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Sample records for active river channel

  1. River Elongation as a Proxy for Lateral Channel Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. W.

    2009-12-01

    Lateral channel movement is a process that is tightly linked to both channel hydraulics and sediment transport, strongly influences floodplain ecology, and also has great relevance for banktop property owners. The correlation between channel migration rate and channel curvature usually causes meandering river channels to elongate as they migrate laterally. Over the long term, the increase in sinuosity is compensated by a rapid decrease in sinuosity where and when river bends shorten through cutoff processes. However, the elongation for most meander bends in systems free to migrate across wide floodplains often occurs relatively uniformly throughout the system. Consequently, the rate of elongation of individual river bends, integrated across a river reach, offers a simple mechanism for characterizing the reach’s lateral activity. Spatial series of accumulated elongation can also be used to delineate reaches with similar properties. We use aerial imagery pairs to compare rates of lateral channel centerline shifting with channel centerline elongation for reaches many bends long along eight different rivers with widths ranging from 12 to 584 m. Except where bends translate downstream without changing form, elongation rates are closely linked to lateral shifting. In several cases, a change in elongation rate corresponds closely with a change in channel width, discharge, and/or bed material. For reaches free to migrate across a wide, unconfined floodplain and where lateral migration measurements are likely of high quality, the average ratio between the reach average migration rate normalized by channel width and the rate of sinuosity increase (excluding bends that experienced a cutoff between imagery dates) is approximately 5.6. Since elongation rate measurements can be made accurately even from photos that are poorly aligned, the relationship between sinuosity increase and lateral migration potentially provides a means of bypassing time-consuming georeferencing

  2. Human activities impact on mountain river channels (case study of Kamchatka peninsula rivers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Aleksandra S.

    2010-05-01

    Human-induced driving factors along with natural environmental changes greatly impact on fluvial regime of rivers. On mountain and semi-mountain territories these processes are developed in the most complicated manner due to man-made activities diversity throughout river basins. Besides these processes are significantly enhanced because of the disastrous natural processes (like volcanic and mud-flow activity) frequent occurrences in mountainous regions. On of the most striking example on the matter is Kamchatka peninsula which is located at the North-West part of Russian Federation. This paper contributes to the study of human activities impact on fluvial systems in this volcanic mountain region. Human effects on rivers directly alter channel morphology and deformations, dynamics of water and sediment movement, aquatic communities or indirectly affect streams by altering the movement of water and sediment into the channel. In case study of Kamchatka peninsula human activities affect fluvial systems through engineering works including construction of bridges, dams and channel diversions and placer mining. These processes are characterized by spatial heterogeneity because of irregular population distribution. Due to specific natural conditions of the peninsula the most populated areas are the valleys of big rivers (rivers Kamchatka, Avacha, Bistraya (Bolshaya), etc) within piedmont and plain regions. These rivers are characterized by very unstable channels. Both with man-made activities this determines wide range of fluvial system changes. Firstly bridges construction leads to island and logjam formation directly near their piers and intensification of channels patterns shifts. Furthermore rivers of the peninsula are distinguished for high water flow velocities and water rate. Incorrect bridge constructions both with significant channel deformations lead to the destructions of the bridges themselves due to intensive bank erosion. Secondly, intensive water flow

  3. Observations of the Behavior and Distribution of Fish in Relation to the Columbia River Navigation Channel and Channel Maintenance Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, R. L.; Mueller, Robert P.; Weiland, Mark A.; Johnson, P. N.

    2001-10-19

    This report is a compilation of 7 studies conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers between 1995 and 1998 which used hydroacoustic methods to study the behavior of migrating salmon in response to navigation channel maintenance activities in the lower Columbia River near river mile 45. Differences between daytime and nighttime behavior and fish densities were noted. Comparisons were made of fish distribution across the river (in the channel, channel margin or near shore) and fish depth upstream and downstream of dikes, dredges, and pile driving areas.

  4. Quantifying the transition from fluvial- to wave-dominance for river deltas with multiple active channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, J.; Ashton, A. D.; Giosan, L.

    2012-12-01

    The plan-view morphologies of fluvial- and wave-dominated deltas are clearly distinctive, but transitional forms are numerous. A quantitative, process-based description of this transition remains unexplored, particularly for river deltas with multiple active channels. Previous studies focused on general attributes of the fluvial and marine environment, such as the balance between wave energy and river discharge. Here, we propose that the transition between fluvial and wave dominance is directly related to the magnitude of the fluvial bedload flux to the nearshore region versus the alongshore sediment transport capacity of waves removing sediment away from the mouth. In the case of a single-channel delta, this balance can be computed for a given distribution of waves approaching shore. Fluvial dominance occurs when fluvial sediment input exceeds the wave-sustained maximum alongshore sediment transport for all potential shoreline orientations both up- and downdrift of the river mouth. However, deltaic channels have the tendency to bifurcate with increasing fluvial strength. Initial bifurcation splits the fluvial sediment flux among individual channels, while the potential sediment transport by waves remains constant for both river mouths. At higher bifurcation orders, multiple channels interact with each other alongshore, a situation more complicated than the single channel case and one that cannot be simple addressed analytically. We apply a model of plan-view shoreline evolution to simulate the evolution of a deltaic environment with multiple active channels. A highly simplified fluvial domain is represented by deposition of sediment where channels meet the coast. We investigate two scenarios of fluvial delivery. The first scenario deposits fluvial sediment alongshore on a self-similar predefined network of channels. We analyze the effects of different network geometrical parameters, such as bifurcation length, bifurcation angle, and sediment partitioning. In the

  5. Reach-scale channel sensitivity to multiple human activities and natural events: Lower Santa Clara River, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Peter W.; Dusterhoff, Scott R.; Sears, William A.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the cumulative impact of natural and human influences on the sensitivity of channel morphodynamics, a relative measure between the drivers for change and the magnitude of channel response, requires an approach that accommodates spatial and temporal variability in the suite of primary stressors. Multiple historical data sources were assembled to provide a reach-scale analysis of the lower Santa Clara River (LSCR) in Ventura County, California, USA. Sediment supply is naturally high due to tectonic activity, earthquake-generated landslides, wildfires, and high magnitude flow events during El Niño years. Somewhat typically for the region, the catchment has been subject to four reasonably distinct land use and resource management combinations since European-American settlement. When combined with analysis of channel morphological response (quantifiable since ca. 1930), reach-scale and temporal differences in channel sensitivity become apparent. Downstream reaches have incised on average 2.4 m and become narrower by almost 50% with changes focused in a period of highly sensitive response after about 1950 followed by forced insensitivity caused by structural flood embankments and a significant grade control structure. In contrast, the middle reaches have been responsive but are morphologically resilient, and the upstream reaches show a mildly sensitive aggradational trend. Superimposing the natural and human drivers for change reveals that large scale stressors (related to ranching and irrigation) have been replaced over time by a suite of stressors operating at multiple spatial scales. Lower reaches have been sensitive primarily to 'local' scale impacts (urban growth, flood control, and aggregate mining) whereas, upstream, catchment-scale influences still prevail (including flow regulation and climate-driven sediment supply factors). These factors illustrate the complexity inherent to cumulative impact assessment in fluvial systems, provide evidence for a

  6. The human role in changing river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, K. J.

    2006-09-01

    Direct consequences of the human role, where human activity affects river channels through engineering works including channelization, dam construction, diversion and culverting, have been long recognised [Marsh, G.P., 1864. Man and Nature or Physical Geography as Modified by Human Action. Charles Scribner, New York; Thomas Jr., W.L., (ed.) 1956. Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.]. The less obvious indirect effects of point and reach changes occurring downstream and throughout the basin, however, are much more recently appreciated, dating from key contributions by Strahler [Strahler, A.N., 1956. The nature of induced erosion and aggradation. In W. L. Thomas (Ed.), Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 621-638.], Wolman [Wolman, M.G., 1967. A cycle of sedimentation and erosion in urban river channels. Geografiska Annaler 49A, 385-95.], Schumm [Schumm, S.A., 1969. River metamorphosis. Proceedings American Society of Civil Engineers, Journal Hydraulics Division 95, 255-73.], and Graf [Graf, W.L., 1977. The rate law in fluvial geomorphology. American Journal of Science, 277, 178-191.]. These are complemented by effects of alterations of land use, such as deforestation, intensive agriculture and incidence of fire, with the most extreme effects produced by building activity and urbanisation. Changing river channels are most evident in the channel cross-section where changes of size, shape and composition are now well-established, with up to tenfold increases or decreases illustrated by results from more than 200 world studies. In addition the overall channel planform, the network and the ecology have changed. Specific terms have become associated with changing river channels including enlargement, shrinkage and metamorphosis. Although the scope of adjustment has been established, it has not always been possible to predict what will happen in a particular location

  7. Hepatic monooxygenase induction and promutagen activation in channel catfish from a contaminated river basin

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, G.W.; Shane, B.S.; Henry, C.B.

    1988-12-01

    To better understand the etiology of cancer in fish from polluted waters, the impact of environmental contaminants on xenobiotic metabolism of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) from a highly polluted water body, Devil's Swamp in southeastern Louisiana, has been investigated. Fish from Devil's Swamp bioaccumulated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides (CHI), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in fat tissue, the latter exceeding 7000 ppb. Reference catfish from the University farm, Ben Hur, were virtually devoid of PAH, CHI, and PCB. Liver microsomal enzymes (MFO) from Devil's Swamp fish were markedly induced. The specific content of cytochromes P450 and b5 and the specific activities of NAD(P)H-cytochrome c reductase were two to three times higher than those of Ben Hur fish. Consistent with this induction, a 9000g supernatant from Devil's Swamp but not Ben Hur fish activated 2-aminofluorene and benzo(a)pyrene (BP) to mutagens in the Ames test. BP metabolism by Devil's Swamp fish liver microsomes was inhibited to a greater extent by alpha-naphthoflavone than was BP metabolism by Ben Hur fish microsomes. This finding indicates that the induced activity in the Devil's Swamp fish liver was the result of P450 isozymes characteristic of PAH/PCB induction. Thus, exposure of fish to environmental pollutants can alter MFO leading to enhanced metabolic activation of promutagens to mutagens.

  8. Channel Morphology and Bed Sediment Characteristics Before and After Habitat Enhancement Activities in the Uridil Property, Platte River, Nebraska, Water Years 2005-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzel, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Fluvial geomorphic data were collected by the United States Geological Survey from July 2005 to June 2008 (a time period within water years 2005 to 2008) to monitor the effects of habitat enhancement activities conducted in the Platte River Whooping Crane Maintenance Trust's Uridil Property, located along the Platte River, Nebraska. The activities involved the removal of vegetation and sand from the tops of high permanent islands and the placement of the sand into the active river channel. This strategy was intended to enhance habitat for migratory water birds by lowering the elevations of the high islands, thereby eliminating a visual obstruction for roosting birds. It was also thought that the bare sand on the lowered island surfaces could serve as potential habitat for nesting water birds. Lastly, the project supplied a local source of sediment to the river to test the hypothesis that this material could contribute to the formation of lower sandbars and potential nesting sites downstream. Topographic surveys on the islands and along river transects were used to quantify the volume of removed sand and track the storage and movement of the introduced sand downstream. Sediment samples were also collected to map the spatial distribution of river bed sediment sizes before and after the management activities. While the project lowered the elevation of high islands, observations of the sand addition indicated the relatively fine-grained sand that was placed in the active river channel was rapidly transported by the flowing water. Topographic measurements made 3 months after the sand addition along transects in the area of sediment addition showed net aggradation over measurements made in 2005. In the year following the sand addition, 2007, elevated river flows from local rain events generally were accompanied by net degradation along transects within the area of sediment addition. In the spring of 2008, a large magnitude flow event of approximately 360 cubic meters per

  9. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  10. Defining large river channel patterns: Alluvial exchange and plurality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, John; Ashworth, Philip J.

    2014-06-01

    Large rivers have anabranching channels with components that may be defined as braided, meandering or straight. This paper shows that application of such holistic terminologies is complicated by recognition of within-type and transitional-type variety, a confusingly varied use of terms, and a coverage of pattern characteristics that for many large rivers is incomplete. In natural states, big rivers can be plural systems in which main, accessory, tributary and floodplain channels and lakes differ functionally and vary in terms of morphological dynamics. A distinction is drawn between the hydrological and geomorphological connectivity of components in big river plural systems. At any one time, even at flood stage, only some channels are geomorphologically active. Six types of geomorphological connectivity are described that range from coupled, through to partially-coupled and decoupled. The interplay between geomorphological and hydrological connectivity in large rivers is shown to determine habitat status and therefore ecological diversity. For improved understanding of the dynamics as well as the forms of these large composite systems, it is helpful to: (1) adopt element-level specification, not only for sediment bodies, but also for functioning channels; (2) track the sediment transfer processes and exchanges that produce channel forms over the highly varied timescales operating within large rivers; and (3) recognise the ways in which partially coupled and connected geomorphological systems produce naturally a composite set of forms at different rates. Such augmenting information will provide an improved platform for both river management and ecological understanding.

  11. Morphoevolution of slope-to-channel systems in active extensional domains: testing the potential of basin and river profile metrics in the inner sector of the Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Seta, Marta; Esposito, Carlo; Menichetti, Marco; Scarascia Mugnozza, Gabriele; Troiani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    This work explores the relevance and potential of a quantitative approach based on the time-dependent basin and river profile metrics for constraining the morphoevolution of slope-to-channel systems associated to Quaternary intermontane basins. Previous researches successfully applied this approach to regions experiencing base-level changes due to tectonic uplift, though significant tests in areas undergoing local base-level changes related to extensional faulting are still lacking. The axial zone of the Apennine chain (Italy) has provided test sites, where the activity of normal faults and associated slope-scale gravitational deformations evolving in rock avalanche have been already documented. Hypsometric integrals at three nested levels of a set of catchments allowed obtaining the morphometric characterization of slopes affected by rock avalanches, which had been documented to occur in different morphostructural settings (i.e. forelimb rock-slide avalanches and backlimb slide-wedge rock avalanches). Furthermore, river profile metrics recorded the effects of the rock avalanche emplacement along connected streams. Basin and river profile metrics provided quantitative geomorphic constraints to the morphoevolutionary steps of slope-to-channel systems, in particular for massive rock slope failures and drainage network reorganization. Our methodological test provided further insights for the interpretation of landscape metrics in case of transient response of slope-to-channel systems to local, fault-related base-level changes.

  12. River meanders and channel size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    This study uses an enlarged data set to (1) compare measured meander geometry to that predicted by the Langbein and Leopold (1966) theory, (2) examine the frequency distribution of the ratio radius of curvature/channel width, and (3) derive 40 empirical equations (31 of which are original) involving meander and channel size features. The data set, part of which comes from publications by other authors, consists of 194 sites from a large variety of physiographic environments in various countries. The Langbein-Leopold sine-generated-curve theory for predicting radius of curvature agrees very well with the field data (78 sites). The ratio radius of curvature/channel width has a modal value in the range of 2 to 3, in accordance with earlier work; about one third of the 79 values is less than 2.0. The 40 empirical relations, most of which include only two variables, involve channel cross-section dimensions (bankfull area, width, and mean depth) and meander features (wavelength, bend length, radius of curvature, and belt width). These relations have very high correlation coefficients, most being in the range of 0.95-0.99. Although channel width traditionally has served as a scale indicator, bankfull cross-sectional area and mean depth also can be used for this purpose. ?? 1986.

  13. River Channel Patterns: Braided, Meandering, and Straight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna B.; Wolman, M. Gordon

    1957-01-01

    Channel pattern is used to describe the plan view of a reach of river as seen from an airplane, and includes meandering, braiding, or relatively straight channels. Natural channels characteristically exhibit alternating pools or deep reaches and riffles or shallow reaches, regardless of the type of pattern. The length of the pool or distance between riffles in a straight channel equals the straight line distance between successive points of inflection in the wave pattern of a meandering river of the same width. The points of inflection are also shallow points and correspond to riffles in the straight channel. This distance, which is half the wavelength of the meander, varies approximately as a linear function of channel width. In the data we analysed the meander wavelength, or twice the distance between successive riffles, is from 7 to 12 times the channel width. It is concluded that the mechanics which may lead to meandering operate in straight channels. River braiding is characterized by channel division around alluvial islands. The growth of an island begins as the deposition of a central bar which results from sorting and deposition of the coarser fractions of the load which locally cannot be transported. The bar grows downstream and in height by continued deposition on its surface, forcing the water into the flanking channels, which, to carry the flow, deepen and cut laterally into the original banks. Such deepening locally lowers the water surface and the central bar emerges as an island which becomes stabilized by vegetation. Braiding was observed in a small river in a laboratory. Measurements of the adjustments of velocity, depth, width, and slope associated with island development lead to the conclusion that braiding is one of the many patterns which can maintain quasi-equilibrium among discharge, load, and transporting ability. Braiding does not necessarily indicate an excess of total load. Channel cross section and pattern are ultimately controlled by

  14. Channel degradation in southeastern Nebraska Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahl, Kenneth L.; Weiss, Linda S.; ,

    1995-01-01

    Many stream channels in southeastern Nebraska were dredged and straightened during 1904-15. The resulting channels were both shorter and steeper than the original channels. Tests for time trends were conducted using the nonparametric Kendall tau test to see if the channels have responded to these changes. Tests were conducted on the stages associated with specific discharges and on measurement characteristics at gaging stations. Tests also were conducted on hydrologic forcing variables (annual mean precipitation, annual peak discharges, annual mean discharge, and annual mean base flows). The null hypothesis (that the data were free from trend) was rejected for stages associated with the mean of the annual discharges for 6 of 7 gaging stations in the study area, but was accepted for all 3 gages on the main stem of the Missouri River. The trends at the 6 streamflow gaging stations were for decreasing stages (degrading channels) for specific discharges. The rates of change ranged from about 0.2 to 0.5 m per decade. Mean stream bed elevations computed for individual discharge measurements at these streamflow gaging stations confirmed that the channels are degrading. However, neither the precipitation nor flow variables show evidence of trends. The tendency for the channels to degrade thus cannot be attributed to changes in runoff characteristics and are assumed to be a response to the channel modifications in the early 1900's. Indications are that the channels presently are continuing to degrade.

  15. Curvilinear grids for sinuous river channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Waldrop, W. R.; Smith, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    In order to effectively analyze the flow in sinuous river channels, a curvilinear grid system was developed for use in the appropriate hydrodynamic code. The CENTERLINE program was designed to generate a two dimensional grid for this purpose. The Cartesian coordinates of a series of points along the boundaries of the sinuous channel represent the primary input to CENTERLINE. The program calculates the location of the river centerline, the distance downstream along the centerline, and both radius of curvature and channel width as a function of such distance downstream. These parameters form the basis for the generation of the curvilinear grid. Based on input values for longitudinal and lateral grid spacing, the corresponding grid system is generated and a file is created containing the appropriate parameters for use in the associated explicit finite difference hydrodynamic programs. Because of the option for a nonuniform grid, grid spacing can be concentrated in areas containing the largest flow gradients.

  16. Testing river surveying techniques in tidal environments: example from an actively meandering channel surveyed with TLS (Mont Saint-Michel bay, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, J.; Lague, D.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal channel developed in mega-tidal salt marsh offer a unique set of characteristics to study the interaction between hydraulics, riparian vegetation and sedimentation using Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). The recession of water allows a nearly complete survey of the channel that is otherwise impossible in rivers. Moreover, the predictability of tide amplitude allows to target surveys large events. Finally, the hydro-sedimentary processes and peak flow velocities in excess of 2 m/s in mega-tidal estuaries (e.g. Mont Saint Michel (MSM) bay) allow to explore conditions that are similar to river during flood conditions. This has motivated a 3 years study of a sinuous tidal channel located on the fringe of the marsh with the aim to understand its dynamics at daily to annual scales. We have acquired 36 high resolution topographic surveys with TLS, whose 13 daily surveys were acquired during annual largest tides. A local reference network of targets is used to yield a high registration accuracy with uncertainty varying between 1.5 mm and 3.4 mm. We use the CANUPO algorithm for classifying riparian vegetation and ground in 3D data, and use the point cloud comparison algorithm M3C2 to resolve 3D topographic changes down to 5 mm. ADCP, ADV and a turbidimeter were installed to constrain flow velocities and suspended sediment concentration (SSC). Our analysis is focused on three active compartments: (1) the inner bar on which riparian pioneer vegetation is developing and where sedimentation reaches up to 5 cm/tide; (2) the actively eroding outer bank which exhibits local retreat rates up to 2 m/tide; (3) the channel itself for which we document fluctuations of up to 0.2 m in elevation at daily to monthly timescales. We find that High Water Level (HWL) is a good predictor of the mean rate of evolution of these compartments with different empirical relationships. Spatially averaged sedimentation on the inner bend tends to increase linearly with HWL and is increased by a

  17. Implications of Historic River Channel Modifications on Contemporary Restoration Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrahan, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying contemporary river management and restoration opportunities relies on understanding how river ecosystems respond to historic forcing from natural events and human impacts. Over the past 70 years, the Big Wood River in central Idaho, USA, has experienced significant engineered channel modifications and realignment, as well as natural changes in channel location and riverbank instability. Understanding the effects of these historic conditions on contemporary river characteristics and processes was needed to inform river management and restoration planning. A geomorphic assessment along 16 km of the Big Wood River was completed in order to understand the physical characteristics and processes upstream, within, and downstream of a 3 km long project reach. This evaluation included analysis of the longitudinal profile, planform pattern, cross-section dimensions, cross-section hydraulics, riverbed and riverbank materials, sediment transport conditions, and large roughness elements such as boulders and large wood material. As a result of residential and highway encroachment along the river corridor, river channel modifications (bank revetments, grade-control drop structures, training channels, sediment traps) have been implemented in attempts to limit the vertical and lateral channel adjustments that would negatively affect infrastructure along the river corridor. These river channel modifications have interrupted the geomorphic processes of the Big Wood River, and have initiated the need for ongoing maintenance of in-channel structures and new efforts at river restoration. Future river ecosystem response along this reach of the Big Wood River will be constrained as a result of river channel and floodplain modifications throughout the valley.

  18. Active channel for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobieszczyk, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban runoff and shows characteristic flashy streamflow and poor water quality commonly associated with urban streams. This data set represents the active, wetted channel as derived from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and aerial photographic imagery. The wetted channel boundary is equivalent to the extent of water observed during a 2-yr high flow event.

  19. Impact of a large flood on mountain river habitats, channel morphology, and valley infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukiewicz, Hanna; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Mikuś, Paweł; Zawiejska, Joanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2016-11-01

    The Biała River, Polish Carpathians, was considerably modified by channelization and channel incision in the twentieth century. To restore the Biała, establishing an erodible corridor was proposed in two river sections located in its mountain and foothill course. In these sections, longer, unmanaged channel reaches alternate with short, channelized reaches; and channel narrowing and incision increases in the downstream direction. In June 2010 an 80-year flood occurred on the river; and this study aims at determining its effects on physical habitat conditions for river biota, channel morphology, and valley-floor infrastructure. Surveys of 10 pairs of closely located, unmanaged and channelized cross sections, performed in 2009 and in the late summer 2010, allowed us to assess the flood-induced changes to physical habitat conditions. A comparison of channel planforms determined before (2009) and after (2012) the flood provided information on the degree of channel widening as well as changes in the width of particular elements of the river's active zone in eight stretches of the Biała. The impact of the flood on valley-floor infrastructure was confronted with the degree of river widening in unmanaged and channelized river reaches. Before the flood, unmanaged cross sections were typified by finer bed material and greater lateral variability in depth-averaged and near-bed flow velocity than channelized cross sections. The flood tended to equalize habitat conditions in both types of river cross sections, obliterating differences (in particular physical habitat parameters) between channelized and unmanaged channel reaches. River widening mostly reflected an increase in the area of channel bars, whereas the widening of low-flow channels was less pronounced. A comparison of channel planform from 2009 and 2012 indicated that intense channel incision typical of downstream sections limited river widening by the flood. Active channel width increased by half in the unmanaged

  20. Cyclic Sediment Trading Between Channel and River Bed Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadchi, A.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the previous work on sediment tracing has focused on determining either the initial sources of the sediment (soils derive from a particular rock type) or the erosion processes generating the sediment. However, alluvial stores can be both a source and sink for sediment transported by streams. Here geochemical and fallout radionuclide tracing of river-bed and alluvial sediments are used to determine the role of secondary sources, sediment stores, as potential sources of sediment leaving Emu Creek catchment, southeastern Queensland, Australia. Activity concentrations of 137Cs on the river sediments are consistent with channel erosion being the dominant source at all sites sampled along the river. To characterise the deposition and remobilisation cycles in the catchment, a novel geochemical tracing approach was used. Successive pockets of alluvium were treated as discrete sink terms within geochemical mixing models and their source contributions compared with those of river bed sediments collected adjacent to each alluvial pocket. Three different size fractions were examined; silts and clays (<10 μm), silts (10-63 μm), and fine sands (63-212 μm). The contribution of the initial soil/rock type sources to river bed and alluvial sediments at each sampling site was identical for all three different size fractions, but varied along the stream. Combining these findings it is concluded that proximal alluvial stores dominated the supply of sediment to the river at each location, with this being particularly evident at the catchment outlet. Identical contribution of rock type sources to both river bed and alluvial pockets together with the dominant erosion being from channel banks indicates a high degree of 'trading' between the fluvial space and the alluvial space. Hence, management works aimed at primarily reducing the supply of sediments to the outlet of Emu Creek should focus on rehabilitation of channel banks in the lower catchment.

  1. 8. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OLD SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OLD SOURIS RIVER CHANNEL FROM THE DOWNSTREAM FACE OF THE DAM WITH POND A IN THE BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  2. Perception of Wood in River Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, A.

    2003-12-01

    In managing river channels, wood is often perceived as hazardous and has traditionally been removed. On the other hand, wood provides many benefits including food and habitat for fish and mechanisms for energy dissipation. Increasing recognition of the positive role of wood has encouraged the reintroduction of wood to restore rivers. However, it is not clear how widely this practice is accepted, and whether traditional views of wood hazards may influence the success of such restoration projects. This paper describes a large-scale effort to increase understanding of how wood is perceived in stream channels. This project, led by H. Piegay and K.J. Gregory, involves an international group of workers from 9 countries in contrasting parts of the world. A total of 1886 surveys were given to students 20-25 years of age to test the hypothesis that the perception of wood is related to one's socio-cultural environment. Students were asked to view a set of 20 standard photographs, 10 with wood and 10 without, and to answer a set of questions related to how hazardous the scenes are perceived. Results show clear differences in perception, with students from Texas, USA, viewing streams with wood to be more dangerous, less aesthetic, and to need more improvement than those without. These perceptions contrast with those from the Pacific northwest and some areas around the world, providing clues to the potential success and acceptance of reintroducing wood in stream restoration.

  3. River channel adjustments in Southern Italy over the past 150 years and implications for channel recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorpio, Vittoria; Aucelli, Pietro P. C.; Giano, Salvatore I.; Pisano, Luca; Robustelli, Gaetano; Rosskopf, Carmen M.; Schiattarella, Marcello

    2015-12-01

    Multi-temporal GIS analysis of topographic maps and aerial photographs along with topographic and geomorphological surveys are used to assess evolutionary trends and key control factors of channel adjustments for five major rivers in southern Italy (the Trigno, Biferno, Volturno, Sinni and Crati rivers) to support assessment of channel recovery and river restoration. Three distinct phases of channel adjustment are identified over the past 150 years primarily driven by human disturbances. Firstly, slight channel widening dominated from the last decades of the nineteenth century to the 1950s. Secondly, from the 1950s to the end of the 1990s, altered sediment fluxes induced by in-channel mining and channel works brought about moderate to very intense incision (up to 6-7 m) accompanied by strong channel narrowing (up to 96%) and changes in channel configuration from multi-threaded to single-threaded patterns. Thirdly, the period from around 2000 to 2015 has been characterized by channel stabilization and local widening. Evolutionary trajectories of the rivers studied are quite similar to those reconstructed for other Italian rivers, particularly regarding the second phase of channel adjustments and ongoing transitions towards channel recovery in some reaches. Analyses of river dynamics, recovery potential and connectivity with sediment sources of the study reaches, framed in their catchment context, can be used as part of a wider interdisciplinary approach that views effective river restoration alongside sustainable and risk-reduced river management.

  4. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING DOWNSTREAM FROM KACHESS DAM CREST, 1910 RIVER CUTOFF CHANNEL WITH CRIB STRUCTURE IN CENTER. BRIDGE FOOTING CRIB STRUCTURE AT RIGHT (Upstream face of Kachess Dam in foreground) - Kachess Dam, Cutoff Channel and Crib Structures, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  5. GEOMORPHIC THRESHOLDS AND CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY IN LARGE RIVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systematic changes in channel morphology occur as channel gradient, streamflow, and sediment character change and interact. Geomorphic thresholds of various kinds are useful metrics to define these changes along the river network, as they are based on in-channel processes that d...

  6. Hungry water: Effects of dams and gravel mining on river channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kondolf, G.M.

    1997-07-01

    Rivers transport sediment from eroding uplands to depositional areas near sea level. If the continuity of sediment transport is interrupted by dams or removal of sediment from the channel by gravel mining, the flow may become sediment-starved (hungry water) and prone to erode the channel bed and banks, producing channel incision (downcutting), coarsening of bed material, and loss of spawning gravels for salmon and trout (as smaller gravels are transported without replacement from upstream), Gravel is artificially added to the River Rhine to prevent further incision and to many other rivers in attempts to restore spawning habitat. It is possible to pass incoming sediment through some small reservoirs, thereby maintaining the continuity of sediment transport through the system. Damming and mining have reduced sediment delivery from rivers to many coastal areas, leading to accelerated beach erosion. Sand and gravel are mined for construction aggregate from river channel and floodplains. In-channel mining commonly causes incision, which may propagate up- and downstream of the mine, undermining bridges, inducing channel instability, and lowering alluvial water tables. Floodplain gravel pits have the potential to become wildlife habitat upon reclamation, but may be captured by the active channel and thereby become instream pits. Management of sand and gravel in rivers must be done on a regional basis, restoring the continuity of sediment transport where possible and encouraging alternatives to river-derived aggregate sources. 80 refs., 17 figs.

  7. PROFILE: Hungry Water: Effects of Dams and Gravel Mining on River Channels

    PubMed

    Kondolf

    1997-07-01

    / Rivers transport sediment from eroding uplands to depositional areas near sea level. If the continuity of sediment transport is interrupted by dams or removal of sediment from the channel by gravel mining, the flow may become sediment-starved (hungry water) and prone to erode the channel bed and banks, producing channel incision (downcutting), coarsening of bed material, and loss of spawning gravels for salmon and trout (as smaller gravels are transported without replacement from upstream). Gravel is artificially added to the River Rhine to prevent further incision and to many other rivers in attempts to restore spawning habitat. It is possible to pass incoming sediment through some small reservoirs, thereby maintaining the continuity of sediment transport through the system. Damming and mining have reduced sediment delivery from rivers to many coastal areas, leading to accelerated beach erosion. Sand and gravel are mined for construction aggregate from river channel and floodplains. In-channel mining commonly causes incision, which may propagate up- and downstream of the mine, undermining bridges, inducing channel instability, and lowering alluvial water tables. Floodplain gravel pits have the potential to become wildlife habitat upon reclamation, but may be captured by the active channel and thereby become instream pits. Management of sand and gravel in rivers must be done on a regional basis, restoring the continuity of sediment transport where possible and encouraging alternatives to river-derived aggregate sources.KEY WORDS: Dams; Aquatic habitat; Sediment transport; Erosion; Sedimentation; Gravel mining PMID:9175542

  8. Channeling in Paleocene coals, northern Powder River basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Interpretation of 1,200 geophysical logs in the northern Powder River basin, Montana, reveals the paleodrainages influencing coal deposition during the deposition of the Tongue River member (Paleocene, Fort Union Formation). Four channels with associated crevasse splay deposits are recognized: (1) an east-west rosebud drainage near Colstrip, (2) a north-south wall channel near Birney, (3) a north-south Dietz drainage near Tongue River Reservoir, and (4) a north-south Anderson channel in the vicinity of Moorhead. These channels support the concept of a major northeast-flowing drainage system during deposition of the Tongue River Member. Identification of these channels serves as a guide to future coal exploration.

  9. BED Material Transport and the Morphology of Alluvial River Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The morphology of an alluvial river channel is the consequence of sediment transport and sedimentation in the river. Morphological style is determined chiefly by the caliber and quantity of sediment delivered to the channel, although modulated by channel scale. Yet the relations between sediment transport and river morphology have received only limited, qualitative attention. In this review, the problem is studied by defining sediment transport regimes on the basis of the Shields number, a nondimensional measure of the capacity of the channel to move sediment of a given caliber. The problem is also approached from an inverse perspective by which the quantity and character of sediment deposits are used to infer details about the variation of sediment transport and sedimentation along a channel. Coupling the two approaches establishes a basis to gain new insights into the origins of alluvial channel morphology.

  10. River channel morphology and hydraulics properties due to introduction of plant basket hydraulic structures for river channel management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kałuża, Tomasz; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Plesiński, Karol; Walczak, Natalia; Szoszkiewicz, Krzysztof; Radecki-Pawlik, Bartosz

    2016-04-01

    In the present time integrated water management is directly connected with management and direct works in river channels themselves which are taking into account morphological processes in rivers and improve flow conditions. Our work focused on the hydraulic and hydrodynamic consequences upon the introduction of the concept of the improvement of the hydromorphological conditions of the Flinta River in a given reach following river channel management concept. Based on a comprehensive study of the hydromorphological state of the river, four sections were selected where restoration measures can efficiently improve river habitat conditions in the river. For each section a set of technical and biological measures were proposed and implemented in practice. One of the proposed solutions was to construct plant basket hydraulic structures (PBHS) within the river channel, which are essentially plant barriers working as sediment traps, changing river channel morphology and are in line with concepts of Water Framework Directive. These relatively small structures work as crested weirs and unquestionably change the channel morphology. Along our work we show the results of three-year long (2013-2015) systematic measurements that provided information on the morphological consequences of introducing such structures into a river channel. Our main conclusions are as follows: 1. Plant basket hydraulic structures cause changes in hydrodynamic conditions and result in sediment accumulation and the formation of river backwaters upstream and downstream the obstacle; 2. The introduced plant basket hydraulic structures cause plant debris accumulation which influences the hydrodynamic flow conditions; 3. The installation of plant basket hydraulic structures on the river bed changes flow pattern as well as flow hydrodynamic conditions causing river braiding process; 4. The erosion rate below the plant basket hydraulic structures is due to the hydraulic work conditions of the PBHS and its

  11. River Channel Migration: A Remote Sensing and GIS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tariqul

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing and geographic information system provide tools for quantitative and qualitative river morphological analysis. Bangladesh is a riverine, flood prone country and, the Padma and the Jamuna are two of major three rivers in the country. The aim of this research is to monitor the channel migration of the Padma and the Jamuna rivers since 1977 to 2004 using remote sensing and GIS. Four scenes for dry season's cloud free Landsat images were used in this study. Images were processed using PCI Geomatica and ArcGIS 9.3 was used for GIS analysis. The Landsat images were visualized and identified nine locations to investigate the channel migration. The images were classified into two broad categories, i.e. water and nonwater body. ArcGIS 9.3 was used to transfer these classified images into GIS layers. A standard measurement tool of ArcGIS was applied to measure the movement of river channel based on initial river channel in 1977. General trend of the Padma and the Jamuna river channel migration at locations A, B, C, D, F, G, H and I towards north, northeast and southwest eventually, north, northeast, east, east, west and west, respectively. The confluence point of the Padma and Jamuna (at location E) migrated toward southeast with high rate. During 1977-2004, it migrated about 9000m toward southeast. Trend of migration of the confluence point was faster than any other locations in the channel of the Padma river.

  12. Channel evolution on the dammed Elwha River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, A.E.; Logan, J.B.; Mastin, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    Like many rivers in the western U.S., the Elwha River, Washington, has changed substantially over the past century in response to natural and human forcing. The lower river is affected by two upstream dams that are slated for removal as part of a major river restoration effort. In preparation for studying the effects of dam removal, we present a comprehensive field and aerial photographic analysis of dam influence on an anabranching, gravel-bed river. Over the past century with the dams in place, loss of the upstream sediment supply has caused spatial variations in the sedimentary and geomorphic character of the lower Elwha River channel. Bed sediment is armored and better sorted than on the naturally evolving bed upstream of the dams. On time scales of flood seasons, the channel immediately below the lower dam is fairly stable, but progresses toward greater mobility downstream such that the lowermost portion of the river responded to a recent 40-year flood with bank erosion and bed-elevation changes on a scale approaching that of the natural channel above the dams. In general, channel mobility in the lowest 4 km of the Elwha River has not decreased substantially with time. Enough fine sediment remains in the floodplain that – given sufficient flood forcing – the channel position, sinuosity, and braiding index change substantially. The processes by which this river accesses new fine sediment below the dams (rapid migration into noncohesive banks and avulsion of new channels) allow it to compensate for loss of upstream sediment supply more readily than would a dammed river with cohesive banks or a more limited supply of alluvium. The planned dam removal will provide a valuable opportunity to evaluate channel response to the future restoration of natural upstream sediment supply.

  13. Flood plain and channel dynamics of the Quinault and Queets Rivers, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Jim E.; Jones, Myrtle A.; Haluska, Tana L.

    2003-03-01

    Comparison of historic channel migration rates, modern planform conditions, and overall sediment, wood, and flow conditions and interactions for the Quinault River and Queets River in the western Olympic Peninsula, Washington, reveals decadal- to century-scale interactions between gravel-bed channels and forested flood plains in temperate maritime environments. The downstream alluvial portions of these two rivers can be divided into three reaches of different slope, flow, sediment, and wood regimes: (i) the upper Quinault River is aggrading behind Lake Quinault, a natural lake that traps most sediment and wood transported from the Olympic Mountain headwaters. (ii) The lower Quinault River, downstream of Lake Quinault, transports only sediment and wood derived from reworking of flood-plain deposits and contributed from valley margins. (iii) The Queets River has unimpeded movement of sediment and water from the mountainous headwaters to the Pacific Ocean. Measurements of channel planform characteristics and historic migration rates and patterns show that these three reaches have correspondingly distinct channel and flood-plain morphologies and dynamics. The aggrading and sediment-rich upper Quinault River has the widest flood plain, widest active channel, greatest number of low-flow channels and flanking gravel bars, and an average channel migration rate of 12.7±3.3 m/year between 1900 and 1994. The comparatively sediment-poor lower Quinault River has the narrowest flood plain, narrowest active channel, and lowest channel migration rate (4.0±1.2 m/year); and most flow is through a single channel with few adjacent gravel bars. The Queets River has attributes intermediate between the lower and upper Quinault Rivers, including an average channel migration rate of 7.5±2.9 m/year. Flood-plain turnover rates are similar for all three reaches, with channels eroding the flood plain at the rate of about 0.2% of the flood-plain area per year, and with corresponding flood

  14. Channel Evolution on the Lower Elwha River, Washington, 1939-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Logan, Joshua B.; McCoy, Randall E.; McHenry, Michael; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of historical aerial photographs of the lower Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington, reveal rates and patterns of channel change in this dammed, anabranching river between 1939 and 2006. Absolute positional changes of the active-floodplain margins, which commonly exceeded 50 m over that interval, have exceeded 400 m locally. Annualized rates of channel movement were typically ~2 to 10 m/yr; higher annualized rates over some time intervals are attributable to the formation of new channels by episodic avulsion. Channel movement by more gradual lateral meander migration was also common. Anthropogenic modification of the floodplain between the 1940s and 1980s substantially altered channel form and position. This analysis of rates and patterns of channel change over nearly 70 years on the lower Elwha River is intended to characterize the evolution of the river throughout most of the time interval when two large dams have been in place upstream. Channel morphology and rates of channel movement are expected to change significantly in response to removal of the dams and re-establishment of the upstream sediment supply during a major river-restoration project.

  15. 76 FR 40616 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Old River Channel of the Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Old River Channel of... regulations governing the operation of the Willow Street Bridge at mile 1.02 across the Old River Channel of... inspection or copying at the Docket Management Facility (M-30), U.S. Department of Transportation,...

  16. The role of river trajectories and channel recovery potential within sustainable river management: some case studies from southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosskopf, Carmen Maria; Scorpio, Vittoria; Patrizio Ciro Aucelli, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    ongoing narrowing. The assessment of evolutionary trajectories and current states of the study reaches coupled with the analysis of their connectivity at the reach to basin scale, has allowed to identify the reaches whose recovery potential and/or good ecological values maximizes the likelihood of success of future river restoration interventions. Nevertheless, as the study highlights, the widespread anthropization of river segments, including/connected to the study reaches, has to be taken in account. Therefore, any attempt to promote their natural dynamics and channel recovery, has to be accurately assessed in the framework of sustainable and risk-reduced river management according to implemented basin plans and other territorial constraints. Conversely, the obtained knowledge on the present status of river reaches and their potential near-future changes is fundamental in considering revising actual basin plans and/or programming monitoring activities.

  17. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  18. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  19. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  20. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  1. 33 CFR 117.751 - Shark River (South Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Shark River (South Channel). 117.751 Section 117.751 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.751 Shark River...

  2. 33 CFR 117.953 - Brazos River (Diversion Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brazos River (Diversion Channel). 117.953 Section 117.953 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.953 Brazos River...

  3. 33 CFR 117.953 - Brazos River (Diversion Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Brazos River (Diversion Channel). 117.953 Section 117.953 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.953 Brazos River...

  4. 33 CFR 117.953 - Brazos River (Diversion Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brazos River (Diversion Channel). 117.953 Section 117.953 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.953 Brazos River...

  5. 33 CFR 117.953 - Brazos River (Diversion Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brazos River (Diversion Channel). 117.953 Section 117.953 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.953 Brazos River...

  6. 33 CFR 117.953 - Brazos River (Diversion Channel).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brazos River (Diversion Channel). 117.953 Section 117.953 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.953 Brazos River...

  7. Large flood on a mountain river subjected to restoration: effects on aquatic habitats, channel morphology and valley infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdukiewicz, Hanna; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Mikuś, Paweł; Zawiejska, Joanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2016-04-01

    The Biała River, Polish Carpathians, was considerably modified by channelization and channel incision in the twentieth century. To restore the Biała, establishing an erodible corridor was proposed in two river sections located in its mountain and foothill course. In these sections, longer, unmanaged channel reaches alternate with short, channelized reaches; and channel narrowing and incision increases in the downstream direction. In June 2010 an 80-year flood occurred on the river; and this study aims at determining its effects on physical habitat conditions for river biota, channel morphology, and valley-floor infrastructure. Surveys of 10 pairs of closely located, unmanaged and channelized cross sections, performed in 2009 and in the late summer 2010, allowed us to assess the flood-induced changes to physical habitat conditions. A comparison of channel planforms determined before (2009) and after (2012) the flood provided information on the degree of channel widening as well as changes in the width of particular elements of the river's active zone in eight stretches of the Biała. The impact of the flood on valley-floor infrastructure was confronted with the degree of river widening in unmanaged and channelized river reaches. Before the flood, unmanaged cross sections were typified by finer bed material and greater lateral variability in depth-averaged and near-bed flow velocity than channelized cross sections. The flood tended to equalize habitat conditions in both types of river cross sections, obliterating differences (in particular physical habitat parameters) between channelized and unmanaged channel reaches. River widening mostly reflected an increase in the area of channel bars, whereas the widening of low-flow channels was less pronounced. A comparison of channel planform from 2009 and 2012 indicated that intense channel incision typical of downstream sections limited river widening by the flood. Active channel width increased by half in the unmanaged

  8. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  9. Seismic stochastic inversion identify river channel sand body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The technology of seismic inversion is regarded as one of the most important part of geophysics. By using the technology of seismic inversion and the theory of stochastic simulation, the concept of seismic stochastic inversion is proposed.Seismic stochastic inversion can play an significant role in the identifying river channel sand body. Accurate sand body description is a crucial parameter to measure oilfield development and oilfield stimulation during the middle and later periods. Besides, rational well spacing density is an essential condition for efficient production. Based on the geological knowledge of a certain oilfield, in line with the use of seismic stochastic inversion, the river channel sand body in the work area is identified. In this paper, firstly, the single river channel body from the composite river channel body is subdivided. Secondly, the distribution of river channel body is ascertained in order to ascertain the direction of rivers. Morever, the superimposed relationship among the sand body is analyzed, especially among the inter-well sand body. The last but not at the least, via the analysis of inversion results of first vacuating the wells and continuous infilling later, it is meeted the most needs well spacing density that can obtain the optimal inversion result. It would serve effective guidance for oilfield stimulation.

  10. Flood plain and channel dynamics of the Quinault and Queets Rivers, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, J. E.; Jones, M.A.; Haluska, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    Observations from this study and previous studies on the Queets River show that channel and flood-plain dynamics and morphology are affected by interactions between flow, sediment, and standing and entrained wood, some of which likely involve time frames similar to 200–500-year flood-plain half-lives. On the upper Quinault River and Queets River, log jams promote bar growth and consequent channel shifting, short-distance avulsions, and meander cutoffs, resulting in mobile and wide active channels. On the lower Quinault River, large portions of the channel are stable and flow within vegetated flood plains. However, locally, channel-spanning log jams have caused channel avulsions within reaches that have been subsequently mobile for several decades. In all three reaches, log jams appear to be areas of conifer germination and growth that may later further influence channel and flood-plain conditions on long time scales by forming flood-plain areas resistant to channel migration and by providing key members of future log jams. Appreciation of these processes and dynamics and associated temporal and spatial scales is necessary to formulate effective long-term approaches to managing fluvial ecosystems in forested environments.

  11. Spatial and temporal variability in sedimentation rates associated with cutoff channel infill deposits: Ain River, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piegay, H.; Hupp, C.R.; Citterio, A.; Dufour, S.; Moulin, B.; Walling, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Floodplain development is associated with lateral accretion along stable channel geometry. Along shifting rivers, the floodplain sedimentation is more complex because of changes in channel position but also cutoff channel presence, which exhibit specific overflow patterns. In this contribution, the spatial and temporal variability of sedimentation rates in cutoff channel infill deposits is related to channel changes of a shifting gravel bed river (Ain River, France). The sedimentation rates estimated from dendrogeomorphic analysis are compared between and within 14 cutoff channel infills. Detailed analyses along a single channel infill are performed to assess changes in the sedimentation rates through time by analyzing activity profiles of the fallout radionuclides 137Cs and unsupported 210Pb. Sedimentation rates are also compared within the channel infills with rates in other plots located in the adjacent floodplain. Sedimentation rates range between 0.65 and 2.4 cm a -1 over a period of 10 to 40 years. The data provide additional information on the role of distance from the bank, overbank flow frequency, and channel geometry in controlling the sedimentation rate. Channel infills, lower than adjacent floodplains, exhibit higher sedimentation rates and convey overbank sediment farther away within the floodplain. Additionally, channel degradation, aggradation, and bank erosion, which reduce or increase the distance between the main channel and the cutoff channel aquatic zone, affect local overbank flow magnitude and frequency and therefore sedimentation rates, thereby creating a complex mosaic of sedimentation zones within the floodplain and along the cutoff channel infills. Last, the dendrogeomorphic and 137Cs approaches are cross validated for estimating the sedimentation rate within a channel infill. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Linking channel hydrology with riparian wetland accretion in tidal rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrologic processes by which tide affects river channel and riparian morphology within the tidal freshwater zone are poorly understood, yet are fundamental to predicting the fate of coastal rivers and wetlands as sea level rises. We investigated patterns of sediment accretion in riparian wetlands along the non-tidal through oligohaline portion of two coastal plain rivers in Maryland, U.S.A., and how flow velocity, water level, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel may have contributed to those patterns. Sediment accretion was measured over a one year period using artificial marker horizons, channel hydrology was measured over a one month period using acoustic Doppler current profilers, and SSC was predicted from acoustic backscatter. Riparian sediment accretion was lowest at the non-tidal sites (mean and standard deviation = 8 ± 8 mm yr-1), highest at the upstream tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) (33 ± 28 mm yr-1), low at the midstream TFFW (12 ± 9 mm yr-1), and high at the oligohaline (fresh-to-brackish) marshes (19 ± 8 mm yr-1). Channel maximum flood and ebb velocity was 2-fold faster at the oligohaline than tidal freshwater zone on both tidal rivers, corresponding with the differences in in-channel SSC: the oligohaline zone's SSC was more than double the tidal freshwater zone's, and was greater than historical SSC at the non-tidal gages. The tidal wave characteristics differed between rivers, leading to significantly greater in-channel SSC during floodplain inundation in the weakly convergent than the strongly convergent tidal river. Overall sediment accretion was higher in the embayed river likely due to a single storm discharge and associated sedimentation.

  13. Linking channel hydrology with riparian wetland accretion in tidal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign, Scott H.; Noe, Gregory B.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    hydrologic processes by which tide affects river channel and riparian morphology within the tidal freshwater zone are poorly understood yet are fundamental to predicting the fate of coastal rivers and wetlands as sea level rises. We investigated patterns of sediment accretion in riparian wetlands along the nontidal through oligohaline portion of two coastal plain rivers in Maryland, U.S., and how flow velocity, water level, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in the channel may have contributed to those patterns. Sediment accretion was measured over a 1 year period using artificial marker horizons, channel hydrology was measured over a 1 month period using acoustic Doppler current profilers, and SSC was predicted from acoustic backscatter. Riparian sediment accretion was lowest at the nontidal sites (mean and standard deviation = 8 ± 8 mm yr-1), highest at the upstream tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) (33 ± 28 mm yr-1), low at the midstream TFFW (12 ± 9 mm yr-1), and high at the oligohaline (fresh-to-brackish) marshes (19 ± 8 mm yr-1). Channel maximum flood and ebb velocity was twofold faster at the oligohaline than tidal freshwater zone on both tidal rivers, corresponding with the differences in in-channel SSC: The oligohaline zone's SSC was more than double the tidal freshwater zone's and was greater than historical SSC at the nontidal gages. The tidal wave characteristics differed between rivers, leading to significantly greater in-channel SSC during floodplain inundation in the weakly convergent than the strongly convergent tidal river. High sediment accretion at the upstream TFFW was likely due to high river discharge following a hurricane.

  14. Channel adjustements over the last century of the Moldova River, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriloaei, F. A.; Radoane, M.; Radoane, N.

    2012-04-01

    Moldova River is a 205 km long river, right tributary of the Siret River, with the confluence close to Roman city. The most important tributaries are Moldoviţa, Suha Mică, Suha Mare, Râsca, Ozana and Topolita Rivers. The drainage basin area is 4316 km2, a discharge of about 32.8 m3/s and is superimposed on four lithostratigraphic units: the crystalline Mesozoic unit, the flysch unit, the molasse unit and the platform unit. The study reach is 110 km long and is located on the external part of the Eastern-Carpathians at the contact with the Moldavian Plateau. This contact is characterised by a piedmont zone. The high rate of alluviation in this piedmont plain had a decisive role on the spatial and temporal evolution of fluvial forms and processes, expressed in the morphology of alluvial terraces in the valley bottom, the morphology of the active channel, the spatial distribution of bars and secondary channels and lateral migration rates. The morphology of the river in the study reach is dominated by braided and wandering channel patterns. The present (2005) active channel width ranges between 700 and 1000 m. Planform changes of river features over the last 100 years were analyzed on three historical maps (1910, 1960, and 1980) and one orthophoto (2005). Channel width average has significantly decreased in the last century. The Moldova river channel width suffered a strong narrowing, approximately 76% (from 1910 to 2005). So, from a channel width about more than 1200 m, it decreased at about 300 m. We can note two phase of narrowing: a first one - stronger, of 56%, untill 1960 (a reduction of active channel width for about 10.5 m/year) and a second phase, of 35%, after 1960, with a narrowing rate for about 8.8 m/an. The historical trend of braiding index shows a remarkable decrease in the last 50 - 60 years, from 3.2 in 1960, at 2.6 in 1980 and 2.0, in 2005, for all the extra-Carpathian study reach (110 km). There are different situations at local scale, shown

  15. Episodic Channels: Effects of Regulation on Non-Equilibrium River Systems in California (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Minear, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Mediterranean-climate rivers are characterized by episodic channels, whose geomorphic work is concentrated in short, infrequent events (large floods), separated by long periods of quiescence in which the channel narrows and riparian vegetation can establish and mature, only to be disrupted by the next large disturbance. While not ‘pretty’ in conventional terms, such rivers support diverse assemblages of native species, adapted to the episodic regime. Because of the importance of irrigated agriculture in Mediterranean-climate regions, large reservoir storage projects are common, resulting in dam-induced reductions flood peaks, which have reduced dynamism in downstream channels. The result has been loss of habitat diversity and native species. A systems-level analysis of the Sacramento-San Joaquin and other rivers reveals that Q2 has commonly been reduced by 80%, sediment loads reduced, and vegetation encroached in formerly active channels. More profound have been hardening of banks and isolation of floodplains by levees. Restoration of ecological values in such rivers will require room for the river to move and flood, as well as floods sufficient to drive these processes. We identify a set of rivers with highest potential for re-activation or preservation of dynamic process in California.

  16. Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

  17. Predictive techniques for river channel evolution and maintenance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Predicting changes in alluvial channel morphology associated with anthropogenic and natural changes in flow and/or sediment supply is a critical part of the management of riverine systems. Over the past few years, advances in the understanding of the physics of sediment transport in conjunction with rapidly increasing capabilities in computational fluid dynamics have yielded now approaches to problems in river mechanics. Techniques appropriate for length scales ranging from reaches to bars and bedforms are described here. Examples of the use of these computational approaches are discussed for three cases: (1) the design of diversion scenarios that maintain channel morphology in steep cobble-bedded channels in Colorado, (2) determination of channel maintenance flows for the preservation of channel islands in the Snake River in Idaho, and (3) prediction of the temporal evolution of deposits in lateral separation zones for future assessment of the impacts of various dam release scenarios on lateral separation deposits in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. With continued development of their scientific and technical components, the methodologies described here can provide powerful tools for the management of river environments in the future.

  18. Flow Structure and Channel Change in a Chute Cutoff along a Large Meandering River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J.; Johnson, K.; Engel, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    Meander cutoffs, which develop when flow cuts across the narrow neck of a bend, are common features along actively migrating meandering rivers. Despite the importance of cutoffs in the dynamics of river meandering and floodplain sedimentation, few, if any, studies have documented in detail the fluvial processes involved in the development of a meander cutoff. This paper examines the morphodynamics of a chute cutoff along the Wabash River, Illinois-Indiana, immediately following initiation of the cutoff. The original cutoff channel formed across the neck of Mackey Bend, a meander loop immediately upstream of the confluence with the Ohio River, during a major flood in June 2008. The formation of the cutoff channel likely involved migration of a headcut from the downstream side to the upstream side of the meander neck along the path of a floodplain slough. A key focus of the investigation has been to document flow structure at the upstream and downstream ends of the cutoff channel so that patterns of flow can be related to morphological change. Three separate measurement campaigns using an acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP) and single-beam echosounder were conducted between January and May 2009 to determine 3D flow structure and bed morphology during events with different discharges and flow stages. In addition, channel dimensions were surveyed using a dGPS system in September 2008 and in August 2009. Results indicate that the cutoff channel has widened dramatically over a one-year period, increasing its width by as much as 100 percent. Curvature of flow into the entrance of the cutoff channel from the Wabash River generates strong helical motion that advects momentum toward the outer bank, resulting in high velocities near the bank toe and ongoing bank retreat through slab failures. This flow pattern, accentuated by dramatic widening of the cutoff channel, has resulted in deposition along the inner bank and development of a large bar platform at this location

  19. River channel changes of the Subansiri in Assam, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, U.; Sarma, J. N.; Patgiri, A. D.

    1999-12-01

    The sequential changes in the position of banklines as a result of bank erosion, as well as various changes in the channel have been studied in the Subansiri river in Assam, India. The study was carried out from available topographic maps of 1920, 1970 and satellite imagery of 1990. The types of changes taking place in the Subansiri river channel as observed from the above-mentioned maps and imagery are grouped into four categories: (1) alteration of the direction of flow due to neck cut-off, (2) widening of a channel in response to bar development, (3) development (and subsequent abandonment) of anabranches, and (4) progressive shifting of meander bends. The river channel has become substantially wider during the period of 1970-1990. There has also been a progressive increase in the number and area of mid-channel bars with a corresponding decrease in the number and area of point bars during 1920-1990. These periodic and progressive changes are responsible for a change in channel pattern of the river. A study made on nature and amount of change in the banklines of the Subansiri river by dividing the channel (84 km in 1970) into 10 equal segments reveals that the types of change are varied, and in some cases chaotic in nature. Study of the bankline shift of the Subansiri determined separately for the periods 1920-1970, 1970-1990 and 1920-1990 at 20 evenly spaced transverse sections reveals that there has been a substantial westward shift of both the banklines, up to a maximum of 6 km, in the three upstream sections during 1920-1970. However, shifting of banklines in both directions and the unequal amount of shifting in the same direction have caused a marked increase in channel width during 1970-1990. It is found that due to bankline migration, the total amount of area eroded along the entire course under study during 1920-1970 and 1970-1990 are 107.90 and 57.50 km 2, respectively. The overall sinuosity which was 1.51 in 1920 has decreased to 1.30 in 1970, while the

  20. Dynamic aspects of large woody debris in river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaro, Alexandra; Caporali, Enrica; Becchi, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    Large Woody Debris (LWD) are an integral component of the fluvial environment. They represent an environmental resource, but without doubt they represent also a risk factor for the amplification that could give to the destructive power of a flood event. While countless intervention in river channels have reintroduced wood in rivers with restoration and banks protection aims, during several flash flood events LWD have had a great part in catastrophic consequences, pointing out the urgency of an adequate risk assessment procedure. At present wood dynamics in rivers is not systematically considered within the procedures for the elaboration of hazard maps resulting in loss of prediction accuracy and underestimation of hazard impacts. The assessment inconsistency comes from the complexity of the question: several aspects in wood processes are not yet well known and the superposition of different physical phenomena results in great difficulty to predict critical scenarios. The presented research activity has been aimed to improve management skills for the assessment of the hydrologic risk associated to the presence of large woody debris in rivers, improving knowledge about LWD dynamic processes and proposing effective tools for monitoring and mapping river catchments vulnerability. Utilizing critical review of the published works, field surveys and experimental investigations LWD damaging potential has been analysed to support the identification of the exposed sites and the redaction of hazard maps, taking into account that a comprehensive procedure has to involve: a) Identification of the critical cross sections; b) Evaluation of wood availability in the river catchment; c) Prediction of hazard scenarios through the estimation of water discharge, wood recruitment and entrainment, wood transport and destination. Particularly, a survey sheets form for direct measurements has been implemented and tested in field to provide an investigation instruments for wood and river

  1. Channel adjustments to historical disturbances along the lower Brazos and Sabine Rivers, south-central USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.

    2014-01-01

    Historical channel adjustments are documented and discussed in context with anthropogenic disturbances along two meandering, coastal plain rivers - the lower Brazos and Sabine Rivers in the south-central United States. Hard-copy streamflow-measurement notes of the U.S. Geological Survey were utilized to render historical cross sections (1925-2007) at nine gauging stations, which were complemented with repeat photographs and flood-frequency analysis to assess trajectories of channel change and interpret causative mechanisms. Downstream- and upstream-propagating disturbances caused episodes of channel-bed incision and aggradation at different locations for distinct time periods along both rivers. Incision associated with upstream dams is detected, but channels are compensated downstream with sediment inputs from lateral channel migration and tributaries. In one case, temporary aggradation along the Brazos River at Waco was likely caused by a combination of dam construction and regional soil erosion. Channel-bed incision on the lowermost Brazos River is unrelated to dams, but is associated with instream aggregate extraction, possibly in conjunction with downstream channelization. On the Sabine River, extensive aggradation during the 1930s might be associated with logging activities (1880s-1930s), but whether the cause is pervasive regional-scale hillslope erosion or local-scale mill-site activities is indeterminate. Following passage of this sediment, the river generally recovered to pre-disturbance conditions and has exhibited stability despite a mainstem reservoir. Translation of this sediment slug is attenuated by a transition to a flood-prone, distributary-dominated system downstream of the Holocene-Pleistocene terrace onlap position. Additional findings include cross-channel hingepoints separating thalweg incision from simultaneous point-bar or bank accretion at meander bends, which indicates channel adjustment occurs along non-cohesive beds in preference to

  2. Channel metamorphosis, floodplain disturbance, and vegetation development: Ain River, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Richard A.; Girel, Jacky; Pautou, Guy; Piegay, Herve; Bravard, Jean-Paul; Arneson, Chris

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and explain channel metamorphosis of the Ain River in east-central France and the effects of this metamorphosis on floodplain disturbance and vegetation development. The Ain River is a 195 km long stream originating in the Jura Mountains which flows into the Rhône River between Lyon, France, and Geneva, Switzerland. The lower 40 km of the Ain River, beyond the mountain front, are situated in a valley of outwash deposits where the floodplain is 0.2 to 1.2 km wide. A complex mosaic of floodplain landscape units has developed. Maps dating back to 1766 and six sets of aerial photographs dated between 1945 and 1991 were used to document changes in channel pattern. Aerial photos and field surveys were used to compile maps of landscape units based on dominant vegetation life-forms, species, and substrate. Six maps dated between 1945 and 1991 were digitized in ARC/INFO and an overlay was generated to determine the changes in landscape units as related to channel disturbance. Change from a braided to a single-thread meandering channel probably took place in the period 1930-1950. The process of river entrenchment has occurred throughout the Holocene but has accelerated in the present century due to shortening of the river course, construction of lateral embankments, and vegetation encroachment following reservoir construction and cessation of wood-cutting and grazing. The increase in horizontal channel stability coupled with channel entrenchment have decreased floodplain disturbance and lowered the water table by approximately one meter. Pioneer and disturbance-dependent landscape units have experienced a more terrestrial-like succession to an alluvial forest. Abandoned channels have also been replaced by alluvial forests. On poorly drained soils, shrub-swamp communities of willow and hydrophytic herbaceous plants have been replaced by mixed forests of ash, alder, black poplar, and oak. On well drained alluvial soils, ash and oak

  3. 76 FR 11679 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Belmar, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Belmar... operation of the S71 Bridge across Shark River (South Channel), mile 0.8, at Belmar, NJ. The deviation is... INFORMATION: The S71 Bridge, a bascule lift drawbridge, across Shark River (South Channel), at mile 0.8,...

  4. 75 FR 20776 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel... establishing a temporary security zone in certain waters of Washington Channel on the Potomac River. The... (NPRM) entitled ``Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC'' in the...

  5. Forming of single-thread channels and multiple channel rivers on Titan and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiura, Katarzyna; Czechowski, Leszek

    2016-10-01

    In our research we use numerical model of the river to determine the limits of different fluvial parameters that play important roles in evolution of the rivers on Titan and on Earth. We have found that transport of sediments as suspended load is the main way of transport for Titan [1]. We also determined the range of the river's parameters for which multiple channel rivers are developed rather than single channel. This work is aimed to investigate the similarity and differences between these processes on Titan and the Earth.Numerical modelThe dynamical analysis of the considered rivers is performed using the package CCHE modified for the specific conditions on Titan. The package is based on the Navier-Stokes equations for depth-integrated two dimensional, turbulent flow and three dimensional convection-diffusion equation of sediment transport. We use the same numerical package that in our previous work [1] and [2], i.e. CCHE2D package.Parameters of the modelFor Titan we consider liquid corresponding to a Titan's rain (75% methane, 25% nitrogen) and water ice as material transported in rivers, for Earth the water and the quartz. We model evolution of the river for at least 100-200 days.Results and ConclusionsOur preliminary results indicate that suspended load is the main way of transport in simulated Titan's conditions. We also indicate that multiple channel rivers appears for larger range of slope on Titan (e.g. S=0.01-0.04) than on Earth (e.g. S=0.004-0.009). Also, for the same type of river, the grain size on Titan is at least 10 times larger than on Earth (1 cm for Titan versus 1 mm for the Earth). It is very interesting that on Titan multiple channel rivers appear even for very little discharge (e.g. Q=30m3/s) and for very large grain size (e.g. 10 cm). In the future we plan the experimental modelling in sediment basin to confirm results from computer modelling.References[1] Misiura, K., Czechowski, L., 2015. Numerical modelling of sedimentary structures in

  6. The Missing Link: the Role of Floodplain Tie Channels in Connecting Off River Water Bodies to Lowland Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, J. C.; Dietrich, W. E.; Day, G.

    2005-05-01

    Along lowland river systems across the globe the exchange of water, sediment, carbon, nutrients and biota between main stem rivers and off-river water bodies (ORWB) is facilitated by the presence of stable secondary channels referred to here as tie channels. Sixty five percent of the ORWB along the middle Fly River in Papua New Guinea connect to the river through such channels. A similar percentage of the 37 ORWB located between Baton Rouge and Memphis on the lower Mississippi River at one time were linked to the river by tie or batture (as they are locally known) channels. Levee construction and other alterations aimed at flood control or navigation on the Mississippi have left only a handful of lakes connected to the river, of these, most are heavily altered by dredging or other modifications. Tie channels were also once common along major tributaries to the Mississippi, such as the Red River. In the much less disturbed Alaskan environment, tie channels are still common, especially along Birch Creek and the Koyukuk and Black rivers. Our studies on the Mississippi River, in Alaska and in Papua New Guinea indicate that tie channels possess a common channel form that is stable and self-maintaining for hundreds to possibly a thousand years. Tie channels exhibit narrow width to depth ratios (~ 5.5) and consistently scale in cross-sectional dimensions to the size of the lake into which they flow. Variations in river and lake stage drive flow bi-directionally through tie channels. A local high or sill in the bed of tie channels controls the degree and duration of connection between the river and ORWB, with many lakes becoming isolated during periods of low stage. The life-span of a tie channel depends on the rate of sediment loading to the ORWB. Our research indicates that this rate directly corresponds to the sediment loading in the main stem river. Along the Fly River, for example, a 5 to 7 fold increase in the river sediment load has resulted increases of 6 to 17

  7. Use of main channel and two backwater habitats by larval fishes in the Detroit River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Erik A.; McNaught, A. Scott; Roseman, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations in the Detroit River have revealed renewed spawning activity by several important fishes, but little is known about their early life history requirements. We surveyed two main channel and two backwater areas in the lower Detroit River weekly from May to July 2007 to assess habitat use by larval fishes. Backwater areas included a soft-sediment embayment (FI) and a hard-sediment area (HIW). Main channel sites were located adjacent to each backwater area. Water temperature, velocity and clarity measurements and zooplankton samples were collected weekly. A macrophyte assessment was conducted in July. Growth and diet of larval yellow perch (Perca flavescens), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) were used to assess habitat quality. Macrophyte diversity and percent cover were higher and velocity lower at FI than HIW. Although larval fish diversity was highest in the main channel, yellow perch and bluegill larvae only grew beyond the yolk stage at FI, where they preferentially selected copepods, while Daphnia were selected in the main channel. Round goby ate harpacticoid copepods and Daphnia and grew at similar rates in HIW and the main channel. These data indicate that FI was a valuable nursery area for yellow perch and bluegill, whereas HIW was better suited to round goby. We only assessed two backwater areas, thus a complete census of wetland areas in the Detroit River is needed to identify valuable habitats. Restoration of shallow backwater areas is essential for rehabilitating fish populations and should be a priority in the Detroit River.

  8. River channel's predisposition to ice jams: a geospatial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Munck, S.; Gauthier, Y.; Bernier, M.; Légaré, S.

    2012-04-01

    When dynamic breakup occurs on rivers, ice moving downstream may eventually stop at an obstacle when the volume of moving ice exceeds the transport capacity of the river, resulting into an ice jam. The suddenness and unpredictability of these ice jams are a constant danger to local population. Therefore forecasting methods are necessary to provide an early warning to these population. Nonetheless the morphological and hydrological factors controlling where and how the ice will jam are numerous and complex. Existing studies which exist on this topic are highly site specific. Therefore, the goal of this work is to develop a simplified geospatial model that would estimate the predisposition of any river channel to ice jams. The question here is not to predict when the ice will break up but rather to know where the released ice would be susceptible to jam. This paper presents the developments and preliminary results of the proposed approach. The initial step was to document the main factors identified in the literature, as potential cause for an ice jam. First, several main factors identified in the literature as potential cause for an ice jam have been selected: presence of an island, narrowing of the channel, sinuosity, presence of a bridge, confluence of rivers and slope break. The second step was to spatially represent, in 2D, the physical characteristics of the channel and to translate these characteristics into potential ice jamming factors. The Chaudiere River, south of Quebec City (Canada), was chosen as a test site. Tools from the GIS-based FRAZIL system have been used to generate these factors from readily available geospatial data and calcutate an "ice jam predisposition index" over regular-spaced segments along the entire channel. The resulting map was validated upon historical observations and local knowledge, collected in relationship with the Minister of Public Security.

  9. Channel pattern and river-floodplain dynamics in forested mountain river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, Timothy J.; Liermann, Martin; Pollock, Michael M.; Baker, Sarah; Davies, Jeremy

    2006-08-01

    Channel pattern effectively stratifies the dynamics of rivers and floodplains in forested mountain river systems of the Pacific Northwest, USA. Straight channels are least dynamic, with relatively slow floodplain turnover and floodplains dominated by old surfaces. Braided channels are most dynamic, with floodplain turnover as low as 25 years and predominantly young floodplain surfaces. Island-braided and meandering channels have intermediate dynamics, with moderately frequent disturbances (erosion of floodplain patches) maintaining a mix of old and young surfaces. Return intervals for the erosion of floodplains increase in the order of braided, island-braided, meandering, and straight (8, 33, 60, and 89 years, respectively). A threshold for the lateral migration of a channel occurs at a bankfull width of 15-20 m. The most likely mechanism underlying this threshold is that larger channels are deep enough to erode below the rooting zone of bank vegetation. Above this threshold, channels not confined between valley walls exhibit channel patterns distinguishable by slope and discharge, and slope-discharge domains can be used to predict channel patterns. Meandering and braided patterns are most consistently identified by the model, and prediction errors are largely associated with indistinct transitions among channel patterns that are adjacent in plots of slope against discharge. Locations of straight channels are difficult to identify accurately with the current model. The predicted spatial distribution of channel patterns reflects a downstream decline in channel slope, which is likely correlated with a declining ratio of bed load to suspended load. Ecological theory suggests that biological diversity should be highest where the intermediate disturbance regime of island-braided channels sustains high diversity of habitat and successional states through time.

  10. Heavy metal storage in near channel sediments of the Lahn River, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Charles W.

    2004-08-01

    Heavy metal pollution in urban, industrial, and mined watersheds of Europe is well documented, but less is known about metal contamination in agrarian watersheds or those with no history of mining. Along a 75-km reach of the Lahn River, central Germany, near-channel flood-plain sediments (<5 m from the active channel) have mean concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn that exceed background values. Vertically, metal concentrations are highest at 15 or 20 cm below the flood plain. Although mean metal concentrations in the watershed are below mean values found in more industrial watersheds of western Europe, individual near-channel sites along the Lahn River have metal concentrations approaching those found in more urbanized drainage basins. Several sites along the Lahn are "excessively contaminated" with Cd and "moderately/strongly" contaminated with Cu, Pb, and Zn. Metal concentrations are generally higher and more variable downstream from metal-producing locations and in the vicinity of industrial facilities. Topographic and geomorphic factors appear to have minimal influence on near-channel metal concentrations. The elevated concentrations of metals in geomorphically sensitive channel banks and near-channel sediments raise the possibility of future metal pollution in the Lahn River watershed even as metal emissions to the environment decline.

  11. Mediative adjustment of river dynamics: The role of chute channels in tropical sand-bed meandering rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, M. C.; Nicholas, A. P.; Aalto, R.

    2014-03-01

    suggest that chute formation can exert negative feedback on shear stress and bank erosion in the adjacent mainstem bifurcate, such that the process of chute formation may also be rate-limiting. Chute formation is activated iteratively in space and time in response to changes in river energy (and sediment load), predominantly affecting sites of rapid channel elongation, and thereby mediating the river response.

  12. THE GAPS BETWEEN AN INTEGRATED UNDERSTANDING OF CHANNELIZATION, HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY VERSUS HOLISTIC FUTURE MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY OF THE WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last 150 years the main channel of the Willamette River has been drastically altered by human activity. It has changed from a generally meandering and anastamosing river with extensive reaches of broad, active and connected flood plain features to a river with 13 major ...

  13. Reach-Scale Channel Geometry of a Mountain River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.; Kuzma, J.; Brown, N.

    2002-12-01

    N. St. Vrain Creek drains 250 km2 of the Colorado Front Range. The basin is underlain by granitic rocks, and the upper half was glaciated. We used 25 study reaches to examine controls on reach-scale channel geometry. Variables measured included channel geometry (width, depth, gradient, bedforms), grain size, and mean velocity. Drainage area at each study reach ranged from 2.2-245 km2, and gradient from 0.013-0.147 m/m. The increase in discharge with drainage area is strongly linear. Channel types included cascade, step-pool, plane-bed and pool-riffle. We examined correlations among (1) the reach-scale response variables bankfull width (w), hydraulic radius (R), mean velocity (v), Darcy-Weisbach ff, bedform wavelength (bw) and amplitude (a), grain size, relative roughness (R/D84) and shear stress (ss), and (2) potential control variables that change progressively downstream (drainage area, discharge) or that are reach-specific (bed gradient). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that response variables correlate most strongly with local gradient because of the segmented nature of mountain channels. Results from linear regression analyses indicate that most response variables(R/D84, D50, D84, ff, ss) correlate best with gradient, although w, w/d ratio, and bw correlate best with discharge. Multiple regression analyses using Mallow's Cp selection criterion produced similar results in that most response variables correlate strongly with gradient, although the specific variables differ from those selected with linear regressions: w, a, v, ff and ss correlate with gradient, whereas R, bw and v correlate with discharge. These results suggest that the hypothesis is partially supported: channel bed gradient is likely to be a good predictor for many reach-scale response variables along mountain rivers, but discharge is also a good predictor for some response variables. Thus, although subject to strong constraints imposed by changes in gradient and grain size supplied by

  14. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  15. A river mouth submarine channel and failure complex, Fraser Delta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, B. S.; Prior, D. B.; Barrie, J. V.; Currie, R. G.; Luternauer, J. L.

    1992-11-01

    High-resolution seismic and side-scan sonar surveying, combined with coring, of the Fraser Delta slope seaward of the main fluvial distributary has revealed a complex suite of morphologic units which include undisturbed delta slope sediments, shallow rotational slides, relict and active slope channels, debris accumulations and ponded turbidites. Sediment transport through the main submarine channel is thought to be primarily by debris flows, rather than by turbidity currents. Although this is a seismically active region, the instability related features described here are probably due primarily to rapid sediment deposition on the upper delta slope at the river mouth.

  16. Quantitative metrics that describe river deltas and their channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Douglas A.; Paola, Chris; Hoyal, David C. J. D.; Sheets, Ben A.

    2011-12-01

    Densely populated river deltas are losing land at an alarming rate and to successfully restore these environments we must understand the details of their morphology. Toward this end we present a set of five metrics that describe delta morphology: (1) the fractal dimension, (2) the distribution of island sizes, (3) the nearest-edge distance, (4) a synthetic distribution of sediment fluxes at the shoreline, and (5) the nourishment area. The nearest-edge distance is the shortest distance to channelized or unchannelized water from a given location on the delta and is analogous to the inverse of drainage density in tributary networks. The nourishment area is the downstream delta area supplied by the sediment coming through a given channel cross section and is analogous to catchment area in tributary networks. As a first step, we apply these metrics to four relatively simple, fluvially dominated delta networks. For all these deltas, the average nearest-edge distances are remarkably constant moving down delta suggesting that the network organizes itself to maintain a consistent distance to the nearest channel. Nourishment area distributions can be predicted from a river mouth bar model of delta growth, and also scale with the width of the channel and with the length of the longest channel, analogous to Hack's law for drainage basins. The four delta channel networks are fractal, but power laws and scale invariance appear to be less pervasive than in tributary networks. Thus, deltas may occupy an advantageous middle ground between complete similarity and complete dissimilarity, where morphologic differences indicate different behavior.

  17. Analysis of channel evolution characteristics in the Hobq Desert reach of the Yellow River (1962-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Baotian; Guan, Qingyu; Liu, Zibian; Gao, Hongshan

    2015-12-01

    A series of problems, resulting from sediment deposition and channel silting, have occurred on the Hetao Plain as a result of changes to the Hobq Desert reach of the Yellow River. Therefore, improved research on channel evolution in this reach is vitally important. Using profile data from 80 channel cross-sections obtained in 1962, 1982, 1991 and 2000 from the Yellow River in the Hobq Desert, we showed that there was serious sediment deposition here (especially for the tributary section in the eastern desert) and that maximum sediment deposition occurred during 1982-1991. As sediment was deposited along the mobile channel, the channel trunk shrank and moved to the north. The characteristics of river channel evolution are dramatically different between the western and the eastern Hobq Desert reaches of the Yellow River, which include desert and the tributary sections, respectively. Erosion mainly occurred in the desert section, whereas sediment deposition occurred in the tributary section, with peak values at the mouths of on Yellow River tributaries. The desert section had a larger average erosion rate and smaller accumulation rate than the tributary section. The influences of tectonic movement and stream gradient on channel evolution in this fluvial reach were minimal. The sediment inputs from ten Yellow River tributaries (especially during flood seasons) have dominated channel evolution in these tributaries. The building of artificial levées has intensified sediment deposition in the channel, whereas the reduction of mainstream discharge (especially in the flood seasons), caused by the operation of reservoirs and water diversion activities (such as for agricultural irrigation), has further intensified the sediment deposition in the river channel.

  18. Applying fluvial geomorphology to river channel management: Background for progress towards a palaeohydrology protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, K. J.; Benito, G.; Downs, P. W.

    2008-06-01

    Significant developments have been achieved in applicable and applied fluvial geomorphology as shown in publications of the last three decades, analyzed as the basis for using results of studies of environmental change as a basis for management. The range of types of publications and of activities are more pertinent to river channel management as a result of concern with sustainability, global climate change, environmental ethics, ecosystem health concepts and public participation. Possible applications, with particular reference to river channel changes, include those concerned with form and process, assessment of channel change, urbanization, channelization, extractive industries, impact of engineering works, historical changes in land use, and restoration with specific examples illustrated in Table 1. In order to achieve general significance for fluvial geomorphology, more theory and extension by modelling methods is needed, and examples related to morphology and process characteristics, integrated approaches, and changes of the fluvial system are collected in Table 2. The ways in which potential applications are communicated to decision-makers range from applicable outputs including publications ranging from review papers, book chapters, and books, to applied outputs which include interdisciplinary problem solving, educational outreach, and direct involvement, with examples summarized in Table 3. On the basis of results gained from investigations covering periods longer than continuous records, a protocol embracing palaeohydrological inputs for application to river channel management is illustrated and developed as a synopsis version (Table 4), demonstrating how conclusions from geomorphological research can be expressed in a format which can be considered by managers.

  19. Transportation infrastructure, river confinement, and impacts on floodplain and channel habitat, Yakima and Chehalis rivers, Washington, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Paul; Marcus, W. Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Although floodplain roads and railroads are recognized as confining features with potentially large environmental impacts, few studies have explored the linkages between these structures and the natural disturbance regime that creates and maintains channel and riparian habitat. This study compares paired floodplain reaches with or without transportation infrastructure confining the riparian zone along the Yakima and Chehalis rivers in Washington State. Channel and floodplain habitat were degraded in the artificially confined reaches. Confined channels were narrower, simpler in planform, and relatively devoid of depositional surfaces such as bars and islands. Floodplains adjacent to confined channels exhibited degraded riparian forest and less refugium habitat such as side channels, ponds, and alcoves important for endangered salmonids and other biota. The results support hypotheses about how human modification of the floodplain landscape disrupts the flow regime and connectivity along riparian corridors. Neither simple buffer zones nor metrics such as valley width index adequately capture the disturbance-based landscape processes that drive riparian and channel habitat integrity. Future studies and indices of valley confinement, a critical driver of fluvial geomorphic processes, need to pay closer attention to artificial confinement of the channel, the riparian zone, and the active floodplain surfaces in order to portray the true constraints on fluvial processes.

  20. Evolution of channel morphology in a large river subject to rectification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Proto, Matteo; Zen, Simone; Bertoldi, Walter; Prà, Elena Dai; Comiti, Francesco; Surian, Nicola; Zolezzi, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Many large rivers in Europe have been subject to heavy modifications for land reclamation and flood mitigation through centuries. As a consequence, the study of the pre-alteration morphological patterns and of the related channel evolution following the anthropic modifications is rather challenging. The Adige River is the second longest river in Italy and drains 12,100 km2 of the Eastern Italian Alps. Currently, it features a straight to sinuous pattern and an average channel width of 40-60 m. A massive rectification scheme aiming at land reclamation of the Adige valley bottom was planned in the late 18th century, and implemented starting in the first decades of 19th century. Nowadays, it can be considered one of the most altered rivers in Italy, not only due to channelization but also to the presence of many hydropower reservoirs and check-dams along its tributaries. This study aims to the reconstruction of the Adige River's evolutionary trajectory over the last 250 years, and comprehension of key control factors driving channel evolution. A multi-temporal analysis of historical maps and orthophotos from 1776, to 2006 was performed in order to assess channel modifications. In addition, land use changes at the basin scale, years of occurrence of most relevant flood events, and climate variability over the investigated period were analyzed. The detailed topographical map surveyed in 1803 was taken as a reference, and the study sector (115 km long) was divided into 39 reaches. Active channel, bars, riparian vegetation and channel control works were geo-processed. Results show that the Adige River suffered the most intense alteration from 1803 to 1855, and especially from 1847 to 1855. During this period channel narrowing ranged from 14% to 70%, coupled with pattern changes and decreases in the braiding, sinuosity and anabrancing indices. Most important alterations occurred in the reaches presenting a multi-thread morphology in 1803, as their average width declined

  1. Effects of river restoration on riparian biodiversity in secondary channels of the Pite River, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Helfield, James M; Engström, Johanna; Michel, James T; Nilsson, Christer; Jansson, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Between 1850 and 1970, rivers throughout Sweden were channelized to facilitate timber floating. Floatway structures were installed to streamline banks and disconnect flow to secondary channels, resulting in simplified channel morphologies and more homogenous flow regimes. In recent years, local authorities have begun to restore channelized rivers. In this study, we examined the effects of restoration on riparian plant communities at previously disconnected secondary channels of the Pite River. We detected no increase in riparian diversity at restored sites relative to unrestored (i.e., disconnected) sites, but we did observe significant differences in species composition of both vascular plant and bryophyte communities. Disconnected sites featured greater zonation, with mesic-hydric floodplain species represented in plots closest to the stream and mesic-xeric upland species represented in plots farthest from the stream. In contrast, restored sites were most strongly represented by upland species at all distances relative to the stream. These patterns likely result from the increased water levels in reconnected channels where, prior to restoration, upland plants had expanded toward the stream. Nonetheless, the restored fluvial regime has not brought about the development of characteristic flood-adapted plant communities, probably due to the short time interval (ca. 5 years) since restoration. Previous studies have demonstrated relatively quick responses to similar restoration in single-channel tributaries, but secondary channels may respond differently due to the more buffered hydrologic regimes typically seen in anabranching systems. These findings illustrate how restoration outcomes can vary according to hydrologic, climatic and ecological factors, reinforcing the need for site-specific restoration strategies. PMID:22042408

  2. Effects of River Restoration on Riparian Biodiversity in Secondary Channels of the Pite River, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfield, James M.; Engström, Johanna; Michel, James T.; Nilsson, Christer; Jansson, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Between 1850 and 1970, rivers throughout Sweden were channelized to facilitate timber floating. Floatway structures were installed to streamline banks and disconnect flow to secondary channels, resulting in simplified channel morphologies and more homogenous flow regimes. In recent years, local authorities have begun to restore channelized rivers. In this study, we examined the effects of restoration on riparian plant communities at previously disconnected secondary channels of the Pite River. We detected no increase in riparian diversity at restored sites relative to unrestored (i.e., disconnected) sites, but we did observe significant differences in species composition of both vascular plant and bryophyte communities. Disconnected sites featured greater zonation, with mesic-hydric floodplain species represented in plots closest to the stream and mesic-xeric upland species represented in plots farthest from the stream. In contrast, restored sites were most strongly represented by upland species at all distances relative to the stream. These patterns likely result from the increased water levels in reconnected channels where, prior to restoration, upland plants had expanded toward the stream. Nonetheless, the restored fluvial regime has not brought about the development of characteristic flood-adapted plant communities, probably due to the short time interval (ca. 5 years) since restoration. Previous studies have demonstrated relatively quick responses to similar restoration in single-channel tributaries, but secondary channels may respond differently due to the more buffered hydrologic regimes typically seen in anabranching systems. These findings illustrate how restoration outcomes can vary according to hydrologic, climatic and ecological factors, reinforcing the need for site-specific restoration strategies.

  3. Effects of river restoration on riparian biodiversity in secondary channels of the Pite River, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Helfield, James M; Engström, Johanna; Michel, James T; Nilsson, Christer; Jansson, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Between 1850 and 1970, rivers throughout Sweden were channelized to facilitate timber floating. Floatway structures were installed to streamline banks and disconnect flow to secondary channels, resulting in simplified channel morphologies and more homogenous flow regimes. In recent years, local authorities have begun to restore channelized rivers. In this study, we examined the effects of restoration on riparian plant communities at previously disconnected secondary channels of the Pite River. We detected no increase in riparian diversity at restored sites relative to unrestored (i.e., disconnected) sites, but we did observe significant differences in species composition of both vascular plant and bryophyte communities. Disconnected sites featured greater zonation, with mesic-hydric floodplain species represented in plots closest to the stream and mesic-xeric upland species represented in plots farthest from the stream. In contrast, restored sites were most strongly represented by upland species at all distances relative to the stream. These patterns likely result from the increased water levels in reconnected channels where, prior to restoration, upland plants had expanded toward the stream. Nonetheless, the restored fluvial regime has not brought about the development of characteristic flood-adapted plant communities, probably due to the short time interval (ca. 5 years) since restoration. Previous studies have demonstrated relatively quick responses to similar restoration in single-channel tributaries, but secondary channels may respond differently due to the more buffered hydrologic regimes typically seen in anabranching systems. These findings illustrate how restoration outcomes can vary according to hydrologic, climatic and ecological factors, reinforcing the need for site-specific restoration strategies.

  4. Historical Channel Adjustment and Estimates of Selected Hydraulic Values in the Lower Sabine River and Lower Brazos River Basins, Texas and Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Greene, Lauren E.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, evaluated historical channel adjustment and estimated selected hydraulic values at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in the lower Sabine River Basin in Texas and Louisiana and lower Brazos River Basin in Texas to support geomorphic assessments of the Texas Instream Flow Program. Channel attributes including cross-section geometry, slope, and planform change were evaluated to learn how each river's morphology changed over the years in response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Historical and contemporary cross-sectional channel geometries at several gaging stations on each river were compared, planform changes were assessed, and hydraulic values were estimated including mean flow velocity, bed shear stress, Froude numbers, and hydraulic depth. The primary sources of historical channel morphology information were U.S. Geological Survey hard-copy discharge-measurement field notes. Additional analyses were done using computations of selected flow hydraulics, comparisons of historical and contemporary aerial photographs, comparisons of historical and contemporary ground photographs, evaluations of how frequently stage-discharge rating curves were updated, reviews of stage-discharge relations for field measurements, and considerations of bridge and reservoir construction activities. Based on historical cross sections at three gaging stations downstream from Toledo Bend Reservoir, the lower Sabine River is relatively stable, but is subject to substantial temporary scour-and-fill processes during floods. Exceptions to this characterization of relative stability include an episode of channel aggradation at the Sabine River near Bon Wier, Texas, during the 1930s, and about 2 to 3 feet of channel incision at the Sabine River near Burkeville, Texas, since the late 1950s. The Brazos River, at gaging stations downstream from Waco, Texas, has adjusted to a combination of

  5. Life in the fast lane: fish and foodweb structure in the main channel of large rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettmers, J.M.; Wahl, David H.; Soluk, D.A.; Gutreuter, S.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the main channel of the lower Illinois River and of the Mississippi River just upstream and downstream of its confluence with the Illinois River to describe the abundance, composition, and/or seasonal appearance of components of the main-channel community. Abundance of fishes in the main channel was high, especially adults. Most adult fishes were present in the main channel for either 3 or 4 seasons/y, indicating that fishes regularly reside in the main channel. We documented abundant zooplankton and benthic invertebrates in the main channel, and the presence of these food types in the diets of channel catfish and freshwater drum. All trophic levels were well represented in the main channel, indicating that the main channel supports a unique food web. The main channel also serves as an important energetic link with other riverine habitats (e.g., floodplains, secondary channels, backwater lakes) because of the mobility of resident fishes and because of the varied energy sources supplying this food web. It may be more realistic to view energy flow in large-river systems as a combination of 3 existing concepts, the river continuum concept (downstream transport), the flood pulse concept (lateral transport to the floodplain), and the riverine productivity model (autochthonous production). We urge additional research to quantify the links between the main channel and other habitat types in large rivers because of the apparent importance of main-channel processes in the overall structure and function of large-river ecosystems.

  6. Channel change and bed-material transport in the Umpqua River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallick, J. Rose; O'Connor, Jim E.; Anderson, Scott; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Cannon, Charles; Risley, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers of western Oregon; with headwaters in the Cascade Range, the river flows through portions of the Klamath Mountains and Oregon Coast Range before entering the Pacific Ocean. Above the head of tide, the Umpqua River, along with its major tributaries, the North and South Umpqua Rivers, flows on a mixed bedrock and alluvium bed, alternating between bedrock rapids and intermittent, shallow gravel bars composed of gravel to cobble-sized clasts. These bars have been a source of commercial aggregate since the mid-twentieth century. Below the head of tide, the Umpqua River contains large bars composed of mud and sand. Motivated by ongoing permitting and aquatic habitat concerns related to in-stream gravel mining on the fluvial reaches, this study evaluated spatial and temporal trends in channel change and bed-material transport for 350 kilometers of river channel along the Umpqua, North Umpqua, and South Umpqua Rivers. The assessment produced (1) detailed mapping of the active channel, using aerial photographs and repeat surveys, and (2) a quantitative estimation of bed-material flux that drew upon detailed measurements of particle size and lithology, equations of transport capacity, and a sediment yield analysis. Bed-material transport capacity estimates at 45 sites throughout the South Umpqua and main stem Umpqua Rivers for the period 1951-2008 result in wide-ranging transport capacity estimates, reflecting the difficulty of applying equations of bed-material transport to a supply-limited river. Median transport capacity values calculated from surface-based equations of bedload transport for each of the study reaches provide indications of maximum possible transport rates and range from 8,000 to 27,000 metric tons per year (tons/yr) for the South Umpqua River and 20,000 to 82,000 metric tons/yr for the main stem Umpqua River upstream of the head of tide; the North Umpqua River probably contributes little bed material. A

  7. Distribution and characterization of in-channel large wood in relation to geomorphic patterns on a low-gradient river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moulin, Bertrand; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2011-01-01

    A 177 river km georeferenced aerial survey of in-channel large wood (LW) on the lower Roanoke River, NC was conducted to determine LW dynamics and distributions on an eastern USA low-gradient large river. Results indicate a system with approximately 75% of the LW available for transport either as detached individual LW or as LW in log jams. There were approximately 55 individual LW per river km and another 59 pieces in log jams per river km. Individual LW is a product of bank erosion (73% is produced through erosion) and is isolated on the mid and upper banks at low flow. This LW does not appear to be important for either aquatic habitat or as a human risk. Log jams rest near or at water level making them a factor in bank complexity in an otherwise homogenous fine-grained channel. A segmentation test was performed using LW frequency by river km to detect breaks in longitudinal distribution and to define homogeneous reaches of LWfrequency. Homogeneous reaches were then analyzed to determine their relationship to bank height, channel width/depth, sinuosity, and gradient. Results show that log jams are a product of LW transport and occur more frequently in areas with high snag concentrations, low to intermediate bank heights, high sinuosity, high local LW recruitment rates, and narrow channel widths. The largest concentration of log jams (21.5 log jams/km) occurs in an actively eroding reach. Log jam concentrations downstream of this reach are lower due to a loss of river competency as the channel reaches sea level and the concurrent development of unvegetated mudflats separating the active channel from the floodplain forest. Substantial LW transport occurs on this low-gradient, dam-regulated large river; this study, paired with future research on transport mechanisms should provide resource managers and policymakers with options to better manage aquatic habitat while mitigating possible negative impacts to human interests.

  8. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human-induced stream channel abandonment/capture and filling of floodplain channels within the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroes, Daniel E.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The Atchafalaya River Basin is a distributary system of the Mississippi River containing the largest riparian area in the lower Mississippi River Valley and the largest remaining forested bottomland in North America. Reductions in the area of open water in the Atchafalaya have been occurring over the last 100 years, and many historical waterways are increasingly filled by sediment. This study examines two cases of swamp channels (3/s) that are filling and becoming unnavigable as a result of high sediment loads and slow water velocities. The water velocities in natural bayous are further reduced because of flow capture by channels constructed for access. Bathymetry, flow, suspended sediment, deposited bottom-material, isotopes, and photointerpretation were used to characterize the channel fill. On average, water flowing through these two channels lost 23% of the suspended sediment load in the studied reaches. Along one of the studied reaches, two constructed access channels diverted significant flow out of the primary channel and into the adjacent swamp. Immediately downstream of each of the two access channels, the cross-sectional area of the studied channel was reduced. Isotopic analyses of bottom-material cores indicate that bed filling has been rapid and occurred after detectable levels of Cesium-137 were no longer being deposited. Interpretation of aerial photography indicates that water is bypassing the primary channels in favor of the more hydraulically efficient access channels, resulting in low or no-velocity flow conditions in the primary channel. These swamp channel conditions are typical in the Atchafalaya River Basin where relict large channel dimensions result in flow velocities that are normally too low to carry fine-grained sediment. Constructed channels increase the rate of natural channel avulsion and abandonment as a result of flow capture.

  10. THE CONFIGURATION AND THE FORMING PROCESS OF RIVER CHANNEL INFLUENCED BY RIVER CROSSING STRUCTURES AND GRAVEL MINING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Daisuke; Chibana, Takeyoshi; Yamashita, Kimiko

    In many Japanese gravel-bed rivers, during these 30 years, river morphology has changed from single channel to compound channel, and the black locust has been rapidly spreading its habitat in the flood channel. It is said that this change has been caused by past gravel mining and the construction of river-crossing structures. This study aims to reveal how these human impacts affected and altered the river configuration. Previous study pointed out that theriver slope is determined by the size of sediment and the flow condition. In the Tama River, however, it was pointed out that the loss of cobbles and boulders due to gravel mining made the riverbed slope in low flow channel milder than before and formed compound channel. The low flow channel width was narrowest just downstream of a river-crossing structure but increased in the flow direction and was largest upstream of the next structure. This situation was also seen in other gravel-bed rivers, and its ecosystem was strongly related to the height of the weir and the length between a structure and a structure. In the upstream area of the alluvial fan of the Tama river, in 1968, when gravel mining had finished, bedrock was exposed in a lot of places due to gravel mining. This bedrock was firstly eroded just downstream of each structure, and the erosion progressed in the flow direction. This erosion formed low flow channel, and in its flood channel, the suitable condition for the black locust, which was revealed in this paper, was formed during several heavy floods and caused sudden expansion of blacklocust. On the other hand, from the upstream of the next structure, deposited sediment has formed gravel-bed river toward upstream direction. As a result, boundary of eroded channel and gravel-bed channel was formed between the structures.

  11. Impact of channel incision on the hydraulics of flood flows: Examples from Polish Carpathian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Zawiejska, Joanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Channel deepening may result from channel incision or river metamorphosis changing a wide and shallow channel to a narrow and deep one. As only the first type of channel change leads to increased flow capacity of the channel, a lowering of water stage associated with a given discharge rather than a lowering of river bed should be used to identify channel incision. A lowering of minimum annual stage at gauging stations is typically used to assess the relative importance of channel incision along a river or within a particular region. Rivers of the Polish Carpathians incised by 0.5-3.8 m over the twentieth century, with the amount of incision being greater in their lower and middle courses than in the upper ones. Variability in the hydraulic importance of channel incision with increasing river size is analysed by comparing changes in the frequency of valley floor inundation at gauging stations located along the seventh-order Dunajec River. Despite a lower absolute amount of channel incision in the upper river course, here incision has increased channel conveyance and reduced the frequency of valley floor inundation considerably more than in the lower course. Hydraulic effects of channel incision depend also on lateral stability of an incising river. Low-energy rivers from the eastern part of the Polish Carpathians remained laterally stable during channel incision. This has resulted in substantial lowering of stages for low flood discharges and markedly smaller one for high-magnitude floods, whereas velocity of the flows conveyed over the highly elevated floodplains has decreased considerably. In high-energy rivers from the western part of the Polish Carpathians, alternation of incision and lateral channel migration has led to the formation of incised meander belts, with substantially lowered stages for all flood discharges and increased velocity of the flows conveyed over the newly-formed, low-lying floodplains.

  12. Channel Stability and Water Quality of the Alagnak River, Southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.

    2003-01-01

    The Alagnak River, a National Wild River located in southwestern Alaska, drains an area of 3,600 square kilometers and is used for recreational and subsistence activities, primarily angling, camping, rafting, and hunting by visitors and seasonal residents, and for commercial guiding by several lodges. Increases in visitor use in the 1990s included an increase in the use of high-horsepower motorboats on the river, primarily for angling, and raised concerns regarding human impacts on water quality. Downstream from its confluence with the Nonvianuk River at river kilometer (RK) 93, the Alagnak River is formed in glacial drift and outwash with a single, low bedrock outcrop. Analysis of aerial photography from 1951, 1982, and 2001 shows that the river's multiple channels from RK 57 to 93 have been relatively stable. In contrast, long reaches of multiple channels from RK 35 to 57 changed substantially between 1951 and 1982, creating a new complex of channels. Downstream from RK 35, channel changes in the past 50 years consist largely of minor meander migration. Analysis of water samples collected during this study at RK 21, 46, and 93 and in the Alagnak and Nonvianuk Rivers at the outlets of the lakes that form their source shows that the Alagnak River is a nutrient-poor, calcium-bicarbonate water with low suspended-sediment concentrations. Water chemistry changes little over time or in a downstream direction. Weak patterns over time include high late May/early June concentrations of some nutrients, carbon, and iron. Weak patterns over distance include downstream increases in iron, manganese, and phosphorous. No pervasive human impacts on Alagnak River water chemistry were detected. Local effects that could be diluted within a kilometer downstream of the source were not detectable by this study. Data collected at three continuously recording wake gaging stations at RK 21, 46, and 93 showed that 1999-2000 motorboat use was heaviest in the lower reaches of the river

  13. River sedimentation and channel bed characteristics in northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Biadgilgn; Billi, Paolo; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Lanckriet, Sil; Nyssen, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Excessive sedimentation and flood hazard are common in ephemeral streams which are characterized by flashy floods. The purposes of this study was to investigate the temporal variability of bio-climatic factors in controlling sediment supply to downstream channel reaches and the effect of bridges on local hydro-geomorphic conditions in causing the excess sedimentation and flood hazard in ephemeral rivers of the Raya graben (northern Ethiopia). Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was analyzed for the study area using Landsat imageries of 1972, 1986, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2012). Middle term, 1993-2011, daily rainfall data of three meteorological stations, namely, Alamata, Korem and Maychew, were considered to analyse the temporal trends and to calculate the return time intervals of rainfall intensity in 24 hours for 2, 5, 10 and 20 years using the log-normal and the Gumbel extreme events method. Streambed gradient and bed material grain size were measured in 22 river reaches (at bridges and upstream). In the study catchments, the maximum NDVI values were recorded in the time interval from 2000 to 2010, i.e. the decade during which the study bridges experienced the most severe excess sedimentation problems. The time series analysis for a few rainfall parameters do not show any evidence of rainfall pattern accountable for an increase in sediment delivery from the headwaters nor for the generation of higher floods with larger bedload transport capacities. Stream bed gradient and bed material grain size data were measured in order to investigate the effect of the marked decrease in width from the wide upstream channels to the narrow recently constructed bridges. The study found the narrowing of the channels due to the bridges as the main cause of the thick sedimentation that has been clogging the study bridges and increasing the frequency of overbank flows during the last 15 years. Key terms: sedimentation, ephemeral streams, sediment size, bridge clogging

  14. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate.

  15. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca2+ activated BK channels, a K+ channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate. PMID:25705194

  16. Channel changes in the Jarama and Tagus rivers (central Spain) over the past 500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribelarrea, D.; Pérez-González, A.; Benito, G.

    2003-10-01

    Long-term channel changes of the Tagus and the Jarama Rivers in central Spain were studied in relation to variations in hydroclimatic factors, such as rainfall and flooding, and also with respect to human activities undertaken in their valleys. Data were taken from historical (1580-1823) and topographical (1877-1988) maps, as well as aerial photographs (1945-1999). The available hydroclimatic data consists of a series of monthly rainfall totals (1859-1994) and mean river flow values recorded at gauging stations (1911-1985). In addition, a historical flood record (1550-1947) was produced from documentary sources. Some of the data was incorporated into a geographical information system (GIS) to quantify the changes in the course of the rivers. The results show there have been two distinct periods: before and after human intervention in the river system, which took place around 1950. During the earlier period (1550-1950), a correlation exists between climate, frequency and magnitude of flooding and changes in fluvial geomorphology. Between 1860 and 1892 an increase in flood frequency and magnitude occurred, which produced half of the cut-offs recorded in the study area between 1823 and 1877. The meanders length ( L), width ( W) and radius of curvature (RC) of the Tagus River have decreased since 1750. However, those of the Jarama reached their maximum values during flood periods. Both rivers have different geomorphological responses during flood events, which can explain these different trends. Floods in the Jarama not only led to the cut-offs, but also enlarged the channel size ( L, W and RC). In the second period (1956—present), flow regulation via dams and gravel mining modified the system completely and impeded the natural development of these rivers.

  17. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Rogue River basin, southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary assessment of bed-material transport, vertical and lateral channel changes, and existing datasets for the Rogue River basin, which encompasses 13,390 square kilometers (km2) along the southwestern Oregon coast. This study, conducted to inform permitting decisions regarding instream gravel mining, revealed that: * The Rogue River in its lowermost 178.5 kilometers (km) alternates between confined and unconfined segments, and is predominately alluvial along its lowermost 44 km. The study area on the mainstem Rogue River can be divided into five reaches based on topography, hydrology, and tidal influence. The largely confined, active channel flows over bedrock and coarse bed material composed chiefly of boulders and cobbles in the Grants Pass (river kilometers [RKM] 178.5-152.8), Merlin (RKM 152.8-132.7), and Galice Reaches (RKM 132.7-43.9). Within these confined reaches, the channel contains few bars and has stable planforms except for locally wider segments such as the Brushy Chutes area in the Merlin Reach. Conversely, the active channel flows over predominately alluvial material and contains nearly continuous gravel bars in the Lobster Creek Reach (RKM 43.9-6.7). The channel in the Tidal Reach (RKM 6.7-0) is also alluvial, but tidally affected and unconfined until RKM 2. The Lobster Creek and Tidal Reaches contain some of the most extensive bar deposits within the Rogue River study area. * For the 56.6-km-long segment of the Applegate River included in this study, the river was divided into two reaches based on topography. In the Upper Applegate River Reach (RKM 56.6-41.6), the confined, active channel flows over alluvium and bedrock and has few bars. In the Lower Applegate River Reach (RKM 41.6-0), the active channel alternates between confined and unconfined segments, flows predominantly over alluvium, shifts laterally in unconfined sections, and contains more numerous and larger bars. * The 6.5-km segment of the lower

  18. Comparison of planform multi-channel network characteristics of alluvial and bedrock constrained large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, P. A.; Meshkova, L.; Robinson, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Mekong River in northern Cambodia is an multi-channel mixed bedrock-alluvial river but it was poorly researched until present. Preliminary study of the Mekong geomorphology was conducted by gathering existing knowledge of its geological and tectonic settings, specific riparian vegetation and ancient alluvial terraces in which the river has incised since the Holocene. Altogether this process has allowed a geomorphological portrait of the river to be composed within the Quaternary context. Following this outline, the planform characteristics of the Mekong River network are compared, using analysis of channel network and islands configurations, with the fluvial patterns of the Orange River (South Africa), Upper Columbia River (Canada) and the Ganga River (India, Bangladesh). These rivers are selected as examples of multi-channel mixed bedrock alluvial, anastomosed alluvial and braided alluvial rivers respectively. Network parameters such as channel bifurcation angles asymmetry, sinuosity, braid intensity and island morphometric shape metrics are compared and contrasted between bedrock and alluvial systems. In addition, regional and local topographic trend surfaces produced for each river planform help explain the local changes in river direction and the degree of anastomosis, and distinguish the bedrock-alluvial rivers from the alluvial rivers. Variations between planform characteristics are to be explained by channel forming processes and in the case of mixed bedrock-alluvial rivers mediated by structural control. Channel metrics (derived at the reach-scale) provide some discrimination between different multi-channel patterns but are not always robust when considered singly. In contrast, island shape metrics (obtained at subreach-scale) allow robust discrimination between alluvial and bedrock systems.

  19. Channel change on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Santa Cruz River, an ephemeral river that drains 8,581 square miles in southeastern Arizona, has a long history of channel instability. Since the late 19th century, lateral channel erosion has caused extensive property damage, particularly in Pima County. During the flood of 1983, about $100 million damage was caused in the Tucson area alone; most damage resulted from bank erosion on the Santa Cruz River and its tributaries. The nature, magni- tude, location, and frequency of channel change on the Santa Cruz River were highly variable in time and space from 1936 through 1986 along a 70-mile reach in Pima County, Arizona. Four mechanisms of lateral channel change--channel migration, avulsion and meander cutoff, channel widening, and arroyo widening--were identified on the Santa Cruz River. The dominant mechanism in a reach depends on channel morphology and flood magnitude. The dominant vertical change has been degradation. The timing and magnitude of channel change at a particular location are controlled primarily by hydroclimatic factors such as magnitude, duration, intensity, and frequency of precipitation and floods. The location of channel change and its magnitude in response to a given discharge are controlled largely by topographic, geologic, hydraulic, and artificial factors. Although much of the present morphology of the Santa Cruz River is the result of recent large floods, a direct link between hydroclimatic con- ditions and channel change is not always evident because resistance of the channel to erosion varies with time. (USGS)

  20. The resilience of river valleys to deformation in experiments: competition between tectonic advection and channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerit, Laure; Dominguez, Stéphane; Castelltort, Sébastien; Malavielle, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    In oblique collision settings, parallel and perpendicular components of the relative plate motion can be partitioned into different structures of deformation and may be localized close to the plate boundary, or distributed on a wider region. In the Southern Alps of New Zealand, it has been proposed that two-third of the regional convergence was accommodated by the Alpine Fault, while the remaining motion was distributed in a broad area along the Southern Alps orogenic wedge. To better document and understand the regional dynamics of such systems, reliable markers of the horizontal tectonic motion over geological time scales are needed. In numerical models, it has been shown that river networks are able to record a large amount of distributed strain, and that they can thus be used to reconstruct the mode and rate of distribution away from major active structures (Castelltort et al, NGeo, 2012). In order to explore the controls on river resilience to deformation in a less constrained system, we developed an experimental model to investigate river pattern evolution over a doubly-vergent orogenic wedge growing in a context of oblique convergence. We use a rain-fall system to activate erosion, sediment transport and river development on the model surface. The evolution of the wedge is fully recorded through space and time so we are able to follow the drainage geometry deformation. These experiments confirm that rivers record the distribution of motion along the wedge. Image analysis of channel time-space evolution shows how the fault-parallel and fault-perpendicular components of motion decrease toward the fault and impose rotation to the main trunk valleys. However, the capacity of rivers to act as passive markers of deformation competes with the natural lateral channel dynamics and hillslope-channel couplings which both modify the valleys boundaries. In this sense rivers are dynamic markers, which write both a story of passive rotation imposed by the tectonic velocity

  1. 33 CFR 165.508 - Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. 165.508 Section 165.508 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.508 Security Zone; Georgetown Channel, Potomac River, Washington, DC. (a) Definitions. (1)...

  2. Changes in channel characteristics, 1938-74, of the Homochitto River and tributaries, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.V.

    1979-01-01

    Channel characteristics in the lower reaches of the Homochitto River in southwest Mississippi and some of its tributaries changed following the completion of cutoffs and channelization projects between 1938 and 1940. Channel degradation and accelerated bank sloughing began during the early 1940's in the vicinity of Doloroso, a short distance upstream from the Abernathy Channel, a 9-mile cutoff emptying into the Mississippi River. By the late 1940's, channel degradation was apparent at Rosetta, 24 miles upstream. By 1974, channel degradation totaled 19 feet at Doloroso, 18.5 feet at Kingston, and 15 feet at Rosetta. Substantial channel degradation had also occurred in Second Creek, Crooked Creek, and Middle Fork Homochitto River. Little or no channel degradation had occurred at Bude by 1974.

  3. Quantifying downstream impacts of impoundment on flow regime and channel planform, lower Trinity River, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Slattery, Michael C.; Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2005-07-01

    As human population worldwide has grown, so has interest in harnessing and manipulating the flow of water for the benefit of humans. The Trinity River of eastern Texas is one such watershed greatly impacted by engineering and urbanization. Draining the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, just under 30 reservoirs are in operation in the basin, regulating flow while containing public supplies, supporting recreation, and providing flood control. Lake Livingston is the lowest, as well as largest, reservoir in the basin, a mere 95 km above the Trinity's outlet near Galveston Bay. This study seeks to describe and quantify channel activity and flow regime, identifying effects of the 1968 closure of Livingston dam. Using historic daily and peak discharge data from USGS gauging stations, flow duration curves are constructed, identifying pre- and post-dam flow conditions. A digital historic photo archive was also constructed using six sets of aerial photographs spanning from 1938 to 1995, and three measures of channel activity applied using a GIS. Results show no changes in high flow conditions following impoundment, while low flows are elevated. However, the entire post-dam period is characterized by significantly higher rainfall, which may be obscuring the full impact of flow regulation. Channel activity rates do not indicate a more stabilized planform following dam closure; rather they suggest that the Trinity River is adjusting itself to the stress of Livingston dam in a slow, gradual process that may not be apparent in a modern time scale.

  4. On how spatial variations of channel width influence river profile curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer-Boix, Carles; Chartrand, Shawn M.; Hassan, Marwan A.; Martín-Vide, Juan P.; Parker, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Longitudinal profiles of alluvial rivers usually exhibit upward-concave curvatures at equilibrium. River profile concavity has been primarily attributed to sediment downstream fining and to streamwise increments of water discharge. Conversely, upward-convex profiles have been typically associated with tectonic and geologic controls and with outlet base-level drops. Equations to describe river profiles at equilibrium developed from mass conservation principles do not consider longitudinal changes in channel width. This study addresses how variations in channel width can also act to control the curvature of longitudinal profiles. We develop a new theoretical framework in which the role on river profiles of downstream variations of channel width, flow discharge, bed roughness, and surface texture are explicitly shown. Unlike classical approaches for river profile evolution, this novel framework identifies physical domains for rivers to develop upward-concave/convex longitudinal profiles depending on channel width and flow discharge gradients flow intensity and surface texture.

  5. TRPC channel activation by extracellular thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shang-Zhong; Sukumar, Piruthivi; Zeng, Fanning; Li, Jing; Jairaman, Amit; English, Anne; Naylor, Jacqueline; Ciurtin, Coziana; Majeed, Yasser; Milligan, Carol J; Bahnasi, Yahya M; AL-Shawaf, Eman; Porter, Karen E; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Emery, Paul; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu; Beech, David J

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian homologues of Drosophila melanogaster transient receptor potential (TRP) are a large family of multimeric cation channels that act, or putatively act, as sensors of one or more chemical factor1,2. Major research objectives are the identification of endogenous activators and the determination of cellular and tissue functions of these novel channels. Here we show activation of TRPC5 homomultimeric and TRPC5-TRPC1 heteromultimeric channels3-5 by extracellular reduced thioredoxin acting by breaking a disulphide bridge in the predicted extracellular loop adjacent to the ion-selectivity filter of TRPC5. Thioredoxin is an endogenous redox protein with established intracellular functions, but it is also secreted and its extracellular targets are largely unknown6-9. Particularly high extracellular concentrations of thioredoxin are apparent in rheumatoid arthritis8,10-12, an inflammatory joint disease disabling millions of people world-wide13. We show that TRPC5 and TRPC1 are expressed in secretory fibroblast-like synoviocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, endogenous TRPC5-TRPC1 channels of the cells are activated by reduced thioredoxin, and blockade of the channels enhances secretory activity and prevents suppression of secretion by thioredoxin. The data suggest a novel ion channel activation mechanism that couples extracellular thioredoxin to cell function. PMID:18172497

  6. Assessment of long-term channel changes in the Mekong River using remote sensing and a channel-evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    River-channel changes are a key factor affecting physical, ecological and management issues in the fluvial environment. In this study, long-term channel changes in the Mekong River were assessed using remote sensing and a channel-evolution model. A channel-evolution model for calculating long-term channel changes of a measndering river was developed using a previous fluid-dynamic model [Zolezzi and Seminara, 2001], and was applied in order to quantify channel changes of two meandering reaches in the Mekong River. Quite few attempts have been made so far to combine remote sensing observation of meandering planform change with the application of channel evolution models within relatively small-scale gravel-bed systems in humid temperate regions. The novel point of the present work is to link state-of-art meandering planform evolution model with observed morphological changes within large-scale sand-bed rivers with higher bank height in tropical monsoonal climate regions, which are the highly dynamic system, and assess the performance. Unstable extents of the reaches could be historically identified using remote-sensing technique. The instability caused i) bank erosion and accretion of meander bends and ii) movement or development of bars and changes in the flow around the bars. The remote sensing measurements indicate that maximum erosion occurred downstream of the maximum curvature of the river-center line in both reaches. The model simulations indicates that under the mean annual peak discharge the maximum of excess longitudinal velocity near the banks occurs downstream of the maximum curvature in both reaches. The channel migration coefficients of the reaches were calibrated by comparing remote-sensing measurements and model simulations. The diffrence in the migration coefficients between both reaches depends on the diffrence in bank height rather than the geotechnical properties of floodplain sediments. Possible eroded floodplain areas and accreted floodplain

  7. Evaluating the impact of a wide range of vegetation densities on river channel pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Roucou, Ron

    2016-04-01

    Braided rivers are very dynamic systems which have complex controls over their planform and flow dynamics. Vegetation is one variable which influences channel geometry and pattern, through its effect on local flow hydraulics and the process continuum of sediment erosion-transport-deposition. Furthermore, where in the braided floodplain stable vegetation develops depends on the temporal sequencing of the river discharge i.e. floods. Understanding the effect of vegetation in these highly dynamic systems has multiple consequences for human activity and floodplain management. This paper focusses on the specific role of vegetation density in controlling braided river form and processes. Previous research in this field has been contradictory; with Gran and Paola (2001) finding that increasing vegetation density decreased the number of active channels. In contrast, Coulthard (2005] observed that as vegetation become denser there was an increase in the number of channels. This was hypothesized to be caused by flow separation around vegetation and the development of bars immediately downstream of the plant. This paper reports the results from a set of experiments in a 4m by 1m flume, where discharge, slope and sediment size were kept constant. Artificial grass was used to represent vegetation with a density ranging from 50 plants/m2 to 400 plants/m2. Digital photographs, using a GoPro camera with a fish eye lens, were taken from ~1m above the flume at an interval of 30 seconds during the 3 hour experiment. The experiments showed that as the vegetation density increased from 50 to 150 plants/m2, the number of channel bars developing doubled from 12 to 24. At vegetation densities greater than 150 plants/m2 there was a decline in the number of bars created to a minimum of 8 bars for a density of 400 plants/m2. We attribute these patterns to the effect that the vegetation has on flow hydraulics, sediment transport processes and the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition. We

  8. SEASONAL FORAGING BY CHANNEL CATFISH ON TERRESTRIALLY BURROWING CRAYFISH IN A FLOODPLAIN-RIVER ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The seasonal use of terrestrially burrowing crayfish as a food item by channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was studied in channelized and non-channelized sections of the Yockanookany River (Mississippi, USA). During seasonal inundation of the floodplains, the crayfish occupied o...

  9. Channel-conveyance capacity, channel change, and sediment transport in the lower Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers, western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Chistopher S.; Voss, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    Draining the volcanic, glaciated terrain of Mount Rainier, Washington, the Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers convey copious volumes of water and sediment down to Commencement Bay in Puget Sound. Recent flooding in the lowland river system has renewed interest in understanding sediment transport and its effects on flow conveyance throughout the lower drainage basin. Bathymetric and topographic data for 156 cross sections were surveyed in the lower Puyallup River system by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and were compared with similar datasets collected in 1984. Regions of significant aggradation were measured along the Puyallup and White Rivers. Between 1984 and 2009, aggradation totals as measured by changes in average channel elevation were as much as 7.5, 6.5, and 2 feet on the Puyallup, White, and Carbon Rivers, respectively. These aggrading river sections correlated with decreasing slopes in riverbeds where the rivers exit relatively confined sections in the upper drainage and enter the relatively unconstricted valleys of the low-gradient Puget Lowland. Measured grain-size distributions from each riverbed showed a progressive fining downstream. Analysis of stage-discharge relations at streamflow-gaging stations along rivers draining Mount Rainier demonstrated the dynamic nature of channel morphology on river courses influenced by glaciated, volcanic terrain. The greatest rates of aggradation since the 1980s were in the Nisqually River near National (5.0 inches per year) and the White River near Auburn (1.8 inches per year). Less pronounced aggradation was measured on the Puyallup River and the White River just downstream of Mud Mountain Dam. The largest measured rate of incision was measured in the Cowlitz River at Packwood (5.0 inches per year). Channel-conveyance capacity estimated using a one-dimensional hydraulic model decreased in some river reaches since 1984. The reach exhibiting the largest decrease (about 20-50 percent) in channel

  10. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin.

  11. The Interaction between Logjams, Channel Evolution, and Sports Fisheries on a Dam Regulated Low Gradient River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, E.; Hupp, C. R.; Moulin, B.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the interaction between in-stream large wood (LW), bank erosion, and sports fisheries in the 210 river kilometer (km) Coastal Plain segment of the dam-regulated Roanoke River, North Carolina. Methods included collecting background geomorphic data including a 200 km channel geometry survey and measurements from 701 bank erosion pins at 36 cross-sections over 132 km. LW concentrations were evaluated over a 177 km reach using georeferenced aerial video taken during regulated low flow (56 m3/s). LW transport was measured using 290 radio tagged LW pieces (mean diameter = 35.0 cm, length = 9.3 m) installed between 2008 and 2010. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were surveyed in 2010 at 29 sites using a boat mounted electroshock unit. The abundance of LW in logjams was 59 pieces/km and these were concentrated (21.5 logjams/km) in an actively eroding reach with relatively high sinuosity, high local LW production rates, and narrow channel widths. Most jams (70%) are available nearly year round as aquatic habitat, positioned either on the lower bank or submerged at low-water flows. The actively eroding reach is adjusting to upstream dam regulation by channel widening. The channel upstream of this reach has widened and stabilized while the channel downstream of the eroding reach is still relatively narrow but with lower bank erosion rates. Repeat surveys of radio tagged LW determined that transport was common throughout the study area despite dam regulation and a low channel gradient (0.0016). The mean distance travelled by a radio tagged piece of LW was 11.9 km with a maximum of 101 km (84 tags moved, 96 stationary, 110 not found). Radio tagged LW that moved during the study was found at low flow either in logjams (44%), as individual LW (43%), or submerged mid-channel (14%). Largemouth bass biomass density (g/hr effort) was highest in the actively eroding reach where logjams were most common. Our results support the

  12. Channeling Children's Energy through Vocabulary Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares vocabulary development activities for young learners. These activities channel students' energy and make learning more effective and fun. The author stresses the importance of giving young learners a good language-learning experience, and the challenges of teaching young learners who are not literate in their L1.…

  13. Language Development Activities through the Auditory Channel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzmaurice, Peggy, Comp.; And Others

    Presented primarily for use with educable mentally retarded and learning disabled children are approximately 100 activities for language development through the auditory channel. Activities are grouped under the following three areas: receptive skills (auditory decoding, auditory memory, and auditory discrimination); expressive skills (auditory…

  14. The late Cenozoic deep-water channel system in the Baiyun Sag, Pearl River Mouth Basin: Development and tectonic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Benjun; Wu, Shiguo; Sun, Qiliang; Mi, Lijun; Wang, ZhenZhen; Tian, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Twenty modern submarine channels and buried channels were examined using high-resolution 3D/2D seismic data in the Baiyun Sag, Pearl River Mouth Basin. The channels were dominantly straight, sub-parallel with one another, and oriented perpendicular to the slope contours. Four stages of the deep-water channel system (DCS) were identified according to seismic facies and spatial distribution. The stages were controlled by sediment input and tectonic activities. DCS I is distributed in the middle of the Baiyun Sag, with small individual channels. DCS II expanded because of decreasing sediment input and stable subsidence of the Baiyun Sag increased the slope. DCS III had the broadest distribution and nearly covered the entire Baiyun Sag. Further decreases in sediment input and the Dongsha Event increased the gravity flow domain and greatly promoted the development of the DCS. DCS IV narrowed to the southwest because the buried channels in the northeastern Baiyun Sag ceased after 5.5 Ma as the result of active fault activity. This study highlights that the channel system plays an important role in recording the sedimentary evolution of the Pearl River Mouth Basin and affects the deep-water resource (hydrocarbon and gas hydrate) distribution.

  15. Spatial and temporal variations of the Longxi river channel in Sichuan province after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Xie, T.; Liu, G.

    2015-12-01

    Biyun Guo1,21College of Marine Science and Technology, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316004,China; 2State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China Abstract: The great Wenchuan earthquake(Ms=8.0) occurred on May 12, 2008 in the southwestern China which triggerednumerous landslides and collapses that providedflows of an abundant unconsolidated material of debris. Landslides and debris flows were very active and caused river channel change over the affected mountain area. River channel changes due to the earthquake.Many potentially dangerous debris filledgullies have yet to be identified. In this paper,we present a study in the Longxi river watershed of the upper Min River located in Dujiangyan, discussingthe unconsolidated deposits and debris flows and their relationship with the riverbed changes. The secondary geological disasters triggered by this earthquake is delineated across the Longxi Rvier basin. Based on remote sensing and image interpretation of two QuickBird panchromatic images and comparison between two DEM data of different time periods, wevalidatedthe data with field survey by a differential GPS and laser rangefinder. Several variables were systematically measured (width, slope, bed level change, sediment size) along an18.22 km stretch of the river for specific sites. We have found from the study that: (1) the significant feature of geological disaster was near the Longxi river, where it had the mostintensity; (2) the longitudinal profile of channel bed was changed; (3) channel changes were associated with the land use and cover change, especially with the forest degradation and reforest, and post-quake reconstruction;(4)the landslide and debris flows caused the morphology changes in the Longxi River watershed, leading to sharp changes of the riverbed profiles and the slope in the upper and lower reaches. Keywords: Earthquake ;landslides; debris flows; channel change; riverbed evolution

  16. Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: river channel and floodplain geomorphic change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Amy E.; Pess, George R.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Logan, Joshua; Randle, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Minear, Justin T.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Liermann, Martin C.; McHenry, Michael L.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-01-01

    As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of ~ 1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool–riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to tenfold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (in terms of bed elevation change magnitude) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through deposits of the initial sediment wave, ~ 1.2 million t of new sediment (~ 10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed sediment grain size along the Elwha River have important ecological implications, affecting aquatic habitat structure, benthic fauna, salmonid fish spawning and rearing potential, and riparian vegetation. The response of the river to dam removal represents a unique opportunity to observe and quantify fundamental geomorphic processes associated with a massive sediment influx, and also provides important lessons for future river-restoration endeavors.

  17. Changes in Salmon Spawning Habitat Distributions Following Rapid and Gradual Channel Adjustments in the Cedar River, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, R. K.; Wissmar, R. C.; Berge, H.; Foley, S.

    2005-05-01

    Anthropogenic controls on rivers such as dams, hardened banks, and land uses limit the interactions between main river channel and floodplain ecosystems and contribute to decreased habitat diversity. These system controls dampen the frequency and magnitude of natural disturbances that contibute to physical habitat structure and variability. Under natural and altered disturbance regimes river systems are expected to exhibit resiliency. However, in some cases, disturbances cause fluctuations in the trajectory of the mean system state that can have implications for river recovery in the short- and long-term by changing the spatial and temporal dimensions of available habitat relative to specific biological requirements. Historic and contemporary salmon spawning data are analyzed in the context of changing disturbance regimes in the Cedar River, Washington. Historic data are presented for active channel conditions and spawning fish distributions. Contemporary data are presented for an intensively studied reach that received a landslide that deposited approximately 50,000 m3 of sediment in the main channel, temporarily damming the river. Biologically, the spatio-temporal spawning distributions of Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytcha) and sockeye (O. nerka) salmon responded to modifications of physical habitat.

  18. Effects of in-channel sand excavation on the hydrology of the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xian-Lin; Zeng, Eddy Y.; Ji, Rong-Yao; Wang, Chao-Pin

    2007-09-01

    SummaryThe hydrology and morphology of the Pearl River Delta (PRD; South China) water system has been predominantly dictated by human activities over the last 20 years. Uncontrolled sand excavation occurred in all 324 tributaries, largely to meet the construction needs arising from the rapid economic growth and urbanization in the region. It was estimated that >8.7 × 10 8 m 3 of sand were excavated from 1986 to 2003 based on field surveys of excavating activities and the river hypsography, resulting in average downcutting depths of 0.59-1.73 m, 0.34-4.43 m, and 1.77-6.48 m in the main channels of the West River, North River, and East River (three major water networks in the PRD), respectively. Consequently, the water levels in upstream of the PRD were decreased by 1.59-3.12 m (Sanshui Station). Uneven sand dredging also caused changes in the divided flow ratio (DFR) between various water courses. For example, the DFR increased by 8.8% at the Sanshui Station on the upper part of the North River network from the early 1980s to 1999. DFRs also increased almost 7.7% at the four major runoff outlets in the eastern side of the PRD. As a result, present brackish-water has intruded upward 10-20 km more than in the 1980s. Apparently, there are two sides to the effects of sand excavation. The positive effects are decreased chances of flooding damages, improved navigating conditions, and more water inputs to rapid economically growing regions. The negative effects include increased grade slope and instability of the riverbank, disruption of navigation in upstream dredging pits during dry seasons, and brackish-water intrusion.

  19. Estimating changes in riparian and channel features along the Trinity River downstream of Lewiston Dam, California, 1980 to 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Dam construction, flow diversion, and legacy landuse effects reduced the transport capacity, sediment supply, channel complexity and floodplain-connectivity along the Trinity River, CA below Lewiston Dam. This study documents the geomorphic evolution of the Trinity River Restoration Program’s intensively managed 65-km long restoration reach from 1980 to 2011. The nature and extent of riparian and channel changes were assessed using a series of geomorphic feature maps constructed from ortho-rectified photography acquired at low flow conditions in 1980, 1997, 2001, 2006, 2009, and 2011. Since 1980 there has been a general conversion of riparian to channel features and expansion of the active channel area. The primary mechanism for expansion of the active channel was bank erosion from 1980 to 1997 and channel widening was well distributed longitudinally throughout the study reach. Subsequent net bar accretion from 1997 to 2001, followed by slightly higher net bar scour from 2001 to 2006, occurred primarily in the central and lower reaches of the study area. In comparison, post-2006 bank and bar changes were spatially-limited to reaches with sufficient local transport capacity or sediment supply supported by gravel augmentation, mechanical channel rehabilitation, and tributary contributions to flow and sediment supply. A series of tributary floods in 1997, 1998 and 2006 were the primary factors leading to documented increases in channel complexity and floodplain connectivity. During the post-2006 period managed flow releases, in the absence of large magnitude tributary flooding, combined with gravel augmentation and mechanical restoration caused localized increases in sediment supply and transport capacity leading to smaller but measurable increases in channel complexity and floodplain connectivity primarily in the upper river below Lewiston Dam.

  20. Legacy Sediments and Channel Morphology in the Feather and Yuba Rivers, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, A.; Ghoshal, S.; Megison, M. E.; Singer, M. B.; Aalto, R.

    2007-12-01

    Channel aggradation and morphologic change following 19th century hydraulic gold-mining in the Sierra Nevada, California, differed substantially between the lower Feather and Yuba Rivers. These differences can be explained in part by topographic position in the Sacramento Valley but also by differences in early 20th century engineering structures and management policies. Both rivers experienced extreme aggradation by mining sediment and substantial avulsions but the timing and mechanics of channel adjustments were dissimilar, in part due to varying strategies in river-training and flood control. River engineering and management in the late 19th century identified the lower Yuba River as a repository zone where mining sediment could be sequestered to reduce deliveries to navigable rivers downstream. Levees were set back up to 4 km allowing formation of a multi-thread channel system across a broad floodplain that is now deeply buried by mining sediment. In contrast, levees along the lower Feather were given narrow spacings to encourage self-scouring of channels and promote navigability of channels. The lower Feather River drains a larger basin and has a lower gradient than the Yuba River. Construction of Fremont Weir across the mouth of the Yolo Basin raised flood levels in the lower Feather River and may have reduced transport of bed sediment. This could explain the persistence of large sand sheets at and below the Bear River confluence. Data from historical maps, topographic surveys, aerial photographs, and 1999 LiDAR swath mapping are used to document and contrast channel changes and floodplain evolution between these two rivers. Topographic changes derived by differencing detailed 1906-1909 topographic maps and 1999 LiDAR data indicate substantial channel morphologic changes including channel filling, lateral migration, and evolution towards single-thread channel systems. Modern streambank stratigraphy reflects the differences in channel responses. Sites where

  1. Temporal Evolution of Submarine Channel Trajectory and Mobility: Quantitative Analysis and Comparison to Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchter, N.; Jobe, Z. R.; Howes, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine channels are the primary conduits for the transport of clastic detritus from the continents into the deep sea. During their evolution, these channels migrate, forming channel belts that record a complex history of vertical degradation, lateral migration, and vertical aggradation. Previous work drawing on seismic, outcrop, and modeled examples of submarine channel systems have qualitatively observed a significant component of vertical aggradation and a temporal trend transitioning from a phase dominated by lateral migration to one dominated by vertical aggradation. The processes that drive these changes in channel trajectory and their stratigraphic consequences remain poorly constrained. Furthermore, comparisons/contrasts between submarine channels and rivers often do not take into account the variability in channel trajectory/mobility, which clearly affects the resultant architecture. This study compiles a global dataset of >320 channel trajectory and geometry measurements derived from a global suite 2-D cross sections including 21 submarine channel systems and 13 fluvial systems. These data enable the quantitative treatment of the temporal evolution of channel trajectory/mobility as well as highlighting key differences between submarine channels and rivers. Submarine channels show a strong trend of decreasing channel mobility during their evolution, resulting in early stage lateral migration and late stage aggradation. Fluvial channels show a similar evolution, but with ~5x less aggradation and ~2x larger mobility values. Fluvial channel belts contain a large proportion of lateral accretion and have similar trajectories as early phase or degradational submarine channels, while late stage or aggradation submarine channel belts contain significantly more vertically stacked channel fill deposits. These submarine trajectory/mobility measurements provide a valuable quantitative basis for explaining the evolution of stratigraphic architecture of submarine

  2. Co-evolution of Riparian Vegetation and Channel Dynamics in an Aggrading Braided River System, Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, K. B.; Michal, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increased bank stability by riparian vegetation in braided rivers can decrease bed reworking rates and focus the flow. The magnitude of influence and resulting channel morphology are functions of vegetation strength vs. channel dynamics, a concept encapsulated in a dimensionless ratio between timescales for vegetation growth and channel reworking known as T*. We investigate this relationship in an aggrading braided river at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, and compare results to numerical and physical models. Gradual reductions in post-eruption sediment loads have reduced bed reworking rates, allowing vegetation to persist year-round and impact channel dynamics on the Pasig-Potrero and Sacobia Rivers. From 2009-2011, we collected data detailing vegetation extent, type, density, and root strength. Incorporating these data into RipRoot and BSTEM models shows cohesion due to roots increased from zero in unvegetated conditions to >10.2 kPa in densely-growing grasses. Field-based parameters were incorporated into a cellular model comparing vegetation growth and sediment mobility effects on braided channel dynamics. The model shows that both low sediment mobility and high vegetation strength lead to less active systems, reflecting trends observed in the field. An estimated T* between 0.8 - 2.3 for the Pasig-Potrero River suggests channels were mobile enough to maintain the braidplain width clear of vegetation and even experience slight gains in area through annual removal of existing vegetation. However, persistent vegetation focused flow and thus aggradation over the unvegetated fraction of braidplain, leading to an aggradational imbalance and transition to a more avulsive state. While physical models predict continued narrowing of the active braidplain as T* declines, the future trajectory of channel-vegetation interactions at Pinatubo as sedimentation rates decline appears more complicated due to strong seasonal variability in precipitation and sediment loads. By 2011

  3. River channel width change: Dynamics and scaling relationships in the upper Midwestern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notebaert, Bastiaan; Belmont, Patrick; Donovan, Mitchell

    2016-04-01

    The width of alluvial river channels varies as a function of multiple variables, including flow, sediment supply, bed roughness and riparian vegetation. Changes in channel width are highly variable in space and time, but few have characterized and/or explained the structure and scaling relationships of that variability. Increasing availability of remote sensing data and computational power allows us to measure landscape changes at more detailed spatial and temporal scales than ever. In this study we use historic air photos to study patterns of channel width change and examine the effects data resolution on measurements of channel width change. We digitized 129 km of (vegetated) channel banks for the Root River in Minnesota, USA, for nearly every decade (excluding the 60s and 80s) spanning 1937-2013. Rates of channel widening were calculated at different spatial and temporal scales. Spatial-scaling effects were examined by measuring width changes from a 10-m window to the reach (~10 km) scale. The time interval between measurements varied from 1 year to 76 years. Data show that at small (100 m) spatial scales reaches that widen in one time period have a strong propensity to narrow in the following period. The most active reaches typically exhibit short, punctuated periods of change, but the stretches that are most active varied across decades. When increasing the temporal scale (time period) over which rates are calculated, the rates exhibit an apparent decrease, an effect that is observed for both the recent period and for data from the 1930s-50s. When considering the same time scale, rates are comparable for both periods. In addition to a temporal scaling effect there is also a spatial scaling effect. Changes in width are spatially correlated for distances up to a 3 to 5 times the channel width. Rates measured over shorter stretches are higher than those measured for longer ones. The most extreme changes occurred over shorter time periods along reaches with a

  4. A Hot Knife Through Ice-Cream: Earthflow Response to Channel Incision (Or Channel Response to Earthflows?), Eel River Canyon, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, B. H.; Roering, J. J.; McKean, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Abundant glacier-like earthflow features are recognized as a primary erosional process in the highly erodable Franciscan Melange of the Eel River Basin, CA. Despite their prominence in this "melting ice-cream" topography, many questions regarding their effects on the long term sediment flux from this rapidly eroding basin remain unresolved. For example, does an earthflow's basal shear zone propagate vertically downwards with vertical river incision? What controls the upslope and lateral extent of individual earthflows? How does the erosive power of a river influence the rate of earthflow movement, or conversely do earthflow toe deposits regulate the rate of river incision? Here we present preliminary findings derived from study of 200km2 of lidar data (1m resolution) covering hillslopes adjacent to 30km of the Eel River. Lidar allows detailed analysis of the interaction between earthflows and the drainage network, and we document how inferred changes in local base level are propagated throughout adjacent hillslopes via earthflow movement. The most active earthflows (determined by field surveying and analysis of aerial photos rectified using lidar- generated digital topography) coincide with locally steep sections of channel, while downstream of the most active flows we frequently observe less-active or dormant earthflows. This observation supports the idea that the locations of the most active earthflows coincide with headward propagating knickpoints in the channel. The rate of earthflow movement appears to slow when an earthflow exhausts the upslope area of easily mobilized sediment. Earthflow toes can protrude directly into the channel, causing the channel to narrow and steepen, and even undercut the opposite bank. Large resistant boulders (>2m diameter) transported by the earthflow accumulate in the streambed and appear to both act as a check on further channel incision and earthflow movement. In contrast, areas adjacent to active earthflows exhibit smooth

  5. Tracing the contribution of debris flow-dominated channels to gravel-bed torrential river channel: implementing pit-tags in the upper Guil River (French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud-Fassetta, Gilles; Lissak, Candide; Fort, Monique; Bétard, François; Carlier, Benoit; Cossart, Etienne; Madelin, Malika; Viel, Vincent; Charnay, Bérengère; Bletterie, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    In the upper, wider reaches of Alpine valleys, shaping of active channels is usually subject to rapid change. It mostly depends upon hydro-climatic variability, runoff concentration and sediment supply, and may result in alternating sequences of fluvial and debris-flow pulses, as recorded in alluvial fans and terraces. Our study, carried in the frame of SAMCO (ANR) project, focuses on the upper Guil River Valley (Queyras, Southern French Alps) cut into the slaty shale "schistes lustrés". Steep, lower order drains carry a contrasted solid discharge, including predominantly sandy-loam particles mixed with gravels and boulders (sandstone schists, ophiolites). Abundant sediment supply by frost shattering, snow avalanche and landslides is then reworked during snowmelt or summer storm runoff events, and may result in catastrophic, very destructive floods along the main channel, as shown by historical records. Following the RI-30 year 2000 flood, our investigations included sediment budgets, i.e. balance of erosion and deposition, and the mapping of the source, transport and storage of various sediments (talus, colluvium, torrential fans, terraces). To better assess sediment fluxes and sediment delivery into the main channel network, we implemented tracers (pit-tags) in selected sub-catchments, significantly contributing to the sediment yield of the valley bottoms during the floods and/or avalanches: Maloqueste, Combe Morel, Bouchouse and Peyronnelle catchments. The first three are direct tributaries of the Guil River whereas the Peyronnelle is a left bank tributary of the Peynin River, which joins the Guil River via an alluvial cone with high human and material stakes. The Maloqueste and the Combe Morel are two tributaries facing each other in the Guil valley, representing a double lateral constraint for the road during flood events of the Guil River. After pit-tag initialisation in laboratory, we set them up along the four tributaries: Maloqueste (20 pit-tags), Combe

  6. Channel Change and Bed-Material Transport in the Lower Chetco River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallick, J. Rose; Anderson, Scott W.; Cannon, Charles; O'Connor, Jim E.

    2009-01-01

    The lower Chetco River is a wandering gravel-bed river flanked by abundant and large gravel bars formed of coarse bed-material sediment. The large gravel bars have been a source of commercial aggregate since the early twentieth century for which ongoing permitting and aquatic habitat concerns have motivated this assessment of historical channel change and sediment transport rates. Analysis of historical channel change and bed-material transport rates for the lower 18 kilometers show that the upper reaches of the study area are primarily transport zones, with bar positions fixed by valley geometry and active bars mainly providing transient storage of bed material. Downstream reaches, especially near the confluence of the North Fork Chetco River, have been zones of active sedimentation and channel migration. Multiple analyses, supported by direct measurements of bedload during winter 2008-09, indicate that since 1970 the mean annual flux of bed material into the study reach has been about 40,000-100,000 cubic meters per year. Downstream tributary input of bed-material sediment, probably averaging 5-30 percent of the influx coming into the study reach from upstream, is approximately balanced by bed-material attrition by abrasion. Probably very little bed material leaves the lower river under natural conditions, with most of the net influx historically accumulating in wider and more dynamic reaches, especially near the North Fork Chetco River confluence, 8 kilometers upstream from the Pacific Ocean. The year-to-year flux, however, varies tremendously. Some years probably have less than 3,000 cubic meters of bed-material entering the study area; by contrast, some high-flow years, such as 1982 and 1997, likely have more than 150,000 cubic meters entering the reach. For comparison, the estimated annual volume of gravel extracted from the lower Chetco River for commercial aggregate during 2000-2008 has ranged from 32,000 to 90,000 cubic meters and averaged about 59

  7. Channel Change and Bed-Material Transport in the Lower Chetco River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallick, J. Rose; Anderson, Scott W.; Cannon, Charles; O'Connor, Jim E.

    2010-01-01

    The lower Chetco River is a wandering gravel-bed river flanked by abundant and large gravel bars formed of coarse bed-material sediment. Since the early twentieth century, the large gravel bars have been a source of commercial aggregate for which ongoing permitting and aquatic habitat concerns have motivated this assessment of historical channel change and sediment transport rates. Analysis of historical channel change and bed-material transport rates for the lower 18 kilometers shows that the upper reaches of the study area are primarily transport zones, with bar positions fixed by valley geometry and active bars mainly providing transient storage of bed material. Downstream reaches, especially near the confluence of the North Fork Chetco River, are zones of active sedimentation and channel migration. Multiple analyses, supported by direct measurements of bedload during winter 2008-09, indicate that since 1970 the mean annual flux of bed material into the study reach has been about 40,000-100,000 cubic meters per year. Downstream tributary input of bed-material sediment, probably averaging 5-30 percent of the influx coming into the study reach from upstream, is approximately balanced by bed-material attrition by abrasion. Probably little bed material leaves the lower river under natural conditions, with most net influx historically accumulating in wider and more dynamic reaches, especially near the North Fork Chetco River confluence, 8 kilometers upstream from the Pacific Ocean. The year-to-year flux, however, varies tremendously. Some years may have less than 3,000 cubic meters of bed material entering the study area; by contrast, some high-flow years, such as 1982 and 1997, likely have more than 150,000 cubic meters entering the reach. For comparison, the estimated annual volume of gravel extracted from the lower Chetco River for commercial aggregate during 2000-2008 has ranged from 32,000 to 90,000 cubic meters and averaged about 59,000 cubic meters per year

  8. Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and floodplain geomorphic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, Amy E.; Pess, George R.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Logan, Joshua B.; Randle, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Minear, Justin T.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Liermann, Martin C.; McHenry, Michael L.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-01-01

    A substantial increase in fluvial sediment supply relative to transport capacity causes complex, large-magnitude changes in river and floodplain morphology downstream. Although sedimentary and geomorphic responses to sediment pulses are a fundamental part of landscape evolution, few opportunities exist to quantify those processes over field scales. We investigated the downstream effects of sediment released during the largest dam removal in history, on the Elwha River, Washington, USA, by measuring changes in riverbed elevation and topography, bed sediment grain size, and channel planform as two dams were removed in stages over two years. As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of ~ 1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool-riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to tenfold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (in terms of bed elevation change magnitude) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through deposits of the initial sediment wave, ~ 1.2 million t of new sediment (~ 10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed sediment grain size along

  9. Reprint of: Large-scale dam removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and floodplain geomorphic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, Amy E.; Pess, George R.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Logan, Joshua B.; Randle, Timothy J.; Mastin, Mark C.; Minear, Justin T.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Liermann, Martin C.; McHenry, Michael L.; Beechie, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2015-10-01

    A substantial increase in fluvial sediment supply relative to transport capacity causes complex, large-magnitude changes in river and floodplain morphology downstream. Although sedimentary and geomorphic responses to sediment pulses are a fundamental part of landscape evolution, few opportunities exist to quantify those processes over field scales. We investigated the downstream effects of sediment released during the largest dam removal in history, on the Elwha River, Washington, USA, by measuring changes in riverbed elevation and topography, bed sediment grain size, and channel planform as two dams were removed in stages over two years. As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of ~ 1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool-riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to tenfold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (in terms of bed elevation change magnitude) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through deposits of the initial sediment wave, ~ 1.2 million t of new sediment (~ 10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed sediment grain size along

  10. Large-Scale Dam Removal on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River Channel and Floodplain Geomorphic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, A. E.; Pess, G. R.; Bountry, J.; Magirl, C. S.; Ritchie, A. C.; Logan, J. B.; Randle, T. J.; Mastin, M. C.; Duda, J.; Liermann, M. C.; McHenry, M. L.; Beechie, T. J.; Shafroth, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    A substantial increase in fluvial sediment supply causes complex, large-magnitude changes in river and floodplain morphology. Although sedimentary and geomorphic responses to sediment influx are a fundamental part of landscape evolution, few opportunities exist to quantify those processes over field scales. We investigated downstream effects of sediment released during the largest dam removal in history, on the Elwha River, WA, USA, by measuring changes in riverbed elevation and topography, bed-sediment grain size, and channel planform as two dams were removed in stages over two years. As 10.5 million t (7.1 million m3) of sediment was released from two former reservoirs, downstream dispersion of a sediment wave caused widespread bed aggradation of ~1 m (greater where pools filled), changed the river from pool-riffle to braided morphology, and decreased the slope of the lowermost river. The newly deposited sediment, which was finer than most of the pre-dam-removal bed, formed new bars (largely pebble, granule, and sand material), prompting aggradational channel avulsion that increased the channel braiding index by almost 50%. As a result of mainstem bed aggradation, floodplain channels received flow and accumulated new sediment even during low to moderate flow conditions. The river system showed a two- to ten-fold greater geomorphic response to dam removal (bed-elevation change) than it had to a 40-year flood event four years before dam removal. Two years after dam removal began, as the river had started to incise through the new deposits, approximately 1.2 million t of new sediment (~10% of the amount released from the two reservoirs) was stored along 18 river km of the mainstem channel and 25 km of floodplain channels. The Elwha River thus was able to transport most of the released sediment to the river mouth. The geomorphic alterations and changing bed-sediment grain size along the Elwha River have important ecological implications, affecting aquatic habitat

  11. Low Elevation Old Channel Features of the Willamette River Floodplain Support High Subsurface Denitrification Rates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods: Large river floodplains are poor nitrate pollution buffers when polluted groundwater moves beneath biogeochemically retentive zones prior to entering the main channel. However, in floodplain regions with extensive backwaters and organic carbon acc...

  12. Use of multidimensional modeling to evaluate a channel restoration design for the Kootenai River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Logan, B.L.; McDonald, R.R.; Nelson, J.M.; Kinzel, P.J.; Barton, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    River channel construction projects aimed at restoring or improving degraded waterways have become common but have been variously successful. In this report a methodology is proposed to evaluate channel designs before channels are built by using multidimensional modeling and analysis. This approach allows detailed analysis of water-surface profiles, sediment transport, and aquatic habitat that may result if the design is implemented. The method presented here addresses the need to model a range of potential stream-discharge and channel-roughness conditions to best assess the function of the design channel for a suite of possible conditions. This methodology is demonstrated by using a preliminary channel-restoration design proposed for a part of the Kootenai River in northern Idaho designated as critical habitat for the endangered white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and evaluating the design on the basis of simulations with the Flow and Sediment Transport with Morphologic Evolution of Channels (FaSTMECH) model. This evaluation indicated substantial problems with the preliminary design because boundary conditions used in the design were inconsistent with best estimates of future conditions. As a result, simulated water-surface levels did not meet target levels that corresponded to the designed bankfull surfaces; therefore, the flood plain would not function as intended. Sediment-transport analyses indicated that both the current channel of the Kootenai River and the design channel are largely unable to move the bed material through the reach at bankfull discharge. Therefore, sediment delivered to the design channel would likely be deposited within the reach instead of passing through it as planned. Consequently, the design channel geometry would adjust through time. Despite these issues, the design channel would provide more aquatic habitat suitable for spawning white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) at lower discharges than is currently available in the

  13. Dynamic channel adjustments in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junqiang; Deng, Shanshan; Lu, Jinyou; Xu, Quanxi; Zong, Quanli; Tan, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Significant channel adjustments have occurred in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River, because of the operation of the Three Gorges Project (TGP). The Jingjiang Reach is selected as the study area, covering the Upper Jingjiang Reach (UJR) and Lower Jingjiang Reach (LJR). The reach-scale bankfull channel dimensions in the study reach were calculated annually from 2002 to 2013 by means of a reach-averaged approach and surveyed post-flood profiles at 171 sections. We find from the calculated results that: the reach-scale bankfull widths changed slightly in the UJR and LJR, with the corresponding depths increasing by 1.6 m and 1.0 m; the channel adjustments occurred mainly with respect to bankfull depth because of the construction of large-scale bank revetment works, although there were significant bank erosion processes in local regions without the bank protection engineering. The reach-scale bankfull dimensions in the UJR and LJR generally responded to the previous five-year average fluvial erosion intensity during flood seasons, with higher correlations being obtained for the depth and cross-sectional area. It is concluded that these dynamic adjustments of the channel geometry are a direct result of recent human activities such as the TGP operation. PMID:26965069

  14. Dynamic channel adjustments in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Junqiang; Deng, Shanshan; Lu, Jinyou; Xu, Quanxi; Zong, Quanli; Tan, Guangming

    2016-03-01

    Significant channel adjustments have occurred in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River, because of the operation of the Three Gorges Project (TGP). The Jingjiang Reach is selected as the study area, covering the Upper Jingjiang Reach (UJR) and Lower Jingjiang Reach (LJR). The reach-scale bankfull channel dimensions in the study reach were calculated annually from 2002 to 2013 by means of a reach-averaged approach and surveyed post-flood profiles at 171 sections. We find from the calculated results that: the reach-scale bankfull widths changed slightly in the UJR and LJR, with the corresponding depths increasing by 1.6 m and 1.0 m the channel adjustments occurred mainly with respect to bankfull depth because of the construction of large-scale bank revetment works, although there were significant bank erosion processes in local regions without the bank protection engineering. The reach-scale bankfull dimensions in the UJR and LJR generally responded to the previous five-year average fluvial erosion intensity during flood seasons, with higher correlations being obtained for the depth and cross-sectional area. It is concluded that these dynamic adjustments of the channel geometry are a direct result of recent human activities such as the TGP operation.

  15. Dynamic channel adjustments in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junqiang; Deng, Shanshan; Lu, Jinyou; Xu, Quanxi; Zong, Quanli; Tan, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Significant channel adjustments have occurred in the Jingjiang Reach of the Middle Yangtze River, because of the operation of the Three Gorges Project (TGP). The Jingjiang Reach is selected as the study area, covering the Upper Jingjiang Reach (UJR) and Lower Jingjiang Reach (LJR). The reach-scale bankfull channel dimensions in the study reach were calculated annually from 2002 to 2013 by means of a reach-averaged approach and surveyed post-flood profiles at 171 sections. We find from the calculated results that: the reach-scale bankfull widths changed slightly in the UJR and LJR, with the corresponding depths increasing by 1.6 m and 1.0 m; the channel adjustments occurred mainly with respect to bankfull depth because of the construction of large-scale bank revetment works, although there were significant bank erosion processes in local regions without the bank protection engineering. The reach-scale bankfull dimensions in the UJR and LJR generally responded to the previous five-year average fluvial erosion intensity during flood seasons, with higher correlations being obtained for the depth and cross-sectional area. It is concluded that these dynamic adjustments of the channel geometry are a direct result of recent human activities such as the TGP operation. PMID:26965069

  16. Real-Time River Channel-Bed Monitoring at the Chariton and Mississippi Rivers in Missouri, 2007-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rydlund, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    Scour and depositional responses to hydrologic events have been important to the scientific community studying sediment transport as well as potential effects on bridges and other hydraulic structures within riverine systems. A river channel-bed monitor composed of a single-beam transducer was installed on a bridge crossing the Chariton River near Prairie Hill, Missouri (structure L-344) as a pilot study to evaluate channel-bed change in response to the hydrologic condition disseminated from an existing streamgage. Initial results at this location led to additional installations in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation at an upstream Chariton River streamgage location at Novinger, Missouri (structure L-534) and a Mississippi River streamgage location near Mehlville, Missouri (structures A-1850 and A-4936). In addition to stage, channel-bed elevation was collected at all locations every 15 minutes and transmitted hourly to a U.S. Geological Survey database. Bed elevation data for the Chariton River location at Novinger and the Mississippi River location near Mehlville were provided to the World Wide Web for real-time monitoring. Channel-bed data from the three locations indicated responses to hydrologic events depicted in the stage record; however, notable bedforms apparent during inter-event flows also may have affected the relation of scour and deposition to known hydrologic events. Throughout data collection periods, Chariton River locations near Prairie Hill and Novinger reflected bed changes as much as 13 feet and 5 feet. Nearly all of the bed changes correlated well with the hydrographic record at these locations. The location at the Mississippi River near Mehlville indicated a much more stable channel bed throughout the data collection period. Despite missing data resulting from damage to one of the river channel-bed monitors from ice accumulation at the upstream nose of the bridge pier early in the record, the record from the downstream

  17. Mineral compositions and sources of the riverbed sediment in the desert channel of Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haibing

    2011-02-01

    The Yellow River flows through an extensive, aeolian desert area and extends from Xiaheyan, Ningxia Province, to Toudaoguai, Inner Mongolia Province, with a total length of 1,000 km. Due to the construction and operation of large reservoirs in the upstream of the Yellow River, most water and sediment from upstream were stored in these reservoirs, which leads to the declining flow in the desert channel that has no capability to scour large amount of input of desert sands from the desert regions. By analyzing and comparing the spatial distribution of weight percent of mineral compositions between sediment sources and riverbed sediment of the main tributaries and the desert channel of the Yellow River, we concluded that the coarse sediment deposited in the desert channel of the Yellow River were mostly controlled by the local sediment sources. The analyzed results of the Quartz-Feldspar-Mica (QFM) triangular diagram and the R-factor models of the coarse sediment in the Gansu reach and the desert channel of the Yellow River further confirm that the Ningxia Hedong desert and the Inner Mongolian Wulanbuhe and Kubuqi deserts are the main provenances of the coarse sediment in the desert channel of the Yellow River. Due to the higher fluidity of the fine sediment, they are mainly contributed by the local sediment sources and the tributaries that originated from the loess area of the upper reach of the Yellow River.

  18. Mineral compositions and sources of the riverbed sediment in the desert channel of Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haibing

    2011-02-01

    The Yellow River flows through an extensive, aeolian desert area and extends from Xiaheyan, Ningxia Province, to Toudaoguai, Inner Mongolia Province, with a total length of 1,000 km. Due to the construction and operation of large reservoirs in the upstream of the Yellow River, most water and sediment from upstream were stored in these reservoirs, which leads to the declining flow in the desert channel that has no capability to scour large amount of input of desert sands from the desert regions. By analyzing and comparing the spatial distribution of weight percent of mineral compositions between sediment sources and riverbed sediment of the main tributaries and the desert channel of the Yellow River, we concluded that the coarse sediment deposited in the desert channel of the Yellow River were mostly controlled by the local sediment sources. The analyzed results of the Quartz-Feldspar-Mica (QFM) triangular diagram and the R-factor models of the coarse sediment in the Gansu reach and the desert channel of the Yellow River further confirm that the Ningxia Hedong desert and the Inner Mongolian Wulanbuhe and Kubuqi deserts are the main provenances of the coarse sediment in the desert channel of the Yellow River. Due to the higher fluidity of the fine sediment, they are mainly contributed by the local sediment sources and the tributaries that originated from the loess area of the upper reach of the Yellow River. PMID:20354782

  19. Targeting the Channel Activity of Viroporins.

    PubMed

    To, Janet; Surya, Wahyu; Torres, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery that certain small viral membrane proteins, collectively termed as viroporins, can permeabilize host cellular membranes and also behave as ion channels, attempts have been made to link this feature to specific biological roles. In parallel, most viroporins identified so far are virulence factors, and interest has focused toward the discovery of channel inhibitors that would have a therapeutic effect, or be used as research tools to understand the biological roles of viroporin ion channel activity. However, this paradigm is being shifted by the difficulties inherent to small viral membrane proteins, and by the realization that protein-protein interactions and other diverse roles in the virus life cycle may represent an equal, if not, more important target. Therefore, although targeting the channel activity of viroporins can probably be therapeutically useful in some cases, the focus may shift to their other functions in following years. Small-molecule inhibitors have been mostly developed against the influenza A M2 (IAV M2 or AM2). This is not surprising since AM2 is the best characterized viroporin to date, with a well-established biological role in viral pathogenesis combined the most extensive structural investigations conducted, and has emerged as a validated drug target. For other viroporins, these studies are still mostly in their infancy, and together with those for AM2, are the subject of the present review.

  20. 78 FR 24063 - Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed..., Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... the Detroit River, Wyandotte, Michigan. This action is necessary and intended to ensure safety of...

  1. 77 FR 25073 - Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ..., Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... the Detroit River, Wyandotte, Michigan. This action is necessary and intended to ensure safety of life... Department, Sector Detroit, Coast Guard; telephone 313-568-9508, email Adrian.F.Palomeque@uscg.mil . If...

  2. Determination of channel capacity of the Merced River downstream from Merced Falls Dam, Merced County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, J.C.; Bertoldi, G.L.

    1968-01-01

    Peak flows in Dry Creek, as measured 18.7 miles upstream from the mouth of Dry Creek, will be attenuated due to channel storage and will increase the discharge of the Merced River at Cressey by only about 50 per cent of t he Dry Creek peak discharge. Furthermore, Dry Creek seldom carries floodflows during periods of high water on the Merced River.

  3. 77 FR 70372 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South Channel), Avon Township, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Sec. Section Symbol U.S.C. United States Code... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Shark River (South..., across Shark River (South Channel) at Avon Township, NJ. The existing regulation contains a...

  4. The effect of channelization on floodplain sediment deposition and subsidence along the Pocomoke River, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroes, D.E.; Hupp, C.R.

    2010-01-01

    The nontidal Pocomoke River was intensively ditched and channelized by the mid-1900s. In response to channelization; channel incision, head-cut erosion, and spoil bank perforation have occurred in this previously nonalluvial system. Six sites were selected for study of floodplain sediment dynamics in relation to channel condition. Short- and long-term sediment deposition/subsidence rates and composition were determined. Short-term rates (four years) ranged from 0.6 to 3.6 mm/year. Long-term rates (15-100+ years) ranged from -11.9 to 1.7 mm/year. 137Cs rates (43 years) indicate rates of 0.24 to 7.4 mm/year depending on channel condition. Channelization has limited contact between streamflow and the floodplain, resulting in little or no sediment retention in channelized reaches. Along unchannelized reaches, extended contact and depth of river water on the floodplain resulted in high deposition rates. Drainage of floodplains exposed organic sediments to oxygen resulting in subsidence and releasing stored carbon. Channelization increased sediment deposition in downstream reaches relative to the presettlement system. The sediment storage function of this river has been dramatically altered by channelization. Results indicate that perforation of spoil banks along channelized reaches may help to alleviate some of these issues. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association. No claim to original U.S. government works.

  5. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  6. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  7. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  8. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  9. 33 CFR 162.35 - Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Channel of Christina River, Del.; navigation. 162.35 Section 162.35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.35 Channel...

  10. DISTRIBUTION OF AQUATIC OFF-CHANNEL HABITATS AND ASSOCIATED RIPARIAN VEGETATION, WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of aquatic off-channel habitats such as secondary and side channels, sloughs, and alcoves, have been reduced more than 50% since the 1850s along the upper main stem of the Willamette River, Oregon, USA. Concurrently, the hydrogeomorphic potential, and associated flood...

  11. Diversions from Red River to Lake Dallas, Texas; and related channel losses, February and March 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, Pat H.

    1954-01-01

    During the period Feb. 10 to Mar. 3, 19541 the City of Dallas pumped 1,363 acre-feet of water from its Red River plant into Pecan Creek (a tributary of Elm Fork Trinity River) 3.5 miles above Gainesville; 1,272 acre-feet of this diversion reached the head of Lake Dallas. Discharge records were obtained at four points along the channels. This water was transported down the channels of Pecan Creek and Elm Fork Trinity River to Lake Dallas, a distance of about 31 miles.

  12. Nutrient contributions to the Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the ephemeral Santa Clara River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Washburn, L.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Siegel, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Santa Clara River delivers nutrient rich runoff to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief (???1-3 day) episodic events. Using both river and oceanographic measurements, we evaluate river loading and dispersal of dissolved macronutrients (silicate, inorganic N and P) and comment on the biological implications of these nutrient contributions. Both river and ocean observations suggest that river nutrient concentrations are inversely related to river flow rates. Land use is suggested to influence these concentrations, since runoff from a subwatershed with substantial agriculture and urban areas had much higher nitrate than runoff from a wooded subwatershed. During runoff events, river nutrients were observed to conservatively mix into the buoyant, surface plume immediately seaward of the Santa Clara River mouth. Dispersal of these river nutrients extended 10s of km into the channel. Growth of phytoplankton and nutrient uptake was low during our observations (1-3 days following runoff), presumably due to the very low light levels resulting from high turbidity. However, nutrient quality of runoff (Si:N:P = 16:5:1) was found to be significantly different than upwelling inputs (13:10:1), which may influence different algal responses once sediments settle. Evaluation of total river nitrate loads suggests that most of the annual river nutrient fluxes to the ocean occur during the brief winter flooding events. Wet winters (such as El Nin??o) contribute nutrients at rates approximately an order-of-magnitude greater than "average" winters. Although total river nitrate delivery is considerably less than that supplied by upwelling, the timing and location of these types of events are very different, with river discharge (upwelling) occurring predominantly in the winter (summer) and in the eastern (western) channel. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hillslope deposits in gravel-bed rivers and their effects on the evolution of alluvial channel forms: A case study from the Sudetes and Carpathian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, Piotr

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes initiation and development of specific alluvial channel forms, connected with the supply of coarse-grained hillslope sediment. The study was carried out in gravel-bed rivers, located in mid-mountain areas (the Sudetes and the Carpathian Mountains) in Central Europe. In the river channels studied, where input of hillslope material is abundant, patterns of sedimentation and erosion are determined by hillslope processes. Two types of primary sediment source in mountain temperate rivers, with flat valley floors, were identified: mass movements, in particular landslides, and supply of angular coarse-grained slope material to streams from cut-bank sections. The introduced coarsest hillslope sediment is only entrained during floods which destabilize the river systems downstream of the supply points. At these river channel sections, development of new, and transformation of existing, alluvial channel forms is observed. Sediment accretion and progradation of bars downstream of the hillslope sediment delivery zones (HSD zones) is connected with: activity of these zones (frequency of hillslope sediment supply), size of coarse-grained, angular deposits introduced into the river channels and frequency of flood events. The largest depositional forms, such as gravel-rich debris longitudinal bars, lateral bars with a rock block core and lateral bars downstream of an HSD zone, comprise coarse, usually gravel-sized sediment. The main feature of their initiation and progradation is deposition of large rock blocks within or at a short distance downstream of the supply points. Lateral sediment accretion of the bars leads to river channel constriction during subsequent floods and development of other alluvial channel forms such as transverse gravel-rich debris ribs, diffuse gravel-rich debris sheets, side debris bars and small sandy-rich gravel separation bars. These forms create depositional complexes which are observed in the river channel within the zone of the

  14. Synthetic modulators of TRP channel activity.

    PubMed

    Harteneck, Christian; Klose, Chihab; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    In humans, 27 TRP channels from 6 related families contribute to a broad spectrum of cellular functions, such as thermo-, pressure-, volume-, pain- and chemosensation. Pain and inflammation-inducing compounds represent potent plant and animal defense mechanisms explaining the great variety of the naturally occurring, TRPV1-, TRPM8-, and TRPA1-activating ligands. The discovery of the first vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and its involvement in nociception triggered the euphoria and the hope in novel therapeutic strategies treating pain, and this clear-cut indication inspired the development of TRPV1-selective ligands. On the other hand the nescience in the physiological role and putative clinical indication hampered the development of a selective drug in the case of the other TRP channels. Therefore, currently only a handful of mostly un-selective blocker is available to target TRP channels. Nevertheless, there is an ongoing quest for new, natural or synthetic ligands and modulators. In this chapter, we will give an overview on available broad-range blocker, as well as first TRP channel-selective compounds. PMID:21290290

  15. Characterization of geomorphic units in the alluvial valleys and channels of Gulf Coastal Plain rivers in Texas, with examples from the Brazos, Sabine, and Trinity Rivers, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffman, David K.; Malstaff, Greg; Heitmuller, Franklin T.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, described and characterized examples of geomorphic units within the channels and alluvial valleys of Texas Gulf Coastal Plain rivers using a geomorphic unit classification scale that differentiates geomorphic units on the basis of their location either outside or inside the river channel. The geomorphic properties of a river system determine the distribution and type of potential habitat both within and adjacent to the channel. This report characterizes the geomorphic units contained in the river channels and alluvial valleys of Texas Gulf Coastal Plain rivers in the context of the River Styles framework. This report is intended to help Texas Instream Flow Program practitioners, river managers, ecologists and biologists, and others interested in the geomorphology and the physical processes of the rivers of the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain (1) gain insights into how geomorphic units develop and adjust spatially and temporally, and (2) be able to recognize common geomorphic units from the examples cataloged in this report. Recent aerial imagery (high-resolution digital orthoimagery) collected in 2008 and 2009 were inspected by using geographic information system software to identify representative examples of the types of geomorphic units that occurred in the study area. Geomorphic units outside the channels of Texas Gulf Coastal Plain rivers are called \\"valley geomorphic units\\" in this report. Valley geomorphic units for the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain rivers described in this report are terraces, flood plains, crevasses and crevasse splays, flood-plain depressions, tie channels, tributaries, paleochannels, anabranches, distributaries, natural levees, neck cutoffs, oxbow lakes, and constructed channels. Channel geomorphic units occur in the river channel and are subject to frequent stresses associated with flowing water and sediment transport; they adjust (change) relatively quickly in

  16. Hydrologic and morphologic changes in channels of the Platte River basin; a historical perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eschner, T.R.; Hadley, R.F.; Crowley, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    The channels of the South Platte River in Colorado and Nebraska and the North Platte and Platte Rivers in Nebraska have undergone major changes in hydrologic regime and morphology since 1860. These changes are attributed to agricultural, municipal, and industrial water use. Diversion and storage of water have changed streamflow patterns throughout the basin. At some stations, significant changes in flood peaks, annual mean discharges, and shapes of flow-duration curves have been observed. Changes in streamflow patterns are manifested by changes in morphology of channels of the Platte River. Prior to water development in the 19th century, the Platte was a wide (2 kilometers), shallow (1.8 to 2.4 meters) river characterized by bankfull spring flows and low summer flows. The width of the Platte River in 1979 ranged from 8 to 92 percent of the channel width in 1860, increasing in a downstream direction. Above the confluence with the Loup River, overbank flows evidently have become more common. Moreover, the annual number of low flow days has increased and the days of no flow have decreased giving the channels a more perennial character. Width reduction has occurred by progressive encroachment of vegetation and consequent vertical and horizontal accretion on sand bars in the channel. (USGS)

  17. Seasonal migration and homing of channel catfish in the lower Wisconsin River, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pellett, Thomas D.; Van Dyck, Gene J.; Adams, Jean V.

    1998-01-01

    A multiyear tag and recapture study was conducted to determine whether channel catfishIctalurus punctatus were migratory and if they had strong homing tendencies. Over 10,000 channel catfish were tagged from the lower Wisconsin River and adjacent waters of the upper Mississippi River during the 3-year sampling period. Data on movements were obtained from study recaptures and through tag returns and harvest information provided by sport anglers and commercial fishers. Channel catfish occupied relatively small home ranges during summer, migrated downstream to the upper Mississippi River in autumn, then migrated back up the Wisconsin River in spring to spawn and to occupy the same summer home sites they had used in previous summers. Fish size was a factor in the degree of fidelity to summer home sites, with larger fish showing greater fidelity.

  18. Self-organization of river channels as a critical filter on climate signals.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Colin B; Jerolmack, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in rainfall are hypothesized to influence landscape evolution through erosion and sediment transport by rivers. However, determining the relation between rainfall and river dynamics requires a greater understanding of the feedbacks between flooding and a river's capacity to transport sediment. We analyzed channel geometry and stream-flow records from 186 coarse-grained rivers across the United States. We found that channels adjust their shape so that floods slightly exceed the critical shear velocity needed to transport bed sediment, independently of climatic, tectonic, and bedrock controls. The distribution of fluid shear velocity associated with floods is universal, indicating that self-organization of near-critical channels filters the climate signal evident in discharge. This effect blunts the impact of extreme rainfall events on landscape evolution.

  19. Self-organization of river channels as a critical filter on climate signals.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Colin B; Jerolmack, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in rainfall are hypothesized to influence landscape evolution through erosion and sediment transport by rivers. However, determining the relation between rainfall and river dynamics requires a greater understanding of the feedbacks between flooding and a river's capacity to transport sediment. We analyzed channel geometry and stream-flow records from 186 coarse-grained rivers across the United States. We found that channels adjust their shape so that floods slightly exceed the critical shear velocity needed to transport bed sediment, independently of climatic, tectonic, and bedrock controls. The distribution of fluid shear velocity associated with floods is universal, indicating that self-organization of near-critical channels filters the climate signal evident in discharge. This effect blunts the impact of extreme rainfall events on landscape evolution. PMID:27151865

  20. Thinking outside the channel: Modeling nitrogen cycling in networked river ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, Ashley; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Meyer, Judy; Wollheim, Wilfred; Peterson, Bruce; Mulholland, Patrick J; Bernhardt, Emily; Stanford, Jack; Arango, Clay; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dodds, Walter; Gregory, Stanley; Hall, Robert; Hamilton, Stephen; Johnson, Sherri; McDowell, William; Potter, Jody; Tank, Jennifer; Thomas, Suzanne; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Zeglin, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and urban development alters nitrogen and other biogeochemical cycles in rivers worldwide. Because such biogeochemical processes cannot be measured empirically across whole river networks, simulation models are critical tools for understanding river-network biogeochemistry. However, limitations inherent in current models restrict our ability to simulate biogeochemical dynamics among diverse river networks. We illustrate these limitations using a river-network model to scale up in situ measures of nitrogen cycling in eight catchments spanning various geophysical and land-use conditions. Our model results provide evidence that catchment characteristics typically excluded from models may control river-network biogeochemistry. Based on our findings, we identify important components of a revised strategy for simulating biogeochemical dynamics in river networks, including approaches to modeling terrestrial-aquatic linkages, hydrologic exchanges between the channel, floodplain/riparian complex, and subsurface waters, and interactions between coupled biogeochemical cycles.

  1. Characterizing channel change along a multithread gravel-bed river using random forest image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Snake River in Grand Teton National Park is a dam-regulated but highly dynamic gravel-bed river that alternates between a single thread and a multithread planform. Identifying key drivers of channel change on this river could improve our understanding of 1) how flow regulation at Jackson Lake Dam has altered the character of the river over time; 2) how changes in the distribution of various types of vegetation impacts river dynamics; and 3) how the Snake River will respond to future human and climate driven disturbances. Despite the importance of monitoring planform changes over time, automated channel extraction and understanding the physical drivers contributing to channel change continue to be challenging yet critical steps in the remote sensing of riverine environments. In this study we use the random forest statistical technique to first classify land cover within the Snake River corridor and then extract channel features from a sequence of high-resolution multispectral images of the Snake River spanning the period from 2006 to 2012, which encompasses both exceptionally dry years and near-record runoff in 2011. We show that the random forest technique can be used to classify images with as few as four spectral bands with far greater accuracy than traditional single-tree classification approaches. Secondly, we couple random forest derived land cover maps with LiDAR derived topography, bathymetry, and canopy height to explore physical drivers contributing to observed channel changes on the Snake River. In conclusion we show that the random forest technique is a powerful tool for classifying multispectral images of rivers. Moreover, we hypothesize that with sufficient data for calculating spatially distributed metrics of channel form and more frequent channel monitoring, this tool can also be used to identify areas with high probabilities of channel change. Land cover maps of a portion of the Snake River produced from digital aerial photography from 2010 and

  2. Research Spotlight: What controls the shape of sediment channels in river deltas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-03-01

    When turbulent, sediment-filled rivers empty into oceans and lakes, the channels often divide repeatedly to form triangular deltas. Some channels, however, travel long distances before bifurcating, creating elongated channels. Understanding how these patterns arise could be useful for designing wetland restoration schemes on river deltas. Seeking to explain the conditions under which elongated channels form, Falcini and Jerolmack considered an analogy with cold filaments in ocean currents, in which high potential vorticity (a measure that combines the rotation of a flow with its thermal gradient) helps a filament hold a coherent structure over long distances. The researchers introduced a model that incorporates sediment concentration and fluid vorticity, to derive a new “potential vorticity” equation that describes sedimentation patterns at the river mouth. Their model shows that a high potential vorticity is needed for the creation of elongated channels, and their comparison to modeling, laboratory, and field studies confirms that potential vorticity is a primary control on channel morphology. The new model could help to understand the shape of the iconic Mississippi River delta and may aid in the design of proposed channel diversions there and in other deltas. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface, doi:10.1029/2010JF001802, 2010)

  3. Epithelial sodium channel modulates platelet collagen activation.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris; Martínez-Vieyra, Ivette; Alonso-Rangel, Lea; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-03-01

    Activated platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelial extracellular matrix and undergo a rapid cytoskeletal rearrangement resulting in shape change and release of their intracellular dense and alpha granule contents to avoid hemorrhage. A central step in this process is the elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through its release from intracellular stores and on throughout its influx from the extracellular space. The Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a highly selective Na(+) channel involved in mechanosensation, nociception, fluid volume homeostasis, and control of arterial blood pressure. The present study describes the expression, distribution, and participation of ENaC in platelet migration and granule secretion using pharmacological inhibition with amiloride. Our biochemical and confocal analysis in suspended and adhered platelets suggests that ENaC is associated with Intermediate filaments (IF) and with Dystrophin-associated proteins (DAP) via α-syntrophin and β-dystroglycan. Migration assays, quantification of soluble P-selectin, and serotonin release suggest that ENaC is dispensable for migration and alpha and dense granule secretion, whereas Na(+) influx through this channel is fundamental for platelet collagen activation.

  4. Quantifying the combined effects of multiple extreme floods on river channel geometry and on flood hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Mingfu; Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Wright, Nigel G.; Sleigh, P. Andy; Staines, Kate E. H.

    2016-07-01

    Effects of flood-induced bed elevation and channel geometry changes on flood hazards are largely unexplored, especially in the case of multiple floods from the same site. This study quantified the evolution of river channel and floodplain geometry during a repeated series of hypothetical extreme floods using a 2D full hydro-morphodynamic model (LHMM). These experiments were designed to examine the consequences of channel geometry changes on channel conveyance capacity and subsequent flood dynamics. Our results revealed that extreme floods play an important role in adjusting a river channel to become more efficient for subsequent propagation of floods, and that in-channel scour and sediment re-distribution can greatly improve the conveyance capacity of a channel for subsequent floods. In our hypothetical sequence of floods the response of bed elevation was of net degradation, and sediment transport successively weakened even with floods of the same magnitude. Changes in river channel geometry led to significant impact on flood hydraulics and thereby flood hazards. We found that flood-induced in-channel erosion can disconnect the channel from its floodplain resulting in a reduction of floodwater storage. Thus, the frequency and extent of subsequent overbank flows and floodplain inundation decreased, which reduced downstream flood attenuation and increased downstream flood hazard. In combination and in summary, these results suggest that changes in channel capacity due to extreme floods may drive changes in flood hazard. The assumption of unchanging of river morphology during inundation modelling should therefore be open to question for flood risk management.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Connecting Side Channels to the Long Tom River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, C.; McDowell, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    The lower Long Tom River is a heavily managed, highly modified stream in the southwestern Willamette Valley with many opportunities for habitat improvements and river restoration. In the 1940s and 1950s, the US Army Corps of Engineers dramatically altered this river system by constructing the Fern Ridge Dam and three, large drop structures, converting the River from a highly sinuous channel to a straight, channelized stream that is interrupted by these grade control structures, and removed the majority of the riparian vegetation. As a result, juvenile spring Chinook salmon are no longer found in the Watershed and the local population of coastal cutthroat trout face limited aquatic habitat. When the river was channelized, long sections of the historical channel were left abandoned on the floodplain. Reconnecting these historical channels as side channels may improve the quality and quantity of aquatic habitat and could allow fish passage around current barriers. However, such construction may also lead to undesirable threats to infrastructure and farmland. This study uses multiple HEC-RAS models to determine the impact of reconnecting two historical channels to the lower Long Tom River by quantifying the change in area of flood inundation and identifying infrastructure in jeapordy given current and post-restoration conditions for 1.5, 5, 10, and 25-year flood discharges. Bathymetric data from ADCP and RTK-GPS surveys has been combined with LiDAR-derived topographic data to create continuous elevation models. Several types of side channel connections are modeled in order to determine which type of connection will result in both the greatest quantity of accessible habitat and the fewest threats to public and private property. In the future, this study will also consider the change in the quantity of physical salmonid habitat and map the areas prone to sedimentation and erosion using CEASAR and PHABSIM tools.

  6. Dam-induced and natural channel changes in the Saskatchewan River below the E.B. Campbell Dam, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Norman D.; Morozova, Galina S.; Pérez-Arlucea, Marta; Gibling, Martin R.

    2016-09-01

    The E.B. Campbell Dam on the Saskatchewan River, east-central Saskatchewan, was constructed in 1962, forming Tobin Lake (2.2 billion m3 capacity), which today impounds most fluvial sediment and disrupts normal outflow patterns. Thirty-five kilometers below the dam, the river diverts into a 500 km2 belt of alluvial sediment initiated by an avulsion ~ 140 years ago, rejoining the parent channel 108 km from the dam. Effects of the dam on channel geomorphology, including the historical channel (reach I) and the more recent avulsion-affected channels, were investigated by pre- and post-dam cross section surveys combined with grain-size and bedload measurements. Twenty-three sites were surveyed at least twice, and 14 were resurveyed annually in 2003-2014 (except 2007) during which significant floods occurred in 2005, 2011, and 2013. All channel cross sections up to 81 km below the dam have coarsened and enlarged since closure, resulting in excavation of 35.4 × 106 m3 of channel-perimeter sediment since 1962. The most proximal segment is armored and has changed little in recent years. Since 2003, channel enlargement has been greatest in the 35-81 km segment between the avulsion site and the Forks (reaches II, III), manifested as widening and deepening. Enlargement rates were greatest during the three floods, and the paucity of bedload has prevented degraded portions of the channel bed from replenishment following flooding. Budget calculations based on bedload measurements and channel cross-section areas suggest that > 30 years would be required to replace the sediment removed between 2003 and 2014, assuming all available bedload remains in the affected reach. Dam effects appear to be absent or uncertain beyond 81 km, a multichanneled region of varied stages of activity (reach IV), recombining and eventually rejoining the parent Saskatchewan River channel at km 108 (reach V). Sediment evacuated from reaches I-III is sufficient to sustain modest aggradation in some distal

  7. Alterations of channel parameters in response to river regulation works since 1840 on the Lower Tisza River (Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Tímea; Fiala, Károly; Sipos, György

    2008-06-01

    In the last few years an increase in the frequency and magnitude of floods was detected on the Tisza River, endangering large areas of Hungary. The causes of these record floods were complex, including both natural and human induced factors. This paper focuses on river management works and their effect on planimetric and cross-sectional parameters, with special attention to the flood conductivity changes to the river channel. During 19th century river regulation works, half of the total length of the Tisza River was altered by cut-offs, while in the 20th century mostly revetments and groynes were constructed. Subsequently, horizontal and vertical channel parameters have changed considerably due to semi-natural bed processes. In order to reveal changes, hydrological map series (1842, 1890, 1929, 1957, 1976 and 1999) and cross-sectional surveys from the same dates were analysed. Prior to the intensive human interventions (before 1890s) the river's course was highly sinuous with some very sharp bends. Due to cut-offs both the length and sinuosity of the Tisza River decreased by 35%, while the lengths of straight sections and the river's slope doubled. As a consequence the river incised by up to 3.8 m until the 1929 survey, resulting better flood conductivity, which improved flood safety. In the 1920s river management favoured bank stabilisation in order to stop the lateral migration of the channel. Despite these measures, meander development has continued, however, in a distorted manner. This is reflected by the opposing processes of lengthening centre-line on the one hand and gradually decreasing radius of curvature on the other. These processes can be explained by the continuous development of natural point-bars on the convex bank, and the lack of lateral retreat on the concave stabilised bank. The width of the river decreased by 17-45%, while its mean and maximum depth increased by 5-48%. The area of cross-sections influenced by revetments decreased by 6

  8. Invertebrate drift during in-channel gravel mining: the Upper River Cinca (Southern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjar, Maria; Gibbins, Chris; Vericat, Damià; Batalla, Ramon J.; Muñoz, Efrén; Ramos, Ester; Lobera, Gemma; Andrés López-Tarazón, Jose; Piqué, Gemma; Tena, Álvaro; Buendía, Cristina; Rennie, Colin D.

    2015-04-01

    Invertebrate drift has been widely studied as an important mechanism to structure the benthic assemblages and as a part of invertebrate behavior in fluvial systems. River channel disturbance is considered the main factor affecting the organization of riverine communities and contributes to key ecological processes. However, little is known about involuntary drift associated to bed disturbance due to the difficulties associated with sampling during floods. In-channel gravel mining offers an opportunity to study involuntary drift associated not only to local bed disturbances but also to sudden changes on suspended sediment concentrations and flow. High suspended sediment concentrations and sudden changes in flow also prompt drift due to the limiting conditions (i.e. lack of oxygen, hydric stress). Within this context, invertebrate drift was monitored in the Upper River Cinca (Southern Pyrenees) during two gravel mining activities performed in summer 2014. The data acquisition design includes: drift, suspended sediment, bedload, bed mobility and flow. Data was acquired before, during and after mining at different sampling locations located upstream and downstream the perturbation. Drift and suspended sediment transport were sampled at 5 sections: 1 control site upstream the mining and 4 downstream. Bedload samples were collected just downstream the channel where gravels were extracted. Bed mobility and changes on topography were assessed by means of GPS-aDcp and repeat topographic surveys. Discharge was continuously recorded 2.5 km downstream the mining location. Additionally, two turbidity meters registered water turbidity at 15 minute intervals in two of the four sampling sections located downstream. This experimental design provides data on the spatial and temporal variability of drift associated to a local bed disturbance that (i) changes the distribution of flow across the section where mining was performed, (ii) increase substantially suspended sediment

  9. Evaluation of plain river channel deformation in the absence of observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savichev, O. G.; Reshetko, M. V.; Matveenko, I. A.; Ivanova, Ye V.

    2015-02-01

    Evaluation and long-term forecast techniques for plain river channel deformation has been developed in the absence of observation data. Their testing was performed by the example of medium rivers (with catchment area from 2000 to 50000 km2) in taiga zone of Western Siberia (the Ob river basin on the section of its midstream). The technique is based on determination of flow parameters, at which the maximum river bed deformations are observed. Standard data of hydrometric observations obtained at the state hydrological network are used for calculation.

  10. Modeling flood dynamics along the superelevated channel belt of the Yellow River over the last 3000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunzhen; Overeem, Irina; Kettner, Albert J.; Gao, Shu; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2015-07-01

    The Yellow River, China, experienced >1000 levee breaches during the last 3000 years. A reduced-complexity model is developed in this study to explore the effects of climate change and human activity on flood levels, levee breaches, and river avulsions. The model integrates yearly morphological change along a channel belt with daily river fluxes and hourly evolution of levee breaches. Model sensitivity analysis reveals that under natural conditions, superelevation of the channel belt dominates flood frequency. When there is significant human-accelerated basin erosion and breach repair, the dominant factors shift to a combination of mean annual precipitation, superelevation, critical shear stress of weak channel banks, and the time interval between breach initiation and its repair. The effect of precipitation on flood frequency is amplified by land use changes in the hinterland, particularly in the erodible Loess Plateau. Uncertainty analysis estimates the most likely values of the dominant factors for six historical periods between 850 B.C. and A.D. 1839, which are used to quantitatively reconstruct flood dynamics. During 850 B.C. to A.D. 1839, when the sediment load increased fourfold, the breach recurrence interval was shortened from more than 500 years to less than 6 years, and the breach outflow rate increased ~27 times. River management practices during A.D. 1579 to A.D. 1839 focused on levees and triggered a severe positive feedback of increased levee heights and flood hazard exacerbation. Raising the levee heights proved to be ineffective for sustainable flood management.

  11. Spatiotemporal variations in channel changes caused by cumulative factors in a meandering river: The lower Peixe River, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Eduardo S.; Rocha, Paulo C.; Hooke, Janet

    2016-11-01

    Channel changes in meandering rivers naturally exhibit complex behaviour, and understanding the river dynamics can be challenging in environments also subject to cumulative human impacts. Planform changes were analysed on four reaches of the lower course of the Peixe River, Brazil, at decadal scales over the period 1962-2008 from aerial photographs and satellite imagery, complemented by a historical map from 1907. Analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of channel change mechanisms and morphometry of bends and of the sinuosity and morphodynamic variations of the reaches demonstrates major changes in planform characteristics. Sinuosity in all reaches decreased from ~ 2.6 to ~ 1.7, average wavelength of bends has increased from ~ 200 to ~ 500 m, and the planform has become much simpler. Changes have been progressive from downstream to upstream, with higher intensities of processes, particularly cutoffs first in downstream reaches then more recently in upstream reaches. It is suggested that channel changes represent a morphological adjustment to human interventions, such as reservoir construction and land use. However, evidence of the autogenic behaviour of meanders is highlighted in which the existence of compound meanders reveals control over the spatial variation in the reaches. The results suggest that geomorphic thresholds associated with the compound meander formation and the bend evolution should be considered, even in impacted meandering rivers, because they exert primary controls on the spatial-temporal adjustment of channels.

  12. Wildlife use of back channels associated with islands on the Ohio River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zadnik, A.K.; Anderson, James T.; Wood, P.B.; Bledsoe, K.

    2009-01-01

    The back channels of islands on the Ohio River are assumed to provide habitat critical for several wildlife species. However, quantitative information on the wildlife value of back channels is needed by natural resource managers for the conservation of these forested islands and embayments in the face of increasing shoreline development and recreational boating. We compared the relative abundance of waterbirds, turtles, anurans, and riparian furbearing mammals during 2001 and 2002 in back and main channels of the Ohio River in West Virginia. Wood ducks (Aix sponsa), snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina), beavers (Castor canadensis), and muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) were more abundant in back than main channels. Spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer) and American toads (Bufo americanus) occurred more frequently on back than main channels. These results provide quantitative evidence that back channels are important for several wildlife species. The narrowness of the back channels, the protection they provide from the main current of the river, and their ability to support vegetated shorelines and woody debris, are characteristics that appear to benefit these species. As a conservation measure for important riparian wildlife habitat, we suggest limiting building of piers and development of the shoreline in back channel areas. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  13. Using a novel flood prediction model and GIS automation to measure the valley and channel morphology of large river networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional methods for measuring river valley and channel morphology require intensive ground-based surveys which are often expensive, time consuming, and logistically difficult to implement. The number of surveys required to assess the hydrogeomorphic structure of large river n...

  14. Residence Times of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead in Off-Channel Tidal Freshwater Habitats, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    We estimated seasonal residence times of acoustic-tagged juvenile salmonids in off-channel, tidal freshwater habitats of the Columbia River near the Sandy River delta (rkm 198; 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2011) and Cottonwood Island (rkm 112; 2012).

  15. Channel Pattern and the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis Predict Biodiversity in River-floodplain Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T.; Pollock, M.; Baker, S.; Morley, S.

    2005-05-01

    River-floodplain ecosystems are among the most diverse and dynamic environments in the world, yet mechanisms that regulate biodiversity in river corridors are poorly understood. In part, this stems from a lack of integration of geomorphological and biological concepts that link fluvial processes to biological diversity. Here we illustrate how channel pattern predicts biodiversity via the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH). We show that (1) channel pattern predicts disturbance frequency and age diversity of patches, (2) there are distinct life history tradeoffs among colonizing and climax species, and (3) diversity should be highest in channel patterns with intermediate levels of disturbance. We first classify river-floodplains in northwestern USA using geomorphological channel patterns, and show how these patterns predict patch dynamics in river-floodplain systems. We then use space-for-time substitution to illustrate successional patterns of trees and aquatic invertebrates. Finally, we link reach-level patch dynamics to reach-level biodiversity of trees and aquatic invertebrates using the IDH. Patch age diversity is low in straight channels with low movement rates and mostly old surfaces, and low in braided channels with high movement rates and mostly young surfaces. Patch age diversity is highest in channels with intermediate movement rates (meandering and island-braided channels). Vegetation succession drives temporal patterns of biological diversity within individual terrestrial and aquatic patches (alpha diversity). Trees exhibit clear successional trade-offs as patches age, succeeding from hardwood-dominated at the colonizing stage to conifer-dominated at the climax stage. Highest within-patch species richness occurs at an intermediate age. Alpha diversity of aquatic invertebrates follows a similar pattern, probably in response to riparian forest succession and the shifting composition of detrital resources entering river and floodplain channels. We

  16. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases.

  17. The dynamic feedbacks between channel changes in the Colorado River Basin and the rapid invasion of Tamarisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    The resiliency and sensitivity of western rivers to future climate change may be partly anticipated by the response of these rivers to past perturbations in stream flow and sediment supply. Predictions of earlier spring runoff and reduced peak flows of snowmelt-dominated streams mimic hydrologic changes caused by the closure and operation of large dams built within the past century. In the Colorado River Basin, channels have narrowed between 5 and 26% following large dam construction, but the correlation between flow reduction and channel narrowing is confounded by changes in bank strength caused by the rapid spread of the non-native riparian shrub, tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). Thus, predictions of future changes in channel form and analysis of past changes related to dams must distinguish between channel narrowing caused by direct changes in flow, and caused by the indirect effects wherein changes in flow regime allow expansion of non-native riparian vegetation that in turn leads to accelerated channel narrowing. Our research evaluates the geomorphic controls on tamarisk colonization, the role of tamarisk in accelerating the narrowing process, and the dynamic feedbacks between channel changes on western rivers and the invasion of non-native riparian species. The transformation of formerly active bars and channel margins into stable inset floodplain surfaces is the dominant process by which these channels have narrowed, as determined by detailed alluvial stratigraphy and dendrogeomorphology. We recreated the 3-dimensional bar surface present at the time of tamarisk establishment by excavating an extensive network of trenches. In doing this, we evaluated the hydraulic environment within which tamarisk established. We also characterized the hydrodynamic roughness of aging tamarisk stands from ground-based LiDAR scans to evaluate the role of tamarisk in the promotion of floodplain formation. Our study sites are representative of the predominant geomorphic organization of

  18. Differences between main-channel and off-channel food webs in the upper Mississippi River revealed by fatty acid profiles of consumers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Bartsch, Michelle; Gutreuter, Steve; Knights, Brent C.; Bartsch, Lynn; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Arts, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Large river systems are often thought to contain a mosaic of patches with different habitat characteristics driven by differences in flow and mixing environments. Off-channel habitats (e.g., backwater areas, secondary channels) can become semi-isolated from main-channel water inputs, leading to the development of distinct biogeochemical environments. Observations of adult bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in the main channel of the Mississippi River led to speculation that the main channel offered superior food resources relative to off-channel areas. One important aspect of food quality is the quantity and composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). We sampled consumers from main-channel and backwater habitats to determine whether they differed in PUFA content. Main-channel individuals for relatively immobile species (young-of-year bluegill, zebra mussels [Dreissena polymorpha], and plain pocketbook mussels [Lampsilis cardium]) had significantly greater PUFA content than off-channel individuals. No difference in PUFA was observed for the more mobile gizzard shad (Dorsoma cepedianum), which may move between main-channel and off-channel habitats even at early life-history stages. As off-channel habitats become isolated from main-channel waters, flow and water column nitrogen decrease, potentially improving conditions for nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and vascular plants that, in turn, have low PUFA content. We conclude that main-channel food webs of the upper Mississippi River provide higher quality food resources for some riverine consumers as compared to food webs in off-channel habitats.

  19. ALWAYS A RIVER - ACTIVITY BOOKLET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cincinnati has the privilege of being a part of a very special celebration this summer. We are one of several cities that will welcome a floating barge exhibition entitled "Always a River", between July 15 and 22,1991. Once aboard the barge you will enter the magic and mystery ...

  20. Emergency cooling simulation tests on an electrically heated channel typical of SRP (Savannah River Laboratory) reactor fuel channels - RIG B

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.

    1990-01-01

    Emergency cooling simulation tests were conducted on a single electrically heated test channel representative of Savannah River Plant fuel assembly flow channels. The primary objective was to investigate downflow, air-water hydraulic flow conditions that lead to the onset of a runaway thermal excursion in the range of superficial liquid and gas velocities, 1.4 m/sec and 1 m/sec, respectively. The thermal excursion power normalized by the power to reach fluid outlet saturation conditions, or R-factor, was found to decrease from values close to 2, at annular flow conditions to approximately 0.8 at low to zero void fractions. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Erosion and channel change as factors of landslides and valley formation in Champlain Sea Clays: The Chacoura River, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévy, Sébastien; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Locat, Jacques; Demers, Denis

    2012-04-01

    The Champlain Sea clays of Eastern Canada are incised by numerous rivers. Their slopes have been modified by landslides: on the Chacoura River near Trois-Rivières (Quebec), several large landslide scars, more or less recent, are visible. The role of erosion (channel incision, lateral channel migration and erosion of slopes due to agricultural drainage) as a trigger of these landslides is important. The aim of this study is to understand how erosion and landslides are related to valley development. From a detailed analysis of aerial photographs and DEMs, a map of the phenomena has been drawn by identifying various elements such as landslides, limits of the slope, position of the channel, and the area covered by forest. It is shown that channel change and erosion are strongly linked to landslides by the fact that they change the bank morphology in an unstable way. A slide in itself is a natural way for the slope to achieve stability. But when it occurs in a stream, it creates a disturbance to the stream flow enhancing local erosion which may change the river path and generate more erosion downstream or upstream resulting in more slides. Cross-valley sections and a longitudinal profile show that landslides are a major factor of valley formation. It appears that the upper part of the Chacoura River valley is still unaffected by landslides and has V-shaped sections. The lower part has been subject to intense erosion and many landslide scars can be seen. This shows that the valley morphology is transient, and that future activity is more likely to occur in the upper part of the river. Therefore the identification of areas prone to erosion will help determine the possible location of future large landslides just like the ones that occurred in the lower part.

  2. Propagation of subtidal sea level oscillations in the river channel: A case study of the St. Johns River, Florida, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Alexander E.; Iyer, Suneil K.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of water level and river discharge time series collected at three locations in the St. Johns River, FL reveals that subtidal variability with periods of several days is associated with long waves propagating from the ocean into the river channel. These dynamics are similar to tidal wave propagation: both tidal and subtidal frequency bands have the same ratio of free surface-to-discharge standard deviations, which is not the case on oceanic shelves. However, important differences also emerge: as waves pass through the river mouth, tidal oscillations exhibit much stronger attenuation, while subtidal oscillations propagate at a lower speed. Further upstream, where the channel cross-sectional area contracts (between Palatka and Buffalo Bluff), the waves in two frequency bands adjust differently: tidal waves are amplified and continue upstream, while a significant fraction of subtidal energy is reflected. The amplification of tidal waves occurs mostly through the generation of overtides. Also, tidal wave attenuation in the river relative to the mouth is nearly constant over the observation period, while the attenuation of subtidal waves exhibits strong changes. Variations in subtidal attenuation are linked to the influence of the river discharge: higher discharge (relative to the subtidal water level variability) causes stronger attenuation of subtidal waves.

  3. A native sedge, Carex nudata, as facilitator of restoration goals: effects on channel morphology and planform in the Middle Fork John Day River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslin, M.; McDowell, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    In the Middle Fork of the John Day River, the native riparian sedge, Carex nudata, has exploded across the landscape following the removal of cattle grazing in the late 1990s. C. nudata now forms fringes along the edges of the low flow channel and grows as islands within the river. C. nudata appears to be altering channel morphology and planform in ways that may facilitate key restoration goals. I have employed multiple methods to investigate changes in channel morphology and planform in association with C. nudata: aerial imagery analysis, repeated topographic surveys, and erosion pins in cut banks with C. nudata fringes. Preliminary results suggest that C. nudata stabilizes the edges of the low flow channel, but cut banks behind C. nudata fringes continue to erode such that the bankflow width and channel boundaries continue to move. Aerial imagery analysis indicates that current C. nudata islands are often the result of C. nudata fringes becoming "detached" from banks rather than from initial establishment of plants in midchannel positions. Topographic surveys suggest scouring upstream of C. nudata islands and along the edges of C. nudata fringes. We propose a conceptual model in which multiple alternative pathways of river development may be possible after the establishment of C. nudata, depending on the antecedent conditions where it becomes established (e.g. bank composition, river curvature). Alternative pathways include: 1) bank stabilization, channel narrowing and deepening; 2) formation of a compound channel with a side channel that is activated at high flows; 3) the formation of islands within the channel. The potential for multiple pathways of development after C. nudata establishment may lead to complex patterns of river morphology and planform consistent with habitat complexity goals of river restoration.

  4. Flow Structure and Channel Change in Chute Cutoffs On Meandering Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, J. A.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J. L.; Johnson, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Freely meandering rivers typically exhibit complex, continuously evolving patterns of planform geometry involving elongation of the channel path through lateral migration and shorting of this path through bend cutoffs. Despite the importance of cutoffs in shaping the planform geometry of meandering rivers, the fluvial processes operative immediately after initiation of a cutoff are poorly understood. Two recent chute cutoff events on a single bend on the Wabash River, IL-IN, have provided an unprecedented opportunity to document the morphologic evolution and flow structure of chute cutoffs in a large, unregulated, meandering river. Here, we present results of ADCP measurements of three-dimensional flow velocity and bed topography at these cutoffs and describe a conceptual model for the morphodynamics of chute cutoffs prior to oxbow lake formation. Our results indicate that the flow structure at upstream and downstream ends of cutoff channels, prior to plugging of the entrance and exit of the abandoned bend with sediment, is analogous to flow through diffluence - confluence units. The interaction of this flow structure with an erodible bed and banks can cause rapid widening of the upstream end of the cutoff channel and bar development i) in the main channel where velocities are reduced, and ii) in the separation zone of the cutoff channel. Over time, these patterns of deposition and erosion will lead formation of an oxbow lake and complete capture of the flow by the cutoff channel.

  5. Climate and Tectonics: Why Self-organized River Channels Just Don't Care (that much)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Phillips, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies seeking to link climatic and tectonic drivers to fluvial records start with the assumption that such links exist, and that our failure to identify these links is due to either noisy data or confounding factors. This study begins from a different perspective: the robust hydraulic-geometry scaling relations of both alluvial and bedrock rivers suggests an insensitivity of these systems to climatic and tectonic drivers. The pattern stability of river channels, in the face of an onslaught of stochastic driving over a wide range of scales, becomes the feature in need of explanation. To explore this question in a constrained manner, we examine the case of gravel-bedded (d > 10 mm) rivers where one may reasonably suggest that bed-load transport is the dominant means of channel adjustment and erosion. We examined data from 188 rivers across the USA, covering a wide range of climatic, tectonic and bedrock controls. Almost without exception, the rivers exhibit two remarkable features: (1) they are organized such that the bankfull fluid stress is slightly in excess of the critical value; and (2) the distribution of fluid stresses in excess of critical follows a common exponential-decay function. Although discharge regimes and distributions for these rivers vary widely as a function of climate (as expected), the fluid-stress distribution is universal. We surmise that the generic self-organization of a river channel to a near-critical condition acts to decouple important aspects of sediment transport from its regional climate. This "critical filter" suggests that finding strong signatures of climate and tectonics in river morphology and erosion should be the exception, rather than the rule. We anticipate and invite criticism of this view. Results imply that landscape evolution models can get by with a simple treatment of climate, and may use a constant Shields stress condition as a channel closure scheme even for bedrock-influenced rivers.

  6. Low sinuosity and meandering bedload rivers of the Okavango Fan: channel confinement by vegetated levées without fine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanistreet, I. G.; Cairncross, B.; McCarthy, T. S.

    1993-05-01

    The river systems of the Okavango Fan negate present fluviological perceptions that fluvial geometry is primarily dependent upon the type of sediment load being carried by the river. In northwest Botswana, meandering and low sinuosity rivers, both of which may show anastomosis, are distinctly bedload in character. This is mainly because of a restricted source of clastic sediment, consisting of aeolian sand from the Tertiary to Recent Kalahari Basin. All that seems to be required, therefore, to control low sinuosity and meandering geometries is adequate confinement of channels. In the study examples this is provided by heavily vegetated levées comprising peat, formed from and colonised by a Cyperus papyrus dominated flora: fine sediment plays almost no role in the confinement process. Active and abandoned examples of low sinuosity river channels were studied. An inversion of topography develops in the latter, caused by the low survival probability of metres thick peat levées. Desiccation and burning of peat ultimately form a degraded ash layer only tens of centimetres thick. The channel sand then stands as a ridge rising above the surrounding fan surface. In both examples studied, no crevasse splays occur, but hippopotami trails breach the levées to form minor distributary channels which become filled with sand. The sand ultimately grades backwards to plug the breach. Meander belts are also developed, particularly in the upper fan and entry corridor. Cut banks incise into the sand substrate and scroll bar topographies can be discerned beneath their peat cover. Fine sediment plays no role in the confinement of these channels, which are maintained by peat levées similar to those encountered in the low sinuosity river channels. The recognition of these bedload low sinuosity and meandering river channels now completes the matrix, whereby any geometry of river channel can be developed in bedload, mixed load and suspended load rivers. Important aspects of the modern

  7. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic controls on channel evolution in a sub-tropical river, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, James; Croke, Jacky; Thompson, Chris; Cohen, Tim; Macklin, Mark; Sharma, Ashneel

    2016-04-01

    Palaeohydrological research provides valuable insights to the understanding of short- and long-term fluvial dynamics in response to climate change and tectonic activity. In landscapes where tectonic activity is minimal fluvial archives record long-term changes in sediment and discharge dynamics related to either intrinsic or extrinsic controls. Isolating the relative controls of these factors is an important frontier in this area of research. Advances in geochronology, the acquisition of high resolution topographic data and geomorphological techniques provide an opportunity to assess the relative importance of intrinsic and extrinsic controls on terrace and floodplain formation. This study presents the results of detailed chrono-stratigraphic research in a partly confined river valley in subtropical southeast Queensland. River systems within this region are characterized by high hydrological variability and have a near-ubiquitous compound channel morphology (macrochannel) where Holocene deposits are inset within late Pleistocene terraces. These macrochannels can accommodate floods up to and beyond the predicted 100-year flood. Using single grain optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon analyses, combined with high resolution spatial datasets, we demonstrate the nature of fluvial response to major late Quaternary climate change. A large proportion of the valley floor is dominated by terrace alluvium deposited after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (17 - 13 ka) and overlies basal older Pleistocene alluvium. Preliminary results suggest a phase of incision occurred at 10 ka with the formation of the large alluvial trench. The Holocene floodplain is dominated by processes of catastrophic vertical accretion and erosion (cut-and-fill) and oblique accretion at the macrochannel margins. The consistency in ages for the terraces and subsequent incision suggests a uniform network response. Alluvial sediments and channel configuration in this compound and complex

  8. Linkages between sediment supply and channel morphology in gravel-bed river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitlick, John; Recking, Alain; Liebault, Fred

    2013-04-01

    Mountain river systems are characterized by a wide range of channel patterns and varying levels of instability. In steeper channels- torrents and cascades- resistant bed and bank materials tend to limit entrainment and transport, except during large floods or debris flows. In lower-gradient channels, with meandering or braided planforms, bed and bank materials are mobilized more frequently, consequently channel geometry is maintained by a long-term balance between bank erosion and the lateral migration and growth of bars. These differences in stability are largely a reflection of position with the drainage network, but other factors, such as valley confinement and drainage basin sediment supply (both quantity and grain size), play equally strong roles in the downstream evolution of channel morphology. In this talk we present data and preliminary results from a comparative study of the influences of sediment supply on channel morphology in rivers draining high-elevation basins in the Rocky Mountains and the French Alps. Study sites are located in river basins with high to very high relief (1000-3000 m), and hydrologic cycles dominated by snowmelt runoff. The scaling between peak flows and drainage basin area is very similar in both regions. There are sharp contrasts, however, in the underlying rock types, and the connectivity between hillslopes and channels, such that the sediment supply to rivers in high-relief areas of the French Alps is orders of magnitude higher than in the Rocky Mountain region. Rock type also influences the grain size and durability of the sediment delivered from hillslopes, thus sand and fine gravel are abundant in French alpine channels. The net effect of finer grain sizes in channels with steep slopes is to produce Shields numbers that are 2-3 times the threshold for motion at channel-forming discharges. These conditions are quite different from conditions in Rocky Mountain channels where the Shields numbers at bankfull flows are typically

  9. Self-organization of river channels as a critical filter on climate signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Colin B.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2016-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in rainfall are hypothesized to influence landscape evolution through erosion and sediment transport by rivers. However, determining the relation between rainfall and river dynamics requires a greater understanding of the feedbacks between flooding and a river’s capacity to transport sediment. We analyzed channel geometry and stream-flow records from 186 coarse-grained rivers across the United States. We found that channels adjust their shape so that floods slightly exceed the critical shear velocity needed to transport bed sediment, independently of climatic, tectonic, and bedrock controls. The distribution of fluid shear velocity associated with floods is universal, indicating that self-organization of near-critical channels filters the climate signal evident in discharge. This effect blunts the impact of extreme rainfall events on landscape evolution.

  10. Estimates of deep percolation beneath native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River Channel, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Prudic, David E.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Akstin, Katherine C.; Boyd, Robert A.; Henkelman, Katherine K.

    2003-01-01

    The presence and approximate rates of deep percolation beneath areas of native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River channel in the Amargosa Desert of southern Nevada were evaluated using the chloride mass-balance method and inferred downward velocities of chloride and nitrate peaks. Estimates of deep-percolation rates in the Amargosa Desert are needed for the analysis of regional ground-water flow and transport. An understanding of regional flow patterns is important because ground water originating on the Nevada Test Site may pass through the area before discharging from springs at lower elevations in the Amargosa Desert and in Death Valley. Nine boreholes 10 to 16 meters deep were cored nearly continuously using a hollow-stem auger designed for gravelly sediments. Two boreholes were drilled in each of three irrigated fields in the Amargosa-Farms area, two in the Amargosa-River channel, and one in an undisturbed area of native vegetation. Data from previously cored boreholes beneath undisturbed, native vegetation were compared with the new data to further assess deep percolation under current climatic conditions and provide information on spatial variability. The profiles beneath native vegetation were characterized by large amounts of accumulated chloride just below the root zone with almost no further accumulation at greater depths. This pattern is typical of profiles beneath interfluvial areas in arid alluvial basins of the southwestern United States, where salts have been accumulating since the end of the Pleistocene. The profiles beneath irrigated fields and the Amargosa-River channel contained more than twice the volume of water compared to profiles beneath native vegetation, consistent with active deep percolation beneath these sites. Chloride profiles beneath two older fields (cultivated since the 1960?s) as well as the upstream Amargosa-River site were indicative of long-term, quasi-steady deep percolation. Chloride profiles beneath the

  11. A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Washburn, L.; Siegel, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The ephemeral Santa Clara River delivers large amounts of freshwater and sediment to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief, episodic discharge events. This discharge into the channel was characterized here with shipboard measurements during floods of 1997 and 1998. Within approximately 1-km of the river mouth, the river discharge quickly stratifies into a freshened, turbid surface plume and a bottom nephloid layer. Observations immediately off the Santa Clara River mouth on a peak day of river discharge revealed that sediment rapidly settled from the freshened surface waters, as suspended sediment in the freshened surface plume contained only ???6% of the sediment mass expected if the sediment mixed conservatively. On the two subsequent days the reduction of sediment mass in the surface plume continued at ???50% per day. These observations suggest that river sediment undergoes rapid initial settling within ???1-km of the river mouth, followed by somewhat slower rates of settling. Although we did not measure sedimentation or bottom boundary layer processes, our mass balance results suggest that almost all of the river sediment either escapes along or deposits upon the inner shelf seabed.

  12. Sediment, water column, and open-channel denitrification in rivers measured using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Alexander J.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Hoellein, Timothy J.; Hall, Robert O.

    2016-05-01

    Riverine biogeochemical processes are understudied relative to headwaters, and reach-scale processes in rivers reflect both the water column and sediment. Denitrification in streams is difficult to measure, and is often assumed to occur only in sediment, but the water column is potentially important in rivers. Dissolved nitrogen (N) gas flux (as dinitrogen (N2)) and open-channel N2 exchange methods avoid many of the artificial conditions and expenses of common denitrification methods like acetylene block and 15N-tracer techniques. We used membrane-inlet mass spectrometry and microcosm incubations to quantify net N2 and oxygen flux from the sediment and water column of five Midwestern rivers spanning a land use gradient. Sediment and water column denitrification ranged from below detection to 1.8 mg N m-2 h-1 and from below detection to 4.9 mg N m-2 h-1, respectively. Water column activity was variable across rivers, accounting for 0-85% of combined microcosm denitrification and 39-85% of combined microcosm respiration. Finally, we estimated reach-scale denitrification at one Midwestern river using a diel, open-channel N2 exchange approach based on reach-scale metabolism methods, providing an integrative estimate of riverine denitrification. Reach-scale denitrification was 8.8 mg N m-2 h-1 (95% credible interval: 7.8-9.7 mg N m-2 h-1), higher than combined sediment and water column microcosm estimates from the same river (4.3 mg N m-2 h-1) and other estimates of reach-scale denitrification from streams. Our denitrification estimates, which span habitats and spatial scales, suggest that rivers can remove N via denitrification at equivalent or higher rates than headwater streams.

  13. Geomorphic changes resulting from floods in reconfigured gravel-bed river channels in Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, J.G.; Capesius, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Geomorphic changes in reconfi gured reaches of three Colorado rivers in response to floods in 2005 provide a benchmark for "restoration" assessment. Sedimententrainment potential is expressed as the ratio of the shear stress from the 2 yr, 5 yr, 10 yr, and 2005 floods to the critical shear stress for sediment. Some observed response was explained by the excess of flood shear stress relative to the resisting force of the sediment. Bed-load entrainment in the Uncompahgre River and the North Fork Gunnison River, during 4 and 6 yr floods respectively, resulted in streambed scour, streambed deposition, lateral-bar accretion, and channel migration at various locations. Some constructed boulder and log structures failed because of high rates of bank erosion or bed-material deposition. The Lake Fork showed little or no net change after the 2005 flood; however, this channel had not conveyed floods greater than the 2.5 yr flood since reconfi guration. Channel slope and the 2 yr flood, a surrogate for bankfull discharge, from all three reconfi gured reaches plotted above the Leopold and Wolman channel-pattern threshold in the "braided channel" region, indicating that braiding, rather than a single-thread meandering channel, and midchannel bar formation may be the natural tendency of these gravel-bed reaches. When plotted against a total stream-power and median-sediment-size threshold for the 2 yr flood, however, the Lake Fork plotted in the "single-thread channel" region, the North Fork Gunnison plotted in the " multiplethread" region, and the Uncompahgre River plotted on the threshold. All three rivers plotted in the multiple-thread region for floods of 5 yr recurrence or greater. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  14. Historical channel-planform change of the Little Colorado River near Winslow, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Block, Debra

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates channel-planform adjustment on an alluvial reach of the Little Colorado River and documents the geomorphic evolution of the channel through an analysis of aerial photographs and orthophotographs for the period 1936–2010. The Little Colorado River has adjusted to the effects of an extreme flood in 1923 and a subsequent decline in peak discharge and mean annual flow by channel narrowing: the channel width and area of the river have decreased by approximately 90 percent over the study period. Although deposition historically exceeds erosion, lateral migration exacerbates localized erosion, particularly near hydraulic controls. Despite repeated cutoff and avulsion, the Little Colorado River has steadily increased in length and sinuosity over a period of 74 years. Changes in temperature and precipitation are likely affecting the discharge of the Little Colorado River near and downstream of Winslow, Ariz. Nonparametric methods of trend detection determine whether the probability distribution of temperature, precipitation, and peak streamflow has changed over time. Time-series plots of temperature and precipitation show statistically significant trends at the 99-percent-confidence level when evaluated with a Mann-Kendall test. An increasing trend was indicated in mean daily minimum air temperature (Tmin), whereas decreasing trends were indicated in both annual precipitation (Pann) and monsoon-seasonal precipitation (Pjas), as well as in peak discharge.

  15. Contemporary pattern adjustments of Putna River's channel (South - Eastern Carpathians) reflected by cartographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, I.; Rǎdoane, M.; Møndrescu, M.

    2012-04-01

    Putna is an approximately 160 km long Romanian river draining the south-eastern part of Carpathian Mountains. The extensive deforestations recorded before the 1950 in the upper part of its catchment have undoubtedly affected river channel planform typology due to the high rates of slope erosion and associated sediment input. After this period, an ample process of reforestation was initiated that limited soil erosion to a great extent. This determined further river channel adjustments as an effect of the boost in the energy of the stream discharge. However in scientific literature there are just a few established evidence and observations on these transformations. In order to determine the trend of channel adjustments we analysed three sets of topographical maps edited by the Romanian Army's Geographical Service in 1891-1901, 1961-1962 and 1981 (in scale 1:20 000 or 1:25 000), as well as some satellite and aerial images (Landsat, Corona, orthophotos). These cartographic materials were basis for creating a digital database, with the typology and position of the river channel during each historical stage for almost the entire valley length. Automatic measurements on channel sinuosity and braiding indices (based on the method used by Friend and Sinha, 1993) were performed for 121 one-kilometer sections. Along river channel, the coefficient of sinuosity showed a gradual decrease of the maximum values (3.7 at the end of 19th century, 3.4 in 1960, 3.2 in 1980 and 2.9 in 2003), but in terms of frequency, the trend is reversed, with more and more sections showing an increased index. A simple analysis of the sinuosity index variation, defined in classical manner, however, proved ineffective for relation to influencing factors (there may be similar values for different width values of the river floodplain). Hence we reevaluated the formulation of an index to show the percentage deviation of a riverbed from a straight course, the differences between valley sinuosity and river

  16. Perennial-streamflow characteristics related to channel geometry and sediment in Missouri River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Hedman, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    Geometry, channel-sediment, and discharge data were collected and compiled from 252 streamflow-gaging stations in the Missouri River basin. The sites represent the complete ranges of hydrologic and geologic conditions found in the basin. The data were analyzed by computer to yield equations relating various discharge characteristics to variables of channel geometry and bed and bank material. The equations provide discharge as the dependent variable for the purpose of making estimates of discharge characteristics at ungaged sites. Results show that channel width is best related to variables of discharge, but that reduction of standard errors can be achieved by considering channel-sediment properties, channel gradient, and discharge variability. The channel-material variables do not exert uniform effects on width-discharge relations and, therefore, are considered as sediment-data groups, or stream types, rather than as terms in multiple power-function equations. Relative to streamflow, narrowest channels occur when streams of steady discharge transport sufficient silt and clay to form stable, cohesive banks but have a small tractive load of sand and coarser sizes. Stable channels also are associated with high channel gradients, which cause high channel roughness and bed and bank armouring by coarse particle sizes. The widest, most unstable channels are found with streams that apparently transport of large tractive load of sand sizes. The downstream rates of change of width with discharge reflect these trends, suggesting that a given bed-material load necessitates a minimum width over which the tractive material can be moved. (USGS)

  17. Sediment Transport and Channel Morphology of the Kosi River, North Bihar Plain (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaurav, Kumar; Chauvet, Hugo; Metivier, Francois; Devauchelle, Olivier; Sinha, Rajiv

    2013-04-01

    The Kosi River of the northern Bihar plain, India and Nepal, is well-known for the frequent lateral shift of its course. In the last two centuries, it migrated more than 150 km westward (Gole and Chitale, 1966; Wells and Dorr, 1987; Sinha.R, 2008). This westward shift produced a megafan of an area about 16,000 Km2. Today the river shows a braided networks of streams of various magnitude. The large dimension of the Kosi river, its sandy bed, and its avulsive nature makes it an ideal field site to understand sediment transport in large braided rivers. We report measurements of discharge, velocity, width and depth across channels of the Kosi river within its embankment. ADCP measurements were performed during the high flow period in late July to early August 2012. First-hand analysis of the ADCP data shows order-of-magnitude variations of channel aspect ratio, discharge and velocity. We use these measurements to evaluate wether individual threads are close to the threshold for the sediment movement, and to evaluate the relationship between channel shape and discharge. This represents a first step towards the establishment of sediment budgets in a large sandy braided river.

  18. A landscape perspective on bat foraging ecology along rivers: does channel confinement and insect availability influence the response of bats to aquatic resources in riverine landscapes?

    PubMed

    Hagen, Elizabeth M; Sabo, John L

    2011-07-01

    River and riparian areas provide an important foraging habitat for insectivorous bats owing to high insect availability along waterways. However, structural characteristics of the riverine landscape may also influence the location of foraging bats. We used bat detectors to compare bat activity longitudinally along river reaches with contrasting channel confinement, ratio of valley floor width to active channel width, and riparian vegetation, and laterally with distance from the river along three different reach types. We measured rates of insect emergence from the river and aerial insect availability above the river and laterally up to 50-m into the riparian habitat in order to assess the relationship between food resources and insectivorous bat activity. Longitudinally, bat activity was concentrated along confined reaches in comparison to unconfined reaches but was not related to insect availability. Laterally, bats tracked exponential declines in aquatic insects with distance from the river. These data suggest that along the lateral dimension bats track food resources, but that along the longitudinal dimension channel shape and landscape structure determine bat distributions more than food resources.

  19. Potential effects of deepening the St. Johns River navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system, Jacksonville, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellino, Jason C.; Spechler, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed dredging a 13-mile reach of the St. Johns River navigation channel in Jacksonville, Florida, deepening it to depths between 50 and 54 feet below North American Vertical Datum of 1988. The dredging operation will remove about 10 feet of sediments from the surficial aquifer system, including limestone in some locations. The limestone unit, which is in the lowermost part of the surficial aquifer system, supplies water to domestic wells in the Jacksonville area. Because of density-driven hydrodynamics of the St. Johns River, saline water from the Atlantic Ocean travels upstream as a saltwater “wedge” along the bottom of the channel, where the limestone is most likely to be exposed by the proposed dredging. A study was conducted to determine the potential effects of navigation channel deepening in the St. Johns River on salinity in the adjacent surficial aquifer system. Simulations were performed with each of four cross-sectional, variable-density groundwater-flow models, developed using SEAWAT, to simulate hypothetical changes in salinity in the surficial aquifer system as a result of dredging. The cross-sectional models were designed to incorporate a range of hydrogeologic conceptualizations to estimate the effect of uncertainty in hydrogeologic properties. The cross-sectional models developed in this study do not necessarily simulate actual projected conditions; instead, the models were used to examine the potential effects of deepening the navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system under a range of plausible hypothetical conditions. Simulated results for modeled conditions indicate that dredging will have little to no effect on salinity variations in areas upstream of currently proposed dredging activities. Results also indicate little to no effect in any part of the surficial aquifer system along the cross section near River Mile 11 or in the water-table unit along the cross

  20. Channel infiltration from floodflows along the Pawnee River and its tributaries, west-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, James B.; Perry, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Most of the streams is west-central Kansas are ephemeral. Natural recharge to the alluvial aquifers underlying these streams occurs during periods of storm runoff in the ephemeral channels. Proposed flood-retarding structures within the basin will alter the downstream runoff characteristics in these channels by reducing the peak flow and increasing the flow duration. Information concerning channel-infiltration rate, unsaturated and saturated flow, and lithology of the unsaturated zone as related to stream stage and duration was collected along the Pawnee River and its tributaries to determine the effects of the flood-retarding structures. The infiltration rate on ephemeral streams was determined at five sites within the Pawnee River Basin. Tests were conducted in channel infiltrometers constructed by isolating a section of channel with two plastic-lined wooden cofferdams. At two of the sites, perched groundwater mounds intersected the bottom of the channel and reduced the infiltration rate. At two other sites where the perched groundwater mounds did not reach the bottom of the channel, the infiltration rate was directly proportional to the stage. Comparison of infiltration from simulated controlled and uncontrolled floodflows at the five sites indicated an average increase of about 2% with the controlled floodflow. Cumulative infiltration for these simulations ranged from 0.5 to 14.8 acre-ft/mi of channel. (USGS)

  1. Braiding of submarine channels controlled by aspect ratio similar to rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Brady Z.; Lai, Steven Y. J.; Komatsu, Yuhei; Paola, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The great majority of submarine channels formed by turbidity and density currents are meandering in planform; they consist of a single, sinuous channel that transports a turbid, dense flow of sediment from submarine canyons to ocean floor environments. Braided turbidite systems consisting of multiple, interconnected channel threads are conspicuously rare. Furthermore, such systems may not represent the spontaneous planform instability of true braiding, but instead result from erosive processes or bathymetric variability. In marked contrast to submarine environments, both meandering and braided planforms are common in fluvial systems. Here we present experiments of subaqueous channel formation conducted at two laboratory facilities. We find that density currents readily produce a braided planform for flow aspect ratios of depth to width that are similar to those that produce river braiding. Moreover, we find that stability model theory for river planform morphology successfully describes submarine channels in both experiments and the field. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the rarity of braided submarine channels is explained by the generally greater flow depths in submarine systems, which necessitate commensurately greater widths to achieve the required aspect ratio, along with feedbacks among flow thickness, suspended sediment concentration and channel relief that induce greater levee deposition rates and limit channel widening.

  2. Impact of river-tide dynamics on the residual water level slope and residual sediment transport in the Pearl River channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huayang; Zhang, Zihao; Yang, Qingshu; Ou, Suying

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale delta systems, such as the Rhine-Meuse delta, the Mississippi River delta, the Mekong delta, the Yangtze delta and the Pearl River delta etc., usually feature a typical channel networks, where individual channels are interrelated through a networks system, resulting in both longitudinal and transverse variations of residual water level slope (averaged over a lunar day) caused by the river-tide interplay. Enhancing our insight of river-tide dynamics in these channel networks has vital importance for the protection and management of estuarine environment since river-tide interplay is closely related to sediment transport, water quality, water utilization and estuarine ecosystem. In this study, we investigate the impact of river-tide dynamics on the temporal-spatial changes of flow and suspended sediment load in terms of residual water level slope and residual sediment transport in the Pearl River channel networks, which is one of the complex channel networks in the world. Making use of a nonstationary harmonic analysis (NS_TIDE), the continuous time series observations of velocity covering a spring-neap cycle in 1999 (representing flood season) and 2001 (representing dry season) collected from around 60 stations in the Pearl River channel networks have been used to extract the temporal-spatial changes in residual velocity and tidal properties (including amplitudes and phases) as a function of variable river flow debouching into the delta. On the basis of harmonic analysis, the tidally averaged friction is decomposed into contributions made by riverine forcing alone, river-tide interaction and tidal asymmetry using Chebyshev polynomials approach. It is shown that river flow enhances friction via river-tide interaction, which increases the residual water level slope that influences the distribution of suspended sediment load in the Pearl River channel networks.

  3. Hydraulic interactions between a meandering river channel and its floodplain during an overbank flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L.; Dunne, T.; Fisher, B.

    2012-12-01

    River channel and floodplain complexity is generated by the lateral migration of meandering river channels across the floodplain surface. The main driver of meander migration is the flow field which erodes the outer bank of river bends, scours pools, creates topographic variability on the floodplain and interacts with riparian vegetation. Flows between channels and floodplains are generally thought to be highly three-dimensional due to the presence of secondary circulation cells and helical flow patterns observed in laboratory experiments, yet few field datasets exist to test or validate existing conceptual models. Flow over and through floodplain vegetation has also been difficult to characterize at the field scale. We took advantage of a remarkably long and stable 5-year flood discharge to measure flow fields across the floodplain and in curved reaches of the gravel-bed Merced River In California to document the hydraulic interactions between the channel and floodplain. We then developed, calibrated and validated a quasi-3D hydrodynamic model of the flows in order to expand the interpretation of the results. Due to the spatial variability in both topography and flow resistance, the modeling required detailed mapping of the channel-floodplain surface and vegetation with a terrestrial LiDAR scanner and RTK GPS units. The results highlight several general aspects of the channel-floodplain flow during an overbank flow event: (1) the flow field in the channel was largely two-dimensional with only weak helical flow patterns; (2) the highest channel velocities and boundary shear stresses occurred at the local maxima in bend curvature where lateral migration has been documented via repeat topographic surveys; (3) flow velocities rapidly decelerated as water was decanted from the channel onto the floodplain where the velocity magnitude was roughly 20-30% of the average channel velocity; (4) dense vegetation along the channel margins enhanced channel velocities but reduced

  4. Channel-changing processes on the Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, 1936-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, John T.C.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Lateral channel change on the mainly ephemeral Santa Cruz River, Pima County, Arizona, causes damage and has spawned costly efforts to control bank erosion. Aerial photographs, historical data, and field observations are used to document the history of channel change since 1936. Variability in the nature and degree of channel change over time and space is shown. Three major channel change processes are: (1) migration by bank erosion during meander migration or initiation; (2) avulsion by overbank flooding and flood plain incision; (3) widening by erosion of low, cohesionless banks during floods and arroyo widening by undercutting and mass wasting of deeply incised vertical walls. The first process generally is a product of low to moderate flows or waning high flows; the others result mainly from higher flows, though sensitive arroyo walls may erode during relatively low flows. Channel morphology, bank resistance, and hydrology are factors determining the dominant channel-changing process on a particular reach of the river. Present river morphology reflects high flows since the 1960's.

  5. A Catchment-Based Hydrologic and Routing Modeling System with explicit river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goteti, Gopi; Famiglietti, James S.; Asante, Kwabena

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we present a macroscale hydrologic modeling system with an explicit representation of storage and movement of water in river channels and floodplains. The overall modeling system, called the Catchment-Based Hydrologic and Routing Modeling System (CHARMS), is composed of a land surface model and a river routing model that operate on a network of hydrologic catchments (or watersheds). The land surface model in CHARMS is based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model. The river routing model in CHARMS generates river discharge by transporting runoff generated by the catchment-based CLM through the river network. The routing model uses information on channel cross-section geometry, derived from the 90 m Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model, to simulate river discharge and the associated flow depth and inundation width. CHARMS was implemented over the Wabash River basin in the central United States (drainage area 72282 km2), and simulated streamflow was validated using daily observations. Simulated flow depth and inundation extent generally followed seasonal variations in observed flooding and droughts. Limitations of some of the assumptions and scaling factors used in this study and the issues that need to be addressed for a continental- or global-scale implementation of CHARMS are discussed. This paper serves as the foundation for a catchment-based, global land surface modeling framework that could incorporate spatiotemporal variations in surface water bodies, as well as satellite measurements of these variations.

  6. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z; Ortiz, Eydith J Comenencia; Moss, Stephen J; Jensen, Anders A; Davies, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na(+) and K(+) relative to Cs(+) are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na(+) and K(+) with the divalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) results in complete elimination of Zn(2+)-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+).

  7. Ion channels activated by light in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The light-activated conductance of Limulus ventral photoreceptors was studied using the patch-clamp technique. Channels (40 pS) were observed whose probability of opening was greatly increased by light. In some cells the latency of channel activation was nearly the same as that of the macroscopic response, while in other cells the channel latency was much greater. Like the macroscopic conductance, channel activity was reduced by light adaptation but enhanced by the intracellular injection of the calcium chelator EGTA. The latter observation indicates that channel activation was not a secondary result of the light-induced rise in intracellular calcium. A two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method was used to measure the voltage dependence of the light-activated macroscopic conductance. It was found that this conductance is constant over a wide voltage range more negative than zero, but it increases markedly at positive voltages. The single channel currents measured over this same voltage range show that the single channel conductance is independent of voltage, but that channel gating properties are dependent on voltage. Both the mean channel open time and the opening rate increase at positive voltages. These properties change in a manner consistent with the voltage dependence of the macroscopic conductance. The broad range of similarities between the macroscopic and single channel currents supports the conclusion that the 40-pS channel that we have observed is the principal channel underlying the response to light in these photoreceptors. PMID:2419481

  8. Interactions of Growth-faulting with Incised Valleys and Channels on the Late Miocene to Recent Mississippi River Delta, LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, C. P.; Mohrig, D.; Steel, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The interaction between incised valleys and growth-fault related subsidence is poorly understood in the Late Miocene to Recent Mississippi River Delta. Previous work has found little evidence that growth-faults are able to affect the course or geometry of small (< 200m in width and 20m in depth) channels. However, the relationship between growth-faults and larger scale valleys (> 1km in width and 25m in depth) has not been previously evaluated in this area. We use a 1400 km2 3D seismic volume located under Breton Sound, LA, integrated with a selection of well logs to document the effect of growth-faults on 12 valleys and 14 channels present within the upper 1.5 kilometers of the seismic volume. In contrast to the majority of smaller distributary channels found within the survey, valleys appear to be steered along or away from growth-faults. This observation suggests that faults are able to affect the course of valleys to a greater extent than small channels. We suggest that this is because valleys are long lived features which do not avulse before being influenced by shorter time scale faulting events. This study contributes to our understanding of the dynamics of growth-faults and valleys in the subsurface and has important long term societal implications for populations living near large rivers in areas with active growth-faulting.

  9. The formation and maintenance of single-thread tie channels entering floodplain lakes: observations from three diverse river systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Joel C; Dietrich, William E; Day, Geoff; Parker, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Tie channels connect rivers to floodplain lakes on many lowland rivers and thereby play a central role in floodplain sedimentology and ecology, yet they are generally unrecognized and little studied. here we report the results of field studies focused on tie channel origin and morphodynamics in three contrasting systems: the Middle Fly River, Papua New Guinea, the Lower Mississippi River, and Birch Creek in Alaska. Across these river systems, tie channels vary by an order of magnitude in size but exhibit the same characteristic morphology and appear to develop and evolve by a similar set of processes. In all three systems, the channels are characterized by a narrow, leveed single-thread morphology with maximum width approximately one tenth the width of the mainstem river. The channels typically have a V shaped cross-section, unlike most fluvial channels. These channels develop as lakes become isolated from the river by sedimentation. Narrowing of the connection between river and lake causes a sediment-laden jet to develop. Levees develop along the margins of the jet leading to channel emergence and eventual levee aggradation to the height of the mainstem levees. Bi-directional flow in these channels is common. Outflows from the lake scour sediment and prevent channel blockage. We propose that channel geometry and size are then controlled by a dynamic balance between channel narrowing by suspended sediment deposition and incision and widening by mass failure of banks during outflows. Tie channels are laterally stable and may convey flow for hundreds to a few thousand of years.

  10. Formation and maintenance of single-thread tie channels entering floodplain lakes: Observations from three diverse river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, J. C.; Dietrich, W. E.; Day, G.; Parker, G.

    2009-06-01

    Tie channels connect rivers to floodplain lakes on many lowland rivers and thereby play a central role in floodplain sedimentology and ecology; yet they are generally unrecognized and little studied. Here we report the results of field studies focused on tie channel origin and morphodynamics in the following three contrasting systems: the Middle Fly River (Papua New Guinea), the Lower Mississippi River, and Birch Creek in Alaska. Across these river systems, tie channels vary by an order of magnitude in size but exhibit the same characteristic morphology and appear to develop and evolve by a similar set of processes. In all three systems, the channels are characterized by a narrow, leveed, single-thread morphology with maximum width approximately one tenth the width of the mainstem river. The channels typically have a V-shaped cross section, unlike most fluvial channels. These channels develop as lakes become isolated from the river by sedimentation. Narrowing of the connection between river and lake causes a sediment-laden jet to develop. Levees develop along the margins of the jet leading to channel emergence and eventual levee aggradation to the height of the mainstem levees. Bidirectional flow in these channels is common. Outflows from the lake scour sediment and prevent channel blockage. We propose that channel geometry and size are then controlled by a dynamic balance between channel narrowing by suspended sediment deposition and incision and widening by mass failure of banks during outflows. Tie channels are laterally stable and may convey flow for hundreds to a few thousand of years.

  11. Physical habitat dynamics in four side-channel chutes, lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Johnson, Harold E.; Laustrup, Mark S.; D'Urso, Gary J.; Reuter, Joanna M.

    2004-01-01

    Construction of the side-channel chutes has become a popular means to rehabilitate habitate of the Lower Missouri River. We studied various aspects of hydrology, hydraulics, and geomorphology of four side-channel chutes to document a range of existing conditions in the Lower Missouri River. The Cranberry Bend side-channel chute has existed for at least 40 years and is an example of a persistent, minimally engineered chute. The Lisbon Bottom side-channel chute is a young chute, created by extreme floods during 1993-1996, and allowed to evolve with minimum engineering of inlet and outlet structures. The Hamburg Bend and North Overton Bottom side-channel chutes were constructed in 1996 and 2000, respectively, as part of the Missouri River Bank Stabilization and navigation Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Project. These side-channel chutes provide increased areas of sandbars and shallow, slow water -- habitats thought to be substantially diminished in the modern Missouri River. Depths and velocities measured in side-channel chutes are also present in the main channel, but the chutes provide more areas of slow, shallow water and they increase the range of discharges over which shallow, slow water is present. The 3.6 km long Lisbon Bottom chute provides as much as 50% of the entire shallow water habitat that exists in the encompassing 15 km reach of the river. At Cranberry Bend and Lisbon Bottom, the side-channel chutes provided 10-40% of the availabile sandbar area in the reach, depending on discharge. Each of the side-channel chutes shows evidence of continuing erosion and deposition. The longevity and the Cranberry Bend chute attests to dynamic stability -- that is, a chute that maintains form and processes while shifting in position. The Hamburg chute similarly shows evidence of lateral movement and construction of flood plain to compensate for erosion. The Lisbon Bottom chute -- the most intensively studied chute -- appears to have achieved an equilibrium width and

  12. Patterns of fish assemblage structure and habitat use among main- and side-channel environments in the lower Kootenai River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, Carson J.; Stevens, Bryan S.; Quist, Michael; Shepard, Bradley B.; Ireland, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    The lower Kootenai River, Idaho, was sampled during the summers of 2012 and 2013 to evaluate its fish assemblage structure at seven sites within main- and side-channel habitats where large-scale habitat rehabilitation was undertaken. Understanding the current patterns of fish assemblage structure and their relationships with habitat is important for evaluating the effects of past and future rehabilitation projects on the river. Species-specific habitat associations were modeled, and the variables that best explained the occurrence and relative abundance of fish were identified in order to guide future habitat rehabilitation so that it benefits native species. The results indicated that the side-channel habitats supported higher species richness than the main-channel habitats and that nonnative fishes were closely associated with newly rehabilitated habitats. This research provides valuable insight on the current fish assemblages in the Kootenai River and the assemblage-level responses that may occur as a result of future rehabilitation activities.

  13. 77 FR 39630 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History... Federal Register (77 FR 82). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was requested... Potomac River and National Harbor Access Channel during the event, the effect of this regulation will...

  14. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE. PMID:27255892

  15. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-06-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE.

  16. Salt Plug Formation Caused by Decreased River Discharge in a Multi-channel Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Shaha, Dinesh Chandra; Cho, Yang-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater input to estuaries may be greatly altered by the river barrages required to meet human needs for drinking water and irrigation and prevent salt water intrusion. Prior studies have examined the salt plugs associated with evaporation and salt outwelling from tidal salt flats in single-channel estuaries. In this work, we discovered a new type of salt plug formation in the multi-channel Pasur River Estuary (PRE) caused by decreasing river discharges resulting from an upstream barrage. The formation of a salt plug in response to changes in river discharge was investigated using a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) recorder during spring and neap tides in the dry and wet seasons in 2014. An exportation of saline water from the Shibsa River Estuary (SRE) to the PRE through the Chunkhuri Channel occurred during the dry season, and a salt plug was created and persisted from December to June near Chalna in the PRE. A discharge-induced, relatively high water level in the PRE during the wet season exerted hydrostatic pressure towards the SRE from the PRE and thereby prevented the intrusion of salt water from the SRE to the PRE. PMID:27255892

  17. Elevated Channel Concavities Arising from Sediment-Flux Effects in Natural Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, D. E. J.; Sinclair, H. D.; Gasparini, N. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Cowie, P. A.; Adams, J. M.; Hutton, E. W. H.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Nudurupati, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The concavity of an incising river system - a measure of the rate of change of its bed slope with increasing discharge downstream - is a commonly used metric in fluvial geomorphology. It is commonly used in assessing variation of factors such as uplift, climate, and rock type along a system in a qualitative way, and underpins a number of quantitative analyses in tectonic geomorphology, such as the normalized channel steepness index. However, the factors that fundamentally control channel concavities in rocky streams remain relatively poorly understood, especially in rivers that are undergoing transient response to a perturbation in their boundary conditions.Here we use a combination of field data and numerical modeling to demonstrate that elevated channel concavities are a common and shared response to the propagation of a convex-upward "knickzone" through a bedrock channel long profile. Simulations using the novel modeling framework Landlab exploring thresholded incision and saltation-abrasion theory indicate that the presence of the knickzone can perturb the relative sediment flux in the area immediately downstream of the convexity, allowing enhanced erosion there and systematic elevation of channel concavities in reaches downstream of this point. The reality of this effect is demonstrated using field and remotely sensed data from three sites - the Red River area, Yunnan, China; channels on the Ladakh batholith, Indian Himalaya; and the Fagaras Alps, Romania. All contain broad scale migrating knickzones, but the causes of the disturbances that produced them and scales of the systems differ. Nonetheless, the concavities of all the channels are all elevated in the same way downstream of knickzones, consistent with the modeling output. These results demonstrate the ubiquity of sediment flux effects on erosion rates in many natural channels, and have consequences for the way we read tectonic histories from landscapes.

  18. Channel-morphology data for the Tongue River and selected tributaries, southeastern Montana, 2001-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, Katherine J.

    2004-01-01

    Coal-bed methane exploration and production have begun within the Tongue River watershed in southeastern Montana. The development of coal-bed methane requires production of large volumes of ground water, some of which may be discharged to streams, potentially increasing stream discharge and sediment load. Changes in stream discharge or sediment load may result in changes to channel morphology through changes in erosion and vegetation. These changes might be subtle and difficult to detect without baseline data that indicate stream-channel conditions before extensive coal-bed methane development began. In order to provide this baseline channel-morphology data, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, collected channel-morphology data in 2001-02 to document baseline conditions for several reaches along the Tongue River and selected tributaries. This report presents channel-morphology data for five sites on the mainstem Tongue River and four sites on its tributaries. Bankfull, water-surface, and thalweg elevations, channel sections, and streambed-particle sizes were measured along reaches near streamflow-gaging stations. At each site, the channel was classified using methods described by Rosgen. For six sites, bankfull discharge was determined from the stage- discharge relation at the gage for the stage corresponding to the bankfull elevation. For three sites, the step-backwater computer model HEC-RAS was used to estimate bankfull discharge. Recurrence intervals for the bankfull discharge also were estimated for eight of the nine sites. Channel-morphology data for each site are presented in maps, tables, graphs, and photographs.

  19. Bedform signatures of channel erosion: examples from the Delaware and Hudson River estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerfield, C.; Klingbeil, A.; Walsh, D.

    2003-04-01

    Bedforms are the most ubiquitous and accessible indicators of sediment-transport conditions in river-estuaries and shed light on processes and patterns of deposition and erosion over large spatial scales. Results of recent observational studies in the Delaware and Hudson River estuaries (Mid-Atlantic Region U.S.A.) permit a provisional systemization of bedform morphologies associated with cohesive strata erosion in tidal channels. An understanding of mechanisms and scales of erosion is necessary to predict the long-term fate of pollutants buried within urbanized sections of these estuaries. Side-scan sonographs, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, and extensive sedimentological data collectively reveal at least two common signatures of channel erosion: (1) depositional bedforms, including flow-perpendicular, sand and gravel ribbons, and flow-parallel, sediment trails and furrows; and (2) sculpted forms, including cohesive sediment ripples and waves, scour depressions, and terraces. Although the ribbons and trails are created through bedload deposition, because these forms are observed only where the channels are deepening on the long term (as per historical bathymetric data), they are in fact manifestations of net erosion. Both depositional and sculpted bedforms exhibit marked cross-channel variations in distribution, presumably due to flood-ebb current asymmetry and transverse gradients in sediment transport. Additionally, sediment supply influences the along-channel continuity of depositional forms, which ranges from patchy (sediment limited) to continuous (sediment rich). Coring observations of sands and shell fragments in the vicinity of the sculpted forms suggest that abrasion is an agent of bed reworking. Indeed, these findings confirm that corrasion is an important mechanism of erosion in muddy estuarine channels, though this elusive process is generally not considered in models of channel morphodynamics. Bedforms are useful for recognizing channel

  20. Environmental Flows Can Reduce the Encroachment of Terrestrial Vegetation into River Channels: A Systematic Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kimberly A.; Webb, J. Angus; de Little, Siobhan C.; Stewardson, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Encroachment of riparian vegetation into regulated river channels exerts control over fluvial processes, channel morphology, and aquatic ecology. Reducing encroachment of terrestrial vegetation is an oft-cited objective of environmental flow recommendations, but there has been no systematic assessment of the evidence for and against the widely-accepted cause-and-effect mechanisms involved. We systematically reviewed the literature to test whether environmental flows can reduce the encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into river channels. We quantified the level of support for five explicit cause-effect hypotheses drawn from a conceptual model of the effects of flow on vegetation. We found that greater inundation, variously expressed as changes in the area, depth, duration, frequency, seasonality, and volume of surface water, generally reduces riparian vegetation abundance in channels, but most studies did not investigate the specific mechanisms causing these changes. Those that did show that increased inundation results in increased mortality, but also increased germination. The evidence was insufficient to determine whether increased inundation decreases reproduction. Our results contribute to hydro-ecological understanding by using the published literature to test for general cause-effect relationships between flow regime and terrestrial vegetation encroachment. Reviews of this nature provide robust support for flow management, and are more defensible than expert judgement-based approaches. Overall, we predict that restoration of more natural flow regimes will reduce encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into regulated river channels, partly through increased mortality. Conversely, infrequent deliveries of environmental flows may actually increase germination and subsequent encroachment.

  1. Channel evolution and hydrologic variations in the Colorado River basin: Factors influencing sediment and salt loads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, A.; Hereford, R.; Schumm, S.A.; Hayes, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Suspended-sediment and dissolved-solid (salt) loads decreased after the early 1940s in the Colorado Plateau portion of the Colorado River basin, although discharge of major rivers - the Colorado, Green and San Juan - did not change significantly. This decline followed a period of high sediment yield caused by arroyo cutting. Reduced sediment loads have previously been explained by a change in sediment sampling procedures or changes in climate, land-use and conservation practices. More recent work has revealed that both decreased sediment production and sediment storage in channels of tributary basins produced the decline of sediment and salt loads. Sediment production and sediment storage are important components of incised-channel evolution, which involves sequential channel deepening, widening and finally floodplain formation. Accordingly, the widespread arroyo incision of the late nineteenth century resulted initially in high sediment loads. Since then, loads have decreased as incised channels (arroyos) have stabilized and begun to aggrade. However, during the 1940s, a period of low peak discharges permitted vegetational colonization of the valley floors, which further reduced sediment loads and promoted channel stabilization. This explanation is supported by experimental studies and field observations. Both geomorphic and hydrologic factors contributed to sediment storage and decreased sediment and salt loads in the upper Colorado River basin. ?? 1991.

  2. Braided submarine channels produced with experiments suggest scale independent controls on planform morphology similar to rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, B.; Lai, S. Y. J.; Komatsu, Y.; Paola, C.

    2015-12-01

    There are two dominant planform morphologies in channelized aggradational sedimentary systems; meandering and braided. Within marine settings meandering channels formed from turbidity and density currents are the most abundant. Braided channels are rare, and it is unclear if the few documented cases are generated by spontaneous bar deposition or are an artifact of erosive events or seafloor bathymetry. This is in contrast to fluvial systems wherein both meandering and braided planforms are common, and led us to the question if submarine channels require different conditions from river systems to obtain braided planform morphologies. We ran two experimental series wherein we provided density currents with an initial channel geometry known to produce braiding in natural and experimental river systems. Fluvial braiding occurs across a wide range of scales, and we predicted the same would hold true for subaqueous systems. The two experiments had initial width to depth ratios of 1000:1 and 350:1 and similar sediment to saline water discharge ratios of 0.02 and 0.03, and a saline current with a density contrast similar to natural currents. The experiments freely evolved a network of individual channels separated by depositional bars. Moreover, existing stability model theory for fluvial systems successfully explains both braided and meandering submarine channels from a compilation of lab and field examples. This suggests the aspect ratio of the flow determines the planform morphology, and that it is a scale independent phenomenon. The rarity of braided submarine channels in nature is more likely explained by factors that inhibit channel widening in submarine systems as compared to fluvial systems. We suggest the cause is a combination of the relatively thicker flow depths of turbidity currents that require commensurately wider flows, and a variety of feedbacks that tend to yield higher overbank sedimentation rates in submarine channels compared to fluvial systems.

  3. Channel form and processes in bedrock and alluvial reaches of the Raritan River, New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Gail M.; Renwick, William H.; Haag, Gary H.

    1988-05-01

    Fluvial geomorphologists have generally considered alluvial and bedrock channels to be fundamentally different in character, alluvial channels being shaped by sediment-transport processes and bedrock channels being shaped by structural and lithologic controls. This study examines a 12-km bedrock-floored reach of the Raritan River that separates two gravel-bed reaches, above and below. The bedrock channel has a patchy veneer of sandy gravel that covers the bed in areas of low slope but elsewhere consists of lateral bars and discrete, two-dimensional gravel bed forms perched on bedrock. Mean B-axes of the 25 largest clasts on the crests of these bed forms range from 10.4 to 13.8 cm. Shear stresses estimated from measured velocity profiles and depth-slope calculations indicate that most clasts on the bed forms are entrained by the bankfull discharge (290 m/s) which is equaled or exceeded about 1%of the time. The thalweg of the 80-m-wide channel is incised about 0.5 to 0.7 m, and it meanders with a wavelength of about 750 m, or approximately 10 times channel width. This thalweg meander wavelength is consistent with reference to drainage area when compared to channel meander wavelengths in other locations within the basin and is similar to that in other rivers of comparable dimensions and discharge. The bedrock-alluvial reach is similar to alluvial channels with reference to meander geometry and sediment distribution. It occupies an intermediate position on a continuum of channels-of varying sediment supply in relation to transport capacity, ranging from alluvial channels to those completely formed in bedrock.

  4. Sedge (Carex nudata) as a mediator of river channel change in response to grazing reduction and a large flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.

    2011-12-01

    Human land use can change vegetation - hydrogeomorphic interactions in ways that exert a major influence on channel form. The native riparian sedge Carex nudata (torrent sedge) was suppressed by cattle grazing in the Middle Fork John Day River in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon, and following the end of grazing in 2000 C. nudata and other sedge populations exploded. Today C. nudata forms highly resistant tussocks on the active channel bed. The tussocks cause both stabilization (of bars and channel bed) and erosion (around the tussocks as resistance elements). C. nudata has stabilized active bars, pool tails and riffle crests. The tussocks behave as boulder-sized resistance elements and create scour holes and appear to increase bank erosion. From a habitat perspective, C. nudata has increased fish cover, as well as the complexity of bed morphology and hydraulic diversity. The flood of record in May 2011 produced only limited erosion of C. nudata tussocks. Comparison of pre and post-flood channel cross-sections shows both the stabilizing and erosive effects of C. nudata. These changes suggest that C. nudata is setting a new trajectory of channel adjustment toward narrower, rougher, more stable, and reduced sediment transport conditions.

  5. Dynamics of nonmigrating mid-channel bar and superimposed dunes in a sandy-gravelly river (Loire River, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintenberger, Coraline L.; Rodrigues, Stéphane; Claude, Nicolas; Jugé, Philippe; Bréhéret, Jean-Gabriel; Villar, Marc

    2015-11-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the dynamics during floods of a nonmigrating, mid-channel bar of the Loire River (France) forced by a riffle and renewed by fluvial management works. Interactions between the bar and superimposed dunes developed from an initial flat bed were analyzed during floods using frequent mono- and multibeam echosoundings, Acoustic Doppler Profiler measurements, and sediment grain-size analysis. When water left the bar, terrestrial laser scanning and sediment sampling documented the effect of post-flood sediment reworking. During floods a significant bar front elongation, spreading (on margins), and swelling was shown, whereas a stable area (no significant changes) was present close to the riffle. During low flows and falling limbs of floods, intense sediment reworking on the top of the bar and lateral scouring occurred. Hydrological variations controlled the sediment supply (in terms of phasing, quantity, and grain size) delivered by surrounding channels during floods and thus superimposed dune development. Their development was also linked to the sediment availability (armor layers, riffle proximity). Their relatively constant height highlights a preferential adaptation on dune length during floods. The role of each morphological forcing parameters (riffle vs. channel widening and curvature) on the bar dynamics and evolution is stage dependent; the shape, dynamics, and long-term morphological evolution of the bar and of the river reach (surrounding islands, channel translation) mainly depends on the presence of the natural riffle.

  6. The sediment-starved Yellow River Delta as remotely controlled by human activities in the river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Bi, N.

    2015-12-01

    Human presented significant disturbances on the natural processes of land-ocean interactions in context of global change. Here we illustrate how the signals of human activities in the river basin have been transferred to the coastal ocean along the hydrological pathway and remotely controlled the Yellow River Delta. Dam-orientated water and sediment regulation scheme (WSRS) has resulted in effective erosion of the lower channel and mitigation of siltation within the reservoirs. However, significant impacts have been identified on the delta morphology and coastal ecosystem ten years after the WSRS, which was unexpected at the beginning of engineering efforts. The coarser sediment derived from the channel erosion during the first phase of WSRS was directly contributed to the rapid accretion of present river mouth, whereas the delta was starved and declined due to insufficient sediment supply and regime shift of sediment transport. The fine-grained sediment exported from the Xiaolangdi Reservoir during the second phase of WSRS seemed to be a critical carrier for the nutrients and pollutants. The human-altered hydrological cycle, enhanced delivery of nutrient and pollutants and the changing estuarine environment present unpredictable impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem in the delta region. These confirm that humans are modifying the river-coast system in ways that go well beyond climate change, and an integrated management of the river-coast continuum is crucially important for the sustainability of the river-delta system.

  7. Suspended sediment dynamics in a tidal channel network under peak river flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achete, Fernanda Minikowski; van der Wegen, Mick; Roelvink, Dano; Jaffe, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Peak river flows transport fine sediment, nutrients, and contaminants that may deposit in the estuary. This study explores the importance of peak river flows on sediment dynamics with special emphasis on channel network configurations. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, which is connected to San Francisco Bay (California, USA), motivates this study and is used as a validation case. Besides data analysis of observations, we applied a calibrated process-based model (D-Flow FM) to explore and analyze high-resolution (˜100 m, ˜1 h) dynamics. Peak river flows supply the vast majority of sediment into the system. Data analysis of six peak flows (between 2012 and 2014) shows that on average, 40 % of the input sediment in the system is trapped and that trapping efficiency depends on timing and magnitude of river flows. The model has 90 % accuracy reproducing these trapping efficiencies. Modeled deposition patterns develop as the result of peak river flows after which, during low river flow conditions, tidal currents are not able to significantly redistribute deposited sediment. Deposition is quite local and mainly takes place at a deep junction. Tidal movement is important for sediment resuspension, but river induced, tide residual currents are responsible for redistributing the sediment towards the river banks and to the bay. We applied the same forcing for four different channel configurations ranging from a full delta network to a schematization of the main river. A higher degree of network schematization leads to higher peak-sediment export downstream to the bay. However, the area of sedimentation is similar for all the configurations because it is mostly driven by geometry and bathymetry.

  8. Channel degradation and restoration of an Alpine river and related morphological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Daniela; Marchese, Enrico; Theule, Joshua I.; Comiti, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    River degradation and thus necessity for restoration are major issues worldwide. However, adequate methodologies to assess morphological variations linked to these actions and the morphological success of restoration interventions are still to be determined. The Ahr River (South Tyrol, Italian Alps) was characterized until the mid-twentieth century by an anabranching and meandering pattern, but starting from the 1960s it underwent intense channel degradation in terms of narrowing, incision, and floodplain disconnection. In the period 2003-2011, several reaches of the Ahr River were restored by widening and raising the channel bed. The planimetric changes that occurred historically in the Ahr River were determined by the interpretation of 10 maps and aerial photos covering the period 1820-2011. The estimation of the incision that occurred during the degradation phase was assessed by the difference in elevation between gravel surfaces, whereas the changes introduced by restoration interventions in two reaches were evaluated through the comparison of topographic cross sections surveyed in year 2000 and a high-resolution bathymetric LiDAR survey flown in late 2012. The MQI (Morphological Quality Index) was applied to different reaches in order to test how assessment methodologies respond to degradation and restoration actions. The combined analysis of planform and vertical changes indicates that gravel mining has been the largest pressure for the river, but a change in sediment/flow regimes probably led to the channel adjustments that occurred during the early twentieth century. The restoration measures have locally increased channel width, elevation, and morphometrical diversity compared to the unrestored reaches, as well as the morphological quality assessed by MQI. However, the extent of the modifications brought about by restoration works differs between the two restored reaches, pointing out the need for a quantitative analysis of the historical evolution of each

  9. Influence of vegetation cover on bars morpho-dynamics in sinuous gravel-bed channels of the Northern Marche rivers (central Italy): cues for research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, Valentina

    2010-05-01

    Sinuous gravel-bed channels are well represented in the Northern Marche river basins (central Italy), both in main streams and along several tributaries. In both cases, lozenge bars divide flow into a main branch (always active) and secondary channels (characterized by episodic reactivations). In the study area, this fluvial pattern characterized several river reaches during the last three decades and seems to be evolved from wandering configurations. Researches in progress are mainly investigating the role played by catchment controls (i.e. land use and climate changes, gravel removal, human alterations of longitudinal profiles) on major channel transformations (i.e. with regard to bankfull width, channel downcutting, pattern changes) applying a geomorphological methodology but, detailed studies carried out in order to define sinuous gravel-bed channel at the reach scale, suggest the need of an eco-morphological approach. These considerations result particularly appropriate for the Foglia River Basin where, in some cases, vegetation covers up to the 70% of the channel surface and shows a high stability during several bankfull discharge occurrences. Field surveys and monitoring also seem to demonstrate an impulsive evolution of meso-morphologies and different time-space behaviours of vegetate bars compared to the non-vegetate ones. The aim of this contribution is to provide some preliminary considerations about influence of vegetation cover on bars morpho-dynamics of some sinuous gravel-bed channels and promote specific eco-morphologic researches.

  10. Dynamic Channel Network Extraction from Satellite Imagery of the Jamuna River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addink, E. A.; Marra, W. A.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Evolution of the largest rivers on Earth is poorly understood while their response to global change is dramatic, such as severe drought and flooding problems. Rivers with high annual dynamics, like the Jamuna, allow us to study their response to changing conditions. Most remote-sensing work so far focused only on pixel-based analysis of channels and change detection or manual digitisation of channels, which is far from urgently needed quantifiers of pattern and pattern change. Using a series of Landsat TM images taken at irregular intervals showing inter- and intra-annual variation, we demonstrate that braided rivers can be represented as nearly chain-like directional networks. These can be studied with novel methods gleaned from neurology. These networks provide an integral spatial description of the network and should not be confused with hierarchical hydrological stream network descriptions developed in the ’60s to describe drainage basins. The images were first classified into water, bare sediment and vegetation. The contiguous water body of the river was then selected and translated into a network description with bifurcations and confluences at the nodes, and interconnecting channels. Along the entire river the well-known braiding indices were derived from the network. The channel width is a crucial attribute of the channel network as this allows the calculation of bifurcation asymmetry. The width was also used with channel length as weights to all the elements in the network in the calculation of more advanced measures for the nature and evolution of the channel network. The key step here is to describe river network evolution by identifying the same node in multiple subsequent images as well as new and abandoned nodes, in order to distinguish migration of bifurcations from avulsion processes. Once identified through time, the changes in node position and the changes in the connected channels can be quantified. These changes can potentially be linked to

  11. Investigating historical changes in morphodynamic processes associated with channelization of a large Alpine river: the Etsch/Adige River, NE Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Simone; Scorpio, Vittoria; Mastronunzio, Marco; Proto, Matteo; Zolezzi, Guido; Bertoldi, Walter; Comiti, Francesco; Surian, Nicola; Prà, Elena Dai

    2016-04-01

    River channel management within the last centuries has largely modified fluvial processes and morphodynamic evolution of most large European rivers. Several river systems experienced extensive channelization early in the 19th century, thus strongly challenging our present ability to detect their morphodynamic functioning with contemporary photogrammetry or cartographical sources. This consequently leaves open questions about their potential future response, especially to management strategies that "give more room" to the river, aiming at partially rehabilitating their natural functioning. The Adige River (Etsch in German), the second longest Italian river, is an exemplary case where channelization occurred more than 150 years ago, and is the focus of the present work. This work aims (i) to explore changes in fundamental morphodynamic processes associated with massive channelization of the Adige River and (ii) to quantify the alteration in river bars characteristics, by using morphodynamic models of bars and meandering. To fulfil our aims we combine the analysis of historical data with morphodynamic mathematical modelling. Historical sources (recovered in a number of European archives), such as hydrotopographical maps, airborne photogrammetry and hydrological datasets were collected to investigate channel morphology before and after the channelization. Information extracted from this analysis was combined with morphodynamic linear models of free migrating and forced steady bars, to investigate river bars and bend stability properties under different hydromorphological scenarios. Moreover, a morphodynamic model for meandering channel was applied to investigate the influence of river channel planform on the evolution of the fluvial bars. Results from the application of morphodynamic models allowed to predict the type, position and geometry of bars characterizing the channelized configuration of the river, and to explain the presently observed relative paucity of bars

  12. Tide and river influences on distributary channels of the Mekong River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Nguyen, V. L.; Ta, T. K. O.; Tamura, T.; Kanai, Y.; Nakashima, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Mekong River delta, one of the world's largest deltas, has extended from Phnom Penh in Cambodia (apex) to the coast from the Saigon River mouth to Cape Camau in Vietnam with a triangular-shape area of more than 60,000 km2. The delta has prograded more than 200 km over at least the last 6-7 ka. The river-mouth area of the delta is meso-tidal with the mean tidal range of 2.5 ± 0.1 m and the maximum tidal range is 3.2-3.8 m. The mean wave height is 0.9 m. Its water discharge is 470 km3/y and its sediment discharge is 160 million t/y, or tenth and ninth largest in the world, respectively. The water discharge varies by season because most of the drainage area is under a monsoonal tropical regime. The flow at Phnom Penh, Cambodia, reaches a maximum in October (typically 39,000 m3/s) and a minimum in May (about 1700 m3/s). Tidal water-level changes are observed in Cambodia, more than 200 km upstream from the river mouth. To understand the combined influenced of river and tide on river bottom sediments, we have collected ~210 surface samples from river bottoms of the whole Mekong River delta in Vietnam, covering five distributaries during dry season from January to May 2015. Sediment characteristics show clearly tide- and river-influenced areas, which are closely linked with river morphology.

  13. Channel changes of Powder River between Moorhead and Broadus, Montana, 1939-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinson, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    Bank erosion and changes in channel width, length, and pattern were determined for the Powder River between Moorhead and Broadus, Montana using maps of the bankfull channel made from aerial photographs taken during 1939, 1954, 1967, 1973, and 1978. Contemporaneous daily mean and peak discharge records from Moorhead provide the hydrologic data used to interpret the measurements. Magnitudes and frequency of flows were determined for each interval of time delimited by photographs. Bank erosion is related to the number of days that mean discharge was equal to or greater than bankfull (1.5-year flood). Mean channel width ranged between 264 ft (1973) and 415 ft (1967). The channel was wider after periods of higher annual peak flows. The channel lengthened between 1939 and 1978, although at least 12 meanders cut off between Moorhead and Broadus. Variable rates of lengthening in the reach reflect the degree of bedrock control in the valley and local variations in valley slope. Data from the Powder River verify the concept of thresholds of channel pattern stability that were demonstrated experimentally. (USGS)

  14. Watershed land use influences on river discharge and channel characteristics across northern New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galster, J. C.; Palmer, K.; Birrer, M.; Espinosa, S.; Pope, G. A.; Feng, H.; Wu, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    River characteristics such as sediment size, channel dimensions, and discharges can be strongly controlled by watershed land use. This project investigated three watersheds in northern New Jersey with varying degrees of forested, agriculture, and urban land uses to determine the effects of land use on these rivers. The watersheds are the Flatbrook, the Wallkill, and the Rockaway rivers and are predominantly forested, forested/agricultural, and forested/urban respectively. Eight sites across these fourth and fifth-order watersheds were investigated including: 1) the grain size using the Wolman pebble count method, 2) channel dimensions (slope, width, depth) with a total station, and 3) channel stability using the rapid geomorphic assessment (RGA). Channel width changes from 1930 to present were determined using historic aerial photographs, and river discharge characteristics were compiled using custom software to determine the flashiness (as measured by the Reynolds-Baker Index) and the Baseflow Index. The three adjacent watersheds have minimal variations in potential confounding variables such as watershed slope, climate, and precipitation, allowing for the isolation of the effects of land use changes. While some of the general relationship between how land use changes affect rivers (e.g., urban streams typically have larger grain sizes and flashier discharges), studies such as this one are important in determining how rivers respond locally. Across the studied watersheds, forested land uses are positively associated with rapid geomorphic assessments scores, indicating the influence of upstream land use and the importance of vegetation. Forested land use is also associated with efficient discharges as measured by hydraulic radius, although there were not significant changes in channel width from 1930 to present. The flashiness of all rivers has increased over time while the baseflow index has decreased, which may be a climatic signal as opposed to being influenced

  15. Anchoring submersible ultrasonic receivers in river channels with stable substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Scholten, G.D.; Hubbs, D.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an anchoring system for submersible ultrasonic receivers (SURs) that we placed on the bottom of the riverine reaches of three main-stem reservoirs in the upper Tennessee River. Each anchor consisted of a steel tube (8.9 x 35.6 cm) welded vertically to a round plate of steel (5.1 x 40.6 cm). All seven SURs and their 57-kg anchors were successfully deployed and retrieved three times over 547 d by a dive team employing surface air-breathing equipment and a davit-equipped boat. All of the anchors and their SURs remained stationary over two consecutive winters on the hard-bottom, thalweg sites where they were deployed. The SUR and its anchor at the most downriver site experienced flows that exceeded 2,100 m(3)/s and mean water column velocities of about 0.9 m/s.

  16. Cumulative Activation of Voltage-Dependent KVS-1 Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Patricio; Garst-Orozco, Jonathan; Baban, Beravan; de Santiago-Castillo, Jose Antonio; Covarrubias, Manuel; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we reveal the existence of a novel use-dependent phenomenon in potassium channels, which we refer to as cumulative activation (CA). CA consists of an increase in current amplitude in response to repetitive depolarizing step pulses to the same potential. CA persists for up to 20 s and is similar to a phenomenon called “voltage-dependent facilitation” observed in some calcium channels. The KVS-1 K+ channel, which exhibits CA, is a rapidly activating and inactivating voltage-dependent potassium channel expressed in chemosensory and other neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. It is unusual in being most closely related to the Shab (Kv2) family of potassium channels, which typically behave like delayed rectifier K+ channels in other species. The magnitude of CA depends on the frequency, voltage, and duration of the depolarizing step pulse. CA also radically changes the activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel, suggesting that the channel may undergo a physical modification in a use-dependent manner; thus, a model that closely simulates the behavior of the channel postulates the existence of two populations of channels, unmodified and modified. Use-dependent changes in the behavior of potassium channels, such as CA observed in KVS-1, could be involved in functional mechanisms of cellular plasticity such as synaptic depression that represent the cellular basis of learning and memory. PMID:18199775

  17. Active overbank deposition during the last century, South River, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, Jim; Skalak, Katherine; Pearson, Adam; Benthem, Adam

    2016-03-01

    We quantify rates of overbank deposition over decadal to centennial timescales along the South River in Virginia using four independent methods. Detailed mercury profiles sampled adjacent to the stream channel preserve the peak historic mercury concentration on suspended sediment dating from 1955 to 1961 and suggest sedimentation rates of 8 to 50 cm/100 years. Sediment accumulation over the roots of trees suggest rates of 0 to 100 cm/100 years, with significantly higher values on levees and lower values on floodplains farther from the channel. Profiles of 137Cs and 210Pb from two eroding streambanks are fit with an advection-diffusion model calibrated at an upland reference site; these methods suggest sedimentation rates of 44 to 73 cm/100 years. Mercury inventories from 107 floodplain cores, combined with a previously published reconstruction of the history of mercury concentration on suspended sediment, provide spatially comprehensive estimates of floodplain sedimentation: median sedimentation rates are 3.8 cm/100 years for the < 0.3-year floodplain, 1.37 cm/100 years for the 0.3- to 2-year floodplain, 0.4 cm/100 years for the 2- to 5-year floodplain, and 0.1 cm/100 years for the 5- to 62-year floodplain. While these sedimentation rates are relatively low, the total mass of sediment stored from 1930 to 2007 is 4.9 ± 1.7 (95% confidence interval) × 107 kg, corresponding to an average thickness of 2.5 cm (3.2 cm/100 years). These results demonstrate that floodplains of our 4.5-km-long study reach have stored 8 to 12% of the total suspended sediment supplied to the study reach of the South River. Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) modeling demonstrates that the floodplain of the South River remains hydraulically connected to the channel: 56% of the 100-year floodplain is inundated every two years, and 83% of the floodplain is inundated every five years. These results, combined with previously published data, provide the basis for a

  18. Anastomosing channels and arroyo development on the Nogoa River, Central Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, B. L.; Brizga, S. O.

    1993-05-01

    It is widely accepted that European settlement in Australia has had a major impact on river channels. For many parts of Australia records are available which permit the history of channel changes to be reconstructed over most of the post-settlement period. In this paper the history of changes on part of the Nogoa River in Central Queensland is described from the first European contact until the present. The river channel at this site has changed from an anastomosing pattern to a single large channel (arroyo). There is evidence to suggest that such changes have occurred also in the past but an unusual feature of the present incision phase is that incision is synchronous throughout the region. This may have been triggered by the introduction of cattle which naturally congregate in the moister valley bottoms in this otherwise dry environment. The changes observed here reflect those reported for the semiarid regions of the USA. A linking factor appears to be hydrological behaviour characterised by high levels of variability in the annual flood series, which appears to render such streams more sensitive to disturbance than those with less variable flood behaviour.

  19. From channelization to restoration: Sociohydrologic modeling with changing community preferences in the Kissimmee River Basin, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Dingbao; Tian, Fuqiang; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-02-01

    The Kissimmee River Basin (Florida, USA) underwent river channelization in the 1960s and subsequent restoration in the 1990s, revealing a shift in management emphasis from flood protection to wetland health. In this paper, this shift is hypothesized to result from changing human values and preferences, and a power differential between the more numerous and affluent upstream urban residents (who prioritize wetland restoration) and downstream rural residents (who prioritize flood protection). We develop a conceptual sociohydrologic model to simulate the interactions between community interests and hydrology. The modeling results show that flood intensity decreased after channelization, which reduced concern about flooding. However, channelization also led to a decrease in wetland storage, which caused an increase of wetland concern, especially among the urban residents. Eventually, the community sensitivity switched from favoring flood protection to favoring wetlands, and subsequent management strategies switched from channelization to restoration. Using the model, we project that the wetlands will be recovering for the next 20 years and community sensitivity will slowly go back to a neutral state. However, possible rainfall intensification in the future could return the community sensitivity to favoring flood protection again. The preferential increase of upstream population growth will raise the community's concern about wetlands and the preferential increase of downstream population growth will magnify concern about flooding. This study provides insight into the driving forces behind human-water interactions in the Kissimmee River Basin while simultaneously demonstrating the potential of sociohydrologic modeling to describe complex human-water coupled systems with simple concepts and equations.

  20. Bedrock erosion in the lower Big Wood River channel, southcentral Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Maley, T.S.; Oberlindacher, P. )

    1993-04-01

    The Big Wood River, which is fed from the mountains to the north of the Snake River Plain, cuts through 0.8 m.y. old basalt in an area north and east of Shoshone, Idaho. The basalt channel carved by the Big Wood River exhibits remarkable and unusual bedrock erosional features. Approximately 10,000 years ago, nearby Black Butte shield volcano erupted basaltic lave which rerouted the Big Wood River. At the time the new river channel formed 10,000 years ago, alpine glaciers in the mountains were also beginning to melt. High flows of water from the melting glaciers during the next few thousand years carried large sediment loads and were instrumental in developing the spectacular potholes now found in the channel. Most of the scouring agents are pebbles and cobbles derived from quartzite, granitic, and gneissic rocks. As potholes began to develop, they were closely spaced and generally less than 1 m apart. However, as the potholes enlarged and expanded both horizontally and vertically, they coalesced with one another. The merging process occurred when the walls of two or more adjacent potholes were breached by the outward expansion of each pothole. The deeper of the two potholes captured the pebbles of the adjacent pothole. When pebbles are captured, pothole growth is terminated and the more shallow pothole was gradually cannibalized. All of the features within the channel are overprinted with a strong asymmetry caused by the current-driven pebbles against the upstream side of the features. Consequently, the upstream side of the features tends to be smooth, convex and rounded; whereas, the downstream side tends to be concave with the leading edge of the feature pointing in the downstream direction.

  1. Threshold bedrock channels in tectonically active mountains with frequent mass wasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korup, O.; Hayakawa, Y. S.; Codilean, A.; Oguchi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Models of how mountain belts grow and erode through time largely rely on the paradigm of fluvial bedrock incision as the main motor of response to differences in rock uplift, thus setting base levels of erosion in tectonically active landscapes. Dynamic feedbacks between rock uplift, bedrock river geometry, and mass wasting have been encapsulated within the concept of threshold hillslopes that attain a mechanically critical inclination capable of adjusting to fluvial incision rates via decreased stability and commensurately more frequent landsliding. Here we provide data that challenge the widely held view that channel steepness records tectonic forcing more faithfully than hillslope inclination despite much robust empirical evidence of such links between bedrock-river geometry and hillslope mass wasting. We show that the volume mobilized by mass wasting depends more on local topographic relief and the sinuosity of bedrock rivers than their mean normalized channel steepness. We derive this counterintuitive observation from an unprecedented inventory of ~300,000 landslides covering the tectonically active Japanese archipelago with substantial differences in seismicity, lithology, vertical surface deformation, topography, and precipitation variability. Both total landslide number and volumes increase nonlinearly with mean local relief even in areas where the fraction of steepest channel segments attains a constant threshold well below the maximum topographic relief. Our data document for the first time that mass wasting increases systematically with preferential steepening of flatter channel segments. Yet concomitant changes in mean channel steepness are negligible such that it remains a largely insensitive predictor of landslide denudation. Further, minute increases in bedrock-river sinuosity lead to substantial reduction in landslide abundance and volumes. Our results underline that sinuosity (together with mean local relief) is a key morphometric variable for

  2. Flood Deposition Patterns and Channel Migration due to a 10-year flood event: the case of the Indus River flood 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, A. J.; Syvitski, J. P.; Overeem, I.; Brakenridge, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Fluvial geomorphological processes evolve the landscape and are often referred to as processes that act for hundred to thousands of years before making a noticeable change in landforms. For the Indus River, landscape evolution has been intensified due to human interference. Failure in repairing its levees from previous floods led in July 2010 during a not exceptional discharge event (~10 year recurrence interval) to a large avulsion and flooding disaster that caused ~2,000 fatalities. Examining pre- and post flood maps by analyzing MODIS and ASTER-A1 data allowed us to determine the extent of sandy flood deposits and to quantify channel migration patterns. The typical pattern of inner bend deposition (due to helical flow) and outer bend erosion were less pronounced. We hypothesize that when flow exceeds bankfull conditions, deposition is more uniform and no longer constrained by the streambed geometry. We observe that the inner and the outer river bend receive similar amounts of sandy deposits (43% versus 57% respectively). Crevasse splaying was widespread and appeared to occur as a flow stripping process again both upon the point bars as well as in river outer bends. Channel activity (defined as the areal shift of the pre- and post river centerline), sinuosity, slope and lateral sediment deposition were determined for 50km river stretches. Analyzes reveal that flood deposits extend generally less than 2 km from the main channel axis. Furthermore, channel activity correlates negatively with channel sinuosity and lateral distance of sediment deposition and positively with slope. The river channel migrated over 100's of meters during the July 2010 flood event. Lateral migration averaged ~340m along a 1000km stretch of the Indus River over a period of just 52 days. Although this discharge event was not exceptional, lateral migration was significant and deposition impacts the active river floodplain. Remarkably, most sediments are deposited downstream the large

  3. The Topographic Design of River Channels for Form-Process Linkages.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rocko A; Pasternack, Gregory B; Lin, Tin

    2016-04-01

    Scientists and engineers design river topography for a wide variety of uses, such as experimentation, site remediation, dam mitigation, flood management, and river restoration. A recent advancement has been the notion of topographical design to yield specific fluvial mechanisms in conjunction with natural or environmental flow releases. For example, the flow convergence routing mechanism, whereby shear stress and spatially convergent flow migrate or jump from the topographic high (riffle) to the low point (pool) from low to high discharge, is thought to be a key process able to maintain undular relief in gravel bedded rivers. This paper develops an approach to creating riffle-pool topography with a form-process linkage to the flow convergence routing mechanism using an adjustable, quasi equilibrium synthetic channel model. The link from form to process is made through conceptualizing form-process relationships for riffle-pool couplets into geomorphic covariance structures (GCSs) that are then quantitatively embedded in a synthetic channel model. Herein, GCSs were used to parameterize a geometric model to create five straight, synthetic river channels with varying combinations of bed and width undulations. Shear stress and flow direction predictions from 2D hydrodynamic modeling were used to determine if scenarios recreated aspects of the flow convergence routing mechanism. Results show that the creation of riffle-pool couplets that experience flow convergence in straight channels requires GCSs with covarying bed and width undulations in their topography as supported in the literature. This shows that GCSs are a useful way to translate conceptualizations of form-process linkages into quantitative models of channel form. PMID:26707499

  4. The Topographic Design of River Channels for Form-Process Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Rocko A.; Pasternack, Gregory B.; Lin, Tin

    2016-04-01

    Scientists and engineers design river topography for a wide variety of uses, such as experimentation, site remediation, dam mitigation, flood management, and river restoration. A recent advancement has been the notion of topographical design to yield specific fluvial mechanisms in conjunction with natural or environmental flow releases. For example, the flow convergence routing mechanism, whereby shear stress and spatially convergent flow migrate or jump from the topographic high (riffle) to the low point (pool) from low to high discharge, is thought to be a key process able to maintain undular relief in gravel bedded rivers. This paper develops an approach to creating riffle-pool topography with a form-process linkage to the flow convergence routing mechanism using an adjustable, quasi equilibrium synthetic channel model. The link from form to process is made through conceptualizing form-process relationships for riffle-pool couplets into geomorphic covariance structures (GCSs) that are then quantitatively embedded in a synthetic channel model. Herein, GCSs were used to parameterize a geometric model to create five straight, synthetic river channels with varying combinations of bed and width undulations. Shear stress and flow direction predictions from 2D hydrodynamic modeling were used to determine if scenarios recreated aspects of the flow convergence routing mechanism. Results show that the creation of riffle-pool couplets that experience flow convergence in straight channels requires GCSs with covarying bed and width undulations in their topography as supported in the literature. This shows that GCSs are a useful way to translate conceptualizations of form-process linkages into quantitative models of channel form.

  5. The topographic design of river channels for form-process linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. A.; Pasternack, G. B.; White, J.

    2015-12-01

    Scientists and engineers design river topography for a wide variety of uses, such as experimentation, site remediation, dam mitigation, flood management, and river restoration. A recent advancement has been the notion of topographical design to yield specific fluvial mechanisms in conjunction with natural or environmental flow releases. For example, the flow convergence routing mechanism, whereby shear stress and spatially convergent flow migrate or jump from the topographic high (riffle) to the low point (pool) from low to high discharge, is thought to be a key process able to maintain undular relief in gravel bedded rivers. This work develops an approach to creating riffle-pool topography with a form-process linkage to the flow convergence routing mechanism using an adjustable, quasi equilibrium synthetic channel model. The link from form to process is made through conceptualizing form-process relationships for riffle-pool couplets into geomorphic covariance structures (GCSs) that are then quantitatively embedded in a synthetic channel model. Herein, GCSs were used to parameterize a geometric model to create five straight, synthetic river channels with varying combinations of bed and width undulations. Shear stress and flow direction predictions from 2D hydrodynamic modeling were used to determine if scenarios recreated aspects of the flow convergence routing mechanism. Results show that the creation of riffle-pool couplets that experience flow convergence in straight channels require GCSs with positively covarying bed and width undulations in their topography as supported in the literature. This shows that GCSs are a useful way to translate conceptualizations models of form-process linkages into quantitative models of channel form. Beyond synthetic examples, several real-world examples of restoration projects that use this approach are shown and discussed.

  6. Exchanges of sediment between the flood plain and channel of the Amazon River in Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, T.; Mertes, L.A.K.; Meade, R.H.; Richey, J.E.; Forsberg, B.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment transport through the Brazilian sector of the Amazon River valley, a distance of 2010 km, involves exchanges between the channel and the flood plain that in each direction exceed the annual flux of sediment out of the river at O??bidos (???1200 Mt yr-1). The exchanges occur through bank erosion, bar deposition, settling from diffuse overbank flow, and sedimentation in flood-plain channels. We estimated the magnitude of these exchanges for each of 10 reaches of the valley, and combined them with calculations of sediment transport into and out of the reaches based on sediment sampling and flow records to define a sediment budget for each reach. Residuals in the sediment budget of a reach include errors of estimation and erosion or deposition within the channel. The annual supply of sediment entering the channel from bank erosion was estimated to average 1570 Mt yr-1 (1.3 ?? the O??bidos flux) and the amount transferred from channel transport to the bars (380 Mt yr-1) and the flood plain (460 Mt yr-1 in channelized flow; 1230 Mt yr-1 in diffuse overbank flow) totaled 2070 Mt yr-1 (1.7 ?? the O??bidos flux). Thus, deposition on the bars and flood plain exceeded bank erosion by 500 Mt yr-1 over a 10-16 yr period. Sampling and calculation of sediment loads in the channel indicate a net accumulation in the valley floor of approximately 200 Mt yr-1 over 16 yr, crudely validating the process-based calculations of the sediment budget, which in turn illuminate the physical controls on each exchange process. Another 300-400 Mt yr-1 are deposited in a delta plain downstream of O??bidos. The components of the sediment budget reflect hydrologie characteristics of the valley floor and geomorphic characteristics of the channel and flood plain, which in turn are influenced by tectonic features of the Amazon structural trough.

  7. Analysis of flood-flow frequency, flow duration, and channel-forming flow for the James River in South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The James River, which originates in North Dakota and joins the Missouri River near Yankton, South Dakota, is about 747 miles long, with about 474 river miles located in South Dakota. The James River basin includes 21,116 sq mi, with 14,428 sq mi located in South Dakota. Bankfull capacity of the James River in South Dakota ranges from a minimum of about 200 cu ft/sec near the mouth. Discharges that produce bankfull conditions on much of the river in South Dakota occur on an average of once in about 2 years. The 10-year flood flows, which range from 1,620 cu ft/sec (at the gage near Stratford) to 8,870 cu ft/sec (at the gage near Scotland), cause major flooding on most of the river in South Dakota. The river also has potential for extending periods of low or zero flow, especially in the northern portion within South Dakota. Generally, low flows occur from late summer until spring snowmelt. The James River at Columbia had zero flow for 623 consecutive days from July 13, 1958, through March 26, 1960. The channel pattern (channel alignment) has changed little since 1922. This channel stability indicates that channel formation is approaching a state of equilibrium. It does not appear that velocities in the river are sufficient to carry the sediment being delivered by the tributaries. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  9. Channel changes and floodplain management in the meandering middle Ebro River, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollero, Alfredo

    2010-05-01

    The 346 km of the middle Ebro River between Logroño and La Zaida is a free meandering channel in a wide floodplain. This reach contains a discontinuous riparian corridor, including valuable riparian forests and oxbow lakes. The Ebro has witnessed substantial changes in channel morphology, gravel bars, riparian vegetation and floodplain uses over the last 80 years. The growth in sinuosity, migrations and meander cut-offs have been frequent before 1981. Afterwards, bank protections and dykes have stabilized the channel. There has been a progressive and significant decrease of both the area covered by water and the gravel bars without plant colonization. As a result the width of the riparian corridor has been dramatically reduced for human use. The deceleration and near elimination of the free meander dynamics of the Ebro channel represent an important loss of natural heritage. Dams, land-use changes throughout the basin, and construction of flood defences that restrict the main channel have changed the river system behaviour, which urgently needs a management plan combining both improvement and risk reduction. The solution proposed is the creation of a "Fluvial Territory".

  10. A theoretical analysis of river bars stability under changing channel width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, S.; Zolezzi, G.; Tubino, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we propose a new theoretical model to investigate the influence of temporal changes in channel width on river bar stability. This is achieved by performing a nonlinear stability analysis, which includes temporal width variations as a small-amplitude perturbation of the basic flow. In order to quantify width variability, channel width is related with the instantaneous discharge using existing empirical formulae proposed for channels with cohesionless banks. Therefore, width can vary (increase and/or decrease) either because it adapts to the temporally varying discharge or, if discharge is constant, through a relaxation relation describing widening of an initially overnarrow channel towards the equilibrium width. Unsteadiness related with changes in channel width is found to directly affect the instantaneous bar growth rate, depending on the conditions under which the widening process occurs. The governing mathematical system is solved by means of a two-parameters (ɛ, δ) perturbation expansion, where ɛ is related to bar amplitude and δ to the temporal width variability. In general width unsteadiness is predicted to play a destabilizing role on free bar stability, namely during the peak stage of a flood event in a laterally unconfined channel and invariably for overnarrow channels fed with steady discharge. In this latter case, width unsteadiness tends to shorten the most unstable bar wavelength compared to the case with constant width, in qualitative agreement with existing experimental observations.

  11. The effect of channel shape, bed morphology, and shipwrecks on flow velocities in the Upper St. Clair River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Oberg, Kevin; Best, Jim; Parsons, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Great Lakes of North America, the St. Clair River is the major outlet of Lake Huron and conveys water to Lake St. Clair which then flows to Lake Erie. One major topic of interest is morphological change in the St. Clair River and its impact on water levels in the Upper Great Lakes and connecting channel flows. A combined multibeam echosounder (MBES) bathymetric survey and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) flow survey of the outlet of Lake Huron and the Upper St. Clair River was conducted July 21 – 25, 2008. This paper presents how channel morphology and shipwrecks affect the flow in the Upper St. Clair River. The river is most constricted at the Blue Water Bridge near Port Huron, Michigan, with water velocities over 2 ms-1 for a flow of 5,200 m3s-1. Downstream of this constriction, the river flows around a bend and expands creating a large recirculation zone along the left bank due to flow separation. This recirculation zone reduces the effective channel width, and thus increases flow velocities to over 2 ms-1 in this region. The surveys reveal several shipwrecks on the bed of the St. Clair River, which possess distinct wakes in their flow velocity downstream of the wrecks. The constriction and expansion of the channel, combined with forcing of the flow by bed topography, initiates channel-scale secondary flow, creating streamwise vortices that maintain coherence downstream over a distance of several channel widths.

  12. Reduced channel conveyance on the Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Texas, 1900-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, Karl; Baldys, Stanley; Schreiber, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Recent floods on the Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Texas, have reached higher stages compared to historical floods of similar magnitude discharges. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated streamflow-gaging station 07312500 Wichita River at Wichita Falls, Tex., since 1938 and flood measurements near the location of the present gage were first made in 1900. Floods recorded in 2007 and 2008 at this gaging station, including the record flood of June 30, 2007, reached higher stages compared to historical floods before 1972 of similar peak discharges. For flood measurements made at stages of more than 18 feet, peak stages were about 1 to 3 feet higher compared to peak stages of similar peak discharges measured before 1972. Flood measurements made at stages of more than 18 feet also indicate a decrease in the measured mean velocity from about 3.5 to about 2.0 feet per second from 1941 to 2008. The increase in stage and decrease in streamflow velocity for similar magnitude floods indicates channel conveyance has decreased over time. A study to investigate the causes of reduced channel conveyance in the Wichita River reach from Loop 11 downstream to River Road in Wichita Falls was done by the USGS in cooperation with the City of Wichita Falls. Historical photographs indicate substantial growth of riparian vegetation downstream from Loop 11 between 1950 and 2009. Aerial photographs taken between 1950 and 2008 also indicate an increase in riparian vegetation. Twenty-five channel cross sections were surveyed by the USGS in this reach in 2009. These cross sections were located at bridge crossings or collocated with channel cross sections previously surveyed in 1986 for use in a floodplain mapping study by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Four channel cross sections 3,400 to 11,900 feet downstream from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard indicate narrowing of the channel. The remaining channel cross sections surveyed in 2009 by the USGS compared favorably with

  13. Hydraulic response and morphological evolution at a lower Mississippi River channel bar after sand mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuill, B. T.; Gaweesh, A.; Allison, M. A.; Meselhe, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Sand mining in alluvial rivers by hydraulic or bucket dredge causes a significant disturbance within the geomorphic processes controlling river form and function. While the reach-scale impacts of dredging associated with a general decline in sediment availability (e.g., channel incision) are well documented, the effects of the borrow pit on the local flow and sediment transport field are not well understood. These local effects are important because they control the post-dredge evolution of the borrow pit, setting the lifespan of the pit as well as affecting channel morphology on a reach-scale. This study documents the observed morphological evolution of a large (1.46 x 106 m3) borrow pit located on a lateral sandbar in the lower Mississippi River channel that was mined for coastal restoration purposes using a time series of multibeam bathymetric surveys. Observations show that within the 2.5 year study period, 53 % of the initial pit volume infilled with sediment, decreasing pit depth by 0.88 m/yr on average. To explore the possible controls of the observed pit infilling, a calibrated 3D hydraulic model (Delft3D) was used to simulate flow and sediment transport within the affected river reach. Results indicate that the observed infilling rates were closely related to predicted sediment supply rates and borrow pit geometry. The pit geometry (pit depth, length) influenced the predicted magnitude of the bed stress within the pit relative to its initial pre-dredged bed stress value, i.e., the bed stress reduction ratio (R*), a metric that was correlated with the magnitude and spatial distribution of infilling. A simple 1D model was derived using sediment supply and R* to simulate temporal and spatial patterns of pit infilling. This model was able to closely approximate the cumulative amount of observed infilling during the study period and reproduce realistic longitudinal infilling patterns. Additional infilling model experiments show that, for a borrow pit of a set

  14. Urban river restoration: implications on channel sedimentation patterns and associated ecosystem and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, H.; Gurnell, A.; Heppell, K.; Spencer, K.

    2012-04-01

    Urban river restoration, which alters the physical and hydraulic conditions of rivers, creates rivers favourable to increased sedimentation through greater sediment availability and heterogeneous flow patterns. Sediments, particularly finer-grained, store contaminants including metals which can have detrimental impacts upon aquatic ecosystems and potentially human health. This research therefore looks at the effect of urban river restoration practices upon sedimentation patterns, the associated changes in sediment metal storage and the potential impact upon river function and use in terms of the aquatic ecosystem and human health. Research was undertaken at four sites on urban rivers in London. The spatial extent of different bed sediment types (unvegetated gravel, sand, finer and sediment around in-channel vegetation) in adjacent restored and unrestored stretches was mapped in July 2010. Additionally, sediments were sampled through the year and analysed for a range of metals and sediment characteristics. Two sites (Chinbrook Meadows and Sutcliffe Park) showed a clear difference in bed sediment type channel cover between the restored and unrestored stretches. The majority of the concrete-lined unrestored stretch at Chinbrook Meadows had no sediment deposition, whereas the restored stretch had over half of the channel occupied by finer sediment either on the open channel bed or accumulated around in-channel vegetation. At Sutcliffe Park, the dominant bed sediment type in the restored stretch was finer sediment on the open bed and accumulated around in-channel vegetation, whereas in the unrestored stretch the dominant bed sediment type was gravel. At both sites there were significant differences in metal concentrations and sediment characteristics between bed sediment types. Metal concentrations, organic matter and % <63µm were generally higher in the finer sediment whether on the open bed or around in-channel vegetation. Total loadings of all metals were greater in

  15. Modelling the flooding capacity of a Polish Carpathian river: A comparison of constrained and free channel conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Wiktoria; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Hajdukiewicz, Hanna

    2016-11-01

    The gravel-bed Biała River, Polish Carpathians, was heavily affected by channelization and channel incision in the twentieth century. Not only were these impacts detrimental to the ecological state of the river, but they also adversely modified the conditions of floodwater retention and flood wave passage. Therefore, a few years ago an erodible corridor was delimited in two sections of the Biała to enable restoration of the river. In these sections, short, channelized reaches located in the vicinity of bridges alternate with longer, unmanaged channel reaches, which either avoided channelization or in which the channel has widened after the channelization scheme ceased to be maintained. Effects of these alternating channel morphologies on the conditions for flood flows were investigated in a study of 10 pairs of neighbouring river cross sections with constrained and freely developed morphology. Discharges of particular recurrence intervals were determined for each cross section using an empirical formula. The morphology of the cross sections together with data about channel slope and roughness of particular parts of the cross sections were used as input data to the hydraulic modelling performed with the one-dimensional steady-flow HEC-RAS software. The results indicated that freely developed cross sections, usually with multithread morphology, are typified by significantly lower water depth but larger width and cross-sectional flow area at particular discharges than single-thread, channelized cross sections. They also exhibit significantly lower average flow velocity, unit stream power, and bed shear stress. The pattern of differences in the hydraulic parameters of flood flows apparent between the two types of river cross sections varies with the discharges of different frequency, and the contrasts in hydraulic parameters between unmanaged and channelized cross sections are most pronounced at low-frequency, high-magnitude floods. However, because of the deep

  16. Channel and island change in the lower Platte River, Eastern Nebraska, USA: 1855 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joeckel, R. M.; Henebry, G. M.

    2008-12-01

    The lower Platte River has undergone considerable change in channel and bar characteristics since the mid-1850s in four 20-25 km-long study stretches. The same net effect of historical channel shrinkage that was detected upstream from Grand Island, Nebraska, can also be detected in the lower river but differences in the behaviors of study stretches upstream and downstream from major tributaries are striking. The least relative decrease occurred downstream from the Loup River confluence, and the stretch downstream from the Elkhorn River confluence actually showed an increase in channel area during the 1940s. Bank erosion was also greater downstream of the tributaries between ca. 1860 and 1938/1941, particularly in stretch RG, which showed more lateral migration. The cumulative island area and the ratio of island area to channel area relative to the 1938/1941 baseline data showed comparatively great fluctuations in median island size in both downstream stretches. The erratic behavior of island size distributions over time indicates that large islands were accreted to the banks at different times, and that some small, newly-stabilized islands were episodically "flushed" out of the system. In the upstream stretches the stabilization of mobile bars to create new, small islands had a more consistent impact over time. Channel decrease by the abandonment of large, long-lived anabranches and by the in-place narrowing resulting from island accretion were more prominent in these upstream stretches. Across all of the study area, channel area appears to be stabilizing gradually as the rate of decrease lessens. This trend began earliest in stretch RG in the late 1950s and was accompanied by shifts in the size distributions of stabilized islands in that stretch into the 1960s. Elsewhere, even in the easternmost study stretch, stabilizing was occurring by the late 1960s, the same time frame documented by investigations of the Platte system upstream of the study area. Comprehensive

  17. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  18. Distribution, persistence, and hydrologic characteristics of salmon spawning habitats in clearwater side channels of the Matanuska River, southcentral Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.; McTeague, Monica L.; Burril, Sean E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2011-01-01

    Turbid, glacially influenced rivers are often considered to be poor salmon spawning and rearing habitats and, consequently, little is known about salmon habitats that do occur within rivers of this type. To better understand salmon spawning habitats in the Matanuska River of southcentral Alaska, the distribution and characteristics of clearwater side-channel spawning habitats were determined and compared to spawning habitats in tributaries. More than 100 kilometers of clearwater side channels within the braided mainstem of the Matanuska River were mapped for 2006 from aerial images and ground-based surveys. In reaches selected for historical analysis, side channel locations shifted appreciably between 1949 and 2006, but the relative abundance of clearwater side channels was fairly stable during the same period. Geospatial analysis of side channel distribution shows side channels typically positioned along abandoned bars at the braid plain margin rather than on bars between mainstem channels, and shows a strong correlation of channel abundance with braid plain width. Physical and geomorphic characteristics of the channel and chemical character of the water measured at 19 side channel sites, 6 tributary sites, 4 spring sites, and 5 mainstem channel sites showed conditions suitable for salmon spawning in side channels and tributaries, and a correlation of side channel characteristics with the respective tributary or groundwater source water. Autumn-through-spring monitoring of intergravel water temperatures adjacent to salmon redds (nests) in three side channels and two tributaries indicate adequate accumulated thermal units for incubation and emergence of salmon in side channels and relatively low accumulated thermal units in tributaries.

  19. 75 FR 10446 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to establish a temporary security zone in certain waters of Washington Channel on the Potomac River. The security zone is necessary to provide for the security and safety of life and property of event participants, spectators and mariners during the U.S. Coast Guard Commandant's Change of Command ceremony from 6 a.m. through 5 p.m. on May 25, 2010. Entry into this zone......

  20. Historical and simulated changes in channel characteristics of the Kalamazoo River, Plainwell to Otesgo, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rachol, Cynthia M.; Fitzptrick, Faith A.; Rossi, Tiffiny

    2005-01-01

    In a study to understand the historical effects of the construction and decommissioning of dams on the Kalamazoo River, Plainwell to Otsego, Michigan, and to simulate channel changes that may result if the dams were removed, early to mid-1800s General Land Office surveys and aerial photographs from 1938, 1981, and 1999 were compared in order to identify historical changes in the river's planform. This analysis of the 80-mile reach from Morrow Dam to the river mouth at Saugatuck provided insight into how susceptible the river has been to channel migration. The comparison showed that changes in channel width and location were caused mainly by construction of dams and subsequent water-level adjustments in the impounded reaches upstream from the dams. Braiding also occurred downstream from one of the dams. Minor changes in channel form that were not caused by the dams, such as the development and cutoff of meander bends, were observed. A more detailed study in a 5-mile reach passing through the Plainwell and Otsego City Dams included compiling existing valley cross section and longitudinal profile data into a database, assessing bank stability, and using a hydrologic model to simulate the channel as if the dams were removed. Fifty-four valley cross sections compiled from United States Geological Survey and consultant data sets were used as a base for a bank-stability assessment and to design a hypothetical stable channel without the two dams. The channel design involved adjusting the slope, hydraulic geometry, and flood-plain width to ensure that water could be transferred through the reach without increasing flooding or erosion problems. The bank-stability assessment focused on conditions that are critical to failure. This was accomplished through the use of a two step process. The first involved evaluating the sediment removed from the bank toe when the stage is high. The second involved calculating the factor of safety for the bank based on the water table being

  1. Reduced fine sediment flux and channel change in response to the managed diversion of an upland river channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, Matthew Thomas; Warburton, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a novel mitigation approach and subsequent adaptive management, designed to reduce the transfer of fine sediment (< 2 mm) in Glaisdale Beck, a small, predominantly upland catchment in the UK. Hydro-meteorological and suspended sediment data sets are collected over a 2-year period spanning pre- and post-diversion periods in order to assess the impact of the channel reconfiguration scheme on the fluvial suspended sediment dynamics. Analysis of the river response demonstrates that the fluvial sediment system has become more restrictive with reduced fine sediment transfer. This is characterized by reductions in flow-weighted mean suspended sediment concentrations from 77.93 mg L-1 prior to mitigation, to 74.36 mg L-1 following the diversion. A Mann-Whitney U test found statistically significant differences (p < 0.001) between the pre- and post-monitoring median suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs). Whilst application of one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) on the coefficients of sediment rating curves developed before and after the diversion found statistically significant differences (p < 0.001), with both Loga and b coefficients becoming smaller following the diversion. Non-parametric analysis indicates a reduction in residuals through time (p < 0.001), with the developed LOWESS model over-predicting sediment concentrations as the channel stabilizes. However, the channel is continuing to adjust to the reconfigured morphology, with evidence of a headward propagating knickpoint which has migrated 120 m at an exponentially decreasing rate over the last 7 years since diversion. The study demonstrates that channel reconfiguration can be effective in mitigating fine sediment flux in headwater streams but the full value of this may take many years to achieve whilst the fluvial system slowly readjusts.

  2. Particle size distribution of main-channel-bed sediments along the upper Mississippi River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, Jonathan W. F.; Heine, Reuben A.; Ickes, Brian S.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we compared pre-lock-and-dam (ca. 1925) with a modern longitudinal survey of main-channel-bed sediments along a 740-km segment of the upper Mississippi River (UMR) between Davenport, IA, and Cairo, IL. This comparison was undertaken to gain a better understanding of how bed sediments are distributed longitudinally and to assess change since the completion of the UMR lock and dam navigation system and Missouri River dams (i.e., mid-twentieth century). The comparison of the historic and modern longitudinal bed sediment surveys showed similar bed sediment sizes and distributions along the study segment with the majority (> 90%) of bed sediment samples having a median diameter (D50) of fine to coarse sand. The fine tail (≤ D10) of the sediment size distributions was very fine to medium sand, and the coarse tail (≥ D90) of sediment-size distribution was coarse sand to gravel. Coarsest sediments in both surveys were found within or immediately downstream of bedrock-floored reaches. Statistical analysis revealed that the particle-size distributions between the survey samples were statistically identical, suggesting no overall difference in main-channel-bed sediment-size distribution between 1925 and present. This was a surprising result given the magnitude of river engineering undertaken along the study segment over the past ~ 90 years. The absence of substantial differences in main-channel-bed-sediment size suggests that flow competencies within the highly engineered navigation channel today are similar to conditions within the less-engineered historic channel.

  3. Particle size distribution of main-channel-bed sediments along the upper Mississippi River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Remo, Jonathan; Heine, Ruben A.; Ickes, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared pre-lock-and-dam (ca. 1925) with a modern longitudinal survey of main-channel-bed sediments along a 740-km segment of the upper Mississippi River (UMR) between Davenport, IA, and Cairo, IL. This comparison was undertaken to gain a better understanding of how bed sediments are distributed longitudinally and to assess change since the completion of the UMR lock and dam navigation system and Missouri River dams (i.e., mid-twentieth century). The comparison of the historic and modern longitudinal bed sediment surveys showed similar bed sediment sizes and distributions along the study segment with the majority (> 90%) of bed sediment samples having a median diameter (D50) of fine to coarse sand. The fine tail (≤ D10) of the sediment size distributions was very fine to medium sand, and the coarse tail (≥ D90) of sediment-size distribution was coarse sand to gravel. Coarsest sediments in both surveys were found within or immediately downstream of bedrock-floored reaches. Statistical analysis revealed that the particle-size distributions between the survey samples were statistically identical, suggesting no overall difference in main-channel-bed sediment-size distribution between 1925 and present. This was a surprising result given the magnitude of river engineering undertaken along the study segment over the past ~ 90 years. The absence of substantial differences in main-channel-bed-sediment size suggests that flow competencies within the highly engineered navigation channel today are similar to conditions within the less-engineered historic channel.

  4. Mechanism of activation of the prokaryotic channel ELIC by propylamine: a single-channel study.

    PubMed

    Marabelli, Alessandro; Lape, Remigijus; Sivilotti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic channels, such as Erwinia chrysanthemi ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC) and Gloeobacter violaceus ligand-gated ion channel, give key structural information for the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel family, which includes nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. ELIC, a cationic channel from E. chrysanthemi, is particularly suitable for single-channel recording because of its high conductance. Here, we report on the kinetic properties of ELIC channels expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Single-channel currents elicited by the full agonist propylamine (0.5-50 mM) in outside-out patches at -60 mV were analyzed by direct maximum likelihood fitting of kinetic schemes to the idealized data. Several mechanisms were tested, and their adequacy was judged by comparing the predictions of the best fit obtained with the observable features of the experimental data. These included open-/shut-time distributions and the time course of macroscopic propylamine-activated currents elicited by fast theta-tube applications (50-600 ms, 1-50 mM, -100 mV). Related eukaryotic channels, such as glycine and nicotinic receptors, when fully liganded open with high efficacy to a single open state, reached via a preopening intermediate. The simplest adequate description of their activation, the "Flip" model, assumes a concerted transition to a single intermediate state at high agonist concentration. In contrast, ELIC open-time distributions at saturating propylamine showed multiple components. Thus, more than one open state must be accessible to the fully liganded channel. The "Primed" model allows opening from multiple fully liganded intermediates. The best fits of this type of model showed that ELIC maximum open probability (99%) is reached when at least two and probably three molecules of agonist have bound to the channel. The overall efficacy with which the fully liganded channel opens was ∼ 102 (∼ 20 for α1β glycine channels). The microscopic affinity for the agonist

  5. Why Rivers Flood: Implications of the Elimination of Overbank Flows Through Channel Widening in a Laboratory Flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, J.; Pitlick, J.

    2007-12-01

    We performed a series of laboratory flume experiments to document the adjustment of straight channels carved from non-cohesive sediment to overbank flows. We first created a stable channel adjusted to a bankfull discharge. Then, the discharge was abruptly increased to create an overbank flow. In all of our experiments, the channel widened during overbank flow until the increased discharge could be accommodated within the channel, suggesting that bank erosion in the absence of deposition will tend to eliminate flooding. We propose two dimensionless numbers to evaluate these processes in nature. The first, termed the Flood Elimination Number (FLENUM), represents the ratio of the duration of flooding to the time required for bank erosion to fully capture overbank flows during a single flood. The second, termed the Channel Stability Number (CHASNUM), evaluates the maximum length of channel that can accommodate the additional sediment supplied by widening without catastrophic deposition or changes in channel planform (such as braiding). Our experiments suggest that a critical value of the FLENUM is ~0.1. For FLENUM values higher than 0.1, rivers will accommodate flooding through channel widening, likely leading to braiding. As expected, braided rivers have high FLENUM values on the order of 10. Rivers with FLENUM values lower than 0.1 should endure overbank flows without significant widening, and indeed single-thread meandering rivers with cohesive banks have FLENUM values around 0.01. In our experiments, the CHASNUM was approximately 50 river widths, approximately equal to the working length of our experimental channel, which explains our ability to successfully maintain a stable, single thread channel despite extensive channel widening. The CHASNUM may provide an interesting explanation for the observation of periodically spaced disturbance zones in some gravel-bed rivers.

  6. Channel Characteristics and Planform Dynamics in the Indian Terai, Sharda River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midha, Neha; Mathur, Pradeep K.

    2014-01-01

    The Sharda River creates and maintains the ecologically diverse remnant patches of rare Terai ecosystem in northern India. This study used repeat satellite imagery and geographic information system analysis to assess the planform dynamics along a 60 km length of the Sharda River between 1977 and 2001 to understand the altered dynamics and its plausible causes in this data-poor region. Analyses revealed that the Sharda River has undergone significant change corresponding to enhanced instability in terms of increased number of neck cut-offs and consistent occurrence of avulsions in subsequent shorter assessment periods. An increased channel area (8 %), decreased sinuosity (15 %), increased braiding intensity, and abrupt migrations were also documented. The river has migrated toward the east with its west bankline being more unstable. The maximum shifts were 2.85 km in 13 years (1977-1990), 2.33 km in next 9 years (1990-1999), and a substantial shift of 2.39 km in just 2 years (1999-2001). The altered dynamics is making the future of critical wildlife habitats in Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary and North Kheri Forest Division precarious and causing significant economic damage. Extensive deforestation and expansion of agriculture since the 1950s in the catchment area are presumed to have severely impacted the equilibrium of the river, which urgently needs a management plan including wildlife habitat conservation, control, and risk reduction. The present study provides a strong foundation for understanding channel changes in the Sharda River and the finding can serve as a valuable information base for effective management planning and ecological restoration.

  7. Channel geometry, flood elevations, and flood maps, lower Toutle and Cowlitz rivers, Washington, June 1980 to May 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, triggered mudflows that deposited upwards of 15 ft of sediment in the channels of the lower Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers. The major population areas along the lower Cowlitz River (Kelso, Longview,Lexington, and Castle Rock) were not flooded, but the channel capacity of the river was seriously reduced and the potential for unusually high flood elevations from fall and winter storms was an obvious concern. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began dredging operations in June 1980 to alleviate the flood hazard. Surveys to monitor the effect of changes to the channel and flood plains that resulted from dredging and additional sediment inflow from the upper Toutle River basin were started in June 1980 and continued until May 11, 1981, when dredging operations on the Cowlitz River had been completed. (USGS)

  8. Serine protease activation of near-silent epithelial Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Ray A; Boucher, Richard C; Stutts, M Jackson

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) function is critical for normal salt and water balance. This regulation is achieved through cell surface insertion/retrieval of channels, by changes in channel open probability (Po), or through a combination of these processes. Epithelium-derived serine proteases, including channel activating protease (CAP) and prostasin, regulate epithelial Na+ transport, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that extracellular serine proteases activate a near-silent ENaC population resident in the plasma membrane. Single-channel events were recorded in outside-out patches from fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) stably expressing rat alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits (rENaC), before and during exposure to trypsin, a serine protease homologous to CAP and prostasin. Under baseline conditions, near-silent patches were defined as having rENaC activity (NPo) < 0.03, where N is the number of channels. Within 1-5 min of 3 microg/ml bath trypsin superfusion, NPo increased approximately 66-fold (n = 7). In patches observed to contain a single functional channel, trypsin increased Po from 0.02 +/- 0.01 to 0.57 +/- 0.03 (n = 3, mean +/- SE), resulting from the combination of an increased channel open time and decreased channel closed time. Catalytic activity was required for activation of near-silent ENaC. Channel conductance and the Na+/Li+ current ratio with trypsin were similar to control values. Modulation of ENaC Po by endogenous epithelial serine proteases is a potentially important regulator of epithelial Na+ transport, distinct from the regulation achieved by hormone-induced plasma membrane insertion of channels. PMID:12967915

  9. Channel dynamics and habitat development in a meandering, gravel bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L. R.; Legleiter, C. J.; Wydzga, M. A.; Dunne, T.

    2011-04-01

    We investigated how channel morphology, flow complexity, and habitat characteristics in a meandering gravel bed river evolved over time from a simple, reconfigured initial condition. Using a time series of topographic data, we measured rates of channel migration and morphologic change, documented patterns of sediment storage, and estimated rates of sediment supply. We constructed, calibrated, and validated hydrodynamic models to quantify how the evolving morphology influenced hydraulic conditions, flow complexity, and habitat suitability for Chinook salmon spawning and rearing. For a series of meander bends with constant curvature, similar bank materials, and an identical flow history, sediment supply and bar storage directly influenced channel migration rates. Habitat modeling indicated that the availability of Chinook salmon spawning habitat increased over time, whereas the majority of the reach continues to provide only low- to medium-quality rearing habitat for juvenile salmonids, primarily because of a lack of low-velocity refuge zones. However, other metrics of flow complexity indicate that areas of favorable flow conditions gradually expanded as point bars developed along the inner bank of each bend. These results indicate that although sediment supply can stimulate channel change and diversify river morphology, which acts to promote flow complexity and provide spawning habitat, these sediment-driven morphological changes might not create bioenergetically favorable habitat for juvenile salmonids.

  10. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  11. Mitigation of hazards from future lahars from Mount Merapi in the Krasak River channel near Yogyakarta, central Java

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ege, John R.; ,

    1983-01-01

    Procedures for reducing hazards from future lahars and debris flows in the Krasak River channel near Yogyakarta, Central Java, Indonesia, include (1) determining the history of the location, size, and effects of previous lahars and debris flows, and (2) decreasing flow velocities. The first may be accomplished by geologic field mapping along with acquiring information by interviewing local residents, and the second by increasing the cross sectional area of the river channel and constructing barriers in the flow path.

  12. UAV Measurement of the 2015 Large Flood Impact in Kinugawa River on Riverine Vegetation and Channel Form Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Inoue, Toshiya; Chigasaki, Yuka

    2016-04-01

    This presentation gives the results of field observation for a flood impact on riverine environment measured by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The flood we examined occurred on September 9-10, 2015 in Kinugawa River, Japan, owing to the heavy rainfall that brought tremendous volume of water on the Kanto and Tohoku regions of Japan. In Kinugawa River, the largest record flood occurred in this time, resulting in the levee failure and the corresponding flood disaster in Joso City located in the downstream part of Kinugawa River, as well as the large flood impact on the riverine environment in the Kinugawa channel network. In order to investigate the very initial state of the after-flood-impact throughout the channel network, 13 channel sections with 2 km in longitudinal length were chosen and observed in October 2015. Orthochromatic images of the river channel sections obtained by the UAV measurement with a geographic information system (GIS) were used for analyzing the changes in riverine vegetation distributions and channel form profiles. The results show that there exist three characteristic river segments having different impact-response states in vegetation and channel form changes. The river sections in the most upstream segment indicated severe damage of trees and herbs as well as large movement of gravel bed material, while those in the most downstream segment showed relatively small damage in vegetation distribution and small change in channel forms. Furthermore, relationships between the vegetation damage, channel deformation, channel slopes, and bed shear stresses calculated by a numerical simulation model were discussed in detail along the river network.

  13. SLO2 Channels Are Inhibited by All Divalent Cations That Activate SLO1 K+ Channels.

    PubMed

    Budelli, Gonzalo; Sun, Qi; Ferreira, Juan; Butler, Alice; Santi, Celia M; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Two members of the family of high conductance K(+)channels SLO1 and SLO2 are both activated by intracellular cations. However, SLO1 is activated by Ca(2+)and other divalent cations, while SLO2 (Slack or SLO2.2 from rat) is activated by Na(+) Curiously though, we found that SLO2.2 is inhibited by all divalent cations that activate SLO1, with Zn(2+)being the most effective inhibitor with an IC50of ∼8 μmin contrast to Mg(2+), the least effective, with an IC50of ∼ 1.5 mm Our results suggest that divalent cations are not SLO2 pore blockers, but rather inhibit channel activity by an allosteric modification of channel gating. By site-directed mutagenesis we show that a histidine residue (His-347) downstream of S6 reduces inhibition by divalent cations. An analogous His residue present in some CNG channels is an inhibitory cation binding site. To investigate whether inhibition by divalent cations is conserved in an invertebrate SLO2 channel we cloned the SLO2 channel fromDrosophila(dSLO2) and compared its properties to those of rat SLO2.2. We found that, like rat SLO2.2, dSLO2 was also activated by Na(+)and inhibited by divalent cations. Inhibition of SLO2 channels in mammals andDrosophilaby divalent cations that have second messenger functions may reflect the physiological regulation of these channels by one or more of these ions.

  14. River restoration strategies in channelized, low-gradient landscapes of West Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.P.; Diehl, T.H.; Turrini-Smith, L. A.; Maas-Baldwin, J.; Croyle, Z.

    2009-01-01

    West Tennessee has a complex history of watershed disturbance, including agricultural erosion, channelization, accelerated valley sedimentation, and the removal and reestablishment of beaver. Watershed management has evolved from fl oodplain drainage via pervasive channelization to include local drainage canal maintenance and local river restoration. Many unmaintained canals are undergoing excessive aggradation and complex channel evolution driven by upland erosion and low valley gradient. The locus of aggradation in fully occluded canals (valley plugs) moves up-valley as sediment continues to accumulate in the backwater behind the plug. Valley plugs that cause canal avulsion can lead to redevelopment of meandering channels in less disturbed areas of the fl oodplain, in a process of passive self-restoration. Some valley plugs have brought restored fl oodplain function, reoccupation of extant historic river channels, and formation of a "sediment shadow" that protects downstream reaches from excess sedimentation. Despite the presence of numerous opportunities, there is presently no mechanism for including valley plugs in mitigation projects. In 1997 a survey of 14 reference reach cross sections documented relations between drainage area and bankfull geometry of relatively unmodified streams in West Tennessee. Reassessment of seven of those sites in 2007 showed that one had been dammed by beaver and that two sites could not be analyzed further because of signifi cant vertical or lateral instability. In contrast to other regions of North America, the results suggest that stream channels in this region fl ood more frequently than once each year, and can remain out of banks for several weeks each year. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  15. Open-channel block by internally applied amines inhibits activation gate closure in batrachotoxin-activated sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, G W; French, R J

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the action of several pore-blocking amines on voltage-dependent activation gating of batrachotoxin(BTX)-activated sodium channels, from bovine heart and rat skeletal muscle, incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. Although structurally simpler, the compounds studied show general structural features and channel-inhibiting actions that resemble those of lidocaine. When applied to the cytoplasmic end of the channel, these compounds cause a rapid, voltage-dependent, open-channel block seen as a reduction in apparent single-channel amplitude (companion paper). Internal application of phenylpropanolamine, phenylethylamine, phenylmethylamine, and diethylamine, as well as causing open-channel block, reduces the probability of channel closure, producing a shift of the steady-state activation curve toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. These gating effects were observed for both cardiac and skeletal muscle channels and were not evoked by addition of equimolar N-Methyl-D-Glucamine, suggesting a specific interaction of the blockers with the channel rather than a surface charge effect. Kinetic analysis of phenylpropanolamine action on skeletal muscle channels indicated that phenylpropanolamine reduced the closed probability via two separate mechanisms. First, mean closed durations were slightly abbreviated in its presence. Second, and more important, the frequency of the gating closures was reduced. This action was correlated with the degree, and the voltage dependence, of open-channel block, suggesting that the activation gate cannot close while the pore is occluded by the blocker. Such a mechanism might underlie the previously reported immobilization of gating charge associated with local anesthetic block of unmodified sodium channels. PMID:7811914

  16. Tonic PKA Activity Regulates SK Channel Nanoclustering and Somatodendritic Distribution.

    PubMed

    Abiraman, Krithika; Sah, Megha; Walikonis, Randall S; Lykotrafitis, George; Tzingounis, Anastasios V

    2016-06-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels mediate a potassium conductance in the brain and are involved in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. SK channels show a distinct subcellular localization that is crucial for their neuronal functions. However, the mechanisms that control this spatial distribution are unknown. We imaged SK channels labeled with fluorophore-tagged apamin and monitored SK channel nanoclustering at the single molecule level by combining atomic force microscopy and toxin (i.e., apamin) pharmacology. Using these two complementary approaches, we found that native SK channel distribution in pyramidal neurons, across the somatodendritic domain, depends on ongoing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) levels, strongly limiting SK channel expression at the pyramidal neuron soma. Furthermore, tonic cAMP-PKA levels also controlled whether SK channels were expressed in nanodomains as single entities or as a group of multiple channels. Our study reveals a new level of regulation of SK channels by cAMP-PKA and suggests that ion channel topography and nanoclustering might be under the control of second messenger cascades. PMID:27107637

  17. Small Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias and up-regulation of SK channels in heart failure (HF) in animal models and human HF. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both anti-arrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review will provide an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and to serve as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic target in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible pro-arrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations. PMID:25956967

  18. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  19. Channel dynamics and habitat complexity in a meandering, gravel-bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L. R.; Legleiter, C. J.; Pecquerie, L.; Dunne, T.

    2009-12-01

    River channel dynamics play an important role in creating and maintaining diverse habitat conditions for multiple life stages of aquatic organisms. As a result, many river restoration projects seek to re-establish ecosystems in which an enhanced degree of habitat complexity is sustained through natural fluvial processes of flow, sediment transport, and channel change. Few field cases have effectively quantified the evolution of channel morphology and habitat complexity in restored rivers, however, and the outcomes of restoration actions remain difficult to predict. Our objective was to quantify the extent to which morphology, flow complexity and salmonid spawning and rearing habitat develop from the simplified initial conditions commonly observed in re-configured meandering channels. Using a time-series of topographic data, we measured rates of morphologic change in a recently restored gravel-bed reach of the Merced River, California, USA. We constructed two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic models to quantify how the evolving morphology influenced hydraulic conditions, flow complexity and suitability for Chinook salmon spawning and rearing. Following two large flood events, point bar development led to order-of-magnitude increases in modeled flow complexity, as quantified via the metrics of kinetic energy gradient, vorticity and hydraulic strain. On a bend-averaged scale, morphologic changes produced up to a two-fold increase in flow circulation, indicating a direct linkage between geomorphic processes and the development of habitat complexity at both the local (1.0 m2 grid cell) and meander wavelength scale. Habitat modeling indicated that the availability of Chinook salmon spawning habitat has increased over time, whereas the majority of the reach provides low-medium quality rearing habitat for juvenile salmonids, primarily due to a lack of low velocity refuge zones. These results demonstrate the ability of geomorphic processes to increase flow complexity and

  20. Channel morphodynamics and habitat recovery in a river reach affected by gravel-mining (River Ésera, Ebro basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Tarazon, J. A.; Lobera, G.; Andrés-Doménech, I.; Martínez-Capel, F.; Muñoz-Mas, R.; Vallés, F.; Tena, A.; Vericat, D.; Batalla, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Physical processes in rivers are the result of the interaction between flow regime and hydraulics, morphology, sedimentology and sediment transport. The frequency and magnitude of physical disturbance (i.e. bed stability) control habitat integrity and, consequently, ecological diversity of a particular fluvial system. Most rivers experience human-induced perturbations that alter such hydrosedimentary equilibrium, thus affecting the habitat of aquatic species. A dynamic balance may take long time to be newly attained. Within this context, gravel mining is well known to affect channel characteristics mostly at the local scale, but its effect may also propagate downstream and upstream. Sedimentary forms are modified during extraction and habitat features are reduced or even eliminated. Effects tend to be most acute in contrasted climatic environments, such as the Mediterranean areas, in which climatic and hydrological variability maximises effects of impacts and precludes short regeneration periods. Present research focuses on the evolution of a river reach, which has experienced an intense gravel extraction. The selected area is located in the River Ésera (Ebro basin), where interactions between morphodynamics and habitat recovery are examined. Emphasis is put on monitoring sedimentary, morphological and hydraulic variables to later compare pre (t0) and post (t1, t2... tn) extraction situations. Methodology for all time monitoring steps (i.e. ti) includes: i) characterization of grain size distribution at all of the different hydromorphological units within the reach; ii) description of channel morphology (together with changes before and after floods) by means of close-range aerial photographs, which are taken with a digital camera attached to a 1m3 helium balloon (i.e. BLIMP); and iii) determination of flow parameters from 2D hydraulic modelling that is based on detailed topographical data obtained from Leica® GNSS/GPS and robotic total station, and River

  1. Air-Photograph Based Estimates of Channel Widening within the Minnesota River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterling, C.; Conway, J.; Graves, J.; Lauer, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Minnesota River is a major tributary of the Mississippi River that has experienced a roughly two-fold increase in mean April-November discharge over the past century. Because the Minnesota River supplies the majority of sediment to the Mississippi at the confluence, sediment sources within the basin, and in particular within the Le Sueur River sub-basin, have recently been the subject of several detailed sediment budget studies. One of the potential sediment sources is associated with channel widening. In the present study, we focus on channel widening as a potential source of sediment in the Minnesota, Little Cobb, Maple, Blue Earth, Le Sueur, Redwood, Cottonwood, and Watonwan Rivers, Minnesota. Using aerial photographs, changes in channel bankfull width were measured over the period from 1937 to 2009. Historic photographs were georeferenced to recent high-resolution imagery using a minimum of ten ground control points and a second order polynomial transformation in ArcGIS 9.3. Water surface width and the width between vegetation lines (which we take to be equivalent to the bankfull width) were determined by hand for representative reaches of a minimum of ten meander bends along each river. We chose to digitize by hand to avoid computer misclassification associated with the highly variable color spectra in the historic photographs and because this allowed us to visually interpolate the bank line where scattered overhanging vegetation partially obscured the banks. In general, bankfull width has increased steadily by between 20 and 50 percent over the period of photographic record. However, because our basic method focuses only on the vegetation line, it is possible in principle that the observed changes in width are primarily related to ecological change (i.e. to a change in the elevation at which vegetation colonizes the banks) and not directly to an increase in channel volume (and hence to a net export of sediment from these reaches). To determine whether the

  2. Geomorphic response to flow regulation and channel and floodplain alteration in the gravel-bedded Cedar River, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.

    2012-01-01

    Decadal- to annual-scale analyses of changes to the fluvial form and processes of the Cedar River in Washington State, USA, reveal the effects of flow regulation, bank stabilization, and log-jam removal on a gravel-bedded river in a temperate climate. During the twentieth century, revetments were built along ~ 60% of the lower Cedar River's length and the 2-year return period flow decreased by 47% following flow regulation beginning in 1914. The formerly wide, anastomosing channel narrowed by over 50% from an average of 47 m in 1936 to 23 m in 1989 and became progressively single threaded. Subsequent high flows and localized revetment removal contributed to an increase in mean channel width to about 34 m by 2011. Channel migration rates between 1936 and 2011 were up to 8 m/year in reaches not confined by revetments or valley walls and less than analysis uncertainty throughout most of the Cedar River's length where bank armoring restricted channel movement. In unconfined reaches where large wood and sediment can be recruited, contemporary high flows, though smaller in magnitude than preregulation high flows, form and maintain geomorphic features such as pools, gravel bars, and side channels. Reaches confined by revetments remain mostly unmodified in the regulated flow regime. While high flows are important for maintaining channel dynamics in the Cedar River, their effectiveness is currently reduced by revetments, limited sediment supply, the lack of large wood available for recruitment to the channel, and decreased magnitude since flow regulation.

  3. Significance of active growth faulting on marsh accretion processes in the lower Pearl River, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeager, Kevin M.; Brunner, Charlotte A.; Kulp, Mark A.; Fischer, Dane; Feagin, Rusty A.; Schindler, Kimberly J.; Prouhet, Jeremiah; Bera, Gopal

    2012-06-01

    Neotectonic processes influence marsh accretion in the lower Pearl River valley. Active growth faults are suggested by groupings of ponded river channel sections, transverse and linear river channel sections, and down- and across-valley contrasts in channel sinuosity. Seismic profiles identified several likely, fault-induced structural anomalies, two of which parallel the axes of surface distributary networks. Lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of six cores from across a suspected fault in the West Middle River, combined with 14C-based age control, yielded evidence of vertical offsets, indicating that this river section is on the plane of a growth fault. These data were used to estimate fault slip rates over two time intervals, 1.2 mm/y over the last 1300 yr, and 0.2 mm yr- 1 over the last 3700 yr, and delineated a sinusoidal pattern of deformation moving distally from the fault, which we interpret as resulting from fault-propagation folding. Higher rates of sediment accumulation (of the order of cm yr- 1 from 210Pbxs and 137Cs activity data) on the down-thrown side are consistent with sedimentary response to increased accommodation space, and mass-based sediment accumulation rates (g cm- 2 yr- 1) exhibit a pattern inverse of that shown by fault-driven sinusoidal deformation. We contend that near-surface growth faults are critically important to driving accretion rates and marsh response to sea-level rise.

  4. Control of Sediment Availability on the Path of Channel Recovery in Bedload-Dominated Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, H.; Renshaw, C. E.; Magilligan, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    Following a disturbance, a channel can recover to an equilibrium form by adjusting its slope, width, depth, grain size, or some combination of these dimensions that define the recovery path. In this study we relate the channel recovery path to the quantity and caliber of sediment introduced due to dam construction/removal or erosion caused by flooding. We suggest that the recovery path of a channel depends on the availability of sediment of a size that is transported as bedload during bankfull flows (the "mobile fraction"). We define a ratio, S*, of the sediment volume added to the channel because of the disturbance to the average annual sediment flux. We compare S* values to the recovery path of New England gravel-bedded streams following two dam emplacements and removals and flooding related to Tropical Storm Irene. Pelham Dam in Pelham, MA (removed 2012) and Kendrick Dam in Pittsford, VT (removed 2014) were on similar streams: drainage areas ~25 km2, slopes 1-2%, and bankfull widths ~10 m. Sediment was excavated from both impoundments prior to removal, resulting in lower S* values. Irene-affected study sites are on ~10 gravel-bedded streams in VT, NH, and MA. Sediment input at these sites is due to bank failures and landslides, many of which continue to supply sediment to the channel four years after flooding. To track recovery we collected annual topographic and sediment size data and calculated Shields numbers to determine if channels had reached an equilibrium form. We define equilibrium for bedload rivers as Shields numbers at bankfull discharge equal to that required to initiate bedload transport. Following dam emplacements the channels failed to recover because mobile sediment was unavailable. Fining dominated the recovery at Irene-affected sites (~10% reduction in sediment size) and dam removal sites (up to 30-60% reduction) with little post-disturbance change in channel geometry, possibly due to the limited mobile fraction.

  5. Nature Impact of Channel Planform Change of the river Khowai, Tripura, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Sunando; de, Sunil Kumar; Saha, Sushmita

    2010-05-01

    The Chattagram-Tripura Fold Belt (CTFB) is a relatively young region of deformation developed in an arc-trench setting and may be viewed as westward extension of the more matured Indo-Burman Ranges. The Tripura State occupies the northern part of the CTFB and consists of five major ridges (250~950 m) with progressively higher elevation towards the east. The four intervening synclinal valleys mostly drain north or south. Khowai is one of such rivers that flow between Baramura and Atharamura anticlines. To evaluate the nature and impact of channel planform change of the river Khowai during the last 78 years, we georeferenced and mosaiced six obtainable Survey of India maps of 1932-33 and 1974-75 besides satellite images of 1975 (Landsat-2 MSS), 2001 (Landsat-7 ETM+) and 2009 (IRS-P6 L3+L4-mono). A Corona photograph of 1962 was also available for a part of the study area. From these materials, channels of different survey or imaging years were extracted and superposed. Preliminary results indicate that the Khowai markedly lowered its width-depth ratio and sinuosity—from 2.58 to 1.55—in its alluvial / floodplain reaches between 1932-33 and 1974-75, irrespective of deforested or wooded areas. Its path length reduced by 60 percent. Over the same period, variation in the constricted mountainous reaches of the river was only minor. A number of wetlands associated with the river shrunk or disappeared. Oral histories from the region strongly support these map- or image-based observations. With the absence of any record of significant increase in precipitation or occurrence of earthquake in Tripura since the early 20th century, this region-wide shift in channel patterns points to tectonic control and signals initiation of a new phase of uplift in the northern CTFB. Human inventions may also have some contribution to the change.

  6. Geomorphic Classification and Evaluation of Channel Width and Emergent Sandbar Habitat Relations on the Lower Platte River, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a summary of geomorphic characteristics extracted from aerial imagery for three broad segments of the Lower Platte River. This report includes a summary of the longitudinal multivariate classification in Elliott and others (2009) and presents a new analysis of total channel width and habitat variables. Three segments on the lower 102.8 miles of the Lower Platte River are addressed in this report: the Loup River to the Elkhorn River (70 miles long), the Elkhorn River to Salt Creek (6.9 miles long), and Salt Creek to the Missouri River (25.9 miles long). The locations of these segments were determined by the locations of tributaries potentially significant to the hydrology or sediment supply of the Lower Platte River. This report summarizes channel characteristics as mapped from July 2006 aerial imagery including river width, valley width, channel curvature, and in-channel habitat features. In-channel habitat measurements were not made under consistent hydrologic conditions and must be considered general estimates of channel condition in late July 2006. Longitudinal patterns in these features are explored and are summarized in the context of the longitudinal multivariate classification in Elliott and others (2009) for the three Lower Platte River segments. Detailed descriptions of data collection and classification methods are described in Elliott and others (2009). Nesting data for the endangered interior least tern (Sternula antillarum) and threatened piping plover (Charadrius melodus) from 2006 through 2009 are examined within the context of the multivariate classification and Lower Platte River segments. The widest reaches of the Lower Platte River are located in the segment downstream from the Loup River to the Elkhorn River. This segment also has the widest valley and highest degree of braiding of the three segments and many large vegetated islands. The short segment of river between the Elkhorn River and Salt Creek has a fairly low valley

  7. Quantifying Channel Morphology Changes in Response to the Removal of the Glines Canyon Dam, Elwha River, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Free, B. J.; Ely, L. L.; Hickey, R.; Flake, R.; Baumgartner, S.

    2014-12-01

    The removal of two dams on the Elwha River, Washington, is the largest dam-removal project in history. Our research documents the sediment deposition, erosion, and channel changes between the dams following the initial sediment release from the removal of the upstream Glines Canyon Dam. Within the first year following the dam removal, the pulse of coarse sediment and large woody debris propagated downstream well over 6 km below the dam. The sediment deposition and altered channel hydraulics caused lateral channel migration where anabranching channels merge around new mid-channel bars and at large bends in the river channel. Documenting the river channel response to this exceptional sediment pulse could improve models of the impacts of future dam removals on similar gravel-bed rivers. We quantified the sediment flux and channel changes at four field sites 2-6 km downstream of Glines Canyon Dam. Topographic changes were surveyed with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) on an annual basis from August 2012 - August 2014 and the surface sediment distribution was quantified with bimonthly sediment counts. Differencing the annual TLS data yielded an overall increase in sediment throughout the study reach, with a minimum of 20,000 m3 of deposition on bars and banks exposed above the water surface in each 700-m-long TLS survey reach. The surface sediment distribution decreased from ~18 cm to < 1 mm. Large woody debris transported downstream from the former reservoir contributed to the formation of new sand and gravel bars along the channel margin at two sites as well as the longitudinal growth of several bars throughout the study area. The new bar formations have continued to propagate downstream as new sediment and woody debris have been added and remobilized, increasing the complexity of the river channel. By spring 2013, channel features that were present before the dam removal began to re-emerge due to the remobilizing of sediment through the system.

  8. Strontium isotopic compositions of dissolved and suspended loads from the main channel of the Yangtze River.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Liang; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2007-10-01

    The concentrations of Sr and (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotopic ratios have been measured in the dissolved loads from the main channel of the Yangtze River. The result shows that the Yangtze River mainstream water has considerably higher Sr concentration (202-330 microg kg(-1)) and slightly lower (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio (0.7098-0.7108) than the global average runoff values of dissolved Sr (78 microg kg(-1)) and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio (0.7119). The (87)Sr/(86)Sr values of 0.7098-0.7108 in river waters result from the intense weathering of carbonate and evaporate rocks that enriched in the Yangtze River drainage basin. The calculated result based on the end-member mixing model shows that about 91% of total dissolved Sr are derived from the weathering of carbonate and evaporate rocks and the other 9% derived from the weathering of silicate rock. The Yangtze River transports about 1.86 x1 0(11)g yr(-1) (2.12 x 10(9)mol yr(-1)) of dissolved Sr annually to the East China Sea, with an average (87)Sr/(86)Sr of 0.7108. The calculated "(87)Sr(excess) flux" of the Yangtze River is about 2.12 x 10(7)mol yr(-1), indicating the important impact on seawater Sr isotope evolution. The measured (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios of suspended particulate matters in the Yangtze River water ranging from 0.7178 to 0.7252, are about 0.015 higher than that of corresponding dissolved loads, reflecting more important contribution of silicate particles in suspended particulate matters and preferential dissolution of carbonate rocks during basin weathering.

  9. Recent morphological changes in the Mekong and Bassac river channels, Mekong delta: The marked impact of river-bed mining and implications for delta destabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Anthony, Edward J.; Goichot, Marc; Provansal, Mireille; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The Mekong delta, in Vietnam, is the world's third largest delta. Densely populated, the delta has been significantly armoured with engineering works and dykes to protect populations and infrastructure from storms, and shrimp farms from saltwater intrusion. Considerable development pressures in Vietnam and in the upstream countries have resulted in the construction of several dams in China and in important channel-bed aggregate extractions especially in Cambodia. The effects of these developments impact the delta dynamics in various ways. In this study, changes in the channel morphology of the Mekong proper and the Bassac, the two main distributaries in the 250 km-long deltaic reach from the Cambodian border to the coast, were analysed using channel depth data for 1998 and 2008. The channels display important and irregular bed changes over the 10-year comparison period, including significant incision and expansion and deepening of numerous pools. The mean depth of both channels increased by more than 1.3 m. Both channels also showed correlative significant bed material losses: respectively 90 million m3 in the Mekong and 110 million m3 in the Bassac over the 10-year period. These important losses over a relatively short period, and weak correlations between bed incision and hydraulic parameters suggest that the marked morphological changes are not in equilibrium with flow and sediment entrainment conditions, and are therefore not related to changes in river hydrology. We claim that aggregate extraction, currently practised on a very large scale in the Mekong delta channels and upstream of the delta, is the main cause of these recent morphological changes. These changes are deemed to contribute actively to rampant bank erosion in the delta as well as to erosion of the Mekong delta shoreline. Other contributory activities include the numerous dykes and embankments. The role of existing dams in bed losses remains unclear in the absence of reliable data on the Mekong

  10. Differences in ichthyofauna feeding habits among lateral lagoons and the river channel in a large reservoir.

    PubMed

    Ferrareze, M; Nogueira, M G; Casatti, L

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated differences in feeding habits of small-sized ichthyofauna among lateral lagoons and the river channel in a large reservoir. The study was performed in four lagoons and in one sampling site of the main channel in Rosana Reservoir, Paranapanema River, Brazil. The samples were taken in September and November of 2004 and in January, March, May, and August of 2005. Fish were sampled with a 7.5 m2 hand net. Five manual throws were made toward aquatic macrophytes stands. The sampling design favored the collection of small-sized fish fauna (juveniles/small-sized species). The stomach contents of 42 species were analyzed. A total of 183 different items were consumed by fish. These items were grouped in 11 food categories, which were used to classify fish into seven trophic guilds. Aquatic insects were consumed by 32 species and were the predominant feeding item. In the river, the most consumed items were aquatic insects, cladocerans, and phytoplankton, whereas in the lagoons aquatic insects, copepods, and cladocerans were the main items. By comparing each trophic guild, the number of insectivores, algivores, and zooplanktivores species was higher in the lagoons than in the river, and the opposite was found only for omnivore fish. Low niche width in all sites indicates high trophic specialization and low niche overlap between pairs of species. Fish assemblage in the lateral lagoons presents feeding habits distinct from those of the river species, indicating that the coexistence and high abundance of small-sized fish in the sampling sites are explained by their high feeding adaptability, which includes a tendency toward dietary specialization, low feeding overlap, and resource partitioning, along with different temporal resource uses. PMID:26132022

  11. Differences in ichthyofauna feeding habits among lateral lagoons and the river channel in a large reservoir.

    PubMed

    Ferrareze, M; Nogueira, M G; Casatti, L

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated differences in feeding habits of small-sized ichthyofauna among lateral lagoons and the river channel in a large reservoir. The study was performed in four lagoons and in one sampling site of the main channel in Rosana Reservoir, Paranapanema River, Brazil. The samples were taken in September and November of 2004 and in January, March, May, and August of 2005. Fish were sampled with a 7.5 m2 hand net. Five manual throws were made toward aquatic macrophytes stands. The sampling design favored the collection of small-sized fish fauna (juveniles/small-sized species). The stomach contents of 42 species were analyzed. A total of 183 different items were consumed by fish. These items were grouped in 11 food categories, which were used to classify fish into seven trophic guilds. Aquatic insects were consumed by 32 species and were the predominant feeding item. In the river, the most consumed items were aquatic insects, cladocerans, and phytoplankton, whereas in the lagoons aquatic insects, copepods, and cladocerans were the main items. By comparing each trophic guild, the number of insectivores, algivores, and zooplanktivores species was higher in the lagoons than in the river, and the opposite was found only for omnivore fish. Low niche width in all sites indicates high trophic specialization and low niche overlap between pairs of species. Fish assemblage in the lateral lagoons presents feeding habits distinct from those of the river species, indicating that the coexistence and high abundance of small-sized fish in the sampling sites are explained by their high feeding adaptability, which includes a tendency toward dietary specialization, low feeding overlap, and resource partitioning, along with different temporal resource uses.

  12. Indirect activation of the epithelial Na+ channel by trypsin.

    PubMed

    Bengrine, Abderrahmane; Li, Jinqing; Hamm, L Lee; Awayda, Mouhamed S

    2007-09-14

    We tested the hypothesis that the serine protease trypsin can indirectly activate the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). Experiments were carried out in Xenopus oocytes and examined the effects on the channel formed by all three human ENaC subunits and that formed by Xenopus epsilon and human beta and gamma subunits (epsilonbetagammaENaC). Low levels of trypsin (1-10 ng/ml) were without effects on the oocyte endogenous conductances and were specifically used to test the effects on ENaC. Addition of 1 ng/ml trypsin for 60 min stimulated the amiloride-sensitive human ENaC conductance (g(Na)) by approximately 6-fold. This effect on the g(Na) was [Na(+)]-independent, thereby ruling out an interaction with channel feedback inhibition by Na(+). The indirect nature of this activation was confirmed in cell-attached patch clamp experiments with trypsin added to the outside of the pipette. Trypsin was comparatively ineffective at activating epsilonbetagammaENaC, a channel that exhibited a high spontaneous open probability. These observations, in combination with surface binding experiments, indicated that trypsin indirectly activated membrane-resident channels. Activation by trypsin was also dependent on catalytic activity of this protease but was not accompanied by channel subunit proteolysis. Channel activation was dependent on downstream activation of G-proteins and was blocked by G-protein inhibition by injection of guanyl-5'-yl thiophosphate and by pre-stimulation of phospholipase C. These data indicate a receptor-mediated activation of ENaC by trypsin. This trypsin-activated receptor is distinct from that of protease-activated receptor-2, because the response to trypsin was unaffected by protease-activated receptor-2 overexpression or knockdown. PMID:17627947

  13. Chloride dependence of hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel gates.

    PubMed

    Pusch, M; Jordt, S E; Stein, V; Jentsch, T J

    1999-03-01

    1. ClC proteins are a class of voltage-dependent Cl- channels with several members mutated in human diseases. The prototype ClC-0 Torpedo channel is a dimeric protein; each subunit forms a pore that can gate independently from the other one. A common slower gating mechanism acts on both pores simultaneously; slow gating activates ClC-0 at hyperpolarized voltages. The ClC-2 Cl- channel is also activated by hyperpolarization, as are some ClC-1 mutants (e.g. D136G) and wild-type (WT) ClC-1 at certain pH values. 2. We studied the dependence on internal Cl- ([Cl-]i) of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of several ClC channels (WT ClC-0, ClC-0 mutant P522G, ClC-1 mutant D136G and an N-terminal deletion mutant of ClC-2), by patch clamping channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 3. With all these channels, reducing [Cl-]i shifted activation to more negative voltages and reduced the maximal activation at most negative voltages. 4. We also investigated the external halide dependence of WT ClC-2 using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Reducing external Cl- ([Cl-]o) activated ClC-2 currents. Replacing [Cl-]o by the less permeant Br- reduced channel activity and accelerated deactivation. 5. Gating of the ClC-2 mutant K566Q in normal [Cl-]o resembled that of WT ClC-2 in low [Cl-]o, i.e. channels had a considerable open probability (Po) at resting membrane potential. Substituting external Cl- by Br- or I- led to a decrease in Po. 6. The [Cl-]i dependence of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of various ClC channels suggests a similar gating mechanism, and raises the possibility that the gating charge for the hyperpolarization-activated gate is provided by Cl-. 7. The external halide dependence of hyperpolarization-activated gating of ClC-2 suggests that it is mediated or modulated by anions as in other ClC channels. In contrast to the depolarization-activated fast gates of ClC-0 and ClC-1, the absence of Cl- favours channel opening. Lysine 556 may be important for the

  14. Equilibrium Cross-section for River Channel with Cohesive Erodible Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francalanci, S.; Lanzoni, S.; Macovei, D.; Solari, L.

    2012-12-01

    Bank erosion processes represent an important factor in driving planform changes, meander development and channel width adjustments in alluvial rivers. Recent literature of the last decade has shown that bank retreat process often involves combination of fluvial erosion and mass wasting, giving important contribution to the amount of sediment delivered downstream. In particular fluvial (or hydraulic) erosion involves the removal of bank materials by the direct erosive action of the flow, and it is one on the triggering factors of mass wasting such that the long-term rate of bank retreat is controlled by the rate of hydraulic erosion at the toe. A theoretical framework is here proposed to investigate the equilibrium cross-section in a river channel with cohesive erodible bank: the equilibrium width and the near-bank shear stress are predicted, given the channel and bank roughness characterization and the hydraulic variables which define the flow in the central region (slope, discharge, depth at bankfull condition). In this approach the solution for the flow obtained with a simple 1D model is coupled with a theoretical model to derive the boundary shear stress. The Kean and Smith (2006) model, which predicts the flow over the irregular bank topography that is characteristic of fine-grained riverbanks, provides a means to partition the form and skin drag components of bank boundary shear stress and thus determine the extent to which form drag influences bank erosion rates and channel equilibrium width. In this work, the hydraulic bank erosion rates are quantified using an excess shear stress formula; hence, the river channel is supposed to widen if the banks are unstable under the given hydraulic conditions, while the shape of the bank profile is conserved. The procedure is repeated until the equilibrium width associated with stable bank is reached. The results showed that form roughness induced by bank topographic features is a major component of the spatially

  15. A reduced-complexity model for river delta formation - Part 1: Modeling deltas with channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2014-07-01

    We develop a reduced-complexity model (RCM) delta formation model, in contrast to reductionist models based on high-resolution computational fluid dynamics. The basic framework of this model (referred in this paper as "DeltaRCM") consists of stochastic parcel-based cellular routing schemes for water and sediment and a set of phenomenological rules for sediment deposition and erosion. The outputs of the model include flow field, water surface topography and bed topography that evolves in time. Results show that DeltaRCM is able to: (1) resolve a wide range of channel dynamics, including elongation, bifurcation, avulsion and migration; (2) in response to the changes in input parameters, produce different types of deltas such as alluvial fan deltas at experimental scale. We also identify three key areas of particular model sensitivity, even at the RCM level: (1) avulsion dynamics is sensitive to dynamic free-surface topography; (2) channel network structure is sensitive to instability at channel mouths which creates bars; and (3) out-of-channel sedimentation is sensitive to water surface slope along channel margins. We also demonstrate a simple stratigraphy tracking component which can display the structure of the deposit in terms of distribution of coarse and fine materials along with the age of the deposit. DeltaRCM is a useful tool for understanding the dynamics of river deltas within a relatively simple cellular representation of water and sediment transport.

  16. The geomorphological characteristics of the Mekong River in northern Cambodia: A mixed bedrock-alluvial multi-channel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkova, Liubov V.; Carling, Paul A.

    2012-04-01

    The controls on the development of channel morphology of bedrock-constrained rivers are poorly known. The relative importance of lithological and structural control on channel alignment and character in comparison with the role of hydraulic erosion of the substratum is unclear. In addition, bedrock rivers often have a variable sediment fill and can be described as mixed bedrock-alluvial systems. The Mekong River in northern Cambodia is an anastomosed mixed bedrock-alluvial channel, but little and poorly researched. In this paper information has been gathered from diverse literature sources; digital data sets showing topography, hydrology, geology and land cover; past aerial photographs; and maps. Such data, together with field survey, provide a clear picture of the Mekong River in this region. The channels may be classified into three types: primary, secondary, cross channels. The varying characteristics of these three help towards understanding the evolution of the modern Mekong. Similarly the two-fold classification of the islands reveals the relationship between island inundation characteristics and the annual monsoon flood cycle. The associated riparian vegetation ecotones include a rare and unusual seasonally-inundated forest. Spatial variations in lithology and structure, when combined with maps of river networks, reveals that the channel alignments locally reflect the geological factors that cause the regional topographical gradient. Fault-line constraints on the local slopes of the channel may induce backwater effects and consequent sedimentation patterns (alluvial overprints) or alternatively, steepening of the channels with concomitant reduction in sedimentation. These structural constraints, taken together, lead to the identification of a mixed bedrock-alluvial five-fold geomorphological zonation within the study area. The general absence of paleochannels, and terraces close to the modern river, indicates that the Mekong is laterally stable with a

  17. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of River Channel Migration on the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta: 2000-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, C.; Chiu, S.; Sousa, D.; Mondal, D. R.; Steckler, M. S.; Akhter, S. H.; Mia, B.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Wilson, C.; Seeber, L.

    2014-12-01

    We use multitemporal multiscale satellite remote sensing to complement field observations and subsurface measurements to better understand the relationship between recent and historic fluvial dynamics on the Ganges-Brahmaputra (GB) delta. To provide regional context for the interannual changes in river channel geometry we conduct spatiotemporal (ST) analyses of MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) imagery for 2000-2013 using a new method of Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis. We use EVI because it distinguishes water from wet and dry sediment on the basis of the spectral slope at VNIR wavelengths. Water has a negative slope while dry sediment has a small positive slope and vegetation has a large positive slope. To characterize the ST patterns associated with river channel migration we use iterative EOF analysis (iEOF). In iEOF we first conduct a single year EOF analysis for each year in the time series to identify the primary spatial principal component (PC1) for each year and separate this from the spatial structure of the subannual temporal patterns associated with vegetation phenology. We then construct a decadal time series of PC 1 for each single year and conduct a second EOF analysis of the time series of 13 individual year PCs. The standard EOFs of the full (312 images x 16 day) time series only resolve a decadal trend (EOF 8), but the iEOF clearly distinguishs the progressive decadal trend (EOF 2) from the cyclic component (EOF 3) of decadal changes in sediment reflectance. The temporal feature space constructed from PC 2 and PC 3 (corresponding to temporal EOFs 2 and 3) distinguishes pixels with progressive decadal increases and decreases in reflectance from pixels with cyclic changes. Evolution of the annual structure is animated at www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM1UYvdnYXk Despite significant differences in the 2 rivers'morphologies, and the considerable magnitude of flooding every year, we observe year-to-year continuity in the progressive

  18. How are River Discharge - Suspended Sediment Relations Influenced by Watershed and Channel-Floodplain Morphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, A. A.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Erosion, transport and deposition of fine sediment (clay, silt and fine sand) influence the form and function of river systems. Excess suspended sediment degrades stream ecosystems and is implicated as a leading cause of water quality and aquatic life impairment. Consequently, understanding the factors that control fine sediment transport regimes is an interesting topic for basic science and one that has important management and policy implications. Fine sediment is mostly transported in suspension as a non-capacity load; transport rates are dependent on sediment supply in addition to a river's transport capacity. Many studies have investigated watershed-scale topographic, hydrologic, climatic, and land use influences on fine sediment erosion and transport regimes. Several recent studies in a wide range of landscapes have demonstrated that the majority of suspended sediment may be sourced from the near-channel environment; therefore, near-channel morphological characteristics may provide better predictive power compared to watershed averages. This study analyzes recent total suspended solids (TSS) data from 45 gages on 35 separate rivers. The rivers span the state of Minnesota, draining basins ranging from 33 km2 to 68100 km2 with distinct settings in terms of topography, land cover, hydrology and geologic history. We generate rating curves of the form TSS = aQb, where Q is normalized discharge and a and b are parameters that describe the shape of the relations. Values of a range from 4 to 138 mg/L; b values range from -0.53 to 1.86. We use high resolution lidar topography data to characterize the near-channel environment upstream of gages. In addition to commonly studied metrics describing the topographic, climatic/hydrologic and land use setting of the basin, we extract near-channel morphometrics that we hypothesize to influence fine sediment generation and transport: the difference in height of banks/bluffs (a measure of the amount of material available to be

  19. Geomorphic response to channel modifications of Skuna River at the State Highway 9 crossing at Bruce, Calhoun County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K.V.; Turnipseed, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    Skuna River at State Highway 9 at Bruce, Calhoun County, Mississippi, has geomorphically responded to channel modifications by lowering of the channel bed through degradation, which heightened and steepened channel banks and induced widening. Skuna River Canal (Skuna River) has typically degraded about 16.5 feet and widened about 150 feet from 1925 (when constructed) to 1992. Old Skuna River has degraded and widened about 11 feet and 40 feet, respectively, from 1921 to 1991. Skuna River Canal tributary has degraded about 6 feet from 1921 to 1991. Most of the geomorphic response on the Old River and the tributary seems to be a consequence of modifications of the canal. The bankfull discharge of the canal has increased about 1,450 percent, and the channel slope has decreased about 34 percent from 1925 to 1989. The bankfull stream power has been decreasing since 1980. The bankfull channel width-depth ratio has been increasing since 1975, which indicates the canal has been widening more than degrading since 1975. As much as 1 foot of additional degradation and 40 feet of additional widening are projected through 2010 on Skuna River Canal in the vicinity of State Highway 9. About 70 feet of additional widening could occur before the canal reaches quasi-equilibrium, which will likely be reached after 2010. If Old Skuna River and Skuna River Canal tributary degrade as much as the canal, which is doubtful, then about 6 and 11 feet of additional degradation could occur by 2010 on the Old Skuna River and the tributary, respectively, at State Highway 9. Old Skuna River and the tributary could both widen an additional 30 feet in the next 10 to 20 years. The channel low-stage thalweg of Skuna River Canal is beginning to meander around sandbars inducing lateral erosion of the channel banks. The widening projections in this report do not directly account for lateral erosion and are considered to be a minimum for the typical channel reach. Lateral erosion will likely have a

  20. Evaluation of Lower Umatilla River Channel Modifications Below Three Mile Dam, 1984 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nigro, Anthony A.; Ward, David L.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes results of the first year of a study initiated in September 1984 to evaluate the adequacy of channel modifications made in the lower Umatilla River to improve adult anadromous salmonid passage to Three Mile Dam (RKm 5.6), determine if fish passage or delay problems exist at Three Mile Dam and recommend site specific corrective measures if needed. Movements of steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) were monitored using mark and recapture and radio telemetry techniques. Thirty-four steelhead were marked with T-anchor tags and released in the lower river. Fifteen of those marked were also fitted with radio transmitters. Three radiotagged steelhead migrated through channel modifications to Three Mile Dam. Two of these fish migrated to the dam in less than 26 hours, but held just below the dam for 7 and 10 days before entering the ladders. The third steelhead delayed for 30 days and entered the west ladder within 24 hours of arrival at the dam. Two other radiotagged steelhead moved upstream through some of the channel modifications but did not migrate to the dam. Only one of 19 marked steelhead not fitted with transmitters was recovered at Three Mile Dam. 14 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Channel morphodynamics in four reaches of the Lower Missouri River, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Reuter, Joanna M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Channel morphodynamics in response to flow modifications from Gavins Point Dam are examined in four reaches of the Lower Missouri River. Measures include changes in channel morphology and indicators of sediment transport in four 6 kilometer long reaches located downstream from Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, Kenslers Bend, Nebraska, Little Sioux, Iowa, and Miami, Missouri. Each of the four reaches was divided into 300 transects with a 20-meter spacing and surveyed during the summer in 2006 and 2007. A subset of 30 transects was randomly selected and surveyed 7-10 times in 2006-07 over a wide range of discharges including managed and natural flow events. Hydroacoustic mapping used a survey-grade echosounder and a Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System to evaluate channel change. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements were used to evaluate bed-sediment velocity. Results indicate varying amounts of deposition, erosion, net change, and sediment transport in the four Lower Missouri River reaches. The Yankton reach was the most stable over monthly and annual time-frames. The Kenslers Bend and Little Sioux reaches exhibited substantial amounts of deposition and erosion, although net change was generally low in both reaches. Total, or gross geomorphic change was greatest in the Kenslers Bend reach. The Miami reach exhibited varying rates of deposition and erosion, and low net change. The Yankton, Kenslers Bend, and Miami reaches experienced net erosion during the time period that bracketed the managed May 2006 spring rise event from Gavins Point Dam.

  2. Channel Morphodynamics in Four Reaches of the Lower Missouri River, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Reuter, Joanna M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Channel morphodynamics in response to flow modifications from Gavins Point Dam are examined in four reaches of the Lower Missouri River. Measures include changes in channel morphology and indicators of sediment transport in four 6 kilometer long reaches located downstream from Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, Kenslers Bend, Nebraska, Little Sioux, Iowa, and Miami, Missouri. Each of the four reaches was divided into 300 transects with a 20-meter spacing and surveyed during the summer in 2006 and 2007. A subset of 30 transects was randomly selected and surveyed 7-10 times in 2006-07 over a wide range of discharges including managed and natural flow events. Hydroacoustic mapping used a survey-grade echosounder and a Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System to evaluate channel change. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements were used to evaluate bed-sediment velocity. Results indicate varying amounts of deposition, erosion, net change, and sediment transport in the four Lower Missouri River reaches. The Yankton reach was the most stable over monthly and annual time-frames. The Kenslers Bend and Little Sioux reaches exhibited substantial amounts of deposition and erosion, although net change was generally low in both reaches. Total, or gross geomorphic change was greatest in the Kenslers Bend reach. The Miami reach exhibited varying rates of deposition and erosion, and low net change. The Yankton, Kenslers Bend, and Miami reaches experienced net erosion during the time period that bracketed the managed May 2006 spring rise event from Gavins Point Dam.

  3. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  4. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  5. Ion permeation of AQP6 water channel protein. Single channel recordings after Hg2+ activation.

    PubMed

    Hazama, Akihiro; Kozono, David; Guggino, William B; Agre, Peter; Yasui, Masato

    2002-08-01

    Aquaporin-6 (AQP6) has recently been identified as an intracellular vesicle water channel with anion permeability that is activated by low pH or HgCl2. Here we present direct evidence of AQP6 channel gating using patch clamp techniques. Cell-attached patch recordings of AQP6 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes indicated that AQP6 is a gated channel with intermediate conductance (49 picosiemens in 100 mm NaCl) induced by 10 microm HgCl2. Current-voltage relationships were linear, and open probability was fairly constant at any given voltage, indicating that Hg2+-induced AQP6 conductance is voltage-independent. The excised outside-out patch recording revealed rapid activation of AQP6 channels immediately after application of 10 microm HgCl2. Reduction of both Na+ and Cl- concentrations from 100 to 30 mm did not shift the reversal potential of the Hg2+-induced AQP6 current, suggesting that Na+ is as permeable as Cl-. The Na+ permeability of Hg2+-induced AQP6 current was further demonstrated by 22Na+ influx measurements. Site-directed mutagenesis identified Cys-155 and Cys-190 residues as the sites of Hg2+ activation both for water permeability and ion conductance. The Hill coefficient from the concentration-response curve for Hg2+-induced conductance was 1.1 +/- 0.3. These data provide the first evidence of AQP6 channel gating at a single-channel level and suggest that each monomer contains the pore region for ions based on the number of Hg2+-binding sites and the kinetics of Hg2+-activation of the channel. PMID:12034750

  6. Flow structure and channel morphodynamics of meander bend chute cutoffs: A case study of the Wabash River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, Jessica A.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Best, James L.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2013-12-01

    paper documents the three-dimensional structure of flow and bed morphology of two developing chute cutoffs on a single meander bend on the lower Wabash River, USA, and relates the flow structure to patterns of morphologic change in the evolving cutoff channels. The upstream end of the cutoff channels is characterized by: (1) a zone of flow velocity reduction/stagnation and bar development in the main channel across from the cutoff entrance, (2) flow separation and bar development along the inner (left) bank of the cutoff channel immediately downstream from the cutoff entrance, and (3) helical motion and outward advection of flow momentum entering the cutoff channel, leading to erosion of the outer (right) bank of the cutoff channel. At the downstream end of the cutoff channels, the major hydrodynamic and morphologic features are: (1) flow stagnation along the bank of the main channel immediately upstream of the cutoff channel mouth, (2) convergence of flows from the cutoff and main channels, (3) helical motion of flow from the cutoff, (4) a zone of reduced velocity along the bank of the main channel immediately downstream from the cutoff channel mouth, and (5) development of a prominent bar complex that penetrates into the main channel and extends from the stagnation zone upstream to downstream of the cutoff mouth. These results provide the basis for a conceptual model of chute-cutoff dynamics in which the upstream and downstream ends of a cutoff channel are treated as a bifurcation and confluence, respectively.

  7. Experiments in dam removal, sediment pulses and channel evolution on the Clark Fork River, MT and White Salmon River, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Two recent dam removals on tributaries to the Columbia River in the northwestern United States present contrasting examples of how dam removal methods, reservoir contents, and geomorphic settings influence system responses. The 2008 removal of Milltown Dam, from the Clark Fork River (CFR), Montana, and the 2011 removal of Condit Dam from the White Salmon River (WSR), Washington (Table 1), represent two of the largest dam removals to date. The Milltown Dam removal was notable because the dam stored millions of cubic meters of contaminated mine tailings, a portion of which were excavated as part of Superfund remediation but a portion of which flowed downstream after the removal. On the CFR, post-breach high flows in 2008 produced reservoir erosion and downstream deposition in bed interstices, along bars, and on the floodplain, but above-average (3-15 year recurrence interval) floods since then have remobilized this material and have, to a large extent, erased signs of downstream sedimentation. The Condit Dam removal entailed dynamiting of a 4m by 5.5m hole at the base of the dam, which produced rapid and dramatic draining of fine reservoir sediments within hours of the blast. Downstream of Condit Dam, the initial hyperconcentrated flows and sediment pulse draped the WSR with fine sediment, filled pools, and, in an unconfined reach influenced by the Columbia River's backwater, caused meters of aggradation and new bar formation. In the confined, bedrock-dominated reach downstream of the Condit site, pool-riffle structure has started to reemerge as of summer 2012 and the finest bed materials have been evacuated from the main channel, although sediment storage in pools and eddies persists. Whereas post-breach geomorphic responses on the CFR have been largely driven by hydrology, the post-breach evolution of the WSR has been predominantly influenced by antecedent geomorphic conditions (slope, confinement, and Columbia River backwater). On both the CFR and WSR, the pace of

  8. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals.

  9. Active Integrated Filters for RF-Photonic Channelizers

    PubMed Central

    Nagdi, Amr El; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P.; Hunt, Louis R.; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L.; Christensen, Marc P.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1–5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain. PMID:22319352

  10. Changes to channel sediments resulting from complex human impacts in a gravel-bed river, Polish Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiejska, Joanna; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Hajdukiewicz, Hanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Mikuś, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    During the second half of the twentieth century, many sections of the Czarny Dunajec River, Polish Carpathians, were considerably modified by channelization as well as gravel-mining and the resultant channel incision (up to 3.5 m). This paper examines changes to the longitudinal pattern of grain size and sorting of bed material in an 18-km-long river reach. Surface bed-material grain size was established on 47 gravel bars and compared with a reference downstream fining trend of bar sediments derived from the sites with average river width and a vertically stable channel. Contrary to expectations, the extraction of cobbles from the channel bed in the upper part of the study reach, conducted in the past decades, has resulted in the marked coarsening of bed material in this river section. The extraction facilitated entrainment of exposed finer grains and has led to rapid bed degradation, whereas the concentration of flood flows in the increasingly deep and narrow channel has increased their competence and enabled a delivery of the coarse particles previously typical of the upstream reach. The middle section of the study reach, channelized to prevent sediment delivery to a downstream reservoir, now transfers the bed material flushed out from the incising upstream section. With considerably increased transport capacity of the river and with sediment delivery from bank erosion eliminated by bank reinforcements, bar sediments in the channelized section are typified by increased size of the finer fraction and better-than-average sorting. In the wide, multi-thread channel in the lower part of the reach, low unit stream power and high channel-form roughness facilitate sediment deposition and are reflected in relatively fine grades of bar gravels. The study showed that selective extraction of larger particles from the channel bed leads to channel incision at and upstream of the mining site. However, unlike bulk gravel mining, selective extraction does not result in sediment

  11. Investigating the Performance of One- and Two-dimensional Flood Models in a Channelized River Network: A Case Study of the Obion River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyanapu, A. J.; Dullo, T. T.; Thornton, J. C.; Auld, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Obion River, is located in the northwestern Tennessee region, and discharges into the Mississippi River. In the past, the river system was largely channelized for agricultural purposes that resulted in increased erosion, loss of wildlife habitat and downstream flood risks. These impacts are now being slowly reversed mainly due to wetland restoration. The river system is characterized by a large network of "loops" around the main channels that hold water either from excess flows or due to flow diversions. Without data on each individual channel, levee, canal, or pond it is not known where the water flows from or to. In some segments along the river, the natural channel has been altered and rerouted by the farmers for their irrigation purposes. Satellite imagery can aid in identifying these features, but its spatial coverage is temporally sparse. All the alterations that have been done to the watershed make it difficult to develop hydraulic models, which could predict flooding and droughts. This is especially true when building one-dimensional (1D) hydraulic models compared to two-dimensional (2D) models, as the former cannot adequately simulate lateral flows in the floodplain and in complex terrains. The objective of this study therefore is to study the performance of 1D and 2D flood models in this complex river system, evaluate the limitations of 1D models and highlight the advantages of 2D models. The study presents the application of HEC-RAS and HEC-2D models developed by the Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), a division of the US Army Corps of Engineers. The broader impacts of this study is the development of best practices for developing flood models in channelized river systems and in agricultural watersheds.

  12. From meander bend to oxbow lake: flow, channel morphology and sedimentology of an evolving chute cutoff on the Wabash River, IL-IN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, J. A.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J. L.; Johnson, K.

    2012-12-01

    Chute channels develop on meandering rivers in a wide variety of environments, and in many cases result in bend cutoff and formation of an oxbow lake. During the transition from active meander bend to oxbow lake, the chute channel and original bend create a paired bifurcation-confluence unit. Here, we present field documentation of the evolving flow structure within a recent chute cutoff on the Wabash River, IL-IN, focusing on the bifurcation located on the upstream limb of the original bend. Previous studies indicate that this is the location of greatest sedimentation rates prior to complete plugging of the bend (e.g. Shields & Abt, 1989). We seek to isolate the fundamental processes causing rapid sedimentation in the upstream limb of the bend, using repeated hydroacoustic measurements of bed elevation and three-dimensional flow velocity at several key cross-sections. We also employ differential GPS surveys of channel banklines, analysis of aerial photographs and sampling of sediment on exposed bars at low flow, to aid interpretations of the cross-sectional data. This paper will detail the co-evolution of flow structure and channel morphology at this site and examine the coherent patterns of erosion and deposition responsible for oxbow lake formation. Reference: Shields, FD; Abt, SR (1989). Sediment deposition in cutoff meander bends and implications for effective management. Regulated Rivers: Research & Management 4, 381-396.

  13. Hydrogeomorphic adjustments of stream channels disturbed by urban runoff (Yzeron River basin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, O.; Breil, P.; Schmitt, L.; Grosprêtre, L.; Albert, M. B.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryThis paper presents a field investigation on hydrogeomorphic adjustments of small streams in a 147 km2 periurban catchment, the Yzeron River catchment located in France. The rapid development of periurban areas in the world is now considered as one of the main factor impacting river systems. Urban disturbances are most of the time associated with irreversible alterations of the hydrological regime, the sediment yields, with major ecological impacts and additional socio-economical costs. Nineteen stream reaches have been considered in this study, with drainage areas ranging from 0.2 to 33.9 km2 and total impervious areas ranging from 1% to 52% of the basin surface. A regional analysis was led in order (i) to quantify the hydrogeomorphic adjustments of stream channels in this periurban context, i.e. the ratios between observed values and reference/rural values; and (ii) to identify the main anthropogenic controlling factors of these adjustments. Results show that urban river channels experience a global enlargement, with a mean bankfull discharge ratio of 1.8, bankfull width and depth ratios of 1.3 and a bankfull area ratio of 1.8. This study also outlines the global increase of hydrogeomorphic adjustments with the increase of the fraction of impervious area and the level of disturbance of the flood regime. However, local anthropogenic factors seem to be much more relevant to explain the highest adjustment ratios at several river reaches (enlargement ratio up to 55). The vicinity of a river reach with road sewers and/or the urban areas is identified to be a very important factor that affects significantly the smallest streams (drainage area less than 5 km2). On the contrary, at several reaches no significant deepening or widening was observed although roads/urban sewers and urban areas were identified in their catchment. Several hypotheses are proposed, but additional works with new data (river monitoring) would be needed to propose management and

  14. The use of extremal hypotheses as a means of predicting alluvial channel dimensions for river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranmer, A.; Goodwin, P.

    2013-12-01

    In designing fluvial infrastructure and restoration projects the question often arises, what are the cross sectional characteristics of width, depth, roughness, and slope necessary to ensure no net aggradation or degradation occurs within a given reach of river? Current fluvial design utilizes empirical and numerical methods to calculate the required slope and geometry of alluvial channels; however, no solution has been proposed that fully incorporates the necessary 3-dimensional mechanics of open channels due to the complicated processes and feedbacks that occur during mobile bed conditions. This is further compounded by numerous local geologic constraints and perturbations that must be considered, which interrupt the evolution towards a balance of deposition and erosion, or the condition of dynamic-equilibrium. However, given the moderate success of power law relations, such as regime theory and hydraulic geometry, it is evident self-organizing processes are present in watersheds that scale channel size and sinuosity to some average condition in order to maintain a balance of fluid and sediment flux from the upstream catchment. Extremal hypotheses have been developed as an alternative to solving the reach scale 3-dimensional conservation laws for fluid and sediment, to provide a first order means of predicting channel dimensions in an objective and reproducible manner. This study evaluates the performance of extremal hypotheses in identifying the trend towards dynamic-equilibrium over unique spatial gradients in 2 gravel-bed river systems. Using a location-for-time-substitution approach, extremal hypotheses were examined over a longitudinal gradient of channel evolution towards reaches found to be near equilibrium in an unconfined, transport-limited river in the undisturbed rain forest of Chilean Patagonia and a supply-limited, semi-confined canyon system in Central Idaho, USA. Field data from these two sites imply alluvial systems attempt to minimize their

  15. Relationship among fish assemblages and main-channel-border physical habitats in the unimpounded Upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barko, V.A.; Herzog, D.P.; Hrabik, R.A.; Scheibe, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    Large rivers worldwide have been altered by the construction and maintenance of navigation channels, which include extensive bank revetments, wing dikes, and levees. Using 7 years of Long-Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) data collected from the unimpounded upper Mississippi River, we investigated assemblages in two main-channel-border physical habitats-those with wing dikes and those without wing dikes. Fishes were captured using daytime electrofishing, mini-fyke netting, large hoop netting, and small hoop netting. Our objectives were to (1) assess associations among fish species richness, physical measurements, and main-channel-border physical habitats using stepwise multiple regression and indicator variables; (2) identify abundant adult and young-of-year (age-0) families in both physical habitats to further investigate assemblage composition; and (3) calculate standardized species richness estimates within each physical habitat for adult and age-0 fishes to provide additional information on community structure. We found species richness was greater at wing dikes for both adult and age-0 fishes when compared with main channel borders. Stepwise multiple regression revealed significant relationships between adult species richness and passive gear deployment (e.g,, hoop nets and mini-fyke nets), physical habitat type, and river elevation, as well as interactions between physical habitat and passive gears, and physical habitat and transparency (i.e., Secchi depth). This model explained 56% of the variance in adult species richness. Approximately 15% of the variation in age-0 species richness was explained by the sample period, sample date, transparency, physical habitat, and depth of gear deployment. Long-term impacts of river modifications on fishes have not been well documented in many large river systems and warrant further study. The findings from this study provide baseline ecological information on fish assemblages using main channel borders in the

  16. Single Channel Activity from Ion Channels in Engineered Tethered Bilayer Membrane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, Henk; Fine, Daniel; K"{O}Per, Ingo; Anderson, Peter

    2005-11-01

    The demand for rapid in situ detection of chemical and biological analytes at high sensitivity has increased interest in the development of biosensors like the commercially available compact glucose sensor. Engineered membrane bound ion channels are promising biological receptors since they would allow for the stochastic detection of analytes at high sensitivity, they can be mutated to alter sensitivity, and they produce a well-defined read-out that is inherently suitable for digitization. In order to perform stochastic sensing it is necessary to be able to measure the ion currents associated with single ion channel opening and closing events. Although sensors based on supported bilayers containing various pore forming proteins have been described, none of these systems have recorded single channel activity. Here we describe the measurement of stochastic activity from synthetic single ion channels, based on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo californica, inserted into individual pixels of a microelectrode array device. The limited size of the gold sense pad surface, 100x100 μm, and the electrical stability of the overlying lipid bilayer membrane make each pixel sensitive enough to measure single ion channel currents in the picoampere range.

  17. Channel morphology and bed-sediment characteristics before and after riparian vegetation clearing in the Cottonwood Ranch, Platte River, Nebraska, water years 2001-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Heckman, Ashley K.

    2006-01-01

    Riparian areas along a reach of Platte River passing through Nebraska Public Power District's Cottonwood Ranch Property were modified during 2002 to 2004 to enhance in-channel habitats for endangered and threatened avian species. A component of this alteration involved the removal of riparian vegetation from riverbanks and islands to provide roosting habitat for the endangered whooping crane and to provide nesting and foraging habitat for the endangered least tern and threatened piping plover. It was hypothesized that the removal of riparian vegetation could have the effect of stimulating channel widening in this reach by increasing the potential of these surfaces to erode under natural fluvial action. It also was hypothesized that as a direct or indirect consequence of the alterations, a local increase in sediment supply also might occur, potentially resulting in geomorphic change downstream and possibly initiating negative third-party effects. The cumulative effects of the management activities on the channel morphology and sediment transport in this reach were monitored during water years 2001-2004 by measuring transect elevation profiles and bed-sediment-size gradations upstream, within, and downstream from the managed area before and after the development activities. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to determine if the geomorphic variables measured before and after the development activities were significantly different. Although statistically significant differences were detected in some of the variables, increases in mean bed elevation did not occur in a greater percentage of the monitoring sections measured downstream compared to upstream from the management activities. This result suggests that the management activities did not have a substantial effect on the downstream river channel morphology and sediment transport. However, it is important to place these short-term and site-specific results in the context that river flows following the

  18. Estimated Entrainment of Dungeness Crab During Dredging For The Columbia River Channel Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H.; Williams, Greg D.; Skalski, John R.

    2002-12-01

    The studies reported here focus on issues regarding the entrainment of Dungeness crab related to the proposed Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and provided direct measurements of crab entrainment rates at three locations (Desdomona Shoals, Upper Sands, and Miller Sands) from RM4 to RM24 during summer 2002. Entrainment rates for all age classes of crabs ranged from zero at Miller Sands to 0.224 crabs per cy at Desdemona Shoals in June 2002. The overall entrainment rate at Desdomona Shoals in September was 0.120 crabs per cy. A modified Dredge Impact Model (DIM) used the summer 2002 entrainment rates to project crab entrainment and adult equivalent loss and loss to the fishery for the Channel Improvement Project. To improve the projections, entrainment data from Flavel Bar is needed. The literature, analyses of salinity intrusion scenarios, and the summer 2002 site-specific data on entrainment and salinity all indicate that bottom salinity influences crab distribution and entrainment, especially at lower salinities. It is now clear from field measurements of entrainment rates and salinity during a period of low river flow (90-150 Kcfs) and high salinity intrusion that entrainment rates are zero where bottom salinity is less than 16 o/oo most of the time. Further, entrainment rates of 2+ and older crab fall with decreasing salinity in a clear and consistent manner. More elaboration of the crab distribution- salinity model, especially concerning salinity and the movements of 1+ crab, is needed.

  19. Effects of human activities on the ecological processes of river biofilms in a highly urbanized river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, R.; Li, M.

    2013-12-01

    Many anthropogenic disturbances and their effects of aquatic ecosystem are difficult to quantify in urbanized rivers. In past, specific taxa analysis of community structure was a common approach in river health monitoring studies. However, it is still difficult to understand stream ecosystem integrity without considering ecosystem processes. The complex species composition and metabolism of a river biofilm have the capacity to interact and/or modulate their surrounding environment. Because of their short life cycles, species richness, and worldwide distribution, structure and function of river biofilm communities are sensitive to change in environmental conditions. Therefore, biofilms are widely used as early warning systems of water pollution for water quality monitoring studies. In this study, we used river biofilms as a bioindicator by examining their extracellular enzyme activities and photosynthesis efficiency to understand human activities on the ecological processes of river ecosystem in a highly urbanized river. We sampled four sites along the Keelung River, Taiwan, based on different intensities of anthropogenic disturbances including water pollution index, population densities, land use types and types of stream habitats. Two study sites are heavily influenced by human activities and the others are not. The activities of extracellular enzymes within the biofilm play an important function for organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling. We measured seven extracellular enzyme activities (β-d-glucosidase, phosphatase, leucine-aminopeptidase, sulfatase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and esterase) to examine specific enzyme activity changes at four study sites monthly. In addition, relative proportion of each extracellular enzyme activity on total enzyme activities was calculated in order to examine the relationship between functional biofilm profiles and different urban intensities. Among four study sites, leucine-aminopeptidase and esterase

  20. Influence of flow regime and channel morphology on larval drift and dispersion in a large regulated river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, S.; Jacobson, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Larval drift is a critical phase of ontogenetic development for many species of lotic fishes. Downstream advection and dispersion of passively drifting larvae or eggs is controlled by the complex interaction of flow regime, channel planform, local channel morphology, and the resulting hydraulic gradients. In many regulated rivers, channel engineering and perturbations to the flow regime may disrupt natural drift processes and impact successful recruitment of native fishes. Here we explore the influence of flow regime and channel morphology on the downstream transport, dispersion, and retention of Pallid Sturgeon larvae, an endangered species endemic to the Mississippi River basin and the focus of significant conservation effort on the Missouri River. The transition from drifting free embryo to exogenously feeding larvae has been identified as a potential life stage bottleneck for the Pallid Sturgeon. Previous studies have indicated that river regulation and fragmentation may contribute to mortality of larval Pallid Sturgeon by reducing the extent of free-flowing river required by free embryos to complete the transition to exogenous feeding. Additionally, channelization may have increased the rate at which larvae are advected downstream out of the Missouri River basin. We describe the complex interactions and influence of morphologic and hydraulic factors on larval drift using an extensive library of hydroacoustic data collected along more than 1300 km of the Lower Missouri River. We use a one-dimensional advection-dispersion model to estimate total drift distance and employ the longitudinal dispersion coefficient as a measure to quantify the tendency towards dispersion or retention of passively drifting larvae in geomorphically distinct segments of river. We use a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model to evaluate the sensitivity of drift and dispersion to in-channel navigation structures and flood hydrology. Based on insights gained from the analysis of field data and

  1. Selective activation of mechanosensitive ion channels using magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Steven; McBain, Stuart; Dobson, Jon; El Haj, Alicia J

    2008-08-01

    This study reports the preliminary development of a novel magnetic particle-based technique that permits the application of highly localized mechanical forces directly to specific regions of an ion-channel structure. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to directly and selectively activate a mechanosensitive ion channel of interest, namely TREK-1. It is shown that manipulation of particles targeted against the extended extracellular loop region of TREK-1 leads to changes in whole-cell currents consistent with changes in TREK-1 activity. Responses were absent when particles were coated with RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide or when magnetic fields were applied in the absence of magnetic particles. It is concluded that changes in whole-cell current are the result of direct force application to the extracellular loop region of TREK-1 and thus these results implicate this region of the channel structure in mechano-gating. It is hypothesized that the extended loop region of TREK-1 may act as a tension spring that acts to regulate sensitivity to mechanical forces, in a nature similar to that described for MscL. The development of a technique that permits the direct manipulation of mechanosensitive ion channels in real time without the need for pharmacological drugs has huge potential benefits not only for basic biological research of ion-channel gating mechanisms, but also potentially as a tool for the treatment of human diseases caused by ion-channel dysfunction.

  2. Activation of peripheral KCNQ channels relieves gout pain

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueming; Xu, Haiyan; Zhan, Li; Zhou, Xindi; Chen, Xueqin; Gao, Zhaobing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intense inflammatory pain caused by urate crystals in joints and other tissues is a major symptom of gout. Among therapy drugs that lower urate, benzbromarone (BBR), an inhibitor of urate transporters, is widely used because it is well tolerated and highly effective. We demonstrate that BBR is also an activator of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels. In cultured recombinant cells, BBR exhibited significant potentiation effects on KCNQ channels comparable to previously reported classical activators. In native dorsal root ganglion neurons, BBR effectively overcame the suppression of KCNQ currents, and the resultant neuronal hyperexcitability caused by inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin (BK). Benzbromarone consistently attenuates BK-, formalin-, or monosodium urate–induced inflammatory pain in rat and mouse models. Notably, the analgesic effects of BBR are largely mediated through peripheral and not through central KCNQ channels, an observation supported both by pharmacokinetic studies and in vivo experiments. Moreover, multiple residues in the superficial part of the voltage sensing domain of KCNQ channels were identified critical for the potentiation activity of BBR by a molecular determinant investigation. Our data indicate that activation of peripheral KCNQ channels mediates the pain relief effects of BBR, potentially providing a new strategy for the development of more effective therapies for gout. PMID:25735002

  3. Na(+) -Activated K(+) Channels in Rat Supraoptic Neurones.

    PubMed

    Bansal, V; Fisher, T E

    2016-06-01

    The magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) of the hypothalamus secrete the neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin. The systemic release of these hormones depends on the rate and pattern of MNC firing and it is therefore important to identify the ion channels that contribute to the electrical behaviour of MNCs. In the present study, we report evidence for the presence of Na(+) -activated K(+) (KN a ) channels in rat MNCs. KN a channels mediate outwardly rectifying K(+) currents activated by the increases in intracellular Na(+) that occur during electrical activity. Although the molecular identity of native KN a channels is unclear, their biophysical properties are consistent with those of expressed Slick (slo 2.1) and Slack (slo 2.2) proteins. Using immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments, we found that both Slick and Slack proteins are expressed in rat MNCs. Using whole cell voltage clamp techniques on acutely isolated rat MNCs, we found that inhibiting Na(+) influx by the addition of the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin or the replacement of Na(+) in the external solution with Li(+) caused a significant decrease in sustained outward currents. Furthermore, the evoked outward current density was significantly higher in rat MNCs using patch pipettes containing 60 mm Na(+) than it was when patch pipettes containing 0 mm Na(+) were used. Our data show that functional KN a channels are expressed in rat MNCs. These channels could contribute to the activity-dependent afterhyperpolarisations that have been identified in the MNCs and thereby play a role in the regulation of their electrical behaviour. PMID:27091544

  4. Heterogeneity of Calcium Channel/cAMP-Dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    The major function of the voltage-gated calcium channels is to provide the Ca(2+) flux into the cell. L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav1) serve as voltage sensors that couple membrane depolarization to many intracellular processes. Electrical activity in excitable cells affects gene expression through signaling pathways involved in the excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. E-T coupling starts with activation of the Cav1 channel and results in initiation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. In this review we discuss the new quantitative approaches to measuring E-T signaling events. We describe the use of wavelet transform to detect heterogeneity of transcriptional activation in nuclei. Furthermore, we discuss the properties of discovered microdomains of nuclear signaling associated with the E-T coupling and the basis of the frequency-dependent transcriptional regulation.

  5. The impacts of Segura River (Spain) channelization on the coastal seabed.

    PubMed

    Aragonés, L; Pagán, J I; López, M P; García-Barba, J

    2016-02-01

    Human actions over rivers and coasts have generated great changes along seaboard. In order to know future development of those changes, it is necessary to understand the development of the coast during the past. When there is a complex morphologic system as a result of the combination of natural elements with human construction elements, the study of the abovementioned changes requires a wider perspective than the one provided by traditional two-dimensional methods. Thus, the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) become a suitable tool for that kind of studies. In this work, GIS are used to understand changes in bathymetry, sediments properties and transport, as well as surface variations of plant species occurred in the Segura River mouth (Spain) within a period of 17 years due to the channelization of the river low course. The methodology followed here implies the integration of data coming from different sources and with different formats in a GIS, what allows for a spatial analysis. Results obtained show the grain-size spatial distribution for every period of time studied, as well as bathymetry changes and seabed morphology. It can be concluded that the construction works carried out in the riverbed have affected sediment grain-size in the area. Clays have nearly disappeared and consequently there is a descent of seabed level that affects plant species, such as Posidonia oceanica.

  6. Seismic facies of incised-channel fill deposits of paleo-Seomjin River in the South Sea, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sung Ho; Kong, Gee Soo; Choul Kim, Dae; Lee, Gwang Soo; Yoo, Dong Geun

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution (Chirp and Sparker system) seismic profiles and piston core samples were analyzed to investigate the depositional environment of paleo-channel in the continental shelf of South Sea. Approximately 1,940 line-km data of chirp and sparker profiles was acquired. Along with seismic profiles, 20 piston core and 10 box core samples collected in 2015. The paleo-channel of Seomjin River is distributed in the continental shelf, with approximately 109 km long, 800-5,000 m wide, and more than 890 km2. The paleo-channel of meandering and straight type is dominant in the inner shelf while changed to braided type in the outer shelf. The paleo-channels in sparker seismic data formed presumably as fluvial systems when the shelf was exposed during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The seismic facies of incision fill divided into five types basis of an erosional surface and internal seismic reflectors: (1) transparent to semi-transparent incised channel fill, (2) parallel to sub-parallel incised channel fill, (3) complex incised channel fill, (4) divergent incised channel fill, and (5) chaotic incised channel fill. The chaotic incised channel fill deposits are consists of gravel with shell fragments in the outer shelf and indicate the LGM to early transgressive (fluvial lag deposits). The complex incised channel fill deposits are dominated by sand and gravel with shell fragments in the mid to outer shelf. The cores which were obtained above the transparent to semi-transparent and parallel to sub-parallel incised channel fill deposits are dominated by mud. These types are dominant in the upstream (inner shelf). The acoustically transparent zones of this type with low-energy, passively infilling depositional environment, suggest the presence of basin muddy deposits. These muddy sediments were likely deposited during a more advanced stage of the Holocene transgression. Thus, the paleo-channel of Seomjin River is strongly controlled by sea-level change and sediment

  7. Latest Holocene evolution and human disturbance of a channel segment in the Hudson River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klingbeil, A.D.; Sommerfield, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The latest Holocene sedimentary record of a cohesive channel and subtidal shoal in the lower Hudson River Estuary was examined to elucidate natural (sea-level rise, sediment transport) and anthropogenic (bulkheading, dredging) influences on the recent morphodynamic evolution of the system. To characterize the seafloor and shallow subbottom, ??? 100 km of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles (chirp) were collected within a 20-km reach of the estuary and correlated with sediment lithologies provided by eight vibracores recovered along seismic lines. Sediment geochronology with 137Cs and 14C was used to estimate intermediate and long-term sedimentation rates, respectively, and historical bathymetric data were analyzed to identify regional patterns of accretion and erosion, and to quantify changes in channel geometry and sediment volume. The shoal lithosome originated around 4 ka presumably with decelerating eustatic sea level rise during the latest Holocene. Long-term sedimentation rates on the shoal (2.3-2.6 mm/yr) are higher than in the channel (2 mm/yr) owing to hydrodynamic conditions that preferentially sequester suspended sediment on the western side of the estuary. As a result, the shoal accretes oblique to the principal axis of tidal transport, and more rapidly than the channel to produce an asymmetric cross-section. Shoal deposits consist of tidally bedded muds and are stratified by minor erosion surfaces that seismic profiles reveal to extend for 10s of meters to kilometers. The frequency and continuity of these surfaces suggest that the surficial shoal is catastrophically stripped on decadal-centennial time scales by elevated tidal flows; tidal erosion maintains the shoal at a uniform depth below sea level and prevents it from transitioning to an intertidal environment. Consequently, the long-term sedimentation rate approximates the rate of sea-level rise in the lower estuary (1-3 mm/yr). After the mid 1800s, the natural geometry of the lower Hudson

  8. Active Brownian particles escaping a channel in single file.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Pierno, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    Active particles may happen to be confined in channels so narrow that they cannot overtake each other (single-file conditions). This interesting situation reveals nontrivial physical features as a consequence of the strong interparticle correlations developed in collective rearrangements. We consider a minimal two-dimensional model for active Brownian particles with the aim of studying the modifications introduced by activity with respect to the classical (passive) single-file picture. Depending on whether their motion is dominated by translational or rotational diffusion, we find that active Brownian particles in single file may arrange into clusters that are continuously merging and splitting (active clusters) or merely reproduce passive-motion paradigms, respectively. We show that activity conveys to self-propelled particles a strategic advantage for trespassing narrow channels against external biases (e.g., the gravitational field).

  9. Active Brownian particles escaping a channel in single file

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Pierno, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    Active particles may happen to be confined in channels so narrow that they cannot overtake each other (single-file conditions). This interesting situation reveals nontrivial physical features as a consequence of the strong interparticle correlations developed in collective rearrangements. We consider a minimal two-dimensional model for active Brownian particles with the aim of studying the modifications introduced by activity with respect to the classical (passive) single-file picture. Depending on whether their motion is dominated by translational or rotational diffusion, we find that active Brownian particles in single file may arrange into clusters that are continuously merging and splitting (active clusters) or merely reproduce passive-motion paradigms, respectively. We show that activity conveys to self-propelled particles a strategic advantage for trespassing narrow channels against external biases (e.g., the gravitational field).

  10. Designing long-term fish community assessments in connecting channels: Lessons from the Saint Marys River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, Jeff; Rogers, Mark W.; Fielder, David G.; Godby, Neal; Bowen, Anjanette K.; O'Connor, Lisa; Parrish, Josh; Greenwood, Susan; Chong, Stephen; Wright, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Long-term surveys are useful in understanding trends in connecting channel fish communities; a gill net assessment in the Saint Marys River performed periodically since 1975 is the most comprehensive connecting channels sampling program within the Laurentian Great Lakes. We assessed efficiency of that survey, with intent to inform development of assessments at other connecting channels. We evaluated trends in community composition, effort versus estimates of species richness, ability to detect abundance changes for four species, and effects of subsampling yellow perch catches on size and age-structure metrics. Efficiency analysis revealed low power to detect changes in species abundance, whereas reduced effort could be considered to index species richness. Subsampling simulations indicated that subsampling would have allowed reliable estimates of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) population structure, while greatly reducing the number of fish that were assigned ages. Analyses of statistical power and efficiency of current sampling protocols are useful for managers collecting and using these types of data as well as for the development of new monitoring programs. Our approach provides insight into whether survey goals and objectives were being attained and can help evaluate ability of surveys to answer novel questions that arise as management strategies are refined.

  11. Use of glacier river-fed estuary channels by juvenile coho salmon: transitional or rearing habitats?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoem Neher, Tammy D.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Walker, Coowe M.; Baird, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems in the world and provide important rearing environments for a variety of fish species. Though generally considered important transitional habitats for smolting salmon, little is known about the role that estuaries serve for rearing and the environmental conditions important for salmon. We illustrate how juvenile coho salmonOncorhynchus kisutch use a glacial river-fed estuary based on examination of spatial and seasonal variability in patterns of abundance, fish size, age structure, condition, and local habitat use. Fish abundance was greater in deeper channels with cooler and less variable temperatures, and these habitats were consistently occupied throughout the season. Variability in channel depth and water temperature was negatively associated with fish abundance. Fish size was negatively related to site distance from the upper extent of the tidal influence, while fish condition did not relate to channel location within the estuary ecotone. Our work demonstrates the potential this glacially-fed estuary serves as both transitional and rearing habitat for juvenile coho salmon during smolt emigration to the ocean, and patterns of fish distribution within the estuary correspond to environmental conditions.

  12. Denitrification capacity and greenhouse gas emissions of soils in channelized and restored reaches along an Alpine river corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Juna; Niklaus, Pascal; Samaritani, Emanuela; Frossard, Emmanuel; Tockner, Klement; Luster, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    In order to assess the effects of river restoration on water and air quality, the biogeochemical functions of channelized and restored river reaches have to be quantified. The objective of this study was to compare denitrification potential and greenhouse gas emissions of functional processing zones (FPZ) in a channelized and a recently restored reach of the alpine river Thur in north-eastern Switzerland. The study was part of the project cluster RECORD of the ETH domain, Switzerland, which was initiated to increase the mechanistic understanding of coupled hydrological and ecological processes in river corridors. The denitrification potential represents an important aspect of the soil filter function related to water quality. Besides, it also contributes to the emission of greenhouse gases. Extensively used pasture growing on a sandy loam is the characteristic FPZ of the channelized section. The restored section encompasses five FPZ: (i) bare gravel bars sparsely colonized by plants, (ii) gravel bars densely colonized by grass (mainly canary reed grass with up to 80 cm sandy deposits), (iii) mixed forest dominated by ash and maple, (iv) riparian forest dominated by willow (Salix alba), (v) older overbank sediments stabilized during restoration with young willows separating the forests from the river-gravel bar system (willow bush). The FPZ were sampled in January, April, August and October 2009. In addition, in June and July 2009 two flood events were monitored in the restored section with more frequent samplings. At each date, topsoil samples were collected in each FPZ (four replicates per samples) and analyzed for denitrifier enzyme activity (DEA). In addition, gas samples were taken in-situ using the closed chamber technique to measure soil respiration as well as N2O and CH4 fluxes. In all FPZ, the denitrification potential was mainly governed by soil moisture. It was highest in the willow forest exhibiting low spatial variability. The DEA in pasture, grass zone

  13. Role of river bends for the formation and evolution of channel bedforms: Combined field studies and numerical modeling from the tidally influenced zones of the Yellow River, China, and Mississippi River, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Moodie, A.; Calson, B.; Parker, G.

    2015-12-01

    River bedforms represent the unstable interface between fluid flow and the granular channel bed, and these features play an important role for modifying flow resistance and sediment transport rates, and thus influencing river morphology. Although widely observed in natural rivers, bedforms are difficult to measure quantitatively and are rarely connected to other fluvial morphological processes. This study presents high-resolution channel bathymetric data from the tidally influenced, lowermost Yellow River, China, collected using a multibeam swath profiler. Repeat surveys were conducted over rising and flood discharge conditions, which is the first such kind of survey in Yellow River. The bathymetry data show that for all water discharges, a flat bed, devoid of a thalweg or dunes, persists within straight-reach segments near the bends of the Yellow River, despite the bed consisting of fine sand. Interestingly, in bend segments, the channel deepens, and linear dunes develop. Moreover, as the water discharge increases over time, the edge of dune field contained in the bend segments propagates into the adjacent upstream and downstream straight-reach segments. In contrasting case study, Nittrouer et al. (2008) reported persistent dune field in the straight reaches of the tidally influenced Mississippi River; however these dunes disappear in neighboring river bends. Based on the two cases of the Yellow and Mississippi Rivers, which have fundamentally different conditions of water-to-sediment discharge ratios, the threshold condition of bedform formation and stability are evaluated, and connected to local conditions of river bend morphology. This work improves the understanding of the co-evolution of bedforms and flow conditions in river bends, which are intertwined and important morphological processes that affect fluvial-deltaic sediment transport dynamics. In addition, the straight-bend structure is a basic element of river morphology, and so the results of this study

  14. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  15. Hysteresis effects in suspended sediment concentration of an allogenic river channel in a very arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guo-An; Disse, Markus; Yu, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Suspended sediment dynamics of the Tarim River, an allogenic and perennial river flowing in a very arid environment in China, are analyzed to examine the hysteresis effects based on data of flow discharge (Q) and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) from two hydrologic gauging stations in the river in the last five decades (1960-2011). Strong hysteresis effects existed in the sediment rating curves of the Tarim River. Under similar flow conditions, the first flood event in a year quite often causes higher suspended sediment concentration (SSC value), and form a rating curve visibly different from later flood processes. The successive flood events often form rating curves gradually from left to right progressively with time on the SSC-Q plot, indicating that higher flow intensity is needed for later flood events to reach the same SSC value of the earlier flood events. Three hysteresis loop forms, i.e., clockwise, anti-clockwise and Figure-eight existed with occurrence frequency of 57%, 27.3% and 15.6% respectively, showing that clockwise loop is the major hysteresis form and sediment load is generally derived from the channel bed. The very weak banks due to composition of quite homogeneous noncohesive particles (fine sand, silt and almost no clay content) often induce bank failure, which complicates suspended sediment dynamics and causes to shape different hysteresis loops. Somehow random but occurrence of bank collapse with higher possibility near the peak and at the falling limb of a flood hydrograph is probably the major reason causing anti-clockwise and figure-eight hysteresis loops.

  16. The role of oxbow lakes in the off-channel storage of bed material along the Ain River, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieras, Pauline Lola; Constantine, José Antonio; Hales, T. C.; Piégay, Hervé; Riquier, Jérémie

    2013-04-01

    Incidents of chute cutoff redistribute floodplain sediment into rivers, causing downstream bar growth while simultaneously creating accommodation space for the storage of sediment within the floodplain in the form of oxbow lakes. Oxbows may be able to sequester enough sediment to balance the amount produced by chute incision, but the long-term consequences of chute cutoff on reach-scale sediment budgets have so far remained unclear. This has been due to a relative paucity of field observations that quantify the exchange of coarse sediment between the channel and floodplain. Here, we take advantage of a unique opportunity to document the sediment budget of a reach of the Ain River, France, that has experienced three recent incidents of chute cutoff. Monitoring of the river prior to chute incision allowed us to precisely quantify the rates of bed-material transfer over a thirteen-year period using a combination of bathymetric surveys, LiDAR data, and aerial photographs. The abandoned channels under study sequestered between 17 and 40% of the sediment introduced to the channel, with most of the rest of the sediment being stored within the river itself. Aggradation of the abandoned channels was not evenly distributed, instead occurring by the growth of point bars and thus implying that the abandoned channel planform may be an important control on aggradation rates. Our results make clear that although oxbows may provide a significant sink for bed material, the amount of sediment sequestered within them cannot compensate for the loading caused by chute incision.

  17. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  18. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  19. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  20. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-01

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  1. Annual bed-elevation regime in the alluvial channel of Squamish River, southwestern British Columbia Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanford, S.D.; Seidl, M.A.; Ashley, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the annual regime of channel scour and fill by monitoring bed-elevation changes in a reach of Squamish River in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. Sonar surveys of 13 river cross-sections in a sandy gravel-bed single-channel study reach were repeated biweekly over a full hydrologic year (1995/6). The survey results show that bedload movement occurs as waves or pulses forming bedwaves that appear to maintain an overall coherence with movement downstream. These bedwaves propagate downstream by a mode here termed pulse scour and pulse fill, a process distinguished from the conventional mode of scour and fill commonly associated with flood events (here termed local scour and local fill). Bedwave celerity was estimated to be about 15.5 m d-1 corresponding to a bedwave residence time in the study reach of almost one hydrologic year. The total amount of local bed-elevation change ranged between 0.22 m and 2.41 m during the period of study. Analysis of the bed-elevation and flow data reveals that, because of the bedware phenomenon, there is no simple relation between the mean bed-elevation and discharge nor any strong linear correlation among cross-sectional behaviour. The bed-elevation data also suggest that complex changes to the bed within a cross-section are masked when the bed is viewed in one dimension, although no definitive trends in bed behaviour were found in the two-dimensional analysis. Although a weak seasonal effect is evident in this study, the bed-elevation regime is dominated by sediment supply-driven fluctuations in bedload transport occurring at timescales shorter than the seasonal fluctuation in discharge. The study also indicates that bed-elevation monitoring on Squamish River, and others like it, for purposes of detecting and measuring aggradation/degradation must take into account very considerable and normal channel-bed variability operating at timescales from hours to months. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and

  2. Physiological mechanisms for the modulation of pannexin 1 channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Sandilos, Joanna K; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognized that ATP, along with other nucleotides, subserves important intercellular signalling processes. Among various nucleotide release mechanisms, the relatively recently identified pannexin 1 (Panx1) channel is gaining prominence by virtue of its ability to support nucleotide permeation and release in a variety of different tissues. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the factors that control Panx1 channel activity. By using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, diverse mechanisms that dynamically regulate Panx1 channel function have been identified in various settings; these include, among others, activation by caspase-mediated channel cleavage in apoptotic immune cells, by G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle, by low oxygen tension in erythrocytes and neurons, by high extracellular K+ in various cell types and by stretch/strain in airway epithelia. Delineating the distinct mechanisms of Panx1 modulation that prevail in different physiological contexts provides the possibility that these channels, and ATP release, could ultimately be targeted in a context-dependent manner. PMID:23070703

  3. Persistent disturbance by commercial navigation afters the relative abundance of channel-dwelling fishes in a large river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Vallazza, J.M.; Knights, B.C.

    2006-01-01

    We provide the first evidence for chronic effects of disturbance by commercial vessels on the spatial distribution and abundance of fishes in the channels of a large river. Most of the world's large rivers are intensively managed to satisfy increasing demands for commercial shipping, but little research has been conducted to identify and alleviate any adverse consequences of commercial navigation. We used a combination of a gradient sampling design incorporating quasicontrol areas with Akaike's information criterion (AIC)-weighted model averaging to estimate effects of disturbances by commercial vessels on fishes in the upper Mississippi River. Species density, which mainly measured species evenness, decreased with increasing disturbance frequency. The most abundant species - gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) - and the less abundant shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus) and flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) were seemingly unaffected by traffic disturbance. In contrast, the relative abundance of the toothed herrings (Hiodon spp.), redhorses (Moxostoma spp.), buffaloes (Ictiobus spp.), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), sauger (Sander canadensis), and white bass (Morone chrysops) decreased with increasing traffic in the navigation channel. We hypothesized that the combination of alteration of hydraulic features within navigation channels and rehabilitation of secondary channels might benefit channel-dependent species. ?? 2006 NRC.

  4. Numerical Model for Channel/Floodplain Exchange on a Gravel Bed River: Relative Importance of Upstream and Downstream Boundaries and of Lateral Exchange (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The centennial-scale evolution of a meandering gravel-bed river has been represented using a size-specific 1-D sediment transport model. The model differs from other 1-D morphodynamic models for gravel-bed rivers in that it allows for sediment storage in and remobilization from an off-channel sediment storage reservoir representing the floodplain. Hydraulics is represented using a 1-D gradually varied flow model that assumes a rectangular cross-section for the channel zone and a constant elevation for the floodplain. Because the solution for steady uniform flow is necessarily iterative in this framework, the gradually varied hydraulic model is not significantly more computationally intensive than is a normal flow solution. The model is parameterized primarily based on the assumption that the channel creates point bars at a constant elevation above the bed. Bar progradation rate is assumed equal to a specified lateral migration rate (which can vary as a function of sediment load). The return of sediment from floodplain to channel is assumed equal to the lateral migration rate times the average bank elevation. Any net imbalance in sediment storage within the floodplain zone results in a change in average elevation and size distribution for the floodplain. This in turn affects the partition of flow between channel and floodplain and the net flux of sediment from the floodplain to channel, eventually causing the model to evolve toward a steady state bankfull capacity. The model is applied to the Ain River, France, a tributary of the Rhône River. The Ain River underwent significant geomorphic transformations over the course of the 20th century in response to changes in climate, vegetation, floodplain management, and, especially, because of the installation of a series of hydroelectric dams. In general, the channel became more incised and less laterally active during this period. However, bank erosion and sediment deposition in bars and floodplain channels continues to

  5. Regulated flushing in a gravel-bed river for channel habitat maintenance: A Trinity River fisheries case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. Wayne; Dwyer, John R.; Greenberg, Wendy E.

    1987-08-01

    The operation of Trinity and Lewiston Dams on the Trinity River in northern California in the United States, combined with severe watershed erosion, has jeopardized the existence of prime salmonid fisheries. Extreme streamflow depletion and stream sedimentation below Lewiston have resulted in heavy accumulation of coarse sediment on riffle gravel and filling of streambed pools, causing the destruction of spawning, nursery, and overwintering habitat for prized chinook salmon ( Salmo gairdnerii) and steelhead trout ( Oncorhynchus tschawytscha). Proposals to restore and maintain the degraded habitat include controlled one-time remedial peak flows or annual maintenance peak flows designed to flush the spawning gravel and scour the banks, deltas, and pools. The criteria for effective channel restoration or maintenance by streambed flushing and scouring are examined here, as well as the mechanics involved. The liabilities of releasing mammoth scouring-flushing flows approximating the magnitude that preceded reservoir construction make this option unviable. The resulting damage to fish habitat established under the postproject streamflow regime, as well as damage to human settlements in the floodplain, would be unacceptable, as would the opportunity costs to hydroelectric and irrigation water users. The technical feasibility of annual maintenance flushing flows depends upon associated mechanical and structural measures, particularly instream maintenance dredging of deep pools and construction of a sediment control dam on a tributary where watershed erosion is extreme. The cost effectiveness of a sediment dam with a limited useful economic life, combined with perpetual maintenance dredging, is questionable.

  6. Salmon as drivers of physical and biological disturbance in river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, S. J.; Petticrew, E. L.

    2012-04-01

    Large migrations across landscapes and ecosystem boundaries combined with disturbances of riverine spawning habitats through nest construction indicate the huge potential that Pacific salmon (Onchorhynchus sp.) have to disturb and alter regional energy flow. Nutrients derived from ocean-reared dead and decaying salmon are released into surrounding aquatic ecosystems fertilizing the water column, recently disturbed by increased suspended sediments due to nest construction. These opposing forces of disturbance and fertilization on spawning habitat have been demonstrated to impact local geomorphic and ecological cycles within salmon streams. An often cited, yet not fully tested, hypothesis is that this pulse of nutrients provided by decaying salmon can shift freshwater habitats to higher production levels. This hypothesis, however, remains contested and uncertain. Fine sediments are increasingly being recognized as important delivery and storage vectors for marine-derived nutrients (MDNs) in spawning streams. The temporal and spatial significance of these sediment vectors on gravelbed storage of MDN have not been quantified thereby restricting our ability to estimate the impact of gravelbed storage of MDNs on the riverine habitats. The objectives of this study were to i) quantify the magnitude of sediment deposition and retention in an active spawning area and ii) determine the contribution of MDN associated with the fine sediment storage. The Horsefly River spawning channel (HFC), an artificial salmon stock enhancement stream, was used to examine the biogeomorphic impacts of salmon spawning. We organized the HFC in an upstream-downstream paired treatment approach where the upstream enclosure was kept free of salmon and the downstream enclosure was loaded with actively spawning salmon. We used the difference in suspended sediment concentration between the salmon enclosure and the control enclosure to determine the contribution of salmon nest construction to suspended

  7. Stretch-Activated Ion Channels: What Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs) exist in all cells, but mechanosensitivity is a phenotype not a genotype. Specialized mechanoreceptors such as the hair cells of the cochlea require elaborate mechanical impedance matching to couple the channels to the external stress. In contrast, MSCs in nonspecialized cells appear activated by stress in the bilayer local to the channel—within about three lipids. Local mechanical stress can be produced by far-field tension, amphipaths, phase separations, the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and the adhesion energy between the membrane and a patch pipette. Understanding MSC function requires understanding the stimulus. PMID:20134028

  8. Lipid bilayer array for simultaneous recording of ion channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Nasu, Tomohiro; Oshima, Azusa; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes an array of stable and reduced-solvent bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) formed in microfabricated silicon chips. BLMs were first vertically formed simultaneously and then turned 90° in order to realize a horizontal BLM array. Since the present BLMs are mechanically stable and robust, the BLMs survive this relatively tough process. Typically, a ˜60% yield in simultaneous BLM formation over 9 sites was obtained. Parallel recordings of gramicidin channel activities from different BLMs were demonstrated. The present system has great potential as a platform of BLM-based high throughput drug screening for ion channel proteins.

  9. Scour and fill in a stream channel, East Fork River, western Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Edmund D.

    1978-01-01

    Frequent soundings of 11 cross sections located on the East Fork River, western Wyoming, during a spring flood revealed two sequences of channel scour and fill. All sections either scoured or filled at the flood crests relative to their low-flow condition. The sections which scoured at high flow (called scouring sections) generally tended to fill at low flow. Conversely, the sections which filled at high flow (called filling sections) generally tended to scour at low flow. The critical discharge at which the character of a section changed from scouring to filling or vice versa was approximately the bankfull discharge. Therefore, at any discharge except bankfull, some sections were accumulating bed material (fill), while others were being depleted of bed material (scour). (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Patterned electrical activity modulates sodium channel expression in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Klein, Joshua P; Tendi, Elisabetta A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Fields, R Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G

    2003-10-15

    Peripheral nerve injury induces changes in the level of gene expression for sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 within dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which may contribute to the development of hyperexcitability, ectopic neuronal discharge, and neuropathic pain. The mechanism of this change in sodium channel expression is unclear. Decreased availability of neurotrophic factors following axotomy contributes to these changes in gene transcription, but the question of whether changes in intrinsic neuronal activity levels alone can trigger changes in the expression of these sodium channels has not been addressed. We examined the effect of electrical stimulation on the expression of Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 by using cultured embryonic mouse sensory neurons under conditions in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was not limiting. Expression of Nav1.3 was not significantly changed following stimulation. In contrast, we observed activity-dependent down-regulation of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA and protein levels after stimulation, as demonstrated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. These results show that a change in neuronal activity can alter the expression of sodium channel genes in a subtype-specific manner, via a mechanism independent of NGF withdrawal. PMID:14515348

  11. Entrainment of Dungeness Crab in the Desdemona Shoals Reach of the Lower Columbia River Navigation Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.

    2006-09-30

    Proposed dredging of the Columbia River has raised concerns about related impacts on Dungeness crab in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). This study follows two major efforts, sponsored by the Portland District of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to quantify the number of crabs entrained by a hopper dredge working in the CRE. From June 2002 through September 2002, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted direct measurements of crab entrainment in the CRE from the mouth of the Columbia River (MCR, river mile -3 to +3) upriver as far as Miller Sands (river mile 21 to 24). These studies constituted a major step in quantifying crab entrainment in the CRE, and allowed statistically bounded projections of adult equivalent loss (AEL) for Dungeness crab populations under a range of future construction dredging and maintenance dredging scenarios (Pearson et al. 2002, 2003). In 2004, PNNL performed additional measurements to improve estimates of crab entrainment at Desdemona Shoals and at Flavel Bar, a reach near Astoria that had not been adequately sampled in 2002 (Figure 1). The 2004 data were used to update the crab loss projections for channel construction to 43 ft MLLW. In addition, a correlation between bottom salinity and adult (age 2+ and 3+, >100 mm carapace width) crab entrainment was developed using 2002 data, and elaborated upon with the 2004 data. This crab salinity model was applied to forecasting seasonal (monthly) entrainment rates and AEL using seasonal variations in salinity (Pearson et al. 2005). In the previous studies, entrainment rates in Desdemona Shoals were more variable than in any of the other reaches. Pearson et al. (2005) concluded that ?the dynamics behind the variable entrainment rates at Desdemona Shoals are not fully understood,? as well as finding that juvenile crab entrainment was not significantly correlated with salinity as it was for older crab. The present study was undertaken to address the question of whether the

  12. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  13. Rivers at Risk: An Activity Based Study Guide for the Colorado River Basin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samples, Bob, Ed.

    This activity guide is intended to increase student awareness and understanding about the Colorado River Basin. Each activity includes objectives, procedures, materials list, related activities, questions for students, and related information. The activities are varied to appeal to a wide range of learning styles and modalities and are…

  14. Post-Eruption Changes in Channel Geometry of Streams in the Toutle River Drainage Basin, 1980-82, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.F.; Nolan, K. Michael; Dodge, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, generated a debris avalanche, lateral blast, lahars, and tephra deposits that altered mainstem and tributary channels within the Toutle River drainage basin. Channel cross sections were monumented and surveyed on North Fork Toutle River and its tributaries, on South Fork Toutle River, on Green River, and on Toutle River in 1980 and 1981. These streams drain the north and west flanks of the volcano. The network of channel cross sections was surveyed more frequently following periods of higher flow. The repetitive cross-section surveys provide measurements of bank erosion or accretion and of channel erosion or aggradation. These data can be used to determine erosion rates, and to identify sources and storage sites of sediment in sediment budget computations. This report presents channel cross-section profiles constructed from the survey data collected during water years 1980 through 1982.

  15. Do Titan's river channels carve into ice bedrock or loose regolith?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. C.; Sklar, L. S.; Litwin, K. L.; Polito, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    transportable blocks, and/or that most of the channels are transport-limited and are primarily acting to redistribute an existing loose regolith layer across Titan’s surface. References: Collins, G. C., Relative rates of fluvial bedrock incision on Titan and Earth, Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L22202, doi:10.1029/2005GL024551, 2005. Keller, H. U., B. Grieger, M. Küppers, S. E. Schröder, Y. V. Skorov, and M. G. Tomasko, The properties of Titan’s surface at the Huygens landing site from DISR observations, Planet. Space Sci. 56, 728-752, 2008. Perron, J. T., M. P. Lamb, C. D. Koven, I. Y. Fung, E. Yager, and M. Ádámkovics, Valley formation and methane precipitation rates on Titan, J. Geophys. Res. 111, E11001, 2006. Sklar, L. S., and W. E. Dietrich, A mechanistic model for river incision into bedrock by saltating bed load, Water Resour. Res. 40, W06301, 2004.

  16. Coupling effect analysis between landslides, river channel changes and sediment budgets - extreme climate events in Laishe River, southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-Jen; Huang, Mei-Jen; Tseng, Chih-Ming

    2016-04-01

    amount of migration along Laishe River by analyzing the 3D DEM before and after the typhoon Morakot. The DEMs are built by using the aerial images taken by digital mapping camera (DMC) and by airborne digital scanner 40 (ADS40) before and after typhoon event. Recently, this research integrates Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and oblique photogrammetric technologies for image acquisition by 5-10cm GSD photos. This approach permits to construct true 3D model so as to decipher ground information more realistically. 10-20cm DSM and DEM, and field GPS, were compiled together to decipher the morphologic changes. All the information, especially by means of true 3D model, the datasets provides detail ground information that may use to evaluate the landslide triggering mechanism and river channel evolution. The goals of this study is to integrates the UAS system and to decipher the sliding process and morphologic changes of large landslide areas, sediment transport and budgets, and to investigate the phenomenon of river migration. The results of this study provides not only geomatics and GIS dataset of the hazards, but also for essential geomorphologic information for other study, and for hazard mitigation and planning, as well.

  17. Combined single channel and single molecule detection identifies subunit composition of STIM1-activated transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Sampieri, Alicia; Moreno, Claudia; Pacheco, Jonathan; Salgado, Alfonso; Sherry, Ryan; Vaca, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of intracellular calcium ion stores initiates a rapid cascade of events culminating with the activation of the so-called Store-Operated Channels (SOC) at the plasma membrane. Calcium influx via SOC is essential in the initiation of calcium-dependent intracellular signaling and for the refilling of internal calcium stores, ensuring the regeneration of the signaling cascade. In spite of the significance of this evolutionary conserved mechanism, the molecular identity of SOC has been the center of a heated controversy spanning over the last 20 years. Initial studies positioned some members of the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel superfamily of channels (with the more robust evidence pointing to TRPC1) as a putative SOC. Recent evidence indicates that Stromal Interacting Molecule 1 (STIM1) activates some members from the TRPC family of channels. However, the exact subunit composition of TRPC channels remains undetermined to this date. To identify the subunit composition of STIM1-activated TRPC channels, we developed novel method, which combines single channel electrophysiological measurements based on the patch clamp technique with single molecule fluorescence imaging. We termed this method Single ion Channel Single Molecule Detection technique (SC-SMD). Using SC-SMD method, we have obtained direct evidence of the subunit composition of TRPC channels activated by STIM1. Furthermore, our electrophysiological-imaging SC-SMD method provides evidence at the molecular level of the mechanism by which STIM1 and calmodulin antagonize to modulate TRPC channel activity.

  18. Predicting stream channel erosion in the lacustrine core of the upper Nemadji River, Minnesota (USA) using stream geomorphology metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magner, Joseph A.; Brooks, Kenneth N.

    2008-06-01

    The USA Clean Water Act requires the development of a total maximum daily load (TMDL) when Minnesota’s water quality standard for turbidity is exceeded; however, regions underlain with fine-grained lacustrine deposits yield large natural background loads of suspended inorganic sediment. A review of hydrogeologic pathways was conducted along with the statistical analysis of geomorphic metrics, collected at 15 sites with varying drainage areas in the upper Nemadji River basin, northeastern Minnesota. Regression analysis indicated a strong linkage between bankfull cross-sectional area and drainage area. Dimensionless geomorphic metric ratios were developed to predict channel evolution potential and associated channel erosion risk. Sites located in drainage areas less than 2 km2 had low erosion risk and showed a correlation between channel slope and relative roughness ( D 84/mean bankfull channel depth, 88%). A principal components analysis explained over 98% of the variance between sites and indicated five important channel shape metrics to predict channel erosion: bankfull width, bankfull depth, maximum depth, cross-sectional area, and valley beltwidth. Mass wasting of cohesive stream channel sediment was influenced by groundwater discharge and produced turbid waters in the upper Nemadji River.

  19. Stream channel cross sections for a reach of the Boise River in Ada County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hortness, Jon E.; Werner, Douglas C.

    1999-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency produces maps of areas that are likely to be inundated during major floods, usually the 100-year, or 1-percent probability, flood. The maps, called Flood Insurance Rate Maps, are used to determine flood insurance rates for homes, businesses, or other structures located in flood-prone areas. State and local governments also use these maps for help with, among other things, development planning and disaster mitigation. During the period October 1997 through December 1998, the initial phase of a hydraulic analysis project of the Boise River from Barber Dam to the Ada/Canyon County boundary, the U.S. Geological Survey collected stream channel cross-section data at 238 locations along the river and documented 108 elevation reference marks established for horizontal and vertical control. In the final phase of the project, the Survey will use these data to determine water-surface elevations for the 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods and to define floodway limits. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will use the results of this hydraulic analysis to update the 100- and 500-year flood boundaries and the floodway limits on their Flood Insurance Rate Maps.

  20. Selective deposition response to aeolian-fluvial sediment supply in the desert braided channel of the upper Yellow River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Jia, X.; Li, Y.; Peng, W.

    2015-09-01

    Rivers flow across aeolian dunes and develop braided stream channels. Both aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies regulate sediment transport and deposition in such cross-dune braided rivers. Here we show a significant selective deposition in response to both aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies in the Ulan Buh desert braided channel. The Ulan Buh desert is the main coarse sediment source for this desert braided channel, and the mean percentage of the coarser (> 0.08 mm) grains on the aeolian dunes surface is 95.34 %. The lateral selective deposition process is developed by the interaction between the flows and the aeolian-fluvial sediment supplies, causing the coarser sediments (> 0.08 mm) from aeolian sand supply and bank erosion to accumulate in the channel centre and the finer fluvial sediments (< 0.08 mm) to be deposited on the bar and floodplain surfaces, forming a coarser-grained thalweg bed bounded by finer-grained floodplain surfaces. This lateral selective deposition reduces the downstream sediment transport and is a primary reason for the formation of an "above-ground" river in the braided reach of the upper Yellow River in response to aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies.

  1. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Coquille River basin, southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary study of bed-material transport, vertical and lateral channel changes, and existing datasets for the Coquille River basin, which encompasses 2,745 km2 (square kilometers) of the southwestern Oregon coast. This study, conducted to inform permitting decisions regarding instream gravel mining, revealed that:

  2. 75 FR 71145 - San Joaquin River Restoration Program: Reach 4B, Eastside Bypass, and Mariposa Bypass Channel and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Register on September 9, 2009 (74 FR 46453). This revised proposal would include measures for the... Bureau of Reclamation San Joaquin River Restoration Program: Reach 4B, Eastside Bypass, and Mariposa Bypass Channel and Structural Improvements Project, Merced County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of...

  3. Ecological Functions of Off-Channel Habitats of the Willamette River, Oregon, Database and Documentation (1997-2001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The database from the Ecological Functions of Off-Channel Habitats of the Willamette River, Oregon project (OCH Project) contains data collected from 1997 through 2001 from multiple research areas of the project, and project documents such as the OCH Research Plan, Quality Assura...

  4. Consistent trophic patterns among fishes in lagoon and channel habitats of a tropical floodplain river: Evidence from stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Katherine A.; Winemiller, Kirk O.; Layman, Craig A.; Zeug, Steven C.

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between food web dynamics and hydrological connectivity in rivers should be strongly influenced by annual flood pulses that affect primary production dynamics and movement of organic matter and consumer taxa. We sampled basal production sources and fishes from connected lagoons and the main channel of a low-gradient, floodplain river within the Orinoco River Basin in Venezuela. Stable isotope analysis was used to model the contribution of four basal production sources to fishes, and to examine patterns of mean trophic position during the falling-water period of the annual flood cycle. IsoSource, a multi-source mixing model, indicated that proportional contributions from production sources to fish assemblages were similar in lagoons and the main channel. Although distributions differed, the means for trophic positions of fish assemblages as well as individual species were similar between the two habitats. These findings contradict recent food web studies conducted in temperate floodplain rivers that described significant differences in trophic positions of fishes from slackwater and floodplain versus main channel habitats. Low between-habitat trophic variation in this tropical river probably results from an extended annual flood pulse (ca. 5 mo.) that allows mixing of sestonic and allochthonous basal production sources and extensive lateral movements of fishes throughout the riverscape.

  5. Channel response to extreme floods: Insights on controlling factors from six mountain rivers in northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surian, Nicola; Righini, Margherita; Lucía, Ana; Nardi, Laura; Amponsah, William; Benvenuti, Marco; Borga, Marco; Cavalli, Marco; Comiti, Francesco; Marchi, Lorenzo; Rinaldi, Massimo; Viero, Alessia

    2016-11-01

    This work addresses the geomorphic response of mountain rivers to extreme floods, exploring the relationships between morphological changes and controlling factors. The research was conducted on six tributaries of the Magra River (northern Apennines, Italy) whose catchments were affected by an extreme flood (estimated recurrence interval > 100 years in most of the basins) on 25 October 2011. An integrated approach was deployed to study this flood, including (i) analysis of channel width changes by comparing aerial photographs taken before and after the flood, (ii) estimate of peak discharges in ungauged streams, (iii) detailed mapping of landslides and analysis of their connectivity with the channel network. Channel widening occurred in 35 reaches out of 39. In reaches with channel slope < 4% (here defined as nonsteep reaches), average and maximum ratios of post-flood and pre-flood channel width were 5.2 and 19.7 (i.e., channel widened from 4 to 82 m), respectively. In steep reaches (slope ≥ 4%), widening was slightly less intense (i.e., average width ratio = 3.4, maximum width ratio = 9.6). The relationships between the degree of channel widening and seven controlling factors were explored at subreach scale by using multiple regression models. In the steep subreaches characterized by higher confinement, the degree of channel widening (i.e., width ratio) showed relatively strong relationships with cross-sectional stream power, unit stream power (calculated based on pre-flood channel width), and lateral confinement, with coefficients of multiple determination (R2) ranging between 0.43 and 0.67. The models for the nonsteep subreaches provided a lower explanation of widening variability, with R2 ranging from 0.30 to 0.38; in these reaches a significant although weak relation was found between the degree of channel widening and the hillslope area supplying sediment to the channels. Results indicate that hydraulic variables alone are not sufficient to satisfactorily

  6. Activation and inhibition of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca(2+)-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+), and discovered that Mg(2+) competes with Ca(2+) in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore-as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions-appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1.

  7. Zinc activates damage-sensing TRPA1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhen; Bandell, Michael; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential biological trace element. It is required for the structure or function of over 300 proteins, and is increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. However, high concentrations of zinc have cytotoxic effects, and overexposure to zinc can cause pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that zinc excites nociceptive somatosensory neurons and causes nociception in mice through TRPA1, a cation channel previously shown to mediate the pungency of wasabi and cinnamon through cysteine-modification. Zinc activates TRPA1 through a novel mechanism that requires zinc influx through TRPA1 channels and subsequent activation via specific intracellular cysteine and histidine residues. TRPA1 is highly sensitive to intracellular zinc, as low nanomolar concentrations activate TRPA1 and modulate its sensitivity. These findings identify TRPA1 as a major target for the sensory effects of zinc, and support an emerging role for zinc as a signaling molecule that can modulate sensory transmission. PMID:19202543

  8. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Tillamook Bay tributaries and Nehalem River basin, northwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    subject to incision and aggradation as well as lateral shifts in thalweg position and bank deposition and erosion. * In fluvial reaches, unit bar area declined a net 5.3-83.6 percent from 1939 to 2009. The documented reduction in bar area may be attributable to several factors, including vegetation establishment and stabilization of formerly active bar surfaces, lateral channel changes and resulting alterations in sediment deposition and erosion patterns, and streamflow and/or tide differences between photographs. Other factors that may be associated with the observed reduction in bar area but not assessed in this reconnaissance level study include changes in the sediment and hydrology regimes of these rivers over the analysis period. * In tidal reaches, unit bar area increased on the Tillamook and Nehalem Rivers (98.0 and 14.7 percent, respectively), but declined a net 24.2 to 83.1 percent in the other four tidal reaches. Net increases in bar area in the Tidal Tillamook and Nehalem Reaches were possibly attributable to tidal differences between the photographs as well as sediment deposition behind log booms and pile structures on the Tillamook River between 1939 and 1967. * The armoring ratio (ratio of the median grain sizes of a bar's surface and subsurface layers) was 1.6 at Lower Waldron Bar on the Miami River, tentatively indicating a relative balance between transport capacity and sediment supply at this location. Armoring ratios, however, ranged from 2.4 to 5.5 at sites on the Trask, Wilson, Kilchis, and Nehalem Rivers; these coarse armor layers probably reflect limited bed-material supply at these sites. * On the basis of mapping results, measured armoring ratios, and channel cross section surveys, preliminary conclusions are that the fluvial reaches on the Tillamook, Trask, Kilchis, and Nehalem Rivers are currently sediment supply-limited in terms of bed material - that is, the transport capacity of the channel generally exceeds the supply of bed material. The

  9. Chemical activation of the mechanotransduction channel Piezo1

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Ruhma; Xu, Jie; Dubin, Adrienne E; Coste, Bertrand; Mathur, Jayanti; Huynh, Truc; Matzen, Jason; Lao, Jianmin; Tully, David C; Engels, Ingo H; Petrassi, H Michael; Schumacher, Andrew M; Montal, Mauricio; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Piezo ion channels are activated by various types of mechanical stimuli and function as biological pressure sensors in both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date, mechanical stimuli are the only means to activate Piezo ion channels and whether other modes of activation exist is not known. In this study, we screened ∼3.25 million compounds using a cell-based fluorescence assay and identified a synthetic small molecule we termed Yoda1 that acts as an agonist for both human and mouse Piezo1. Functional studies in cells revealed that Yoda1 affects the sensitivity and the inactivation kinetics of mechanically induced responses. Characterization of Yoda1 in artificial droplet lipid bilayers showed that Yoda1 activates purified Piezo1 channels in the absence of other cellular components. Our studies demonstrate that Piezo1 is amenable to chemical activation and raise the possibility that endogenous Piezo1 agonists might exist. Yoda1 will serve as a key tool compound to study Piezo1 regulation and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07369.001 PMID:26001275

  10. Geomorphic and stratigraphic evidence for dynamic river channel development in the Dehra Dun region, northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, A. L.; Sinha, R.; Barnes, J. B.; Pickering, J.; Tandon, S. K.

    2009-04-01

    The Ganga and Yamuna rivers drain the Garhwal Himalaya of northern India and cut cross several active faults as they pass into the Gangetic Plain and the northern Indian foreland. Unlike rivers in the central or eastern Himalayas, which debouch directly into the foreland and have built large depositional fan complexes, the Ganga and Yamuna rivers have been funnelled into an intermontane basin, the Dehra Dun, by Quaternary upper-crustal faulting and growth of the Mohand anticline. Sediments in the Dun record a complex history of aggradation and erosion during the Quaternary, as seen by alternate episodes of fan progradation and incision in stratigraphic records. Here, we summarize existing work on the evidence for, and timing of, these episodes, and explore the consequences of proximal sediment storage or evacuation, as well as local sediment sources derived from the active structures bounding the Dun, on the downstream character and behaviour of the river systems. Correlation of fan depositional surfaces across the Dun allows us to constrain both the volumes of Quaternary fill in the Dun and the amount of material excavated during episodes of fan incision. We argue that, while the trapping of sediment in the Dun is ultimately caused by growth and lateral propagation of the Himalayan frontal fault system and the Mohand anticline, variations in storage or excavation on short time scales (50-100 ka to present) are most likely driven by climatically-modulated changes in sediment supply from the catchments upstream of the Dun. We show that active upper-crustal faulting does, however, leave a consistent imprint in the present-day morphology of the rivers as they flow across the Dun. Finally, we place bounds on the volumes of sediment sourced from the active structures bounding the Dun, including the Mohand anticline, and the approximate time scales over which this sediment has been liberated. An open question is whether or not the proximal sediment storage ‘filter' of

  11. Habitat used by juvenile lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) in the North Channel of the St. Clair River (Michigan, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boase, James C.; Manny, Bruce A.; Donald, Katherine A.L.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Diana, James S.; Thomas, Michael V.; Chiotti, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) occupy the St. Clair River, part of a channel connecting lakes Huron and Erie in the Laurentian Great Lakes. In the North Channel of the St. Clair River, juvenile lake sturgeon (3–7 years old and 582–793 mm in length) were studied to determine movement patterns and habitat usage. Fourteen juveniles were implanted with ultrasonic transmitters and tracked June–August of 2004, 2005 and 2006. Telemetry data, Geographic Information System software, side-scan sonar, video images of the river bottom, scuba diving, and benthic substrate samples were used to determine the extent and composition of habitats they occupied. Juvenile lake sturgeon habitat selection was strongly related to water depth. No fish were found in 700 mm in length selected sand and gravel areas mixed with zebra mussels and areas dominated by zebra mussels, while fish < 700 mm used these habitat types in proportion to their availability.

  12. The role of vegetation in the formation of anabranching channels in an ephemeral river, Northern plains, arid central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooth, Stephen; Nanson, Gerald C.

    2000-10-01

    As the distribution and abundance of vegetation in drylands is often controlled by the greater availability of water along river channels, riparian vegetation has the potential to influence significantly dryland river form, process and behaviour. This paper demonstrates how a small indigenous shrub, the inland teatree (Melaleuca glomerata), influences the formation and maintenance of anabranching channels in a reach of the ephemeral Marshall River, Northern Plains, arid central Australia. Here, the Marshall is characterized by ridge-form anabranching, where water and sediment are routed through subparallel, multiple channels of variable size which occur within a typically straight channel-train. Channels are separated by channel-train ridges - narrow, flow-aligned, vegetated features - or by wider islands. By providing a substantial element of boundary roughness, dense stands of teatrees growing on channel beds or atop the ridges and islands influence flow velocities, flow depths and sediment transport, resulting in flow diversion, bank and floodplain erosion, and especially sediment deposition. Ridges and islands represent a continuum of forms, and their formation and development can be divided into a three-stage sequence involving teatree growth and alluvial sedimentation.1Teatrees colonize a flat, sandy channel bed, initiating the formation of ridges by lee-side accretion. Individual ridges grow laterally, vertically and longitudinally and maintain a geometrically similar streamlined (lemniscate) form that presents minimum drag.2Individual ridges grow in size, and interact with neighbouring ridges, causing the lemniscate forms to become distorted. Ridges in the lee of other ridges tend to be protected from the erosive effects of floods and survive, whereas individual teatrees or small ridges exposed to flow concentrated between larger ridges, tend to be removed.3

  13. Sinuosity change of the Po River near Cremona (Northern Italy) - a result of neotectonic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovszki, Judit; Timár, Gábor

    2010-05-01

    In the map sheets of the Second Military Survey of the Habsburg Empire, Lombardia, Parma, Modena and Venice also can be seen (Timár et al., 2006). This area was surveyed between 1818 and 1829. In these map sheets, we can also follow the river Po from Vaccarizza to the delta. This river reach is about 350 km long. This river reach was digitized and sinuosity values were calculated with different window sizes, and displayed in a spectrum-like diagram (sinuosity spectra; after van Balen et al., 2008). At Cremona, a significante sinuosity change were identified. The sinuosity increasing, and we have high sinuosity values. In the summarizing geological map of Italy (Compagnoni and Calluzzo, 2004), at this place, a tectonic line was identified. So probably this fault line invokes the sinuosity change on the river. The vertical movements indicated on the maps are just the opposite like they would be according to the flume experiments of Ouchi (1985). In the case of the Po River at Cremona, the decrease of the channel slope results higher sinuosity. The reason is that the rate of the slope and water discharge is higher than it is required by the self-organized meandering and the river parameters fell to the range of the unorganized meandering (cf. Timár, 2003). Another possible explanation could be that the northern tributary, the Adda River has significant sediment load that lowers the sinuosity of the trunk river at the confluence. Compagnoni, B., Galluzzo, F. (eds., 2004): Geological Map of Italy. Agenzia per la Protezione dell'Ambiente per I Servizi Tecnici - Dipartimento Difesa del Suolo, Servizio Geologico d'Italia, Rome-Florence-Genoa. Map, scale=1:1250000, especially printed for the 32nd International Geological Congress. Ouchi, S. (1985): Response of alluvial rivers to slow active tectonic movement. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 96: 504-515. Timár, G. (2003): Controls on channel sinuosity changes: a case study of the Tisza River, the Great Hungarian Plain. Quaternary

  14. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-09-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2-5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface potential of a carbonyl/carbamate oxygen atom present in most KCNQ activators. These findings functionally pinpoint an atomic-scale interaction essential for effects of retigabine and provide stringent constraints that may guide rational improvement of the emerging drug class of KCNQ channel activators.

  15. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2–5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface potential of a carbonyl/carbamate oxygen atom present in most KCNQ activators. These findings functionally pinpoint an atomic-scale interaction essential for effects of retigabine and provide stringent constraints that may guide rational improvement of the emerging drug class of KCNQ channel activators. PMID:26333338

  16. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  17. Linking long-term gully and river channel dynamics to environmental change using repeat photography (Northern Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankl, Amaury; Nyssen, Jan; De Dapper, Morgan; Haile, Mitiku; Billi, Paolo; Munro, R. Neil; Deckers, Jozef; Poesen, Jean

    2011-06-01

    In the Highlands of Northern Ethiopia gully occurrence is linked to poverty-driven unsustainable use of the land in a vulnerable semi-arid and mountainous environment, where intensive rainfall challenges the physical integrity of the landscape. Trends in gully and river channel erosion, and their relation to triggering environmental changes can proffer valuable insights into sustainable development in Northern Ethiopia. In order to assess the region-wide change in gully and river channel morphology over 140 years, a set of 57 historical photographs taken in Tigray, and, clearly displaying gully cross-sections, were precisely repeated from 2006 till 2009. Ninety-two percent of the gully and river sections (n = 38) increased in cross-sectional area during the studied period, especially after 1975. Two repeatedly photographed catchments of Lake Ashenge and Atsela allowed a detailed study of gully development from 1936 until 2009. A conceptual hydrogeomorphic model was devised for these catchments and validated for the Northern Ethiopian Highlands. Three major phases can be distinguished in the hydrological regime of the catchments. In the first phase, between 1868 (or earlier) and ca. 1965, the relatively stable channels showed an oversized morphology inherited from a previous period when external forcing in environmental conditions had caused the channels to shape. In the second phase (ca. 1965 - ca. 2000), increased aridity and continued vegetation clearance accelerated the channel dynamics of the gully and river system. The third phase (ca. 2000 - present) started after the large-scale implementation of soil and water conservation measures. In 2009, 23% of the gully and river sections were stabilizing. This paper validates previous research indicating severe land degradation in the second half of the 20th century. Additionally, it demonstrates that the recent erosive cycle started around 1965 and, that at the present time, improved land management stabilizes

  18. Sediment discharge and channel change in the North Fork Teton River, 1977-78, Fremont and Madison counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Rhea P.

    1979-01-01

    The Teton Dam failure flood of June 5, 1976, severely disrupted the geomorphic character of North Fork Teton River in Idaho. Extensive channel restoration was required to contain expected normal spring flows. Six principal sites were established on the 17-mile reach of the river to study sediment transport and channel change during 1977-78. During April 1 to September 30, 1977, total water discharge at Teton Island bridge was 97,530 acre-feet; 4,360 tons of total sediment were transported. Total water discharge, April 1 to September 30, 1978, was 191,940 acre-feet; 10,680 tons of total sediment were transported. Analyses of data indicated several trends of erosion and deposition. Minimal channel change in the upper 7 miles of the river indicated equilibrium may temporarily exist between hydraulic-flow properties and channel shape. Streambed profiles indicated little change in streambed elevations. Erosional tonnage at mid-study reaches was 4,260 tons. One-half mile downstream, an increase of 4,150 tons of suspended and 1,050 tons of bedload sediment probably was partly derived from upstream bank erosion. An estimated 5,870 tons was deposited within the next subreach downstream. Virtually the entire bedload was redeposited before the last subreach, 4.4 miles downstream measured bedload was 91 tons. Suspended-sediment discharge transported past the last site was 16,470 tons. Lateral erosion and deposition in the lower 10 miles of the river indicate that subreaches now shortened by manmade channel alinements may begin to meander. Future deposition of coarse material at upstream gravel and concrete impoundments may trigger instability in the entire river. (Kosco-USGS)

  19. Geomorphic Framework to assess changes to aquatic habitat due to flow regulation and channel and floodplain alteration, Cedar River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Little, Rand

    2010-01-01

    Flow regulation, bank armoring, and floodplain alteration since the early 20th century have contributed to significant changes in the hydrologic regime and geomorphic processes of the Cedar River in Washington State. The Cedar River originates in the Cascade Range, provides drinking water to the Seattle metropolitan area, and supports several populations of anadromous salmonids. Flow regulation currently has limited influence on the magnitude, duration, and timing of high-flow events, which affect the incubation of salmonids as well as the production and maintenance of their habitat. Unlike structural changes to the channel and floodplain, flow regulation may be modified in the short-term to improve the viability of salmon populations. An understanding of the effects of flow regulation on those populations must be discerned over a range of scales from individual floods that affect the size of individual year classes to decadal high flow regime that influences the amount and quality of channel and off-channel habitat available for spawning and rearing. We present estimates of reach-scale sediment budgets and changes to channel morphology derived from historical orthoimagery, specific gage analyses at four long-term streamflow-gaging stations to quantify trends in aggradation, and hydrologic statistics of the magnitude and duration of peak streamflows. These data suggest a gradient of channel types from unconfined, sediment-rich segments to confined, sediment-poor segments that are likely to have distinct responses to high flows. Particle-size distribution data and longitudinal water surface and streambed profiles for the 56 km downstream of Chester Morse Lake measured in 2010 show the spatial extent of preferred salmonid habitat along the Cedar River. These historical and current data constitute a geomorphic framework to help assess different river management scenarios for salmonid habitat and population viability. PDF version of a presentation on changes to aquatic

  20. Fish assemblages at engineered and natural channel structures in the lower Missouri river: implications for modified dike structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, J.T.; Paukert, Craig P.; Doyle, W.J.; Hill, T.; Steffensen, K.D.; Travnichek, Vincent H.

    2012-01-01

    Large rivers throughout the world have been modified by using dike structures to divert water flows to deepwater habitats to maintain navigation channels. These modifications have been implicated in the decline in habitat diversity and native fishes. However, dike structures have been modified in the Missouri River USA to increase habitat diversity to aid in the recovery of native fishes. We compared species occupancy and fish community composition at natural sandbars and at notched and un-notched rock dikes along the lower Missouri River to determine if notching dikes increases species diversity or occupancy of native fishes. Fish were collected using gill nets, trammel nets, otter trawls, and mini fyke nets throughout the lower 1212 river km of the Missouri River USA from 2003 to 2006. Few differences in species richness and diversity were evident among engineered dike structures and natural sandbars. Notching a dike structure had no effect on proportional abundance of fluvial dependents, fluvial specialists, and macrohabitat generalists. Occupancy at notched dikes increased for two species but did not differ for 17 other species (81%). Our results suggest that dike structures may provide suitable habitats for fluvial species compared with channel sand bars, but dike notching did not increase abundance or occupancy of most Missouri River fishes. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cilostazol induces vasodilation through the activation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in aortic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Hong, Da Hye; Son, Youn Kyoung; Na, Sung Hun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Bae, Young Min; Seo, Eun Young; Kim, Sung Joon; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol and related signaling pathways in phenylephrine (Phe)-induced pre-contracted aortic rings. Cilostazol induced vasorelaxation in a concentration-dependent manner when aortic rings were pre-contracted with Phe. Application of the voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channel inhibitor 4-AP, the ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel inhibitor glibenclamide, and the inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channel inhibitor Ba(2+) did not alter the vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol; however, pre- and post-treatment with the big-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel inhibitor paxilline inhibited the vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol. This vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol was reduced in the presence of an adenylyl cyclase or a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, but not a protein kinase G inhibitor. Inside-out single channel recordings revealed that cilostazol induced the activation of BK(Ca) channel activity. The vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol was not affected by removal of the endothelium. In addition, application of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and a small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK(Ca)) channel inhibitor did not affect cilostazol-induced vasorelaxation. We conclude that cilostazol induced vasorelaxation of the aorta through activation of BK(Ca) channel via a PKA-dependent signaling mechanism independent of endothelium.

  2. A longitudinal assessment of the aquatic macroinvertebrate community in the channelized lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Charbonneau, Collette S.; Fairchild, James F.; Mueller, Brad G.; Schmitt, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted an aquatic macroinvertebrate assessment in the channelized reach of the lower Missouri River, and used statistical analysis of individual metrics and multimetric scores to identify community response patterns and evaluate relative biological condition. We examined longitudinal site differences that are potentially associated with water qualityrelated factors originating from the Kansas City metropolitan area, using data from coarse rock substrate in flowing water habitats (outside river bends), and depositional mud substratein slack water habitats (dike fields). Three sites above rivermile (RM) 369 in Kansas City (Nebraska City, RM = 560; St. Joseph, RM = 530; Parkville, RM = 377) and three below (Lexington, RM = 319; Glasgow, RM = 228; Hermann, RM = 94) were sampled with rock basket artificial substrates, a qualitative kicknet method, and the Petite Ponar. We also compared the performance of the methods used. A total of 132 aquatic macroinvertebrate taxa were collected from the lower Missouri River; one third of these taxa belonged to the sensitiveEPOT insect orders (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Odonata, and Trichoptera). Rock baskets had the highest mean efficiency (34.1%) of the methods, and the largest number of taxa was collected by Ponar (n = 69) and kicknet (n = 69) methods. Seven of the 15 metrics calculated from rock basket data, and five ofthe nine metrics calculated from Ponar data showed highly significant differences (ANOVA, P < 0.001) at one or more sitesbelow Kansas City. We observed a substantial reduction in net-spinning Trichoptera in rock habitats below Kansas City (Lexington), an increase in relative dominance of Oligochaeta in depositional habitats at the next site downstream (Glasgow), and lower relative condition scores in rock habitat at Lexingtonand depositional habitat at Glasgow. Collectively, these data indicate that some urban-related impacts on the aquatic macroinvertebrate community are occurring. Our results suggest that

  3. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  4. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  5. Water-surface elevations and channel characteristics for a selected reach of the Applegate River, Jackson County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, David Dell; Alexander, Clyde W.

    1970-01-01

    In land-use planning for the Applegate River and its flood plain, consideration should be given to (1) preservation of the recreational attributes of the area, (2) allowance for optimum development of the flood plain's natural resources, and (3) protection of the rights of private landowners. Major factors that influence evaluation of the above considerations are the elevations and characteristics of floods. Heretofore, such flood data for the Applegate River have been inadequate to evaluate the flood potential or to use as a basis for delineating reasonable land-use zones. Therefore, at the request of Jackson County, this study was made to provide flood elevations, water-surface profiles, and channel characteristics (geometry and slope) for a reach of the Applegate River from the Jackson-Josephine County line upstream to the Applegate damsite (fig. 1). A similar study was previously made for reaches of adjacent Rogue River and Elk Creek (Harris, 1970).

  6. Quantifying floodplain and mainstem channel response to the removal of the Elwha River dams using "old school" techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pess, G. R.; McHenry, M.; Peters, R.; Beechie, T. J.; Duda, J. J.; Liermann, M. C.; Bakke, P. D.; Morley, S. A.; McMillan, J. R.; Denton, K.

    2012-12-01

    In 2011 a multi-year deconstruction of two long-standing, high-head dams began on the Elwha River, Washington State. Over the past decade, we have been monitoring a variety of ecosystem attributes in the Elwha River basin to establish baseline conditions prior to one of the largest watershed restoration projects in the US. Our study design is tailored to the Elwha's geomorphic template, as different channel types are expected to respond differently to the large amount of sediment that will be released. A primary focus of this effort has been on the 28 km of floodplain channels below the dams (for every 1km of main stem habitat there is 1.35km of floodplain channel). Another focus has been on main stem channel features such as pool and riffle habitat, which are critical habitats for salmonids and other biota. How will these floodplain channels and mainstem channel features react to the large amount of sediment that is being released? We have used simple field techniques such as longitudinal profiles of floodplain channels, pebble counts, turbidity measurements, and the amount of sediment accumulation in pools and riffles to document baseline as well as "during dam removal" conditions. Early results indicate increased turbidity downstream of dams throughout deconstruction, suggesting there will be dramatic increases in fine sediment accumulations once dam removal is completed. We plan to continue using inexpensive methods to quantify the geomorphic and ecological change following dam removal in the Elwha River basin. These findings have direct implications for other dam removal projects.

  7. Comparing effects of active and passive restoration on the Middle Fork John Day River, NE Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.; Goslin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, cattle grazing has been eliminated on over 14 km of the upper Middle Fork John Day. Starting in 2008, active restoration (log structures with dug pools, woody vegetation planting, and modifications to increase channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity) was implemented on nearly 6 km within the cattle exclosure length. Implementation of active and passive restoration strategies in the same and adjacent reaches allows comparison of these two approaches. We have been monitoring these reaches since 2008. Unexpectedly in response to grazing exclosure, a native sedge, Carex nudata (torrent sedge), has exploded in population. C. nudata grows in the active channel, anchoring itself tightly to the gravel-cobble river bed with a dense root network. As a result, C. nudata has changed erosion and sedimentation patterns including bank erosion, channel bed scour, and island formation. We present data on fish cover increases due to C. nudata and log structures, and on channel complexity before and after restoration. Both active and passive restorations are increasing channel complexity and juvenile fish cover, although in different ways. Fish cover provided by active and passive restoration are similar in area but different in depth and position, with C. nudata fish cover generally shallower and partly mid-channel. Residual pool depth is larger in log structure pools than in C. nudata scour pools, but C. nudata pools are more numerous in some reaches. By producing frequent, small scour features and small islands, it can be argued that C. nudata is increasing hydraulic complexity more than the large, meander-bend pools at log structures, but this is hard to quantify. C. nudata has also stabilized active bars, perhaps changing the bedload sediment budget. Positive habitat benefits of active restoration appear to be greater in the short term, but over the long term (20 years or more) effects of C. nudata may be comparable or greater.

  8. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  9. Influence of channel morphology and flow regime on larval drift of pallid sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, Susannah O.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    The transition from drifting free embryo to exogenously feeding larvae has been identified as a potential life-stage bottleneck for the endangered Missouri River pallid sturgeon. Previous studies have indicated that river regulation and fragmentation may contribute to the mortality of larval pallid sturgeon by reducing the extent of free-flowing river available to free embryos to complete ontogenetic development. Calculations of total drift distance based on mean velocity, however, do not address the potential for complex channels and flow patterns to increase retention or longitudinal dispersion of free embryos. We use a one-dimensional advection–dispersion model to estimate total drift distance and employ the longitudinal dispersion coefficient as a metric to quantify the tendency towards dispersion or retention of passively drifting larvae. We describe the effects of different styles of channel morphology on larval dispersion and consider the implications of flow regime modifications on retention of free embryos within the Lower Missouri River. The results illustrate the complex interactions of local morphology, engineered structures, and hydraulics that determine patterns of dispersion in riverine environments and inform how changes to channel morphology and flow regime may alter dispersion of drifting organisms.

  10. Large-scale bedforms in the Platte River downstream from Grand Island, Nebraska; structure, process, and relationship to channel narrowing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Platte River channel in Nebraska, especially downstream from Grand Island, is characterized by large, periodic, and geometrically distinct bedforms called macroforms. Macroforms have dimensions commensurate with the width and depth of the channel and are emergent at all but the highest flow stages. The encroachment of vegetation on macroforms and their consequent stabilization since the large-scale development of irrigation in the Platte River basin is the major cause of the reduction in channel width upstream from Grand Island. From simple geometrical considerations of macroform shape, an equation is developed to predict the depth and duration of flow required to erode the stoss sides of the macroforms to remove new vegetal growth each year. The methods developed in this report to eliminate vegetal growth on macroforms may provide a useful management tool for controlling width of the Platte River channels. Although further testing is required to establish the validity of these methods at actual stream sites, a sample calculation for the Silver Creek reach shows good agreement between the flow conditions predicted by the methods developed in this report and actual flow conditions. (USGS)

  11. Drivers of barotropic and baroclinic exchange through an estuarine navigation channel in the Mississippi River Delta Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Estuarine navigation channels have long been recognized as conduits for saltwater intrusion into coastal wetlands. Salt flux decomposition and time series measurements of velocity and salinity were used to examine salt flux components and drivers of baroclinic and barotropic exchange in the Houma Navigation Channel, an estuarine channel located in the Mississippi River delta plain that receives substantial freshwater inputs from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system at its inland extent. Two modes of vertical current structure were identified from the time series data. The first mode, accounting for 90% of the total flow field variability, strongly resembled a barotropic current structure and was coherent with alongshelf wind stress over the coastal Gulf of Mexico. The second mode was indicative of gravitational circulation and was linked to variability in tidal stirring and the horizontal salinity gradient along the channel’s length. Tidal oscillatory salt flux was more important than gravitational circulation in transporting salt upestuary, except over equatorial phases of the fortnightly tidal cycle during times when river inflows were minimal. During all tidal cycles sampled, the advective flux, driven by a combination of freshwater discharge and wind-driven changes in storage, was the dominant transport term, and net flux of salt was always out of the estuary. These findings indicate that although human-made channels can effectively facilitate inland intrusion of saline water, this intrusion can be minimized or even reversed when they are subject to significant freshwater inputs.

  12. Stimulation of epithelial sodium channel activity by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide.

    PubMed

    Chrabi, A; Horisberger, J D

    1999-07-01

    The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) contributes to the regulation of the sodium balance and blood pressure because it mediates a rate-limiting step in sodium transport across the epithelium of the distal nephron. The activity of ENaC is regulated by hormones, such as aldosterone and vasopressin, and by other intracellular or extracellular factors, but the mechanisms of these regulations are not yet well understood. It has been proposed that ENaC may be regulated by an associated ATP-binding cassette protein such as the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator or the K channel-associated sulfonylurea receptor. Glibenclamide, a known inhibitor of sulfonylurea receptor and cystic fibrosis conductance regulator, induced a dose-dependent and reversible stimulation (of the order of 40-50%) of the amiloride-sensitive current in oocytes expressing Xenopus ENaC, with a K1/2 of 45 +/- 5 microM. A similar effect was observed in oocytes expressing human ENaC, but not rat ENaC. Measurements performed with various combinations of rat and Xenopus subunits indicated that several subunits are involved in this effect. Glibenclamide also increased the transepithelial Na transport by the A6 Xenopus kidney cell line. Single-channel current recordings showed a doubling of the number of the open channels when glibenclamide was applied locally to the extracellular surface of the cell membrane. These results support the hypothesis of the existence of an associated ATP-binding cassette-type regulatory protein associated with the epithelial sodium channel. PMID:10381797

  13. Channel adjustments to a succession of water pulses in gravel bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer-Boix, Carles; Hassan, Marwan A.

    2015-11-01

    Gravel bed rivers commonly exhibit a coarse surface armor resulting from a complex history of interactions between flow and sediment supply. The evolution of the surface texture under single storm events or under steady flow conditions has been studied by a number of researchers. However, the role of successive floods on the surface texture evolution is still poorly understood. An experimental campaign in an 18 m-long 1 m-wide flume has been designed to study these issues. Eight consecutive runs, each one consisting of a low-flow period of variable duration followed by a sudden flood (water pulse) lasting 1.5 h, have been conducted. The total duration of the experiment was 46 h. The initial bed surface was created during a 280 h-long experiment focused on the influence of episodic sediment supply on channel adjustments. Our experiments represent a realistic armored and structured beds found in mountain gravel bed rivers. The armor surface texture persists over the duration of the experiment. The experiment exhibits downstream fining of the bed-surface texture. It was found that sorting processes were affected by the duration of low-flow between flood pulses. Since bed load transport is influenced by sediment sorting, the evolution of bed load transport is impacted by the frequency of the water pulses: short interpulse durations reduce the time over which fine material (transported as bed load) can be winnowed. This, in turn, contributes to declining reduction of the bed load transport over time while the sediment storage increases.

  14. Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in rat thymic lymphocytes: activation by concanavalin A.

    PubMed Central

    Mahaut-Smith, M P; Mason, M J

    1991-01-01

    1. The role of ion channels in the mitogenic response of rat thymic lymphocytes to concanavalin A (ConA) was studied using single-channel patch-clamp recordings and measurements of membrane potential with the fluorescent probe bis-oxonol. 2. ConA (20 micrograms ml-1) evoked a rapid membrane hyperpolarization; Indo-1 measurements indicated a concurrent increase in [Ca2+]i. The hyperpolarization was blocked by cytoplasmic loading with the Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (bis(O-amino-phenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid), or charybdotoxin, a component of scorpion venom known to block K+ channels in lymphocytes. 3. Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings showed that both ConA and the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin activated channels with high selectivity for K+. Two conductance levels were observed -6-7 pS and 17-18 pS-measured as inward chord conductance at 60 mV from reversal potential (Erev) with 140 mM-KCl in the pipette. The current-voltage relationship for the larger channel displayed inward rectification and channel open probability was weakly dependent upon membrane potential. 4. These experiments provide the first direct evidence for mitogen-activated Ca(2+)-gated K+ channels (IK(Ca)) in lymphocytes. This conductance is relatively inactive in unstimulated rat thymocytes but following the intracellular Ca2+ rises induced by ConA, IK(Ca) channels are activated and produce a significant hyperpolarization of the cell potential. PMID:1716678

  15. A common mechanism underlies stretch activation and receptor activation of TRPC6 channels

    PubMed Central

    Spassova, Maria A.; Hewavitharana, Thamara; Xu, Wen; Soboloff, Jonathan; Gill, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    The TRP family of ion channels transduce an extensive range of chemical and physical signals. TRPC6 is a receptor-activated nonselective cation channel expressed widely in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types. We report here that TRPC6 is also a sensor of mechanically and osmotically induced membrane stretch. Pressure-induced activation of TRPC6 was independent of phospholipase C. The stretch responses were blocked by the tarantula peptide, GsMTx-4, known to specifically inhibit mechanosensitive channels by modifying the external lipid-channel boundary. The GsMTx-4 peptide also blocked the activation of TRPC6 channels by either receptor-induced PLC activation or by direct application of diacylglycerol. The effects of the peptide on both stretch- and diacylglycerol-mediated TRPC6 activation indicate that the mechanical and chemical lipid sensing by the channel has a common molecular mechanism that may involve lateral-lipid tension. The mechanosensing properties of TRPC6 channels highly expressed in smooth muscle cells are likely to play a key role in regulating myogenic tone in vascular tissue. PMID:17056714

  16. Effects of channel modification on fish habitat in the upper Yellowstone River: Final report to the USACE, Omaha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Bovee, Ken D.; Waddle, Terry J.

    2003-01-01

    A two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation model was coupled with a geographic information system (GIS) to produce a variety of habitat classification maps for three study reaches in the upper Yellowstone River basin in Montana. Data from these maps were used to examine potential effects of channel modification on shallow, slow current velocity (SSCV) habitats that are important refugia and nursery areas for young salmonids. At low flows, channel modifications were found to contribute additional SSCV habitat, but this contribution was negligible at higher discharges. During runoff, when young salmonids are most vulnerable to downstream displacement, the largest areas of SSCV habitat occurred in side channels, point bars, and overbank areas. Because of the diversity of elevations in the existing Yellowstone River, SSCV habitat tends to be available over a wide range of discharges. Based on simulations in modified and unmodified sub-reaches, channel simplification results in decreased availability of SSCV habitat, particularly during runoff. The combined results of the fish population and fish habitat studies present strong evidence that during runoff, SSCV habitat is most abundant in side channel and overbank areas and that juvenile salmonids use these habitats as refugia. Channel modifications that result in reduced availability of side channel and overbank habitats, particularly during runoff, will probably cause local reductions in juvenile abundances during the runoff period. Effects of reduced juvenile abundances during runoff on adult numbers later in the year will depend on (1) the extent of channel modification, (2) patterns of fish displacement and movement, (3) longitudinal connectivity between reaches that contain refugia and those that do not, and (4) the relative importance of other limiting factors.

  17. Response of lateral channel dynamics of a lowland meandering river to engineering-derived adjustments - an example of the Morava River (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondruch, Jakub; Mácka, Zdenek

    2015-11-01

    Freely meandering (quasi)natural reaches of lowland rivers represent a rare phenomenon in Central Europe. Increasing attention is currently being paid to the dynamics of quasi-natural (artificially influenced) meandering rivers as this attention represents the basic prerequisite for the development of appropriate restoration strategies on regulated rivers. This study focused on a 5.5 km long reach of the Morava River in the Strážnické Pomoraví region, Czech Republic that is characterised by quasi-natural evolution after substantial engineering adjustments were made in the first decades of the twentieth century. Based on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis of aerial photographs, the spatio-temporal dynamics of bank erosion and accretion rates were quantitatively described and variables that control channel migration rates were identified. High rates of lateral shifts were localised in high sinuosity segments (sinuosity 1.17-2.37), whereas segments with very low rates were straight or formed into slightly curved bends (sinuosity 1.05-1.18). As a key factor, engineering works that influenced local river bed slope and induced a dramatic increase in bank erosion rates were identified. River engineering works induced a dramatic increase in bank erosion rate (2.19 m/year for 1938-53 and 1.47 m/year for 1953-63). An interval of approximately 25 years was needed before the erosion rates dropped back to values documented before river regulation (0.35-1.09 m/year for 1841-1938). Other important controlling variables included radius of curvature, frequency and magnitude of floods and, locally, river bank material properties and floodplain land cover.

  18. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  19. Regulation of Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated (HCN) Channel Activity by cCMP*

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xiangang; Krause, Stefanie; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Krüger, Jens; Gruner, Christian; Cao-Ehlker, Xiaochun; Fenske, Stefanie; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Activation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels is facilitated in vivo by direct binding of the second messenger cAMP. This process plays a fundamental role in the fine-tuning of HCN channel activity and is critical for the modulation of cardiac and neuronal rhythmicity. Here, we identify the pyrimidine cyclic nucleotide cCMP as another regulator of HCN channels. We demonstrate that cCMP shifts the activation curves of two members of the HCN channel family, HCN2 and HCN4, to more depolarized voltages. Moreover, cCMP speeds up activation and slows down deactivation kinetics of these channels. The two other members of the HCN channel family, HCN1 and HCN3, are not sensitive to cCMP. The modulatory effect of cCMP is reversible and requires the presence of a functional cyclic nucleotide-binding domain. We determined an EC50 value of ∼30 μm for cCMP compared with 1 μm for cAMP. Notably, cCMP is a partial agonist of HCN channels, displaying an efficacy of ∼0.6. cCMP increases the frequency of pacemaker potentials from isolated sinoatrial pacemaker cells in the presence of endogenous cAMP concentrations. Electrophysiological recordings indicated that this increase is caused by a depolarizing shift in the activation curve of the native HCN current, which in turn leads to an enhancement of the slope of the diastolic depolarization of sinoatrial node cells. In conclusion, our findings establish cCMP as a gating regulator of HCN channels and indicate that this cyclic nucleotide has to be considered in HCN channel-regulated processes. PMID:22715094

  20. Evaluation of flushing of a high-selenium backwater channel in the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.; Weston, L.K.; McDonald, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    Concern has been raised that selenium contamination may be adversely affecting endangered fish in the upper Colorado River basin. The objective of the study was to determine if operation of a water control structure (opened in December 1996) that allowed the Colorado River to flow through a channel area at Walter Walker State Wildlife Area (WWSWA) would reduce selenium and other inorganic elements in water, sediment, aquatic invertebrates, and forage fish. Endangered Colorado pikeminnow were collected and muscle plug samples taken for selenium analysis. Selenium concentrations in filtered water were 21.0 ??g/L in 1995, 23.5 ??g/L in 1996, 2.1 ??g/L in 1997, and 2.1 ??g/L in 1998. Selenium concentrations in sediment cores and sediment traps were 8.5 ??/g in 1995, 8.2 ??g/g in 1996, 4.8 ??g/g in 1997, and 1.1 ??g/g in 1998. Selenium concentrations in aquatic invertebrates were 27.4 ??g/g in 1996, 15.5 ??g/g in 1997, and 4.9 ??g/g in 1998. Selenium concentrations in forage fish were 27.2 ??g/g in 1996, 20.2 ??g/g in 1997, and 8.6 ??g/g in 1998. Selenium concentrations in muscle plugs of Colorado pikeminnow were 9.8 ??g/g in 1995, 9.5 ??g/g in 1996, 9.0 ??g/g in 1997, and 10.3 ??g/g in 1998. Although selenium concentrations in water, sediment, aquatic invertebrates, and forage fish decreased substantially after operation of the water control structure, a corresponding change in Colorado pikeminnow did not seem to occur. Selenium concentrations in muscle plugs decreased with increasing fish total length and weight, did not change between repeat sampling in the same year or recapture in subsequent years, and seemed to be most closely associated with the mean monthly river flow for the March-July period. ?? 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Estimating of suspended sediment loads of rivers in the Seine downstream basin and coastal rivers in Southeastern Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landemaine, Valentin; Cerdan, Olivier; Laignel, Benoit; Fournier, Matthieu; Copard, Yoann

    2014-05-01

    Sediment exports in rivers constitute the essential of materials transfer from the land surface to the ocean and contribute significantly to the transfer of nutrients, pesticides, heavy metals which can affect water quality. Such problems of water pollution are particularly present at the Norman loess plateaus because soil erosion is a frequent phenomena and mudslides are common. In this context, the quantification of sediment load, as well as the short and long term variability analysis are a key component for any sustainable management project of water resources. The quantification of sediment fluxes is based on turbidity, suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) and discharge measurements. These measurements must be made with sufficient high frequency for integrating temporal variability of SSC and flows. However, the cost of a high frequency monitoring limits their use at large scale. In France, discharges are monitored using daily frequency (Banque Hydro), while SSC are measured in monthly or bimonthly frequency under the national water quality survey system (RNB). With these low frequency measurements, an algorithm must be used to reconstruct SSC temporal variability and to estimate a sediment flux. Many estimation algorithms have been developed in recent decades, from the simplest to the most elaborate, but no consensus has been reached on the use of a particular algorithm because of the complexity of SSC-discharge relationship. In this study, the analysis focuses on eight Channel coastal watersheds and nine Seine watersheds in the downstream part. We have a several years of high-frequency measurements on nine watersheds with highly variable area (10 km² to 10,000 km²) and low-frequency measurements for all watersheds. From these data, we compared the statistical performance of eleven algorithms to estimate sediment fluxes conventionally used in the literature. These algorithms are: averaging estimator, ratio estimator, linear interpolation, rating curve

  2. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further

  3. Carbon and Manganese Cycling in the Columbia River's Estuarine Turbidity Maxima in the South Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer, S. L.; Kranzler, K.; Tebo, B. M.

    2007-12-01

    The Columbia River represents the largest input (60-90%) of fresh water to the California Current System, and provides a major source of dissolved manganese and nutrients to the coastal waters. Researchers have identified upper Estuarine Turbidity Maxima (ETM(s)) as hot spots for microbial activity, and it is here that extensive manganese cycling is thought to occur. Most probable number counts of microorganisms within the ETM have revealed that the cultivable numbers of manganese-oxidizing bacteria are not statistically significantly different than that of other heterotrophs when grown on defined media with simple carbon sources or low concentrations (0.05%) of casamino acids and were in the range of 103 - 104 cells per mL. Similar numbers of heterotrophs (9.3 X 103 cells/mL) were found using a nutrient-rich complex medium; however, the numbers of manganese-oxidizers were significantly lower (~13 cells/mL). Approximately 100 different manganese-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from different media and are being phylogenetically characterized. Measurements of dissolved, ascorbate-reducible and total Mn by inductively coupled plasma- optical emission spectroscopy revealed that concentrations of Mn are positively correlated with turbidity and thus are higher during an ETM event. In addition, dissolved, total, and ascorbate-reducible Mn were all negatively correlated with salinity, supporting the idea that the manganese originates in the river and is diluted by the seawater originating off the coast. Uptake of 14C-labeled bicarbonate in response to various electron donors (nitrite, ammonium, thiosulfate, or Mn(II)) was stimulated during an ETM event but not before or after, indicating that these electron donors may serve as potential energy sources for carbon fixation. Taken together, our results further demonstrate that ETMs are zones with high microbial activity and that the ETM microbial communities harbor the potential for carbon fixation even in the relatively

  4. Running out of time: the decline of channel activity and nucleotide activation in adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K-channels

    PubMed Central

    Proks, Peter; Puljung, Michael C.; Vedovato, Natascia; Sachse, Gregor; Mulvaney, Rachel; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    KATP channels act as key regulators of electrical excitability by coupling metabolic cues—mainly intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations—to cellular potassium ion efflux. However, their study has been hindered by their rapid loss of activity in excised membrane patches (rundown), and by a second phenomenon, the decline of activation by Mg-nucleotides (DAMN). Degradation of PI(4,5)P2 and other phosphoinositides is the strongest candidate for the molecular cause of rundown. Broad evidence indicates that most other determinants of rundown (e.g. phosphorylation, intracellular calcium, channel mutations that affect rundown) also act by influencing KATP channel regulation by phosphoinositides. Unfortunately, experimental conditions that reproducibly prevent rundown have remained elusive, necessitating post hoc data compensation. Rundown is clearly distinct from DAMN. While the former is associated with pore-forming Kir6.2 subunits, DAMN is generally a slower process involving the regulatory sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. We speculate that it arises when SUR subunits enter non-physiological conformational states associated with the loss of SUR nucleotide-binding domain dimerization following prolonged exposure to nucleotide-free conditions. This review presents new information on both rundown and DAMN, summarizes our current understanding of these processes and considers their physiological roles. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377720

  5. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kheradpezhouh, E; Barritt, G J; Rychkov, G Y

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca(2+) entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca(2+)]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels.

  6. Curcumin inhibits activation of TRPM2 channels in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpezhouh, E.; Barritt, G.J.; Rychkov, G.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of many liver diseases including viral and drug-induced hepatitis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. One of the consequences of oxidative stress in the liver is deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis, resulting in a sustained elevation of the free cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in hepatocytes, which leads to irreversible cellular damage. Recently it has been shown that liver damage induced by paracetamol and subsequent oxidative stress is, in large part, mediated by Ca2+ entry through Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channels. Involvement of TRPM2 channels in hepatocellular damage induced by oxidative stress makes TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for treatment of a range of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. We report here the identification of curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), a natural plant-derived polyphenol in turmeric spice, as a novel inhibitor of TRPM2 channel. Presence of 5 µM curcumin in the incubation medium prevented the H2O2- and paracetamol-induced [Ca2+]c rise in rat hepatocytes. Furthermore, in patch clamping experiments incubation of hepatocytes with curcumin inhibited activation of TRPM2 current by intracellular ADPR with IC50 of approximately 50 nM. These findings enhance understanding of the actions of curcumin and suggest that the known hepatoprotective properties of curcumin are, at least in part, mediated through inhibition of TRPM2 channels. PMID:26609559

  7. Evaluation of the SHOALS 1000T Bathymetric LIDAR System for Monitoring Channel Sediment Within the Colorado River in Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. A.; Gonzales, F. M.; Brown, K. M.; Melis, T. S.

    2005-12-01

    The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center of the U.S. Geological Survey monitors sediment transport and storage within the Colorado River ecosystem in Arizona in order to develop flow protocols for the Glen Canyon dam that preserve or restore aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Currently, monitoring the channel sediments is accomplished using acoustic multi-beam surveys, which are very time-consuming. We explored more efficient collection systems that could provide a 2-m point spacing and a vertical accuracy of 25 cm or better. The dual-beam SHOALS 1000T LIDAR system, which simultaneously collects bathymetric and topographic data, could meet these requirements if flown at a 300 m altitude. This low altitude required this fixed-wing system to be modified for helicopter collection to navigate the sinuous, steep-walled canyon. We tested the helicopter-based SHOALS on two segments of the Colorado River - the San Juan River confluence at Lake Powell and the southern portion of Glen Canyon near Lees Ferry. The test flights occurred in late November after a high-flow dam experiment. Early winter storms injected such large volumes of sediment into the unmanaged San Juan River that the SHOALS green laser could not penetrate the water's surface. The water at Lees Ferry was relatively clear (Secchi depths of 7-7.5 m) because there are no tributaries between Lees Ferry and Glen Canyon dam and because the dam maintained a low steady flow for a week following the high-flow experiment in order for ground and aerial surveys to collect monitoring data. At a 300 m altitude, the SHOALS scanner produced a 60-m ground swath. Seven separate flight lines were collected - more than necessary to cover the 100-m-wide channel. Three GPS stations were operated within 30 km of the test flights. Within the areas of overlap between each pair of the seven SHOALS flight lines we found the reproducibility of the SHOALS data to be 19 cm in the channel and 21 cm on land. At Lees Ferry, 20 land

  8. Photochemical activation of TRPA1 channels in neurons and animals

    PubMed Central

    Kokel, David; Cheung, Chung Yan J.; Mills, Robert; Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Huang, Liyi; Setola, Vincent; Sprague, Jared; Jin, Shan; Jin, Youngnam N.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Bruni, Giancarlo; Woolf, Clifford; Roth, Bryan L.; Hamblin, Michael R; Zylka, Mark J.; Milan, David J.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is a powerful research tool because it enables high-resolution optical control of neuronal activity. However, current optogenetic approaches are limited to transgenic systems expressing microbial opsins and other exogenous photoreceptors. Here, we identify optovin, a small molecule that enables repeated photoactivation of motor behaviors in wild type animals. Surprisingly, optovin's behavioral effects are not visually mediated. Rather, photodetection is performed by sensory neurons expressing the cation channel TRPA1. TRPA1 is both necessary and sufficient for the optovin response. Optovin activates human TRPA1 via structure-dependent photochemical reactions with redox-sensitive cysteine residues. In animals with severed spinal cords, optovin treatment enables control of motor activity in the paralyzed extremities by localized illumination. These studies identify a light-based strategy for controlling endogenous TRPA1 receptors in vivo, with potential clinical and research applications in non-transgenic animals, including humans. PMID:23396078

  9. Nature's complex flume - Using a diagnostic state-and-transition framework to understand post-restoration channel adjustment of the Clark Fork River, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyke, Chris

    2016-02-01

    There is an imperfect symmetry between the patterns of channel evolution observed during laboratory flume experiments and those which materialize in rivers exposed to ambient environmental conditions that produce hydrogeomorphic fluxes which are more complex, contingent, and unpredictable. One strategy to improve our understanding of short- to medium-term channel evolution is to study landscapes that have undergone significant disturbance and have had their biogeomorphic templates reset to a known condition - in effect, creating a flume in nature. This study adopts a diagnostic state-and-transition framework to narrate and document baseline hypotheses for the potential evolutionary trajectories Clark Fork River, near Milltown, Montana. Following dam removal and remediation, a 5-km stretch of the Clark Fork River and its adjoining floodplain were reconstructed. Since flow was introduced to the newly constructed channel in December 2010, complex evolutionary trajectories have been observed on the Clark Fork's mainstem, its secondary channels, and floodplain. Focusing particularly on the river's secondary channels, this paper develops a typology of channel states that have been observed and demonstrates that multiple adjustment trajectories have materialized, sometimes within the same channel. A diagnostic state-and-transition framework offers a parsimonious strategy to quantitatively or qualitatively anticipate the influence of water, sediment, and ecological fluxes on channel evolution at the basin, reach, or segment scale. It provides environmental agencies with a robust method to devise spatially explicit scenario-based management plans for rivers in a variety of geomorphic settings.

  10. Changes in high-flow frequency and channel geometry of the Neosho River downstream from John Redmond Dam, southeastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Studley, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    The streamflow regimen of the Neosho River downstream from John Redmond Dam in southeastern Kansas has changed significantly since the dam's completion in 1964. The controlled releases from the dam have decreased the magnitudes of peak discharges and increased the magnitudes of low discharges. The trends in river stage for selected discharges also have changed at two of the streamflow-gaging stations--those closest to the dam. There is a significant downward trend in the stages associated with the median annual peak discharges, but no significant trend in the stages associated with the annual mean discharges, which indicates that the river channel is increasing in width but not depth or that the hflow velocity has increased at the streamflow-gaging stations. Because there were not significant trends present in precipitation, mean annual discharge, or annual peak discharge, the changes are attributed to John Redmond Dam.

  11. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca2+, possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  12. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca(2+), possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  13. Geomorphic Classification and Assessment of Channel Dynamics in the Missouri National Recreational River, South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    A multiscale geomorphic classification was established for the 39-mile, 59-mile, and adjacent segments of the Missouri National Recreational River administered by the National Park Service in South Dakota and Nebraska. The objective of the classification was to define naturally occurring clusters of geomorphic characteristics that would be indicative of discrete sets of geomorphic processes, with the intent that such a classification would be useful in river-management and rehabilitation decisions. The statistical classification was based on geomorphic characteristics of the river collected from 1999 orthophotography and the persistence of classified units was evaluated by comparison with similar datasets for 2003 and 2004 and by evaluating variation of bank erosion rates by geomorphic class. Changes in channel location and form were also explored using imagery and maps from 1993-2004, 1941 and 1894. The multivariate classification identified a hierarchy of naturally occurring clusters of reach-scale geomorphic characteristics. The simplest level of the hierarchy divides the river from segments into discrete reaches characterized by single and multithread channels and additional hierarchical levels established 4-part and 10-part classifications. The classification system presents a physical framework that can be applied to prioritization and design of bank stabilization projects, design of habitat rehabilitation projects, and stratification of monitoring and assessment sampling programs.

  14. On the estimation of cooperativity in ion channel kinetics: activation free energy and kinetic mechanism of Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kinshuk; Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2013-04-28

    In this paper, we have explored generic criteria of cooperative behavior in ion channel kinetics treating it on the same footing with multistate receptor-ligand binding in a compact theoretical framework. We have shown that the characterization of cooperativity of ion channels in terms of the Hill coefficient violates the standard Hill criteria defined for allosteric cooperativity of ligand binding. To resolve the issue, an alternative measure of cooperativity is proposed here in terms of the cooperativity index that sets a unified criteria for both the systems. More importantly, for ion channel this index can be very useful to describe the cooperative kinetics as it can be readily determined from the experimentally measured ionic current combined with theoretical modelling. We have analyzed the correlation between the voltage value and slope of the voltage-activation curve at the half-activation point and consequently determined the standard free energy of activation of the ion channel using two well-established mechanisms of cooperativity, namely, Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer (KNF) and Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) models. Comparison of the theoretical results for both the models with appropriate experimental data of mutational perturbation of Shaker K(+) channel supports the experimental fact that the KNF model is more suitable to describe the cooperative behavior of this class of ion channels, whereas the performance of the MWC model is unsatisfactory. We have also estimated the mechanistic performance through standard free energy of channel activation for both the models and proposed a possible functional disadvantage in the MWC scheme.

  15. NSAIDs attenuate hyperalgesia induced by TRP channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz; Tsagareli, Merab G.

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels have been extensively investigated as targets for analgesic drug discovery. Because some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are structural analogs of prostaglandins (mediators of inflammation) and NSAIDs attenuate heat nociception and mechanical allodynia in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, we examined three widely used NSAIDs (diclofenac, ketorolac, and xefocam) on the activation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels using thermal paw withdrawal (Hargreaves) test and mechanical paw withdrawal (von Frey) test in male rats. Thermal withdrawal latencies and mechanical thresholds for both hind paws were obtained with 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min intraplantar post-injection of TRPA1 agonizts, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (a natural compound of mustard oil) and cinnamaldehyde (CA), and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or vehicle. Twenty minutes prior to the start of the experiment with TRP agonizts, diclofenac, ketorolac or xefocam were pre-injected in the same hindpaw and animals were examined by these two tests. After pretreatment of all three NSAIDs in the ipsilateral (injected) hindpaw that produced strong antinociceptive effects, AITC, CA, and capsaicin caused significant decreases in latency of the thermal withdrawal reflex compared with vehicle or the contralateral hindpaw. The same findings were observed for the paw withdrawal threshold. In approximately 30 min the effects of CA, AITC, and capsaicin returned to baseline. The data are different from our previous evidence, where TRPA1 agonizts AITC and CA and TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hyperalgesia for nearly 2 h and resulted in facilitation of these withdrawal reflexes (Tsagareli et al., 2010, 2013). Thus, our data showing that NSAIDs suppress thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia following TRP activation could presumably due to inactivation or desensitization of TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels by NSAIDs. PMID:26909384

  16. An overview of historical channel adjustment and selected hydraulic values in the Lower Sabine and Lower Brazos River Basins, Texas and Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Greene, Lauren E.; John D. Gordon, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The Sabine and Brazos are alluvial rivers; alluvial rivers are dynamic systems that adjust their geometry in response to changes in streamflow (discharge) and sediment load. In fluvial geomorphology, the term 'channel adjustment' refers to river channel changes in three geometric dimensions: (1) channel slope (profile); (2) the outline or shape, such as meandering or braided, projected on a horizontal plane (planform); and (3) cross-sectional form (shape). The primary objective of the study was to investigate how the channel morphology of these rivers has changed in response to reservoirs and other anthropogenic disturbances that have altered streamflow and sediment load. The results of this study are expected to aid ecological assessments in the lower Sabine River and lower Brazos River Basins for the Texas Instream Flow Program. Starting in the 1920s, several dams have been constructed on the Sabine and Brazos Rivers and their tributaries, and numerous bridges have been built and sometimes replaced multiple times, which have changed the natural flow regime and reduced or altered sediment loads downstream. Changes in channel geometry over time can reduce channel conveyance and thus streamflow, which can have adverse ecological effects. Channel attributes including cross-section form, channel slope, and planform change were evaluated to learn how each river's morphology changed over many years in response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Climate has large influence on the hydrologic regimes of the lower Sabine and lower Brazos River Basins. Equally important as climate in controlling the hydrologic regime of the two river systems are numerous reservoirs that regulate downstream flow releases. The hydrologic regimes of the two rivers and their tributaries reflect the combined influences of climate, flow regulation, and drainage area. Historical and contemporary cross-sectional channel geometries at 15 streamflow-gaging stations in the lower Sabine and

  17. Spacial Distribution of Salinity and the Mechanism of Saltwater Intrusion in the Modaomen Water Channel of Pear River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. B.; Bao, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Modaomen channel is an important fresh water resource in Pearl River Delta. It has been impacted by saltwater intrusion frequently in the last decade. This has drawn more and more attention from scientists and engineers. The hydrodynamic mechanism of saltwater intrusion is still impercipient. In the present paper, hydrographs of velocity and salinity in the channel are analyzed based on field observations of velocity and salinity of upper, middle, and lower water layers at several stations along the Modaomen channel. It is found that the transport of salinity in Modaomen channel is obviously different from other estuaries. As the tidal range increases from neap to spring tide, the salinity in each water layer decreases unexpectedly. This peculiar phenomenon is attributed to the extraordinary flow process in the channel. When salinity value in each layer and vertical salinity gradient are lower during spring tide, no matter on rising or ebbing tide, the flow velocity monotonously decreases from water surface to the bottom, which is suggested by common sense. However, when salinity values and vertical salinity gradient are higher during neap tide, the flow velocity unexpectedly increases from water surface to the bottom during flood period, and flood duration of the bottom current is surprisingly as long as 15-18 hours. In addition, an inflexional velocity profile may remain amazingly for about 9 hours. This could be driven by the baroclinic pressure under the condition of tides, topography and upstream runoff discharge of this channel.

  18. The LRRC26 Protein Selectively Alters the Efficacy of BK Channel Activators

    PubMed Central

    Almassy, Janos

    2012-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca2+-activated K channel proteins are involved in a wide range of physiological activities, so there is considerable interest in the pharmacology of large conductance calcium-activated K (BK) channels. One potent activator of BK channels is mallotoxin (MTX), which produces a very large hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage gating of heterologously expressed BK channels and causes a dramatic increase in the activity of BK channels in human smooth muscle cells. However, we found that MTX shifted the steady-state activation of BK channels in native parotid acinar cells by only 6 mV. This was not because the parotid BK isoform (parSlo) is inherently insensitive to MTX as MTX shifted the activation of heterologously expressed parSlo channels by 70 mV. Even though MTX had a minimal effect on steady-state activation of parotid BK channels, it produced an approximate 2-fold speeding of the channel-gating kinetics. The BK channels in parotid acinar cells have a much more hyperpolarized voltage activation range than BK channels in most other cell types. We found that this is probably attributable to an accessory protein, LRRC26, which is expressed in parotid glands: expressed parSlo + LRRC26 channels were resistant to the actions of MTX. Another class of BK activators is the benzimidazalones that includes 1,3-dihydro-1-(2-hydroxy-5-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (NS-1619). Although the LRRC26 accessory protein strongly inhibited the ability of MTX to activate BK channels, we found that it had only a small effect on the action of NS-1619 on BK channels. Thus, the LRRC26 BK channel accessory protein selectively alters the pharmacology of BK channels. PMID:21984254

  19. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara.

  20. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara. PMID:19234734

  1. Sediment budget analysis from Landslide debris and river channel change during the extreme event - example of Typhoon Morakot at Laonong river, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-Jen; Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Mei-Jen; Chiang, Yi-Lin; Yeh, En-Chao; Chao, Yu-Jui

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan, due to the high seismicity and high annual rainfall, numerous landslides triggered every year and severe impacts affect the island. Typhoon Morakot brought extreme and long-time rainfall for Taiwan in August 2009. It further caused huge loss of life and property in central and southern Taiwan. Laonong River is the largest tributary of Gaoping River. It's length is 137 km, and the basin area is 1373 km2. More than 2000mm rainfall brought and maximum rainfall exceeded 100mm/hr in the region by Typhoon Morakot in Aug, 2009. Its heavy rains made many landslides and debris flew into the river and further brought out accumulation and erosion on river banks of different areas. It caused severe disasters within the Laonong River drainage. In the past, the study of sediment blockage of river channel usually relies on field investigation, but due to inconvenient transportation, topographical barriers, or located in remote areas, etc. the survey is hardly to be completed sometimes. In recent years, the rapid development of remote sensing technology improves image resolution and quality significantly. Remote sensing technology can provide a wide range of image data, and provide essential and precious information. Furthermore, although the amount of sediment transportation can be estimated by using data such as rainfall, river flux, and suspended loads, the situation of large debris migration cannot be studied via those data. However, landslides, debris flow and river sediment transportation model in catchment area can be evaluated easily through analyzing the digital terrain model (DTM) . The purpose of this study is to investigate the phenomenon of river migration and to evaluate the amount of migration along Laonong River by analyzing the DEM before and after the typhoon Morakot. The DEMs are built by using the aerial images taken by digital mapping camera (DMC) and by airborne digital scanner 40 (ADS 40) before and after typhoon event. The results show that lateral

  2. Long-term channel adjustment and geomorphic feature creation by vegetation in a lowland, low energy river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Robert; Gurnell, Angela

    2016-04-01

    Physical habitat restoration is increasingly being used to improve the ecological status of rivers. This is particularly true for lowland streams which are perceived to lack sufficient energy to create new features or to flush out fine sediment derived from agricultural and urban sources. However, this study has found that even in low-energy, base-flow dominated chalk streams, physical habitat improvement can happen naturally without direct human intervention. Furthermore this positive change is achieved by components of the river that are often regarded as management problems: in-stream macrophytes (i.e. weed), riparian trees, woody debris, and most importantly fine sediment. This project investigated the long-term changes in channel planform for the River Frome (Dorset, UK) over the last 120 years and the role of aquatic and riparian vegetation in driving this change. Agricultural census data, historical maps, recent aerial images and field observations were analysed within a process-based, hierarchical framework for hydromorphological assessment, developed in the EU FP7 REFORM project, to investigate the source and timing of fine sediment production in the catchment, to quantify the reach-scale geomorphic response, and to identify vegetation-related bedforms that could be responsible for the adjustment. The analysis reveals that the channel has narrowed and become more sinuous in the last 50-60 years. The timing of this planform adjustment correlates with substantial changes in land use and agricultural practices (post-World War II) that are known to increase soil erosion and sediment connectivity. The field observations and recent aerial images suggest that the increased delivery of fine sediment to the channel has been translated into geomorphic adjustment and diversification though the interactions between vegetation, water flow and sediment. Emergent aquatic macrophytes are retaining fine sediment, leading to the development of submerged shelves that aggrade

  3. Complex channel responses to changes in stream flow and sediment supply on the lower Duchesne River, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Schmidt, J.C.; Wilcock, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    Channel responses to flow depletions in the lower Duchesne River over the past 100 years have been highly complex and variable in space and time. In general, sand-bed reaches adjusted to all perturbations with bed-level changes, whereas the gravel-bed reaches adjusted primarily through width changes. Gravel-bed reaches aggraded only when gravel was supplied to the channel through local bank erosion and degraded only during extreme flood events. A 50% reduction in stream flow and an increase in fine sediment supply to the study area occurred in the first third of the 20th century. The gravel-bed reach responded primarily with channel narrowing, whereas bed aggradation and four large-scale avulsions occurred in the sand-bed reaches. These avulsions almost completely replaced a section of sinuous channel about 14 km long with a straighter section about 7 km long. The most upstream avulsion, located near a break in valley slope and the transition from a gravel bed upstream and a sand bed downstream, transformed a sinuous sand-bed reach into a braided gravel-bed reach and eventually into a meandering gravel-bed reach over a 30-year period. Later, an increase in flood magnitudes and durations caused widening and secondary bed aggradation in the gravel-bed reaches, whereas the sand-bed reaches incised and narrowed. Water diversions since the 1950s have progressively eliminated moderate flood events, whereas larger floods have been less affected. The loss of frequent flooding has increased the duration and severity of drought periods during which riparian vegetation can establish along the channel margins. As a result, the channel has gradually narrowed throughout the study area since the late 1960s, despite the occasional occurrence of large floods. No tributaries enter the Duchesne River within the study area, so all reaches have experienced identical changes in stream flow and upstream sediment supply. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vegetative impacts upon bedload transport capacity and channel stability for differing alluvial planforms in the Yellow River source zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi Wei; Yu, Guo An; Brierley, Gary; Wang, Zhao Yin

    2016-07-01

    The influence of vegetation upon bedload transport and channel morphodynamics is examined along a channel stability gradient ranging from meandering to anabranching to anabranching-braided to fully braided planform conditions along trunk and tribut