluding the 60s and 80s) spanning 1937-2013. Rates of channel widening were calculated at different spatial and temporal scales. Spatial-scaling effects were examined by measuring width changes from a 10-m window to the reach (~10 km) scale. The time interval between measurements varied from 1 year to 76 years. Data show that at small (100 m) spatial scales reaches that widen in one time period have a strong propensity to narrow in the following period. The most active reaches typically exhibit short, punctuated periods of change, but the stretches that are most active varied across decades. When increasing the temporal scale (time period) over which rates are calculated, the rates exhibit an apparent decrease, an effect that is observed for both the recent period and for data from the 1930s-50s. When considering the same time scale, rates are comparable for both periods. In addition to a temporal scaling effect there is also a spatial scaling effect. Changes in width are spatially correlated for distances up to a 3 to 5 times the channel width. Rates measured over shorter stretches are higher than those measured for longer ones. The most extreme changes occurred over shorter time periods along reaches with a

  10. River channel network design for drought and flood control: A case study of Xiaoqinghe River basin, Jinan City, China.

    PubMed

    Cui, Baoshan; Wang, Chongfang; Tao, Wendong; You, Zheyuan

    2009-08-01

    Vulnerability of river channels to urbanization has been lessened by the extensive construction of artificial water control improvements. The challenge, however, is that traditional engineering practices on isolated parts of a river may disturb the hydrologic continuity and interrupt the natural state of ecosystems. Taking the Xiaoqinghe River basin as a whole, we developed a river channel network design to mitigate river risks while sustaining the river in a state as natural as possible. The river channel risk from drought during low-flow periods and flood during high-flow periods as well as the potential for water diversion were articulated in detail. On the basis of the above investigation, a network with "nodes" and "edges" could be designed to relieve drought hazard and flood risk respectively. Subsequently, the shortest path algorithm in the graph theory was applied to optimize the low-flow network by searching for the shortest path. The effectiveness assessment was then performed for the low-flow and high-flow networks, respectively. For the former, the network connectedness was evaluated by calculating the "gamma index of connectivity" and "alpha index of circuitry"; for the latter, the ratio of flood-control capacity to projected flood level was devised and calculated. Results show that the design boosted network connectivity and circuitry during the low-flow periods, indicating a more fluent flow pathway, and reduced the flood risk during the high-flow periods.

  11. Low Elevation Old Channel Features of the Willamette River Floodplain Support High Subsurface Denitrification Rates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods: Large river floodplains are poor nitrate pollution buffers when polluted groundwater moves beneath biogeochemically retentive zones prior to entering the main channel. However, in floodplain regions with extensive backwaters and organic carbon acc...

  12. Real-Time River Channel-Bed Monitoring at the Chariton and Mississippi Rivers in Missouri, 2007-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rydlund, Jr., Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    Scour and depositional responses to hydrologic events have been important to the scientific community studying sediment transport as well as potential effects on bridges and other hydraulic structures within riverine systems. A river channel-bed monitor composed of a single-beam transducer was installed on a bridge crossing the Chariton River near Prairie Hill, Missouri (structure L-344) as a pilot study to evaluate channel-bed change in response to the hydrologic condition disseminated from an existing streamgage. Initial results at this location led to additional installations in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation at an upstream Chariton River streamgage location at Novinger, Missouri (structure L-534) and a Mississippi River streamgage location near Mehlville, Missouri (structures A-1850 and A-4936). In addition to stage, channel-bed elevation was collected at all locations every 15 minutes and transmitted hourly to a U.S. Geological Survey database. Bed elevation data for the Chariton River location at Novinger and the Mississippi River location near Mehlville were provided to the World Wide Web for real-time monitoring. Channel-bed data from the three locations indicated responses to hydrologic events depicted in the stage record; however, notable bedforms apparent during inter-event flows also may have affected the relation of scour and deposition to known hydrologic events. Throughout data collection periods, Chariton River locations near Prairie Hill and Novinger reflected bed changes as much as 13 feet and 5 feet. Nearly all of the bed changes correlated well with the hydrographic record at these locations. The location at the Mississippi River near Mehlville indicated a much more stable channel bed throughout the data collection period. Despite missing data resulting from damage to one of the river channel-bed monitors from ice accumulation at the upstream nose of the bridge pier early in the record, the record from the downstream

  13. Side Channels of the Impounded and Middle Mississippi River: Opportunities and Challenges to Maximize Restoration Potential

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    restoration planning for the Middle Mississippi River. Side channels support a wide range of ecological processes, functions, and biota in large river...each with a facilitator and recorder) that were tasked with developing their own CM describing ecological dynamics of side channels. The breakout...resulting from outcomes of a set of management policies and practices. The uncertainties inherent in management actions go beyond the ecological to the

  14. TRENTON CHANNEL/DETROIT RIVER SEDIMENT ASSESSMENT AND REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit River has experienced over a century of discharges from industry and municipalaties. Demonstrable improvements have been made in water quality, loadings, and biota. Common with other International Joint Commission Areas of Concern, sediment of the Detroit River still...

  15. Use of multidimensional modeling to evaluate a channel restoration design for the Kootenai River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Logan, B.L.; McDonald, R.R.; Nelson, J.M.; Kinzel, P.J.; Barton, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    River channel construction projects aimed at restoring or improving degraded waterways have become common but have been variously successful. In this report a methodology is proposed to evaluate channel designs before channels are built by using multidimensional modeling and analysis. This approach allows detailed analysis of water-surface profiles, sediment transport, and aquatic habitat that may result if the design is implemented. The method presented here addresses the need to model a range of potential stream-discharge and channel-roughness conditions to best assess the function of the design channel for a suite of possible conditions. This methodology is demonstrated by using a preliminary channel-restoration design proposed for a part of the Kootenai River in northern Idaho designated as critical habitat for the endangered white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and evaluating the design on the basis of simulations with the Flow and Sediment Transport with Morphologic Evolution of Channels (FaSTMECH) model. This evaluation indicated substantial problems with the preliminary design because boundary conditions used in the design were inconsistent with best estimates of future conditions. As a result, simulated water-surface levels did not meet target levels that corresponded to the designed bankfull surfaces; therefore, the flood plain would not function as intended. Sediment-transport analyses indicated that both the current channel of the Kootenai River and the design channel are largely unable to move the bed material through the reach at bankfull discharge. Therefore, sediment delivered to the design channel would likely be deposited within the reach instead of passing through it as planned. Consequently, the design channel geometry would adjust through time. Despite these issues, the design channel would provide more aquatic habitat suitable for spawning white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) at lower discharges than is currently available in the

  16. Persistence and Geomorphology of Clearwater Side Channels in a Braided River: The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    Clearwater side channel lifespans and geomorphic changes are being examined to guide research on importance of side channels to salmon habitat quantity and quality at the river-long scale and implications for land management. Dynamic patterns of channel formation in braided rivers can result in rapid abandonment of channels within the braid plain. When these channels fill with water from hyporheic, regional ground water, or upland tributary sources, clearwater side channels result that might create a stable environment for spawning salmon. To determine the annual to decadal persistence of these side channels, clearwater channels in the 120 km-long Matanuska River in southcentral Alaska are being identified from color differences on a 0.3 m pixel 2006 color orthophoto prepared from 1:24,000-scale aerial photography. Channel identification is being calibrated with field observations of selected channels. This inventory of modern clearwater side channels is being compared to historical conditions from a black-and-white orthophoto prepared from 1949 1:40,000-scale aerial photography, and selected aerial photography for the 1960s and 1980s. Where photo quality limits detection of water clarity, side channel presence or absence is noted. Initial results show that while individual side channels may persist for many years, they have rarely persisted more than a few decades. Analysis of selected, wide braid plain areas shows that multiple water sources may exist for supplying abandoned braid plain channels, an indication that some locations may host clearwater side channels regardless of mainstem position. For example, a clearwater side channel that has been historically used as a spawning site is fed by a tributary known locally as Yellow Creek. This channel is presently being captured by the active braids of the Matanuska River. A comparable clearwater side channel has formed from tributary flow on the opposite bank. However, in 1949, this condition was reversed, with

  17. Dynamic channel adjustments in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junqiang; Deng, Shanshan; Lu, Jinyou; Xu, Quanxi; Zong, Quanli; Tan, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Significant channel adjustments have occurred in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River, because of the operation of the Three Gorges Project (TGP). The Jingjiang Reach is selected as the study area, covering the Upper Jingjiang Reach (UJR) and Lower Jingjiang Reach (LJR). The reach-scale bankfull channel dimensions in the study reach were calculated annually from 2002 to 2013 by means of a reach-averaged approach and surveyed post-flood profiles at 171 sections. We find from the calculated results that: the reach-scale bankfull widths changed slightly in the UJR and LJR, with the corresponding depths increasing by 1.6 m and 1.0 m; the channel adjustments occurred mainly with respect to bankfull depth because of the construction of large-scale bank revetment works, although there were significant bank erosion processes in local regions without the bank protection engineering. The reach-scale bankfull dimensions in the UJR and LJR generally responded to the previous five-year average fluvial erosion intensity during flood seasons, with higher correlations being obtained for the depth and cross-sectional area. It is concluded that these dynamic adjustments of the channel geometry are a direct result of recent human activities such as the TGP operation. PMID:26965069

  18. Mineral compositions and sources of the riverbed sediment in the desert channel of Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haibing

    2011-02-01

    The Yellow River flows through an extensive, aeolian desert area and extends from Xiaheyan, Ningxia Province, to Toudaoguai, Inner Mongolia Province, with a total length of 1,000 km. Due to the construction and operation of large reservoirs in the upstream of the Yellow River, most water and sediment from upstream were stored in these reservoirs, which leads to the declining flow in the desert channel that has no capability to scour large amount of input of desert sands from the desert regions. By analyzing and comparing the spatial distribution of weight percent of mineral compositions between sediment sources and riverbed sediment of the main tributaries and the desert channel of the Yellow River, we concluded that the coarse sediment deposited in the desert channel of the Yellow River were mostly controlled by the local sediment sources. The analyzed results of the Quartz-Feldspar-Mica (QFM) triangular diagram and the R-factor models of the coarse sediment in the Gansu reach and the desert channel of the Yellow River further confirm that the Ningxia Hedong desert and the Inner Mongolian Wulanbuhe and Kubuqi deserts are the main provenances of the coarse sediment in the desert channel of the Yellow River. Due to the higher fluidity of the fine sediment, they are mainly contributed by the local sediment sources and the tributaries that originated from the loess area of the upper reach of the Yellow River.

  19. Use of Channel Non-uniformity in River Restoration Across Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, G. B.

    2005-12-01

    Linked abiotic-biotic processes in rivers are highly nonlinear and tuned to specific conditions across all spatio-temporal scales. A key aspect of the nonlinearity that has been undervalued in both river science and restoration is the role of channel non-uniformity. As the water depth to bed grain size ratio decreases, channel non-uniformity takes over as a dominant control on hydraulic, geomorphic, and ecologic processes in rivers. Field-based and numerical experiments incorporating channel non-uniformity in hypothesis-driven river restoration projects were conducted to quantify associated aspects of abiotic-biotic linkages. Examples of key non-uniform dynamics relevant to river restoration across a basin that were evaluated include channel-unit self-sustainability, spatial patterns of physical habitat, organism utilization of physical habitat, knickpoint dynamics, and woody debris dynamics. A significant ecological response to restoration projects that incorporated channel non-uniformity was observed. Although inclusion of non-uniformity in river restoration design involves more sophisticated methods than currently practiced, rapid advancements in data collection, management, and analysis methods already enable use of non-uniformity at the sub-reach scale, and will soon enable systemic evaluation over tens of kilometers at the same resolution at which organisms experience a river.

  20. Patterns in abundance of fishes in main channels of the upper Mississippi River system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettmers, J.M.; Gutreuter, S.; Wahl, David H.; Soluk, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Abundance of fishes of the main channels of the upper Mississippi River system and of other large North American rivers is largely unknown because historic sampling methods have been inadequate. We used a bottom trawl to estimate spatial and temporal patterns in abundance in the navigation channels of Pool 26 of the Mississippi River and the lower Illinois River. Total biomass density averaged 21 and 29 kg·ha-1 in the navigation channels of Pool 26 and the lower Illinois River, respectively. We identified spatial and temporal patterns in catches of key species using a generalized linear model based on the negative binomial distribution. Some species, including shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus), are persistent residents of the main channel. Multiple-season residents, including freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens), rely heavily on the main channel during most of the year but leave it briefly, for example to seek thermal refugia in backwaters during winters. We suggest revision of the prevailing notion that main channels of large temperate rivers serve mainly as corridors for movement among other habitat types.

  1. Metals in edible fish from Vistula River and Dead Vistula River channel, Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Wyrzykowska, Barbara; Falandysz, Jerzy; Jarzyńska, Grażyna

    2012-01-01

    Metals including Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn were determined in muscle tissue of 12 fish species by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and cold vapour-atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS). Fish were collected from Vistula River at lower course and Dead Vistula River channel in south of Baltic Sea in Poland. The fish species examined include Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus), Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius), Bull-rout (Myoxocephalus scorpius), Tench (Tinca tinca), Bream (Abramis brama), Burbot (Lota lot), Perch (Perca perca), Roach (Rutilus rutilus), Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), Pikeperch (Stizostediun lucioperca), Brown salmon (Salmo trutta m. Trutta) and Eel (Anguilla anguilla). The median values of metal concentrations in fresh muscle tissue of 11 fish species varied as follows: Al < 0.5-60; Ba < 0.05-0.31; Ca 120-1800; Cd < 0.05-0.096; Co < 0.10; Cr < 0.10-0.50; Cu < 0.15-0.77; Fe 1.5-21; Hg 0.0058-0.65; K 1800-4200; Mg 130-560; Mn 0.12-0.59; Na 350-840; Ni < 0.2-0.31; Pb < 0.75; Sr 0.079-2.9; Zn 3.3-23 μg/g fresh weight. The Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) values calculated in this study for Cd and Hg from muscles of fish species collected from Vistula River were low in the range of 0.4 for Hg and 0.8 for Cd.

  2. The effect of channelization on floodplain sediment deposition and subsidence along the Pocomoke River, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroes, D.E.; Hupp, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    The nontidal Pocomoke River was intensively ditched and channelized by the mid-1900s. In response to channelization; channel incision, head-cut erosion, and spoil bank perforation have occurred in this previously nonalluvial system. Six sites were selected for study of floodplain sediment dynamics in relation to channel condition. Short- and long-term sediment deposition/subsidence rates and composition were determined. Short-term rates (four years) ranged from 0.6 to 3.6 mm/year. Long-term rates (15-100+ years) ranged from -11.9 to 1.7 mm/year. 137Cs rates (43 years) indicate rates of 0.24 to 7.4 mm/year depending on channel condition. Channelization has limited contact between streamflow and the floodplain, resulting in little or no sediment retention in channelized reaches. Along unchannelized reaches, extended contact and depth of river water on the floodplain resulted in high deposition rates. Drainage of floodplains exposed organic sediments to oxygen resulting in subsidence and releasing stored carbon. Channelization increased sediment deposition in downstream reaches relative to the presettlement system. The sediment storage function of this river has been dramatically altered by channelization. Results indicate that perforation of spoil banks along channelized reaches may help to alleviate some of these issues. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association. No claim to original U.S. government works.

  3. Channel profiles around Himalayan river anticlines: Constraints on their formation from digital elevation model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, JöRg; Stüwe, Kurt; Hergarten, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    We present a comparison between measured and numerically modeled channel profiles of rivers in two important drainage basins of Central Nepal: the Kali-Gandaki and the Arun drainage basins. Modeled channel profiles are based on a simple stream power approach using best fit exponents defining the nonlinearities in the relative contributions of local channel gradient and water flux to erosion rate. Our analysis of the stream power in the whole river network confirms the work of other authors that a 50- to 80-km-wide zone, roughly corresponding to the High Himalayan topography, is subjected to rapid rock uplift. We suggest a model where the uplift of this zone is driven by erosion and isostatic response, so that centers of maximum uplift are located within the main channels of the north-south draining rivers. We also suggest that the rate of uplift slows down with increasing distance to the main channels. Such a spatial distribution of the uplift leads ultimately to the formation of river anticlines as observed along all major Himalayan rivers. We propose that the formation of river anticlines along south draining Himalayan rivers was accelerated by a sudden increase of the drainage area and discharge when the rivers captured orogen-parallel drainages on the north side of the range. This may follow successive headward cutting into the Tibetan Plateau. The model is confirmed by differences between main channels and east-west running tributaries. Time-dependent numerical models predict that capture events cause strongly elevated erosion rates in the main channel.

  4. Active dendrites, potassium channels and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Christie, Brian R; Frick, Andreas; Gray, Richard; Hoffman, Dax A; Schexnayder, Lalania K; Watanabe, Shigeo; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2003-01-01

    The dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus express numerous types of voltage-gated ion channel, but the distributions or densities of many of these channels are very non-uniform. Sodium channels in the dendrites are responsible for action potential (AP) propagation from the axon into the dendrites (back-propagation); calcium channels are responsible for local changes in dendritic calcium concentrations following back-propagating APs and synaptic potentials; and potassium channels help regulate overall dendritic excitability. Several lines of evidence are presented here to suggest that back-propagating APs, when coincident with excitatory synaptic input, can lead to the induction of either long-term depression (LTD) or long-term potentiation (LTP). The induction of LTD or LTP is correlated with the magnitude of the rise in intracellular calcium. When brief bursts of synaptic potentials are paired with postsynaptic APs in a theta-burst pairing paradigm, the induction of LTP is dependent on the invasion of the AP into the dendritic tree. The amplitude of the AP in the dendrites is dependent, in part, on the activity of a transient, A-type potassium channel that is expressed at high density in the dendrites and correlates with the induction of the LTP. Furthermore, during the expression phase of the LTP, there are local changes in dendritic excitability that may result from modulation of the functioning of this transient potassium channel. The results support the view that the active properties of dendrites play important roles in synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity of these neurons. PMID:12740112

  5. Characterization of geomorphic units in the alluvial valleys and channels of Gulf Coastal Plain rivers in Texas, with examples from the Brazos, Sabine, and Trinity Rivers, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffman, David K.; Malstaff, Greg; Heitmuller, Franklin T.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, described and characterized examples of geomorphic units within the channels and alluvial valleys of Texas Gulf Coastal Plain rivers using a geomorphic unit classification scale that differentiates geomorphic units on the basis of their location either outside or inside the river channel. The geomorphic properties of a river system determine the distribution and type of potential habitat both within and adjacent to the channel. This report characterizes the geomorphic units contained in the river channels and alluvial valleys of Texas Gulf Coastal Plain rivers in the context of the River Styles framework. This report is intended to help Texas Instream Flow Program practitioners, river managers, ecologists and biologists, and others interested in the geomorphology and the physical processes of the rivers of the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain (1) gain insights into how geomorphic units develop and adjust spatially and temporally, and (2) be able to recognize common geomorphic units from the examples cataloged in this report. Recent aerial imagery (high-resolution digital orthoimagery) collected in 2008 and 2009 were inspected by using geographic information system software to identify representative examples of the types of geomorphic units that occurred in the study area. Geomorphic units outside the channels of Texas Gulf Coastal Plain rivers are called \\"valley geomorphic units\\" in this report. Valley geomorphic units for the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain rivers described in this report are terraces, flood plains, crevasses and crevasse splays, flood-plain depressions, tie channels, tributaries, paleochannels, anabranches, distributaries, natural levees, neck cutoffs, oxbow lakes, and constructed channels. Channel geomorphic units occur in the river channel and are subject to frequent stresses associated with flowing water and sediment transport; they adjust (change) relatively quickly in

  6. DISTRIBUTION OF AQUATIC OFF-CHANNEL HABITATS AND ASSOCIATED RIPARIAN VEGETATION, WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of aquatic off-channel habitats such as secondary and side channels, sloughs, and alcoves, have been reduced more than 50% since the 1850s along the upper main stem of the Willamette River, Oregon, USA. Concurrently, the hydrogeomorphic potential, and associated flood...

  7. The similarity of river evolution at the initial stage of channel erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.

    2011-12-01

    The similarity of river evolution at the initial stage of channel erosion Jiun-Chuan Lin Department of Geography, National Taiwan University Abstract The study deals with a comparison study of two types of rocks at the initial stage of channel erosion in Taiwan. It is interesting that channel erosion at different types of rocks shows some similarity. There are two types of rocks: sandstone at Ta-an River, central Taiwan where river channel erosion from the nick point because of earthquake uplifting and mud rock at Tainan, southern Taiwan where rill erosion on a flat surface after artificial engineering. These two situations are both at the beginning stage of channel erosion, there are some similar landform appeared on channels. However the rate of erosion and magnitude of erosion are different. According to the using of photogrammetry method to reconstruct archive imageries and field surveying by total station and 3D scanner at different stages. The incision rate is high both at the Ta-an River and the bank erosion and it is even more obvious at mud rock area because of erodibility of mud rock. The results show that bank erosion and incision both are obvious processes. Bank erosion made channel into meander. The bank erosion cause slope in a asymmetric channel profile. The incision process will start at the site where land is relatively uplifted. This paper demonstrates such similarity and landform characters.

  8. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  9. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  10. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  11. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  12. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  13. Nutrient contributions to the Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the ephemeral Santa Clara River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Washburn, L.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Siegel, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Santa Clara River delivers nutrient rich runoff to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief (???1-3 day) episodic events. Using both river and oceanographic measurements, we evaluate river loading and dispersal of dissolved macronutrients (silicate, inorganic N and P) and comment on the biological implications of these nutrient contributions. Both river and ocean observations suggest that river nutrient concentrations are inversely related to river flow rates. Land use is suggested to influence these concentrations, since runoff from a subwatershed with substantial agriculture and urban areas had much higher nitrate than runoff from a wooded subwatershed. During runoff events, river nutrients were observed to conservatively mix into the buoyant, surface plume immediately seaward of the Santa Clara River mouth. Dispersal of these river nutrients extended 10s of km into the channel. Growth of phytoplankton and nutrient uptake was low during our observations (1-3 days following runoff), presumably due to the very low light levels resulting from high turbidity. However, nutrient quality of runoff (Si:N:P = 16:5:1) was found to be significantly different than upwelling inputs (13:10:1), which may influence different algal responses once sediments settle. Evaluation of total river nitrate loads suggests that most of the annual river nutrient fluxes to the ocean occur during the brief winter flooding events. Wet winters (such as El Nin??o) contribute nutrients at rates approximately an order-of-magnitude greater than "average" winters. Although total river nitrate delivery is considerably less than that supplied by upwelling, the timing and location of these types of events are very different, with river discharge (upwelling) occurring predominantly in the winter (summer) and in the eastern (western) channel. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of Fish in the Main Channel of the Mississippi River Between River Miles 500 and 513.5.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    parasitizes many commercially taken fish species (Pflieger 1975). Larval lampreys require clear moving waters with stable silt and sand bars for completion...they parasitize commercial fish species. The importance of the main channel to this species is probably simi- lar to that for the chestnut lamprey . 124...AD-A096 287 LGL ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATES INC BRYAN TX F/B 8/1 STUDY OF FISH IN THE MAIN CHANNEL OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BETW--ETC(U) JAN 81

  15. Diversions from Red River to Lake Dallas, Texas; and related channel losses, February and March 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, Pat H.

    1954-01-01

    During the period Feb. 10 to Mar. 3, 19541 the City of Dallas pumped 1,363 acre-feet of water from its Red River plant into Pecan Creek (a tributary of Elm Fork Trinity River) 3.5 miles above Gainesville; 1,272 acre-feet of this diversion reached the head of Lake Dallas. Discharge records were obtained at four points along the channels. This water was transported down the channels of Pecan Creek and Elm Fork Trinity River to Lake Dallas, a distance of about 31 miles.

  16. Reorganization of river networks under changing spatiotemporal precipitation patterns: An optimal channel network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abed-Elmdoust, Armaghan; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Singh, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the impact of changing nonuniform spatial and temporal precipitation patterns on the evolution of river networks. To achieve this, we develop a two-dimensional optimal channel network (OCN) model with a controllable rainfall distribution to simulate the evolution of river networks, governed by the principle of minimum energy expenditure, inside a prescribed boundary. We show that under nonuniform precipitation conditions, river networks reorganize significantly toward new patterns with different geomorphic and hydrologic signatures. This reorganization is mainly observed in the form of migration of channels of different orders, widening or elongation of basins as well as formation and extinction of channels and basins. In particular, when the precipitation gradient is locally increased, the higher-order channels, including the mainstream river, migrate toward regions with higher precipitation intensity. Through pertinent examples, the reorganization of the drainage network is quantified via stream parameters such as Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga measures, order-based channel total length and river long profiles obtained via simulation of three-dimensional basin topography, while the hydrologic response of the evolved network is investigated using metrics such as hydrograph and power spectral density of simulated streamflows at the outlet of the network. In addition, using OCNs, we investigate the effect of orographic precipitation patterns on multicatchment landscapes composed of several interacting basins. Our results show that network-inspired methods can be utilized as insightful and versatile models for directly exploring the effects of climate change on the evolution of river drainage systems.

  17. Hydrologic and morphologic changes in channels of the Platte River basin; a historical perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eschner, T.R.; Hadley, R.F.; Crowley, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    The channels of the South Platte River in Colorado and Nebraska and the North Platte and Platte Rivers in Nebraska have undergone major changes in hydrologic regime and morphology since 1860. These changes are attributed to agricultural, municipal, and industrial water use. Diversion and storage of water have changed streamflow patterns throughout the basin. At some stations, significant changes in flood peaks, annual mean discharges, and shapes of flow-duration curves have been observed. Changes in streamflow patterns are manifested by changes in morphology of channels of the Platte River. Prior to water development in the 19th century, the Platte was a wide (2 kilometers), shallow (1.8 to 2.4 meters) river characterized by bankfull spring flows and low summer flows. The width of the Platte River in 1979 ranged from 8 to 92 percent of the channel width in 1860, increasing in a downstream direction. Above the confluence with the Loup River, overbank flows evidently have become more common. Moreover, the annual number of low flow days has increased and the days of no flow have decreased giving the channels a more perennial character. Width reduction has occurred by progressive encroachment of vegetation and consequent vertical and horizontal accretion on sand bars in the channel. (USGS)

  18. Seasonal migration and homing of channel catfish in the lower Wisconsin River, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pellett, Thomas D.; Van Dyck, Gene J.; Adams, Jean V.

    1998-01-01

    A multiyear tag and recapture study was conducted to determine whether channel catfishIctalurus punctatus were migratory and if they had strong homing tendencies. Over 10,000 channel catfish were tagged from the lower Wisconsin River and adjacent waters of the upper Mississippi River during the 3-year sampling period. Data on movements were obtained from study recaptures and through tag returns and harvest information provided by sport anglers and commercial fishers. Channel catfish occupied relatively small home ranges during summer, migrated downstream to the upper Mississippi River in autumn, then migrated back up the Wisconsin River in spring to spawn and to occupy the same summer home sites they had used in previous summers. Fish size was a factor in the degree of fidelity to summer home sites, with larger fish showing greater fidelity.

  19. Self-organization of river channels as a critical filter on climate signals.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Colin B; Jerolmack, Douglas J

    2016-05-06

    Spatial and temporal variations in rainfall are hypothesized to influence landscape evolution through erosion and sediment transport by rivers. However, determining the relation between rainfall and river dynamics requires a greater understanding of the feedbacks between flooding and a river's capacity to transport sediment. We analyzed channel geometry and stream-flow records from 186 coarse-grained rivers across the United States. We found that channels adjust their shape so that floods slightly exceed the critical shear velocity needed to transport bed sediment, independently of climatic, tectonic, and bedrock controls. The distribution of fluid shear velocity associated with floods is universal, indicating that self-organization of near-critical channels filters the climate signal evident in discharge. This effect blunts the impact of extreme rainfall events on landscape evolution.

  20. Statistical Characterization of River and Channel Network Formation in Intermittently Flowing Vortex Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.; Nori, F.

    1997-03-01

    Vortices moving in dirty superconductors can form intricate flow patterns, resembling fluid rivers, as they interact with the pinning landscape (F. Nori, Science 271), 1373 (1996).. Weaker pinning produces relatively straight vortex channels, while stronger pinning results in the formation of one or more winding channels that carry all flow. This corresponds to a crossover from elastic flow to plastic flow as the pinning strength is increased. For several pinning parameters, we find the fractal dimension of the channels that form, the vortex trail density, the distance travelled by vortices as they pass through the sample, the branching ratio, the sinuosity, and the size distribution of the rivers, and we compare our rivers with physical rivers that follow Horton's laws.

  1. Characterizing channel change along a multithread gravel-bed river using random forest image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Snake River in Grand Teton National Park is a dam-regulated but highly dynamic gravel-bed river that alternates between a single thread and a multithread planform. Identifying key drivers of channel change on this river could improve our understanding of 1) how flow regulation at Jackson Lake Dam has altered the character of the river over time; 2) how changes in the distribution of various types of vegetation impacts river dynamics; and 3) how the Snake River will respond to future human and climate driven disturbances. Despite the importance of monitoring planform changes over time, automated channel extraction and understanding the physical drivers contributing to channel change continue to be challenging yet critical steps in the remote sensing of riverine environments. In this study we use the random forest statistical technique to first classify land cover within the Snake River corridor and then extract channel features from a sequence of high-resolution multispectral images of the Snake River spanning the period from 2006 to 2012, which encompasses both exceptionally dry years and near-record runoff in 2011. We show that the random forest technique can be used to classify images with as few as four spectral bands with far greater accuracy than traditional single-tree classification approaches. Secondly, we couple random forest derived land cover maps with LiDAR derived topography, bathymetry, and canopy height to explore physical drivers contributing to observed channel changes on the Snake River. In conclusion we show that the random forest technique is a powerful tool for classifying multispectral images of rivers. Moreover, we hypothesize that with sufficient data for calculating spatially distributed metrics of channel form and more frequent channel monitoring, this tool can also be used to identify areas with high probabilities of channel change. Land cover maps of a portion of the Snake River produced from digital aerial photography from 2010 and

  2. Regulation of TRPM8 channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Yudin, Yevgen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is a Ca2+ permeable non-selective cation channel directly activated by cold temperatures and chemical agonists such as menthol. It is a well established sensor of environmental cold temperatures, found in peripheral sensory neurons, where its activation evokes depolarization and action potentials. The activity of TRPM8 is regulated by a number of cellular signaling pathways, most notably by phosphoinositides and the activation of phospholipase C. This review will summarize current knowledge on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of TRPM8 and its regulation by various intracellular messenger molecules and signaling pathways. PMID:22061619

  3. Modeling the Effects of Connecting Side Channels to the Long Tom River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, C.; McDowell, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    The lower Long Tom River is a heavily managed, highly modified stream in the southwestern Willamette Valley with many opportunities for habitat improvements and river restoration. In the 1940s and 1950s, the US Army Corps of Engineers dramatically altered this river system by constructing the Fern Ridge Dam and three, large drop structures, converting the River from a highly sinuous channel to a straight, channelized stream that is interrupted by these grade control structures, and removed the majority of the riparian vegetation. As a result, juvenile spring Chinook salmon are no longer found in the Watershed and the local population of coastal cutthroat trout face limited aquatic habitat. When the river was channelized, long sections of the historical channel were left abandoned on the floodplain. Reconnecting these historical channels as side channels may improve the quality and quantity of aquatic habitat and could allow fish passage around current barriers. However, such construction may also lead to undesirable threats to infrastructure and farmland. This study uses multiple HEC-RAS models to determine the impact of reconnecting two historical channels to the lower Long Tom River by quantifying the change in area of flood inundation and identifying infrastructure in jeapordy given current and post-restoration conditions for 1.5, 5, 10, and 25-year flood discharges. Bathymetric data from ADCP and RTK-GPS surveys has been combined with LiDAR-derived topographic data to create continuous elevation models. Several types of side channel connections are modeled in order to determine which type of connection will result in both the greatest quantity of accessible habitat and the fewest threats to public and private property. In the future, this study will also consider the change in the quantity of physical salmonid habitat and map the areas prone to sedimentation and erosion using CEASAR and PHABSIM tools.

  4. ALWAYS A RIVER - ACTIVITY BOOKLET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cincinnati has the privilege of being a part of a very special celebration this summer. We are one of several cities that will welcome a floating barge exhibition entitled "Always a River", between July 15 and 22,1991. Once aboard the barge you will enter the magic and mystery ...

  5. Spatiotemporal variations in channel changes caused by cumulative factors in a meandering river: The lower Peixe River, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Eduardo S.; Rocha, Paulo C.; Hooke, Janet

    2016-11-01

    Channel changes in meandering rivers naturally exhibit complex behaviour, and understanding the river dynamics can be challenging in environments also subject to cumulative human impacts. Planform changes were analysed on four reaches of the lower course of the Peixe River, Brazil, at decadal scales over the period 1962-2008 from aerial photographs and satellite imagery, complemented by a historical map from 1907. Analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of channel change mechanisms and morphometry of bends and of the sinuosity and morphodynamic variations of the reaches demonstrates major changes in planform characteristics. Sinuosity in all reaches decreased from 2.6 to 1.7, average wavelength of bends has increased from 200 to 500 m, and the planform has become much simpler. Changes have been progressive from downstream to upstream, with higher intensities of processes, particularly cutoffs first in downstream reaches then more recently in upstream reaches. It is suggested that channel changes represent a morphological adjustment to human interventions, such as reservoir construction and land use. However, evidence of the autogenic behaviour of meanders is highlighted in which the existence of compound meanders reveals control over the spatial variation in the reaches. The results suggest that geomorphic thresholds associated with the compound meander formation and the bend evolution should be considered, even in impacted meandering rivers, because they exert primary controls on the spatial-temporal adjustment of channels.

  6. Dam-induced and natural channel changes in the Saskatchewan River below the E.B. Campbell Dam, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Norman D.; Morozova, Galina S.; Pérez-Arlucea, Marta; Gibling, Martin R.

    2016-09-01

    The E.B. Campbell Dam on the Saskatchewan River, east-central Saskatchewan, was constructed in 1962, forming Tobin Lake (2.2 billion m3 capacity), which today impounds most fluvial sediment and disrupts normal outflow patterns. Thirty-five kilometers below the dam, the river diverts into a 500 km2 belt of alluvial sediment initiated by an avulsion ~ 140 years ago, rejoining the parent channel 108 km from the dam. Effects of the dam on channel geomorphology, including the historical channel (reach I) and the more recent avulsion-affected channels, were investigated by pre- and post-dam cross section surveys combined with grain-size and bedload measurements. Twenty-three sites were surveyed at least twice, and 14 were resurveyed annually in 2003-2014 (except 2007) during which significant floods occurred in 2005, 2011, and 2013. All channel cross sections up to 81 km below the dam have coarsened and enlarged since closure, resulting in excavation of 35.4 × 106 m3 of channel-perimeter sediment since 1962. The most proximal segment is armored and has changed little in recent years. Since 2003, channel enlargement has been greatest in the 35-81 km segment between the avulsion site and the Forks (reaches II, III), manifested as widening and deepening. Enlargement rates were greatest during the three floods, and the paucity of bedload has prevented degraded portions of the channel bed from replenishment following flooding. Budget calculations based on bedload measurements and channel cross-section areas suggest that > 30 years would be required to replace the sediment removed between 2003 and 2014, assuming all available bedload remains in the affected reach. Dam effects appear to be absent or uncertain beyond 81 km, a multichanneled region of varied stages of activity (reach IV), recombining and eventually rejoining the parent Saskatchewan River channel at km 108 (reach V). Sediment evacuated from reaches I-III is sufficient to sustain modest aggradation in some distal

  7. Residence Times of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead in Off-Channel Tidal Freshwater Habitats, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    We estimated seasonal residence times of acoustic-tagged juvenile salmonids in off-channel, tidal freshwater habitats of the Columbia River near the Sandy River delta (rkm 198; 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2011) and Cottonwood Island (rkm 112; 2012).

  8. Using a novel flood prediction model and GIS automation to measure the valley and channel morphology of large river networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for measuring river valley and channel morphology require intensive ground-based surveys which are often expensive, time consuming, and logistically difficult to implement. The number of surveys required to assess the hydrogeomorphic structure of large river n...

  9. Invertebrate drift during in-channel gravel mining: the Upper River Cinca (Southern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjar, Maria; Gibbins, Chris; Vericat, Damià; Batalla, Ramon J.; Muñoz, Efrén; Ramos, Ester; Lobera, Gemma; Andrés López-Tarazón, Jose; Piqué, Gemma; Tena, Álvaro; Buendía, Cristina; Rennie, Colin D.

    2015-04-01

    Invertebrate drift has been widely studied as an important mechanism to structure the benthic assemblages and as a part of invertebrate behavior in fluvial systems. River channel disturbance is considered the main factor affecting the organization of riverine communities and contributes to key ecological processes. However, little is known about involuntary drift associated to bed disturbance due to the difficulties associated with sampling during floods. In-channel gravel mining offers an opportunity to study involuntary drift associated not only to local bed disturbances but also to sudden changes on suspended sediment concentrations and flow. High suspended sediment concentrations and sudden changes in flow also prompt drift due to the limiting conditions (i.e. lack of oxygen, hydric stress). Within this context, invertebrate drift was monitored in the Upper River Cinca (Southern Pyrenees) during two gravel mining activities performed in summer 2014. The data acquisition design includes: drift, suspended sediment, bedload, bed mobility and flow. Data was acquired before, during and after mining at different sampling locations located upstream and downstream the perturbation. Drift and suspended sediment transport were sampled at 5 sections: 1 control site upstream the mining and 4 downstream. Bedload samples were collected just downstream the channel where gravels were extracted. Bed mobility and changes on topography were assessed by means of GPS-aDcp and repeat topographic surveys. Discharge was continuously recorded 2.5 km downstream the mining location. Additionally, two turbidity meters registered water turbidity at 15 minute intervals in two of the four sampling sections located downstream. This experimental design provides data on the spatial and temporal variability of drift associated to a local bed disturbance that (i) changes the distribution of flow across the section where mining was performed, (ii) increase substantially suspended sediment

  10. The sinuous bedrock channel of the Tapi River, Central India: Its form and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Vishwas S.

    2005-09-01

    The Tapi Gorge lies in the monsoon-dominated region of the Indian subcontinent. Because of the seasonality of rainfall and flows all the fluvial activity in the bedrock gorge is confined to the monsoon season, in general, and during a few high-magnitude monsoon floods in particular. Field investigations along a 30-km reach of the sinuous bedrock gorge indicate that the river displays all the morphologic properties of a meandering alluvial channel albeit with a much higher level of energy expenditure. Considering the perimeter lithology and channel morphology two types of reaches are evident in the field: a predominantly rocky and relatively straight reach close to the gorge-head, and a longer, sinuous reach of gravel deposition downstream. Hydraulic modeling of a rainfall-induced dam-failure flood indicates that large-magnitude events that exceed the threshold of bedrock resistance for a sustained length of time are capable of erosion. It appears that the overall channel and gorge morphology is adjusted to two types of thresholds. A threshold of boulder-transport, which is associated with large floods that are competent to entrain boulders but are incapable of bedrock erosion; and another higher threshold that is exceeded by truly high-energy processes that generate large total energy and exceed the threshold of bedrock resistance. The later threshold is exceeded only episodically, with fairly long periods of little or no bedrock erosion in between. Interestingly, meso-scale erosional features such as inner channels and well-developed potholes are nearly absent or inconspicuous within the gorge section. Whilst this could be partly attributed to the bedrock resistance, it appears that under the present hydro-geomorphic conditions the dominant fluvial activity is not directed towards the channel bed, but towards the banks. This is evident from the concentration of erosion on the outer banks and deposition of coarse gravel on the inner banks, and armoring of the

  11. The dynamic feedbacks between channel changes in the Colorado River Basin and the rapid invasion of Tamarisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    The resiliency and sensitivity of western rivers to future climate change may be partly anticipated by the response of these rivers to past perturbations in stream flow and sediment supply. Predictions of earlier spring runoff and reduced peak flows of snowmelt-dominated streams mimic hydrologic changes caused by the closure and operation of large dams built within the past century. In the Colorado River Basin, channels have narrowed between 5 and 26% following large dam construction, but the correlation between flow reduction and channel narrowing is confounded by changes in bank strength caused by the rapid spread of the non-native riparian shrub, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). Thus, predictions of future changes in channel form and analysis of past changes related to dams must distinguish between channel narrowing caused by direct changes in flow, and caused by the indirect effects wherein changes in flow regime allow expansion of non-native riparian vegetation that in turn leads to accelerated channel narrowing. Our research evaluates the geomorphic controls on tamarisk colonization, the role of tamarisk in accelerating the narrowing process, and the dynamic feedbacks between channel changes on western rivers and the invasion of non-native riparian species. The transformation of formerly active bars and channel margins into stable inset floodplain surfaces is the dominant process by which these channels have narrowed, as determined by detailed alluvial stratigraphy and dendrogeomorphology. We recreated the 3-dimensional bar surface present at the time of tamarisk establishment by excavating an extensive network of trenches. In doing this, we evaluated the hydraulic environment within which tamarisk established. We also characterized the hydrodynamic roughness of aging tamarisk stands from ground-based LiDAR scans to evaluate the role of tamarisk in the promotion of floodplain formation. Our study sites are representative of the predominant geomorphic organization of

  12. Propagation of subtidal sea level oscillations in the river channel: A case study of the St. Johns River, Florida, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Alexander E.; Iyer, Suneil K.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of water level and river discharge time series collected at three locations in the St. Johns River, FL reveals that subtidal variability with periods of several days is associated with long waves propagating from the ocean into the river channel. These dynamics are similar to tidal wave propagation: both tidal and subtidal frequency bands have the same ratio of free surface-to-discharge standard deviations, which is not the case on oceanic shelves. However, important differences also emerge: as waves pass through the river mouth, tidal oscillations exhibit much stronger attenuation, while subtidal oscillations propagate at a lower speed. Further upstream, where the channel cross-sectional area contracts (between Palatka and Buffalo Bluff), the waves in two frequency bands adjust differently: tidal waves are amplified and continue upstream, while a significant fraction of subtidal energy is reflected. The amplification of tidal waves occurs mostly through the generation of overtides. Also, tidal wave attenuation in the river relative to the mouth is nearly constant over the observation period, while the attenuation of subtidal waves exhibits strong changes. Variations in subtidal attenuation are linked to the influence of the river discharge: higher discharge (relative to the subtidal water level variability) causes stronger attenuation of subtidal waves.

  13. Preliminary Skylab MSS channel evaluation. [Susquehanna river basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Barr, D. M.; Borden, F. Y.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A set of 18 channels which were considered of usable quality were identified. These were channels 1-14, 17, 19-21. Channels 15, 16, 18, and 22 were dropped out because they were of poor quality; channels 7 and 11 were dropped to limit the total channel number to 16. From these 16 channels, a total of 22 signatures were obtained. Eight were developed from uniform blocks of the UMAP, and 14 from use of the DCLUS program. These signatures fell into six basic categories and classified more than 90% of the five scenes mapped: agriculture land (6 signatures); forest aland (4); water (2); open nonagriculture land (2); urban (6); and disturbed land (2).

  14. Wildlife use of back channels associated with islands on the Ohio River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zadnik, A.K.; Anderson, James T.; Wood, P.B.; Bledsoe, K.

    2009-01-01

    The back channels of islands on the Ohio River are assumed to provide habitat critical for several wildlife species. However, quantitative information on the wildlife value of back channels is needed by natural resource managers for the conservation of these forested islands and embayments in the face of increasing shoreline development and recreational boating. We compared the relative abundance of waterbirds, turtles, anurans, and riparian furbearing mammals during 2001 and 2002 in back and main channels of the Ohio River in West Virginia. Wood ducks (Aix sponsa), snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina), beavers (Castor canadensis), and muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) were more abundant in back than main channels. Spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer) and American toads (Bufo americanus) occurred more frequently on back than main channels. These results provide quantitative evidence that back channels are important for several wildlife species. The narrowness of the back channels, the protection they provide from the main current of the river, and their ability to support vegetated shorelines and woody debris, are characteristics that appear to benefit these species. As a conservation measure for important riparian wildlife habitat, we suggest limiting building of piers and development of the shoreline in back channel areas. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  15. Channel Pattern and the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis Predict Biodiversity in River-floodplain Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T.; Pollock, M.; Baker, S.; Morley, S.

    2005-05-01

    River-floodplain ecosystems are among the most diverse and dynamic environments in the world, yet mechanisms that regulate biodiversity in river corridors are poorly understood. In part, this stems from a lack of integration of geomorphological and biological concepts that link fluvial processes to biological diversity. Here we illustrate how channel pattern predicts biodiversity via the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH). We show that (1) channel pattern predicts disturbance frequency and age diversity of patches, (2) there are distinct life history tradeoffs among colonizing and climax species, and (3) diversity should be highest in channel patterns with intermediate levels of disturbance. We first classify river-floodplains in northwestern USA using geomorphological channel patterns, and show how these patterns predict patch dynamics in river-floodplain systems. We then use space-for-time substitution to illustrate successional patterns of trees and aquatic invertebrates. Finally, we link reach-level patch dynamics to reach-level biodiversity of trees and aquatic invertebrates using the IDH. Patch age diversity is low in straight channels with low movement rates and mostly old surfaces, and low in braided channels with high movement rates and mostly young surfaces. Patch age diversity is highest in channels with intermediate movement rates (meandering and island-braided channels). Vegetation succession drives temporal patterns of biological diversity within individual terrestrial and aquatic patches (alpha diversity). Trees exhibit clear successional trade-offs as patches age, succeeding from hardwood-dominated at the colonizing stage to conifer-dominated at the climax stage. Highest within-patch species richness occurs at an intermediate age. Alpha diversity of aquatic invertebrates follows a similar pattern, probably in response to riparian forest succession and the shifting composition of detrital resources entering river and floodplain channels. We

  16. A native sedge, Carex nudata, as facilitator of restoration goals: effects on channel morphology and planform in the Middle Fork John Day River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslin, M.; McDowell, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    In the Middle Fork of the John Day River, the native riparian sedge, Carex nudata, has exploded across the landscape following the removal of cattle grazing in the late 1990s. C. nudata now forms fringes along the edges of the low flow channel and grows as islands within the river. C. nudata appears to be altering channel morphology and planform in ways that may facilitate key restoration goals. I have employed multiple methods to investigate changes in channel morphology and planform in association with C. nudata: aerial imagery analysis, repeated topographic surveys, and erosion pins in cut banks with C. nudata fringes. Preliminary results suggest that C. nudata stabilizes the edges of the low flow channel, but cut banks behind C. nudata fringes continue to erode such that the bankflow width and channel boundaries continue to move. Aerial imagery analysis indicates that current C. nudata islands are often the result of C. nudata fringes becoming "detached" from banks rather than from initial establishment of plants in midchannel positions. Topographic surveys suggest scouring upstream of C. nudata islands and along the edges of C. nudata fringes. We propose a conceptual model in which multiple alternative pathways of river development may be possible after the establishment of C. nudata, depending on the antecedent conditions where it becomes established (e.g. bank composition, river curvature). Alternative pathways include: 1) bank stabilization, channel narrowing and deepening; 2) formation of a compound channel with a side channel that is activated at high flows; 3) the formation of islands within the channel. The potential for multiple pathways of development after C. nudata establishment may lead to complex patterns of river morphology and planform consistent with habitat complexity goals of river restoration.

  17. Channel morphology and its impact on flood passage, the Tianjiazhen reach of the middle Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yafeng; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Zhongyuan; Jiang, Tong; Wu, Jinglu

    2007-03-01

    The Tianjiazhen reach of the middle Yangtze is about 8 km long, and characterized by a narrow river width of 650 m and local water depth of > 90 m in deep inner troughs, of which about 60 m is below the mean sea level. The troughs in the channel of such a large river are associated with regional tectonics and local lithology. The channel configuration plays a critical role in modifying the height and duration of river floods and erosion of the riverbed. The formation of the troughs in the bed of the Yangtze is considered to be controlled by sets of NW-SE-oriented neotectonic fault zones, in which some segments consist of highly folded thick Triassic limestone crossed by the Yangtze River. Several limestone hills, currently located next to the river channel, serve as nodes that create large vortices in the river, thereby accelerating downcutting on the riverbed composed of limestone highly susceptible to physical corrosion and chemical dissolution. Hydrological records indicate that the nodal hills and channel configuration at Tianjiazhen do not impact on normal flow discharges but discharges > 50,000 m 3s - 1 are slowed down for 2-3 days. Catastrophic floods are held up for even longer periods. These inevitably result in elevated flood stages upstream of prolonged duration, affecting large cities such as Wuhan and a very large number of people.

  18. Climate and Tectonics: Why Self-organized River Channels Just Don't Care (that much)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Phillips, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies seeking to link climatic and tectonic drivers to fluvial records start with the assumption that such links exist, and that our failure to identify these links is due to either noisy data or confounding factors. This study begins from a different perspective: the robust hydraulic-geometry scaling relations of both alluvial and bedrock rivers suggests an insensitivity of these systems to climatic and tectonic drivers. The pattern stability of river channels, in the face of an onslaught of stochastic driving over a wide range of scales, becomes the feature in need of explanation. To explore this question in a constrained manner, we examine the case of gravel-bedded (d > 10 mm) rivers where one may reasonably suggest that bed-load transport is the dominant means of channel adjustment and erosion. We examined data from 188 rivers across the USA, covering a wide range of climatic, tectonic and bedrock controls. Almost without exception, the rivers exhibit two remarkable features: (1) they are organized such that the bankfull fluid stress is slightly in excess of the critical value; and (2) the distribution of fluid stresses in excess of critical follows a common exponential-decay function. Although discharge regimes and distributions for these rivers vary widely as a function of climate (as expected), the fluid-stress distribution is universal. We surmise that the generic self-organization of a river channel to a near-critical condition acts to decouple important aspects of sediment transport from its regional climate. This "critical filter" suggests that finding strong signatures of climate and tectonics in river morphology and erosion should be the exception, rather than the rule. We anticipate and invite criticism of this view. Results imply that landscape evolution models can get by with a simple treatment of climate, and may use a constant Shields stress condition as a channel closure scheme even for bedrock-influenced rivers.

  19. Flow Structure and Channel Change in Chute Cutoffs On Meandering Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, J. A.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J. L.; Johnson, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Freely meandering rivers typically exhibit complex, continuously evolving patterns of planform geometry involving elongation of the channel path through lateral migration and shorting of this path through bend cutoffs. Despite the importance of cutoffs in shaping the planform geometry of meandering rivers, the fluvial processes operative immediately after initiation of a cutoff are poorly understood. Two recent chute cutoff events on a single bend on the Wabash River, IL-IN, have provided an unprecedented opportunity to document the morphologic evolution and flow structure of chute cutoffs in a large, unregulated, meandering river. Here, we present results of ADCP measurements of three-dimensional flow velocity and bed topography at these cutoffs and describe a conceptual model for the morphodynamics of chute cutoffs prior to oxbow lake formation. Our results indicate that the flow structure at upstream and downstream ends of cutoff channels, prior to plugging of the entrance and exit of the abandoned bend with sediment, is analogous to flow through diffluence - confluence units. The interaction of this flow structure with an erodible bed and banks can cause rapid widening of the upstream end of the cutoff channel and bar development i) in the main channel where velocities are reduced, and ii) in the separation zone of the cutoff channel. Over time, these patterns of deposition and erosion will lead formation of an oxbow lake and complete capture of the flow by the cutoff channel.

  20. Differences between main-channel and off-channel food webs in the upper Mississippi River revealed by fatty acid profiles of consumers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Bartsch, Michelle; Gutreuter, Steve; Knights, Brent C.; Bartsch, Lynn; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Arts, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Large river systems are often thought to contain a mosaic of patches with different habitat characteristics driven by differences in flow and mixing environments. Off-channel habitats (e.g., backwater areas, secondary channels) can become semi-isolated from main-channel water inputs, leading to the development of distinct biogeochemical environments. Observations of adult bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in the main channel of the Mississippi River led to speculation that the main channel offered superior food resources relative to off-channel areas. One important aspect of food quality is the quantity and composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). We sampled consumers from main-channel and backwater habitats to determine whether they differed in PUFA content. Main-channel individuals for relatively immobile species (young-of-year bluegill, zebra mussels [Dreissena polymorpha], and plain pocketbook mussels [Lampsilis cardium]) had significantly greater PUFA content than off-channel individuals. No difference in PUFA was observed for the more mobile gizzard shad (Dorsoma cepedianum), which may move between main-channel and off-channel habitats even at early life-history stages. As off-channel habitats become isolated from main-channel waters, flow and water column nitrogen decrease, potentially improving conditions for nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and vascular plants that, in turn, have low PUFA content. We conclude that main-channel food webs of the upper Mississippi River provide higher quality food resources for some riverine consumers as compared to food webs in off-channel habitats.

  1. Interaction of ENSO-driven flood variability and anthropogenic changes driving river channel evolution: Corryong Creek, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Elisha; Marren, Philip

    2014-05-01

    River channels are highly responsive to climatic forcing, particularly in terms of changes in flow regime. Variability in precipitation can directly alter channel dimensions via erosion and deposition, particularly in response to prolonged droughts or extreme floods, but also alter channel stability through changes in catchment and riparian vegetation, which create complex feedback mechanisms which can reinforce relatively modest climate changes. In Australia, short-term hydrological precipitation is largely driven by changes to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation cycle. A body of research also suggests that river channels respond to longer term (40-50 year) alternating flood and drought dominated regimes. In this study, we determine the role of climate forcing in controlling the channel shape and stability of Corryong Creek, a dynamic gravel-bed river in southeast Australia, using a range of climate, hydrological, geomorphological and historic data. Corryong Creek is highly response to ENSO scale hydrological variability, with a distinct pattern of channel narrowing and stabilisation by vegetation during El Nino periods, and significant, often catastrophic widening during La Nina phases, usually associated with a rapid succession of high magnitude floods. There is no evidence of longer flood or drought dominated regimes, either statistically, in the hydrological record, or in terms of a geomorphological signature. Major bushfires (which have occurred in 1939 and 2003) occur during or toward the end of dry phases, but produce a short live increase in flood erosion, due to increased runoff and the destruction of riparian vegetation. However, long-term (100 year) changes have been heavily mediated by anthropogenic activities. The most dramatic change to the channel is a significant reduction in sinuosity, which occurred rapidly in the early to mid 20th century, associated with clearing of all floodplain and riparian vegetation, and major clearing of the lower hillslopes

  2. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic controls on channel evolution in a sub-tropical river, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, James; Croke, Jacky; Thompson, Chris; Cohen, Tim; Macklin, Mark; Sharma, Ashneel

    2016-04-01

    Palaeohydrological research provides valuable insights to the understanding of short- and long-term fluvial dynamics in response to climate change and tectonic activity. In landscapes where tectonic activity is minimal fluvial archives record long-term changes in sediment and discharge dynamics related to either intrinsic or extrinsic controls. Isolating the relative controls of these factors is an important frontier in this area of research. Advances in geochronology, the acquisition of high resolution topographic data and geomorphological techniques provide an opportunity to assess the relative importance of intrinsic and extrinsic controls on terrace and floodplain formation. This study presents the results of detailed chrono-stratigraphic research in a partly confined river valley in subtropical southeast Queensland. River systems within this region are characterized by high hydrological variability and have a near-ubiquitous compound channel morphology (macrochannel) where Holocene deposits are inset within late Pleistocene terraces. These macrochannels can accommodate floods up to and beyond the predicted 100-year flood. Using single grain optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon analyses, combined with high resolution spatial datasets, we demonstrate the nature of fluvial response to major late Quaternary climate change. A large proportion of the valley floor is dominated by terrace alluvium deposited after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (17 - 13 ka) and overlies basal older Pleistocene alluvium. Preliminary results suggest a phase of incision occurred at 10 ka with the formation of the large alluvial trench. The Holocene floodplain is dominated by processes of catastrophic vertical accretion and erosion (cut-and-fill) and oblique accretion at the macrochannel margins. The consistency in ages for the terraces and subsequent incision suggests a uniform network response. Alluvial sediments and channel configuration in this compound and complex

  3. Sediment, water column, and open-channel denitrification in rivers measured using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Alexander J.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Hoellein, Timothy J.; Hall, Robert O.

    2016-05-01

    Riverine biogeochemical processes are understudied relative to headwaters, and reach-scale processes in rivers reflect both the water column and sediment. Denitrification in streams is difficult to measure, and is often assumed to occur only in sediment, but the water column is potentially important in rivers. Dissolved nitrogen (N) gas flux (as dinitrogen (N2)) and open-channel N2 exchange methods avoid many of the artificial conditions and expenses of common denitrification methods like acetylene block and 15N-tracer techniques. We used membrane-inlet mass spectrometry and microcosm incubations to quantify net N2 and oxygen flux from the sediment and water column of five Midwestern rivers spanning a land use gradient. Sediment and water column denitrification ranged from below detection to 1.8 mg N m-2 h-1 and from below detection to 4.9 mg N m-2 h-1, respectively. Water column activity was variable across rivers, accounting for 0-85% of combined microcosm denitrification and 39-85% of combined microcosm respiration. Finally, we estimated reach-scale denitrification at one Midwestern river using a diel, open-channel N2 exchange approach based on reach-scale metabolism methods, providing an integrative estimate of riverine denitrification. Reach-scale denitrification was 8.8 mg N m-2 h-1 (95% credible interval: 7.8-9.7 mg N m-2 h-1), higher than combined sediment and water column microcosm estimates from the same river (4.3 mg N m-2 h-1) and other estimates of reach-scale denitrification from streams. Our denitrification estimates, which span habitats and spatial scales, suggest that rivers can remove N via denitrification at equivalent or higher rates than headwater streams.

  4. Estimates of deep percolation beneath native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River Channel, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Prudic, David E.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Akstin, Katherine C.; Boyd, Robert A.; Henkelman, Katherine K.

    2003-01-01

    The presence and approximate rates of deep percolation beneath areas of native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River channel in the Amargosa Desert of southern Nevada were evaluated using the chloride mass-balance method and inferred downward velocities of chloride and nitrate peaks. Estimates of deep-percolation rates in the Amargosa Desert are needed for the analysis of regional ground-water flow and transport. An understanding of regional flow patterns is important because ground water originating on the Nevada Test Site may pass through the area before discharging from springs at lower elevations in the Amargosa Desert and in Death Valley. Nine boreholes 10 to 16 meters deep were cored nearly continuously using a hollow-stem auger designed for gravelly sediments. Two boreholes were drilled in each of three irrigated fields in the Amargosa-Farms area, two in the Amargosa-River channel, and one in an undisturbed area of native vegetation. Data from previously cored boreholes beneath undisturbed, native vegetation were compared with the new data to further assess deep percolation under current climatic conditions and provide information on spatial variability. The profiles beneath native vegetation were characterized by large amounts of accumulated chloride just below the root zone with almost no further accumulation at greater depths. This pattern is typical of profiles beneath interfluvial areas in arid alluvial basins of the southwestern United States, where salts have been accumulating since the end of the Pleistocene. The profiles beneath irrigated fields and the Amargosa-River channel contained more than twice the volume of water compared to profiles beneath native vegetation, consistent with active deep percolation beneath these sites. Chloride profiles beneath two older fields (cultivated since the 1960?s) as well as the upstream Amargosa-River site were indicative of long-term, quasi-steady deep percolation. Chloride profiles beneath the

  5. The similarity of river evolution at the initial stage of channel erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiun-Chuan

    2014-05-01

    The study deals with a comparison study of two types of rocks at the initial stage of channel erosion in Taiwan. It is interesting that channel erosion at different types of rocks shows some similarity. There are two types of rocks: sandstone at Ta-an River, central Taiwan where river channel erosion from the nick point because of earthquake uplifting and mud rock at Tainan, southern Taiwan where rill erosion on a flat surface after artificial engineering. These two situations are both at the beginning stage of channel erosion, there are some similar landform appeared on channels. However the rate of erosion and magnitude of erosion are different. According to the using of photogrammetry method to reconstruct archive imageries and field surveying by total station and 3D scanner at different stages. The incision rate is high both at the Ta-an River and the bank erosion and it is even more obvious at mud rock area because of erodibility of mud rock. The results show that bank erosion and incision both are obvious processes. Bank erosion made channel into meander. The bank erosion cause slope in a asymmetric channel profile. The incision process will start at the site where land is relatively uplifted. This paper demonstrates such similarity and landform characters.

  6. Ca2+-activated K channels in parotid acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Victor G; Thompson, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Fluid secretion relies on a close interplay between Ca2+-activated Cl and K channels. Salivary acinar cells contain both large conductance, BK, and intermediate conductance, IK1, K channels. Physiological fluid secretion occurs with only modest (<500 nM) increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels but BK channels in many cell types and in heterologous expression systems require very high concentrations for significant activation. We report here our efforts to understand this apparent contradiction. We determined the Ca2+ dependence of IK1 and BK channels in mouse parotid acinar cells. IK1 channels activated with an apparent Ca2+ affinity of about 350 nM and a hill coefficient near 3. Native parotid BK channels activated at similar Ca2+ levels unlike the BK channels in other cell types. Since the parotid BK channel is encoded by an uncommon splice variant, we examined this clone in a heterologous expression system. In contrast to the native parotid channel, activation of this expressed “parslo” channel required very high levels of Ca2+. In order to understand the functional basis for the special properties of the native channels, we analyzed the parotid BK channel in the context of the horrigan-Aldrich model of BK channel gating. We found that the shifted activation of parotid BK channels resulted from a hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage dependence of voltage sensor activation and channel opening and included a large change in the coupling of these two processes. PMID:20519930

  7. A landscape perspective on bat foraging ecology along rivers: does channel confinement and insect availability influence the response of bats to aquatic resources in riverine landscapes?

    PubMed

    Hagen, Elizabeth M; Sabo, John L

    2011-07-01

    River and riparian areas provide an important foraging habitat for insectivorous bats owing to high insect availability along waterways. However, structural characteristics of the riverine landscape may also influence the location of foraging bats. We used bat detectors to compare bat activity longitudinally along river reaches with contrasting channel confinement, ratio of valley floor width to active channel width, and riparian vegetation, and laterally with distance from the river along three different reach types. We measured rates of insect emergence from the river and aerial insect availability above the river and laterally up to 50-m into the riparian habitat in order to assess the relationship between food resources and insectivorous bat activity. Longitudinally, bat activity was concentrated along confined reaches in comparison to unconfined reaches but was not related to insect availability. Laterally, bats tracked exponential declines in aquatic insects with distance from the river. These data suggest that along the lateral dimension bats track food resources, but that along the longitudinal dimension channel shape and landscape structure determine bat distributions more than food resources.

  8. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project: Final Supplemental Integrated Feasibility Report and Environmental Impact Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    quality of shallow water and flats habitat is expected to remain constant in the river and estuary reaches. COLUMBIA RIVER CHANNEL IMPROVEMENTS ...of inlets, complete with water control structures at the head of these interior sloughs to improve fish accessibility, water quality , and circulation...intended to improve flow, circulation and water temperature conditions in these embayments formed via dredged material deposition. These water quality

  9. Impact of river-tide dynamics on the residual water level slope and residual sediment transport in the Pearl River channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huayang; Zhang, Zihao; Yang, Qingshu; Ou, Suying

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale delta systems, such as the Rhine-Meuse delta, the Mississippi River delta, the Mekong delta, the Yangtze delta and the Pearl River delta etc., usually feature a typical channel networks, where individual channels are interrelated through a networks system, resulting in both longitudinal and transverse variations of residual water level slope (averaged over a lunar day) caused by the river-tide interplay. Enhancing our insight of river-tide dynamics in these channel networks has vital importance for the protection and management of estuarine environment since river-tide interplay is closely related to sediment transport, water quality, water utilization and estuarine ecosystem. In this study, we investigate the impact of river-tide dynamics on the temporal-spatial changes of flow and suspended sediment load in terms of residual water level slope and residual sediment transport in the Pearl River channel networks, which is one of the complex channel networks in the world. Making use of a nonstationary harmonic analysis (NS_TIDE), the continuous time series observations of velocity covering a spring-neap cycle in 1999 (representing flood season) and 2001 (representing dry season) collected from around 60 stations in the Pearl River channel networks have been used to extract the temporal-spatial changes in residual velocity and tidal properties (including amplitudes and phases) as a function of variable river flow debouching into the delta. On the basis of harmonic analysis, the tidally averaged friction is decomposed into contributions made by riverine forcing alone, river-tide interaction and tidal asymmetry using Chebyshev polynomials approach. It is shown that river flow enhances friction via river-tide interaction, which increases the residual water level slope that influences the distribution of suspended sediment load in the Pearl River channel networks.

  10. Historical channel-planform change of the Little Colorado River near Winslow, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Block, Debra

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates channel-planform adjustment on an alluvial reach of the Little Colorado River and documents the geomorphic evolution of the channel through an analysis of aerial photographs and orthophotographs for the period 1936–2010. The Little Colorado River has adjusted to the effects of an extreme flood in 1923 and a subsequent decline in peak discharge and mean annual flow by channel narrowing: the channel width and area of the river have decreased by approximately 90 percent over the study period. Although deposition historically exceeds erosion, lateral migration exacerbates localized erosion, particularly near hydraulic controls. Despite repeated cutoff and avulsion, the Little Colorado River has steadily increased in length and sinuosity over a period of 74 years. Changes in temperature and precipitation are likely affecting the discharge of the Little Colorado River near and downstream of Winslow, Ariz. Nonparametric methods of trend detection determine whether the probability distribution of temperature, precipitation, and peak streamflow has changed over time. Time-series plots of temperature and precipitation show statistically significant trends at the 99-percent-confidence level when evaluated with a Mann-Kendall test. An increasing trend was indicated in mean daily minimum air temperature (Tmin), whereas decreasing trends were indicated in both annual precipitation (Pann) and monsoon-seasonal precipitation (Pjas), as well as in peak discharge.

  11. Sediment samples and channel-geometry data, lower Platte River watershed, Nebraska, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaepe, Nathaniel J.; Alexander, Jason S.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between channel width and stream physical habitat in the lower Platte River in eastern Nebraska was studied as part of the lower Platte River Cumulative Impact Study. The purpose of this component was to document the grain-size distribution of sediment deposited as specific types of physical features, such as sandbars, banks, and stream beds within different hydraulic habitats, within the lower Platte River system. In so doing, the major sources of sediment for sandbar creation downstream are described. Sediment samples were collected from 11 reaches of the lower Platte River from Silver Creek, Nebraska, to the mouth of the Platte River, and from 4 tributary streams. Two bed-material samples, 2 bank-material samples, and 3 sandbar-material samples were collected at main-stem sampling sites, and 1 sample each of bed material and bank material was collected at each tributary sampling site. Aspects of channel geometry, such as channel width, sandbar height and width, and bank height, were measured at each sampled site. This report presents the channel-geometry results and documents the sample-collection methods.

  12. Geomorphic changes resulting from floods in reconfigured gravel-bed river channels in Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, J.G.; Capesius, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Geomorphic changes in reconfi gured reaches of three Colorado rivers in response to floods in 2005 provide a benchmark for "restoration" assessment. Sedimententrainment potential is expressed as the ratio of the shear stress from the 2 yr, 5 yr, 10 yr, and 2005 floods to the critical shear stress for sediment. Some observed response was explained by the excess of flood shear stress relative to the resisting force of the sediment. Bed-load entrainment in the Uncompahgre River and the North Fork Gunnison River, during 4 and 6 yr floods respectively, resulted in streambed scour, streambed deposition, lateral-bar accretion, and channel migration at various locations. Some constructed boulder and log structures failed because of high rates of bank erosion or bed-material deposition. The Lake Fork showed little or no net change after the 2005 flood; however, this channel had not conveyed floods greater than the 2.5 yr flood since reconfi guration. Channel slope and the 2 yr flood, a surrogate for bankfull discharge, from all three reconfi gured reaches plotted above the Leopold and Wolman channel-pattern threshold in the "braided channel" region, indicating that braiding, rather than a single-thread meandering channel, and midchannel bar formation may be the natural tendency of these gravel-bed reaches. When plotted against a total stream-power and median-sediment-size threshold for the 2 yr flood, however, the Lake Fork plotted in the "single-thread channel" region, the North Fork Gunnison plotted in the " multiplethread" region, and the Uncompahgre River plotted on the threshold. All three rivers plotted in the multiple-thread region for floods of 5 yr recurrence or greater. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  13. Potential effects of deepening the St. Johns River navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system, Jacksonville, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellino, Jason C.; Spechler, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed dredging a 13-mile reach of the St. Johns River navigation channel in Jacksonville, Florida, deepening it to depths between 50 and 54 feet below North American Vertical Datum of 1988. The dredging operation will remove about 10 feet of sediments from the surficial aquifer system, including limestone in some locations. The limestone unit, which is in the lowermost part of the surficial aquifer system, supplies water to domestic wells in the Jacksonville area. Because of density-driven hydrodynamics of the St. Johns River, saline water from the Atlantic Ocean travels upstream as a saltwater “wedge” along the bottom of the channel, where the limestone is most likely to be exposed by the proposed dredging. A study was conducted to determine the potential effects of navigation channel deepening in the St. Johns River on salinity in the adjacent surficial aquifer system. Simulations were performed with each of four cross-sectional, variable-density groundwater-flow models, developed using SEAWAT, to simulate hypothetical changes in salinity in the surficial aquifer system as a result of dredging. The cross-sectional models were designed to incorporate a range of hydrogeologic conceptualizations to estimate the effect of uncertainty in hydrogeologic properties. The cross-sectional models developed in this study do not necessarily simulate actual projected conditions; instead, the models were used to examine the potential effects of deepening the navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system under a range of plausible hypothetical conditions. Simulated results for modeled conditions indicate that dredging will have little to no effect on salinity variations in areas upstream of currently proposed dredging activities. Results also indicate little to no effect in any part of the surficial aquifer system along the cross section near River Mile 11 or in the water-table unit along the cross

  14. Impact of Volcanic Activity on AMC Channel Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    IMPACT OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Matthew D... VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences...AFIT-ENS-GRP-14-J-11 IMPACT OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS Matthew D. Meshanko, BS, MA Major, USAF

  15. Hydrological connectivity in river deltas: The first-order importance of channel-island exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Matthew; Passalacqua, Paola

    2015-04-01

    Deltaic systems are composed of distributary channels and interdistributary islands. While previous work has focused either on the channels or on the islands, here we study the hydrological exchange between channels and islands and point at its important role in delta morphology and ecology. We focus our analysis on Wax Lake Delta in coastal Louisiana (USA) and characterize the surface water component of hydrological connectivity through measurements of water discharge and hydraulic tracer propagation. We find that deltaic islands are zones of significant water flux as 23-54% of the incoming distributary channel flux enters the islands. A calculation of the travel times through a channel-island complex shows travel times through the islands to be at least 3 times their channel counterparts. A dye release experiment also indicates that travel times in islands are much longer that those within channels as dye remained in the island for the 3.8 day duration of the experiment. Additionally, islands are more sensitive than channels to environmental forces such as tides, which cause flow reversal and thus can increase travel times through the islands. Our work defines the "hydrological network" of a river delta to include not only the distributary channel network but also the interdistributary islands, quantifies the implications of channel-island hydrological connectivity to travel times through the system, and discusses the relevance of our findings to channel mouth dynamics at the delta front and the potential for denitrification in coastal systems.

  16. Perennial-streamflow characteristics related to channel geometry and sediment in Missouri River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Hedman, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    Geometry, channel-sediment, and discharge data were collected and compiled from 252 streamflow-gaging stations in the Missouri River basin. The sites represent the complete ranges of hydrologic and geologic conditions found in the basin. The data were analyzed by computer to yield equations relating various discharge characteristics to variables of channel geometry and bed and bank material. The equations provide discharge as the dependent variable for the purpose of making estimates of discharge characteristics at ungaged sites. Results show that channel width is best related to variables of discharge, but that reduction of standard errors can be achieved by considering channel-sediment properties, channel gradient, and discharge variability. The channel-material variables do not exert uniform effects on width-discharge relations and, therefore, are considered as sediment-data groups, or stream types, rather than as terms in multiple power-function equations. Relative to streamflow, narrowest channels occur when streams of steady discharge transport sufficient silt and clay to form stable, cohesive banks but have a small tractive load of sand and coarser sizes. Stable channels also are associated with high channel gradients, which cause high channel roughness and bed and bank armouring by coarse particle sizes. The widest, most unstable channels are found with streams that apparently transport of large tractive load of sand sizes. The downstream rates of change of width with discharge reflect these trends, suggesting that a given bed-material load necessitates a minimum width over which the tractive material can be moved. (USGS)

  17. Channel-changing processes on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.C.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Lateral channel change on the mainly ephemeral Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, causes damage and has spawned costly efforts to control bank erosion. Aerial photographs, historical data, and field observations are used to document the history of channel change since 1936. Variability in the nature and degree of channel change over time and space is shown. Three major channel change processes are: (1) migration by bank erosion during meander migration or initiation; (2) avulsion by overbank flooding and flood plain incision; (3) widening by erosion of low, cohesionless banks during floods and arroyo widening by undercutting and mass wasting of deeply incised vertical walls. The first process generally is a product of low to moderate flows or waning high flows; the others result mainly from higher flows, though sensitive arroyo walls may erode during relatively low flows. Channel morphology, bank resistance, and hydrology are factors determining the dominant channel-changing process on a particular reach of the river. Present river morphology reflects high flows since the 1960's.

  18. The sediment-starved Yellow River Delta as remotely controlled by human activities in the river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Bi, N.

    2015-12-01

    Human presented significant disturbances on the natural processes of land-ocean interactions in context of global change. Here we illustrate how the signals of human activities in the river basin have been transferred to the coastal ocean along the hydrological pathway and remotely controlled the Yellow River Delta. Dam-orientated water and sediment regulation scheme (WSRS) has resulted in effective erosion of the lower channel and mitigation of siltation within the reservoirs. However, significant impacts have been identified on the delta morphology and coastal ecosystem ten years after the WSRS, which was unexpected at the beginning of engineering efforts. The coarser sediment derived from the channel erosion during the first phase of WSRS was directly contributed to the rapid accretion of present river mouth, whereas the delta was starved and declined due to insufficient sediment supply and regime shift of sediment transport. The fine-grained sediment exported from the Xiaolangdi Reservoir during the second phase of WSRS seemed to be a critical carrier for the nutrients and pollutants. The human-altered hydrological cycle, enhanced delivery of nutrient and pollutants and the changing estuarine environment present unpredictable impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem in the delta region. These confirm that humans are modifying the river-coast system in ways that go well beyond climate change, and an integrated management of the river-coast continuum is crucially important for the sustainability of the river-delta system.

  19. 33 CFR 165.731 - Safety/Security Zone: Cumberland Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River Entrance Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River Entrance Channel. 165.731 Section 165.731 Navigation and Navigable... Seventh Coast Guard District § 165.731 Safety/Security Zone: Cumberland Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River... waters and land from bank to bank within Cumberland Sound and the St. Marys Entrance Channel:...

  20. 33 CFR 165.731 - Safety/Security Zone: Cumberland Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River Entrance Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River Entrance Channel. 165.731 Section 165.731 Navigation and Navigable... Seventh Coast Guard District § 165.731 Safety/Security Zone: Cumberland Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River... waters and land from bank to bank within Cumberland Sound and the St. Marys Entrance Channel:...

  1. 33 CFR 165.731 - Safety/Security Zone: Cumberland Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River Entrance Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River Entrance Channel. 165.731 Section 165.731 Navigation and Navigable... Seventh Coast Guard District § 165.731 Safety/Security Zone: Cumberland Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River... waters and land from bank to bank within Cumberland Sound and the St. Marys Entrance Channel:...

  2. 33 CFR 165.731 - Safety/Security Zone: Cumberland Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River Entrance Channel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River Entrance Channel. 165.731 Section 165.731 Navigation and Navigable... Seventh Coast Guard District § 165.731 Safety/Security Zone: Cumberland Sound, Georgia and St. Marys River... waters and land from bank to bank within Cumberland Sound and the St. Marys Entrance Channel:...

  3. Patterns of fish assemblage structure and habitat use among main- and side-channel environments in the lower Kootenai River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Carson J.; Stevens, Bryan S.; Quist, Michael; Shepard, Bradley B.; Ireland, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    The lower Kootenai River, Idaho, was sampled during the summers of 2012 and 2013 to evaluate its fish assemblage structure at seven sites within main- and side-channel habitats where large-scale habitat rehabilitation was undertaken. Understanding the current patterns of fish assemblage structure and their relationships with habitat is important for evaluating the effects of past and future rehabilitation projects on the river. Species-specific habitat associations were modeled, and the variables that best explained the occurrence and relative abundance of fish were identified in order to guide future habitat rehabilitation so that it benefits native species. The results indicated that the side-channel habitats supported higher species richness than the main-channel habitats and that nonnative fishes were closely associated with newly rehabilitated habitats. This research provides valuable insight on the current fish assemblages in the Kootenai River and the assemblage-level responses that may occur as a result of future rehabilitation activities.

  4. The formation and maintenance of single-thread tie channels entering floodplain lakes: observations from three diverse river systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Joel C; Dietrich, William E; Day, Geoff; Parker, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Tie channels connect rivers to floodplain lakes on many lowland rivers and thereby play a central role in floodplain sedimentology and ecology, yet they are generally unrecognized and little studied. here we report the results of field studies focused on tie channel origin and morphodynamics in three contrasting systems: the Middle Fly River, Papua New Guinea, the Lower Mississippi River, and Birch Creek in Alaska. Across these river systems, tie channels vary by an order of magnitude in size but exhibit the same characteristic morphology and appear to develop and evolve by a similar set of processes. In all three systems, the channels are characterized by a narrow, leveed single-thread morphology with maximum width approximately one tenth the width of the mainstem river. The channels typically have a V shaped cross-section, unlike most fluvial channels. These channels develop as lakes become isolated from the river by sedimentation. Narrowing of the connection between river and lake causes a sediment-laden jet to develop. Levees develop along the margins of the jet leading to channel emergence and eventual levee aggradation to the height of the mainstem levees. Bi-directional flow in these channels is common. Outflows from the lake scour sediment and prevent channel blockage. We propose that channel geometry and size are then controlled by a dynamic balance between channel narrowing by suspended sediment deposition and incision and widening by mass failure of banks during outflows. Tie channels are laterally stable and may convey flow for hundreds to a few thousand of years.

  5. Formation and maintenance of single-thread tie channels entering floodplain lakes: Observations from three diverse river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, J. C.; Dietrich, W. E.; Day, G.; Parker, G.

    2009-06-01

    Tie channels connect rivers to floodplain lakes on many lowland rivers and thereby play a central role in floodplain sedimentology and ecology; yet they are generally unrecognized and little studied. Here we report the results of field studies focused on tie channel origin and morphodynamics in the following three contrasting systems: the Middle Fly River (Papua New Guinea), the Lower Mississippi River, and Birch Creek in Alaska. Across these river systems, tie channels vary by an order of magnitude in size but exhibit the same characteristic morphology and appear to develop and evolve by a similar set of processes. In all three systems, the channels are characterized by a narrow, leveed, single-thread morphology with maximum width approximately one tenth the width of the mainstem river. The channels typically have a V-shaped cross section, unlike most fluvial channels. These channels develop as lakes become isolated from the river by sedimentation. Narrowing of the connection between river and lake causes a sediment-laden jet to develop. Levees develop along the margins of the jet leading to channel emergence and eventual levee aggradation to the height of the mainstem levees. Bidirectional flow in these channels is common. Outflows from the lake scour sediment and prevent channel blockage. We propose that channel geometry and size are then controlled by a dynamic balance between channel narrowing by suspended sediment deposition and incision and widening by mass failure of banks during outflows. Tie channels are laterally stable and may convey flow for hundreds to a few thousand of years.

  6. Channel-planform evolution in four rivers of Olympic National Park, Washington, U.S.A.: The roles of physical drivers and trophic cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Amy; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Happe, Patricia J.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Sankey, Joel B.; Randle, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the relative contributions of physical and ecological processes to channel evolution remains a substantial challenge in fluvial geomorphology. We use a 74-year aerial photographic record of the Hoh, Queets, Quinault, and Elwha Rivers, Olympic National Park, Washington, U.S.A., to investigate whether physical or trophic-cascade-driven ecological factors—excessive elk impacts after wolves were extirpated a century ago—are the dominant controls on channel planform of these gravel-bed rivers. We find that channel width and braiding show strong relationships with recent flood history. All four rivers have widened significantly in recent decades, consistent with increased flood activity since the 1970s. Channel planform also reflects sediment-supply changes, evident from landslide response on the Elwha River. We surmise that the Hoh River, which shows a multi-decadal trend toward greater braiding, is adjusting to increased sediment supply associated with rapid glacial retreat. In this sediment-routing system with high connectivity, such climate-driven signals appear to propagate downstream without being buffered substantially by sediment storage. Legacy effects of anthropogenic modification likely also affect the Quinault River planform. We infer no correspondence between channel geomorphic evolution and elk abundance, suggesting that trophic-cascade effects in this setting are subsidiary to physical controls on channel morphology. Our findings differ from previous interpretations of Olympic National Park fluvial dynamics and contrast with the classic example of Yellowstone National Park, where legacy effects of elk overuse are apparent in channel morphology; we attribute these differences to hydrologic regime and large-wood availability.

  7. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  8. Physical habitat dynamics in four side-channel chutes, lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Johnson, Harold E.; Laustrup, Mark S.; D'Urso, Gary J.; Reuter, Joanna M.

    2004-01-01

    Construction of the side-channel chutes has become a popular means to rehabilitate habitate of the Lower Missouri River. We studied various aspects of hydrology, hydraulics, and geomorphology of four side-channel chutes to document a range of existing conditions in the Lower Missouri River. The Cranberry Bend side-channel chute has existed for at least 40 years and is an example of a persistent, minimally engineered chute. The Lisbon Bottom side-channel chute is a young chute, created by extreme floods during 1993-1996, and allowed to evolve with minimum engineering of inlet and outlet structures. The Hamburg Bend and North Overton Bottom side-channel chutes were constructed in 1996 and 2000, respectively, as part of the Missouri River Bank Stabilization and navigation Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Project. These side-channel chutes provide increased areas of sandbars and shallow, slow water -- habitats thought to be substantially diminished in the modern Missouri River. Depths and velocities measured in side-channel chutes are also present in the main channel, but the chutes provide more areas of slow, shallow water and they increase the range of discharges over which shallow, slow water is present. The 3.6 km long Lisbon Bottom chute provides as much as 50% of the entire shallow water habitat that exists in the encompassing 15 km reach of the river. At Cranberry Bend and Lisbon Bottom, the side-channel chutes provided 10-40% of the availabile sandbar area in the reach, depending on discharge. Each of the side-channel chutes shows evidence of continuing erosion and deposition. The longevity and the Cranberry Bend chute attests to dynamic stability -- that is, a chute that maintains form and processes while shifting in position. The Hamburg chute similarly shows evidence of lateral movement and construction of flood plain to compensate for erosion. The Lisbon Bottom chute -- the most intensively studied chute -- appears to have achieved an equilibrium width and

  9. Channel Modification for Fish Passage on Umatilla River, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguine, William L.

    1985-06-01

    This report describes the construction of modifications to the bed of the Umatilla River and to the Threemile Dam fish ladder to improve fish passage during periods of low flow. The report also provides a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of the modified channel in improving fish passage. (ACR)

  10. 78 FR 24063 - Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... the Detroit River, Wyandotte, Michigan. This action is necessary and intended to ensure safety of life... Regatta. This special local regulation will establish restrictions upon, and control movement of, vessels in a portion of the Trenton Channel. During the enforcement period, no person or vessel may enter...

  11. 75 FR 20776 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ..., Washington, DC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and... (NPRM) entitled ``Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC'' in the...

  12. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE. PMID:27255892

  13. Dam Effects on Sediment Transport and Channel Form in the Klamath River: Implications for Salmonid Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, M. R.; Kondolf, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    By virtue of the historical importance of its salmonid fishery and recent controversies over agricultural water diversions and fish mortality, the Klamath River (California and Oregon) has attracted significant attention from the public and federal agencies, including reports by two committees of the National Research Council since 2000. One proposal under consideration to restore Klamath River salmonid fisheries is to remove four hydroelectric dams that influence hydrology, sediment transport, and fish passage. The Klamath River is unusual in many respects, including the fact that its upper reaches are low-gradient, lake and bedrock-sill-controlled, with small sediment yields but large influxes of natural and anthropogenic nutrients. The river’s gradient and sediment load increase downstream as it passes through the steep Klamath Mountains and Coast Range. Therefore, the impact of the four dams proposed for removal on downstream geomorphic conditions varies with location in the watershed. Thus, some expectations of downstream dam effects based on observations on other rivers may not be directly applicable to the Klamath dams. We conducted a two-year study of reservoir sedimentation, bed material size, bed mobility, sediment transport, and channel form between Klamath Falls, Oregon and Seiad Valley, California. Based on our results, we identified geomorphically distinct reaches, and quantified bed mobility and sensitivity to channel change, as a basis to evaluate dam effects on downstream channel morphology. Our findings could be used to inform future dam removal approaches for the Klamath River.

  14. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-06-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE.

  15. Epilepsy-Related Slack Channel Mutants Lead to Channel Over-Activity by Two Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ran; Chen, Jian; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-01-05

    Twelve sodium-activated potassium channel (KCNT1, Slack) genetic mutants have been identified from severe early-onset epilepsy patients. The changes in biophysical properties of these mutants and the underlying mechanisms causing disease remain elusive. Here, we report that seven of the 12 mutations increase, whereas one mutation decreases, the channel's sodium sensitivity. Two of the mutants exhibit channel over-activity only when the intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)]i) concentration is ∼80 mM. In contrast, single-channel data reveal that all 12 mutants increase the maximal open probability (Po). We conclude that these mutant channels lead to channel over-activity predominantly by increasing the ability of sodium binding to activate the channel, which is indicated by its maximal Po. The sodium sensitivity of these epilepsy causing mutants probably determines the [Na(+)]i concentration at which these mutants exert their pathological effects.

  16. Suspended sediment dynamics in a tidal channel network under peak river flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achete, Fernanda Minikowski; van der Wegen, Mick; Roelvink, Dano; Jaffe, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Peak river flows transport fine sediment, nutrients, and contaminants that may deposit in the estuary. This study explores the importance of peak river flows on sediment dynamics with special emphasis on channel network configurations. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, which is connected to San Francisco Bay (California, USA), motivates this study and is used as a validation case. Besides data analysis of observations, we applied a calibrated process-based model (D-Flow FM) to explore and analyze high-resolution (˜100 m, ˜1 h) dynamics. Peak river flows supply the vast majority of sediment into the system. Data analysis of six peak flows (between 2012 and 2014) shows that on average, 40 % of the input sediment in the system is trapped and that trapping efficiency depends on timing and magnitude of river flows. The model has 90 % accuracy reproducing these trapping efficiencies. Modeled deposition patterns develop as the result of peak river flows after which, during low river flow conditions, tidal currents are not able to significantly redistribute deposited sediment. Deposition is quite local and mainly takes place at a deep junction. Tidal movement is important for sediment resuspension, but river induced, tide residual currents are responsible for redistributing the sediment towards the river banks and to the bay. We applied the same forcing for four different channel configurations ranging from a full delta network to a schematization of the main river. A higher degree of network schematization leads to higher peak-sediment export downstream to the bay. However, the area of sedimentation is similar for all the configurations because it is mostly driven by geometry and bathymetry.

  17. Investigating historical changes in morphodynamic processes associated with channelization of a large Alpine river: the Etsch/Adige River, NE Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Simone; Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Proto, Matteo; Zolezzi, Guido; Bertoldi, Walter; Comiti, Francesco; Surian, Nicola; Prà, Elena Dai

    2016-04-01

    River channel management within the last centuries has largely modified fluvial processes and morphodynamic evolution of most large European rivers. Several river systems experienced extensive channelization early in the 19th century, thus strongly challenging our present ability to detect their morphodynamic functioning with contemporary photogrammetry or cartographical sources. This consequently leaves open questions about their potential future response, especially to management strategies that "give more room" to the river, aiming at partially rehabilitating their natural functioning. The Adige River (Etsch in German), the second longest Italian river, is an exemplary case where channelization occurred more than 150 years ago, and is the focus of the present work. This work aims (i) to explore changes in fundamental morphodynamic processes associated with massive channelization of the Adige River and (ii) to quantify the alteration in river bars characteristics, by using morphodynamic models of bars and meandering. To fulfil our aims we combine the analysis of historical data with morphodynamic mathematical modelling. Historical sources (recovered in a number of European archives), such as hydrotopographical maps, airborne photogrammetry and hydrological datasets were collected to investigate channel morphology before and after the channelization. Information extracted from this analysis was combined with morphodynamic linear models of free migrating and forced steady bars, to investigate river bars and bend stability properties under different hydromorphological scenarios. Moreover, a morphodynamic model for meandering channel was applied to investigate the influence of river channel planform on the evolution of the fluvial bars. Results from the application of morphodynamic models allowed to predict the type, position and geometry of bars characterizing the channelized configuration of the river, and to explain the presently observed relative paucity of bars

  18. Environmental flows can reduce the encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into river channels: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kimberly A; Webb, J Angus; de Little, Siobhan C; Stewardson, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Encroachment of riparian vegetation into regulated river channels exerts control over fluvial processes, channel morphology, and aquatic ecology. Reducing encroachment of terrestrial vegetation is an oft-cited objective of environmental flow recommendations, but there has been no systematic assessment of the evidence for and against the widely-accepted cause-and-effect mechanisms involved. We systematically reviewed the literature to test whether environmental flows can reduce the encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into river channels. We quantified the level of support for five explicit cause-effect hypotheses drawn from a conceptual model of the effects of flow on vegetation. We found that greater inundation, variously expressed as changes in the area, depth, duration, frequency, seasonality, and volume of surface water, generally reduces riparian vegetation abundance in channels, but most studies did not investigate the specific mechanisms causing these changes. Those that did show that increased inundation results in increased mortality, but also increased germination. The evidence was insufficient to determine whether increased inundation decreases reproduction. Our results contribute to hydro-ecological understanding by using the published literature to test for general cause-effect relationships between flow regime and terrestrial vegetation encroachment. Reviews of this nature provide robust support for flow management, and are more defensible than expert judgement-based approaches. Overall, we predict that restoration of more natural flow regimes will reduce encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into regulated river channels, partly through increased mortality. Conversely, infrequent deliveries of environmental flows may actually increase germination and subsequent encroachment.

  19. Channel evolution and hydrologic variations in the Colorado River basin: Factors influencing sediment and salt loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellis, Allen; Hereford, Richard; Schumm, S. A.; Hayes, B. R.

    1991-05-01

    Suspended-sediment and dissolved-solid (salt) loads decreased after the early 1940s in the Colorado Plateau portion of the Colorado River basin, although discharge of major rivers — the Colorado, Green and San Juan — did not change significantly. This decline followed a period of high sediment yield caused by arroyo cutting. Reduced sediment loads have previously been explained by a change in sediment sampling procedures or changes in climate, land-use and conservation practices. More recent work has revealed that both decreased sediment production and sediment storage in channels of tributary basins produced the decline of sediment and salt loads. Sediment production and sediment storage are important components of incised-channel evolution, which involves sequential channel deepening, widening and finally floodplain formation. Accordingly, the widespread arroyo incision of the late nineteenth century resulted initially in high sediment loads. Since then, loads have decreased as incised channels (arroyos) have stabilized and begun to aggrade. However, during the 1940s, a period of low peak discharges permitted vegetational colonization of the valley floors, which further reduced sediment loads and promoted channel stabilization. This explanation is supported by experimental studies and field observations. Both geomorphic and hydrologic factors contributed to sediment storage and decreased sediment and salt loads in the upper Colorado River basin.

  20. Environmental Flows Can Reduce the Encroachment of Terrestrial Vegetation into River Channels: A Systematic Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kimberly A.; Webb, J. Angus; de Little, Siobhan C.; Stewardson, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Encroachment of riparian vegetation into regulated river channels exerts control over fluvial processes, channel morphology, and aquatic ecology. Reducing encroachment of terrestrial vegetation is an oft-cited objective of environmental flow recommendations, but there has been no systematic assessment of the evidence for and against the widely-accepted cause-and-effect mechanisms involved. We systematically reviewed the literature to test whether environmental flows can reduce the encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into river channels. We quantified the level of support for five explicit cause-effect hypotheses drawn from a conceptual model of the effects of flow on vegetation. We found that greater inundation, variously expressed as changes in the area, depth, duration, frequency, seasonality, and volume of surface water, generally reduces riparian vegetation abundance in channels, but most studies did not investigate the specific mechanisms causing these changes. Those that did show that increased inundation results in increased mortality, but also increased germination. The evidence was insufficient to determine whether increased inundation decreases reproduction. Our results contribute to hydro-ecological understanding by using the published literature to test for general cause-effect relationships between flow regime and terrestrial vegetation encroachment. Reviews of this nature provide robust support for flow management, and are more defensible than expert judgement-based approaches. Overall, we predict that restoration of more natural flow regimes will reduce encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into regulated river channels, partly through increased mortality. Conversely, infrequent deliveries of environmental flows may actually increase germination and subsequent encroachment.

  1. Channel-morphology data for the Tongue River and selected tributaries, southeastern Montana, 2001-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, Katherine J.

    2004-01-01

    Coal-bed methane exploration and production have begun within the Tongue River watershed in southeastern Montana. The development of coal-bed methane requires production of large volumes of ground water, some of which may be discharged to streams, potentially increasing stream discharge and sediment load. Changes in stream discharge or sediment load may result in changes to channel morphology through changes in erosion and vegetation. These changes might be subtle and difficult to detect without baseline data that indicate stream-channel conditions before extensive coal-bed methane development began. In order to provide this baseline channel-morphology data, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, collected channel-morphology data in 2001-02 to document baseline conditions for several reaches along the Tongue River and selected tributaries. This report presents channel-morphology data for five sites on the mainstem Tongue River and four sites on its tributaries. Bankfull, water-surface, and thalweg elevations, channel sections, and streambed-particle sizes were measured along reaches near streamflow-gaging stations. At each site, the channel was classified using methods described by Rosgen. For six sites, bankfull discharge was determined from the stage- discharge relation at the gage for the stage corresponding to the bankfull elevation. For three sites, the step-backwater computer model HEC-RAS was used to estimate bankfull discharge. Recurrence intervals for the bankfull discharge also were estimated for eight of the nine sites. Channel-morphology data for each site are presented in maps, tables, graphs, and photographs.

  2. Elevated Channel Concavities Arising from Sediment-Flux Effects in Natural Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, D. E. J.; Sinclair, H. D.; Gasparini, N. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Cowie, P. A.; Adams, J. M.; Hutton, E. W. H.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Nudurupati, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The concavity of an incising river system - a measure of the rate of change of its bed slope with increasing discharge downstream - is a commonly used metric in fluvial geomorphology. It is commonly used in assessing variation of factors such as uplift, climate, and rock type along a system in a qualitative way, and underpins a number of quantitative analyses in tectonic geomorphology, such as the normalized channel steepness index. However, the factors that fundamentally control channel concavities in rocky streams remain relatively poorly understood, especially in rivers that are undergoing transient response to a perturbation in their boundary conditions.Here we use a combination of field data and numerical modeling to demonstrate that elevated channel concavities are a common and shared response to the propagation of a convex-upward "knickzone" through a bedrock channel long profile. Simulations using the novel modeling framework Landlab exploring thresholded incision and saltation-abrasion theory indicate that the presence of the knickzone can perturb the relative sediment flux in the area immediately downstream of the convexity, allowing enhanced erosion there and systematic elevation of channel concavities in reaches downstream of this point. The reality of this effect is demonstrated using field and remotely sensed data from three sites - the Red River area, Yunnan, China; channels on the Ladakh batholith, Indian Himalaya; and the Fagaras Alps, Romania. All contain broad scale migrating knickzones, but the causes of the disturbances that produced them and scales of the systems differ. Nonetheless, the concavities of all the channels are all elevated in the same way downstream of knickzones, consistent with the modeling output. These results demonstrate the ubiquity of sediment flux effects on erosion rates in many natural channels, and have consequences for the way we read tectonic histories from landscapes.

  3. Probabilistic Evaluation of Anthropogenic Regulations In a Vegetated River Channel Using a Vegetation Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation overgrowth in fluvial floodplains, gravel beds, and sand bars has been a serious engineering problem for riparian management in Japan. From the viewpoints of flood control and ecological conservation, it would be necessary to predict the vegetation dynamics accurately for long-term duration. In this research, we have developed a stochastic model for predicting the vegetation dynamics in fluvial floodplains with emphasis on the interaction with flood impacts. The model consists of the following four components: (i) long-term stochastic behavior of flow discharge, (ii) hydrodynamics in a channel with floodplain vegetation, (iii) variation of riverbed topography, and (iv) vegetation dynamics on floodplains. In the vegetation dynamics model, the flood discharge (i) is stochastically simulated using a filtered Poisson process, one of the conventional approaches in hydrological time-series generation. The component for vegetation dynamics (iv) includes the effects of tree growth, mortality by floods, and infant tree recruitment. Vegetation condition has been observed mainly before and after floods since 2008 at a field site located between 23-24 km from the river mouth in Kako River, Japan. The Kako River has the catchment area of 1,730 km2 and the main channel length of 96 km. This site is one of the vegetation overgrowth sites in the Kako River floodplains. The predominant tree species are willows and bamboos. In the field survey, the position, trunk diameter and height of each tree as well as the riverbed materials were measured after several flood events to investigate their impacts on the floodplain vegetation community. This presentation tries to examine effects of anthropogenic river regulations, i.e., thinning and cutting-down, in the vegetated channel in Kako River by using the vegetation dynamics model. Sensitivity of both the flood water level and the vegetation status in the channel is statistically evaluated in terms of the different cutting

  4. Channel migration of the White River in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurado, Antonio; Fields, Fred K.

    1978-01-01

    The White River is the largest stream in the southeastern part of the Uinta Basin in Utah and Colorado. This map shows the changes that have occurred in the location of the main channel of the river from 1936 to 1974. The map indicated that certain reaches of the river are subject to different rates of channel migration. Also shown is the boundary of the flood plain, which is mapped at the point of abrupt break in slope. This map documents the position of the river channel prior to any withdrawals of water or alteration of the flow characteristics of the white river that may occur in order to meet water requirements principally associated with the proposed oil-shale industry or other development in the area.The channel locations were determined from aerial photographs taken at four different time periods for the following Federal agencies: In 1936, U.S. Soil Conservation Services; 1953, U.S. Corps of Engineers; 1965, U.S. Geological Survey; and in 1974, U.S. Bureau of Land Management. The 1936 delineation, which is actually based upon photographs that were taken in 1936 and 1937, was made by projection of the original photographs on a base map that was prepared from 1:24,000 scale topographic maps. The 1953, 1965, and 1974 delineations were produced from stereographic models. The 1965 delineation was compiled from photographs that were taken during 1962-65. The delineation is labeled as 1965 for simplicity, however, because the photographs for 1965 cover about 60 percent of the study read of the river, and because no changed were discernable in those areas of repetitive photographic coverage.

  5. A potential vorticity theory for the formation of elongate channels in river deltas and lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcini, Federico; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2010-12-01

    Rivers empty into oceans and lakes as turbulent sediment-laden jets, which can be characterized by a Gaussian horizontal velocity profile that spreads and decays downstream because of shearing and lateral mixing at the jet margins. Recent experiments demonstrate that this velocity field controls river-mouth sedimentation patterns. In nature, diffuse jets are associated with mouth bar deposition forming bifurcating distributary networks, while focused jets are associated with levee deposition and the growth of elongate channels that do not bifurcate. River outflows from elongate channels are similar in structure to cold filaments observed in ocean currents, where high potential vorticity helps to preserve coherent structure over large distances. Motivated by these observations, we propose a hydrodynamic theory that seeks to predict the conditions under which elongate channels form. Our approach models jet velocity patterns using the flow vorticity. Both shearing and lateral spreading are directly related to the vertical component of vorticity. We introduce a new kind of potential vorticity that incorporates sediment concentration and thus allows study of jet sedimentation patterns. The potential vorticity equation reduces the number of fluid momentum equations to one without losing generality. This results in a compact analytical solution capable of describing the streamwise evolution of the potential vorticity of a sediment-laden jet from initial conditions at the river mouth. Our theory predicts that high potential vorticity is a necessary condition for focused levee deposition and the creation of elongate channels. Comparison to numerical, laboratory, and field studies indicates that potential vorticity is a primary control on channel morphology. Our results may be useful for designing river delta restoration schemes such as the proposed Mississippi Delta diversion.

  6. Contrasting channel response to floods on the middle Gila River, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckleberry, Gary

    1994-12-01

    Floods of January and February 1993 in Arizona resulted in the most dramatic channel widening on the middle Gila River since 1905. An earlier flood in October 1983 had a larger instantaneous discharge but resulted in little channel change. The 1993 flood was of greater volume and duration, factors important in destabilizing flood-plain vegetation and eroding bank material. The 1983 flood was produced by a dissipating eastern Pacific tropical storm, whereas the 1993 flood was produced by a series of cold fronts from the northern Pacific Ocean supplied with subtropical moisture from a split jet stream. Meridional global circulation patterns enhance the frequency of winter storms that produce sustained flooding in Arizona and are more likely to result in channel widening and flood-plain instability on main trunk streams like the Gila River.

  7. Active overbank deposition during the last century, South River, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, Jim; Skalak, Katherine; Pearson, Adam; Benthem, Adam

    2016-03-01

    We quantify rates of overbank deposition over decadal to centennial timescales along the South River in Virginia using four independent methods. Detailed mercury profiles sampled adjacent to the stream channel preserve the peak historic mercury concentration on suspended sediment dating from 1955 to 1961 and suggest sedimentation rates of 8 to 50 cm/100 years. Sediment accumulation over the roots of trees suggest rates of 0 to 100 cm/100 years, with significantly higher values on levees and lower values on floodplains farther from the channel. Profiles of 137Cs and 210Pb from two eroding streambanks are fit with an advection-diffusion model calibrated at an upland reference site; these methods suggest sedimentation rates of 44 to 73 cm/100 years. Mercury inventories from 107 floodplain cores, combined with a previously published reconstruction of the history of mercury concentration on suspended sediment, provide spatially comprehensive estimates of floodplain sedimentation: median sedimentation rates are 3.8 cm/100 years for the < 0.3-year floodplain, 1.37 cm/100 years for the 0.3- to 2-year floodplain, 0.4 cm/100 years for the 2- to 5-year floodplain, and 0.1 cm/100 years for the 5- to 62-year floodplain. While these sedimentation rates are relatively low, the total mass of sediment stored from 1930 to 2007 is 4.9 ± 1.7 (95% confidence interval) × 107 kg, corresponding to an average thickness of 2.5 cm (3.2 cm/100 years). These results demonstrate that floodplains of our 4.5-km-long study reach have stored 8 to 12% of the total suspended sediment supplied to the study reach of the South River. Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) modeling demonstrates that the floodplain of the South River remains hydraulically connected to the channel: 56% of the 100-year floodplain is inundated every two years, and 83% of the floodplain is inundated every five years. These results, combined with previously published data, provide the basis for a

  8. Bisandrographolide from Andrographis paniculata activates TRPV4 channels.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paula L; Maloney, Katherine N; Pothen, Randy G; Clardy, Jon; Clapham, David E

    2006-10-06

    Many transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are activated or blocked by various compounds found in plants; two prominent examples include the activation of TRPV1 channels by capsaicin and the activation of TRPM8 channels by menthol. We sought to identify additional plant compounds that are active on other types of TRP channels. We screened a library of extracts from 50 Chinese herbal plants using a calcium-imaging assay to find compounds active on TRPV3 and TRPV4 channels. An extract from the plant Andrographis paniculata potently activated TRPV4 channels. The extract was fractionated further, and the active compound was identified as bisandrographolide A (BAA). We used purified compound to characterize the activity of BAA on certain TRPV channel subtypes. Although BAA activated TRPV4 channels with an EC(50) of 790-950 nm, it did not activate or block activation of TRPV1, TRPV2, or TRPV3 channels. BAA activated a large TRPV4-like current in immortalized mouse keratinocytes (308 cells) that have been shown to express TRPV4 protein endogenously. This compound also activated TRPV4 currents in cell-free outside-out patches from HEK293T cells overexpressing TRPV4 cDNA, suggesting that BAA can activate the channel in a membrane-delimited manner. Another related compound, andrographolide, found in abundance in the plant Andrographis was unable to activate or block activation of TRPV4 channels. These experiments show that BAA activates TRPV4 channels, and we discuss the possibility that activation of TRPV4 by BAA could play a role in some of the effects of Andrographis extract described in traditional medicine.

  9. Dynamic Channel Network Extraction from Satellite Imagery of the Jamuna River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addink, E. A.; Marra, W. A.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Evolution of the largest rivers on Earth is poorly understood while their response to global change is dramatic, such as severe drought and flooding problems. Rivers with high annual dynamics, like the Jamuna, allow us to study their response to changing conditions. Most remote-sensing work so far focused only on pixel-based analysis of channels and change detection or manual digitisation of channels, which is far from urgently needed quantifiers of pattern and pattern change. Using a series of Landsat TM images taken at irregular intervals showing inter- and intra-annual variation, we demonstrate that braided rivers can be represented as nearly chain-like directional networks. These can be studied with novel methods gleaned from neurology. These networks provide an integral spatial description of the network and should not be confused with hierarchical hydrological stream network descriptions developed in the ’60s to describe drainage basins. The images were first classified into water, bare sediment and vegetation. The contiguous water body of the river was then selected and translated into a network description with bifurcations and confluences at the nodes, and interconnecting channels. Along the entire river the well-known braiding indices were derived from the network. The channel width is a crucial attribute of the channel network as this allows the calculation of bifurcation asymmetry. The width was also used with channel length as weights to all the elements in the network in the calculation of more advanced measures for the nature and evolution of the channel network. The key step here is to describe river network evolution by identifying the same node in multiple subsequent images as well as new and abandoned nodes, in order to distinguish migration of bifurcations from avulsion processes. Once identified through time, the changes in node position and the changes in the connected channels can be quantified. These changes can potentially be linked to

  10. A quantized mechanism for activation of pannexin channels

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Jin, Xueyao; Medina, Christopher B.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Kiessling, Volker; Bennett, Brad C.; Shu, Shaofang; Tamm, Lukas K.; Yeager, Mark; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    Pannexin 1 (PANX1) subunits form oligomeric plasma membrane channels that mediate nucleotide release for purinergic signalling, which is involved in diverse physiological processes such as apoptosis, inflammation, blood pressure regulation, and cancer progression and metastasis. Here we explore the mechanistic basis for PANX1 activation by using wild type and engineered concatemeric channels. We find that PANX1 activation involves sequential stepwise sojourns through multiple discrete open states, each with unique channel gating and conductance properties that reflect contributions of the individual subunits of the hexamer. Progressive PANX1 channel opening is directly linked to permeation of ions and large molecules (ATP and fluorescent dyes) and occurs during both irreversible (caspase cleavage-mediated) and reversible (α1 adrenoceptor-mediated) forms of channel activation. This unique, quantized activation process enables fine tuning of PANX1 channel activity and may be a generalized regulatory mechanism for other related multimeric channels. PMID:28134257

  11. Watershed land use influences on river discharge and channel characteristics across northern New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galster, J. C.; Palmer, K.; Birrer, M.; Espinosa, S.; Pope, G. A.; Feng, H.; Wu, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    River characteristics such as sediment size, channel dimensions, and discharges can be strongly controlled by watershed land use. This project investigated three watersheds in northern New Jersey with varying degrees of forested, agriculture, and urban land uses to determine the effects of land use on these rivers. The watersheds are the Flatbrook, the Wallkill, and the Rockaway rivers and are predominantly forested, forested/agricultural, and forested/urban respectively. Eight sites across these fourth and fifth-order watersheds were investigated including: 1) the grain size using the Wolman pebble count method, 2) channel dimensions (slope, width, depth) with a total station, and 3) channel stability using the rapid geomorphic assessment (RGA). Channel width changes from 1930 to present were determined using historic aerial photographs, and river discharge characteristics were compiled using custom software to determine the flashiness (as measured by the Reynolds-Baker Index) and the Baseflow Index. The three adjacent watersheds have minimal variations in potential confounding variables such as watershed slope, climate, and precipitation, allowing for the isolation of the effects of land use changes. While some of the general relationship between how land use changes affect rivers (e.g., urban streams typically have larger grain sizes and flashier discharges), studies such as this one are important in determining how rivers respond locally. Across the studied watersheds, forested land uses are positively associated with rapid geomorphic assessments scores, indicating the influence of upstream land use and the importance of vegetation. Forested land use is also associated with efficient discharges as measured by hydraulic radius, although there were not significant changes in channel width from 1930 to present. The flashiness of all rivers has increased over time while the baseflow index has decreased, which may be a climatic signal as opposed to being influenced

  12. Morphodynamic river processes and techniques for assessment of channel evolution in Alpine gravel bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formann, E.; Habersack, H. M.; Schober, St.

    2007-10-01

    Over the past 10 years many restoration projects have been undertaken in Austria, and river engineering measures such as spur dykes and longitudinal bank protection, which imposed fixed lateral boundaries on rivers, have been removed. The EU-Life Project "Auenverbund Obere Drau" has resulted in extensive restoration on the River Drau, aimed to improve the ecological integrity of the river ecosystem, to arrest riverbed degradation, and to ensure flood protection. An essential part of the restoration design involved the consideration of self-forming river processes, which led to new demands being imposed on river management. This paper illustrates how model complexity is adapted to the solution and evaluation of different aspects of river restoration problems in a specific case. Point-scale monitoring data were up-scaled to the whole investigation area by means of digital elevation models, and a scaling approach to the choice of model complexity was applied. Simple regime analysis methods and 1-D models are applicable to the evaluation of long-term and reach-scale restoration aims, and to the prediction of kilometre-scale processes (e.g. mean river bed aggradation or degradation, flood protection). 2-D models gave good results for the evaluation of hydraulic changes (e.g. transverse flow velocities, shear stresses, discharges at diffluences) for different morphological units at the local scale (100 m-10 m), and imposed an intermediate demand on calibration data and topographic survey. The study shows that complex 3-D numerical models combined with high resolution digital elevation models are necessary for detailed analysis of processes (1 m-0.01 m), but not for the evaluation of the restoration aims on the River Drau. In conclusion, model choice (complexity) will depend on both lower limits (determined by the complexity of processes to be analysed) and upper limits (field data quality and process understanding for numerical models).

  13. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z; Ortiz, Eydith J Comenencia; Moss, Stephen J; Jensen, Anders A; Davies, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na(+) and K(+) relative to Cs(+) are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na(+) and K(+) with the divalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) results in complete elimination of Zn(2+)-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+).

  14. Deriving Flood-Mediated Connectivity between River Channels and Floodplains: Data-Driven Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Shao, Quanxi; Zhang, Yongyong

    2017-01-01

    The flood-mediated connectivity between river channels and floodplains plays a fundamental role in flood hazard mapping and exerts profound ecological effects. The classic nearest neighbor search (NNS) fails to derive this connectivity because of spatial heterogeneity and continuity. We develop two novel data-driven connectivity-deriving approaches, namely, progressive nearest neighbor search (PNNS) and progressive iterative nearest neighbor search (PiNNS). These approaches are illustrated through a case study in Northern Australia. First, PNNS and PiNNS are employed to identify flood pathways on floodplains through forward tracking. That is, progressive search is performed to associate newly inundated cells in each time step to previously inundated cells. In particular, iterations in PiNNS ensure that the connectivity is continuous – the connection between any two cells along the pathway is built through intermediate inundated cells. Second, inundated floodplain cells are collectively connected to river channel cells through backward tracing. Certain river channel sections are identified to connect to a large number of inundated floodplain cells. That is, the floodwater from these sections causes widespread floodplain inundation. Our proposed approaches take advantage of spatial–temporal data. They can be applied to achieve connectivity from hydro-dynamic and remote sensing data and assist in river basin planning and management. PMID:28256547

  15. Deriving Flood-Mediated Connectivity between River Channels and Floodplains: Data-Driven Approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Shao, Quanxi; Zhang, Yongyong

    2017-03-03

    The flood-mediated connectivity between river channels and floodplains plays a fundamental role in flood hazard mapping and exerts profound ecological effects. The classic nearest neighbor search (NNS) fails to derive this connectivity because of spatial heterogeneity and continuity. We develop two novel data-driven connectivity-deriving approaches, namely, progressive nearest neighbor search (PNNS) and progressive iterative nearest neighbor search (PiNNS). These approaches are illustrated through a case study in Northern Australia. First, PNNS and PiNNS are employed to identify flood pathways on floodplains through forward tracking. That is, progressive search is performed to associate newly inundated cells in each time step to previously inundated cells. In particular, iterations in PiNNS ensure that the connectivity is continuous - the connection between any two cells along the pathway is built through intermediate inundated cells. Second, inundated floodplain cells are collectively connected to river channel cells through backward tracing. Certain river channel sections are identified to connect to a large number of inundated floodplain cells. That is, the floodwater from these sections causes widespread floodplain inundation. Our proposed approaches take advantage of spatial-temporal data. They can be applied to achieve connectivity from hydro-dynamic and remote sensing data and assist in river basin planning and management.

  16. Deriving Flood-Mediated Connectivity between River Channels and Floodplains: Data-Driven Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tongtiegang; Shao, Quanxi; Zhang, Yongyong

    2017-03-01

    The flood-mediated connectivity between river channels and floodplains plays a fundamental role in flood hazard mapping and exerts profound ecological effects. The classic nearest neighbor search (NNS) fails to derive this connectivity because of spatial heterogeneity and continuity. We develop two novel data-driven connectivity-deriving approaches, namely, progressive nearest neighbor search (PNNS) and progressive iterative nearest neighbor search (PiNNS). These approaches are illustrated through a case study in Northern Australia. First, PNNS and PiNNS are employed to identify flood pathways on floodplains through forward tracking. That is, progressive search is performed to associate newly inundated cells in each time step to previously inundated cells. In particular, iterations in PiNNS ensure that the connectivity is continuous – the connection between any two cells along the pathway is built through intermediate inundated cells. Second, inundated floodplain cells are collectively connected to river channel cells through backward tracing. Certain river channel sections are identified to connect to a large number of inundated floodplain cells. That is, the floodwater from these sections causes widespread floodplain inundation. Our proposed approaches take advantage of spatial–temporal data. They can be applied to achieve connectivity from hydro-dynamic and remote sensing data and assist in river basin planning and management.

  17. Anchoring submersible ultrasonic receivers in river channels with stable substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Scholten, G.D.; Hubbs, D.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an anchoring system for submersible ultrasonic receivers (SURs) that we placed on the bottom of the riverine reaches of three main-stem reservoirs in the upper Tennessee River. Each anchor consisted of a steel tube (8.9 x 35.6 cm) welded vertically to a round plate of steel (5.1 x 40.6 cm). All seven SURs and their 57-kg anchors were successfully deployed and retrieved three times over 547 d by a dive team employing surface air-breathing equipment and a davit-equipped boat. All of the anchors and their SURs remained stationary over two consecutive winters on the hard-bottom, thalweg sites where they were deployed. The SUR and its anchor at the most downriver site experienced flows that exceeded 2,100 m(3)/s and mean water column velocities of about 0.9 m/s.

  18. From channelization to restoration: Sociohydrologic modeling with changing community preferences in the Kissimmee River Basin, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Dingbao; Tian, Fuqiang; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-02-01

    The Kissimmee River Basin (Florida, USA) underwent river channelization in the 1960s and subsequent restoration in the 1990s, revealing a shift in management emphasis from flood protection to wetland health. In this paper, this shift is hypothesized to result from changing human values and preferences, and a power differential between the more numerous and affluent upstream urban residents (who prioritize wetland restoration) and downstream rural residents (who prioritize flood protection). We develop a conceptual sociohydrologic model to simulate the interactions between community interests and hydrology. The modeling results show that flood intensity decreased after channelization, which reduced concern about flooding. However, channelization also led to a decrease in wetland storage, which caused an increase of wetland concern, especially among the urban residents. Eventually, the community sensitivity switched from favoring flood protection to favoring wetlands, and subsequent management strategies switched from channelization to restoration. Using the model, we project that the wetlands will be recovering for the next 20 years and community sensitivity will slowly go back to a neutral state. However, possible rainfall intensification in the future could return the community sensitivity to favoring flood protection again. The preferential increase of upstream population growth will raise the community's concern about wetlands and the preferential increase of downstream population growth will magnify concern about flooding. This study provides insight into the driving forces behind human-water interactions in the Kissimmee River Basin while simultaneously demonstrating the potential of sociohydrologic modeling to describe complex human-water coupled systems with simple concepts and equations.

  19. The Topographic Design of River Channels for Form-Process Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Rocko A.; Pasternack, Gregory B.; Lin, Tin

    2016-04-01

    Scientists and engineers design river topography for a wide variety of uses, such as experimentation, site remediation, dam mitigation, flood management, and river restoration. A recent advancement has been the notion of topographical design to yield specific fluvial mechanisms in conjunction with natural or environmental flow releases. For example, the flow convergence routing mechanism, whereby shear stress and spatially convergent flow migrate or jump from the topographic high (riffle) to the low point (pool) from low to high discharge, is thought to be a key process able to maintain undular relief in gravel bedded rivers. This paper develops an approach to creating riffle-pool topography with a form-process linkage to the flow convergence routing mechanism using an adjustable, quasi equilibrium synthetic channel model. The link from form to process is made through conceptualizing form-process relationships for riffle-pool couplets into geomorphic covariance structures (GCSs) that are then quantitatively embedded in a synthetic channel model. Herein, GCSs were used to parameterize a geometric model to create five straight, synthetic river channels with varying combinations of bed and width undulations. Shear stress and flow direction predictions from 2D hydrodynamic modeling were used to determine if scenarios recreated aspects of the flow convergence routing mechanism. Results show that the creation of riffle-pool couplets that experience flow convergence in straight channels requires GCSs with covarying bed and width undulations in their topography as supported in the literature. This shows that GCSs are a useful way to translate conceptualizations of form-process linkages into quantitative models of channel form.

  20. The topographic design of river channels for form-process linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. A.; Pasternack, G. B.; White, J.

    2015-12-01

    Scientists and engineers design river topography for a wide variety of uses, such as experimentation, site remediation, dam mitigation, flood management, and river restoration. A recent advancement has been the notion of topographical design to yield specific fluvial mechanisms in conjunction with natural or environmental flow releases. For example, the flow convergence routing mechanism, whereby shear stress and spatially convergent flow migrate or jump from the topographic high (riffle) to the low point (pool) from low to high discharge, is thought to be a key process able to maintain undular relief in gravel bedded rivers. This work develops an approach to creating riffle-pool topography with a form-process linkage to the flow convergence routing mechanism using an adjustable, quasi equilibrium synthetic channel model. The link from form to process is made through conceptualizing form-process relationships for riffle-pool couplets into geomorphic covariance structures (GCSs) that are then quantitatively embedded in a synthetic channel model. Herein, GCSs were used to parameterize a geometric model to create five straight, synthetic river channels with varying combinations of bed and width undulations. Shear stress and flow direction predictions from 2D hydrodynamic modeling were used to determine if scenarios recreated aspects of the flow convergence routing mechanism. Results show that the creation of riffle-pool couplets that experience flow convergence in straight channels require GCSs with positively covarying bed and width undulations in their topography as supported in the literature. This shows that GCSs are a useful way to translate conceptualizations models of form-process linkages into quantitative models of channel form. Beyond synthetic examples, several real-world examples of restoration projects that use this approach are shown and discussed.

  1. Maintenance Dredging of the Federal Navigation Channels in the Detroit River, Michigan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    waterways in the world, the river hu-s with activity during the navigation season and includes the Ports of River Rouge, Ecorse, Wyandotte, Riverview...from activities of the Southeastern Michigan Water Resources Study - Economic Workshop Subcommittee. Sub-areas II and III cover the majority of the...4.01 Water Quality. (The water quality standards of the State of 20 Michigan, indicated in Appendix C, do not apply to dredging activities

  2. Channel mapping river miles 29–62 of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, May 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaplinski, Matt; Hazel, Joseph E.; Grams, Paul E.; Kohl, Keith; Buscombe, Daniel D.; Tusso, Robert B.

    2017-03-23

    Bathymetric, topographic, and grain-size data were collected in May 2009 along a 33-mi reach of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The study reach is located from river miles 29 to 62 at the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers. Channel bathymetry was mapped using multibeam and singlebeam echosounders, subaerial topography was mapped using ground-based total-stations, and bed-sediment grain-size data were collected using an underwater digital microscope system. These data were combined to produce digital elevation models, spatially variable estimates of digital elevation model uncertainty, georeferenced grain-size data, and bed-sediment distribution maps. This project is a component of a larger effort to monitor the status and trends of sand storage along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. This report documents the survey methods and post-processing procedures, digital elevation model production and uncertainty assessment, and procedures for bed-sediment classification, and presents the datasets resulting from this study.

  3. Exchanges of sediment between the flood plain and channel of the Amazon River in Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, T.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Meade, R.H.; Richey, J.E.; Forsberg, B.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment transport through the Brazilian sector of the Amazon River valley, a distance of 2010 km, involves exchanges between the channel and the flood plain that in each direction exceed the annual flux of sediment out of the river at O??bidos (???1200 Mt yr-1). The exchanges occur through bank erosion, bar deposition, settling from diffuse overbank flow, and sedimentation in flood-plain channels. We estimated the magnitude of these exchanges for each of 10 reaches of the valley, and combined them with calculations of sediment transport into and out of the reaches based on sediment sampling and flow records to define a sediment budget for each reach. Residuals in the sediment budget of a reach include errors of estimation and erosion or deposition within the channel. The annual supply of sediment entering the channel from bank erosion was estimated to average 1570 Mt yr-1 (1.3 ?? the O??bidos flux) and the amount transferred from channel transport to the bars (380 Mt yr-1) and the flood plain (460 Mt yr-1 in channelized flow; 1230 Mt yr-1 in diffuse overbank flow) totaled 2070 Mt yr-1 (1.7 ?? the O??bidos flux). Thus, deposition on the bars and flood plain exceeded bank erosion by 500 Mt yr-1 over a 10-16 yr period. Sampling and calculation of sediment loads in the channel indicate a net accumulation in the valley floor of approximately 200 Mt yr-1 over 16 yr, crudely validating the process-based calculations of the sediment budget, which in turn illuminate the physical controls on each exchange process. Another 300-400 Mt yr-1 are deposited in a delta plain downstream of O??bidos. The components of the sediment budget reflect hydrologie characteristics of the valley floor and geomorphic characteristics of the channel and flood plain, which in turn are influenced by tectonic features of the Amazon structural trough.

  4. Medium and short-term channel planform changes on the Rivers Tay and Tummel, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterbottom, Sandra J.

    2000-09-01

    Channel planform change was analysed using a variety of data-sources for the medium-term (>25 years and <250 years) and short-term (<25 years) on a reach of the Rivers Tay and Tummel, Scotland. Map data were input into a Geographic Information System (GIS) and used to determine planform characteristics and changes in width, braiding index and sinuosity for the study reach between 1755 and 1976. Aerial photographs were utilised to determine the more recent changes that had taken place between 1971 and 1994. The analysis showed that significant changes had occurred over the medium term with a mean reduction in channel width of 34% for this period. These changes are comparable to those found in studies of similar European rivers for this period. Changes determined for the short-term displayed a continuance of this trend at a comparable rate of change. An analysis of flood frequency and magnitude, precipitation and discharge records for both periods does not show an associated decrease and therefore does not reflect the changes in channel planform. Evidence points towards flood embankment construction in the mid-1800s as the initial cause of channel change for the study reach which was later exacerbated by flow regulation. Incision and the subsequent stabilisation of lateral and mid-channel gravel bars by vegetation succession has resulted in an overall increase in the stability of the study reach which has persisted even where the embankments have fallen into disrepair.

  5. Channel changes and floodplain management in the meandering middle Ebro River, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollero, Alfredo

    2010-05-01

    The 346 km of the middle Ebro River between Logroño and La Zaida is a free meandering channel in a wide floodplain. This reach contains a discontinuous riparian corridor, including valuable riparian forests and oxbow lakes. The Ebro has witnessed substantial changes in channel morphology, gravel bars, riparian vegetation and floodplain uses over the last 80 years. The growth in sinuosity, migrations and meander cut-offs have been frequent before 1981. Afterwards, bank protections and dykes have stabilized the channel. There has been a progressive and significant decrease of both the area covered by water and the gravel bars without plant colonization. As a result the width of the riparian corridor has been dramatically reduced for human use. The deceleration and near elimination of the free meander dynamics of the Ebro channel represent an important loss of natural heritage. Dams, land-use changes throughout the basin, and construction of flood defences that restrict the main channel have changed the river system behaviour, which urgently needs a management plan combining both improvement and risk reduction. The solution proposed is the creation of a "Fluvial Territory".

  6. Threshold bedrock channels in tectonically active mountains with frequent mass wasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korup, O.; Hayakawa, Y. S.; Codilean, A.; Oguchi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Models of how mountain belts grow and erode through time largely rely on the paradigm of fluvial bedrock incision as the main motor of response to differences in rock uplift, thus setting base levels of erosion in tectonically active landscapes. Dynamic feedbacks between rock uplift, bedrock river geometry, and mass wasting have been encapsulated within the concept of threshold hillslopes that attain a mechanically critical inclination capable of adjusting to fluvial incision rates via decreased stability and commensurately more frequent landsliding. Here we provide data that challenge the widely held view that channel steepness records tectonic forcing more faithfully than hillslope inclination despite much robust empirical evidence of such links between bedrock-river geometry and hillslope mass wasting. We show that the volume mobilized by mass wasting depends more on local topographic relief and the sinuosity of bedrock rivers than their mean normalized channel steepness. We derive this counterintuitive observation from an unprecedented inventory of ~300,000 landslides covering the tectonically active Japanese archipelago with substantial differences in seismicity, lithology, vertical surface deformation, topography, and precipitation variability. Both total landslide number and volumes increase nonlinearly with mean local relief even in areas where the fraction of steepest channel segments attains a constant threshold well below the maximum topographic relief. Our data document for the first time that mass wasting increases systematically with preferential steepening of flatter channel segments. Yet concomitant changes in mean channel steepness are negligible such that it remains a largely insensitive predictor of landslide denudation. Further, minute increases in bedrock-river sinuosity lead to substantial reduction in landslide abundance and volumes. Our results underline that sinuosity (together with mean local relief) is a key morphometric variable for

  7. The effect of channel shape, bed morphology, and shipwrecks on flow velocities in the Upper St. Clair River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Oberg, Kevin; Best, Jim; Parsons, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Great Lakes of North America, the St. Clair River is the major outlet of Lake Huron and conveys water to Lake St. Clair which then flows to Lake Erie. One major topic of interest is morphological change in the St. Clair River and its impact on water levels in the Upper Great Lakes and connecting channel flows. A combined multibeam echosounder (MBES) bathymetric survey and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) flow survey of the outlet of Lake Huron and the Upper St. Clair River was conducted July 21 – 25, 2008. This paper presents how channel morphology and shipwrecks affect the flow in the Upper St. Clair River. The river is most constricted at the Blue Water Bridge near Port Huron, Michigan, with water velocities over 2 ms-1 for a flow of 5,200 m3s-1. Downstream of this constriction, the river flows around a bend and expands creating a large recirculation zone along the left bank due to flow separation. This recirculation zone reduces the effective channel width, and thus increases flow velocities to over 2 ms-1 in this region. The surveys reveal several shipwrecks on the bed of the St. Clair River, which possess distinct wakes in their flow velocity downstream of the wrecks. The constriction and expansion of the channel, combined with forcing of the flow by bed topography, initiates channel-scale secondary flow, creating streamwise vortices that maintain coherence downstream over a distance of several channel widths.

  8. Single Na+ channels activated by veratridine and batrachotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive Na+ channels from rat skeletal muscle plasma membrane vesicles were inserted into planar lipid bilayers in the presence of either of the alkaloid toxins veratridine (VT) or batrachotoxin (BTX). Both of these toxins are known to cause persistent activation of Na+ channels. With BTX as the channel activator, single channels remain open nearly all the time. Channels activated with VT open and close on a time scale of 1-10 s. Increasing the VT concentration enhances the probability of channel opening, primarily by increasing the rate constant of opening. The kinetics and voltage dependence of channel block by 21-sulfo-11-alpha-hydroxysaxitoxin are identical for VT and BTX, as is the ionic selectivity sequence determined by bi-ionic reversal potential (Na+ approximately Li+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+). However, there are striking quantitative differences in open channel conduction for channels in the presence of the two activators. Under symmetrical solution conditions, the single channel conductance for Na+ is about twice as high with BTX as with VT. Furthermore, the symmetrical solution single channel conductances show a different selectivity for BTX (Na+ greater than Li+ greater than K+) than for VT (Na+ greater than K+ greater than Li+). Open channel current-voltage curves in symmetrical Na+ and Li+ are roughly linear, while those in symmetrical K+ are inwardly rectifying. Na+ currents are blocked asymmetrically by K+ with both BTX and VT, but the voltage dependence of K+ block is stronger with BTX than with VT. The results show that the alkaloid neurotoxins not only alter the gating process of the Na+ channel, but also affect the structure of the open channel. We further conclude that the rate-determining step for conduction by Na+ does not occur at the channel's "selectivity filter," where poorly permeating ions like K+ are excluded. PMID:2435846

  9. Comparison of Methods to Estimate Ephemeral Channel Recharge, Walnut Gulch, San Pedro River Basin, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Williams, D. G.; Unkrich, C. L.; Hogan, J. F.; Scott, R. L.; Hultine, K. R.; Pool, D. R.; Coes, A. L.; Miller, S. N.

    2004-12-01

    Ephemeral channel transmission loss represents an important groundwater-surface water exchange in arid and semiarid regions and is potentially a significant source of recharge at the basin scale. However, identification of the processes and dynamics that control this exchange is a challenging problem. Specifically, data on the proportion of runoff transmission losses that escape from near-channel transpiration and wetted channel evaporation to become deep groundwater recharge are difficult to obtain. This issue was addressed through coordinated field research and modeling within the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) located in the San Pedro River Basin of southeastern Arizona. Recharge was estimated using several independent methods which included a reach water balance approach, with near-channel ET estimated using sap flux and micrometeorological measurements; geochemical methods such as chloride mass balance; modeling of changes in groundwater level or microgravity measurements; and vadose zone water and temperature transport modeling. It was found that during the relatively wet 1999 and average 2000 monsoon seasons, the range of ephemeral channel recharge estimated from these methods differed by a factor of less than three. A rough scaling to the entire San Pedro Basin indicates that ephemeral channel recharge constitutes between approximately 15 percent and 40 percent of total annual recharge to the regional aquifer as estimated from a calibrated groundwater model. In contrast, during the weak monsoon seasons of 2001 and 2002 limited runoff and stream channel infiltration did occur but no discernable deep aquifer recharge was detected.

  10. Modelling the flooding capacity of a Polish Carpathian river: A comparison of constrained and free channel conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Wiktoria; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Hajdukiewicz, Hanna

    2016-11-01

    The gravel-bed Biała River, Polish Carpathians, was heavily affected by channelization and channel incision in the twentieth century. Not only were these impacts detrimental to the ecological state of the river, but they also adversely modified the conditions of floodwater retention and flood wave passage. Therefore, a few years ago an erodible corridor was delimited in two sections of the Biała to enable restoration of the river. In these sections, short, channelized reaches located in the vicinity of bridges alternate with longer, unmanaged channel reaches, which either avoided channelization or in which the channel has widened after the channelization scheme ceased to be maintained. Effects of these alternating channel morphologies on the conditions for flood flows were investigated in a study of 10 pairs of neighbouring river cross sections with constrained and freely developed morphology. Discharges of particular recurrence intervals were determined for each cross section using an empirical formula. The morphology of the cross sections together with data about channel slope and roughness of particular parts of the cross sections were used as input data to the hydraulic modelling performed with the one-dimensional steady-flow HEC-RAS software. The results indicated that freely developed cross sections, usually with multithread morphology, are typified by significantly lower water depth but larger width and cross-sectional flow area at particular discharges than single-thread, channelized cross sections. They also exhibit significantly lower average flow velocity, unit stream power, and bed shear stress. The pattern of differences in the hydraulic parameters of flood flows apparent between the two types of river cross sections varies with the discharges of different frequency, and the contrasts in hydraulic parameters between unmanaged and channelized cross sections are most pronounced at low-frequency, high-magnitude floods. However, because of the deep

  11. Urban river restoration: implications on channel sedimentation patterns and associated ecosystem and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, H.; Gurnell, A.; Heppell, K.; Spencer, K.

    2012-04-01

    Urban river restoration, which alters the physical and hydraulic conditions of rivers, creates rivers favourable to increased sedimentation through greater sediment availability and heterogeneous flow patterns. Sediments, particularly finer-grained, store contaminants including metals which can have detrimental impacts upon aquatic ecosystems and potentially human health. This research therefore looks at the effect of urban river restoration practices upon sedimentation patterns, the associated changes in sediment metal storage and the potential impact upon river function and use in terms of the aquatic ecosystem and human health. Research was undertaken at four sites on urban rivers in London. The spatial extent of different bed sediment types (unvegetated gravel, sand, finer and sediment around in-channel vegetation) in adjacent restored and unrestored stretches was mapped in July 2010. Additionally, sediments were sampled through the year and analysed for a range of metals and sediment characteristics. Two sites (Chinbrook Meadows and Sutcliffe Park) showed a clear difference in bed sediment type channel cover between the restored and unrestored stretches. The majority of the concrete-lined unrestored stretch at Chinbrook Meadows had no sediment deposition, whereas the restored stretch had over half of the channel occupied by finer sediment either on the open channel bed or accumulated around in-channel vegetation. At Sutcliffe Park, the dominant bed sediment type in the restored stretch was finer sediment on the open bed and accumulated around in-channel vegetation, whereas in the unrestored stretch the dominant bed sediment type was gravel. At both sites there were significant differences in metal concentrations and sediment characteristics between bed sediment types. Metal concentrations, organic matter and % <63µm were generally higher in the finer sediment whether on the open bed or around in-channel vegetation. Total loadings of all metals were greater in

  12. Reduced channel conveyance on the Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Texas, 1900-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, Karl; Baldys, Stanley; Schreiber, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Recent floods on the Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Texas, have reached higher stages compared to historical floods of similar magnitude discharges. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated streamflow-gaging station 07312500 Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Tex., since 1938 and flood measurements near the location of the present gage were first made in 1900. Floods recorded in 2007 and 2008 at this gaging station, including the record flood of June 30, 2007, reached higher stages compared to historical floods before 1972 of similar peak discharges. For flood measurements made at stages of more than 18 feet, peak stages were about 1 to 3 feet higher compared to peak stages of similar peak discharges measured before 1972. Flood measurements made at stages of more than 18 feet also indicate a decrease in the measured mean velocity from about 3.5 to about 2.0 feet per second from 1941 to 2008. The increase in stage and decrease in streamflow velocity for similar magnitude floods indicates channel conveyance has decreased over time. A study to investigate the causes of reduced channel conveyance in the Wichita River reach from Loop 11 downstream to River Road in Wichita Falls was done by the USGS in cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls. Historical photographs indicate substantial growth of riparian vegetation downstream from Loop 11 between 1950 and 2009. Aerial photographs taken between 1950 and 2008 also indicate an increase in riparian vegetation. Twenty-five channel cross sections were surveyed by the USGS in this reach in 2009. These cross sections were located at bridge crossings or collocated with channel cross sections previously surveyed in 1986 for use in a floodplain mapping study by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Four channel cross sections 3,400 to 11,900 feet downstream from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard indicate narrowing of the channel. The remaining channel cross sections surveyed in 2009 by the USGS compared favorably with

  13. Distribution, persistence, and hydrologic characteristics of salmon spawning habitats in clearwater side channels of the Matanuska River, southcentral Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.; McTeague, Monica L.; Burril, Sean E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2011-01-01

    Turbid, glacially influenced rivers are often considered to be poor salmon spawning and rearing habitats and, consequently, little is known about salmon habitats that do occur within rivers of this type. To better understand salmon spawning habitats in the Matanuska River of southcentral Alaska, the distribution and characteristics of clearwater side-channel spawning habitats were determined and compared to spawning habitats in tributaries. More than 100 kilometers of clearwater side channels within the braided mainstem of the Matanuska River were mapped for 2006 from aerial images and ground-based surveys. In reaches selected for historical analysis, side channel locations shifted appreciably between 1949 and 2006, but the relative abundance of clearwater side channels was fairly stable during the same period. Geospatial analysis of side channel distribution shows side channels typically positioned along abandoned bars at the braid plain margin rather than on bars between mainstem channels, and shows a strong correlation of channel abundance with braid plain width. Physical and geomorphic characteristics of the channel and chemical character of the water measured at 19 side channel sites, 6 tributary sites, 4 spring sites, and 5 mainstem channel sites showed conditions suitable for salmon spawning in side channels and tributaries, and a correlation of side channel characteristics with the respective tributary or groundwater source water. Autumn-through-spring monitoring of intergravel water temperatures adjacent to salmon redds (nests) in three side channels and two tributaries indicate adequate accumulated thermal units for incubation and emergence of salmon in side channels and relatively low accumulated thermal units in tributaries.

  14. Application of the SAM Computer Program for Truckee River Stable Channel Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    River flows from its source, Lake Tahoe , to Pyramid Lake , over a distance of approximately 100 miles. The example restoration reach is located...Flood Damage Reduction and Stream Restoration Research Program sponsored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE 2000). These programs are...resulting bed degradation (deepening of the channel invert) have resulted in less frequent overbank flows. The goal of the restoration effort is to

  15. Effects of Snow-making, Grading, and Timber Harvest on Stream Channel Morphology in the White River National Forest, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, G. C.; Bledsoe, B. P.; Merritt, D. M.; Wohl, E.

    2005-12-01

    The White River National Forest Service is responsible for managing and protecting the ecological integrity of many streams in some of the major ski resorts in Colorado. The combined effects of timber harvesting, snow-making, grading and road construction can increase streamflows but the effects of these four activities on stream channel stability are not well documented. Increased flow can result in bank failure, increased amounts of large woody debris, pool scour and bed coarsening. Specific stream channel response to increased flows associated with ski resort activities partly depends on the type of vegetation growing along stream banks and the amount of human development in the basin. We hypothesize that a threshold of development must be attained for each vegetation type before the stream channel is significantly impacted. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed channel condition, channel dimensions, and vegetation along 49 stream reaches (200 - 300 m in length). Twenty-four of these streams are within ski areas (project streams), either adjacent to or downstream from ski slopes. Twenty-five ""reference"" streams have very little to no development in their basins. These streams are used to define reference conditions bank stability, bank undercutting, bank height, bank angle, percent of large woody debris, pool depth, sediment size, and vegetation structure. A Principle Component Analysis will be utilized to ordinate and allow comparison of project and reference streams. The effects of overstory and understory vegetation on bank height, angle and stability will also be determined. A larger percentage of willows adjacent to stream channels may decrease bank height and angle thereby increasing stability. These data will help in the revision of a forest management plan to provide guidelines for planning and development of ski areas on public lands.

  16. Effect of outlet hydrodynamics on the formation of river channel morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachtman, D.; Laronne, J. B.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of salinity gradients between fresh water and salt water at river outlets has been known and documented. The recognition of a halocline in such aquatic environments has helped to better understand the nature of mixing between saline and fresh waters; the presence of halocline dividing waters of contrasting salinity, suspended sediment concentration and thermal characteristics have been explored in the past two decades. However, the effect of the interface between rivers and saline waters in saline or semi-closed seas and their inland intrusion has not been studied hitherto with respect to its effect on nearshore stream channel morphology and consequent formation of bed topography. The evolution of the studied fluvial system takes place in the the hyperarid Dead Sea environment, Israel, constrained by a very short time scale system response to very abrupt (1 m/yr) base level lowering taking place while channel water discharge remains relatively constant. These conditions lead to formation and development of channels in a cohesive-lacustrine depositional environment. High resolution 3-D velocity measurements, salinity distribution, suspended sediment concentration and channel bed topography survey reveal that a hypersaline Dead Sea water prism intrudes in the form of a wedge-shaped salty bottom layer several metres into the brackish stream channel, generating a wide parabolic cross-section. The magnitude of intrusion is responsible for the rate of channel widening at the nearshore area and for initiation of primary bed topography - a longitudinal trough - of the evolving proto-channel. The sea effect on initial topography seems to have a relatively long-term consequence developing to a more pronounced bed element during further phases of channel development due to the effect of bed topography on flow structure. The role of the salt water interface on the rate of erosion or sedimentation in the channel outlet is not fully understood. However, 3-D

  17. Spatial interpolation of river channel topography using the shortest temporal distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Xian, Cuiling; Chen, Huajin; Grieneisen, Michael L.; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-11-01

    It is difficult to interpolate river channel topography due to complex anisotropy. As the anisotropy is often caused by river flow, especially the hydrodynamic and transport mechanisms, it is reasonable to incorporate flow velocity into topography interpolator for decreasing the effect of anisotropy. In this study, two new distance metrics defined as the time taken by water flow to travel between two locations are developed, and replace the spatial distance metric or Euclidean distance that is currently used to interpolate topography. One is a shortest temporal distance (STD) metric. The temporal distance (TD) of a path between two nodes is calculated by spatial distance divided by the tangent component of flow velocity along the path, and the STD is searched using the Dijkstra algorithm in all possible paths between two nodes. The other is a modified shortest temporal distance (MSTD) metric in which both the tangent and normal components of flow velocity were combined. They are used to construct the methods for the interpolation of river channel topography. The proposed methods are used to generate the topography of Wuhan Section of Changjiang River and compared with Universal Kriging (UK) and Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW). The results clearly showed that the STD and MSTD based on flow velocity were reliable spatial interpolators. The MSTD, followed by the STD, presents improvement in prediction accuracy relative to both UK and IDW.

  18. Particle size distribution of main-channel-bed sediments along the upper Mississippi River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Remo, Jonathan; Heine, Ruben A.; Ickes, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared pre-lock-and-dam (ca. 1925) with a modern longitudinal survey of main-channel-bed sediments along a 740-km segment of the upper Mississippi River (UMR) between Davenport, IA, and Cairo, IL. This comparison was undertaken to gain a better understanding of how bed sediments are distributed longitudinally and to assess change since the completion of the UMR lock and dam navigation system and Missouri River dams (i.e., mid-twentieth century). The comparison of the historic and modern longitudinal bed sediment surveys showed similar bed sediment sizes and distributions along the study segment with the majority (> 90%) of bed sediment samples having a median diameter (D50) of fine to coarse sand. The fine tail (≤ D10) of the sediment size distributions was very fine to medium sand, and the coarse tail (≥ D90) of sediment-size distribution was coarse sand to gravel. Coarsest sediments in both surveys were found within or immediately downstream of bedrock-floored reaches. Statistical analysis revealed that the particle-size distributions between the survey samples were statistically identical, suggesting no overall difference in main-channel-bed sediment-size distribution between 1925 and present. This was a surprising result given the magnitude of river engineering undertaken along the study segment over the past ~ 90 years. The absence of substantial differences in main-channel-bed-sediment size suggests that flow competencies within the highly engineered navigation channel today are similar to conditions within the less-engineered historic channel.

  19. Particle size distribution of main-channel-bed sediments along the upper Mississippi River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, Jonathan W. F.; Heine, Reuben A.; Ickes, Brian S.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we compared pre-lock-and-dam (ca. 1925) with a modern longitudinal survey of main-channel-bed sediments along a 740-km segment of the upper Mississippi River (UMR) between Davenport, IA, and Cairo, IL. This comparison was undertaken to gain a better understanding of how bed sediments are distributed longitudinally and to assess change since the completion of the UMR lock and dam navigation system and Missouri River dams (i.e., mid-twentieth century). The comparison of the historic and modern longitudinal bed sediment surveys showed similar bed sediment sizes and distributions along the study segment with the majority (> 90%) of bed sediment samples having a median diameter (D50) of fine to coarse sand. The fine tail (≤ D10) of the sediment size distributions was very fine to medium sand, and the coarse tail (≥ D90) of sediment-size distribution was coarse sand to gravel. Coarsest sediments in both surveys were found within or immediately downstream of bedrock-floored reaches. Statistical analysis revealed that the particle-size distributions between the survey samples were statistically identical, suggesting no overall difference in main-channel-bed sediment-size distribution between 1925 and present. This was a surprising result given the magnitude of river engineering undertaken along the study segment over the past 90 years. The absence of substantial differences in main-channel-bed-sediment size suggests that flow competencies within the highly engineered navigation channel today are similar to conditions within the less-engineered historic channel.

  20. Channel Characteristics and Planform Dynamics in the Indian Terai, Sharda River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midha, Neha; Mathur, Pradeep K.

    2014-01-01

    The Sharda River creates and maintains the ecologically diverse remnant patches of rare Terai ecosystem in northern India. This study used repeat satellite imagery and geographic information system analysis to assess the planform dynamics along a 60 km length of the Sharda River between 1977 and 2001 to understand the altered dynamics and its plausible causes in this data-poor region. Analyses revealed that the Sharda River has undergone significant change corresponding to enhanced instability in terms of increased number of neck cut-offs and consistent occurrence of avulsions in subsequent shorter assessment periods. An increased channel area (8 %), decreased sinuosity (15 %), increased braiding intensity, and abrupt migrations were also documented. The river has migrated toward the east with its west bankline being more unstable. The maximum shifts were 2.85 km in 13 years (1977-1990), 2.33 km in next 9 years (1990-1999), and a substantial shift of 2.39 km in just 2 years (1999-2001). The altered dynamics is making the future of critical wildlife habitats in Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary and North Kheri Forest Division precarious and causing significant economic damage. Extensive deforestation and expansion of agriculture since the 1950s in the catchment area are presumed to have severely impacted the equilibrium of the river, which urgently needs a management plan including wildlife habitat conservation, control, and risk reduction. The present study provides a strong foundation for understanding channel changes in the Sharda River and the finding can serve as a valuable information base for effective management planning and ecological restoration.

  1. Sandhill crane roosts use, channel characteristics, and environmental variables along the Platte River, Nebraska, 2003-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Brandt, David; Krapu, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The central Platte River Valley represents a key mid-latitude stopover This dataset supports a contemporary analysis of nocturnal roost selection for sandhill cranes staging along the Platte River during 2003-2007. We explored variation in selection for previously established characteristics of roost sites, including river channel width, vegetation height along the river bank, and distance to nearest disturbance feature. This analysis also included novel environmental factors (yearly estimates of corn near roost sites, nightly temperature, wind speed, and river discharge) and how they may interact with the more established characteristics.

  2. Regulation of Sodium Channel Activity by Capping of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Shumilina, Ekaterina V.; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Morachevskaya, Elena A.; Hinssen, Horst; Khaitlina, Sofia Yu

    2003-01-01

    Ion transport in various tissues can be regulated by the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Specifically, involvement of actin dynamics in the regulation of nonvoltage-gated sodium channels has been shown. Herein, inside-out patch clamp experiments were performed to study the effect of the heterodimeric actin capping protein CapZ on sodium channel regulation in leukemia K562 cells. The channels were activated by cytochalasin-induced disruption of actin filaments and inactivated by G-actin under ionic conditions promoting rapid actin polymerization. CapZ had no direct effect on channel activity. However, being added together with G-actin, CapZ prevented actin-induced channel inactivation, and this effect occurred at CapZ/actin molar ratios from 1:5 to 1:100. When actin was allowed to polymerize at the plasma membrane to induce partial channel inactivation, subsequent addition of CapZ restored the channel activity. These results can be explained by CapZ-induced inhibition of further assembly of actin filaments at the plasma membrane due to the modification of actin dynamics by CapZ. No effect on the channel activity was observed in response to F-actin, confirming that the mechanism of channel inactivation does not involve interaction of the channel with preformed filaments. Our data show that actin-capping protein can participate in the cytoskeleton-associated regulation of sodium transport in nonexcitable cells. PMID:12686620

  3. Operation and Maintenance. 9-Foot Navigation Channel, Upper Mississippi River, Head of Navigation to Guttenberg, Iowa. Volume 1. Narrative.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    OF NAVIGATIO]TO GUTTENDMO*" IOWA . Volum I: Narrative DOCUMENT IDENTIFICATION IS ID DIITID ON STATMENT A Appuwv" Jg public rlan j)s<hj Unlio. m ited...NAVIGATION Final CHANNEL, UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER HEAD OF NAVIGATION 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER TO GUTTENBERG, IOWA . Volume I: Narrative 7. AUTHOR(a) S...depths for commercial navigation on the Mississippi River from Minneapolis, Minnesota to Guttenberg, Iowa . Also included is maintenance of 9-foot channel

  4. Mitigation of hazards from future lahars from Mount Merapi in the Krasak River channel near Yogyakarta, central Java

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ege, John R.; ,

    1983-01-01

    Procedures for reducing hazards from future lahars and debris flows in the Krasak River channel near Yogyakarta, Central Java, Indonesia, include (1) determining the history of the location, size, and effects of previous lahars and debris flows, and (2) decreasing flow velocities. The first may be accomplished by geologic field mapping along with acquiring information by interviewing local residents, and the second by increasing the cross sectional area of the river channel and constructing barriers in the flow path.

  5. Historic Geomorphic Adjustment and Restoration of Channel Morphology and Floodplain Connectivity on the Upper Truckee River, Lake Tahoe, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belby, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Lake Tahoe in California and Nevada of the United States is world renowned for its spectacular alpine setting and deep water clarity. Unfortunately, Lake Tahoe's water clarity has declined since measurements began in the 1960s due to increased atmospheric and watershed pollutant inputs of fine-grained minerals and phosphorous and nitrogen nutrients. The Upper Truckee River watershed drains 145 square kilometers and is the largest tributary in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Before the river empties into the lake, it flows through one of the largest meadows in the Sierra Nevada. Historically, the meadow stored fine-grained minerals and nutrients deposited by the river's near-annual floods, thus filtering pollutants and contributing to the maintenance of Lake Tahoe's water clarity. Multiple watershed-scale and direct channel disturbances over the past 150 years have degraded the river's geomorphic condition, resulting in channel incision, widening, and accelerated bank collapse. Field studies and modeling show the river currently has twice the in-channel flow capacity it did prior to degradation. As a result, the meadow floodplain is becoming increasingly hydrologically disconnected from the channel and now only receives overbank flows approximately once every five years. The severity of the channel degradation and loss of floodplain connectivity has led to the river's identification as a major contributor of pollutants detrimental to Lake Tahoe's water clarity. ENTRIX is working with federal, state, and local agencies to implement Upper Truckee River channel and floodplain restoration designs for projects that extend eleven kilometers through delta and meadow environments. The primary goals of the projects are to reduce suspended sediment and nutrient delivery to Lake Tahoe and to improve aquatic and riparian habitat. Construction on the first project to re-meander a channelized reach of the river and restore a floodplain began in summer 2008. This presentation focuses on

  6. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  7. UAV Measurement of the 2015 Large Flood Impact in Kinugawa River on Riverine Vegetation and Channel Form Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Inoue, Toshiya; Chigasaki, Yuka

    2016-04-01

    This presentation gives the results of field observation for a flood impact on riverine environment measured by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The flood we examined occurred on September 9-10, 2015 in Kinugawa River, Japan, owing to the heavy rainfall that brought tremendous volume of water on the Kanto and Tohoku regions of Japan. In Kinugawa River, the largest record flood occurred in this time, resulting in the levee failure and the corresponding flood disaster in Joso City located in the downstream part of Kinugawa River, as well as the large flood impact on the riverine environment in the Kinugawa channel network. In order to investigate the very initial state of the after-flood-impact throughout the channel network, 13 channel sections with 2 km in longitudinal length were chosen and observed in October 2015. Orthochromatic images of the river channel sections obtained by the UAV measurement with a geographic information system (GIS) were used for analyzing the changes in riverine vegetation distributions and channel form profiles. The results show that there exist three characteristic river segments having different impact-response states in vegetation and channel form changes. The river sections in the most upstream segment indicated severe damage of trees and herbs as well as large movement of gravel bed material, while those in the most downstream segment showed relatively small damage in vegetation distribution and small change in channel forms. Furthermore, relationships between the vegetation damage, channel deformation, channel slopes, and bed shear stresses calculated by a numerical simulation model were discussed in detail along the river network.

  8. Fast activation of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels of skeletal muscle. Multiple pathways of channel gating

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) receptors of the transverse tubule membrane play two roles in excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle: (a) they function as the voltage sensor which undergoes fast transition to control release of calcium from sarcoplasmic reticulum, and (b) they provide the conducting unit of a slowly activating L-type calcium channel. To understand this dual function of the DHP receptor, we studied the effect of depolarizing conditioning pulse on the activation kinetics of the skeletal muscle DHP-sensitive calcium channels reconstituted into lipid bilayer membranes. Activation of the incorporated calcium channel was imposed by depolarizing test pulses from a holding potential of -80 mV. The gating kinetics of the channel was studied with ensemble averages of repeated episodes. Based on a first latency analysis, two distinct classes of channel openings occurred after depolarization: most had delayed latencies, distributed with a mode of 70 ms (slow gating); a small number of openings had short first latencies, < 12 ms (fast gating). A depolarizing conditioning pulse to +20 mV placed 200 ms before the test pulse (-10 mV), led to a significant increase in the activation rate of the ensemble averaged-current; the time constant of activation went from tau m = 110 ms (reference) to tau m = 45 ms after conditioning. This enhanced activation by the conditioning pulse was due to the increase in frequency of fast open events, which was a steep function of the intermediate voltage and the interval between the conditioning pulse and the test pulse. Additional analysis demonstrated that fast gating is the property of the same individual channels that normally gate slowly and that the channels adopt this property after a sojourn in the open state. The rapid secondary activation seen after depolarizing prepulses is not compatible with a linear activation model for the calcium channel, but is highly consistent with a cyclical model. A six- state cyclical model is

  9. Reduced fine sediment flux and channel change in response to the managed diversion of an upland river channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, Matthew Thomas; Warburton, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a novel mitigation approach and subsequent adaptive management, designed to reduce the transfer of fine sediment (< 2 mm) in Glaisdale Beck, a small, predominantly upland catchment in the UK. Hydro-meteorological and suspended sediment data sets are collected over a 2-year period spanning pre- and post-diversion periods in order to assess the impact of the channel reconfiguration scheme on the fluvial suspended sediment dynamics. Analysis of the river response demonstrates that the fluvial sediment system has become more restrictive with reduced fine sediment transfer. This is characterized by reductions in flow-weighted mean suspended sediment concentrations from 77.93 mg L-1 prior to mitigation, to 74.36 mg L-1 following the diversion. A Mann-Whitney U test found statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) between the pre- and post-monitoring median suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs). Whilst application of one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) on the coefficients of sediment rating curves developed before and after the diversion found statistically significant differences (p < 0.001), with both Loga and b coefficients becoming smaller following the diversion. Non-parametric analysis indicates a reduction in residuals through time (p < 0.001), with the developed LOWESS model over-predicting sediment concentrations as the channel stabilizes. However, the channel is continuing to adjust to the reconfigured morphology, with evidence of a headward propagating knickpoint which has migrated 120 m at an exponentially decreasing rate over the last 7 years since diversion. The study demonstrates that channel reconfiguration can be effective in mitigating fine sediment flux in headwater streams but the full value of this may take many years to achieve whilst the fluvial system slowly readjusts.

  10. Channel morphodynamics and habitat recovery in a river reach affected by gravel-mining (River Ésera, Ebro basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Tarazon, J. A.; Lobera, G.; Andrés-Doménech, I.; Martínez-Capel, F.; Muñoz-Mas, R.; Vallés, F.; Tena, A.; Vericat, D.; Batalla, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Physical processes in rivers are the result of the interaction between flow regime and hydraulics, morphology, sedimentology and sediment transport. The frequency and magnitude of physical disturbance (i.e. bed stability) control habitat integrity and, consequently, ecological diversity of a particular fluvial system. Most rivers experience human-induced perturbations that alter such hydrosedimentary equilibrium, thus affecting the habitat of aquatic species. A dynamic balance may take long time to be newly attained. Within this context, gravel mining is well known to affect channel characteristics mostly at the local scale, but its effect may also propagate downstream and upstream. Sedimentary forms are modified during extraction and habitat features are reduced or even eliminated. Effects tend to be most acute in contrasted climatic environments, such as the Mediterranean areas, in which climatic and hydrological variability maximises effects of impacts and precludes short regeneration periods. Present research focuses on the evolution of a river reach, which has experienced an intense gravel extraction. The selected area is located in the River Ésera (Ebro basin), where interactions between morphodynamics and habitat recovery are examined. Emphasis is put on monitoring sedimentary, morphological and hydraulic variables to later compare pre (t0) and post (t1, t2... tn) extraction situations. Methodology for all time monitoring steps (i.e. ti) includes: i) characterization of grain size distribution at all of the different hydromorphological units within the reach; ii) description of channel morphology (together with changes before and after floods) by means of close-range aerial photographs, which are taken with a digital camera attached to a 1m3 helium balloon (i.e. BLIMP); and iii) determination of flow parameters from 2D hydraulic modelling that is based on detailed topographical data obtained from Leica® GNSS/GPS and robotic total station, and River

  11. Molecular mechanism of pharmacological activation of BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Guido; Cui, Yong-Mei; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Soom, Malle; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (Slo1 BK) channels serve numerous cellular functions, and their dysregulation is implicated in various diseases. Drugs activating BK channels therefore bear substantial therapeutic potential, but their deployment has been hindered in part because the mode of action remains obscure. Here we provide mechanistic insight into how the dehydroabietic acid derivative Cym04 activates BK channels. As a representative of NS1619-like BK openers, Cym04 reversibly left-shifts the half-activation voltage of Slo1 BK channels. Using an established allosteric BK gating model, the Cym04 effect can be simulated by a shift of the voltage sensor and the ion conduction gate equilibria toward the activated and open state, respectively. BK activation by Cym04 occurs in a splice variant-specific manner; it does not occur in such Slo1 BK channels using an alternative neuronal exon 9, which codes for the linker connecting the transmembrane segment S6 and the cytosolic RCK1 domain—the S6/RCK linker. In addition, Cym04 does not affect Slo1 BK channels with a two-residue deletion within this linker. Mutagenesis and model-based gating analysis revealed that BK openers, such as Cym04 and NS1619 but not mallotoxin, activate BK channels by functionally interacting with the S6/RCK linker, mimicking site-specific shortening of this purported passive spring, which transmits force from the cytosolic gating ring structure to open the channel's gate. PMID:22331907

  12. River restoration strategies in channelized, low-gradient landscapes of West Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.P.; Diehl, T.H.; Turrini-Smith, L. A.; Maas-Baldwin, J.; Croyle, Z.

    2009-01-01

    West Tennessee has a complex history of watershed disturbance, including agricultural erosion, channelization, accelerated valley sedimentation, and the removal and reestablishment of beaver. Watershed management has evolved from fl oodplain drainage via pervasive channelization to include local drainage canal maintenance and local river restoration. Many unmaintained canals are undergoing excessive aggradation and complex channel evolution driven by upland erosion and low valley gradient. The locus of aggradation in fully occluded canals (valley plugs) moves up-valley as sediment continues to accumulate in the backwater behind the plug. Valley plugs that cause canal avulsion can lead to redevelopment of meandering channels in less disturbed areas of the fl oodplain, in a process of passive self-restoration. Some valley plugs have brought restored fl oodplain function, reoccupation of extant historic river channels, and formation of a "sediment shadow" that protects downstream reaches from excess sedimentation. Despite the presence of numerous opportunities, there is presently no mechanism for including valley plugs in mitigation projects. In 1997 a survey of 14 reference reach cross sections documented relations between drainage area and bankfull geometry of relatively unmodified streams in West Tennessee. Reassessment of seven of those sites in 2007 showed that one had been dammed by beaver and that two sites could not be analyzed further because of signifi cant vertical or lateral instability. In contrast to other regions of North America, the results suggest that stream channels in this region fl ood more frequently than once each year, and can remain out of banks for several weeks each year. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  13. Geomorphic response to flow regulation and channel and floodplain alteration in the gravel-bedded Cedar River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.

    2012-01-01

    Decadal- to annual-scale analyses of changes to the fluvial form and processes of the Cedar River in Washington State, USA, reveal the effects of flow regulation, bank stabilization, and log-jam removal on a gravel-bedded river in a temperate climate. During the twentieth century, revetments were built along ~ 60% of the lower Cedar River's length and the 2-year return period flow decreased by 47% following flow regulation beginning in 1914. The formerly wide, anastomosing channel narrowed by over 50% from an average of 47 m in 1936 to 23 m in 1989 and became progressively single threaded. Subsequent high flows and localized revetment removal contributed to an increase in mean channel width to about 34 m by 2011. Channel migration rates between 1936 and 2011 were up to 8 m/year in reaches not confined by revetments or valley walls and less than analysis uncertainty throughout most of the Cedar River's length where bank armoring restricted channel movement. In unconfined reaches where large wood and sediment can be recruited, contemporary high flows, though smaller in magnitude than preregulation high flows, form and maintain geomorphic features such as pools, gravel bars, and side channels. Reaches confined by revetments remain mostly unmodified in the regulated flow regime. While high flows are important for maintaining channel dynamics in the Cedar River, their effectiveness is currently reduced by revetments, limited sediment supply, the lack of large wood available for recruitment to the channel, and decreased magnitude since flow regulation.

  14. Channel dynamics and habitat complexity in a meandering, gravel-bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L. R.; Legleiter, C. J.; Pecquerie, L.; Dunne, T.

    2009-12-01

    River channel dynamics play an important role in creating and maintaining diverse habitat conditions for multiple life stages of aquatic organisms. As a result, many river restoration projects seek to re-establish ecosystems in which an enhanced degree of habitat complexity is sustained through natural fluvial processes of flow, sediment transport, and channel change. Few field cases have effectively quantified the evolution of channel morphology and habitat complexity in restored rivers, however, and the outcomes of restoration actions remain difficult to predict. Our objective was to quantify the extent to which morphology, flow complexity and salmonid spawning and rearing habitat develop from the simplified initial conditions commonly observed in re-configured meandering channels. Using a time-series of topographic data, we measured rates of morphologic change in a recently restored gravel-bed reach of the Merced River, California, USA. We constructed two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic models to quantify how the evolving morphology influenced hydraulic conditions, flow complexity and suitability for Chinook salmon spawning and rearing. Following two large flood events, point bar development led to order-of-magnitude increases in modeled flow complexity, as quantified via the metrics of kinetic energy gradient, vorticity and hydraulic strain. On a bend-averaged scale, morphologic changes produced up to a two-fold increase in flow circulation, indicating a direct linkage between geomorphic processes and the development of habitat complexity at both the local (1.0 m2 grid cell) and meander wavelength scale. Habitat modeling indicated that the availability of Chinook salmon spawning habitat has increased over time, whereas the majority of the reach provides low-medium quality rearing habitat for juvenile salmonids, primarily due to a lack of low velocity refuge zones. These results demonstrate the ability of geomorphic processes to increase flow complexity and

  15. Air-Photograph Based Estimates of Channel Widening within the Minnesota River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterling, C.; Conway, J.; Graves, J.; Lauer, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Minnesota River is a major tributary of the Mississippi River that has experienced a roughly two-fold increase in mean April-November discharge over the past century. Because the Minnesota River supplies the majority of sediment to the Mississippi at the confluence, sediment sources within the basin, and in particular within the Le Sueur River sub-basin, have recently been the subject of several detailed sediment budget studies. One of the potential sediment sources is associated with channel widening. In the present study, we focus on channel widening as a potential source of sediment in the Minnesota, Little Cobb, Maple, Blue Earth, Le Sueur, Redwood, Cottonwood, and Watonwan Rivers, Minnesota. Using aerial photographs, changes in channel bankfull width were measured over the period from 1937 to 2009. Historic photographs were georeferenced to recent high-resolution imagery using a minimum of ten ground control points and a second order polynomial transformation in ArcGIS 9.3. Water surface width and the width between vegetation lines (which we take to be equivalent to the bankfull width) were determined by hand for representative reaches of a minimum of ten meander bends along each river. We chose to digitize by hand to avoid computer misclassification associated with the highly variable color spectra in the historic photographs and because this allowed us to visually interpolate the bank line where scattered overhanging vegetation partially obscured the banks. In general, bankfull width has increased steadily by between 20 and 50 percent over the period of photographic record. However, because our basic method focuses only on the vegetation line, it is possible in principle that the observed changes in width are primarily related to ecological change (i.e. to a change in the elevation at which vegetation colonizes the banks) and not directly to an increase in channel volume (and hence to a net export of sediment from these reaches). To determine whether the

  16. Geomorphic Classification and Evaluation of Channel Width and Emergent Sandbar Habitat Relations on the Lower Platte River, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a summary of geomorphic characteristics extracted from aerial imagery for three broad segments of the Lower Platte River. This report includes a summary of the longitudinal multivariate classification in Elliott and others (2009) and presents a new analysis of total channel width and habitat variables. Three segments on the lower 102.8 miles of the Lower Platte River are addressed in this report: the Loup River to the Elkhorn River (70 miles long), the Elkhorn River to Salt Creek (6.9 miles long), and Salt Creek to the Missouri River (25.9 miles long). The locations of these segments were determined by the locations of tributaries potentially significant to the hydrology or sediment supply of the Lower Platte River. This report summarizes channel characteristics as mapped from July 2006 aerial imagery including river width, valley width, channel curvature, and in-channel habitat features. In-channel habitat measurements were not made under consistent hydrologic conditions and must be considered general estimates of channel condition in late July 2006. Longitudinal patterns in these features are explored and are summarized in the context of the longitudinal multivariate classification in Elliott and others (2009) for the three Lower Platte River segments. Detailed descriptions of data collection and classification methods are described in Elliott and others (2009). Nesting data for the endangered interior least tern (Sternula antillarum) and threatened piping plover (Charadrius melodus) from 2006 through 2009 are examined within the context of the multivariate classification and Lower Platte River segments. The widest reaches of the Lower Platte River are located in the segment downstream from the Loup River to the Elkhorn River. This segment also has the widest valley and highest degree of braiding of the three segments and many large vegetated islands. The short segment of river between the Elkhorn River and Salt Creek has a fairly low valley

  17. Landscape evolution due to river incision in active mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavé, L.; Attal, A.

    2003-04-01

    It is commonly accepted that fluvial network incision control the local base level for hillslopes and therefore controls the rate of landscape denudation, and thus the way the landscape will respond to tectonic or climatic forcings. For that reason, many studies have focused for the last ten years in quantifying fluvial incision rates and the mechanisms of fluvial incision into bedrock. In many morphotectonic settings the shear stress model has been widely used and provided satisfactory first order description of the river incision in active mountains. Across the Siwaliks range in front of the Himalaya, the shear stress model (that also includes bedload mean pebble size and explicit channel width variations), provides a good proxy to estimate incision and uplift rate, that can be measured independently from fluvial terraces studies. By transposition and after calibration to more resistant crystalline lithologies, this model helped to define the incision rate profiles across the whole Himalayan ranges. These profiles were found coherent with current seismotectonic model, sediment budget, fluvial terrace studies and geochronology results. More importantly, the incision model was found to provide good results in two other active regions: across the Nanga Parbat massif in Pakistan, and in the San Gabriel Ranges in California, with only minor required changes of the erodibility coefficient despite very different hydroclimatic setting. However, this semi-empirical model is not mechanically satisfying: in many settings, river bedload fluxes exert an important control on incision rates, by limiting bedrock exposure or by providing an efficient tool for river mechanical abrasion. A reappraisal of the former examples as thus conducted in order to test different models including the role of sediment fluxes. General results and models will be first discussed in light of their physical consistency with field and experimental data on pebble and bedrock abrasion, and second in

  18. Nature Impact of Channel Planform Change of the river Khowai, Tripura, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Sunando; de, Sunil Kumar; Saha, Sushmita

    2010-05-01

    The Chattagram-Tripura Fold Belt (CTFB) is a relatively young region of deformation developed in an arc-trench setting and may be viewed as westward extension of the more matured Indo-Burman Ranges. The Tripura State occupies the northern part of the CTFB and consists of five major ridges (250~950 m) with progressively higher elevation towards the east. The four intervening synclinal valleys mostly drain north or south. Khowai is one of such rivers that flow between Baramura and Atharamura anticlines. To evaluate the nature and impact of channel planform change of the river Khowai during the last 78 years, we georeferenced and mosaiced six obtainable Survey of India maps of 1932-33 and 1974-75 besides satellite images of 1975 (Landsat-2 MSS), 2001 (Landsat-7 ETM+) and 2009 (IRS-P6 L3+L4-mono). A Corona photograph of 1962 was also available for a part of the study area. From these materials, channels of different survey or imaging years were extracted and superposed. Preliminary results indicate that the Khowai markedly lowered its width-depth ratio and sinuosity—from 2.58 to 1.55—in its alluvial / floodplain reaches between 1932-33 and 1974-75, irrespective of deforested or wooded areas. Its path length reduced by 60 percent. Over the same period, variation in the constricted mountainous reaches of the river was only minor. A number of wetlands associated with the river shrunk or disappeared. Oral histories from the region strongly support these map- or image-based observations. With the absence of any record of significant increase in precipitation or occurrence of earthquake in Tripura since the early 20th century, this region-wide shift in channel patterns points to tectonic control and signals initiation of a new phase of uplift in the northern CTFB. Human inventions may also have some contribution to the change.

  19. Composition and source apportionment of PAHs in sediments at river mouths and channel in Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di; Tu, Yao-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-eight sediment samples were collected in 2009 from the bottom of river mouths near Kaohsiung Harbor (Taiwan) and the harbor channel for the analyses of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Concentrations of total PAHs varied from 39 to 30,521 ng g(-1) (dry weight); samples collected from the mouths of Love River, Canon River, Jen-Gen River, and Salt River showed the highest PAHs concentrations. This indicates that the major sources of sediment PAHs come from those polluted urban rivers and the harbor channel. In samples collected from the Salt River mouth, approximately 43% of the PAHs are identified as PAHs with 2 or 3 rings. However, samples collected from other locations contain predominantly PAHs with 4 rings (32 to 42%) or 5 and 6 rings (36 to 44%). Emissions from traffic-related sources and waste incineration contribute to the majority of PAHs found in most channel and river mouth sediments. However, coal/oil combustion is the main cause of high concentrations of PAHs observed in the Salt River mouth sediments. Principal component analyses with multivariate linear regression (PCA/MLR) have been used to further quantify the source contributions, and the results show that the contributions of coal/oil combustion, traffic-related and waste incineration are 37%, 33% and 30%, respectively.

  20. Assessment of dam impacts on sediment dynamics and channel geometry in complex anthropogenic systems: feedbacks from comparative study of the Sacramento and the Ain Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollet, A. J.; Piégay, H.; Michalkova, M.; Kondolf, G. M.

    2009-04-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the complexity of river adjustments downstream dams (Williams and Wolman, 1984; Brandt, 2000; Petts and Gurnell, 2005), depending on many parameters such catchment geology context (Grant et al., 2003), land use, pre-dam sediment supply and transport regime, degree of hydrologic alteration (Church, 1995; Schmidt and Wilcock, 2008), and dam characteristics and operation (Brewer and Lewin, 1998). Dam impact is particularly difficult to evaluate in river systems where human pressures are old and manifold, and where dam-induced impacts can be compounded by other human influences, such as in-channel aggregate mining (Kondolf 1997). In such cases, it may be challenging to sort out the causal links between dam-induced disruptions and resulting channel adjustment. To illustrate these problems, we introduce two complex case studies, the Ain (France) and Sacramento (California) Rivers, both freely meandering rivers regulated since mid-20th century, whose sedimentary and morphologic dynamic have been modified in different ways since the end of the 19th century. Dam impacts can be distinguished from the effects of other factors such as floodplain disconnection by flood-control infrastructure, land-use changes, and artificial meander-bend cutoff. The Ain River evinces a significant sediment deficit, which results in bed degradation, decrease in area of gravel bars , and reduced lateral channel migration. As a result, sediment supply is reduced not only from trapping by upstream reservoirs but also by reduced bank erosion. In the case of the Sacramento, the impact of the dam is not as clear as on the Ain due to major effects of prior pressures on the channel. Using aerial imagery and field measurements (grain-size measurements…), we led a spatiotemporal study of several morphologic parameters (active channel narrowing, gravel bar areas …) to underline the relative contribution of dams to the contemporary channel evolution. These analyses are

  1. Quantifying Channel Morphology Changes in Response to the Removal of the Glines Canyon Dam, Elwha River, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Free, B. J.; Ely, L. L.; Hickey, R.; Flake, R.; Baumgartner, S.

    2014-12-01

    The removal of two dams on the Elwha River, Washington, is the largest dam-removal project in history. Our research documents the sediment deposition, erosion, and channel changes between the dams following the initial sediment release from the removal of the upstream Glines Canyon Dam. Within the first year following the dam removal, the pulse of coarse sediment and large woody debris propagated downstream well over 6 km below the dam. The sediment deposition and altered channel hydraulics caused lateral channel migration where anabranching channels merge around new mid-channel bars and at large bends in the river channel. Documenting the river channel response to this exceptional sediment pulse could improve models of the impacts of future dam removals on similar gravel-bed rivers. We quantified the sediment flux and channel changes at four field sites 2-6 km downstream of Glines Canyon Dam. Topographic changes were surveyed with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) on an annual basis from August 2012 - August 2014 and the surface sediment distribution was quantified with bimonthly sediment counts. Differencing the annual TLS data yielded an overall increase in sediment throughout the study reach, with a minimum of 20,000 m3 of deposition on bars and banks exposed above the water surface in each 700-m-long TLS survey reach. The surface sediment distribution decreased from ~18 cm to < 1 mm. Large woody debris transported downstream from the former reservoir contributed to the formation of new sand and gravel bars along the channel margin at two sites as well as the longitudinal growth of several bars throughout the study area. The new bar formations have continued to propagate downstream as new sediment and woody debris have been added and remobilized, increasing the complexity of the river channel. By spring 2013, channel features that were present before the dam removal began to re-emerge due to the remobilizing of sediment through the system.

  2. Recent morphological changes in the Mekong and Bassac river channels, Mekong delta: The marked impact of river-bed mining and implications for delta destabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Anthony, Edward J.; Goichot, Marc; Provansal, Mireille; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The Mekong delta, in Vietnam, is the world's third largest delta. Densely populated, the delta has been significantly armoured with engineering works and dykes to protect populations and infrastructure from storms, and shrimp farms from saltwater intrusion. Considerable development pressures in Vietnam and in the upstream countries have resulted in the construction of several dams in China and in important channel-bed aggregate extractions especially in Cambodia. The effects of these developments impact the delta dynamics in various ways. In this study, changes in the channel morphology of the Mekong proper and the Bassac, the two main distributaries in the 250 km-long deltaic reach from the Cambodian border to the coast, were analysed using channel depth data for 1998 and 2008. The channels display important and irregular bed changes over the 10-year comparison period, including significant incision and expansion and deepening of numerous pools. The mean depth of both channels increased by more than 1.3 m. Both channels also showed correlative significant bed material losses: respectively 90 million m3 in the Mekong and 110 million m3 in the Bassac over the 10-year period. These important losses over a relatively short period, and weak correlations between bed incision and hydraulic parameters suggest that the marked morphological changes are not in equilibrium with flow and sediment entrainment conditions, and are therefore not related to changes in river hydrology. We claim that aggregate extraction, currently practised on a very large scale in the Mekong delta channels and upstream of the delta, is the main cause of these recent morphological changes. These changes are deemed to contribute actively to rampant bank erosion in the delta as well as to erosion of the Mekong delta shoreline. Other contributory activities include the numerous dykes and embankments. The role of existing dams in bed losses remains unclear in the absence of reliable data on the Mekong

  3. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-05

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action.

  4. Hypoglycemia-activated K+ channels in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Tromba, C; Salvaggio, A; Racagni, G; Volterra, A

    1992-08-31

    Channels linking the electrical and metabolic activities of cells (KATP channels) have been described in various tissues, including some brain areas (hypothalamus, cerebral cortex and substantia nigra). Here we report the existence in hippocampal neurons of K+ permeant channels whose activity is regulated by extracellular glucose. They are open at the cell resting potential and respond to transient hypoglycemia with a reversible increase in activity. The one type so far characterized has a conductance of approximately 100 pS in isotonic K+, is inhibited by the sulphonylurea glibenclamide (1 microM), and is activated by the potassium channel opener lemakalim (0.1-1 microM). These data provide a direct demonstration of the presence, in hippocampal neurons, of glucose-sensitive channels that could belong to the KATP family.

  5. Control of Sediment Availability on the Path of Channel Recovery in Bedload-Dominated Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, H.; Renshaw, C. E.; Magilligan, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    Following a disturbance, a channel can recover to an equilibrium form by adjusting its slope, width, depth, grain size, or some combination of these dimensions that define the recovery path. In this study we relate the channel recovery path to the quantity and caliber of sediment introduced due to dam construction/removal or erosion caused by flooding. We suggest that the recovery path of a channel depends on the availability of sediment of a size that is transported as bedload during bankfull flows (the "mobile fraction"). We define a ratio, S*, of the sediment volume added to the channel because of the disturbance to the average annual sediment flux. We compare S* values to the recovery path of New England gravel-bedded streams following two dam emplacements and removals and flooding related to Tropical Storm Irene. Pelham Dam in Pelham, MA (removed 2012) and Kendrick Dam in Pittsford, VT (removed 2014) were on similar streams: drainage areas ~25 km2, slopes 1-2%, and bankfull widths ~10 m. Sediment was excavated from both impoundments prior to removal, resulting in lower S* values. Irene-affected study sites are on ~10 gravel-bedded streams in VT, NH, and MA. Sediment input at these sites is due to bank failures and landslides, many of which continue to supply sediment to the channel four years after flooding. To track recovery we collected annual topographic and sediment size data and calculated Shields numbers to determine if channels had reached an equilibrium form. We define equilibrium for bedload rivers as Shields numbers at bankfull discharge equal to that required to initiate bedload transport. Following dam emplacements the channels failed to recover because mobile sediment was unavailable. Fining dominated the recovery at Irene-affected sites (~10% reduction in sediment size) and dam removal sites (up to 30-60% reduction) with little post-disturbance change in channel geometry, possibly due to the limited mobile fraction.

  6. Historical and simulated changes in channel characteristics of the Kalamazoo River, Plainwell to Otesgo, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rachol, Cynthia M.; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Rossi, Tiffiny

    2005-01-01

    In a study to understand the historical effects of the construction and decommissioning of dams on the Kalamazoo River, Plainwell to Otesgo, Michigan, and to simulate channel changes that may result if the dams were removed, early to mid-1800s General Land Office surveys and aerial photographs from 1938, 1981, and 1999 were compared in order to identify historical changes in the river’s planform. This analysis of the 80-mile reach from Morrow Dam to the river mouth at Saugatuck provided insight into how susceptible the river has been to channel migration. The comparison showed that changes in channel width and location were caused mainly by construction of dams and subsequent water-level adjustments in the impounded reaches upstream from the dams. Braiding also occurred downstream from one of the dams. Minor changes in channel form that were not caused by the dams, such as the development and cutoff of meander bends, were observed. A more detailed study in a 5-mile reach passing through the Plainwell and Otsego City Dams included compiling existing valley cross section and longitudinal profile data into a database, assessing bank stability, and using a hydrologic model to simulate the channel as if the dams were removed. Fifty-four valley cross sections compiled from United States Geological Survey and consultant data sets were used as a base for a bank-stability assessment and to design a hypothetical stable channel without the two dams. The channel design involved adjusting the slope, hydraulic geometry, and floodplain width to ensure that water could be transferred through the reach without increasing flooding or erosion problems. The bank-stability assessment focused on conditions that are critical to failure. This was accomplished through the use of a two step process. The first involved evaluating the sediment removed from the bank toe when the stage is high. The second involved calculating the factor of safety for the bank based on the water table being

  7. Differences in ichthyofauna feeding habits among lateral lagoons and the river channel in a large reservoir.

    PubMed

    Ferrareze, M; Nogueira, M G; Casatti, L

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated differences in feeding habits of small-sized ichthyofauna among lateral lagoons and the river channel in a large reservoir. The study was performed in four lagoons and in one sampling site of the main channel in Rosana Reservoir, Paranapanema River, Brazil. The samples were taken in September and November of 2004 and in January, March, May, and August of 2005. Fish were sampled with a 7.5 m2 hand net. Five manual throws were made toward aquatic macrophytes stands. The sampling design favored the collection of small-sized fish fauna (juveniles/small-sized species). The stomach contents of 42 species were analyzed. A total of 183 different items were consumed by fish. These items were grouped in 11 food categories, which were used to classify fish into seven trophic guilds. Aquatic insects were consumed by 32 species and were the predominant feeding item. In the river, the most consumed items were aquatic insects, cladocerans, and phytoplankton, whereas in the lagoons aquatic insects, copepods, and cladocerans were the main items. By comparing each trophic guild, the number of insectivores, algivores, and zooplanktivores species was higher in the lagoons than in the river, and the opposite was found only for omnivore fish. Low niche width in all sites indicates high trophic specialization and low niche overlap between pairs of species. Fish assemblage in the lateral lagoons presents feeding habits distinct from those of the river species, indicating that the coexistence and high abundance of small-sized fish in the sampling sites are explained by their high feeding adaptability, which includes a tendency toward dietary specialization, low feeding overlap, and resource partitioning, along with different temporal resource uses.

  8. The geomorphological characteristics of the Mekong River in northern Cambodia: A mixed bedrock-alluvial multi-channel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkova, Liubov V.; Carling, Paul A.

    2012-04-01

    The controls on the development of channel morphology of bedrock-constrained rivers are poorly known. The relative importance of lithological and structural control on channel alignment and character in comparison with the role of hydraulic erosion of the substratum is unclear. In addition, bedrock rivers often have a variable sediment fill and can be described as mixed bedrock-alluvial systems. The Mekong River in northern Cambodia is an anastomosed mixed bedrock-alluvial channel, but little and poorly researched. In this paper information has been gathered from diverse literature sources; digital data sets showing topography, hydrology, geology and land cover; past aerial photographs; and maps. Such data, together with field survey, provide a clear picture of the Mekong River in this region. The channels may be classified into three types: primary, secondary, cross channels. The varying characteristics of these three help towards understanding the evolution of the modern Mekong. Similarly the two-fold classification of the islands reveals the relationship between island inundation characteristics and the annual monsoon flood cycle. The associated riparian vegetation ecotones include a rare and unusual seasonally-inundated forest. Spatial variations in lithology and structure, when combined with maps of river networks, reveals that the channel alignments locally reflect the geological factors that cause the regional topographical gradient. Fault-line constraints on the local slopes of the channel may induce backwater effects and consequent sedimentation patterns (alluvial overprints) or alternatively, steepening of the channels with concomitant reduction in sedimentation. These structural constraints, taken together, lead to the identification of a mixed bedrock-alluvial five-fold geomorphological zonation within the study area. The general absence of paleochannels, and terraces close to the modern river, indicates that the Mekong is laterally stable with a

  9. Equilibrium Cross-section for River Channel with Cohesive Erodible Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francalanci, S.; Lanzoni, S.; Macovei, D.; Solari, L.

    2012-12-01

    Bank erosion processes represent an important factor in driving planform changes, meander development and channel width adjustments in alluvial rivers. Recent literature of the last decade has shown that bank retreat process often involves combination of fluvial erosion and mass wasting, giving important contribution to the amount of sediment delivered downstream. In particular fluvial (or hydraulic) erosion involves the removal of bank materials by the direct erosive action of the flow, and it is one on the triggering factors of mass wasting such that the long-term rate of bank retreat is controlled by the rate of hydraulic erosion at the toe. A theoretical framework is here proposed to investigate the equilibrium cross-section in a river channel with cohesive erodible bank: the equilibrium width and the near-bank shear stress are predicted, given the channel and bank roughness characterization and the hydraulic variables which define the flow in the central region (slope, discharge, depth at bankfull condition). In this approach the solution for the flow obtained with a simple 1D model is coupled with a theoretical model to derive the boundary shear stress. The Kean and Smith (2006) model, which predicts the flow over the irregular bank topography that is characteristic of fine-grained riverbanks, provides a means to partition the form and skin drag components of bank boundary shear stress and thus determine the extent to which form drag influences bank erosion rates and channel equilibrium width. In this work, the hydraulic bank erosion rates are quantified using an excess shear stress formula; hence, the river channel is supposed to widen if the banks are unstable under the given hydraulic conditions, while the shape of the bank profile is conserved. The procedure is repeated until the equilibrium width associated with stable bank is reached. The results showed that form roughness induced by bank topographic features is a major component of the spatially

  10. How are River Discharge - Suspended Sediment Relations Influenced by Watershed and Channel-Floodplain Morphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, A. A.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Erosion, transport and deposition of fine sediment (clay, silt and fine sand) influence the form and function of river systems. Excess suspended sediment degrades stream ecosystems and is implicated as a leading cause of water quality and aquatic life impairment. Consequently, understanding the factors that control fine sediment transport regimes is an interesting topic for basic science and one that has important management and policy implications. Fine sediment is mostly transported in suspension as a non-capacity load; transport rates are dependent on sediment supply in addition to a river's transport capacity. Many studies have investigated watershed-scale topographic, hydrologic, climatic, and land use influences on fine sediment erosion and transport regimes. Several recent studies in a wide range of landscapes have demonstrated that the majority of suspended sediment may be sourced from the near-channel environment; therefore, near-channel morphological characteristics may provide better predictive power compared to watershed averages. This study analyzes recent total suspended solids (TSS) data from 45 gages on 35 separate rivers. The rivers span the state of Minnesota, draining basins ranging from 33 km2 to 68100 km2 with distinct settings in terms of topography, land cover, hydrology and geologic history. We generate rating curves of the form TSS = aQb, where Q is normalized discharge and a and b are parameters that describe the shape of the relations. Values of a range from 4 to 138 mg/L; b values range from -0.53 to 1.86. We use high resolution lidar topography data to characterize the near-channel environment upstream of gages. In addition to commonly studied metrics describing the topographic, climatic/hydrologic and land use setting of the basin, we extract near-channel morphometrics that we hypothesize to influence fine sediment generation and transport: the difference in height of banks/bluffs (a measure of the amount of material available to be

  11. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of River Channel Migration on the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta: 2000-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, C.; Chiu, S.; Sousa, D.; Mondal, D. R.; Steckler, M. S.; Akhter, S. H.; Mia, B.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Wilson, C.; Seeber, L.

    2014-12-01

    We use multitemporal multiscale satellite remote sensing to complement field observations and subsurface measurements to better understand the relationship between recent and historic fluvial dynamics on the Ganges-Brahmaputra (GB) delta. To provide regional context for the interannual changes in river channel geometry we conduct spatiotemporal (ST) analyses of MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) imagery for 2000-2013 using a new method of Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis. We use EVI because it distinguishes water from wet and dry sediment on the basis of the spectral slope at VNIR wavelengths. Water has a negative slope while dry sediment has a small positive slope and vegetation has a large positive slope. To characterize the ST patterns associated with river channel migration we use iterative EOF analysis (iEOF). In iEOF we first conduct a single year EOF analysis for each year in the time series to identify the primary spatial principal component (PC1) for each year and separate this from the spatial structure of the subannual temporal patterns associated with vegetation phenology. We then construct a decadal time series of PC 1 for each single year and conduct a second EOF analysis of the time series of 13 individual year PCs. The standard EOFs of the full (312 images x 16 day) time series only resolve a decadal trend (EOF 8), but the iEOF clearly distinguishs the progressive decadal trend (EOF 2) from the cyclic component (EOF 3) of decadal changes in sediment reflectance. The temporal feature space constructed from PC 2 and PC 3 (corresponding to temporal EOFs 2 and 3) distinguishes pixels with progressive decadal increases and decreases in reflectance from pixels with cyclic changes. Evolution of the annual structure is animated at www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM1UYvdnYXk Despite significant differences in the 2 rivers'morphologies, and the considerable magnitude of flooding every year, we observe year-to-year continuity in the progressive

  12. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  13. Flow-activated ion channels in vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Gojova, Andrea; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-01-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to fluid mechanical forces associated with blood flow is essential for flow-mediated vasoregulation and arterial wall remodeling. Abnormalities in endothelial responses to flow also play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Although our understanding of the endothelial signaling pathways stimulated by flow has greatly increased over the past two decades, the mechanisms by which ECs sense flow remain largely unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is among the fastest known endothelial responses to flow; therefore, these ion channels have been proposed as candidate flow sensors. This review focuses on: 1) describing the various types of flow-sensitive ion channels that have been reported in ECs, 2) discussing the implications of activation of these ion channels for endothelial function, and 3) proposing candidate mechanisms for activation of flow-sensitive ion channels.

  14. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  15. Channel morphodynamics in four reaches of the Lower Missouri River, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Reuter, Joanna M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Channel morphodynamics in response to flow modifications from Gavins Point Dam are examined in four reaches of the Lower Missouri River. Measures include changes in channel morphology and indicators of sediment transport in four 6 kilometer long reaches located downstream from Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, Kenslers Bend, Nebraska, Little Sioux, Iowa, and Miami, Missouri. Each of the four reaches was divided into 300 transects with a 20-meter spacing and surveyed during the summer in 2006 and 2007. A subset of 30 transects was randomly selected and surveyed 7-10 times in 2006-07 over a wide range of discharges including managed and natural flow events. Hydroacoustic mapping used a survey-grade echosounder and a Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System to evaluate channel change. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements were used to evaluate bed-sediment velocity. Results indicate varying amounts of deposition, erosion, net change, and sediment transport in the four Lower Missouri River reaches. The Yankton reach was the most stable over monthly and annual time-frames. The Kenslers Bend and Little Sioux reaches exhibited substantial amounts of deposition and erosion, although net change was generally low in both reaches. Total, or gross geomorphic change was greatest in the Kenslers Bend reach. The Miami reach exhibited varying rates of deposition and erosion, and low net change. The Yankton, Kenslers Bend, and Miami reaches experienced net erosion during the time period that bracketed the managed May 2006 spring rise event from Gavins Point Dam.

  16. Small Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias and up-regulation of SK channels in heart failure (HF) in animal models and human HF. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both anti-arrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review will provide an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and to serve as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic target in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible pro-arrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations. PMID:25956967

  17. SLO2 Channels Are Inhibited by All Divalent Cations That Activate SLO1 K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Budelli, Gonzalo; Sun, Qi; Ferreira, Juan; Butler, Alice; Santi, Celia M; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Two members of the family of high conductance K(+)channels SLO1 and SLO2 are both activated by intracellular cations. However, SLO1 is activated by Ca(2+)and other divalent cations, while SLO2 (Slack or SLO2.2 from rat) is activated by Na(+) Curiously though, we found that SLO2.2 is inhibited by all divalent cations that activate SLO1, with Zn(2+)being the most effective inhibitor with an IC50of ∼8 μmin contrast to Mg(2+), the least effective, with an IC50of ∼ 1.5 mm Our results suggest that divalent cations are not SLO2 pore blockers, but rather inhibit channel activity by an allosteric modification of channel gating. By site-directed mutagenesis we show that a histidine residue (His-347) downstream of S6 reduces inhibition by divalent cations. An analogous His residue present in some CNG channels is an inhibitory cation binding site. To investigate whether inhibition by divalent cations is conserved in an invertebrate SLO2 channel we cloned the SLO2 channel fromDrosophila(dSLO2) and compared its properties to those of rat SLO2.2. We found that, like rat SLO2.2, dSLO2 was also activated by Na(+)and inhibited by divalent cations. Inhibition of SLO2 channels in mammals andDrosophilaby divalent cations that have second messenger functions may reflect the physiological regulation of these channels by one or more of these ions.

  18. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  19. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F; Weiger, Thomas M

    2015-08-17

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences.

  20. Experiments in dam removal, sediment pulses and channel evolution on the Clark Fork River, MT and White Salmon River, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Two recent dam removals on tributaries to the Columbia River in the northwestern United States present contrasting examples of how dam removal methods, reservoir contents, and geomorphic settings influence system responses. The 2008 removal of Milltown Dam, from the Clark Fork River (CFR), Montana, and the 2011 removal of Condit Dam from the White Salmon River (WSR), Washington (Table 1), represent two of the largest dam removals to date. The Milltown Dam removal was notable because the dam stored millions of cubic meters of contaminated mine tailings, a portion of which were excavated as part of Superfund remediation but a portion of which flowed downstream after the removal. On the CFR, post-breach high flows in 2008 produced reservoir erosion and downstream deposition in bed interstices, along bars, and on the floodplain, but above-average (3-15 year recurrence interval) floods since then have remobilized this material and have, to a large extent, erased signs of downstream sedimentation. The Condit Dam removal entailed dynamiting of a 4m by 5.5m hole at the base of the dam, which produced rapid and dramatic draining of fine reservoir sediments within hours of the blast. Downstream of Condit Dam, the initial hyperconcentrated flows and sediment pulse draped the WSR with fine sediment, filled pools, and, in an unconfined reach influenced by the Columbia River's backwater, caused meters of aggradation and new bar formation. In the confined, bedrock-dominated reach downstream of the Condit site, pool-riffle structure has started to reemerge as of summer 2012 and the finest bed materials have been evacuated from the main channel, although sediment storage in pools and eddies persists. Whereas post-breach geomorphic responses on the CFR have been largely driven by hydrology, the post-breach evolution of the WSR has been predominantly influenced by antecedent geomorphic conditions (slope, confinement, and Columbia River backwater). On both the CFR and WSR, the pace of

  1. Floodplain deposits, channel changes and riverbank stratigraphy of the Mekong River area at the 14th-Century city of Chiang Saen, Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Spencer H.; Ziegler, Alan D.; Bundarnsin, Tharaporn

    2008-10-01

    Riverbank stratigraphy and paleochannel patterns of the Mekong River at Chiang Saen provide a geoarchaeological framework to explore for evidence of Neolithic, Bronze-age, AD 5th Century Yonok and AD 14-16th Century Lan Na Cultures. Typical bank stratigraphy charted on the Thailand side is imbricate cobble gravel overlain by 5-10 m of reddish-brown sandy silt. The silt section is composed chiefly of 1/2 to 2-m thick layers of massive silt without paleosols interpreted as near-channel floodplain and gently-inclined levee deposits laid down by episodic, infrequent, large floods. The surface soil is dark-brown clay loam (< 1-m thick) with abundant brick fragments, pottery shards and charcoal of Lan Na time. Brick ruins of 14-16th Century Buddhist temples are crumbling into the river at Chiang Saen Noi, and formerly did so at Chiang Saen until banks were stabilized by rock walls. Bank retreat from river erosion has been > 20 m since Lan Na time, and has exposed a silt-filled moat. A radiocarbon age of 1475 cal yr AD was obtained from charcoal at the bottom of the moat, beneath 5.6 m of silt. Lag material from erosion of the silt banks contains Neolithic and Bronze Age artifacts out of stratigraphic context, as well as ceramics and bricks of Lan Na age. These artifacts as well Neolithic artifacts obtained from a 1972 excavation near the mouth of the Kham River indicate long human habitation of this riverbank area. In northern Thailand the Mekong is mostly in a bedrock canyon, but shifting topography along the active strike-slip Mae Chan fault has formed the upstream 2-5-km wide floodplain at Chiang Saen, and downstream has diverted the river into a broad S-shaped loop in the otherwise straight course of the river. A 1.7-Ma basalt within the bedrock channel 45-km downstream of Chiang Saen indicates little vertical incision by the river. Satellite images show former channels in the Chiang Saen area, meander-point-bar scrolls (radii of curvature > 1.2 km), and floodplain

  2. Investigating the Performance of One- and Two-dimensional Flood Models in a Channelized River Network: A Case Study of the Obion River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyanapu, A. J.; Dullo, T. T.; Thornton, J. C.; Auld, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Obion River, is located in the northwestern Tennessee region, and discharges into the Mississippi River. In the past, the river system was largely channelized for agricultural purposes that resulted in increased erosion, loss of wildlife habitat and downstream flood risks. These impacts are now being slowly reversed mainly due to wetland restoration. The river system is characterized by a large network of "loops" around the main channels that hold water either from excess flows or due to flow diversions. Without data on each individual channel, levee, canal, or pond it is not known where the water flows from or to. In some segments along the river, the natural channel has been altered and rerouted by the farmers for their irrigation purposes. Satellite imagery can aid in identifying these features, but its spatial coverage is temporally sparse. All the alterations that have been done to the watershed make it difficult to develop hydraulic models, which could predict flooding and droughts. This is especially true when building one-dimensional (1D) hydraulic models compared to two-dimensional (2D) models, as the former cannot adequately simulate lateral flows in the floodplain and in complex terrains. The objective of this study therefore is to study the performance of 1D and 2D flood models in this complex river system, evaluate the limitations of 1D models and highlight the advantages of 2D models. The study presents the application of HEC-RAS and HEC-2D models developed by the Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), a division of the US Army Corps of Engineers. The broader impacts of this study is the development of best practices for developing flood models in channelized river systems and in agricultural watersheds.

  3. Flow structure and channel morphodynamics of meander bend chute cutoffs: A case study of the Wabash River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, Jessica A.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Best, James L.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2013-12-01

    paper documents the three-dimensional structure of flow and bed morphology of two developing chute cutoffs on a single meander bend on the lower Wabash River, USA, and relates the flow structure to patterns of morphologic change in the evolving cutoff channels. The upstream end of the cutoff channels is characterized by: (1) a zone of flow velocity reduction/stagnation and bar development in the main channel across from the cutoff entrance, (2) flow separation and bar development along the inner (left) bank of the cutoff channel immediately downstream from the cutoff entrance, and (3) helical motion and outward advection of flow momentum entering the cutoff channel, leading to erosion of the outer (right) bank of the cutoff channel. At the downstream end of the cutoff channels, the major hydrodynamic and morphologic features are: (1) flow stagnation along the bank of the main channel immediately upstream of the cutoff channel mouth, (2) convergence of flows from the cutoff and main channels, (3) helical motion of flow from the cutoff, (4) a zone of reduced velocity along the bank of the main channel immediately downstream from the cutoff channel mouth, and (5) development of a prominent bar complex that penetrates into the main channel and extends from the stagnation zone upstream to downstream of the cutoff mouth. These results provide the basis for a conceptual model of chute-cutoff dynamics in which the upstream and downstream ends of a cutoff channel are treated as a bifurcation and confluence, respectively.

  4. Chlorpromazine confers neuroprotection against brain ischemia by activating BKCa channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Juan; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Zhou, Li; Han, Feng; Wang, Ming-Yan; Xue, Mao-Qiang; Qi, Zhi

    2014-07-15

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) is a well-known antipsychotic drug, still widely being used to treat symptoms of schizophrenia, psychotic depression and organic psychoses. We have previously reported that CPZ activates the BKCa (KCa1.1) channel at whole cell level. In the present study, we demonstrated that CPZ increased the single channel open probability of the BKCa channels without changing its single channel amplitude. As BKCa channel is one of the molecular targets of brain ischemia, we explored a possible new use of this old drug on ischemic brain injury. In middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) focal cerebral ischemia, a single intraperitoneal injection of CPZ at several dosages (5mg/kg, 10mg/kg and 20mg/kg) could exert a significant neuroprotective effect on the brain damage in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, blockade of BKCa channels abolished the neuroprotective effect of CPZ on MCAO, suggesting that the effect of CPZ is mediated by activation of the BKCa channel. These results demonstrate that CPZ could reduce focal cerebral ischemic damage through activating BKCa channels and merits exploration as a potential therapeutic agent for treating ischemic stroke.

  5. Effects of human activities on the ecological processes of river biofilms in a highly urbanized river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, R.; Li, M.

    2013-12-01

    Many anthropogenic disturbances and their effects of aquatic ecosystem are difficult to quantify in urbanized rivers. In past, specific taxa analysis of community structure was a common approach in river health monitoring studies. However, it is still difficult to understand stream ecosystem integrity without considering ecosystem processes. The complex species composition and metabolism of a river biofilm have the capacity to interact and/or modulate their surrounding environment. Because of their short life cycles, species richness, and worldwide distribution, structure and function of river biofilm communities are sensitive to change in environmental conditions. Therefore, biofilms are widely used as early warning systems of water pollution for water quality monitoring studies. In this study, we used river biofilms as a bioindicator by examining their extracellular enzyme activities and photosynthesis efficiency to understand human activities on the ecological processes of river ecosystem in a highly urbanized river. We sampled four sites along the Keelung River, Taiwan, based on different intensities of anthropogenic disturbances including water pollution index, population densities, land use types and types of stream habitats. Two study sites are heavily influenced by human activities and the others are not. The activities of extracellular enzymes within the biofilm play an important function for organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling. We measured seven extracellular enzyme activities (β-d-glucosidase, phosphatase, leucine-aminopeptidase, sulfatase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and esterase) to examine specific enzyme activity changes at four study sites monthly. In addition, relative proportion of each extracellular enzyme activity on total enzyme activities was calculated in order to examine the relationship between functional biofilm profiles and different urban intensities. Among four study sites, leucine-aminopeptidase and esterase

  6. From meander bend to oxbow lake: flow, channel morphology and sedimentology of an evolving chute cutoff on the Wabash River, IL-IN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, J. A.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J. L.; Johnson, K.

    2012-12-01

    Chute channels develop on meandering rivers in a wide variety of environments, and in many cases result in bend cutoff and formation of an oxbow lake. During the transition from active meander bend to oxbow lake, the chute channel and original bend create a paired bifurcation-confluence unit. Here, we present field documentation of the evolving flow structure within a recent chute cutoff on the Wabash River, IL-IN, focusing on the bifurcation located on the upstream limb of the original bend. Previous studies indicate that this is the location of greatest sedimentation rates prior to complete plugging of the bend (e.g. Shields & Abt, 1989). We seek to isolate the fundamental processes causing rapid sedimentation in the upstream limb of the bend, using repeated hydroacoustic measurements of bed elevation and three-dimensional flow velocity at several key cross-sections. We also employ differential GPS surveys of channel banklines, analysis of aerial photographs and sampling of sediment on exposed bars at low flow, to aid interpretations of the cross-sectional data. This paper will detail the co-evolution of flow structure and channel morphology at this site and examine the coherent patterns of erosion and deposition responsible for oxbow lake formation. Reference: Shields, FD; Abt, SR (1989). Sediment deposition in cutoff meander bends and implications for effective management. Regulated Rivers: Research & Management 4, 381-396.

  7. Flow-induced activation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels stimulates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel causing membrane hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung-Kuy; Kim, Ji-Hee; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-12-01

    TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels are expressed in distal renal tubules and play important roles in the transcellular Ca(2+) reabsorption in kidney. They are regulated by multiple intracellular factors including protein kinases A and C, membrane phospholipid PIP2, protons, and divalent ions Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). Here, we report that fluid flow that generates shear force within the physiological range of distal tubular fluid flow activated TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels expressed in HEK cells. Flow-induced activation of channel activity was reversible and did not desensitize over 2min. Fluid flow stimulated TRPV5 and 6-mediated Ca(2+) entry and increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. N-glycosylation-deficient TRPV5 channel was relatively insensitive to fluid flow. In cells coexpressing TRPV5 (or TRPV6) and Slo1-encoded maxi-K channels, fluid flow induced membrane hyperpolarization, which could be prevented by the maxi-K blocker iberiotoxin or TRPV5 and 6 blocker La(3+). In contrast, fluid flow did not cause membrane hyperpolarization in cells coexpressing ROMK1 and TRPV5 or 6 channel. These results reveal a new mechanism for the regulation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels. Activation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 by fluid flow may play a role in the regulation of flow-stimulated K(+) secretion via maxi-K channels in distal renal tubules and in the mechanism of pathogenesis of thiazide-induced hypocalciuria.

  8. Flow-Induced Activation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 Channel Stimulates Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel Causing Membrane Hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seung-Kuy; Kim, Ji-Hee; Huang, Chou-Long

    2014-01-01

    TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels are expressed in distal renal tubules and play important roles in the transcellular Ca2+ reabsorption in kidney. They are regulated by multiple intracellular factors including protein kinase A and C, membrane phospholipid PIP2, protons, and divalent ions Ca2+ and Mg2+. Here, we report that fluid flow that generates shear force within the physiological range of distal tubular fluid flow activated TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels expressed in HEK cells. Flow-induced activation of channel activity was reversible and did not desensitize over 2 minutes. Fluid flow stimulated TRPV5 and 6-mediated Ca2+ entry and increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration. N-glycosylation-deficient TRPV5 channel was relatively insensitive to fluid flow. In cells coexpressing TRPV5 (or TRPV6) and Slo1-encoded maxi-K channels, fluid flow induced membrane hyperpolarization, which could be prevented by the maxi-K blocker iberiotoxin or TRPV5 and 6 blocker La3+. In contrast, fluid flow did not cause membrane hyperpolarization in cells coexpressing ROMK1 and TRPV5 or 6 channels. These results reveal a new mechanism for regulation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels. Activation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 by fluid flow may play a role in the regulation of flow-stimulated K+ secretion via maxi-K channels in distal renal tubules and in the mechanism of pathogenesis of thiazide-induced hypocalciuria. PMID:24001793

  9. The Impact of Rainstorm Stochasticity on Hillslope Sediment Supply to River Channels in Dryland Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, K.; Singer, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Climate interacts with hillslopes supplying sediment to river channels, and impacting drainage basin functioning and evolution. In particular, coarse sediment supply from hillslopes exerts a strong control on channel bed material grain-size distributions (GSD) which feeds back on bedload flux and consequently affects long-term rates of valley incision/aggradation. However, process-based understanding of sediment supply from hillslopes is poorly constrained because it is spatially and temporally variable as a result of interactions between rainstorm attributes (frequency, intensity, duration, size) and hillslope characteristics within a basin (length, gradient, infiltration rates, GSD). Drylands are particularly sensitive to climatic forcing because they are subjected to infrequent, short-lived, but high intensity rainfall events, which are spatially-variable and often smaller than the basin area. These climatic factors coupled with thin, stony soils typical of drylands, produce dynamic and variable sediment supply to channels, with a high proportion of coarse material that remains in channel beds over long timescales. Currently there is limited understanding of how variability and nonstationarity in regional climate affect hillslope sediment supply to valley floors in dryland basins. In these landscapes, the discrete and spatially variable nature of convective rainstorms and other catchment characteristics create challenges for deterministic modelling of the interaction between climate and sediment transport. Here we represent climate as a stochastic process characterized by probability density functions of storm properties (total annual rainfall, location, size, duration, peak rainfall intensity). This stochastic driver is coupled to a physics-based hillslope sediment transport model in order to investigate the decadal impact of climatic variability on longitudinal hillslope coarse (> 2 mm) sediment supply (flux and GSD) to a mainstem channel within a 170 km2

  10. Changes to channel sediments resulting from complex human impacts in a gravel-bed river, Polish Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiejska, Joanna; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Hajdukiewicz, Hanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Mikuś, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    During the second half of the twentieth century, many sections of the Czarny Dunajec River, Polish Carpathians, were considerably modified by channelization as well as gravel-mining and the resultant channel incision (up to 3.5 m). This paper examines changes to the longitudinal pattern of grain size and sorting of bed material in an 18-km-long river reach. Surface bed-material grain size was established on 47 gravel bars and compared with a reference downstream fining trend of bar sediments derived from the sites with average river width and a vertically stable channel. Contrary to expectations, the extraction of cobbles from the channel bed in the upper part of the study reach, conducted in the past decades, has resulted in the marked coarsening of bed material in this river section. The extraction facilitated entrainment of exposed finer grains and has led to rapid bed degradation, whereas the concentration of flood flows in the increasingly deep and narrow channel has increased their competence and enabled a delivery of the coarse particles previously typical of the upstream reach. The middle section of the study reach, channelized to prevent sediment delivery to a downstream reservoir, now transfers the bed material flushed out from the incising upstream section. With considerably increased transport capacity of the river and with sediment delivery from bank erosion eliminated by bank reinforcements, bar sediments in the channelized section are typified by increased size of the finer fraction and better-than-average sorting. In the wide, multi-thread channel in the lower part of the reach, low unit stream power and high channel-form roughness facilitate sediment deposition and are reflected in relatively fine grades of bar gravels. The study showed that selective extraction of larger particles from the channel bed leads to channel incision at and upstream of the mining site. However, unlike bulk gravel mining, selective extraction does not result in sediment

  11. Chloride dependence of hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel gates

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Michael; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Stein, Valentin; Jentsch, Thomas J

    1999-01-01

    ClC proteins are a class of voltage-dependent Cl− channels with several members mutated in human diseases. The prototype ClC-0 Torpedo channel is a dimeric protein; each subunit forms a pore that can gate independently from the other one. A common slower gating mechanism acts on both pores simultaneously; slow gating activates ClC-0 at hyperpolarized voltages. The ClC-2 Cl− channel is also activated by hyperpolarization, as are some ClC-1 mutants (e.g. D136G) and wild-type (WT) ClC-1 at certain pH values.We studied the dependence on internal Cl− ([Cl−]i) of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of several ClC channels (WT ClC-0, ClC-0 mutant P522G, ClC-1 mutant D136G and an N-terminal deletion mutant of ClC-2), by patch clamping channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.With all these channels, reducing [Cl−]i shifted activation to more negative voltages and reduced the maximal activation at most negative voltages.We also investigated the external halide dependence of WT ClC-2 using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Reducing external Cl− ([Cl−]o) activated ClC-2 currents. Replacing [Cl−]o by the less permeant Br− reduced channel activity and accelerated deactivation.Gating of the ClC-2 mutant K566Q in normal [Cl−]o resembled that of WT ClC-2 in low [Cl−]o, i.e. channels had a considerable open probability (Po) at resting membrane potential. Substituting external Cl− by Br− or I− led to a decrease in Po.The [Cl−]i dependence of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of various ClC channels suggests a similar gating mechanism, and raises the possibility that the gating charge for the hyperpolarization-activated gate is provided by Cl−.The external halide dependence of hyperpolarization-activated gating of ClC-2 suggests that it is mediated or modulated by anions as in other ClC channels. In contrast to the depolarization-activated fast gates of ClC-0 and ClC-1, the absence of Cl− favours channel opening. Lysine 556 may be important

  12. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  13. Fault control of channel sandstones in Dakota Formation, southwest Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.R.

    1983-08-01

    The Dakota Formation is an important oil reservoir in the southwestern Powder River basin and adjoining Casper arch. Two fields, Burke Ranch and South Cole Creek, are used as examples to show the depositional environments of the Dakota and to indicate the influence of tectonic control on the distribution of the environments. Burke Ranch field is a stratigraphic trap which produces oil from the upper bench of the Dakota. The environment of deposition of the reservoir, determined by subsurface analysis, is a channel sandstone. South Cole Creek field is a structural-stratigraphic trap which produces from the lower bench of the Dakota. Two distinct facies, a channel and channel margin sandstone, exist at South Cole Creek. At both Burke Ranch and South Cole Creek it can be shown that the Dakota channels were deposited on the downthrown side of faults, which were present during Dakota time and which now are reflected on the surface by drainage patterns. An understanding of the environments of deposition of the Dakota and control of the environments by paleotectonics is necessary for exploration for these prolific reservoirs.

  14. Relationship among fish assemblages and main-channel-border physical habitats in the unimpounded Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barko, V.A.; Herzog, D.P.; Hrabik, R.A.; Scheibe, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    Large rivers worldwide have been altered by the construction and maintenance of navigation channels, which include extensive bank revetments, wing dikes, and levees. Using 7 years of Long-Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) data collected from the unimpounded upper Mississippi River, we investigated assemblages in two main-channel-border physical habitats-those with wing dikes and those without wing dikes. Fishes were captured using daytime electrofishing, mini-fyke netting, large hoop netting, and small hoop netting. Our objectives were to (1) assess associations among fish species richness, physical measurements, and main-channel-border physical habitats using stepwise multiple regression and indicator variables; (2) identify abundant adult and young-of-year (age-0) families in both physical habitats to further investigate assemblage composition; and (3) calculate standardized species richness estimates within each physical habitat for adult and age-0 fishes to provide additional information on community structure. We found species richness was greater at wing dikes for both adult and age-0 fishes when compared with main channel borders. Stepwise multiple regression revealed significant relationships between adult species richness and passive gear deployment (e.g,, hoop nets and mini-fyke nets), physical habitat type, and river elevation, as well as interactions between physical habitat and passive gears, and physical habitat and transparency (i.e., Secchi depth). This model explained 56% of the variance in adult species richness. Approximately 15% of the variation in age-0 species richness was explained by the sample period, sample date, transparency, physical habitat, and depth of gear deployment. Long-term impacts of river modifications on fishes have not been well documented in many large river systems and warrant further study. The findings from this study provide baseline ecological information on fish assemblages using main channel borders in the

  15. Investigation of channel morphology in a restored river/floodplain interconnection at the embanked Danube between Neuburg and Ingolstadt (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Peter; Haas, Florian; Heckmann, Tobias; Stammel, Barbara; Cyffka, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    The Upper part of the Danube was straightened and embanked since the mid of the 19th century and flows between dikes without any contact to its floodplain. Additionally, since the 1970ies hydropower stations are influencing the river continuity and the ground water level of the floodplain negatively. The presented investigations are part of a floodplain restoration project that aims to bring back new dynamics to the floodplain, like water, groundwater and morphological features, as the key processes for floodplain habitats and species.They give a drive to enliven the natural processes in the riparian areas. This project ("Remediation of riparian areas on the Danube floodplain between Neuburg and Ingolstadt", Germany) takes place in a project area of 2.100 hectares of riparian forests. The project consists of two major parts - A permanent flow of water (up to 5 m3/s) bypassing the dam of the power station. The new river will develop on the floodplain partly following old oxbows, but partly eroding its way naturally in the new modelled channel. - Controlled flooding (up to 30 m3/s) of parts of the floodplain during peak discharge of the Danube (600-1.100 m3/s; statistically one to three times a year) The project, conducted by the Bavarian Water Authority, will start at the beginning of February 2010. The Floodplain Institute Neuburg and the Department of Physical Geography of the Catholic University of Eichstaett together with some other Institutes established a comprehensive monitoring program including vegetation, fauna, hydrological and morphological data. This monitoring program is founded by the BfN (Federal Agency for Nature Conservation). From the beginning of the flooding a new morphological activity will start which might be self sustaining or self cumulative. For example the new river banks are prone to lateral erosion and new undercut slopes will develop. The transport, erosion and deposit of sediment will depend on the outflow which is man-controlled and

  16. A 100 ka record of fluvial activity in the Fitzroy River Basin, tropical northeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croke, Jacky; Jansen, John D.; Amos, Kathryn; Pietsch, Timothy J.

    2011-06-01

    This study reports the nature and timing of Quaternary fluvial activity in the Fitzroy River basin, which drains a diverse 143,000 km 2 area in northeastern Queensland, before discharging into the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. The catchment consists of an extensive array of channel and floodplain types that we show have undergone large-scale fluvial adjustment in-channel planform, geometry and sinuosity. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of quartz sediments from fifteen (3-18 m) floodplain cores throughout the basin indicates several discrete phases of active bedload activity: at ˜105-85 ka in Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5, at ˜50-40 ka (MIS 3), and at ˜30-10 ka (MIS 3/2). The overall timing of late Quaternary fluvial activity correlates well with previous accounts from across Australia with rivers being primarily active during interstadials. Fluvial activity, however, does not appear to have been synchronous throughout the basin's major sub-catchments. Fluvial activity throughout MIS 2 (i.e. across the Last Glacial Maximum) in the meandering channels of the Fitzroy correlates well with regional data in tropical northeastern Queensland, and casts new light on the river response to reduced rainfall and vegetation cover suggested by regional palaeoclimate indicators. Moreover, the absence of a strong Holocene signal is at odds with previous accounts from elsewhere throughout Australia. The latitudinal position of the Fitzroy across the Tropic of Capricorn places this catchment at a key location for elucidating the main hydrological drivers of Quaternary fluvial activity in northeastern Australia, and especially for determining tropical moisture sources feeding into the headwaters of Cooper Creek, a major river system of the continental interior.

  17. Toward a unifying model of malaria-induced channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Bouyer, Guillaume; Egée, Stéphane; Thomas, Serge L. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Infection of RBC by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum activates, at the trophozoite stage, a membrane current 100- to 150-fold larger than in uninfected RBC. This current is carried by small anion channels initially described in supraphysiological ion concentrations (1.115 M Cl−) and named plasmodial surface anion channels (PSAC), suggesting their plasmodial origin. Our results obtained with physiological ion concentrations (0.145 M Cl−) support the notion that the parasite-induced channels represent enhanced activity versions of anion channels already present in uninfected RBCs. Among them, an 18-pS inwardly rectifying anion channel (IRC) and a 4- to 5-pS small conductance anion channel (SCC) were present in most single-channel recordings of infected membranes. The aim of this study was to clarify disparities in the reported electrophysiological data and to investigate possible technical reasons why these discrepancies have arisen. We demonstrate that PSAC is the supraphysiological correlate of the SCC and is inhibited by Zn2+, suggesting that it is a ClC-2 channel. We show that in physiological solutions 80% of the membrane conductance in infected cells can be accounted for by IRC and 20% can be accounted for by SCC whereas in supraphysiological conditions the membrane conductance is almost exclusively carried by SCC (PSAC) because the IRC is functionally turned off. PMID:17576926

  18. The use of extremal hypotheses as a means of predicting alluvial channel dimensions for river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranmer, A.; Goodwin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In designing fluvial infrastructure and restoration projects the question often arises, what are the cross sectional characteristics of width, depth, roughness, and slope necessary to ensure no net aggradation or degradation occurs within a given reach of river? Current fluvial design utilizes empirical and numerical methods to calculate the required slope and geometry of alluvial channels; however, no solution has been proposed that fully incorporates the necessary 3-dimensional mechanics of open channels due to the complicated processes and feedbacks that occur during mobile bed conditions. This is further compounded by numerous local geologic constraints and perturbations that must be considered, which interrupt the evolution towards a balance of deposition and erosion, or the condition of dynamic-equilibrium. However, given the moderate success of power law relations, such as regime theory and hydraulic geometry, it is evident self-organizing processes are present in watersheds that scale channel size and sinuosity to some average condition in order to maintain a balance of fluid and sediment flux from the upstream catchment. Extremal hypotheses have been developed as an alternative to solving the reach scale 3-dimensional conservation laws for fluid and sediment, to provide a first order means of predicting channel dimensions in an objective and reproducible manner. This study evaluates the performance of extremal hypotheses in identifying the trend towards dynamic-equilibrium over unique spatial gradients in 2 gravel-bed river systems. Using a location-for-time-substitution approach, extremal hypotheses were examined over a longitudinal gradient of channel evolution towards reaches found to be near equilibrium in an unconfined, transport-limited river in the undisturbed rain forest of Chilean Patagonia and a supply-limited, semi-confined canyon system in Central Idaho, USA. Field data from these two sites imply alluvial systems attempt to minimize their

  19. Three-dimensional flow dynamics of an active submarine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, E. J.; Dorrell, R. M.; Peakall, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Wynn, R.

    2012-12-01

    Field scale submarine channel gravity currents are notoriously difficult to measure and thus directly investigate due to their inaccessible location and infrequent nature, which is compounded by present sea-level high-stand. An exception to this is the almost continuous density-driven current that results from the inflow of saline Mediterranean water, via the Bosporus strait, into the Black Sea. This flow has carved a sinuous channel system in water depths of 70 to 120 m. The relatively shallow depths of the channel and the continuous nature of this current provide a rare opportunity to study three-dimensional flow dynamics and the interaction of the flow with a seafloor channel network. Thus, it provides a rare analogue for channelized dilute sediment-laden turbidity currents. Sediment erosion, transport and deposition within submarine channel bends is primarily controlled by the magnitude and direction of near bed flow. Flow around channel bends is characterized by a helical or spiralling structure. In rivers this helical flow is characterized by near-surface fluid moving toward the outer bank and near-bed fluid moving toward the inner bank. Following fierce debate over the last decade, it is now accepted that helical flow in submarine channel bends can display a variety of complex structures. Most importantly for understanding sediment transport, near bed flow can be directed towards the outer bank, which is in the opposite sense to in a river. The next challenge is to understand what the exact controls on the orientation of helical flow cells within submarine flows are, and their spatial evolution around bends. We present data from the Black Sea showing how the three-dimensional velocity and density of a submarine gravity current evolves at multiple cross sections as the flow travels around a bend. We use this data to calculate the magnitude, relative importance and interaction of centrifugal, coriolis and pressure gradients in controlling the structure of

  20. Channel morphology and bed-sediment characteristics before and after riparian vegetation clearing in the Cottonwood Ranch, Platte River, Nebraska, water years 2001-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Heckman, Ashley K.

    2006-01-01

    Riparian areas along a reach of Platte River passing through Nebraska Public Power District's Cottonwood Ranch Property were modified during 2002 to 2004 to enhance in-channel habitats for endangered and threatened avian species. A component of this alteration involved the removal of riparian vegetation from riverbanks and islands to provide roosting habitat for the endangered whooping crane and to provide nesting and foraging habitat for the endangered least tern and threatened piping plover. It was hypothesized that the removal of riparian vegetation could have the effect of stimulating channel widening in this reach by increasing the potential of these surfaces to erode under natural fluvial action. It also was hypothesized that as a direct or indirect consequence of the alterations, a local increase in sediment supply also might occur, potentially resulting in geomorphic change downstream and possibly initiating negative third-party effects. The cumulative effects of the management activities on the channel morphology and sediment transport in this reach were monitored during water years 2001-2004 by measuring transect elevation profiles and bed-sediment-size gradations upstream, within, and downstream from the managed area before and after the development activities. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to determine if the geomorphic variables measured before and after the development activities were significantly different. Although statistically significant differences were detected in some of the variables, increases in mean bed elevation did not occur in a greater percentage of the monitoring sections measured downstream compared to upstream from the management activities. This result suggests that the management activities did not have a substantial effect on the downstream river channel morphology and sediment transport. However, it is important to place these short-term and site-specific results in the context that river flows following the

  1. Effective contractile response to voltage-gated Na+ channels revealed by a channel activator.

    PubMed

    Ho, W-S Vanessa; Davis, Alison J; Chadha, Preet S; Greenwood, Iain A

    2013-04-15

    This study investigated the molecular identity and impact of enhancing voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(V)) channels in the control of vascular tone. In rat isolated mesenteric and femoral arteries mounted for isometric tension recording, the vascular actions of the Na(V) channel activator veratridine were examined. Na(V) channel expression was probed by molecular techniques and immunocytochemistry. In mesenteric arteries, veratridine induced potent contractions (pEC(50) = 5.19 ± 0.20, E(max) = 12.0 ± 2.7 mN), which were inhibited by 1 μM TTX (a blocker of all Na(V) channel isoforms, except Na(V)1.5, Na(V)1.8, and Na(V)1.9), but not by selective blockers of Na(V)1.7 (ProTx-II, 10 nM) or Na(V)1.8 (A-80347, 1 μM) channels. The responses were insensitive to endothelium removal but were partly (~60%) reduced by chemical destruction of sympathetic nerves by 6-hydroxydopamine (2 mM) or antagonism at the α1-adrenoceptor by prazosin (1 μM). KB-R7943, a blocker of the reverse mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (3 μM), inhibited veratridine contractions in the absence or presence of prazosin. T16A(inh)-A01, a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel blocker (10 μM), also inhibited the prazosin-resistant contraction to veratridine. Na(V) channel immunoreactivity was detected in freshly isolated mesenteric myocytes, with apparent colocalization with the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Veratridine induced similar contractile effects in the femoral artery, and mRNA transcripts for Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels were evident in both vessel types. We conclude that, in addition to sympathetic nerves, NaV channels are expressed in vascular myocytes, where they are functionally coupled to the reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, causing contraction. The TTX-sensitive Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels are likely involved in vascular control.

  2. Quantifying sediment distribution and channel changes following removal of the Glines Canyon Dam, Elwha River, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Free, B.; Ely, L. L.; Bountry, J.; Ritchie, A. C.; Erwin, S.

    2013-12-01

    The ongoing removal of two dams on the Elwha River, Washington, beginning in 2011, is the largest dam-removal project in history. Our research quantifies sediment deposition and channel changes in the reach between the dams during the removal of the upstream Glines Canyon Dam. After the initial release in October 2012, the sediment transport and deposition throughout our study reach has had a dynamic effect on channel and bar morphology. Multiple methods were used to quantify the changes in the morphology of the channel and gravel bars. Detailed topographic surveys using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), and total station bathymetric surveys began before the initial sediment release and were repeated one year later to quantify changes in sediment volume and distribution. Monthly surface pebble counts and photo documentation were used to quantify changes in surface grain-size distribution and the effects of the influx of sediment and woody debris on the channel morphology. We measured changes in channel morphology and grain-size distribution at four field sites located 2 - 6 km downstream of Glines Canyon Dam. In the first two months following the initial sediment release, the mean sediment size on the surface of the channel bars abruptly decreased from approximately 18 cm to < 1mm due to rapid burial by new sediment. Large woody debris transported downstream from the former reservoir has caused new sand and gravel bars to form along the channel margin at two of our study sites, as well as the longitudinal growth of 5 - 10 bars throughout the study area. The copious amount of sediment transported through the system since October 2012 also created new mid-channel bars at all four field sites. In some locations, the formation, growth and merging of bars has effectively narrowed the river channel, causing it to migrate laterally and erode the bank. The initial sediment deposition has started eroding at the downstream end of some of the new bars since May 2013. This

  3. Channel properties of the splicing isoforms of the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 2.

    PubMed

    Ponissery Saidu, Samsudeen; Stephan, Aaron B; Talaga, Anna K; Zhao, Haiqing; Reisert, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    Anoctamin (ANO)2 (or TMEM16B) forms a cell membrane Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel that is present in cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, vomeronasal microvilli, and photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Alternative splicing of Ano2 transcripts generates multiple variants with the olfactory variants skipping exon 14 and having alternative splicing of exon 4. In the present study, 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis was conducted to characterize the 5' end of olfactory Ano2 transcripts, which showed that the most abundant Ano2 transcripts in the olfactory epithelium contain a novel starting exon that encodes a translation initiation site, whereas transcripts of the publically available sequence variant, which has an alternative and longer 5' end, were present in lower abundance. With two alternative starting exons and alternative splicing of exon 4, four olfactory ANO2 isoforms are thus possible. Patch-clamp experiments in transfected HEK293T cells expressing these isoforms showed that N-terminal sequences affect Ca(2+) sensitivity and that the exon 4-encoded sequence is required to form functional channels. Coexpression of the two predominant isoforms, one with and one without the exon 4 sequence, as well as coexpression of the two rarer isoforms showed alterations in channel properties, indicating that different isoforms interact with each other. Furthermore, channel properties observed from the coexpression of the predominant isoforms better recapitulated the native channel properties, suggesting that the native channel may be composed of two or more splicing isoforms acting as subunits that together shape the channel properties.

  4. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  5. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, M H; Spalding, E P

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition. PMID:8755616

  6. Influence of flow regime and channel morphology on larval drift and dispersion in a large regulated river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, S.; Jacobson, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Larval drift is a critical phase of ontogenetic development for many species of lotic fishes. Downstream advection and dispersion of passively drifting larvae or eggs is controlled by the complex interaction of flow regime, channel planform, local channel morphology, and the resulting hydraulic gradients. In many regulated rivers, channel engineering and perturbations to the flow regime may disrupt natural drift processes and impact successful recruitment of native fishes. Here we explore the influence of flow regime and channel morphology on the downstream transport, dispersion, and retention of Pallid Sturgeon larvae, an endangered species endemic to the Mississippi River basin and the focus of significant conservation effort on the Missouri River. The transition from drifting free embryo to exogenously feeding larvae has been identified as a potential life stage bottleneck for the Pallid Sturgeon. Previous studies have indicated that river regulation and fragmentation may contribute to mortality of larval Pallid Sturgeon by reducing the extent of free-flowing river required by free embryos to complete the transition to exogenous feeding. Additionally, channelization may have increased the rate at which larvae are advected downstream out of the Missouri River basin. We describe the complex interactions and influence of morphologic and hydraulic factors on larval drift using an extensive library of hydroacoustic data collected along more than 1300 km of the Lower Missouri River. We use a one-dimensional advection-dispersion model to estimate total drift distance and employ the longitudinal dispersion coefficient as a measure to quantify the tendency towards dispersion or retention of passively drifting larvae in geomorphically distinct segments of river. We use a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to evaluate the sensitivity of drift and dispersion to in-channel navigation structures and flood hydrology. Based on insights gained from the analysis of field data and

  7. Collateral response to activation of potassium channels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lamping, K G

    1998-04-01

    Activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels is involved in the coronary vascular response to decreases in perfusion pressure and ischemia. Since activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in collateral vessels may be important in determining flow to collateral-dependent myocardium, the ability of collaterals to respond to activation of the channel was tested. In the beating heart of dogs, we compared responses of non-collaterals less than 100 microns in diameter to collaterals of similar size using computer-controlled stroboscopic epi-illumination of the left ventricle coupled to a microscope-video system. Aprikalim, a selective activator of ATP-sensitive K+ channels (0.1-10 microM) produced similar dose-dependent dilation of non-collaterals and collaterals. Relaxation was decreased by inhibition of ATP-sensitive K+ channels with glibenclamide, but not by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with nitro-L-arginine. Bradykinin (10-100 microM) produced similar dilation of non-collaterals and collaterals which was decreased by nitro-L-arginine but not glibenclamide. Thus, in microvascular collaterals, relaxation to both nitric oxide and activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels is similar to non-collaterals.

  8. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7522329

  9. Role of river bends for the formation and evolution of channel bedforms: Combined field studies and numerical modeling from the tidally influenced zones of the Yellow River, China, and Mississippi River, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Moodie, A.; Calson, B.; Parker, G.

    2015-12-01

    River bedforms represent the unstable interface between fluid flow and the granular channel bed, and these features play an important role for modifying flow resistance and sediment transport rates, and thus influencing river morphology. Although widely observed in natural rivers, bedforms are difficult to measure quantitatively and are rarely connected to other fluvial morphological processes. This study presents high-resolution channel bathymetric data from the tidally influenced, lowermost Yellow River, China, collected using a multibeam swath profiler. Repeat surveys were conducted over rising and flood discharge conditions, which is the first such kind of survey in Yellow River. The bathymetry data show that for all water discharges, a flat bed, devoid of a thalweg or dunes, persists within straight-reach segments near the bends of the Yellow River, despite the bed consisting of fine sand. Interestingly, in bend segments, the channel deepens, and linear dunes develop. Moreover, as the water discharge increases over time, the edge of dune field contained in the bend segments propagates into the adjacent upstream and downstream straight-reach segments. In contrasting case study, Nittrouer et al. (2008) reported persistent dune field in the straight reaches of the tidally influenced Mississippi River; however these dunes disappear in neighboring river bends. Based on the two cases of the Yellow and Mississippi Rivers, which have fundamentally different conditions of water-to-sediment discharge ratios, the threshold condition of bedform formation and stability are evaluated, and connected to local conditions of river bend morphology. This work improves the understanding of the co-evolution of bedforms and flow conditions in river bends, which are intertwined and important morphological processes that affect fluvial-deltaic sediment transport dynamics. In addition, the straight-bend structure is a basic element of river morphology, and so the results of this study

  10. Fixed-mass multifractal analysis of river networks and braided channels.

    PubMed

    De Bartolo, Samuele G; Primavera, Leonardo; Gaudio, Roberto; D'Ippolito, Antonino; Veltri, Massimo

    2006-08-01

    A fixed-mass multifractal (FMA) analysis was used to investigate natural river networks and braided channels. In particular, while the study of natural river networks was performed with fixed-size algorithms (FSAs) in the past, the analysis of natural braided channels was not pursued before to our knowledge. Results showed the multifractal and non-plane-filling nature of all the digitalized data sets. Analysis of the digitalization step (constant or not) was performed and showed that it does not exert a strong influence on the assessed values of the Lipschitz-Hölder exponents and the support dimensions, even if a constant step permits better reconstruction of the right sides of the spectra, for negative moment orders of probabilities. The FMA approach presented two improvements with respect to the FSA one, in terms of oscillations of the scaling curves for negative moment orders of probabilities and of error bars. A more precise assessment of the multifractal spectra is of great importance in the development of multifractal models for the simulation of flood hydrographs.

  11. Estimated Entrainment of Dungeness Crab During Dredging For The Columbia River Channel Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H.; Williams, Greg D.; Skalski, John R.

    2002-12-01

    The studies reported here focus on issues regarding the entrainment of Dungeness crab related to the proposed Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and provided direct measurements of crab entrainment rates at three locations (Desdomona Shoals, Upper Sands, and Miller Sands) from RM4 to RM24 during summer 2002. Entrainment rates for all age classes of crabs ranged from zero at Miller Sands to 0.224 crabs per cy at Desdemona Shoals in June 2002. The overall entrainment rate at Desdomona Shoals in September was 0.120 crabs per cy. A modified Dredge Impact Model (DIM) used the summer 2002 entrainment rates to project crab entrainment and adult equivalent loss and loss to the fishery for the Channel Improvement Project. To improve the projections, entrainment data from Flavel Bar is needed. The literature, analyses of salinity intrusion scenarios, and the summer 2002 site-specific data on entrainment and salinity all indicate that bottom salinity influences crab distribution and entrainment, especially at lower salinities. It is now clear from field measurements of entrainment rates and salinity during a period of low river flow (90-150 Kcfs) and high salinity intrusion that entrainment rates are zero where bottom salinity is less than 16 o/oo most of the time. Further, entrainment rates of 2+ and older crab fall with decreasing salinity in a clear and consistent manner. More elaboration of the crab distribution- salinity model, especially concerning salinity and the movements of 1+ crab, is needed.

  12. Channel-floodplain sediment interactions along large rivers: hydrological connectivity and sediment budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.; Park, E.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the patterns of sediment delivery processes and their budgets between channel and floodplains of large rivers is important because both hydrogeomorphic and biogeochemical alterations in floodplains take place through these interactions. The Amazon River has continuous exchange of sediment with floodplains, which may exceed over 3500 Mt/yr in both directions. However, characterizing the sediment transport and deposition patterns in floodplains and quantifying their budgets still remains a challenge. In this study, geomorphic units in floodplains are digitized and their hydrological connectivity are assessed by identifying recharge thresholds from the main channel. Historical floodplain recharge records are examined from daily water level data measured at nearby gauge stations by calculating number of days falling in between the connection and disconnection thresholds within a hydrological cycle. Historical recharge patterns of each unit is assessed using Mann-Kendall test. Intensity of hydrological connectivity is further investigated for by building power spectrum of over 15 years water extent time series data through fast Fourier transform, which the power spectral density indicates the intensity of flooding pulses from the main channel. To quantify the sediment budget stored in floodplains, PALSAR DEM acquired during the lowest water level season is used with the MODIS 8-day composite data. First, shoreline grids derived from MODIS-MNDWI is overlaid on PALSAR image to identify the water level at each floodplain lake unit (h). Total imported Sediment Fluxes (TiSF) entering each floodplain lake during a given period will be calculated as sum of (ht1-ht2) x (SSC(x,y)x1000) x 2502, where htn is the water level in floodplain lake at time tn; SSC(x, y) denotes sediment concentration at x, y coordinate; 1000 is a scale factor; and 2502 is the area of MODIS pixel (m2). Successively summing up TiSF derived from each period will retrieve the amount of total

  13. Fine-grained channel margin (FGCM) deposits conditioned by Large Woody Debris (LWD) in a gravel-bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalak, K. J.; Pizzuto, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the origin, occurrence, persistence, residence time and general significance of fine-grained channel margin storage in South River, a steep gravel-bedded stream in western Virginia. Fine-grained channel margin (FGCM) deposits in this study refers to specific in-channel deposits of mud and sand. These deposits occur primarily in the margins and near-banks regions of the channel. Fine- grained sediment storage in the near-bank regions is a result of reduced velocity caused by the bank obstructions. Nearly all of these obstructions consist of LWD accumulations in the channel. Storage occurs in four different geomorphic settings: 1) long pooled sections caused by bedrock or old mill dams, 2) the upstream ends of pools in channel margins with LWD accumulations, 3) bank obstructions usually caused by trees, 4) side channel backwaters where flow separates around islands. In approximately 38 km of river, there is 3000 m3 of fine-grained sediment stored in these features. The channel stores approximately 15 percent its total annual suspended load as fine-grained channel margin deposits. Consequently, these features represent a significant component of an annual sediment budget for this river. On average, the FGCM deposits are about 35 cm deep, 20 m long, and 4 m wide. They average 30 percent mud, 68 percent sand, and 2 percent gravel. These deposits have been cored and analyzed for Hg, grain size, loss-on-ignition, and bomb radiocarbon. Results from bomb radiocarbon analysis indicate that these features have an average age of 13 years. High Hg concentrations in fish tissue are an ongoing problem along South River, further motivating detailed study of these deposits.

  14. Channel adjustments in a Mediterranean river over the last 150 years in the context of anthropic and natural controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorpio, Vittoria; Rosskopf, Carmen M.

    2016-12-01

    Evolutionary trajectories and related control factors of the Fortore River (southern Italy) are analyzed over a 150-year period as to assess channel modifications. A multitemporal GIS analysis of topographic maps and aerial photographs together with topographic and geomorphological field surveys were performed. Attention was focused on the impact caused by human disturbance, above all the presence of the Occhito dam at only 40 km upstream of the Fortore mouth (central Adriatic coast). Results show that channel adjustments occurred in three distinct phases and were primarily driven by human disturbance that diversely affected reaches located upstream and downstream of the dam. From the last decades of the nineteenth century to the 1950s (phase 1), channel widening prevailed along upstream reaches whilst narrowing along downstream reaches. Major channel adjustments occurred from the 1950s until the end of the 1990s (phase 2), especially channel narrowing of up to 81% in upstream reaches and 98% in downstream reaches. Narrowing was accompanied by channel-bed lowering of 1 to 5 m and by pattern changes in prevalence from multithread to largely prevailing single-thread channel configurations. In-channel mining, channel works, and hydraulic interventions are considered key driving factors of observed channel adjustments. The closure of the Occhito dam in 1966 had significant and permanent effects on downstream reaches through overall discharge regulation and permanent sediment trapping as also proved by the progressive retreat of the Fortore river mouth area. From 2000 to 2015 (phase 3), a substantial trend inversion was observed with overall channel widening and partial aggradation of upstream reaches and total stabilization of downstream reaches. As highlighted by an integrated multitemporal analysis of recent channel changes and flood events, the latter have played an important role in channel recovery of upstream reaches. Comparison between the Fortore River and

  15. A tale of two rivers: channel adjustments to restorative floods in the Green River in Dinosaur N.M. as compared to those in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon N.P.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J. S.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment mass balance is a critical system attribute in assessing the potential for restoration of dam-impacted rivers. We compared channel response to large floods on the Green River in Lodore Canyon to similar changes measured along the Colorado River in part of Grand Canyon National Park, a reach with similar geomorphic organization, regulatory constraints, and habitat management goals. The post-dam sediment mass balance of the Green River is indeterminate or in surplus, but the mass balance of the Colorado River is in deficit. Analysis of repeat measurements at 36 cross sections along a 20 km reach of Lodore Canyon show that the sand storage condition in 2006 was no different than the condition observed in 1994, despite an increased frequency of high magnitude floods. Four high magnitude floods occurred in 1997, 1999, 2005, and 2006, but only one, the 1999 flow, triggered channel adjustments to the bed and banks that were significantly different than those of the post- dam 2-year return flood. This condition of relative equilibrium contrasts the sand storage condition of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, where sand bar area and volume have declined despite specific dam releases intended to rebuild sand bars. The contrasting patterns of channel adjustment in these rivers indicate that the opportunities and cost of restoration are likely to differ in relation to the sediment supply available for channel restoration.

  16. Active integrated filters for RF-photonic channelizers.

    PubMed

    El Nagdi, Amr; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P; Hunt, Louis R; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L; Christensen, Marc P

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1-5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain.

  17. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals.

  18. Active Integrated Filters for RF-Photonic Channelizers

    PubMed Central

    Nagdi, Amr El; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P.; Hunt, Louis R.; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L.; Christensen, Marc P.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1–5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain. PMID:22319352

  19. Denitrification capacity and greenhouse gas emissions of soils in channelized and restored reaches along an Alpine river corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Juna; Niklaus, Pascal; Samaritani, Emanuela; Frossard, Emmanuel; Tockner, Klement; Luster, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    In order to assess the effects of river restoration on water and air quality, the biogeochemical functions of channelized and restored river reaches have to be quantified. The objective of this study was to compare denitrification potential and greenhouse gas emissions of functional processing zones (FPZ) in a channelized and a recently restored reach of the alpine river Thur in north-eastern Switzerland. The study was part of the project cluster RECORD of the ETH domain, Switzerland, which was initiated to increase the mechanistic understanding of coupled hydrological and ecological processes in river corridors. The denitrification potential represents an important aspect of the soil filter function related to water quality. Besides, it also contributes to the emission of greenhouse gases. Extensively used pasture growing on a sandy loam is the characteristic FPZ of the channelized section. The restored section encompasses five FPZ: (i) bare gravel bars sparsely colonized by plants, (ii) gravel bars densely colonized by grass (mainly canary reed grass with up to 80 cm sandy deposits), (iii) mixed forest dominated by ash and maple, (iv) riparian forest dominated by willow (Salix alba), (v) older overbank sediments stabilized during restoration with young willows separating the forests from the river-gravel bar system (willow bush). The FPZ were sampled in January, April, August and October 2009. In addition, in June and July 2009 two flood events were monitored in the restored section with more frequent samplings. At each date, topsoil samples were collected in each FPZ (four replicates per samples) and analyzed for denitrifier enzyme activity (DEA). In addition, gas samples were taken in-situ using the closed chamber technique to measure soil respiration as well as N2O and CH4 fluxes. In all FPZ, the denitrification potential was mainly governed by soil moisture. It was highest in the willow forest exhibiting low spatial variability. The DEA in pasture, grass zone

  20. Seismic facies of incised-channel fill deposits of paleo-Seomjin River in the South Sea, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sung Ho; Kong, Gee Soo; Choul Kim, Dae; Lee, Gwang Soo; Yoo, Dong Geun

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution (Chirp and Sparker system) seismic profiles and piston core samples were analyzed to investigate the depositional environment of paleo-channel in the continental shelf of South Sea. Approximately 1,940 line-km data of chirp and sparker profiles was acquired. Along with seismic profiles, 20 piston core and 10 box core samples collected in 2015. The paleo-channel of Seomjin River is distributed in the continental shelf, with approximately 109 km long, 800-5,000 m wide, and more than 890 km2. The paleo-channel of meandering and straight type is dominant in the inner shelf while changed to braided type in the outer shelf. The paleo-channels in sparker seismic data formed presumably as fluvial systems when the shelf was exposed during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The seismic facies of incision fill divided into five types basis of an erosional surface and internal seismic reflectors: (1) transparent to semi-transparent incised channel fill, (2) parallel to sub-parallel incised channel fill, (3) complex incised channel fill, (4) divergent incised channel fill, and (5) chaotic incised channel fill. The chaotic incised channel fill deposits are consists of gravel with shell fragments in the outer shelf and indicate the LGM to early transgressive (fluvial lag deposits). The complex incised channel fill deposits are dominated by sand and gravel with shell fragments in the mid to outer shelf. The cores which were obtained above the transparent to semi-transparent and parallel to sub-parallel incised channel fill deposits are dominated by mud. These types are dominant in the upstream (inner shelf). The acoustically transparent zones of this type with low-energy, passively infilling depositional environment, suggest the presence of basin muddy deposits. These muddy sediments were likely deposited during a more advanced stage of the Holocene transgression. Thus, the paleo-channel of Seomjin River is strongly controlled by sea-level change and sediment

  1. Effect of Cytoskeletal Reagents on Stretch Activated Ion Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-12

    transduction. Biophys J59: 1143-1145, 1991. 23. SACHS, F., W. SIGURDSON, A. RUKNUDIN, AND C. BOWMAN. Single- channel mechanosensitive currents. Science 253: 800... mechanosensitive ion channels . In: Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology, v0C, edited by F. Ito. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1992, p. 55-77. Report of Inventions: None 4 ...EFFECT OF CYTOSKELETAL REAGENTS ON STRETCH ACTIVATED ION CHANNELS b lfli..3-f-I’- o0*’t 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr.-Frederick Sachs DI 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME

  2. Steady-state bedrock river response to tectonic and lithologic variations across active folds at the northwest Himalayan front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. H.; Barnes, J. B.; Kirby, E.; Pavelsky, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    This study examines the response of bedrock channel gradient and width to differences in substrate erodibility and uplift rate along the flanks of active folds in the northwestern Himalaya foreland. Bedrock rivers are a principle driver of topographic evolution in tectonically active landscapes. Several stream power models have been proposed which equate bedrock river incision (E) to a product of channel gradient (S) and upstream drainage area (A) such that, E=KSmAn, where K, m, and n are constants which depend on dominant erosional processes. These models account for changes in channel width (W, a key influence on river incision) by assuming width scales predictably with upstream drainage area such that, W=kwAb, where kw and b are empirical constants. This relationship is often not valid in areas with varying lithology because channel morphology depends in part on the underlying rock strength. Furthermore, the degree to which steady-state channels respond to changes in substrate erodibility has yet to be well tested. In this study, we explicitly account for channel width variations using new quantitative methods to more accurately constrain river incision potential and its relationship to changes in bedrock erodibility and uplift rate in an active steady-state landscape. We focus on the Chandigarh and Mohand anticlines, two active fault-bend folds in the Siwalik Hills in northwestern India. We use digital topography and high resolution (5 m) satellite images to measure channel widths and gradients over ~100 channels draining both flanks resulting in >100,000 width measurements. We then normalize channel widths and slopes to upstream drainage area yielding two sensitive channel morphometrics: normalized width index (kwn) and normalized steepness index (ksn). Our observations show that both kwn and ksn vary systematically with changes in uplift rate and lithology. For example, at locations where channels cross into an erosionally resistant bedrock lithology, mean

  3. Latest Holocene evolution and human disturbance of a channel segment in the Hudson River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klingbeil, A.D.; Sommerfield, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The latest Holocene sedimentary record of a cohesive channel and subtidal shoal in the lower Hudson River Estuary was examined to elucidate natural (sea-level rise, sediment transport) and anthropogenic (bulkheading, dredging) influences on the recent morphodynamic evolution of the system. To characterize the seafloor and shallow subbottom, ??? 100 km of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles (chirp) were collected within a 20-km reach of the estuary and correlated with sediment lithologies provided by eight vibracores recovered along seismic lines. Sediment geochronology with 137Cs and 14C was used to estimate intermediate and long-term sedimentation rates, respectively, and historical bathymetric data were analyzed to identify regional patterns of accretion and erosion, and to quantify changes in channel geometry and sediment volume. The shoal lithosome originated around 4 ka presumably with decelerating eustatic sea level rise during the latest Holocene. Long-term sedimentation rates on the shoal (2.3-2.6 mm/yr) are higher than in the channel (2 mm/yr) owing to hydrodynamic conditions that preferentially sequester suspended sediment on the western side of the estuary. As a result, the shoal accretes oblique to the principal axis of tidal transport, and more rapidly than the channel to produce an asymmetric cross-section. Shoal deposits consist of tidally bedded muds and are stratified by minor erosion surfaces that seismic profiles reveal to extend for 10s of meters to kilometers. The frequency and continuity of these surfaces suggest that the surficial shoal is catastrophically stripped on decadal-centennial time scales by elevated tidal flows; tidal erosion maintains the shoal at a uniform depth below sea level and prevents it from transitioning to an intertidal environment. Consequently, the long-term sedimentation rate approximates the rate of sea-level rise in the lower estuary (1-3 mm/yr). After the mid 1800s, the natural geometry of the lower Hudson

  4. ROMK1 channel activity is regulated by monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Sterling, Hyacinth; Wang, Zhijian; Babilonia, Elisa; Yang, Baofeng; Dong, Ke; Hebert, Steven C; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2005-03-22

    The ubiquitination of proteins can signal their degradation, modify their activity or target them to specific membranes or cellular organelles. Here, we show that monoubiquitination regulates the plasma membrane abundance and function of the potassium channel, ROMK. Immunoprecipitation of proteins obtained from renal cortex and outer medulla with ROMK antibody revealed that this channel was monoubiquitinated. To determine the ubiquitin binding site on ROMK1, all intracellular lysine (Lys) residues of ROMK1 were individually mutated to arginine (Arg), and a two-electrode voltage clamp was used to measure the ROMK1 channel activity in Xenopus oocytes. ROMK1 channel activity increased from 8.1 to 27.2 microA only when Lys-22 was mutated to Arg. Furthermore, Western blotting failed to detect the ubiquitinated ROMK1 in oocytes injected with R1K22R. Patch-clamp experiments showed that biophysical properties of R1K22R were identical to those of wild-type ROMK1. Although total protein expression levels of GFP-ROMK1 and GFP-R1K22R in oocytes were similar, confocal microscopy showed that the surface fluorescence intensity in oocytes injected with GFP-R1K22R was higher than that of GFP-ROMK1. In addition, biotin labeling of ROMK1 and R1K22R proteins expressed in HEK293 cells showed increased surface expression of the Lys-22 mutant channel. Finally, expression of R1K22R in COS7 cells significantly stimulated the surface expression of ROMK1. We conclude that ROMK1 can be monoubiquitinated and that Lys-22 is an ubiquitin-binding site. Thus, monoubiquitination of ROMK1 regulates channel activity by reducing the surface expression of channel protein. This finding implicates the linking of a single ubiquitin molecule to channels as an important posttranslational regulatory signal.

  5. ROMK1 channel activity is regulated by monoubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Sterling, Hyacinth; Wang, Zhijian; Babilonia, Elisa; Yang, Baofeng; Dong, Ke; Hebert, Steven C.; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitination of proteins can signal their degradation, modify their activity or target them to specific membranes or cellular organelles. Here, we show that monoubiquitination regulates the plasma membrane abundance and function of the potassium channel, ROMK. Immunoprecipitation of proteins obtained from renal cortex and outer medulla with ROMK antibody revealed that this channel was monoubiquitinated. To determine the ubiquitin binding site on ROMK1, all intracellular lysine (Lys) residues of ROMK1 were individually mutated to arginine (Arg), and a two-electrode voltage clamp was used to measure the ROMK1 channel activity in Xenopus oocytes. ROMK1 channel activity increased from 8.1 to 27.2 μA only when Lys-22 was mutated to Arg. Furthermore, Western blotting failed to detect the ubiquitinated ROMK1 in oocytes injected with R1K22R. Patch-clamp experiments showed that biophysical properties of R1K22R were identical to those of wild-type ROMK1. Although total protein expression levels of GFP-ROMK1 and GFP-R1K22R in oocytes were similar, confocal microscopy showed that the surface fluorescence intensity in oocytes injected with GFP-R1K22R was higher than that of GFP-ROMK1. In addition, biotin labeling of ROMK1 and R1K22R proteins expressed in HEK293 cells showed increased surface expression of the Lys-22 mutant channel. Finally, expression of R1K22R in COS7 cells significantly stimulated the surface expression of ROMK1. We conclude that ROMK1 can be monoubiquitinated and that Lys-22 is an ubiquitin-binding site. Thus, monoubiquitination of ROMK1 regulates channel activity by reducing the surface expression of channel protein. This finding implicates the linking of a single ubiquitin molecule to channels as an important posttranslational regulatory signal. PMID:15767585

  6. The role of oxbow lakes in the off-channel storage of bed material along the Ain River, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieras, Pauline Lola; Constantine, José Antonio; Hales, T. C.; Piégay, Hervé; Riquier, Jérémie

    2013-04-01

    Incidents of chute cutoff redistribute floodplain sediment into rivers, causing downstream bar growth while simultaneously creating accommodation space for the storage of sediment within the floodplain in the form of oxbow lakes. Oxbows may be able to sequester enough sediment to balance the amount produced by chute incision, but the long-term consequences of chute cutoff on reach-scale sediment budgets have so far remained unclear. This has been due to a relative paucity of field observations that quantify the exchange of coarse sediment between the channel and floodplain. Here, we take advantage of a unique opportunity to document the sediment budget of a reach of the Ain River, France, that has experienced three recent incidents of chute cutoff. Monitoring of the river prior to chute incision allowed us to precisely quantify the rates of bed-material transfer over a thirteen-year period using a combination of bathymetric surveys, LiDAR data, and aerial photographs. The abandoned channels under study sequestered between 17 and 40% of the sediment introduced to the channel, with most of the rest of the sediment being stored within the river itself. Aggradation of the abandoned channels was not evenly distributed, instead occurring by the growth of point bars and thus implying that the abandoned channel planform may be an important control on aggradation rates. Our results make clear that although oxbows may provide a significant sink for bed material, the amount of sediment sequestered within them cannot compensate for the loading caused by chute incision.

  7. Use of glacier river-fed estuary channels by juvenile coho salmon: transitional or rearing habitats?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoem Neher, Tammy D.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Walker, Coowe M.; Baird, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems in the world and provide important rearing environments for a variety of fish species. Though generally considered important transitional habitats for smolting salmon, little is known about the role that estuaries serve for rearing and the environmental conditions important for salmon. We illustrate how juvenile coho salmonOncorhynchus kisutch use a glacial river-fed estuary based on examination of spatial and seasonal variability in patterns of abundance, fish size, age structure, condition, and local habitat use. Fish abundance was greater in deeper channels with cooler and less variable temperatures, and these habitats were consistently occupied throughout the season. Variability in channel depth and water temperature was negatively associated with fish abundance. Fish size was negatively related to site distance from the upper extent of the tidal influence, while fish condition did not relate to channel location within the estuary ecotone. Our work demonstrates the potential this glacially-fed estuary serves as both transitional and rearing habitat for juvenile coho salmon during smolt emigration to the ocean, and patterns of fish distribution within the estuary correspond to environmental conditions.

  8. Designing long-term fish community assessments in connecting channels: Lessons from the Saint Marys River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, Jeff; Rogers, Mark W.; Fielder, David G.; Godby, Neal; Bowen, Anjanette K.; O'Connor, Lisa; Parrish, Josh; Greenwood, Susan; Chong, Stephen; Wright, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Long-term surveys are useful in understanding trends in connecting channel fish communities; a gill net assessment in the Saint Marys River performed periodically since 1975 is the most comprehensive connecting channels sampling program within the Laurentian Great Lakes. We assessed efficiency of that survey, with intent to inform development of assessments at other connecting channels. We evaluated trends in community composition, effort versus estimates of species richness, ability to detect abundance changes for four species, and effects of subsampling yellow perch catches on size and age-structure metrics. Efficiency analysis revealed low power to detect changes in species abundance, whereas reduced effort could be considered to index species richness. Subsampling simulations indicated that subsampling would have allowed reliable estimates of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) population structure, while greatly reducing the number of fish that were assigned ages. Analyses of statistical power and efficiency of current sampling protocols are useful for managers collecting and using these types of data as well as for the development of new monitoring programs. Our approach provides insight into whether survey goals and objectives were being attained and can help evaluate ability of surveys to answer novel questions that arise as management strategies are refined.

  9. Hysteresis effects in suspended sediment concentration of an allogenic river channel in a very arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guo-An; Disse, Markus; Yu, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Suspended sediment dynamics of the Tarim River, an allogenic and perennial river flowing in a very arid environment in China, are analyzed to examine the hysteresis effects based on data of flow discharge (Q) and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) from two hydrologic gauging stations in the river in the last five decades (1960-2011). Strong hysteresis effects existed in the sediment rating curves of the Tarim River. Under similar flow conditions, the first flood event in a year quite often causes higher suspended sediment concentration (SSC value), and form a rating curve visibly different from later flood processes. The successive flood events often form rating curves gradually from left to right progressively with time on the SSC-Q plot, indicating that higher flow intensity is needed for later flood events to reach the same SSC value of the earlier flood events. Three hysteresis loop forms, i.e., clockwise, anti-clockwise and Figure-eight existed with occurrence frequency of 57%, 27.3% and 15.6% respectively, showing that clockwise loop is the major hysteresis form and sediment load is generally derived from the channel bed. The very weak banks due to composition of quite homogeneous noncohesive particles (fine sand, silt and almost no clay content) often induce bank failure, which complicates suspended sediment dynamics and causes to shape different hysteresis loops. Somehow random but occurrence of bank collapse with higher possibility near the peak and at the falling limb of a flood hydrograph is probably the major reason causing anti-clockwise and figure-eight hysteresis loops.

  10. Activation of purified calcium channels by stoichiometric protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Nunoki, K.; Florio, V.; Catterall, W.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Purified dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels from rabbit skeletal muscle were reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles to evaluate the effect of phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A) on their function. Both the rate and extent of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into vesicles containing reconstituted calcium channels were increased severalfold after incubation with ATP and PK-A. The degree of stimulation of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake was linearly proportional to the extent of phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the calcium channel up to a stoichiometry of approximately 1 mol of phosphate incorporated into each subunit. The calcium channels activated by phosphorylation were determined to be incorporated into the reconstituted vesicles in the inside-out orientation and were completely inhibited by low concentrations of dihydropyridines, phenylalkylamines, Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+}. The results demonstrate a direct relationship between PK-A-catalyzed phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the purified calcium channel and activation of the ion conductance activity of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels.

  11. Rivers at Risk: An Activity Based Study Guide for the Colorado River Basin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samples, Bob, Ed.

    This activity guide is intended to increase student awareness and understanding about the Colorado River Basin. Each activity includes objectives, procedures, materials list, related activities, questions for students, and related information. The activities are varied to appeal to a wide range of learning styles and modalities and are…

  12. Stretch-activated cation channel from larval bullfrog skin

    PubMed Central

    Hillyard, Stanley D.; Willumsen, Niels J.; Marrero, Mario B.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-attached patches from isolated epithelial cells from larval bullfrog skin revealed a cation channel that was activated by applying suction (−1 kPa to −4.5 kPa) to the pipette. Activation was characterized by an initial large current spike that rapidly attenuated to a stable value and showed a variable pattern of opening and closing with continuing suction. Current–voltage plots demonstrated linear or inward rectification and single channel conductances of 44–56 pS with NaCl or KCl Ringer's solution as the pipette solution, and a reversal potential (−Vp) of 20–40 mV. The conductance was markedly reduced with N-methyl-D-glucamide (NMDG)-Cl Ringer's solution in the pipette. Neither amiloride nor ATP, which are known to stimulate an apical cation channel in Ussing chamber preparations of larval frog skin, produced channel activation nor did these compounds affect the response to suction. Stretch activation was not affected by varying the pipette concentrations of Ca2+ between 0 mmol l−1 and 4 mmol l−1 or by varying pH between 6.8 and 8.0. However, conductance was reduced with 4 mmol l−1 Ca2+. Western blot analysis of membrane homogenates from larval bullfrog and larval toad skin identified proteins that were immunoreactive with mammalian TRPC1 and TRPC5 (TRPC, canonical transient receptor potential channel) antibodies while homogenates of skin from newly metamorphosed bullfrogs were positive for TRPC1 and TRPC3/6/7 antibodies. The electrophysiological response of larval bullfrog skin resembles that of a stretch-activated cation channel characterized in Xenopus oocytes and proposed to be TRPC1. These results indicate this channel persists in all life stages of anurans and that TRP isoforms may be important for sensory functions of their skin. PMID:20435829

  13. Block of a Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, L S

    2005-04-01

    The primary target for cocaine is believed to be monoamine transporters because of cocaine's high-affinity binding that prevents re-uptake of released neurotransmitter. However, direct interaction with ion channels has been shown to be important for certain pharmacological/toxicological effects of cocaine. Here I show that cocaine selectively blocks a calcium-dependent K(+) channel in hippocampal neurons grown in culture (IC(50)=approximately 30 microM). Single-channel recordings show that in the presence of cocaine, the channel openings are interrupted with brief closures (flicker block). As the concentration of cocaine is increased the open-time is reduced, whereas the duration of brief closures is independent of concentration. The association and dissociation rate constants of cocaine for the neuronal Ca(2+)-activated K(+ )channels are 261+/-37 microM: (-1)s(-1) and 11451+/-1467 s(-1). The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(B)) for cocaine, determined from single-channel parameters, is 43 microM. The lack of voltage dependence of block suggests that cocaine probably binds to a site at the mouth of the pore. Block of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels by cocaine may be involved in functions that include broadening of the action potential, which would facilitate transmitter release, enhancement of smooth muscle contraction particularly in blood vessels, and modulation of repetitive neuronal firing by altering the repolarization and afterhyperpolarization phases of the action potential.

  14. Persistent disturbance by commercial navigation afters the relative abundance of channel-dwelling fishes in a large river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Vallazza, J.M.; Knights, B.C.

    2006-01-01

    We provide the first evidence for chronic effects of disturbance by commercial vessels on the spatial distribution and abundance of fishes in the channels of a large river. Most of the world's large rivers are intensively managed to satisfy increasing demands for commercial shipping, but little research has been conducted to identify and alleviate any adverse consequences of commercial navigation. We used a combination of a gradient sampling design incorporating quasicontrol areas with Akaike's information criterion (AIC)-weighted model averaging to estimate effects of disturbances by commercial vessels on fishes in the upper Mississippi River. Species density, which mainly measured species evenness, decreased with increasing disturbance frequency. The most abundant species - gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) - and the less abundant shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus) and flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) were seemingly unaffected by traffic disturbance. In contrast, the relative abundance of the toothed herrings (Hiodon spp.), redhorses (Moxostoma spp.), buffaloes (Ictiobus spp.), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), sauger (Sander canadensis), and white bass (Morone chrysops) decreased with increasing traffic in the navigation channel. We hypothesized that the combination of alteration of hydraulic features within navigation channels and rehabilitation of secondary channels might benefit channel-dependent species. ?? 2006 NRC.

  15. Numerical Model for Channel/Floodplain Exchange on a Gravel Bed River: Relative Importance of Upstream and Downstream Boundaries and of Lateral Exchange (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The centennial-scale evolution of a meandering gravel-bed river has been represented using a size-specific 1-D sediment transport model. The model differs from other 1-D morphodynamic models for gravel-bed rivers in that it allows for sediment storage in and remobilization from an off-channel sediment storage reservoir representing the floodplain. Hydraulics is represented using a 1-D gradually varied flow model that assumes a rectangular cross-section for the channel zone and a constant elevation for the floodplain. Because the solution for steady uniform flow is necessarily iterative in this framework, the gradually varied hydraulic model is not significantly more computationally intensive than is a normal flow solution. The model is parameterized primarily based on the assumption that the channel creates point bars at a constant elevation above the bed. Bar progradation rate is assumed equal to a specified lateral migration rate (which can vary as a function of sediment load). The return of sediment from floodplain to channel is assumed equal to the lateral migration rate times the average bank elevation. Any net imbalance in sediment storage within the floodplain zone results in a change in average elevation and size distribution for the floodplain. This in turn affects the partition of flow between channel and floodplain and the net flux of sediment from the floodplain to channel, eventually causing the model to evolve toward a steady state bankfull capacity. The model is applied to the Ain River, France, a tributary of the Rhône River. The Ain River underwent significant geomorphic transformations over the course of the 20th century in response to changes in climate, vegetation, floodplain management, and, especially, because of the installation of a series of hydroelectric dams. In general, the channel became more incised and less laterally active during this period. However, bank erosion and sediment deposition in bars and floodplain channels continues to

  16. Annual bed-elevation regime in the alluvial channel of Squamish River, southwestern British Columbia Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanford, S.D.; Seidl, M.A.; Ashley, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the annual regime of channel scour and fill by monitoring bed-elevation changes in a reach of Squamish River in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Sonar surveys of 13 river cross-sections in a sandy gravel-bed single-channel study reach were repeated biweekly over a full hydrologic year (1995/6). The survey results show that bedload movement occurs as waves or pulses forming bedwaves that appear to maintain an overall coherence with movement downstream. These bedwaves propagate downstream by a mode here termed pulse scour and pulse fill, a process distinguished from the conventional mode of scour and fill commonly associated with flood events (here termed local scour and local fill). Bedwave celerity was estimated to be about 15.5 m d-1 corresponding to a bedwave residence time in the study reach of almost one hydrologic year. The total amount of local bed-elevation change ranged between 0.22 m and 2.41 m during the period of study. Analysis of the bed-elevation and flow data reveals that, because of the bedware phenomenon, there is no simple relation between the mean bed-elevation and discharge nor any strong linear correlation among cross-sectional behaviour. The bed-elevation data also suggest that complex changes to the bed within a cross-section are masked when the bed is viewed in one dimension, although no definitive trends in bed behaviour were found in the two-dimensional analysis. Although a weak seasonal effect is evident in this study, the bed-elevation regime is dominated by sediment supply-driven fluctuations in bedload transport occurring at timescales shorter than the seasonal fluctuation in discharge. The study also indicates that bed-elevation monitoring on Squamish River, and others like it, for purposes of detecting and measuring aggradation/degradation must take into account very considerable and normal channel-bed variability operating at timescales from hours to months. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and

  17. Sinuosity change of the Po River near Cremona (Northern Italy) - a result of neotectonic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovszki, Judit; Timár, Gábor

    2010-05-01

    In the map sheets of the Second Military Survey of the Habsburg Empire, Lombardia, Parma, Modena and Venice also can be seen (Timár et al., 2006). This area was surveyed between 1818 and 1829. In these map sheets, we can also follow the river Po from Vaccarizza to the delta. This river reach is about 350 km long. This river reach was digitized and sinuosity values were calculated with different window sizes, and displayed in a spectrum-like diagram (sinuosity spectra; after van Balen et al., 2008). At Cremona, a significante sinuosity change were identified. The sinuosity increasing, and we have high sinuosity values. In the summarizing geological map of Italy (Compagnoni and Calluzzo, 2004), at this place, a tectonic line was identified. So probably this fault line invokes the sinuosity change on the river. The vertical movements indicated on the maps are just the opposite like they would be according to the flume experiments of Ouchi (1985). In the case of the Po River at Cremona, the decrease of the channel slope results higher sinuosity. The reason is that the rate of the slope and water discharge is higher than it is required by the self-organized meandering and the river parameters fell to the range of the unorganized meandering (cf. Timár, 2003). Another possible explanation could be that the northern tributary, the Adda River has significant sediment load that lowers the sinuosity of the trunk river at the confluence. Compagnoni, B., Galluzzo, F. (eds., 2004): Geological Map of Italy. Agenzia per la Protezione dell'Ambiente per I Servizi Tecnici - Dipartimento Difesa del Suolo, Servizio Geologico d'Italia, Rome-Florence-Genoa. Map, scale=1:1250000, especially printed for the 32nd International Geological Congress. Ouchi, S. (1985): Response of alluvial rivers to slow active tectonic movement. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 96: 504-515. Timár, G. (2003): Controls on channel sinuosity changes: a case study of the Tisza River, the Great Hungarian Plain. Quaternary

  18. Formation and evolution of valley-bottom and channel features, Lower Deschutes River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.; O'Conner, Jim E.; O'Conner, Jim E.; Grant, Gordon E.

    2003-01-01

    Primary geologic and geomorphic processes that formed valley-bottom and channel features downstream from the Pelton-Round Butte dam complex are inferred from a canyon-long analysis of feature morphology, composition, location, and spatial distribution. Major controls on valley-bottom morphology are regional tectonics, large landslides, and outsized floods (floods with return periods greater than 1000 yrs), which include the late Holocene Outhouse Flood and several Quaternary landslide dam failures. Floods with a return period on the order of 100 yrs, including historical floods in 1996, 1964, and 1861, contribute to fan building and flood plain formation only within the resistant framework established by the major controls. Key processes in the formation of channel features, in particular the 153 islands and 23 large rapids, include long-term bedrock erosion, outsized floods, and century-scale floods. Historical analysis of channel conditions since 1911 indicates that the largest islands, which are cored by outsized-flood deposits, locally control channel location, although their margins are substantially modified during annual- to century-scale floods. Islands cored by bedrock have changed little. Islands formed by annual- to century-scale floods are more susceptible to dynamic interactions between tributary sediment inputs, mainstem flow hydraulics, and perhaps riparian vegetation. Temporal patterns of island change in response to the sequence of 20th century flooding indicate that many islands accreted sediment during annual- to decadal-scale floods, but eroded during larger century-scale floods. There is, however, no clear trend of long-term changes in patterns of island growth, movement, or erosion either spatially or temporally within the lower Deschutes River.

  19. Activation of peripheral KCNQ channels relieves gout pain

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueming; Xu, Haiyan; Zhan, Li; Zhou, Xindi; Chen, Xueqin; Gao, Zhaobing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intense inflammatory pain caused by urate crystals in joints and other tissues is a major symptom of gout. Among therapy drugs that lower urate, benzbromarone (BBR), an inhibitor of urate transporters, is widely used because it is well tolerated and highly effective. We demonstrate that BBR is also an activator of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels. In cultured recombinant cells, BBR exhibited significant potentiation effects on KCNQ channels comparable to previously reported classical activators. In native dorsal root ganglion neurons, BBR effectively overcame the suppression of KCNQ currents, and the resultant neuronal hyperexcitability caused by inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin (BK). Benzbromarone consistently attenuates BK-, formalin-, or monosodium urate–induced inflammatory pain in rat and mouse models. Notably, the analgesic effects of BBR are largely mediated through peripheral and not through central KCNQ channels, an observation supported both by pharmacokinetic studies and in vivo experiments. Moreover, multiple residues in the superficial part of the voltage sensing domain of KCNQ channels were identified critical for the potentiation activity of BBR by a molecular determinant investigation. Our data indicate that activation of peripheral KCNQ channels mediates the pain relief effects of BBR, potentially providing a new strategy for the development of more effective therapies for gout. PMID:25735002

  20. Intracellular calcium strongly potentiates agonist-activated TRPC5 channels

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Nathaniel T.; Kaczmarek, J. Stefan

    2009-01-01

    TRPC5 is a calcium (Ca2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel expressed in several brain regions, including the hippocampus, cerebellum, and amygdala. Although TRPC5 is activated by receptors coupled to phospholipase C, the precise signaling pathway and modulatory signals remain poorly defined. We find that during continuous agonist activation, heterologously expressed TRPC5 currents are potentiated in a voltage-dependent manner (∼5-fold at positive potentials and ∼25-fold at negative potentials). The reversal potential, doubly rectifying current–voltage relation, and permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-d-glucamine remain unchanged during this potentiation. The TRPC5 current potentiation depends on extracellular Ca2+: replacement by Ba2+ or Mg2+ abolishes it, whereas the addition of 10 mM Ca2+ accelerates it. The site of action for Ca2+ is intracellular, as simultaneous fura-2 imaging and patch clamp recordings indicate that potentiation is triggered at ∼1 µM [Ca2+]. This potentiation is prevented when intracellular Ca2+ is tightly buffered, but it is promoted when recording with internal solutions containing elevated [Ca2+]. In cell-attached and excised inside-out single-channel recordings, increases in internal [Ca2+] led to an ∼10–20-fold increase in channel open probability, whereas single-channel conductance was unchanged. Ca2+-dependent potentiation should result in TRPC5 channel activation preferentially during periods of repetitive firing or coincident neurotransmitter receptor activation. PMID:19398778

  1. Geologic and physiographic controls on bed-material yield, transport, and channel morphology for alluvial and bedrock rivers, western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, James E.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Anderson, Scott; Wallick, J. Rose; Jones, Krista L.; Keith, Mackenzie K.

    2014-01-01

    The rivers of western Oregon have diverse forms and characteristics, with channel substrates ranging from continuous alluvial gravel to bare bedrock. Analysis of several measurable morphologic attributes of 24 valley reaches on 17 rivers provides a basis for comparing nonalluvial and alluvial channels. Key differences are that alluvial reaches have greater bar area, greater migration rates, and show systematic correlation among variables relating grain size to bed-material transport capacity. We relate these differences between channel types to bed-material transport rates as derived from a coupled regional analysis of empirical sediment yield measurements and physical experiments of clast attrition during transport. This sediment supply analysis shows that overall bed-material transport rates for western Oregon are chiefly controlled by (1) lithology and basin slope, which are the key factors for bed-material supply into the stream network, and (2) lithologic control of bed-material attrition from in-transport abrasion and disintegration. This bed-material comminution strongly affects bed-material transport in the study area, reducing transport rates by 50%–90% along the length of the larger rivers in the study area. A comparison of the bed-material transport estimates with the morphologic analyses shows that alluvial gravel-bed channels have systematic and bounding relations between bed-material transport rate and attributes such as bar area and local transport capacity. By contrast, few such relations are evident for nonalluvial rivers with bedrock or mixed-bed substrates, which are apparently more influenced by local controls on channel geometry and sediment supply. At the scale of western Oregon, the physiographic and lithologic controls on the balance between bed-material supply and transport capacity exert far-reaching influence on the distribution of alluvial and nonalluvial channels and their consequently distinctive morphologies and behaviors

  2. Use of Small Fluorescent Molecules to Monitor Channel Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sharon; Stringer, Sarah; Naik, Rajesh; Stone, Morley

    2001-03-01

    The Mechanosensitive channel of Large conductance (MscL) allows bacteria to rapidly adapt to changing environmental conditions such as osmolarity. The MscL channel opens in response to increases in membrane tension, which allows for the efflux of cytoplasmic constituents. Here we describe the cloning and expression of Salmonella typhimurium MscL (St-MscL). Using a fluorescence efflux assay, we demonstrate that efflux through the MscL channel during hypoosmotic shock can be monitored using endogenously produced fluorophores. In addition, we observe that thermal stimulation, i.e., heat shock, can also induce efflux through MscL. We present the first evidence of thermal activation of MscL efflux by heat shocking cells expressing the S. typhimurium protein variant. This finding has significant biosensor implications, especially for investigators exploring the use of channel proteins in biosensor applications. Thermal biosensors are relatively unexplored, but would have considerable commercial and military utility.

  3. Caffeine activates mouse TRPA1 channels but suppresses human TRPA1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Nagatomo, Katsuhiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine has various well-characterized pharmacological effects, but in mammals there are no known plasma membrane receptors or ion channels activated by caffeine. We observed that caffeine activates mouse transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) in heterologous expression systems by Cai2+ imaging and electrophysiological analyses. These responses to caffeine were confirmed in acutely dissociated dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons from WT mice, which are known to express TRPA1, but were not seen in neurons from TRPA1 KO mice. Expression of TRPA1 was detected immunohistochemically in nerve fibers and bundles in the mouse tongue. Moreover, WT mice, but not KO mice, showed a remarkable aversion to caffeine-containing water. These results demonstrate that mouse TRPA1 channels expressed in sensory neurons cause an aversion to drinking caffeine-containing water, suggesting they mediate the perception of caffeine. Finally, we observed that caffeine does not activate human TRPA1; instead, it suppresses its activity. PMID:18988737

  4. Activation of Slo2.1 channels by niflumic acid

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li; Garg, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Slo2.1 channels conduct an outwardly rectifying K+ current when activated by high [Na+]i. Here, we show that gating of these channels can also be activated by fenamates such as niflumic acid (NFA), even in the absence of intracellular Na+. In Xenopus oocytes injected with <10 ng cRNA, heterologously expressed human Slo2.1 current was negligible, but rapidly activated by extracellular application of NFA (EC50 = 2.1 mM) or flufenamic acid (EC50 = 1.4 mM). Slo2.1 channels activated by 1 mM NFA exhibited weak voltage dependence. In high [K+]e, the conductance–voltage (G-V) relationship had a V1/2 of +95 mV and an effective valence, z, of 0.48 e. Higher concentrations of NFA shifted V1/2 to more negative potentials (EC50 = 2.1 mM) and increased the minimum value of G/Gmax (EC50 = 2.4 mM); at 6 mM NFA, Slo2.1 channel activation was voltage independent. In contrast, V1/2 of the G-V relationship was shifted to more positive potentials when [K+]e was elevated from 1 to 300 mM (EC50 = 21.2 mM). The slope conductance measured at the reversal potential exhibited the same [K+]e dependency (EC50 = 23.5 mM). Conductance was also [Na+]e dependent. Outward currents were reduced when Na+ was replaced with choline or mannitol, but unaffected by substitution with Rb+ or Li+. Neutralization of charged residues in the S1–S4 domains did not appreciably alter the voltage dependence of Slo2.1 activation. Thus, the weak voltage dependence of Slo2.1 channel activation is independent of charged residues in the S1–S4 segments. In contrast, mutation of R190 located in the adjacent S4–S5 linker to a neutral (Ala or Gln) or acidic (Glu) residue induced constitutive channel activity that was reduced by high [K+]e. Collectively, these findings indicate that Slo2.1 channel gating is modulated by [K+]e and [Na+]e, and that NFA uncouples channel activation from its modulation by transmembrane voltage and intracellular Na+. PMID:20176855

  5. Activation of Slo2.1 channels by niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Garg, Vivek; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Slo2.1 channels conduct an outwardly rectifying K(+) current when activated by high [Na(+)](i). Here, we show that gating of these channels can also be activated by fenamates such as niflumic acid (NFA), even in the absence of intracellular Na(+). In Xenopus oocytes injected with <10 ng cRNA, heterologously expressed human Slo2.1 current was negligible, but rapidly activated by extracellular application of NFA (EC(50) = 2.1 mM) or flufenamic acid (EC(50) = 1.4 mM). Slo2.1 channels activated by 1 mM NFA exhibited weak voltage dependence. In high [K(+)](e), the conductance-voltage (G-V) relationship had a V(1/2) of +95 mV and an effective valence, z, of 0.48 e. Higher concentrations of NFA shifted V(1/2) to more negative potentials (EC(50) = 2.1 mM) and increased the minimum value of G/G(max) (EC(50) = 2.4 mM); at 6 mM NFA, Slo2.1 channel activation was voltage independent. In contrast, V(1/2) of the G-V relationship was shifted to more positive potentials when [K(+)](e) was elevated from 1 to 300 mM (EC(50) = 21.2 mM). The slope conductance measured at the reversal potential exhibited the same [K(+)](e) dependency (EC(50) = 23.5 mM). Conductance was also [Na(+)](e) dependent. Outward currents were reduced when Na(+) was replaced with choline or mannitol, but unaffected by substitution with Rb(+) or Li(+). Neutralization of charged residues in the S1-S4 domains did not appreciably alter the voltage dependence of Slo2.1 activation. Thus, the weak voltage dependence of Slo2.1 channel activation is independent of charged residues in the S1-S4 segments. In contrast, mutation of R190 located in the adjacent S4-S5 linker to a neutral (Ala or Gln) or acidic (Glu) residue induced constitutive channel activity that was reduced by high [K(+)](e). Collectively, these findings indicate that Slo2.1 channel gating is modulated by [K(+)](e) and [Na(+)](e), and that NFA uncouples channel activation from its modulation by transmembrane voltage and intracellular Na(+).

  6. Characterization of three novel mechanosensitive channel activities in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michelle D; Black, Susan; Rasmussen, Tim; Rasmussen, Akiko; Stokes, Neil R; Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R

    2012-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels sense elevated membrane tension that arises from rapid water influx occurring when cells move from high to low osmolarity environments (hypoosmotic shock). These non-specific channels in the cytoplasmic membrane release osmotically-active solutes and ions. The two major mechanosensitive channels in Escherichia coli are MscL and MscS. Deletion of both proteins severely compromises survival of hypoosmotic shock. However, like many bacteria, E. coli cells possess other MscS-type genes (kefA, ybdG, ybiO, yjeP and ynaI). Two homologs, MscK (kefA) and YbdG, have been characterized as mechanosensitive channels that play minor roles in maintaining cell integrity. Additional channel openings are occasionally observed in patches derived from mutants lacking MscS, MscK and MscL. Due to their rare occurrence, little is known about these extra pressure-induced currents or their genetic origins. Here we complete the identification of the remaining E. coli mechanosensitive channels YnaI, YbiO and YjeP. The latter is the major component of the previously described MscM activity (~300 pS), while YnaI (~100 pS) and YbiO (~1000 pS) were previously unknown. Expression of native YbiO is NaCl-specific and RpoS-dependent. A Δ7 strain was created with all seven E. coli mechanosensitive channel genes deleted. High level expression of YnaI, YbiO or YjeP proteins from a multicopy plasmid in the Δ7 strain (MJFGH) leads to substantial protection against hypoosmotic shock. Purified homologs exhibit high molecular masses that are consistent with heptameric assemblies. This work reveals novel mechanosensitive channels and discusses the regulation of their expression in the context of possible additional functions.

  7. Post-Eruption Changes in Channel Geometry of Streams in the Toutle River Drainage Basin, 1980-82, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.F.; Nolan, K. Michael; Dodge, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, generated a debris avalanche, lateral blast, lahars, and tephra deposits that altered mainstem and tributary channels within the Toutle River drainage basin. Channel cross sections were monumented and surveyed on North Fork Toutle River and its tributaries, on South Fork Toutle River, on Green River, and on Toutle River in 1980 and 1981. These streams drain the north and west flanks of the volcano. The network of channel cross sections was surveyed more frequently following periods of higher flow. The repetitive cross-section surveys provide measurements of bank erosion or accretion and of channel erosion or aggradation. These data can be used to determine erosion rates, and to identify sources and storage sites of sediment in sediment budget computations. This report presents channel cross-section profiles constructed from the survey data collected during water years 1980 through 1982.

  8. Channel properties of the splicing isoforms of the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 2

    PubMed Central

    Ponissery Saidu, Samsudeen; Stephan, Aaron B.; Talaga, Anna K.

    2013-01-01

    Anoctamin (ANO)2 (or TMEM16B) forms a cell membrane Ca2+-activated Cl− channel that is present in cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, vomeronasal microvilli, and photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Alternative splicing of Ano2 transcripts generates multiple variants with the olfactory variants skipping exon 14 and having alternative splicing of exon 4. In the present study, 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis was conducted to characterize the 5′ end of olfactory Ano2 transcripts, which showed that the most abundant Ano2 transcripts in the olfactory epithelium contain a novel starting exon that encodes a translation initiation site, whereas transcripts of the publically available sequence variant, which has an alternative and longer 5′ end, were present in lower abundance. With two alternative starting exons and alternative splicing of exon 4, four olfactory ANO2 isoforms are thus possible. Patch-clamp experiments in transfected HEK293T cells expressing these isoforms showed that N-terminal sequences affect Ca2+ sensitivity and that the exon 4–encoded sequence is required to form functional channels. Coexpression of the two predominant isoforms, one with and one without the exon 4 sequence, as well as coexpression of the two rarer isoforms showed alterations in channel properties, indicating that different isoforms interact with each other. Furthermore, channel properties observed from the coexpression of the predominant isoforms better recapitulated the native channel properties, suggesting that the native channel may be composed of two or more splicing isoforms acting as subunits that together shape the channel properties. PMID:23669718

  9. Salmon as drivers of physical and biological disturbance in river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, S. J.; Petticrew, E. L.

    2012-04-01

    Large migrations across landscapes and ecosystem boundaries combined with disturbances of riverine spawning habitats through nest construction indicate the huge potential that Pacific salmon (Onchorhynchus sp.) have to disturb and alter regional energy flow. Nutrients derived from ocean-reared dead and decaying salmon are released into surrounding aquatic ecosystems fertilizing the water column, recently disturbed by increased suspended sediments due to nest construction. These opposing forces of disturbance and fertilization on spawning habitat have been demonstrated to impact local geomorphic and ecological cycles within salmon streams. An often cited, yet not fully tested, hypothesis is that this pulse of nutrients provided by decaying salmon can shift freshwater habitats to higher production levels. This hypothesis, however, remains contested and uncertain. Fine sediments are increasingly being recognized as important delivery and storage vectors for marine-derived nutrients (MDNs) in spawning streams. The temporal and spatial significance of these sediment vectors on gravelbed storage of MDN have not been quantified thereby restricting our ability to estimate the impact of gravelbed storage of MDNs on the riverine habitats. The objectives of this study were to i) quantify the magnitude of sediment deposition and retention in an active spawning area and ii) determine the contribution of MDN associated with the fine sediment storage. The Horsefly River spawning channel (HFC), an artificial salmon stock enhancement stream, was used to examine the biogeomorphic impacts of salmon spawning. We organized the HFC in an upstream-downstream paired treatment approach where the upstream enclosure was kept free of salmon and the downstream enclosure was loaded with actively spawning salmon. We used the difference in suspended sediment concentration between the salmon enclosure and the control enclosure to determine the contribution of salmon nest construction to suspended

  10. Mechanisms of vegetation-induced channel narrowing of an unregulated canyon river: Results from a natural field-scale experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, Rebecca B.; Schmidt, John C.; Scott, Michael L.

    2014-04-01

    The lower Yampa River in Yampa Canyon, western Colorado serves as a natural, field-scale experiment, initiated when the invasive riparian plant, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), colonized an unregulated river. In response to tamarisk's rapid invasion, the channel narrowed by 6% in the widest reaches since 1961. Taking advantage of this unique setting, we reconstructed the geomorphic and vegetation history in order to identify the key mechanisms for which, in the absence of other environmental perturbations, vegetation alters fluvial processes that result in a narrower channel. From our reconstruction, we identified a distinct similarity in the timing and magnitude of tamarisk encroachment and channel change, albeit with a lag in the channel response, thus suggesting tamarisk as the driving force. Within a decade of establishment, tamarisk effectively trapped sediment and, as a result, increased floodplain construction rates. Increasing tamarisk coverage over time also reduced the occurrence of floodplain stripping. Tamarisk recruitment was driven by both hydrologic and hydraulic variables, and the majority of tamarisk plants (84%) established below the stage of the 2-year flood. Thus, upon establishment nearly all plants regularly interact with the flow and sediment transport field. Our analyses were predicated on the hypothesis that the flow regime of the Yampa River was stationary, and that only the riparian vegetation community had changed. While not heavily impacted by water development, we determined that some aspects of the flow regime have shifted. However, this shift, which involved the clustering in time of extremely wet and dry years, did not influence fluvial processes directly. Instead these changes directly impacted riparian vegetation and changes in vegetation cover, in turn, altered fluvial processes. Today, the rate of channel change and new tamarisk recruitment is small. We believe that the rapid expansion of tamarisk and related floodplain construction

  11. Coupling effect analysis between landslides, river channel changes and sediment budgets - extreme climate events in Laishe River, southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-Jen; Huang, Mei-Jen; Tseng, Chih-Ming

    2016-04-01

    amount of migration along Laishe River by analyzing the 3D DEM before and after the typhoon Morakot. The DEMs are built by using the aerial images taken by digital mapping camera (DMC) and by airborne digital scanner 40 (ADS40) before and after typhoon event. Recently, this research integrates Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and oblique photogrammetric technologies for image acquisition by 5-10cm GSD photos. This approach permits to construct true 3D model so as to decipher ground information more realistically. 10-20cm DSM and DEM, and field GPS, were compiled together to decipher the morphologic changes. All the information, especially by means of true 3D model, the datasets provides detail ground information that may use to evaluate the landslide triggering mechanism and river channel evolution. The goals of this study is to integrates the UAS system and to decipher the sliding process and morphologic changes of large landslide areas, sediment transport and budgets, and to investigate the phenomenon of river migration. The results of this study provides not only geomatics and GIS dataset of the hazards, but also for essential geomorphologic information for other study, and for hazard mitigation and planning, as well.

  12. Entrainment of Dungeness Crab in the Desdemona Shoals Reach of the Lower Columbia River Navigation Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.

    2006-09-30

    Proposed dredging of the Columbia River has raised concerns about related impacts on Dungeness crab in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). This study follows two major efforts, sponsored by the Portland District of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to quantify the number of crabs entrained by a hopper dredge working in the CRE. From June 2002 through September 2002, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted direct measurements of crab entrainment in the CRE from the mouth of the Columbia River (MCR, river mile -3 to +3) upriver as far as Miller Sands (river mile 21 to 24). These studies constituted a major step in quantifying crab entrainment in the CRE, and allowed statistically bounded projections of adult equivalent loss (AEL) for Dungeness crab populations under a range of future construction dredging and maintenance dredging scenarios (Pearson et al. 2002, 2003). In 2004, PNNL performed additional measurements to improve estimates of crab entrainment at Desdemona Shoals and at Flavel Bar, a reach near Astoria that had not been adequately sampled in 2002 (Figure 1). The 2004 data were used to update the crab loss projections for channel construction to 43 ft MLLW. In addition, a correlation between bottom salinity and adult (age 2+ and 3+, >100 mm carapace width) crab entrainment was developed using 2002 data, and elaborated upon with the 2004 data. This crab salinity model was applied to forecasting seasonal (monthly) entrainment rates and AEL using seasonal variations in salinity (Pearson et al. 2005). In the previous studies, entrainment rates in Desdemona Shoals were more variable than in any of the other reaches. Pearson et al. (2005) concluded that ?the dynamics behind the variable entrainment rates at Desdemona Shoals are not fully understood,? as well as finding that juvenile crab entrainment was not significantly correlated with salinity as it was for older crab. The present study was undertaken to address the question of whether the

  13. Active Brownian particles escaping a channel in single file.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Pierno, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    Active particles may happen to be confined in channels so narrow that they cannot overtake each other (single-file conditions). This interesting situation reveals nontrivial physical features as a consequence of the strong interparticle correlations developed in collective rearrangements. We consider a minimal two-dimensional model for active Brownian particles with the aim of studying the modifications introduced by activity with respect to the classical (passive) single-file picture. Depending on whether their motion is dominated by translational or rotational diffusion, we find that active Brownian particles in single file may arrange into clusters that are continuously merging and splitting (active clusters) or merely reproduce passive-motion paradigms, respectively. We show that activity conveys to self-propelled particles a strategic advantage for trespassing narrow channels against external biases (e.g., the gravitational field).

  14. Contrasting Patterns of Juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Growth, Diet, and Prey Densities in Off-channel and Main Channel Habitats on the Sacramento River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limm, M. P.; Marchetti, M. P.; Power, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    Few studies have quantified juvenile salmon growth in or between different habitats or evaluated the mechanisms by which salmon growth and survival might be enhanced. We used otolith microstructure to compare daily relative growth rates among main channel areas, off-channel ponds, and non-natal seasonal tributaries of the Sacramento River in 2001 and 2002. To examine possible mechanisms leading to growth differences, prey availability, prey preference, and stomach fullness were estimated at each site. Stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in salmon tissue and their predominant prey were measured in 2002. We observed wider daily increment widths, higher prey densities, and warmer temperatures in off-channel ponds and non-natal seasonal tributaries in both 2001 and 2002. Off-channel pond salmon and chironomidae pupae had significantly different δ13C and δ15N than those captured in the main channel and non-natal seasonal tributaries. In 2001, all habitats had higher temperatures, wider daily increment widths, higher prey densities, and higher stomach fullness than in 2002. Our findings suggest warmer temperatures and abundant prey in off-channel habitats lead to higher growth rates. Increased access to off-channel habitats during wetter years may account for the stronger year classes and higher survival rates reported in other studies.

  15. Partitioning sand transport between branches of channel bifurcations in deep rivers: Implications for river-diversion structures and land building in southern Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, S. K.; Shaw, J. B.; Mohrig, D. C.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Allison, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Man-made diversion structures cut through the levees of the Mississippi River are intended to act as channel bifurcations, delivering water and sediment to an otherwise disconnected wetland environment. Construction of these artificial bifurcations is necessary to counteract an earlier emplacement of fortified levees on the river that cut off sediment transport to the adjacent overbank regions, thereby halting sedimentation necessary to mitigate loss of land associated with rising relative sea level. We study the role that diversion depth has in controlling the amount of sand that exits the primary channel during river flooding. We follow the sand fraction because new land built by sub-deltas within the lower Mississippi is disproportionately composed of sand rather than mud. Sand transport is not evenly distributed from the bottom to the water surface in the Mississippi River. Suspended sediment and bedform transport measurements collected near Empire, LA during the 2008 flood reveal that in the 40-m deep thalweg, 47% of the sand flux is confined to the lowermost 20% of the water column, while only 11% of the sand flux is in the uppermost 20% of the water column. This suggests that diversions dug to depths tapping the lowermost portion of the water column could export considerably more sand to the neighboring overbank regions for land building purposes. In order to continue exploring the importance of deep diversions for land building we measured properties of the Atchafalaya River - Grand Lake bifurcation near Morgan City, LA during high discharge in May, 2009. Grand Lake is the entrance point to the Wax Lake Outlet channel and the Wax Lake delta. Persistent growth of this delta over the past 30 years highlights the successful land-building properties of this diversion. The diversion at the head of Grand Lake is approximately 850 m wide at its junction with the Atchafalaya River. Average thalweg depth for the river along this connecting length is 19 m. Water

  16. Bacteria-Based Analysis of HIV-1 Vpu Channel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Taube, Robert; Alhadeff, Raphael; Assa, Dror; Krugliak, Miriam; Arkin, Isaiah T.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 Vpu is a small, single-span membrane protein with two attributed functions that increase the virus' pathogenicity: degradation of CD4 and inactivation of BST-2. Vpu has also been shown to posses ion channel activity, yet no correlation has been found between this attribute and Vpu's role in viral release. In order to gain further insight into the channel activity of Vpu we devised two bacteria-based assays that can examine this function in detail. In the first assay Vpu was over-expressed, such that it was deleterious to bacterial growth due to membrane permeabilization. In the second and more sensitive assay, the channel was expressed at low levels in K+ transport deficient bacteria. Consequently, Vpu expression enabled the bacteria to grow at otherwise non permissive low K+ concentrations. Hence, Vpu had the opposite impact on bacterial growth in the two assays: detrimental in the former and beneficial in the latter. Furthermore, we show that channel blockers also behave reciprocally in the two assays, promoting growth in the first assay and hindering it in the second assay. Taken together, we investigated Vpu's channel activity in a rapid and quantitative approach that is amenable to high-throughput screening, in search of novel blockers. PMID:25272035

  17. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Tillamook Bay tributaries and Nehalem River basin, northwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    subject to incision and aggradation as well as lateral shifts in thalweg position and bank deposition and erosion. * In fluvial reaches, unit bar area declined a net 5.3-83.6 percent from 1939 to 2009. The documented reduction in bar area may be attributable to several factors, including vegetation establishment and stabilization of formerly active bar surfaces, lateral channel changes and resulting alterations in sediment deposition and erosion patterns, and streamflow and/or tide differences between photographs. Other factors that may be associated with the observed reduction in bar area but not assessed in this reconnaissance level study include changes in the sediment and hydrology regimes of these rivers over the analysis period. * In tidal reaches, unit bar area increased on the Tillamook and Nehalem Rivers (98.0 and 14.7 percent, respectively), but declined a net 24.2 to 83.1 percent in the other four tidal reaches. Net increases in bar area in the Tidal Tillamook and Nehalem Reaches were possibly attributable to tidal differences between the photographs as well as sediment deposition behind log booms and pile structures on the Tillamook River between 1939 and 1967. * The armoring ratio (ratio of the median grain sizes of a bar's surface and subsurface layers) was 1.6 at Lower Waldron Bar on the Miami River, tentatively indicating a relative balance between transport capacity and sediment supply at this location. Armoring ratios, however, ranged from 2.4 to 5.5 at sites on the Trask, Wilson, Kilchis, and Nehalem Rivers; these coarse armor layers probably reflect limited bed-material supply at these sites. * On the basis of mapping results, measured armoring ratios, and channel cross section surveys, preliminary conclusions are that the fluvial reaches on the Tillamook, Trask, Kilchis, and Nehalem Rivers are currently sediment supply-limited in terms of bed material - that is, the transport capacity of the channel generally exceeds the supply of bed material. The

  18. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Coquille River basin, southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary study of bed-material transport, vertical and lateral channel changes, and existing datasets for the Coquille River basin, which encompasses 2,745 km2 (square kilometers) of the southwestern Oregon coast. This study, conducted to inform permitting decisions regarding instream gravel mining, revealed that:

  19. Ecological Functions of Off-Channel Habitats of the Willamette River, Oregon, Database and Documentation (1997-2001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The database from the Ecological Functions of Off-Channel Habitats of the Willamette River, Oregon project (OCH Project) contains data collected from 1997 through 2001 from multiple research areas of the project, and project documents such as the OCH Research Plan, Quality Assura...

  20. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  1. Macroform and microform-induced change in redox-sensitive chemistries of river channel surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, P.; Zhang, H.; Heathwaite, A. L.; Binley, A.; Ullah, S.; Kaeser, D.; Heppell, C. M.; Lansdown, K.; Trimmer, M.

    2012-04-01

    In-stream geomorphological features such as riffle-pool sequences (macroforms) can produce steep hydraulic gradients which induce flow in and out of the riverbed - hyporheic exchange flow (HEF). The acceleration of flow over channel obstacles such as large cobbles and boulders (microforms) can create variation in surface-subsurface pressure gradients and generation of HEF. HEF in shallow surface sediments affect the transformation of redox-sensitive chemical forms and, therefore, the attenuation or release of nutrients in river systems. Here, we examine the relationship between stream geomorphological environment (microform and macroform) and concentration profiles of redox-sensitive species (nitrate, sulphate, iron, manganese) in shallow (15cm) subsurface sediments. In-situ passive samplers (diffusive equilibrium in thin films - DET) are used to obtain biogeochemical data from armoured environments at fine scale (cm) depth resolution where there is strong upwelling. The probes were deployed in a 50m reach of the River Eden, Cumbria, UK, during baseflow conditions. The experimental setup allowed for the assessment of differences in redox-sensitive chemistries between a riffle and pool environment and between smooth and rough bed surfaces in the pool. The passive sensing basis of the DET methodology provided a means for investigating how HEF systems generated at two different geomorphological scales influence the concentration and spatial patterns of redox-sensitive species. DET's capability of measuring at high spatial resolution allowed the extent of hyporheic mixing to be targeted, even though it is often limited to the top few centimetres of sediment.

  2. Stream channel cross sections for a reach of the Boise River in Ada County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hortness, Jon E.; Werner, Douglas C.

    1999-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency produces maps of areas that are likely to be inundated during major floods, usually the 100-year, or 1-percent probability, flood. The maps, called Flood Insurance Rate Maps, are used to determine flood insurance rates for homes, businesses, or other structures located in flood-prone areas. State and local governments also use these maps for help with, among other things, development planning and disaster mitigation. During the period October 1997 through December 1998, the initial phase of a hydraulic analysis project of the Boise River from Barber Dam to the Ada/Canyon County boundary, the U.S. Geological Survey collected stream channel cross-section data at 238 locations along the river and documented 108 elevation reference marks established for horizontal and vertical control. In the final phase of the project, the Survey will use these data to determine water-surface elevations for the 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods and to define floodway limits. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will use the results of this hydraulic analysis to update the 100- and 500-year flood boundaries and the floodway limits on their Flood Insurance Rate Maps.

  3. Habitat used by juvenile lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) in the North Channel of the St. Clair River (Michigan, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boase, James C.; Manny, Bruce A.; Donald, Katherine A.L.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Diana, James S.; Thomas, Michael V.; Chiotti, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) occupy the St. Clair River, part of a channel connecting lakes Huron and Erie in the Laurentian Great Lakes. In the North Channel of the St. Clair River, juvenile lake sturgeon (3–7 years old and 582–793 mm in length) were studied to determine movement patterns and habitat usage. Fourteen juveniles were implanted with ultrasonic transmitters and tracked June–August of 2004, 2005 and 2006. Telemetry data, Geographic Information System software, side-scan sonar, video images of the river bottom, scuba diving, and benthic substrate samples were used to determine the extent and composition of habitats they occupied. Juvenile lake sturgeon habitat selection was strongly related to water depth. No fish were found in 700 mm in length selected sand and gravel areas mixed with zebra mussels and areas dominated by zebra mussels, while fish < 700 mm used these habitat types in proportion to their availability.

  4. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  5. Ion channel activity in lobster skeletal muscle membrane.

    PubMed

    Worden, M K; Rahamimoff, R; Kravitz, E A

    1993-09-01

    Ion channel activity in the sarcolemmal membrane of muscle fibers is critical for regulating the excitability, and therefore the contractility, of muscle. To begin the characterization of the biophysical properties of the sarcolemmal membrane of lobster exoskeletal muscle fibers, recordings were made from excised patches of membrane from enzymatically induced muscle fiber blebs. Blebs formed as evaginations of the muscle sarcolemmal membrane and were sufficiently free of extracellular debris to allow the formation of gigaohm seals. Under simple experimental conditions using bi-ionic symmetrical recording solutions and maintained holding potentials, a variety of single channel types with conductances in the range 32-380 pS were detected. Two of these ion channel species are described in detail, both are cation channels selective for potassium. They can be distinguished from each other on the basis of their single-channel conductance and gating properties. The results suggest that current flows through a large number of ion channels that open spontaneously in bleb membranes in the absence of exogenous metabolites or hormones.

  6. Ligand-Gated Ion Channels: Permeation and Activation1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Joseph W.; Barry, Peter H.

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) are fast-responding channels in which the receptor, which binds the activating molecule (the ligand), and the ion channel are part of the same nanomolecular protein complex. This chapter will describe the properties and functions of the nicotinic acetylcholine LGIC superfamily, which play a critical role in the fast chemical transmission of electrical signals between nerve cells at synapses and between nerve and muscle cells at endplates. All the processing functions of the brain and the resulting behavioral output depend on chemical transmission across such neuronal interconnections. To describe the properties of the channels of this LGIC superfamily,we will mainly use two examples of this family of channels: the excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) channels. In the chemical transmission of electrical signals, the arrival of an electrical signal at the synaptic terminal of a nerve causes the release of a chemical signal—a neurotransmitter molecule (the ligand, also referred to as the agonist). The neurotransmitter rapidly diffuses across the very narrow 20-40 nm synaptic gap between the cells and binds to the LGIC receptors in the membrane of the target (postsynaptic) cell and generates a new electrical signal in that cell (e.g., Kandel et al., 2000). How this chemical signal is converted into an electrical one depends on the fundamental properties of LGICs and the ionic composition of the postsynaptic cell and its external solution.

  7. Do Titan's river channels carve into ice bedrock or loose regolith?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. C.; Sklar, L. S.; Litwin, K. L.; Polito, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    transportable blocks, and/or that most of the channels are transport-limited and are primarily acting to redistribute an existing loose regolith layer across Titan’s surface. References: Collins, G. C., Relative rates of fluvial bedrock incision on Titan and Earth, Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L22202, doi:10.1029/2005GL024551, 2005. Keller, H. U., B. Grieger, M. Küppers, S. E. Schröder, Y. V. Skorov, and M. G. Tomasko, The properties of Titan’s surface at the Huygens landing site from DISR observations, Planet. Space Sci. 56, 728-752, 2008. Perron, J. T., M. P. Lamb, C. D. Koven, I. Y. Fung, E. Yager, and M. Ádámkovics, Valley formation and methane precipitation rates on Titan, J. Geophys. Res. 111, E11001, 2006. Sklar, L. S., and W. E. Dietrich, A mechanistic model for river incision into bedrock by saltating bed load, Water Resour. Res. 40, W06301, 2004.

  8. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-09

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  9. Geomorphic and stratigraphic evidence for dynamic river channel development in the Dehra Dun region, northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, A. L.; Sinha, R.; Barnes, J. B.; Pickering, J.; Tandon, S. K.

    2009-04-01

    The Ganga and Yamuna rivers drain the Garhwal Himalaya of northern India and cut cross several active faults as they pass into the Gangetic Plain and the northern Indian foreland. Unlike rivers in the central or eastern Himalayas, which debouch directly into the foreland and have built large depositional fan complexes, the Ganga and Yamuna rivers have been funnelled into an intermontane basin, the Dehra Dun, by Quaternary upper-crustal faulting and growth of the Mohand anticline. Sediments in the Dun record a complex history of aggradation and erosion during the Quaternary, as seen by alternate episodes of fan progradation and incision in stratigraphic records. Here, we summarize existing work on the evidence for, and timing of, these episodes, and explore the consequences of proximal sediment storage or evacuation, as well as local sediment sources derived from the active structures bounding the Dun, on the downstream character and behaviour of the river systems. Correlation of fan depositional surfaces across the Dun allows us to constrain both the volumes of Quaternary fill in the Dun and the amount of material excavated during episodes of fan incision. We argue that, while the trapping of sediment in the Dun is ultimately caused by growth and lateral propagation of the Himalayan frontal fault system and the Mohand anticline, variations in storage or excavation on short time scales (50-100 ka to present) are most likely driven by climatically-modulated changes in sediment supply from the catchments upstream of the Dun. We show that active upper-crustal faulting does, however, leave a consistent imprint in the present-day morphology of the rivers as they flow across the Dun. Finally, we place bounds on the volumes of sediment sourced from the active structures bounding the Dun, including the Mohand anticline, and the approximate time scales over which this sediment has been liberated. An open question is whether or not the proximal sediment storage ‘filter' of

  10. Understand spiciness: mechanism of TRPV1 channel activation by capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Capsaicin in chili peppers bestows the sensation of spiciness. Since the discovery of its receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel, how capsaicin activates this channel has been under extensive investigation using a variety of experimental techniques including mutagenesis, patch-clamp recording, crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, computational docking and molecular dynamic simulation. A framework of how capsaicin binds and activates TRPV1 has started to merge: capsaicin binds to a pocket formed by the channel's transmembrane segments, where it takes a "tail-up, head-down" configuration. Binding is mediated by both hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. Upon binding, capsaicin stabilizes the open state of TRPV1 by "pull-and-contact" with the S4-S5 linker. Understanding the ligand-host interaction will greatly facilitate pharmaceutical efforts to develop novel analgesics targeting TRPV1.

  11. Channel response to extreme floods: Insights on controlling factors from six mountain rivers in northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surian, Nicola; Righini, Margherita; Lucía, Ana; Nardi, Laura; Amponsah, William; Benvenuti, Marco; Borga, Marco; Cavalli, Marco; Comiti, Francesco; Marchi, Lorenzo; Rinaldi, Massimo; Viero, Alessia

    2016-11-01

    This work addresses the geomorphic response of mountain rivers to extreme floods, exploring the relationships between morphological changes and controlling factors. The research was conducted on six tributaries of the Magra River (northern Apennines, Italy) whose catchments were affected by an extreme flood (estimated recurrence interval > 100 years in most of the basins) on 25 October 2011. An integrated approach was deployed to study this flood, including (i) analysis of channel width changes by comparing aerial photographs taken before and after the flood, (ii) estimate of peak discharges in ungauged streams, (iii) detailed mapping of landslides and analysis of their connectivity with the channel network. Channel widening occurred in 35 reaches out of 39. In reaches with channel slope < 4% (here defined as nonsteep reaches), average and maximum ratios of post-flood and pre-flood channel width were 5.2 and 19.7 (i.e., channel widened from 4 to 82 m), respectively. In steep reaches (slope ≥ 4%), widening was slightly less intense (i.e., average width ratio = 3.4, maximum width ratio = 9.6). The relationships between the degree of channel widening and seven controlling factors were explored at subreach scale by using multiple regression models. In the steep subreaches characterized by higher confinement, the degree of channel widening (i.e., width ratio) showed relatively strong relationships with cross-sectional stream power, unit stream power (calculated based on pre-flood channel width), and lateral confinement, with coefficients of multiple determination (R2) ranging between 0.43 and 0.67. The models for the nonsteep subreaches provided a lower explanation of widening variability, with R2 ranging from 0.30 to 0.38; in these reaches a significant although weak relation was found between the degree of channel widening and the hillslope area supplying sediment to the channels. Results indicate that hydraulic variables alone are not sufficient to satisfactorily

  12. Fish assemblages at engineered and natural channel structures in the lower Missouri river: implications for modified dike structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, J.T.; Paukert, Craig P.; Doyle, W.J.; Hill, T.; Steffensen, K.D.; Travnichek, Vincent H.

    2012-01-01

    Large rivers throughout the world have been modified by using dike structures to divert water flows to deepwater habitats to maintain navigation channels. These modifications have been implicated in the decline in habitat diversity and native fishes. However, dike structures have been modified in the Missouri River USA to increase habitat diversity to aid in the recovery of native fishes. We compared species occupancy and fish community composition at natural sandbars and at notched and un-notched rock dikes along the lower Missouri River to determine if notching dikes increases species diversity or occupancy of native fishes. Fish were collected using gill nets, trammel nets, otter trawls, and mini fyke nets throughout the lower 1212 river km of the Missouri River USA from 2003 to 2006. Few differences in species richness and diversity were evident among engineered dike structures and natural sandbars. Notching a dike structure had no effect on proportional abundance of fluvial dependents, fluvial specialists, and macrohabitat generalists. Occupancy at notched dikes increased for two species but did not differ for 17 other species (81%). Our results suggest that dike structures may provide suitable habitats for fluvial species compared with channel sand bars, but dike notching did not increase abundance or occupancy of most Missouri River fishes. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Sediment discharge and channel change in the North Fork Teton River, 1977-78, Fremont and Madison counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Rhea P.

    1979-01-01

    The Teton Dam failure flood of June 5, 1976, severely disrupted the geomorphic character of North Fork Teton River in Idaho. Extensive channel restoration was required to contain expected normal spring flows. Six principal sites were established on the 17-mile reach of the river to study sediment transport and channel change during 1977-78. During April 1 to September 30, 1977, total water discharge at Teton Island bridge was 97,530 acre-feet; 4,360 tons of total sediment were transported. Total water discharge, April 1 to September 30, 1978, was 191,940 acre-feet; 10,680 tons of total sediment were transported. Analyses of data indicated several trends of erosion and deposition. Minimal channel change in the upper 7 miles of the river indicated equilibrium may temporarily exist between hydraulic-flow properties and channel shape. Streambed profiles indicated little change in streambed elevations. Erosional tonnage at mid-study reaches was 4,260 tons. One-half mile downstream, an increase of 4,150 tons of suspended and 1,050 tons of bedload sediment probably was partly derived from upstream bank erosion. An estimated 5,870 tons was deposited within the next subreach downstream. Virtually the entire bedload was redeposited before the last subreach, 4.4 miles downstream measured bedload was 91 tons. Suspended-sediment discharge transported past the last site was 16,470 tons. Lateral erosion and deposition in the lower 10 miles of the river indicate that subreaches now shortened by manmade channel alinements may begin to meander. Future deposition of coarse material at upstream gravel and concrete impoundments may trigger instability in the entire river. (Kosco-USGS)

  14. Geomorphic Framework to assess changes to aquatic habitat due to flow regulation and channel and floodplain alteration, Cedar River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Little, Rand

    2010-01-01

    Flow regulation, bank armoring, and floodplain alteration since the early 20th century have contributed to significant changes in the hydrologic regime and geomorphic processes of the Cedar River in Washington State. The Cedar River originates in the Cascade Range, provides drinking water to the Seattle metropolitan area, and supports several populations of anadromous salmonids. Flow regulation currently has limited influence on the magnitude, duration, and timing of high-flow events, which affect the incubation of salmonids as well as the production and maintenance of their habitat. Unlike structural changes to the channel and floodplain, flow regulation may be modified in the short-term to improve the viability of salmon populations. An understanding of the effects of flow regulation on those populations must be discerned over a range of scales from individual floods that affect the size of individual year classes to decadal high flow regime that influences the amount and quality of channel and off-channel habitat available for spawning and rearing. We present estimates of reach-scale sediment budgets and changes to channel morphology derived from historical orthoimagery, specific gage analyses at four long-term streamflow-gaging stations to quantify trends in aggradation, and hydrologic statistics of the magnitude and duration of peak streamflows. These data suggest a gradient of channel types from unconfined, sediment-rich segments to confined, sediment-poor segments that are likely to have distinct responses to high flows. Particle-size distribution data and longitudinal water surface and streambed profiles for the 56 km downstream of Chester Morse Lake measured in 2010 show the spatial extent of preferred salmonid habitat along the Cedar River. These historical and current data constitute a geomorphic framework to help assess different river management scenarios for salmonid habitat and population viability. PDF version of a presentation on changes to aquatic

  15. Abiotic controls of emergent macrophyte density in a bedrock channel - The Cahaba River, AL (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Ryan S.; Davis, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    Research examining bedrock channels is growing. Despite this, biotic-abiotic interactions remain a topic mostly addressed in alluvial systems. This research identified hydrogeomorphic factors operating at the patch-scale (100-102 m) in bedrock shoals of the Cahaba River (AL) that help determine the distribution of the emergent aquatic macrophyte, Justicia americana. Macrophyte patch density (number of stems/m2) and percent bedrock void surface area (rock surface area/m2 occupied by joints, fractures, and potholes) were measured (n = 24 within two bedrock shoals) using stem counts and underwater photography, respectively. One-dimensional hydrologic modeling (HEC-RAS 4.1.0) was completed for a section within a shoal to examine velocity and channel depth as controlling variables for macrophyte patch density. Results from binary logistic regression analysis identified depth and velocity as good predictors of the presence or absence of Justicia americana within shoal structures (depth p = 0.001, velocity p = 0.007), which is a similar finding to previous research conducted in alluvial systems. Correlation analysis between bedrock surface void area and stem density demonstrated a statistically significant positive correlation (r = 0.665, p = 0.01), elucidating a link between abiotic-biotic processes that may well be unique to bedrock channels. These results suggest that the amount of void space present in bedrock surfaces, in addition to localized depth and velocity, helps control macrophyte patch density in bedrock shoal complexes. The utility of geomorphology in explaining patch-scale habitat heterogeneity in this study highlights geomorphology's potential to help understand macrophyte habitat heterogeneity at the reach scale, while also demonstrating its promise for mapping and understanding habitat heterogeneity at the system scale.

  16. Nav channel mechanosensitivity: activation and inactivation accelerate reversibly with stretch.

    PubMed

    Morris, Catherine E; Juranka, Peter F

    2007-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are modulated by many bilayer mechanical amphiphiles, but whether, like other voltage-gated channels (Kv, HCN, Cav), they respond to physical bilayer deformations is unknown. We expressed human heart Nav1.5 pore alpha-subunit in oocytes (where, unlike alphaNav1.4, alphaNav1.5 exhibits normal kinetics) and measured small macroscopic currents in cell-attached patches. Pipette pressure was used to reversibly stretch the membrane for comparison of I(Na)(t) before, during, and after stretch. At all voltages, and in a dose-dependent fashion, stretch accelerated the I(Na)(t) time course. The sign of membrane curvature was not relevant. Typical stretch stimuli reversibly accelerated both activation and inactivation by approximately 1.4-fold; normalization of peak I(Na)(t) followed by temporal scaling ( approximately 1.30- to 1.85-fold) resulted in full overlap of the stretch/no-stretch traces. Evidently the rate-limiting outward voltage sensor motion in the Nav1.5 activation path (as in Kv1) accelerated with stretch. Stretch-accelerated inactivation occurred even with activation saturated, so an independently stretch-modulated inactivation transition is also a possibility. Since Nav1.5 channel-stretch modulation was both reliable and reversible, and required stretch stimuli no more intense than what typically activates putative mechanotransducer channels (e.g., stretch-activated TRPC1-based currents), Nav channels join the ranks of putative mechanotransducers. It is noteworthy that at voltages near the activation threshold, moderate stretch increased the peak I(Na) amplitude approximately 1.5-fold. It will be important to determine whether stretch-modulated Nav current contributes to cardiac arrhythmias, to mechanosensory responses in interstitial cells of Cajal, to touch receptor responses, and to neuropathic (i.e., hypermechanosensitive) and/or normal pain reception.

  17. The Antibacterial Activity of Human Neutrophils and Eosinophils Requires Proton Channels but Not BK Channels

    PubMed Central

    Femling, Jon K.; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Morgan, Deri; Rada, Balázs; Davis, A. Paige; Czirják, Gabor; Enyedi, Peter; England, Sarah K.; Moreland, Jessica G.; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Nauseef, William M.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Electrophysiological events are of central importance during the phagocyte respiratory burst, because NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and voltage sensitive. We investigated the recent suggestion that large-conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels, rather than proton channels, play an essential role in innate immunity (Ahluwalia, J., A. Tinker, L.H. Clapp, M.R. Duchen, A.Y. Abramov, S. Page, M. Nobles, and A.W. Segal. 2004. Nature. 427:853–858). In PMA-stimulated human neutrophils or eosinophils, we did not detect BK currents, and neither of the BK channel inhibitors iberiotoxin or paxilline nor DPI inhibited any component of outward current. BK inhibitors did not inhibit the killing of bacteria, nor did they affect NADPH oxidase-dependent degradation of bacterial phospholipids by extracellular gIIA-PLA2 or the production of superoxide anion (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}). Moreover, an antibody against the BK channel did not detect immunoreactive protein in human neutrophils. A required role for voltage-gated proton channels is demonstrated by Zn2+ inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity assessed by H2O2 production, thus validating previous studies showing that Zn2+ inhibited \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} production when assessed by cytochrome c reduction. In conclusion, BK channels were not detected in human neutrophils or eosinophils, and

  18. Light-Activated Ion Channels for Remote Control of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, James J.; Kramer, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Light-activated ion channels provide a new opportunity to precisely and remotely control neuronal activity for experimental applications in neurobiology. In the past few years, several strategies have arisen that allow light to control ion channels and therefore neuronal function. Light-based triggers for ion channel control include caged compounds, which release active neurotransmitters when photolyzed with light, and natural photoreceptive proteins, which can be expressed exogenously in neurons. More recently, a third type of light trigger has been introduced: a photoisomerizable tethered ligand that directly controls ion channel activity in a light-dependent manner. Beyond the experimental applications for light-gated ion channels, there may be clinical applications in which these light-sensitive ion channels could prove advantageous over traditional methods. Electrodes for neural stimulation to control disease symptoms are invasive and often difficult to reposition between cells in tissue. Stimulation by chemical agents is difficult to constrain to individual cells and has limited temporal accuracy in tissue due to diffusional limitations. In contrast, ion channels that can be directly activated with light allow control with unparalleled spatial and temporal precision. The goal of this chapter is to describe light-regulated ion channels and how they have been tailored to control different aspects of neural activity, and how to use these channels to manipulate and better understand development, function, and plasticity of neurons and neural circuits. PMID:19195553

  19. Comparing effects of active and passive restoration on the Middle Fork John Day River, NE Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.; Goslin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, cattle grazing has been eliminated on over 14 km of the upper Middle Fork John Day. Starting in 2008, active restoration (log structures with dug pools, woody vegetation planting, and modifications to increase channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity) was implemented on nearly 6 km within the cattle exclosure length. Implementation of active and passive restoration strategies in the same and adjacent reaches allows comparison of these two approaches. We have been monitoring these reaches since 2008. Unexpectedly in response to grazing exclosure, a native sedge, Carex nudata (torrent sedge), has exploded in population. C. nudata grows in the active channel, anchoring itself tightly to the gravel-cobble river bed with a dense root network. As a result, C. nudata has changed erosion and sedimentation patterns including bank erosion, channel bed scour, and island formation. We present data on fish cover increases due to C. nudata and log structures, and on channel complexity before and after restoration. Both active and passive restorations are increasing channel complexity and juvenile fish cover, although in different ways. Fish cover provided by active and passive restoration are similar in area but different in depth and position, with C. nudata fish cover generally shallower and partly mid-channel. Residual pool depth is larger in log structure pools than in C. nudata scour pools, but C. nudata pools are more numerous in some reaches. By producing frequent, small scour features and small islands, it can be argued that C. nudata is increasing hydraulic complexity more than the large, meander-bend pools at log structures, but this is hard to quantify. C. nudata has also stabilized active bars, perhaps changing the bedload sediment budget. Positive habitat benefits of active restoration appear to be greater in the short term, but over the long term (20 years or more) effects of C. nudata may be comparable or greater.

  20. A longitudinal assessment of the aquatic macroinvertebrate community in the channelized lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Charbonneau, Collette S.; Fairchild, James F.; Mueller, Brad G.; Schmitt, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted an aquatic macroinvertebrate assessment in the channelized reach of the lower Missouri River, and used statistical analysis of individual metrics and multimetric scores to identify community response patterns and evaluate relative biological condition. We examined longitudinal site differences that are potentially associated with water qualityrelated factors originating from the Kansas City metropolitan area, using data from coarse rock substrate in flowing water habitats (outside river bends), and depositional mud substratein slack water habitats (dike fields). Three sites above rivermile (RM) 369 in Kansas City (Nebraska City, RM = 560; St. Joseph, RM = 530; Parkville, RM = 377) and three below (Lexington, RM = 319; Glasgow, RM = 228; Hermann, RM = 94) were sampled with rock basket artificial substrates, a qualitative kicknet method, and the Petite Ponar. We also compared the performance of the methods used. A total of 132 aquatic macroinvertebrate taxa were collected from the lower Missouri River; one third of these taxa belonged to the sensitiveEPOT insect orders (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Odonata, and Trichoptera). Rock baskets had the highest mean efficiency (34.1%) of the methods, and the largest number of taxa was collected by Ponar (n = 69) and kicknet (n = 69) methods. Seven of the 15 metrics calculated from rock basket data, and five ofthe nine metrics calculated from Ponar data showed highly significant differences (ANOVA, P < 0.001) at one or more sitesbelow Kansas City. We observed a substantial reduction in net-spinning Trichoptera in rock habitats below Kansas City (Lexington), an increase in relative dominance of Oligochaeta in depositional habitats at the next site downstream (Glasgow), and lower relative condition scores in rock habitat at Lexingtonand depositional habitat at Glasgow. Collectively, these data indicate that some urban-related impacts on the aquatic macroinvertebrate community are occurring. Our results suggest that

  1. Water-surface elevations and channel characteristics for a selected reach of the Applegate River, Jackson County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, David Dell; Alexander, Clyde W.

    1970-01-01

    In land-use planning for the Applegate River and its flood plain, consideration should be given to (1) preservation of the recreational attributes of the area, (2) allowance for optimum development of the flood plain's natural resources, and (3) protection of the rights of private landowners. Major factors that influence evaluation of the above considerations are the elevations and characteristics of floods. Heretofore, such flood data for the Applegate River have been inadequate to evaluate the flood potential or to use as a basis for delineating reasonable land-use zones. Therefore, at the request of Jackson County, this study was made to provide flood elevations, water-surface profiles, and channel characteristics (geometry and slope) for a reach of the Applegate River from the Jackson-Josephine County line upstream to the Applegate damsite (fig. 1). A similar study was previously made for reaches of adjacent Rogue River and Elk Creek (Harris, 1970).

  2. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation.

  3. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  4. A cyclic AMP-activated K+ channel in Drosophila larval muscle is persistently activated in dunce.

    PubMed

    Delgado, R; Hidalgo, P; Diaz, F; Latorre, R; Labarca, P

    1991-01-15

    Single-channel recording from longitudinal ventrolateral Drosophila larval muscle reveals the presence of a potassium-selective channel that is directly and reversibly activated by cAMP in a dose-dependent fashion. Activation is specific and it cannot be mimicked by a series of agents that include AMP, cGMP, ATP, inositol trisphosphate, and Ca2+. Channel current records obtained from larval muscle in different dunce mutants possessing abnormally high levels of cAMP show that, in the mutants, the channel displays an increased probability of opening.

  5. A cyclic AMP-activated K+ channel in Drosophila larval muscle is persistently activated in dunce.

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, R; Hidalgo, P; Diaz, F; Latorre, R; Labarca, P

    1991-01-01

    Single-channel recording from longitudinal ventrolateral Drosophila larval muscle reveals the presence of a potassium-selective channel that is directly and reversibly activated by cAMP in a dose-dependent fashion. Activation is specific and it cannot be mimicked by a series of agents that include AMP, cGMP, ATP, inositol trisphosphate, and Ca2+. Channel current records obtained from larval muscle in different dunce mutants possessing abnormally high levels of cAMP show that, in the mutants, the channel displays an increased probability of opening. PMID:1846445

  6. Combined single channel and single molecule detection identifies subunit composition of STIM1-activated transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Sampieri, Alicia; Moreno, Claudia; Pacheco, Jonathan; Salgado, Alfonso; Sherry, Ryan; Vaca, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of intracellular calcium ion stores initiates a rapid cascade of events culminating with the activation of the so-called Store-Operated Channels (SOC) at the plasma membrane. Calcium influx via SOC is essential in the initiation of calcium-dependent intracellular signaling and for the refilling of internal calcium stores, ensuring the regeneration of the signaling cascade. In spite of the significance of this evolutionary conserved mechanism, the molecular identity of SOC has been the center of a heated controversy spanning over the last 20 years. Initial studies positioned some members of the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel superfamily of channels (with the more robust evidence pointing to TRPC1) as a putative SOC. Recent evidence indicates that Stromal Interacting Molecule 1 (STIM1) activates some members from the TRPC family of channels. However, the exact subunit composition of TRPC channels remains undetermined to this date. To identify the subunit composition of STIM1-activated TRPC channels, we developed novel method, which combines single channel electrophysiological measurements based on the patch clamp technique with single molecule fluorescence imaging. We termed this method Single ion Channel Single Molecule Detection technique (SC-SMD). Using SC-SMD method, we have obtained direct evidence of the subunit composition of TRPC channels activated by STIM1. Furthermore, our electrophysiological-imaging SC-SMD method provides evidence at the molecular level of the mechanism by which STIM1 and calmodulin antagonize to modulate TRPC channel activity.

  7. Contrasts between channels and backwaters in a large, floodplain river: Testing our understanding of nutrient cycling, phytoplankton abundance, and suspended solids dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, Jeff N.

    2016-01-01

    In floodplain rivers, variability in hydraulic connectivity interacts with biogeochemistry to determine the distribution of suspended and dissolved substances. Nutrient, chlorophyll a, and suspended solids data spanning longitudinal (5 study reaches across 1300 river km), lateral (main channel and backwaters), and temporal (1994–2011) gradients in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) were used to examine the extent to which observed differences between the main channel and backwaters were consistent with expectations based on current understanding of biogeochemical processes in large rivers. For N and P, the results largely conformed to expectations. N concentrations were greater in the main channel than in the backwaters in 82 to 96% of the observations across river reaches. Maximum TP concentrations generally occurred in backwaters during summer, when backwater TP often exceeded that of the main channel. Flux of P from sediments may be a substantial source of water-column P in UMR backwaters in summer. The data for suspended solids and chlorophyll a suggest that some refinements are needed of our understanding of ecosystem processes in large rivers. During low-discharge conditions, concentrations of inorganic suspended solids often were greater in backwaters than in the main channel, suggesting the importance of sediment resuspension. Chlorophyll a concentrations were usually greater in backwaters than in the main channel, but exceptions indicate that phytoplankton abundance in the main channel of the UMR can sometimes be greater than is typically expected for large rivers.

  8. Influence of channel morphology and flow regime on larval drift of pallid sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, Susannah O.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    The transition from drifting free embryo to exogenously feeding larvae has been identified as a potential life-stage bottleneck for the endangered Missouri River pallid sturgeon. Previous studies have indicated that river regulation and fragmentation may contribute to the mortality of larval pallid sturgeon by reducing the extent of free-flowing river available to free embryos to complete ontogenetic development. Calculations of total drift distance based on mean velocity, however, do not address the potential for complex channels and flow patterns to increase retention or longitudinal dispersion of free embryos. We use a one-dimensional advection–dispersion model to estimate total drift distance and employ the longitudinal dispersion coefficient as a metric to quantify the tendency towards dispersion or retention of passively drifting larvae. We describe the effects of different styles of channel morphology on larval dispersion and consider the implications of flow regime modifications on retention of free embryos within the Lower Missouri River. The results illustrate the complex interactions of local morphology, engineered structures, and hydraulics that determine patterns of dispersion in riverine environments and inform how changes to channel morphology and flow regime may alter dispersion of drifting organisms.

  9. Activation and inhibition of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca(2+)-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+), and discovered that Mg(2+) competes with Ca(2+) in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore-as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions-appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1.

  10. Activation and Inhibition of TMEM16A Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca2+-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+, and discovered that Mg2+ competes with Ca2+ in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore–as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions–appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1. PMID:24489780

  11. Response of lateral channel dynamics of a lowland meandering river to engineering-derived adjustments - an example of the Morava River (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondruch, Jakub; Mácka, Zdenek

    2015-11-01

    Freely meandering (quasi)natural reaches of lowland rivers represent a rare phenomenon in Central Europe. Increasing attention is currently being paid to the dynamics of quasi-natural (artificially influenced) meandering rivers as this attention represents the basic prerequisite for the development of appropriate restoration strategies on regulated rivers. This study focused on a 5.5 km long reach of the Morava River in the Strážnické Pomoraví region, Czech Republic that is characterised by quasi-natural evolution after substantial engineering adjustments were made in the first decades of the twentieth century. Based on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis of aerial photographs, the spatio-temporal dynamics of bank erosion and accretion rates were quantitatively described and variables that control channel migration rates were identified. High rates of lateral shifts were localised in high sinuosity segments (sinuosity 1.17-2.37), whereas segments with very low rates were straight or formed into slightly curved bends (sinuosity 1.05-1.18). As a key factor, engineering works that influenced local river bed slope and induced a dramatic increase in bank erosion rates were identified. River engineering works induced a dramatic increase in bank erosion rate (2.19 m/year for 1938-53 and 1.47 m/year for 1953-63). An interval of approximately 25 years was needed before the erosion rates dropped back to values documented before river regulation (0.35-1.09 m/year for 1841-1938). Other important controlling variables included radius of curvature, frequency and magnitude of floods and, locally, river bank material properties and floodplain land cover.

  12. Large-scale bedforms in the Platte River downstream from Grand Island, Nebraska; structure, process, and relationship to channel narrowing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Platte River channel in Nebraska, especially downstream from Grand Island, is characterized by large, periodic, and geometrically distinct bedforms called macroforms. Macroforms have dimensions commensurate with the width and depth of the channel and are emergent at all but the highest flow stages. The encroachment of vegetation on macroforms and their consequent stabilization since the large-scale development of irrigation in the Platte River basin is the major cause of the reduction in channel width upstream from Grand Island. From simple geometrical considerations of macroform shape, an equation is developed to predict the depth and duration of flow required to erode the stoss sides of the macroforms to remove new vegetal growth each year. The methods developed in this report to eliminate vegetal growth on macroforms may provide a useful management tool for controlling width of the Platte River channels. Although further testing is required to establish the validity of these methods at actual stream sites, a sample calculation for the Silver Creek reach shows good agreement between the flow conditions predicted by the methods developed in this report and actual flow conditions. (USGS)

  13. Drivers of barotropic and baroclinic exchange through an estuarine navigation channel in the Mississippi River Delta Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Estuarine navigation channels have long been recognized as conduits for saltwater intrusion into coastal wetlands. Salt flux decomposition and time series measurements of velocity and salinity were used to examine salt flux components and drivers of baroclinic and barotropic exchange in the Houma Navigation Channel, an estuarine channel located in the Mississippi River delta plain that receives substantial freshwater inputs from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system at its inland extent. Two modes of vertical current structure were identified from the time series data. The first mode, accounting for 90% of the total flow field variability, strongly resembled a barotropic current structure and was coherent with alongshelf wind stress over the coastal Gulf of Mexico. The second mode was indicative of gravitational circulation and was linked to variability in tidal stirring and the horizontal salinity gradient along the channel’s length. Tidal oscillatory salt flux was more important than gravitational circulation in transporting salt upestuary, except over equatorial phases of the fortnightly tidal cycle during times when river inflows were minimal. During all tidal cycles sampled, the advective flux, driven by a combination of freshwater discharge and wind-driven changes in storage, was the dominant transport term, and net flux of salt was always out of the estuary. These findings indicate that although human-made channels can effectively facilitate inland intrusion of saline water, this intrusion can be minimized or even reversed when they are subject to significant freshwater inputs.

  14. Zinc activates damage-sensing TRPA1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhen; Bandell, Michael; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential biological trace element. It is required for the structure or function of over 300 proteins, and is increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. However, high concentrations of zinc have cytotoxic effects, and overexposure to zinc can cause pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that zinc excites nociceptive somatosensory neurons and causes nociception in mice through TRPA1, a cation channel previously shown to mediate the pungency of wasabi and cinnamon through cysteine-modification. Zinc activates TRPA1 through a novel mechanism that requires zinc influx through TRPA1 channels and subsequent activation via specific intracellular cysteine and histidine residues. TRPA1 is highly sensitive to intracellular zinc, as low nanomolar concentrations activate TRPA1 and modulate its sensitivity. These findings identify TRPA1 as a major target for the sensory effects of zinc, and support an emerging role for zinc as a signaling molecule that can modulate sensory transmission. PMID:19202543

  15. TRP channels activated by extracellular hypo-osmoticity in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Harteneck, C; Reiter, B

    2007-02-01

    TRP (transient receptor potential) channels comprise a superfamily of non-selective cation channels with at least seven subfamilies. The variety of subfamilies corresponds to the differences in the activation mechanisms and functions. TRPM3 (TRP melastatin 3) and TRPV4 (TRP vanilloid 3) have been characterized as cation channels activated by extracellular hypo-osmoticity. In addition, TRPV4 is activated by metabolites of arachidonic acid as well as alpha-isomers of phorbol esters known to be ineffective in stimulating proteins of the protein kinase C family. TRPM3 is responsive to sphingosine derivatives. The detection of splice variants with probably different activation mechanisms supports the idea that TRPM3 may have diverse cellular functions depending on the expression of a particular variant. The expression of TRPV4 in many epithelial cell types raised the question of the role of TRPV4 in epithelial physiology. Single-cell experiments as well as approaches using epithelial layers show that multiple cellular responses are triggered by TRPV4 activation and subsequent elevation of intracellular calcium. The TRPV4-induced responses increasing transcellular ion flux as well as paracellular permeability may allow the cells to adjust to changes in extracellular osmolarity. In summary, TRPV4 plays a central role in epithelial homoeostasis by modulating epithelial barrier function.

  16. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2–5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface