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Sample records for active rna polymerase

  1. Norovirus Proteinase-Polymerase and Polymerase Are Both Active Forms of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Green, Kim Y.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro−Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro−Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis. PMID:15681440

  2. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells. PMID:27258298

  3. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells. PMID:27258298

  4. In-ice evolution of RNA polymerase ribozyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Attwater, James; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of molecular self-replication have the potential to shed light upon the origins of life. In particular, self-replication through RNA-catalysed templated RNA synthesis is thought to have supported a primordial ‘RNA World’. However, existing polymerase ribozymes lack the capacity to synthesise RNAs approaching their own size. Here we report the in vitro evolution of such catalysts directly in the RNA-stabilising medium of water-ice, which yielded RNA polymerase ribozymes specifically adapted to sub-zero temperatures and able to synthesise RNA in ices at temperatures as low as −19°C. Combination of cold-adaptive mutations with a previously described 5′ extension operating at ambient temperatures enabled the design of a first polymerase ribozyme capable of catalysing the accurate synthesis of an RNA sequence longer than itself (adding up to 206 nucleotides), an important stepping stone towards RNA self-replication. PMID:24256864

  5. In-ice evolution of RNA polymerase ribozyme activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwater, James; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms of molecular self-replication have the potential to shed light on the origins of life. In particular, self-replication through RNA-catalysed templated RNA synthesis is thought to have supported a primordial ‘RNA world’. However, existing polymerase ribozymes lack the capacity to synthesize RNAs approaching their own size. Here, we report the in vitro evolution of such catalysts directly in the RNA-stabilizing medium of water ice, which yielded RNA polymerase ribozymes specifically adapted to sub-zero temperatures and able to synthesize RNA in ices at temperatures as low as -19 °C. The combination of cold-adaptive mutations with a previously described 5‧ extension operating at ambient temperatures enabled the design of a first polymerase ribozyme capable of catalysing the accurate synthesis of an RNA sequence longer than itself (adding up to 206 nucleotides), an important stepping stone towards RNA self-replication.

  6. In-ice evolution of RNA polymerase ribozyme activity.

    PubMed

    Attwater, James; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms of molecular self-replication have the potential to shed light on the origins of life. In particular, self-replication through RNA-catalysed templated RNA synthesis is thought to have supported a primordial 'RNA world'. However, existing polymerase ribozymes lack the capacity to synthesize RNAs approaching their own size. Here, we report the in vitro evolution of such catalysts directly in the RNA-stabilizing medium of water ice, which yielded RNA polymerase ribozymes specifically adapted to sub-zero temperatures and able to synthesize RNA in ices at temperatures as low as -19 °C. The combination of cold-adaptive mutations with a previously described 5' extension operating at ambient temperatures enabled the design of a first polymerase ribozyme capable of catalysing the accurate synthesis of an RNA sequence longer than itself (adding up to 206 nucleotides), an important stepping stone towards RNA self-replication. PMID:24256864

  7. Separation of lymphocyte chromatin into template-active fractions with specificity for eukaryotic RNA polymerase II or prokaryotic RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Magee, B B; Paoletti, J; Magee, P T

    1975-01-01

    When chromatin prepared from WI-L2 lymphocytes by low salt extraction and shearing is centrifuged on a glycerol gradient, one area of the gradient yields chromatin enriched in template activity for Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6; nucleosidetriphosphate:RNA nucleotidyltransferase) as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II (or B). Another area yields chromatin preferred by the eukaryotic enzyme. Kinetic studies indicate that the differences in activity cannot be explained by differences in affinity of the enzymes for the various templates. The DNA isolated from either fraction has a molecular weight of 8.5 X 106. The "yeast active" fraction seems enriched in proteins. Mixing experiments indicate that the yeast enzyme does not alter the template in such a way as to improve it for the bacterial enzyme. PMID:1108005

  8. De Novo RNA Synthesis by RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Activity of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Maida, Yoshiko; Yasukawa, Mami; Masutomi, Kenkichi

    2016-04-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) plays key roles in RNA silencing to generate double-stranded RNAs. In model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Neurospora crassa, two types of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), primary siRNAs and secondary siRNAs, are expressed; RdRP produces secondary siRNAs de novo, without using either Dicer or primers, while primary siRNAs are processed by Dicer. We reported that human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) has RdRP activity and produces endogenous siRNAs in a Dicer-dependent manner. However, de novo synthesis of siRNAs by human TERT has not been elucidated. Here we show that the TERT RdRP generates short RNAs that are complementary to template RNAs and have 5'-triphosphorylated ends, which indicates de novo synthesis of the RNAs. In addition, we confirmed short RNA synthesis by TERT in several human carcinoma cell lines and found that TERT protein levels are positively correlated with RdRP activity. PMID:26830230

  9. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  10. RNA Polymerases of Maize: Nuclear RNA Polymerases*

    PubMed Central

    Strain, Gustave C.; Mullinix, Kathleen P.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1971-01-01

    Two DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of nuclear origin have been purified from leaves of Zea mays. The two enzymes can be separated on DEAE-cellulose columns. Enzymes I and II are eluted with 0.08 and 0.20 M (NH4)2SO4, respectively. Both enzymes prefer maize nuclear DNA as a template; they are also more active in the presence of Mg++ than Mn++ and are inhibited by (NH4)2-SO4 or KCl. Neither enzyme is inhibited by rifamycin SV. Enzyme II is strongly inhibited by α-amanitin, whereas enzyme I is not significantly affected. Their ability to use native and denatured DNA as templates varies according to the extent and method of purification of the polymerase. Furthermore, enzyme II can be resolved by DEAE-chromatography or glycerol-gradient centrifugation into two components, one of which prefers native DNA, while the other prefers denatured DNA. PMID:5288239

  11. RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of RNA tumor virus. VI. Processive mode of action of avian myeloblastosis virus polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Leis, J P

    1976-01-01

    Purified avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) polymerase consisting of alpha,beta subunits has been shown to act processively in catalyzing DNA synthesis primed with 34S AMV RNA oligo(dT), poly(A)-poly(dT), and poly(I)-poly(dC). DNA transcripts prepared with 34S AMV RNA-oligo(dT)14 and AMV polymerase (alphabeta) have been shown to have a molecular weight of 1.05 X 10(6), or approximately one-third the size of the 34S RNA genome. Polymerase subunit alpha acts nonprocessively with the above templates. PMID:61286

  12. The LEF-4 subunit of baculovirus RNA polymerase has RNA 5'-triphosphatase and ATPase activities.

    PubMed

    Jin, J; Dong, W; Guarino, L A

    1998-12-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus encodes a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase that is required for transcription of viral late genes. This polymerase is composed of four equimolar subunits, LEF-8, LEF-4, LEF-9, and p47. The LEF-4 subunit has guanylyltransferase activity, suggesting that baculoviruses may encode a full complement of capping enzymes. Here we show that LEF-4 is a bifunctional enzyme that hydrolyzes the gamma phosphates of triphosphate-terminated RNA and also hydrolyzes ATP and GTP to the respective diphosphate forms. Alanine substitution of five residues previously shown to be essential for vaccinia virus RNA triphosphatase activity inactivated the triphosphatase component of LEF-4 but not the guanylyltransferase domain. Conversely, mutation of the invariant lysine in the guanylyltransferase domain abolished the guanylyltransferase activity without affecting triphosphatase function. We also investigated the effects of substituting phenylalanine for leucine at position 105, a mutation that results in a virus that is temperature sensitive for late gene expression. We found that this mutation had no significant effect on the ATPase or guanylyltransferase activity of LEF-4 but resulted in a modest decrease in RNA triphosphatase activity. PMID:9811739

  13. The Crystal Structure of a Cardiovirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Reveals an Unusual Conformation of the Polymerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Vives-Adrian, Laia; Lujan, Celia; Oliva, Baldo; van der Linden, Lonneke; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a member of the Cardiovirus genus within the large Picornaviridae family, which includes a number of important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for viral genome replication. In this study, we report the X-ray structures of two different crystal forms of the EMCV RdRp determined at 2.8- and 2.15-Å resolution. The in vitro elongation and VPg uridylylation activities of the purified enzyme have also been demonstrated. Although the overall structure of EMCV 3Dpol is shown to be similar to that of the known RdRps of other members of the Picornaviridae family, structural comparisons show a large reorganization of the active-site cavity in one of the crystal forms. The rearrangement affects mainly motif A, where the conserved residue Asp240, involved in ribonucleoside triphosphate (rNTP) selection, and its neighbor residue, Phe239, move about 10 Å from their expected positions within the ribose binding pocket toward the entrance of the rNTP tunnel. This altered conformation of motif A is stabilized by a cation-π interaction established between the aromatic ring of Phe239 and the side chain of Lys56 within the finger domain. Other contacts, involving Phe239 and different residues of motif F, are also observed. The movement of motif A is connected with important conformational changes in the finger region flanked by residues 54 to 63, harboring Lys56, and in the polymerase N terminus. The structures determined in this work provide essential information for studies on the cardiovirus RNA replication process and may have important implications for the development of new antivirals targeting the altered conformation of motif A. IMPORTANCE The Picornaviridae family is one of the largest virus families known, including many important human and animal pathogens. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3Dpol is a key enzyme for picornavirus genome replication and a validated

  14. Identification of host factors that regulate the influenza virus RNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Momose, F; Handa, H; Nagata, K

    1996-01-01

    Transcription and replication of the influenza virus RNA genome take place in the nuclei of infected cells. Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes consisting of viral RNA, RNA polymerase, and nucleocapsid protein (NP) are proven to be the catalytic unit for RNA synthesis, while it has been indicated that the viral RNA polymerase activity is modulated by host-derived nuclear factors. Here we have identified such host factors present in nuclear extracts prepared from uninfected HeLa cells with biochemical complementation assays using the in vitro RNA synthesis system. The stimulatory activity was not absorbed to phosphocellulose but was tightly bound to Q-Sepharose. The eluate recovered from Q-Sepharose was able to stimulate the RNA synthesis catalyzed by both RNP complexes and purified RNA polymerase and NP. The stimulatory activity was further separated into two distinct fractions, designated RAF-1 (RNA polymerase activating factor-1) and RAF-2 fractions, through phenyl-Sepharose column chromatography. When these fractions were fractionated through a gel filtration column, RAF-1 and RAF-2 activities were recovered in fractions corresponding to the molecular mass of 350 kDa and 60 kDa, respectively. Furthermore, the RAF-2 fraction was shown to contain an inhibitory activity, tentatively designated RIF-1 (RNA polymerase inhibitory factor-1). RIF-1 sedimented as fast as bovine serum albumin in glycerol density gradient centrifugation. Roles of these host factors are discussed in the context of viral RNA transcription and replication.

  15. Rational Attenuation of a Morbillivirus by Modulating the Activity of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David D.; Rima, Bertus K.; Allen, Ingrid V.; Baron, Michael D.; Banyard, Ashley C.; Barrett, Thomas; Duprex, W. Paul

    2005-01-01

    Negative-strand RNA viruses encode a single RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) which transcribes and replicates the genome. The open reading frame encoding the RdRp from a virulent wild-type strain of rinderpest virus (RPV) was inserted into an expression plasmid. Sequences encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were inserted into a variable hinge of the RdRp. The resulting polymerase was autofluorescent, and its activity in the replication/transcription of a synthetic minigenome was reduced. We investigated the potential of using this approach to rationally attenuate a virus by inserting the DNA sequences encoding the modified RdRp into a full-length anti-genome plasmid from which a virulent virus (rRPVKO) can be rescued. A recombinant virus, rRPVKOL-RRegfpR, which grew at an indistinguishable rate and to an identical titer as rRPVKO in vitro, was rescued. Fluorescently tagged polymerase was visible in large cytoplasmic inclusions and beneath the cell membrane. Subcutaneous injection of 104 TCID50 of the rRPVKO parental recombinant virus into cattle leads to severe disease symptoms (leukopenia/diarrhea and pyrexia) and death by 9 days postinfection. Animals infected with rRPVKOL-RRegfpR exhibited transient leukopenia and mild pyrexia, and the only noticeable clinical signs were moderate reddening of one eye and a slight ocular-nasal discharge. Viruses that expressed the modified polymerase were isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes and eye swabs. This demonstrates that a virulent morbillivirus can be attenuated in a single step solely by modulating RdRp activity and that there is not necessarily a correlation between virus growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16254367

  16. Rational attenuation of a morbillivirus by modulating the activity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Brown, David D; Rima, Bertus K; Allen, Ingrid V; Baron, Michael D; Banyard, Ashley C; Barrett, Thomas; Duprex, W Paul

    2005-11-01

    Negative-strand RNA viruses encode a single RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) which transcribes and replicates the genome. The open reading frame encoding the RdRp from a virulent wild-type strain of rinderpest virus (RPV) was inserted into an expression plasmid. Sequences encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were inserted into a variable hinge of the RdRp. The resulting polymerase was autofluorescent, and its activity in the replication/transcription of a synthetic minigenome was reduced. We investigated the potential of using this approach to rationally attenuate a virus by inserting the DNA sequences encoding the modified RdRp into a full-length anti-genome plasmid from which a virulent virus (rRPV(KO)) can be rescued. A recombinant virus, rRPV(KO)L-RRegfpR, which grew at an indistinguishable rate and to an identical titer as rRPV(KO) in vitro, was rescued. Fluorescently tagged polymerase was visible in large cytoplasmic inclusions and beneath the cell membrane. Subcutaneous injection of 10(4) TCID(50) of the rRPV(KO) parental recombinant virus into cattle leads to severe disease symptoms (leukopenia/diarrhea and pyrexia) and death by 9 days postinfection. Animals infected with rRPV(KO)L-RRegfpR exhibited transient leukopenia and mild pyrexia, and the only noticeable clinical signs were moderate reddening of one eye and a slight ocular-nasal discharge. Viruses that expressed the modified polymerase were isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes and eye swabs. This demonstrates that a virulent morbillivirus can be attenuated in a single step solely by modulating RdRp activity and that there is not necessarily a correlation between virus growth in vitro and in vivo.

  17. RNase H and RNA-directed DNA polymerase: associated enzymatic activities of murine mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dion, A S; Williams, C J; Moore, D H

    1977-01-01

    The RNA-directed DNA polymerase of murine mammary tumor virus, a type B RNA tumor virus, was purified sequentially through DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose (step gradient), and phosphocellulose (linear salt gradient) chromatography followed by glycerol sedimentation centrifugation. During all stages of purification, coincident peaks of RNA-directed DNA polymerase activity, templated by polyribocytidylate-oligodeoxyguanidylate, and RNase H digestion of [3H]polyriboadenylate-polydeoxythymidylate were observed, and both enzymatic activities displayed a cation preference for magnesium. Under conditions that removed adventitiously associated nucleases, RNase H activity was found to co-purify with polymerase. The specificity of this nuclease was assayed with various prepared substrates, which indicated that the polymerase-associated RNase H activity was directed only against the RNA strand of an RNA-DNA hybrid. It is highly probable that RNase H (RNA-DNA hybrid: ribonucleotide-hydrolase, EC 3.1.4..34) and RNA-directed DNA polymerase of type B viruses are associated enzymatic activities analogous to those observed for avian and mammalian type C RNA tumor viruses. Images PMID:67221

  18. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  19. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  20. Reticulocyte RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Kathleen M.; Byrnes, John J.; Jurmark, Bonnie S.; So, Antero G.

    1973-01-01

    A cytoplasmic, microsomal bound RNA-dependent RNA polymerase has been purified 2500-fold from rabbit reticulocyte lysates. The synthesis of RNA with the purified enzyme is absolutely dependent on the addition of an RNA template. The best template is hemoglobin messenger RNA, while bacteriophage RNA and poly(A,G) are less active, and DNA is completely inactive as a template. With poly(A,G) as a template, only UTP and CTP are incorporated into polynucleotide chains, indicating that the RNA polymerase is an RNA replicase and not a terminal transferase. With messenger RNA as a template, all four ribonucleoside triphosphates are required for maximal activity. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase reaction is extremely sensitive to low concentrations of heme, rifamycin AF/013, and ribonuclease and resistant to actinomycin D and DNase. The discovery of RNA-directed RNA synthesis in reticulocytes offers an additional site for control of gene expression in mammalian cells and provides a possible mechanism for amplification of the expression of specific genes. PMID:4519633

  1. Comparative analysis of RNA silencing suppression activities between viral suppressors and an endogenous plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Park, Han-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in eukaryotes, including higher plants. To counteract this, several plant viruses express silencing suppressors that inhibit RNA silencing in host plants. Here, we show that both 2b protein from peanut stunt virus (PSV) and a hairpin construct (designated hp-RDR6) that silences endogenous RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) strongly suppress RNA silencing. The Agrobacterium infiltration system was used to demonstrate that both PSV 2b and hp-RDR6 suppressed local RNA silencing as strongly as helper component (HC-Pro) from potato virus Y (PVY) and P19 from tomato bush stunt virus (TBSV). The 2b protein from PSV eliminated the small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with RNA silencing and prevented systemic silencing, similar to 2b protein from cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). On the other hand, hp-RDR6 suppressed RNA silencing by inhibiting the generation of secondary siRNAs. The small coat protein (SCP) of squash mosaic virus (SqMV) also displayed weak suppression activity of RNA silencing. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer was used to investigate whether viral silencing suppressors or hp-RDR6 enhanced accumulations of green fluorescence protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as markers of expression in leaf tissues of Nicotina benthamiana. Expression of both GFP and GUS was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSV 2b or CMV 2b, compared to no suppression or the weak SqMV SCP suppressor. Co-expression with hp-RDR6 also significantly increased the expression of GFP and GUS to levels similar to those induced by PVY HC-Pro and TBSV P19.

  2. Active site labeling of the RNA polymerases A, B, and C from yeast.

    PubMed

    Riva, M; Schäffner, A R; Sentenac, A; Hartmann, G R; Mustaev, A A; Zaychikov, E F; Grachev, M A

    1987-10-25

    RNA polymerases A, B, and C from yeast were modified by reaction with 4-formylphenyl-gamma-ester of ATP as priming nucleotide followed by reduction with NaBH4. Upon phosphodiester bond formation with [alpha-32P]UTP, only the second largest subunit, A135, B150, or C128, was labeled in a template-dependent reaction. This indicates that these polypeptide chains are functionally homologous. The product covalently bound to B150 subunit was found to consist of a mixture of ApU and a trinucleotide. Enzyme labeling exhibited the characteristic alpha-amanitin sensitivity reported for A and B RNA polymerases. Labeling of both large subunits of enzyme A and B but not of any of the smaller subunits was observed when the reduction step stabilizing the binding of the priming nucleotide was carried out after limited chain elongation. These results illustrate the conservative evolution of the active site of eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

  3. Flock house virus RNA polymerase initiates RNA synthesis de novo and possesses a terminal nucleotidyl transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenzhe; Wang, Zhaowei; Xia, Hongjie; Liu, Yongxiang; Qiu, Yang; Liu, Yujie; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Flock House virus (FHV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus with a bipartite genome of RNAs, RNA1 and RNA2, and belongs to the family Nodaviridae. As the most extensively studied nodavirus, FHV has become a well-recognized model for studying various aspects of RNA virology, particularly viral RNA replication and antiviral innate immunity. FHV RNA1 encodes protein A, which is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and functions as the sole viral replicase protein responsible for RNA replication. Although the RNA replication of FHV has been studied in considerable detail, the mechanism employed by FHV protein A to initiate RNA synthesis has not been determined. In this study, we characterized the RdRP activity of FHV protein A in detail and revealed that it can initiate RNA synthesis via a de novo (primer-independent) mechanism. Moreover, we found that FHV protein A also possesses a terminal nucleotidyl transferase (TNTase) activity, which was able to restore the nucleotide loss at the 3'-end initiation site of RNA template to rescue RNA synthesis initiation in vitro, and may function as a rescue and protection mechanism to protect the 3' initiation site, and ensure the efficiency and accuracy of viral RNA synthesis. Altogether, our study establishes the de novo initiation mechanism of RdRP and the terminal rescue mechanism of TNTase for FHV protein A, and represents an important advance toward understanding FHV RNA replication. PMID:24466277

  4. Enzymatic activity of poliovirus RNA polymerase mutants with single amino acid changes in the conserved YGDD amino acid motif.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, S A; Luo, M; Morrow, C D

    1991-09-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases contain a highly conserved region of amino acids with a core segment composed of the amino acids YGDD which have been hypothesized to be at or near the catalytic active site of the molecule. Six mutations in this conserved YGDD region of the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were made by using oligonucleotide site-directed DNA mutagenesis of the poliovirus cDNA to substitute A, C, M, P, S, or V for the amino acid G. The mutant polymerase genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified RNA polymerases were tested for in vitro enzyme activity. Two of the mutant RNA polymerases (those in which the glycine residue was replaced with alanine or serine) exhibited in vitro enzymatic activity ranging from 5 to 20% of wild-type activity, while the remaining mutant RNA polymerases were inactive. Alterations in the in vitro reaction conditions by modification of temperature, metal ion concentration, or pH resulted in no significant differences in the activities of the mutant RNA polymerases relative to that of the wild-type enzyme. An antipeptide antibody directed against the wild-type core amino acid segment containing the YGDD region of the poliovirus polymerase reacted with the wild-type recombinant RNA polymerase and to a limited extent with the two enzymatically active mutant polymerases; the antipeptide antibody did not react with the mutant RNA polymerases which did not have in vitro enzyme activity. These results are discussed in the context of secondary-structure predictions for the core segment containing the conserved YGDD amino acids in the poliovirus RNA polymerase. PMID:1651402

  5. High-throughput identification of compounds targeting influenza RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ching-Yao; Cheng, Ting-Jen R.; Lin, Meng-I.; Wang, Shi-Yun; Huang, Wen-I.; Lin-Chu, Shao-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hou; Wu, Chung-Yi; Lai, Michael M. C.; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Wu, Ying-Ta; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2010-01-01

    As influenza viruses have developed resistance towards current drugs, new inhibitors that prevent viral replication through different inhibitory mechanisms are useful. In this study, we developed a screening procedure to search for new antiinfluenza inhibitors from 1,200,000 compounds and identified previously reported as well as new antiinfluenza compounds. Several antiinfluenza compounds were inhibitory to the influenza RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), including nucleozin and its analogs. The most potent nucleozin analog, 3061 (FA-2), inhibited the replication of the influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus in MDCK cells at submicromolar concentrations and protected the lethal H1N1 infection of mice. Influenza variants resistant to 3061 (FA-2) were isolated and shown to have the mutation on nucleoprotein (NP) that is distinct from the recently reported resistant mutation of Y289H [Kao R, et al. (2010) Nat Biotechnol 28:600]. Recombinant influenza carrying the Y52H NP is also resistant to 3061 (FA-2), and NP aggregation induced by 3061 (FA-2) was identified as the most likely cause for inhibition. In addition, we identified another antiinfluenza RdRP inhibitor 367 which targets PB1 protein but not NP. A mutant resistant to 367 has H456P mutation at the PB1 protein and both the recombinant influenza and the RdRP expressing the PB1 H456P mutation have elevated resistance to 367. Our high-throughput screening (HTS) campaign thus resulted in the identification of antiinfluenza compounds targeting RdRP activity. PMID:20974907

  6. The active site of RNA polymerase II participates in transcript cleavage within arrested ternary complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, M D; Izban, M G; Luse, D S

    1994-01-01

    RNA polymerase II may become arrested during transcript elongation, in which case the ternary complex remains intact but further RNA synthesis is blocked. To relieve arrest, the nascent transcript must be cleaved from the 3' end. RNAs of 7-17 nt are liberated and transcription continues from the newly exposed 3' end. Factor SII increases elongation efficiency by strongly stimulating the transcript cleavage reaction. We show here that arrest relief can also occur by the addition of pyrophosphate. This generates the same set of cleavage products as factor SII, but the fragments produced with pyrophosphate have 5'-triphosphate termini. Thus, the active site of RNA polymerase II, in the presence of pyrophosphate, appears to be capable of cleaving phosphodiester linkages as far as 17 nt upstream of the original site of polymerization, leaving the ternary complex intact and transcriptionally active. Images PMID:8058756

  7. Stimulation of RNA polymerase I and II activities by 17 beta -estradiol receptor on chick liver chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Dierks-Ventling, C; Bieri-Bonniot, F

    1977-01-01

    The endogenous transcriptional capacity (RNA polymerase I and II activity) of liver chromatin from chicks treated with 17 beta-estradiol for 24 h (E 24) was double that of the controls. E 24 chromatin contained estradiol receptor activity while control chromatin did not. Its presence suggested an implication in the enhanced activities of RNA polymerases of E 24 chromatin. When semi-purified estradiol receptor was added to control chromatin, the endogenous transcriptional capacity of this chromatin was greatly increased. Studies with alpha-amanitin showed that both RNA polymerase I and II were stimulated by the estradiol receptor. This stimulation was observed as long as homology of the system was maintained. Solubilized homologous RNA polymerases were stimulated much less by the hormone complex in the presence of heterologous DNA than with homologous chromatin. Prokaryotic RNA polymerase could not be stimulated by chick liver estradiol receptor in the presence of heterologous DNA. PMID:840645

  8. [Role of RNA-polymerase in gene activity regulation of E. coli RNA-polymerase mutants with a pleiotropic effect. I. Physiological and biochemical studies].

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, S G; Arutiunian, A V; Ozolin', O N; Oganesian, M G

    1979-01-01

    Four Rifr-mutants of E. coli B/r (rpo B401, rpo B402, rpo B403, rpo B409) which differ from the wild strain in one or more phenotypic properties besides rifampicin resistance were obtained. Transfer of the mutant Rifr-alleles into the parent strain gives the latter all the properties of the mutant. This indicates that the new properties are due to the pleiotropic effect of Rifr-mutations. Biochemical studies of the properties of RNA-polymerases from the mutants and the parent showed that some new properties of the mutants could not be explained by the appearance of analogous properties in the mutant RNA-polymerase itself. They seem to be caused by alteration in functional activity of the mutant enzyme, particulary, alteration of its control properties during transcription. The function of the beta-subunit in genetic transcription is discussed.

  9. Divergent contributions of conserved active site residues to transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases I and II.

    PubMed

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V; Engel, Krysta L; French, Sarah L; Cui, Ping; Vandeventer, Paul J; Pavlovic, Emily M; Beyer, Ann L; Kaplan, Craig D; Schneider, David A

    2013-09-12

    Multisubunit RNA polymerases (msRNAPs) exhibit high sequence and structural homology, especially within their active sites, which is generally thought to result in msRNAP functional conservation. However, we show that mutations in the trigger loop (TL) in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) yield phenotypes unexpected from studies of Pol II. For example, a well-characterized gain-of-function mutation in Pol II results in loss of function in Pol I (Pol II: rpb1- E1103G; Pol I: rpa190-E1224G). Studies of chimeric Pol II enzymes hosting Pol I or Pol III TLs suggest that consequences of mutations that alter TL dynamics are dictated by the greater enzymatic context and not solely the TL sequence. Although the rpa190-E1224G mutation diminishes polymerase activity, when combined with mutations that perturb Pol I catalysis, it enhances polymerase function, similar to the analogous Pol II mutation. These results suggest that Pol I and Pol II have different rate-limiting steps.

  10. Divergent contributions of conserved active site residues to transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases I and II

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Engel, Krysta L.; French, Sarah L.; Cui, Ping; Vandeventer, Paul J.; Pavlovic, Emily M.; Beyer, Ann L.; Kaplan, Craig D.; Schneider, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Multisubunit RNA polymerases (msRNAPs) exhibit high sequence and structural homology, especially within their active sites, which is generally thought to result in msRNAP functional conservation. However, we show that mutations in the trigger loop (TL) in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) yield phenotypes unexpected from studies of Pol II. For example, a well-characterized gain-of-function mutation in Pol II results in loss-of-function in Pol I [Pol II: rpb1- E1103G; Pol I: rpa190-E1224G]. Studies of chimeric Pol II enzymes hosting Pol I or Pol III TLs suggest that consequences of mutations that alter TL dynamics are dictated by the greater enzymatic context and not solely the TL sequence. Although the rpa190-E1224G mutation diminishes polymerase function, when combined with mutations that perturb Pol I catalysis, it enhances polymerase function, similar to the analogous Pol II mutation. These results suggest that Pol I and Pol II have different rate-limiting steps. PMID:23994471

  11. TRRAP and GCN5 are used by c-Myc to activate RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Ramsbottom, Ben A; Gomez-Roman, Natividad; Marshall, Lynne; Cole, Philip A; White, Robert J

    2007-09-18

    Activation of RNA polymerase (pol) II transcription by c-Myc generally involves recruitment of histone acetyltransferases and acetylation of histones H3 and H4. Here, we describe the mechanism used by c-Myc to activate pol III transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes. Within 2 h of its induction, c-Myc appears at these genes along with the histone acetyltransferase GCN5 and the cofactor TRRAP. At the same time, occupancy of the pol III-specific factor TFIIIB increases and histone H3 becomes hyperacetylated, but increased histone H4 acetylation is not detected at these genes. The rapid acetylation of histone H3 and promoter assembly of TFIIIB, c-Myc, GCN5, and TRRAP are followed by recruitment of pol III and transcriptional induction. The selective acetylation of histone H3 distinguishes pol III activation by c-Myc from mechanisms observed in other systems.

  12. Activation of dormant bacterial genes by Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 mutant-type RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Wang, Guojun; Zemanova, Martina; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the ability of actinomycetes to produce antibiotics and other bioactive secondary metabolites has been underestimated due to the presence of cryptic gene clusters. The activation of dormant genes is therefore one of the most important areas of experimental research for the discovery of drugs in these organisms. The recent observation that several actinomycetes possess two RNA polymerase beta-chain genes (rpoB) has opened up the possibility, explored in this study, of developing a new strategy to activate dormant gene expression in bacteria. Two rpoB paralogs, rpoB(S) and rpoB(R), provide Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 with two functionally distinct and developmentally regulated RNA polymerases. The product of rpoB(R), the expression of which increases after transition to stationary phase, is characterized by five amino acid substitutions located within or close to the so-called rifampin resistance clusters that play a key role in fundamental activities of RNA polymerase. Here, we report that rpoB(R) markedly activated antibiotic biosynthesis in the wild-type Streptomyces lividans strain 1326 and also in strain KO-421, a relaxed (rel) mutant unable to produce ppGpp. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the rpoB(R)-specific missense H426N mutation was essential for the activation of secondary metabolism. Our observations also indicated that mutant-type or duplicated, rpoB often exists in nature among rare actinomycetes and will thus provide a basis for further basic and applied research.

  13. Single molecule microscopy reveals mechanistic insight into RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex assembly and transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Abigail E.; Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a complex process that requires general transcription factors and Pol II to assemble on DNA into preinitiation complexes that can begin RNA synthesis upon binding of NTPs (nucleoside triphosphate). The pathways by which preinitiation complexes form, and how this impacts transcriptional activity are not completely clear. To address these issues, we developed a single molecule system using TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy and purified human transcription factors, which allows us to visualize transcriptional activity at individual template molecules. We see that stable interactions between polymerase II (Pol II) and a heteroduplex DNA template do not depend on general transcription factors; however, transcriptional activity is highly dependent upon TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF. We also found that subsets of general transcription factors and Pol II can form stable complexes that are precursors for functional transcription complexes upon addition of the remaining factors and DNA. Ultimately we found that Pol II, TATA-binding protein, TFIIB and TFIIF can form a quaternary complex in the absence of promoter DNA, indicating that a stable network of interactions exists between these proteins independent of promoter DNA. Single molecule studies can be used to learn how different modes of preinitiation complex assembly impact transcriptional activity. PMID:27112574

  14. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase II basal transcription activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Chibazakura, T; Kitajima, S; Yasukochi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II) in eukaryotic cells requires both basal and regulatory transcription factors. In this report we have investigated in vitro pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle by using nuclear extracts from synchronized HeLa cells. It is shown that pol II basal transcription activity is low in the S and G2 phases and high in early G1 phase and TFIID is the rate limiting component of pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle. Further analyses reveal that TFIID exists as a less active form in the S and G2 phases and nuclear extracts from S and G2 phase cells contain a heat-sensitive repressor(s) of TATA box binding protein (TBP). These results suggest that pol II basal transcription activity is regulated by a qualitative change in the TFIID complex, which could involve repression of TBP, during the cell cycle. Images PMID:7479063

  15. RIG-I and MDA-5 Detection of Viral RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Activity Restricts Positive-Strand RNA Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Nikonov, Andrei; Mölder, Tarmo; Sikut, Rein; Kiiver, Kaja; Männik, Andres; Toots, Urve; Lulla, Aleksei; Lulla, Valeria; Utt, Age; Merits, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2013-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN) are important for antiviral responses. Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5) and retinoic acid-induced gene I (RIG-I) proteins detect cytosolic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) or 5′-triphosphate (5′-ppp) RNA and mediate IFN production. Cytosolic 5′-ppp RNA and dsRNA are generated during viral RNA replication and transcription by viral RNA replicases [RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp)]. Here, we show that the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) RNA replicase can induce IFN-β independently of viral RNA replication and transcription. The SFV replicase converts host cell RNA into 5′-ppp dsRNA and induces IFN-β through the RIG-I and MDA-5 pathways. Inactivation of the SFV replicase RdRp activity prevents IFN-β induction. These IFN-inducing modified host cell RNAs are abundantly produced during both wild-type SFV and its non-pathogenic mutant infection. Furthermore, in contrast to the wild-type SFV replicase a non-pathogenic mutant replicase triggers increased IFN-β production, which leads to a shutdown of virus replication. These results suggest that host cells can restrict RNA virus replication by detecting the products of unspecific viral replicase RdRp activity. PMID:24039580

  16. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease. PMID:27518095

  17. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  18. Identification of the sequences recognized by phage phi 29 transcriptional activator: possible interaction between the activator and the RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Barthelemy, I; Salas, M

    1991-05-11

    Expression of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 late genes requires the transcriptional activator protein p4. This activator binds to a region of the late A3 promoter spanning nucleotides -56 to -102 relative to the transcription start site, generating a strong bending Tin the DNA. In this work the target sequences recognized by protein p4 in the phage phi 29 late A3 promoter have been characterized. The binding of protein p4 to derivatives of the late A3 promoter harbouring deletions in the protein p4 binding site has been studied. When protein p4 recognition sequences were altered, the activator could only bind to the promoter in the presence of RNA polymerase. This strong cooperativity in the binding of protein p4 and RNA polymerase to the promoter suggests the presence of direct protein-protein contacts between them.

  19. RNA polymerase II cofactor PC2 facilitates activation of transcription by GAL4-AH in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, M; Stelzer, G; Roeder, R G; Meisterernst, M

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated from a crude Hela cell cofactor fraction (USA) a novel positive cofactor that cooperates with the general transcription machinery to effect efficient stimulation of transcription by GAL4-AH, a derivative of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae regulatory factor GAL4. PC2 was shown to be a 500-kDa protein complex and to be functionally and biochemically distinct from native TFIID and previously identified cofactors. In the presence of native TFIID and other general factors, PC2 was necessary and sufficient for activation by GAL4-AH. Cofactor function was specific for transcriptional activation domains of GAL4-AH. The repressor histone H1 further potentiated but was not required for activation of transcription by GAL4-AH. On the basis of the observation that PC2 exerts entirely positive effects on transcription, we propose a model in which PC2 increases the activity of the preinitiation complex in the presence of an activator, thereby establishing a specific pathway during activation of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:8196633

  20. Control of activation of liver RNA polymerase I occurring after re-feeding of protein-depleted mice.

    PubMed Central

    Haim, L; Iapalucci-Espinoza, S; Conde, R; Franze-Fernández, M T

    1983-01-01

    Shortly after feeding protein-depleted mice with a meal containing protein, the RNA polymerase I activity in isolated liver nuclei shows a 2-fold increase over the values in the nuclei of either normal or protein-depleted mice. The activity of the RNA polymerase I solubilized from nuclei of re-fed mice was slightly enhanced, probably reflecting an increase in enzyme amount. However, this increase only accounts for about 30% of the stimulation of transcription in the intact nuclei. Administration of pactamycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, to normal or protein-depleted mice has almost no inhibitory effect on the RNA polymerase I activity in the isolated nuclei. On the contrary, within 15 min after treatment with the drug, the stimulated activity in nuclei from re-fed mice declines towards the values in normal or protein-depleted mice and then remains constant. The activity of the solubilized enzyme remains slightly elevated for at least 2 1/2 h after re-fed mice are treated with pactamycin. These observations indicate that the stimulation of the RNA polymerase I activity in the intact nuclei after re-feeding is controlled by mechanisms other than an increase in the enzyme amount and suggest the presence of short-lived proteins required for inducing an activated state of transcription. PMID:6870809

  1. Synthesis and antiviral activity of PB1 component of the influenza A RNA polymerase peptide fragments.

    PubMed

    Matusevich, O V; Egorov, V V; Gluzdikov, I A; Titov, M I; Zarubaev, V V; Shtro, A A; Slita, A V; Dukov, M I; Shurygina, A-P S; Smirnova, T D; Kudryavtsev, I V; Vasin, A V; Kiselev, O I

    2015-01-01

    This study is devoted to the antiviral activity of peptide fragments from the PB1 protein - a component of the influenza A RNA polymerase. The antiviral activity of the peptides synthesized was studied in MDCK cell cultures against the pandemic influenza strain A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pdm09. We found that peptide fragments 6-13, 6-14, 26-30, 395-400, and 531-540 of the PB1 protein were capable of suppressing viral replication in cell culture. Terminal modifications i.e. N-acetylation and C-amidation increased the antiviral properties of the peptides significantly. Peptide PB1 (6-14) with both termini modified showed maximum antiviral activity, its inhibitory activity manifesting itself during the early stages of viral replication. It was also shown that the fluorescent-labeled analog of this peptide was able to penetrate into the cell. The broad range of virus-inhibiting activity of PB1 (6-14) peptide was confirmed using a panel of influenza A viruses of H1, H3 and H5 subtypes including those resistant to oseltamivir, the leading drug in anti-influenza therapy. Thus, short peptide fragments of the PB1 protein could serve as leads for future development of influenza prevention and/or treatment agents.

  2. Visualizing the phage T4 activated transcription complex of DNA and E. coli RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    James, Tamara D.; Cardozo, Timothy; Abell, Lauren E.; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jenkins, Lisa M. Miller; Jha, Saheli S.; Hinton, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) to select the right promoter sequence at the right time is fundamental to the control of gene expression in all organisms. However, there is only one crystallized structure of a complete activator/RNAP/DNA complex. In a process called σ appropriation, bacteriophage T4 activates a class of phage promoters using an activator (MotA) and a co-activator (AsiA), which function through interactions with the σ70 subunit of RNAP. We have developed a holistic, structure-based model for σ appropriation using multiple experimentally determined 3D structures (Escherichia coli RNAP, the Thermus aquaticus RNAP/DNA complex, AsiA /σ70 Region 4, the N-terminal domain of MotA [MotANTD], and the C-terminal domain of MotA [MotACTD]), molecular modeling, and extensive biochemical observations indicating the position of the proteins relative to each other and to the DNA. Our results visualize how AsiA/MotA redirects σ, and therefore RNAP activity, to T4 promoter DNA, and demonstrate at a molecular level how the tactful interaction of transcriptional factors with even small segments of RNAP can alter promoter specificity. Furthermore, our model provides a rational basis for understanding how a mutation within the β subunit of RNAP (G1249D), which is far removed from AsiA or MotA, impairs σ appropriation. PMID:27458207

  3. Visualizing the phage T4 activated transcription complex of DNA and E. coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara D; Cardozo, Timothy; Abell, Lauren E; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Jha, Saheli S; Hinton, Deborah M

    2016-09-19

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) to select the right promoter sequence at the right time is fundamental to the control of gene expression in all organisms. However, there is only one crystallized structure of a complete activator/RNAP/DNA complex. In a process called σ appropriation, bacteriophage T4 activates a class of phage promoters using an activator (MotA) and a co-activator (AsiA), which function through interactions with the σ(70) subunit of RNAP. We have developed a holistic, structure-based model for σ appropriation using multiple experimentally determined 3D structures (Escherichia coli RNAP, the Thermus aquaticus RNAP/DNA complex, AsiA /σ(70) Region 4, the N-terminal domain of MotA [MotA(NTD)], and the C-terminal domain of MotA [MotA(CTD)]), molecular modeling, and extensive biochemical observations indicating the position of the proteins relative to each other and to the DNA. Our results visualize how AsiA/MotA redirects σ, and therefore RNAP activity, to T4 promoter DNA, and demonstrate at a molecular level how the tactful interaction of transcriptional factors with even small segments of RNAP can alter promoter specificity. Furthermore, our model provides a rational basis for understanding how a mutation within the β subunit of RNAP (G1249D), which is far removed from AsiA or MotA, impairs σ appropriation. PMID:27458207

  4. The upstream activator CTF/NF1 and RNA polymerase II share a common element involved in transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Lis, J T; Xiao, H; Greenblatt, J; Friesen, J D

    1994-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II consists of tandem repeats of a heptapeptide with the consensus YSPTSPS. It has been shown that the heptapeptide repeat interacts directly with the general transcription factor TFIID. We report here that the CTD activates transcription when fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. More importantly, we find that the proline-rich transcriptional activation domain of the CCAAT-box-binding factor CTF/NF1 contains a sequence with striking similarity to the heptapeptide repeats of the CTD. We show that this CTD-like motif is essential for the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain of CTF/NF1. Deletion of and point mutations in this CTD-like motif abolish the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain, while natural CTD repeats from RNA polymerase II are fully functional in place of the CTD-like motif. We further show that the proline-rich activation domain of CTF/NF1 interacts directly with the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP), and that a mutation in the CTD-like motif that abolishes transcriptional activation reduces the affinity of the proline-rich domain for TBP. These results demonstrate that a class of proline-rich activator proteins and RNA polymerase II possess a common structural and functional component which can interact with the same target in the general transcription machinery. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanisms of transcriptional activation in eucaryotes. Images PMID:8029001

  5. RNA Polymerase II Regulates Topoisomerase 1 Activity to Favor Efficient Transcription.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Laura; Wojtowicz, Damian; Cui, Kairong; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Chung, Hye-Jung; Chan-Salis, Ka Yim; Guha, Rajarshi; Wilson, Kelli; Zhang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Hongliang; Piotrowski, Jason; Thomas, Craig J; Singer, Dinah S; Pugh, B Franklin; Pommier, Yves; Przytycka, Teresa M; Kouzine, Fedor; Lewis, Brian A; Zhao, Keji; Levens, David

    2016-04-01

    We report a mechanism through which the transcription machinery directly controls topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) activity to adjust DNA topology throughout the transcription cycle. By comparing TOP1 occupancy using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) versus TOP1 activity using topoisomerase 1 sequencing (TOP1-seq), a method reported here to map catalytically engaged TOP1, TOP1 bound at promoters was discovered to become fully active only after pause-release. This transition coupled the phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal-domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with stimulation of TOP1 above its basal rate, enhancing its processivity. TOP1 stimulation is strongly dependent on the kinase activity of BRD4, a protein that phosphorylates Ser2-CTD and regulates RNAPII pause-release. Thus the coordinated action of BRD4 and TOP1 overcame the torsional stress opposing transcription as RNAPII commenced elongation but preserved negative supercoiling that assists promoter melting at start sites. This nexus between transcription and DNA topology promises to elicit new strategies to intercept pathological gene expression. PMID:27058666

  6. RNA Polymerase II Regulates Topoisomerase 1 Activity to Favor Efficient Transcription.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Laura; Wojtowicz, Damian; Cui, Kairong; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Chung, Hye-Jung; Chan-Salis, Ka Yim; Guha, Rajarshi; Wilson, Kelli; Zhang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Hongliang; Piotrowski, Jason; Thomas, Craig J; Singer, Dinah S; Pugh, B Franklin; Pommier, Yves; Przytycka, Teresa M; Kouzine, Fedor; Lewis, Brian A; Zhao, Keji; Levens, David

    2016-04-01

    We report a mechanism through which the transcription machinery directly controls topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) activity to adjust DNA topology throughout the transcription cycle. By comparing TOP1 occupancy using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) versus TOP1 activity using topoisomerase 1 sequencing (TOP1-seq), a method reported here to map catalytically engaged TOP1, TOP1 bound at promoters was discovered to become fully active only after pause-release. This transition coupled the phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal-domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) with stimulation of TOP1 above its basal rate, enhancing its processivity. TOP1 stimulation is strongly dependent on the kinase activity of BRD4, a protein that phosphorylates Ser2-CTD and regulates RNAPII pause-release. Thus the coordinated action of BRD4 and TOP1 overcame the torsional stress opposing transcription as RNAPII commenced elongation but preserved negative supercoiling that assists promoter melting at start sites. This nexus between transcription and DNA topology promises to elicit new strategies to intercept pathological gene expression.

  7. Characterization of the in vitro activity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with the ribonucleoproteins of rice hoja blanca tenuivirus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M; Ramirez, B C; Goldbach, R; Haenni, A L

    1997-04-01

    An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity associated with the ribonucleoproteins of rice hoja blanca tenuivirus (RHBV) was detected and analyzed. Conditions for in vitro RNA synthesis and for coupled RNA synthesis-translation of RHBV were established. In both cases, synthesis of the viral and viral complementary genomic and subgenomic RNA3 and RNA4 were observed, demonstrating that both transcription and replication occurred. Though coupling of RNA synthesis to translation allowed efficient translation of the newly synthesized subgenomic RNAs, studies of the effect of various inhibitors of protein synthesis revealed that RNA synthesis was independent of translation. Primer extension experiments demonstrated that in the presence of capped exogenous RNAs, a stretch of 10 to 16 nonviral nucleotides was added to the 5' end of a population of newly synthesized viral complementary RNA4. It appears that in addition to RdRp activity, RHBV-associated protein(s) also possessed cap-snatching capacity. PMID:9060614

  8. PHF8 Targets Histone Methylation and RNA Polymerase II To Activate Transcription▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fortschegger, Klaus; de Graaf, Petra; Outchkourov, Nikolay S.; van Schaik, Frederik M. A.; Timmers, H. T. Marc; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in PHF8 are associated with X-linked mental retardation and cleft lip/cleft palate. PHF8 contains a plant homeodomain (PHD) in its N terminus and is a member of a family of JmjC domain-containing proteins. While PHDs can act as methyl lysine recognition motifs, JmjC domains can catalyze lysine demethylation. Here, we show that PHF8 is a histone demethylase that removes repressive histone H3 dimethyl lysine 9 marks. Our biochemical analysis revealed specific association of the PHF8 PHD with histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing indicated that PHF8 is enriched at the transcription start sites of many active or poised genes, mirroring the presence of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and of H3K4me3-bearing nucleosomes. We show that PHF8 can act as a transcriptional coactivator and that its activation function largely depends on binding of the PHD to H3K4me3. Furthermore, we present evidence for direct interaction of PHF8 with the C-terminal domain of RNAPII. Importantly, a PHF8 disease mutant was defective in demethylation and in coactivation. This is the first demonstration of a chromatin-modifying enzyme that is globally recruited to promoters through its association with H3K4me3 and RNAPII. PMID:20421419

  9. Amplification of RNA by an RNA polymerase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Horning, David P; Joyce, Gerald F

    2016-08-30

    In all extant life, genetic information is stored in nucleic acids that are replicated by polymerase proteins. In the hypothesized RNA world, before the evolution of genetically encoded proteins, ancestral organisms contained RNA genes that were replicated by an RNA polymerase ribozyme. In an effort toward reconstructing RNA-based life in the laboratory, in vitro evolution was used to improve dramatically the activity and generality of an RNA polymerase ribozyme by selecting variants that can synthesize functional RNA molecules from an RNA template. The improved polymerase ribozyme is able to synthesize a variety of complex structured RNAs, including aptamers, ribozymes, and, in low yield, even tRNA. Furthermore, the polymerase can replicate nucleic acids, amplifying short RNA templates by more than 10,000-fold in an RNA-catalyzed form of the PCR. Thus, the two prerequisites of Darwinian life-the replication of genetic information and its conversion into functional molecules-can now be accomplished with RNA in the complete absence of proteins. PMID:27528667

  10. Real-time quantification of RNA polymerase activity using a "broken beacon".

    PubMed

    Blair, Rebecca H; Rosenblum, Eric S; Dawson, Erica D; Kuchta, Robert D; Kuck, Laura R; Rowlen, Kathy L

    2007-03-15

    A novel assay using a hybridization-based method was developed for real-time monitoring of RNA synthesis. In this work, a "broken beacon" in which the fluor and quencher were located on separate but complementary oligonucleotides was used to quantify the amount of RNA production by T7 polymerase. The relative lengths of the fluor-oligo and quencher-oligo, and their relative concentrations were optimized. The experimentally determined limit-of-detection was approximately 45 nM. The new assay was compared to the "gold-standard" radiolabel ([(32)P]NTP incorporation) assay for RNA quantification. While the broken beacon assay exhibited a higher limit of detection, it provided an accurate measure of RNA production rates. However, the broken beacon assay provided the significant analytical advantages of (i) a real-time and continuous measurement, (ii) no requirement for the use of radiolabels or gel-based analysis, and (iii) substantial time and labor savings.

  11. Differential roles of phosphorylation in the formation of transcriptional active RNA polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Fath, Stephan; Milkereit, Philipp; Peyroche, Gerald; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe; Tschochner, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of rDNA transcription depends on the formation and dissociation of a functional complex between RNA polymerase I (pol I) and transcription initiation factor Rrn3p. We analyzed whether phosphorylation is involved in this molecular switch. Rrn3p is a phosphoprotein that is predominantly phosphorylated in vivo when it is not bound to pol I. In vitro, Rrn3p is able both to associate with pol I and to enter the transcription cycle in its nonphosphorylated form. By contrast, phosphorylation of pol I is required to form a stable pol I-Rrn3p complex for efficient transcription initiation. Furthermore, association of pol I with Rrn3p correlates with a change in the phosphorylation state of pol I in vivo. We suggest that phosphorylation at specific sites of pol I is a prerequisite for proper transcription initiation and that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of pol I is one possibility to modulate cellular rDNA transcription activity. PMID:11717393

  12. Characterization of purified Sindbis virus nsP4 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rubach, Jon K.; Wasik, Brian R.; Rupp, Jonathan C.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Hardy, Richard W.; Smith, Janet L.

    2009-02-05

    The Sindbis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsP4) is responsible for the replication of the viral RNA genome. In infected cells, nsP4 is localized in a replication complex along with the other viral non-structural proteins. nsP4 has been difficult to homogenously purify from infected cells due to its interactions with the other replication proteins and the fact that its N-terminal residue, a tyrosine, causes the protein to be rapidly turned over in cells. We report the successful expression and purification of Sindbis nsP4 in a bacterial system, in which nsP4 is expressed as an N-terminal SUMO fusion protein. After purification the SUMO tag is removed, resulting in the isolation of full-length nsP4 possessing the authentic N-terminal tyrosine. This purified enzyme is able to produce minus-strand RNA de novo from plus-strand templates, as well as terminally add adenosine residues to the 3' end of an RNA substrate. In the presence of the partially processed viral replicase polyprotein, P123, purified nsP4 is able to synthesize discrete template length minus-strand RNA products. Mutations in the 3' CSE or poly(A) tail of viral template RNA prevent RNA synthesis by the replicase complex containing purified nsP4, consistent with previously reported template requirements for minus-strand RNA synthesis. Optimal reaction conditions were determined by investigating the effects of time, pH, and the concentrations of nsP4, P123 and magnesium on the synthesis of RNA.

  13. A novel, non-radioactive eukaryotic in vitro transcription assay for sensitive quantification of RNA polymerase II activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies of the eukaryotic transcription mechanism and its regulation rely on in vitro assays. Conventional RNA polymerase II transcription assays are based on radioactive labelling of the newly synthesized RNA. Due to the inefficient in vitro transcription, the detection of the RNA involving purification and gel electrophoresis is laborious and not always quantitative. Results Herein, we describe a new, non-radioactive, robust and reproducible eukaryotic in vitro transcription assay that has been established in our laboratory. Upon transcription, the newly synthesized RNA is directly detected and quantified using the QuantiGene assay. Alternatively, the RNA can be purified and a primer extension followed by PCR detection or qPCR quantification can be performed. When applied to assess the activity of RNA polymerase II inhibitors, this new method allowed an accurate estimation of their relative potency. Conclusions Our novel assay provides a non-radioactive alternative to a standard in vitro transcription assay that allows for sensitive detection and precise quantification of the newly transcribed, unlabelled RNA and is particularly useful for quantification of strong transcriptional inhibitors like α-amanitin. Moreover, the method can be easily adapted to quantify the reaction yield and the transcription efficiency of other eukaryotic in vitro systems, thus providing a complementary tool for the field of transcriptional research. PMID:24694320

  14. Repression and activation of transcription by Gal and Lac repressors: involvement of alpha subunit of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Choy, H E; Park, S W; Aki, T; Parrack, P; Fujita, N; Ishihama, A; Adhya, S

    1995-01-01

    Gal or Lac repressor binding to an upstream DNA segment, in the absence of DNA looping, represses the P1 promoter located on the same face and activates the P2 promoter situated on the opposite face of the DNA helix in the gal operon. Both inhibition and stimulation of transcription requires the physical presence of the C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase although the latter is not required for transcription itself. We propose that Gal and Lac repressors inhibit or stimulate transcription initiation by disabling or stimulating RNA polymerase activity at a post-binding step by directly or indirectly altering the C-terminal alpha domain to an unfavorable state at P1 or a more favorable state at P2, respectively. Images PMID:7556095

  15. De Novo Polymerase Activity and Oligomerization of Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases from Genotypes 1 to 5

    PubMed Central

    Bellón-Echeverría, Itxaso; Encinar, José Antonio; Martínez-Alfaro, Elisa; Pérez-Flores, Ricardo; Mas, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) shows a great geographical diversity reflected in the high number of circulating genotypes and subtypes. The response to HCV treatment is genotype specific, with the predominant genotype 1 showing the lowest rate of sustained virological response. Virally encoded enzymes are candidate targets for intervention. In particular, promising antiviral molecules are being developed to target the viral NS3/4A protease and NS5B polymerase. Most of the studies with the NS5B polymerase have been done with genotypes 1b and 2a, whilst information about other genotypes is scarce. Here, we have characterized the de novo activity of NS5B from genotypes 1 to 5, with emphasis on conditions for optimum activity and kinetic constants. Polymerase cooperativity was determined by calculating the Hill coefficient and oligomerization through a new FRET-based method. The Vmax/Km ratios were statistically different between genotype 1 and the other genotypes (p<0.001), mainly due to differences in Vmax values, but differences in the Hill coefficient and NS5B oligomerization were noted. Analysis of sequence changes among the studied polymerases and crystal structures show the αF helix as a structural component probably involved in NS5B-NS5B interactions. The viability of the interaction of αF and αT helixes was confirmed by docking studies and calculation of electrostatic surface potentials for genotype 1 and point mutants corresponding to mutations from different genotypes. Results presented in this study reveal the existence of genotypic differences in NS5B de novo activity and oligomerization. Furthermore, these results allow us to define two regions, one consisting of residues Glu128, Asp129, and Glu248, and the other consisting of residues of αT helix possibly involved in NS5B-NS5B interactions. PMID:21490973

  16. Yeast DEAD box protein Mss116p is a transcription elongation factor that modulates the activity of mitochondrial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Wojtas, Ireneusz D; Tessitore, Kassandra; Henderson, Simmone; McAllister, William T

    2014-07-01

    DEAD box proteins have been widely implicated in regulation of gene expression. Here, we show that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD box protein Mss116p, previously known as a mitochondrial splicing factor, also acts as a transcription factor that modulates the activity of the single-subunit mitochondrial RNA polymerase encoded by RPO41. Binding of Mss116p stabilizes paused mitochondrial RNA polymerase elongation complexes in vitro and favors the posttranslocated state of the enzyme, resulting in a lower concentration of nucleotide substrate required to escape the pause; this mechanism of action is similar to that of elongation factors that enhance the processivity of multisubunit RNA polymerases. In a yeast strain in which the RNA splicing-related functions of Mss116p are dispensable, overexpression of RPO41 or MSS116 increases cell survival from colonies that were exposed to low temperature, suggesting a role for Mss116p in enhancing the efficiency of mitochondrial transcription under stress conditions. PMID:24732805

  17. Determination of lysine residues affinity labeled in the active site of yeast RNA polymerase II(B) by mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Treich, I; Carles, C; Sentenac, A; Riva, M

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study, yeast RNA polymerase II(B) was affinity labeled with two nucleotide derivatives (III and VIII) (1). In both cases, the labeled site was localized to the C-terminal part of the B150 subunit. The potential target lysyl residues of derivative III were mapped to the conserved domain H, between Asn946 and Met999. In the present work, we have mutagenized to arginine the five lysines present in domain H. Three lysines can be replaced, individually or simultaneously, without affecting cell growth, and each mutated enzyme can still be affinity labeled. Hence one or both of the other two lysyl residues, Lys979 and Lys987, is the target of the affinity reagent. These two lysines were each found to be essential for cell viability. Derivative VIII labeled another domain in addition to domain H. Supported by analogous results obtained for E. coli RNA polymerase using derivative VIII (2), we hypothesized that the second domain labeled by this derivative in the B150 subunit was domain I. Mutagenesis of the unique lysine present in domain I demonstrated that Lys 1102 was the target of derivative VIII. These results indicate that in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases, domains H and I are in close proximity and participate to the active site. Images PMID:1408783

  18. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer.1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical processes prior to the origin of RNA-based life.3,4 Once an RNA enzyme arose that could catalyze the polymerization of RNA, it would have been possible to distinguish among the two enantiomers, enabling RNA replication and RNA-based evolution to occur. It is commonly thought that the earliest RNA polymerase and its substrates would have been of the same handedness, but this is not necessarily the case. Replicating D-and L-RNA molecules may have emerged together, based on the ability of structured RNAs of one handedness to catalyze the templated polymerization of activated mononucleotides of the opposite handedness. Such a cross-chiral RNA polymerase has now been developed using in vitro evolution. The D-RNA enzyme, consisting of 83 nucleotides, catalyzes the joining of L-mono- or oligonucleotide substrates on a complementary L-RNA template, and similarly for the L-enzyme with D-substrates and a D-template. Chiral inhibition is avoided because the 106-fold rate acceleration of the enzyme only pertains to cross-chiral substrates. The enzyme's activity is sufficient to generate full-length copies of its enantiomer through the templated joining of 11 component oligonucleotides. PMID:25363769

  19. Inhibition of RNA polymerase by streptolydigin: no cycling allowed.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, Scotty; Zhang, Jinwei; Landick, Robert

    2005-08-26

    Bacterial RNA polymerase is a common target for many antibiotics. In two recent papers in Cell and Molecular Cell, and describe a structural basis for inhibition of bacterial RNA polymerase by the antibiotic streptolydigin. Streptolydigin may prevent distortion of a "bridge" alpha helix postulated to occur during the nucleotide addition cycle of RNA polymerase or may block a small movement of the bridge helix that helps load nucleotide triphosphates into the active site. PMID:16122417

  20. The human interferon-regulated ISG95 protein interacts with RNA polymerase II and shows methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haline-Vaz, Thais; Lima Silva, Tereza Cristina; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.

    2008-08-08

    A major mechanism of cellular resistance to viral invasion involves genes from the interferon signaling pathway, called ISGs (interferon stimulated genes). Global transcriptional profiling studies have linked increased expression of ISG95 (KIAA0082) to response to interferon treatment and viral infection, suggesting that it may be part of the cellular defense against viral replication. In this work, we show that the ISG95 promoter can drive interferon-induced transcription of a reporter gene in Vero cells. Recombinant ISG95 shows RNA- and S-adenosyl-methionine binding and protein methyltransferase activity in vitro. ISG95 interacts with the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, which is consistent with its nuclear localization and with the predicted function of the WW domain found in the C-terminal region of ISG95. The results presented in this work indicate that ISG95 is part of the interferon response pathway and functions in the pre-mRNA processing events mediated by the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II.

  1. Wheat DNA Primase (RNA Primer Synthesis in Vitro, Structural Studies by Photochemical Cross-Linking, and Modulation of Primase Activity by DNA Polymerases).

    PubMed Central

    Laquel, P.; Litvak, S.; Castroviejo, M.

    1994-01-01

    DNA primase synthesizes short RNA primers used by DNA polymerases to initiate DNA synthesis. Two proteins of approximately 60 and 50 kD were recognized by specific antibodies raised against yeast primase subunits, suggesting a high degree of analogy between wheat and yeast primase subunits. Gel-filtration chromatography of wheat primase showed two active forms of 60 and 110 to 120 kD. Ultraviolet-induced cross-linking with radioactive oligothymidilate revealed a highly labeled protein of 60 kD. After limited trypsin digestion of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) primase, a major band of 48 kD and two minor bands of 38 and 17 kD were observed. In the absence of DNA polymerases, the purified primase synthesizes long RNA products. The size of the RNA product synthesized by wheat primase is considerably reduced by the presence of DNA polymerases, suggesting a modulatory effect of the association between these two enzymes. Lowering the primase concentration in the assay also favored short RNA primer synthesis. Several properties of the wheat DNA primase using oligoadenylate [oligo(rA)]-primed or unprimed polythymidilate templates were studied. The ability of wheat primase, without DNA polymerases, to elongate an oligo(rA) primer to long RNA products depends on the primer size, temperature, and the divalent cation concentration. Thus, Mn2+ ions led to long RNA products in a very wide range of concentrations, whereas with Mg2+ long products were observed around 15 mM. We studied the ability of purified wheat DNA polymerases to initiate DNA synthesis from an RNA primer: wheat DNA polymerase A showed the highest activity, followed by DNA polymerases B and CII, whereas DNA polymerase CI was unable to initiate DNA synthesis from an RNA primer. Results are discussed in terms of understanding the role of these polymerases in DNA replication in plants. PMID:12232187

  2. Rapid Enhancement of Chick Intestinal DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase II Activity by 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3, In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.; Haussler, Mark R.; Lindell, Thomas J.

    1974-01-01

    1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 was examined for its ability to affect the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (nucleosidetriphosphate:RNA nucleotidyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.6) of rachitic chick intestinal cell nuclei in vivo. Nucleoplasmic (form II) RNA polymerase activity was stimulated 2-fold (P < 0.05) within 2-3 hr after an oral dose of 0.27 μg (0.65 nmol) of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to rachitic chicks. The form II polymerase activity returned to control values by 5-9 hr after dosing with the sterol. In contrast, the nucleolar (form I) RNA polymerase was not increased within this period. Solubilization of nuclear protein and resolution of the two RNA polymerases on DEAE-Sephadex also revealed that there was an increase in polymerase II activity when assayed on exogenous DNA template. This evidence suggests that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 acts at the level of the enzymology of intestinal cell transcription and that increased mRNA synthesis after administration of this hormone cannot be due solely to a change in chromatin template activity. PMID:4526209

  3. DNA polymerase-α regulates the activation of type I interferons through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations that disrupt nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts the expression of POLA1, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency resulted in increased production of type I interferons. This enzyme is necessary for the synthesis of RNA:DNA primers during DNA replication and, strikingly, we found that POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Together this work identifies POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  4. DNA polymerase-α regulates the activation of type I interferons through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations that disrupt nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts the expression of POLA1, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency resulted in increased production of type I interferons. This enzyme is necessary for the synthesis of RNA:DNA primers during DNA replication and, strikingly, we found that POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Together this work identifies POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response.

  5. Template-free generation of RNA species that replicate with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Biebricher, C K; Luce, R

    1996-01-01

    A large variety of different RNA species that are replicated by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from bacteriophage T7 have been generated by incubating high concentrations of this enzyme with substrate for extended time periods. The products differed from sample to sample in molecular weight and sequence, their chain lengths ranging from 60 to 120. The mechanism of autocatalytic amplification of RNA by T7 RNA polymerase proved to be analogous to that observed with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (replicases): only single-stranded templates are accepted and complementary replica strands are synthesized. With enzyme in excess, exponential growth was observed; linear growth resulted when the enzyme was saturated by RNA template. The plus strands, present at 90% of the replicating RNA species, were found to have GG residues at both termini. Consensus sequences were not found among the sequences of the replicating RNA species. The secondary structures of all species sequenced turned out to be hairpins. The RNA species were specifically replicated by T7 RNA polymerase; they were not accepted as templates by the RNA polymerases from Escherichia coli or bacteriophage SP6 or by Qbeta replicase; T3 RNA polymerase was partially active. Template-free production of RNA was completely suppressed by addition of DNA to the incubation mixture. When both DNA and RNA templates were present, transcription and replication competed, but T7 RNA polymerase preferred DNA as a template. No replicating RNA species were detected in vivo in cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase. Images PMID:8670848

  6. Activation of Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase by Cellular Heat Shock Protein 70 Is Enhanced by Phospholipids In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pogany, Judit

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, tombusviruses are replicated by the membrane-bound viral replicase complex (VRC). The VRC consists of the p92 virus-coded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), the viral p33 RNA chaperone, and several co-opted host proteins. In order to become a functional RdRp after its translation, the p92 replication protein should be incorporated into the VRC, followed by its activation. We have previously shown in a cell-free yeast extract-based assay that the activation of the Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) RdRp requires a soluble host factor(s). In this article, we identify the cellular heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) as the co-opted host factor required for the activation of an N-terminally truncated recombinant TBSV RdRp. In addition, small-molecule-based blocking of Hsp70 function inhibits RNA synthesis by the tombusvirus RdRp in vitro. Furthermore, we show that neutral phospholipids, namely, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine (PC), enhance RdRp activation in vitro. In contrast, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) shows a strong and dominant inhibitory effect on in vitro RdRp activation. We also demonstrate that PE and PC stimulate RdRp-viral plus-strand RNA [(+)RNA] interaction, while PG inhibits the binding of the viral RNA to the RdRp. Based on the stimulatory versus inhibitory roles of various phospholipids in tombusvirus RdRp activation, we propose that the lipid composition of targeted subcellular membranes might be utilized by tombusviruses to regulate new VRC assembly during the course of infection. IMPORTANCE The virus-coded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is responsible for synthesizing the viral RNA progeny in infected cells of several positive-strand RNA viruses, is initially inactive. This strategy is likely to avoid viral RNA synthesis in the cytosol that would rapidly lead to induction of RNA-triggered cellular antiviral responses. During the assembly of the membrane-bound replicase

  7. Magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the role of the divalent cation activator of RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Koren, R; Mildvan, S

    1977-01-25

    The interaction of Mn2+, substrates and initiators with RNA polymerase have been studied by kinetic and magnetic resonance methods. As determined by electron paramagnetic resonance, Mn2+ binds to RNA polymerase at one tight binding site with a dissociation constant less than 10 muM and at 6 +/- 1 weak binding sites with dissociation constants 100-fold greater. The binding of Mn2+ to RNA polymerase at both types of sites causes an order of magnitude enhancement of the paramagnetic effect of Mn2+ on the longitudinal relaxation rate of water protons, indicating the presence of residual water ligands on the enzyme-bound Mn2+. A kinetic analysis of the Mn2+-activated enzyme with poly(dT) as template indicates the substrate to be MnATP under steady-state conditions in the presence or absence of the initiator ApA. ATP and UTP interact with the tightly bound Mn2+ to form ternary complexes with approximately 50% greater enhancement factors. The dissociation constant of MnATP from the tight Mn2+ site as determined by longitudinal proton relaxation rate (PRR) titration (4.7 muM) is similar to the KM of MnATP in the ApA-initiated RNA polymerase reaction (10 +/- 3 muM) but not in the ATP-initiated reaction (160 +/- 30 muM). Similarly, the dissociation constant of the substrate MnUTP from the tight Mn2+ site (90 muM) is in agreement with the KM of MnUTP (101 +/- 13 muM) when poly[d(A-T)]-poly[d(A-T)] is used as template, indicating the tight Mn2+ site to be the catalytic site for RNA chain elongation. Manganese adenylyl imidodiphosphate (MnAMP-PNP) has been found to be a substrate for RNA polymerase. It has the same affinity as MnATP for the tight site but, unlike the results obtained with MnATP, the enhancement is decreased by 43% in the enzyme Mn-AMP-PNP complex. These results suggest that the enzyme-bound Mn2+ interacts with the leaving pyrophosphate group. The initiators ApA and ApU and the inhibitor rifamycin interact with the enzyme-Mn2+ complex producing small (15

  8. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ70-dependent and the contrasting σ54-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ54-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ70-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ54-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ54 Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  9. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-11-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ(70)-dependent and the contrasting σ(54)-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ(54)-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ(70)-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ(54)-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ(54) Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator.

  10. Mutations in RNA Polymerase Bridge Helix and Switch Regions Affect Active-Site Networks and Transcript-Assisted Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Schäfer, Jorrit; Sharma, Amit; Rayner, Lucy; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tuma, Roman; Stockley, Peter; Buck, Martin

    2015-11-01

    In bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP), the bridge helix and switch regions form an intricate network with the catalytic active centre and the main channel. These interactions are important for catalysis, hydrolysis and clamp domain movement. By targeting conserved residues in Escherichia coli RNAP, we are able to show that functions of these regions are differentially required during σ(70)-dependent and the contrasting σ(54)-dependent transcription activations and thus potentially underlie the key mechanistic differences between the two transcription paradigms. We further demonstrate that the transcription factor DksA directly regulates σ(54)-dependent activation both positively and negatively. This finding is consistent with the observed impacts of DksA on σ(70)-dependent promoters. DksA does not seem to significantly affect RNAP binding to a pre-melted promoter DNA but affects extensively activity at the stage of initial RNA synthesis on σ(54)-regulated promoters. Strikingly, removal of the σ(54) Region I is sufficient to invert the action of DksA (from stimulation to inhibition or vice versa) at two test promoters. The RNAP mutants we generated also show a strong propensity to backtrack. These mutants increase the rate of transcript-hydrolysis cleavage to a level comparable to that seen in the Thermus aquaticus RNAP even in the absence of a non-complementary nucleotide. These novel phenotypes imply an important function of the bridge helix and switch regions as an anti-backtracking ratchet and an RNA hydrolysis regulator. PMID:26365052

  11. The RNA Polymerase of Marine Cyanophage Syn5*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Tabor, Stanley; Raytcheva, Desislava A.; Hernandez, Alfredo; King, Jonathan A.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    A single subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified and purified to apparent homogeneity from cyanophage Syn5 that infects the marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus. Syn5 is homologous to bacteriophage T7 that infects Escherichia coli. Using the purified enzyme its promoter has been identified by examining transcription of segments of Syn5 DNA and sequencing the 5′-termini of the transcripts. Only two Syn5 RNAP promoters, having the sequence 5′-ATTGGGCACCCGTAA-3′, are found within the Syn5 genome. One promoter is located within the Syn5 RNA polymerase gene and the other is located close to the right genetic end of the genome. The purified enzyme and its promoter have enabled a determination of the requirements for transcription. Unlike the salt-sensitive bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, this marine RNA polymerase requires 160 mm potassium for maximal activity. The optimal temperature for Syn5 RNA polymerase is 24 °C, much lower than that for T7 RNA polymerase. Magnesium is required as a cofactor although some activity is observed with ferrous ions. Syn5 RNA polymerase is more efficient in utilizing low concentrations of ribonucleotides than T7 RNA polymerase. PMID:23258537

  12. RNA polymerase activity in PtK1 micronuclei containing individual chromosomes: an in vitro and in situ study

    SciTech Connect

    Labidi, B.; Gregoire, M.; Frackowiak, S.; Hernandez-Verdun, D.; Bouteille, M.

    1987-03-01

    Micronuclei have been induced by colchicine in rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylis) PtK1 cells. The synthesis of RNA was investigated both in isolated micronuclei by quantifying RNA polymerase activities at different ionic strengths with or without inhibitors, and in micronucleated cells by radioautography after (/sup 3/H)uridine pulse labeling. In vitro transcription shows that isolated micronuclei are able to take up (/sup 3/H)UTP. The rate curves of incorporation are close to those of isolated diploid nuclei, though the level of incorporation was relatively lower (65-70%) than control nuclei. This indicates that micronuclei react to the ionic environment and to inhibitors in the same manner as described for many species of isolated diploid nuclei. The labelling distributions plotted from radioautographs show that micronuclei were able to efficiently incorporate the hot precursor. Furthermore, for short pulses there is no homogeneity in the labelling density among the different micronuclei and there is no correlation between the labelling intensity and the size of micronuclei. After 60-min pulse time, there is an enhanced uptake of (/sup 3/H)uridine and all the micronuclei exhibit considerable labelling, although less than control cells. Thus, the micronuclei exhibit some characteristic RNA transcriptional activity in situ as well as after isolation. This material should be a particular interesting model with which to study the physiological activity and the role of each individual interphasic chromosome.

  13. Use of RNA polymerase molecular beacon assay to measure RNA polymerase interactions with model promoter fragments.

    PubMed

    Mekler, Vladimir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase-promoter interactions that keep the transcription initiation complex together are complex and multipartite, and formation of the RNA polymerase-promoter complex proceeds through multiple intermediates. Short promoter fragments can be used as a tool to dissect RNA polymerase-promoter interactions and to pinpoint elements responsible for specific properties of the entire promoter complex. A recently developed fluorometric molecular beacon assay allows one to monitor the enzyme interactions with various DNA probes and quantitatively characterize partial RNA polymerase-promoter interactions. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of an Escherichia coli molecular beacon and its application to study RNA polymerase interactions with model promoter fragments.

  14. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  15. Base-pair-resolution genome-wide mapping of active RNA polymerases using precision nuclear run-on (PRO-seq).

    PubMed

    Mahat, Dig Bijay; Kwak, Hojoong; Booth, Gregory T; Jonkers, Iris H; Danko, Charles G; Patel, Ravi K; Waters, Colin T; Munson, Katie; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T

    2016-08-01

    We provide a protocol for precision nuclear run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) and its variant, PRO-cap, which map the location of active RNA polymerases (PRO-seq) or transcription start sites (TSSs) (PRO-cap) genome-wide at high resolution. The density of RNA polymerases at a particular genomic locus directly reflects the level of nascent transcription at that region. Nuclei are isolated from cells and, under nuclear run-on conditions, transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases incorporate one or, at most, a few biotin-labeled nucleotide triphosphates (biotin-NTPs) into the 3' end of nascent RNA. The biotin-labeled nascent RNA is used to prepare sequencing libraries, which are sequenced from the 3' end to provide high-resolution positional information for the RNA polymerases. PRO-seq provides much higher sensitivity than ChIP-seq, and it generates a much larger fraction of usable sequence reads than ChIP-seq or NET-seq (native elongating transcript sequencing). Similarly to NET-seq, PRO-seq maps the RNA polymerase at up to base-pair resolution with strand specificity, but unlike NET-seq it does not require immunoprecipitation. With the protocol provided here, PRO-seq (or PRO-cap) libraries for high-throughput sequencing can be generated in 4-5 working days. The method has been applied to human, mouse, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans cells and, with slight modifications, to yeast. PMID:27442863

  16. Optimization of Potent and Selective Quinazolinediones: Inhibitors of Respiratory Syncytial Virus That Block RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerase Complex Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A quinazolinedione-derived screening hit 2 was discovered with cellular antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (CPE EC50 = 2.1 μM), moderate efficacy in reducing viral progeny (4.2 log at 10 μM), and marginal cytotoxic liability (selectivity index, SI ∼ 24). Scaffold optimization delivered analogs with improved potency and selectivity profiles. Most notable were compounds 15 and 19 (EC50 = 300–500 nM, CC50 > 50 μM, SI > 100), which significantly reduced viral titer (>400,000-fold), and several analogs were shown to block the activity of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase complex of RSV. PMID:25399509

  17. ppGpp: magic beyond RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Swanson, Michele S

    2012-02-16

    During stress, bacteria undergo extensive physiological transformations, many of which are coordinated by ppGpp. Although ppGpp is best known for enhancing cellular resilience by redirecting the RNA polymerase (RNAP) to certain genes, it also acts as a signal in many other cellular processes in bacteria. After a brief overview of ppGpp biosynthesis and its impact on promoter selection by RNAP, we discuss how bacteria exploit ppGpp to modulate the synthesis, stability or activity of proteins or regulatory RNAs that are crucial in challenging environments, using mechanisms beyond the direct regulation of RNAP activity.

  18. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji . E-mail: si360405@med.shimane-u.ac.jp; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-13

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor {alpha}-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use.

  19. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  20. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. PMID:18834537

  1. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Morcillo, María; Taylor, Nicholas M. I.; Gruene, Tim; Legrand, Pierre; Rashid, Umar J.; Ruiz, Federico M.; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  2. Transcriptional activities of the chloroplast-nuclei and proplastid-nuclei isolated from tobacco exhibit different sensitivities to tagetitoxin: implication of the presence of distinct RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sakai, A; Saito, C; Inada, N; Kuroiwa, T

    1998-09-01

    We examined the effects of tagetitoxin, a potent inhibitor of RNA polymerases from chloroplasts and Escherichia coli, on the transcriptional activities of chloroplast- and proplastid-nuclei (nucleoids) isolated from mature tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaves and cultured tobacco cells (line BY-2), respectively. Transcription by the isolated chloroplast-nuclei was effectively inhibited by tagetitoxin (95-99% reduction at 10 microM tagetitoxin), but transcription by the isolated proplastid-nuclei was only partially inhibited (40-50% reduction) by this compound. Southern hybridization experiments revealed that the transcription of various plastid genes (psbA, atpA, rpoB, psaA/B, atpB, rbcL, petB, rpl16, and rrn23) was sensitive to tagetitoxin in the isolated chloroplast-nuclei, whereas the transcription of the same genes was relatively resistant to this compound in the isolated proplastid-nuclei. These results suggest that; (i) distinct RNA polymerase activities with different sensitivities to tagetitoxin are present in plastids, (ii) a tagetitoxin-sensitive RNA polymerase is the major RNA polymerase in chloroplasts whereas a tagetitoxin-insensitive enzyme is major in proplastids, and (iii) both RNA polymerases can transcribe various plastid genes.

  3. Mediator, TATA-binding Protein, and RNA Polymerase II Contribute to Low Histone Occupancy at Active Gene Promoters in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Suraiya A.; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z.; Rode, Kara A.; Barber, Wesley T.; Ellis, Laura C.; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M.; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  4. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase targets DNA at sites of RNA polymerase II stalling by interaction with Spt5.

    PubMed

    Pavri, Rushad; Gazumyan, Anna; Jankovic, Mila; Di Virgilio, Michela; Klein, Isaac; Ansarah-Sobrinho, Camilo; Resch, Wolfgang; Yamane, Arito; Reina San-Martin, Bernardo; Barreto, Vasco; Nieland, Thomas J; Root, David E; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2010-10-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates antibody gene diversification by creating U:G mismatches. However, AID is not specific for antibody genes; Off-target lesions can activate oncogenes or cause chromosome translocations. Despite its importance in these transactions little is known about how AID finds its targets. We performed an shRNA screen to identify factors required for class switch recombination (CSR) of antibody loci. We found that Spt5, a factor associated with stalled RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and single stranded DNA (ssDNA), is required for CSR. Spt5 interacts with AID, it facilitates association between AID and Pol II, and AID recruitment to its Ig and non-Ig targets. ChIP-seq experiments reveal that Spt5 colocalizes with AID and stalled Pol II. Further, Spt5 accumulation at sites of Pol II stalling is predictive of AID-induced mutation. We propose that AID is targeted to sites of Pol II stalling in part via its association with Spt5. PMID:20887897

  5. Controlling the motor activity of a transcription-repair coupling factor: autoinhibition and the role of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abigail J; Szczelkun, Mark D; Savery, Nigel J

    2007-01-01

    Motor proteins that couple ATP hydrolysis to movement along nucleic acids play a variety of essential roles in DNA metabolism. Often these enzymes function as components of macromolecular complexes, and DNA translocation by the motor protein drives movement of other components of the complex. In order to understand how the activity of motor proteins is regulated within multi-protein complexes we have studied the bacterial transcription-repair coupling factor, Mfd, which is a helicase superfamily 2 member that binds to RNA polymerase (RNAP) and removes stalled transcription complexes from DNA. Using an oligonucleotide displacement assay that monitors protein movement on double-stranded DNA we show that Mfd has little motor activity in isolation, but exhibits efficient oligonucleotide displacement activity when bound to a stalled transcription complex. Deletion of the C-terminal domain of Mfd increases the ATPase activity of the protein and allows efficient oligo-displacement in the absence of RNAP. Our results suggest that an autoinhibitory domain ensures the motor activity of Mfd is only functional within the correct macromolecular context: recruitment of Mfd to a stalled transcription complex relieves the autoinhibition and unmasks the motor activity.

  6. Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I transcription during disease.

    PubMed

    Hannan, K M; Sanij, E; Rothblum, L I; Hannan, R D; Pearson, R B

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes by the dedicated RNA polymerase I enzyme and subsequent processing of the ribosomal RNA are fundamental control steps in the synthesis of functional ribosomes. Dysregulation of Pol I transcription and ribosome biogenesis is linked to the etiology of a broad range of human diseases. Diseases caused by loss of function mutations in the molecular constituents of the ribosome, or factors intimately associated with RNA polymerase I transcription and processing are collectively termed ribosomopathies. Ribosomopathies are generally rare and treatment options are extremely limited tending to be more palliative than curative. Other more common diseases are associated with profound changes in cellular growth such as cardiac hypertrophy, atrophy or cancer. In contrast to ribosomopathies, altered RNA polymerase I transcriptional activity in these diseases largely results from dysregulated upstream oncogenic pathways or by direct modulation by oncogenes or tumor suppressors at the level of the RNA polymerase I transcription apparatus itself. Ribosomopathies associated with mutations in ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA processing or assembly factors have been covered by recent excellent reviews. In contrast, here we review our current knowledge of human diseases specifically associated with dysregulation of RNA polymerase I transcription and its associated regulatory apparatus, including some cases where this dysregulation is directly causative in disease. We will also provide insight into and discussion of possible therapeutic approaches to treat patients with dysregulated RNA polymerase I transcription. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Transcription by Odd Pols. PMID:23153826

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II CTD is associated with antisense promoter transcription and active enhancers in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Descostes, Nicolas; Heidemann, Martin; Spinelli, Lionel; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Fenouil, Romain; Koch, Frederic; Innocenti, Charlène; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Eick, Dirk; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase (Pol) II consists of 52 conserved heptapeptide repeats containing the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7. Post-translational modifications of the CTD coordinate the transcription cycle and various steps of mRNA maturation. Here we describe Tyr1 phosphorylation (Tyr1P) as a hallmark of promoter (5′ associated) Pol II in mammalian cells, in contrast to what was described in yeast. Tyr1P is predominantly found in antisense orientation at promoters but is also specifically enriched at active enhancers. Mutation of Tyr1 to phenylalanine (Y1F) prevents the formation of the hyper-phosphorylated Pol IIO form, induces degradation of Pol II to the truncated Pol IIB form, and results in a lethal phenotype. Our results suggest that Tyr1P has evolved specialized and essential functions in higher eukaryotes associated with antisense promoter and enhancer transcription, and Pol II stability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02105.001 PMID:24842994

  8. Length heterogeneity at conserved sequence block 2 in human mitochondrial DNA acts as a rheostat for RNA polymerase POLRMT activity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Benedict G.; Wellesley, Frederick C.; Savery, Nigel J.; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    The guanine (G)-tract of conserved sequence block 2 (CSB 2) in human mitochondrial DNA can result in transcription termination due to formation of a hybrid G-quadruplex between the nascent RNA and the nontemplate DNA strand. This structure can then influence genome replication, stability and localization. Here we surveyed the frequency of variation in sequence identity and length at CSB 2 amongst human mitochondrial genomes and used in vitro transcription to assess the effects of this length heterogeneity on the activity of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, POLRMT. In general, increased G-tract length correlated with increased termination levels. However, variation in the population favoured CSB 2 sequences which produced efficient termination while particularly weak or strong signals were avoided. For all variants examined, the 3′ end of the transcripts mapped to the same downstream sequences and were prevented from terminating by addition of the transcription factor TEFM. We propose that CSB 2 length heterogeneity allows variation in the efficiency of transcription termination without affecting the position of the products or the capacity for regulation by TEFM. PMID:27436287

  9. Insect small nuclear RNA gene promoters evolve rapidly yet retain conserved features involved in determining promoter activity and RNA polymerase specificity.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Genaro; Valafar, Faramarz; Stumph, William E

    2007-01-01

    In animals, most small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are synthesized by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), but U6 snRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III). In Drosophila melanogaster, the promoters for the Pol II-transcribed snRNA genes consist of approximately 21 bp PSEA and approximately 8 bp PSEB. U6 genes utilize a PSEA but have a TATA box instead of the PSEB. The PSEAs of the two classes of genes bind the same protein complex, DmSNAPc. However, the PSEAs that recruit Pol II and Pol III differ in sequence at a few nucleotide positions that play an important role in determining RNA polymerase specificity. We have now performed a bioinformatic analysis to examine the conservation and divergence of the snRNA gene promoter elements in other species of insects. The 5' half of the PSEA is well-conserved, but the 3' half is divergent. Moreover, within each species positions exist where the PSEAs of the Pol III-transcribed genes differ from those of the Pol II-transcribed genes. Interestingly, the specific positions vary among species. Nevertheless, we speculate that these nucleotide differences within the 3' half of the PSEA act similarly to induce conformational alterations in DNA-bound SNAPc that result in RNA polymerase specificity.

  10. Dioxin receptor and SLUG transcription factors regulate the insulator activity of B1 SINE retrotransposons via an RNA polymerase switch.

    PubMed

    Román, Angel Carlos; González-Rico, Francisco J; Moltó, Eduardo; Hernando, Henar; Neto, Ana; Vicente-Garcia, Cristina; Ballestar, Esteban; Gómez-Skarmeta, José L; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; White, Robert J; Montoliu, Lluís; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro M

    2011-03-01

    Complex genomes utilize insulators and boundary elements to help define spatial and temporal gene expression patterns. We report that a genome-wide B1 SINE (Short Interspersed Nuclear Element) retrotransposon (B1-X35S) has potent intrinsic insulator activity in cultured cells and live animals. This insulation is mediated by binding of the transcription factors dioxin receptor (AHR) and SLUG (SNAI2) to consensus elements present in the SINE. Transcription of B1-X35S is required for insulation. While basal insulator activity is maintained by RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription, AHR-induced insulation involves release of Pol III and engagement of Pol II transcription on the same strand. B1-X35S insulation is also associated with enrichment of heterochromatin marks H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 downstream of B1-X35S, an effect that varies with cell type. B1-X35S binds parylated CTCF and, consistent with a chromatin barrier activity, its positioning between two adjacent genes correlates with their differential expression in mouse tissues. Hence, B1 SINE retrotransposons represent genome-wide insulators activated by transcription factors that respond to developmental, oncogenic, or toxicological stimuli. PMID:21324874

  11. Fibrillarin methylates H2A in RNA polymerase I trans-active promoters in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Loza-Muller, Lloyd; Rodríguez-Corona, Ulises; Sobol, Margarita; Rodríguez-Zapata, Luis C.; Hozak, Pavel; Castano, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillarin is a well conserved methyltransferase involved in several if not all of the more than 100 methylations sites in rRNA which are essential for proper ribosome function. It is mainly localized in the nucleoli and Cajal bodies inside the cell nucleus where it exerts most of its functions. In plants, fibrillarin binds directly the guide RNA together with Nop56, Nop58, and 15.5ka proteins to form a snoRNP complex that selects the sites to be methylated in pre-processing of ribosomal RNA. Recently, the yeast counterpart NOP1 was found to methylate histone H2A in the nucleolar regions. Here we show that plant fibrillarin can also methylate histone H2A. In Brassica floral meristem cells the methylated histone H2A is mainly localized in the nucleolus but unlike yeast or human cells it also localize in the periphery of the nucleus. In specialized transport cells the pattern is altered and it exhibits a more diffuse staining in the nucleus for methylated histone H2A as well as for fibrillarin. Here we also show that plant fibrillarin is capable of interacting with H2A and carry out its methylation in the rDNA promoter. PMID:26594224

  12. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Crithidia oncopelti kinetoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, G.N.; Levchenko, I.V.; Tarasov, I.A.; Kuz'min, E.V.

    1986-03-10

    Mitochondrial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was isolated from Crithidia oncopelti kinetoplasts, and its properties were studied. RNA polymerase was solubilized from the structures with 2% digitonin in 0.25 M KCl. The enzyme was purified 550-fold according to activity by gel filtration through Sephadex 4B, followed by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose 4B, phosphocellulose, and DEAE-Sephadex A-50. The optimum conditions of the RNA polymerase reaction (time of incubation, temperature, Mg/sup 2 +/, K/sup +/ concentrations, etc) were determined. It was established that the activity of the enzyme is not inhibited by ..cap alpha..-amanitin, rifampicin, and streptolidigin, but is strongly suppressed by Mn/sup 2 +/ ions, a high KCl concentrations, as well as ethidium bromide. The RNA polymerase isolated transcribes denatured DNA substantially better than the native form. The enzyme utilizes mtDNA (in hybrid plasmids) as a substrate appreciably more actively than the nuclear form. Among the substrates used, the greatest template activity is possessed by single-stranded poly(dAT). In all the properties studied, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from C. oncopelti kinetoplasts is similar to the mitochondrial enzymes of other eukaryotes but differs from the nuclear enzymes of this organism and from bacterial RNA polymerases.

  13. Pdx-1 links histone H3-Lys-4 methylation to RNA polymerase II elongation during activation of insulin transcription.

    PubMed

    Francis, Joshua; Chakrabarti, Swarup K; Garmey, James C; Mirmira, Raghavendra G

    2005-10-28

    Expression of the insulin gene is nearly exclusive to the beta cells of the pancreatic islets. Although the sequence-specific transcription factors that regulate insulin expression have been well studied, the interrelationship between these factors, chromatin structure, and transcriptional elongation by RNA polymerase II (pol II) has remained undefined. In this regard, recent studies have begun to establish a role for the methylation of histone H3 in the initiation or elongation of transcription by pol II. To determine a role for the transcriptional activator Pdx-1 in the maintenance of chromatin structure and pol II recruitment at the insulin gene, we performed small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Pdx-1 in betaTC3 cells and subsequently studied histone modifications and pol II recruitment by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We demonstrated here that the 50% fall in insulin transcription following knockdown of Pdx-1 is accompanied by a 60% fall in dimethylated histone H3-Lys-4 at the insulin promoter. H3-Lys-4 methylation at the insulin promoter may be mediated, at least partially, by the methyltransferase Set9. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Set9 is expressed in an islet-enriched pattern in the pancreas, similar to the pattern of Pdx-1 expression. The recruitment of Set9 to the insulin gene appears to be a consequence of its direct interaction with Pdx-1, and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Set9 attenuates insulin transcription. Pdx-1 knockdown was also associated with an overall shift in the recruitment of pol II isoforms to the insulin gene, from an elongation isoform (Ser(P)-2) to an initiation isoform (Ser(P)-5). Our findings therefore suggest a model whereby Pdx-1 plays a novel role in linking H3-Lys-4 dimethylation and pol II elongation to insulin transcription.

  14. RNA polymerase and the regulation of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikoff, W.S.; Gross, C.A.; Burgess, R.R.; Record, M.T.; Dahlberg, J.E.; Wickens, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: RNA Polymerases; Transcription Initiation - Bacterial; Regulation of Bacterial Transcription Initiation; Stable RNA Synthesis in Eukaryotes: Chromatin Structure; Promoters; Enhancers; and the Global Control of Eukaryotic Transcription; Specific Eukaryotic Transcription Factors; Termination of Transcription; and Short Communications.

  15. RNA Polymerases of Maize. Purification and Molecular Structure of DNA-dependent RNA Polymerase II*

    PubMed Central

    Mullinix, Kathleen P.; Strain, Gustave C.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1973-01-01

    Nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II has been purified from leaves of Zea mays by a new procedure that improves enzyme stability and thus permits more manipulation during purification. The purification procedure includes a heating step, gel filtration on Sepharose 6B and 4B, and chromatography on DEAE- and DNA-celluloses. This method of purification yields an enzyme that exhibits maximal activity when denatured DNA is used as a template. Electrophoresis of highly purified enzyme on polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate indicates that maize RNA polymerase IIa is composed of several polypeptide subunits. The most highly purified preparations contain polypeptides with molecular weights of 200,000, 160,000, 35,000, 25,000, 20,000, and 17,000. Images PMID:4525172

  16. Inhibitory effect of modified 5'-capped short RNA fragments on influenza virus RNA polymerase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tado, M; Abe, T; Hatta, T; Ishikawa, M; Nakada, S; Yokota, T; Takaku, H

    2001-11-01

    We have shown previously that the 5'-capped short phosphodiester RNA fragments, Cap decoy, (Gm 12 nt) are potent inhibitors of influenza virus RNA polymerase gene expression. Here we investigate the modified capped RNA derivative containing phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (Cap decoy) as a potential influenza virus RNA polymerase inhibitor. The modified 5'-capped short phosphorothioate RNA fragments (Gms 12-15 nt) with the 5'-capped structure (m7GpppGm) were synthesized by T7 RNA polymerase. The 5'-capped short RNA fragments (Gms 12-15 nt) were encapsulated in liposome particulates and tested for their inhibitory effects on influenza virus RNA polymerase gene expression in the clone 76 cells. The 12-15 nt long Gms RNA fragments showed highly inhibitory effects. By contrast, the inhibitory effects of the 13 nt long short RNA fragments (Gm 13 nt) were considerably less in comparison with the 5'-capped short phosphorothioate RNA fragments (Gms 12-15 nt). In particular, the various Gms RNA chain lengths showed no significant differences in the inhibition of influenza virus RNA polymerase gene expression. Furthermore, the capped RNA with a phosphorothioate backbone was resistant to nuclease activity. These phosphorothioate RNA fragments exhibited higher inhibitory activity than the 5'-capped short RNA fragments (Gm 12 nt). These decoys may prove to be useful in anti-influenza virus therapeutics. PMID:12018680

  17. Euglena gracilis DNA dependent RNA polymerase II: a zinc metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Falchuk, K H; Mazus, B; Ulpino, L; Vallee, B L

    1976-10-01

    Zinc is essential for cellular proliferation. Zinc deficiency of Euglena gracilis results in arrest of cell division and deranges nucleic acid and protein metabolism pointing to a decisive role of zinc in transcription and translation. We have, therefore, investigated the role of zinc in the function of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of this organism. Two RNA polymerases from zinc sufficient organisms were purified first by affinity chromatography on a DNA cellulose column and subsequently separated on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephadex A-25. The two fractions were characterized as polymerase I and II by their elution pattern from DEAE-Sephadex and sensitivity to alpha-amanitin. RNA polymerase II has a provisional molecular weight of 700 000 and contains an average of 2.2 g=atoms of zinc per mol of enzyme, but not Mn, Cu, or Fe, as measured by microwave emission spectroscopy. Chelating agents, such as 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid, and lomofungin, inhibit activity. In contrast, the nonchelating analogues, 1,7-and 4,7-phenanthroline, do not affect activity. Inhibition by 1,10-phenanthroline is instantaneous and fully reversible by dilution. 1,10-Phenanthroline also inhibits RNA polymerase I, suggesting a role of zinc in its function. The demonstration that RNA polymerase II is a zinc enzyme indicates the involvement of zinc in eukaryotic RNA synthesis and serves as a further basis for the definition of the role of this element in eukaryotic cell growth, division, and differentiation.

  18. Transcription initiation complexes and upstream activation with RNA polymerase II lacking the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Buratowski, S; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II assembles with other factors on the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter to generate pairs of transcription initiation complexes resolvable by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. The pairing of the complexes is caused by the presence or absence of the C-terminal domain of the largest subunit. This domain is not required for transcription stimulation by the major late transcription factor in vitro. Images PMID:2398901

  19. [RNA polymerase as a molecular machine].

    PubMed

    Spirin, A S

    2002-01-01

    Structure and function of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is considered in terms of a conveying molecular machine. The use of mechanical energy and mechanical devices, such as "power-stroke motor", is supposed unlikely in the conveying function of RNA polymerase, as well as other molecular machines. Brownian motion and thermal mobility of macromolecules and their parts are postulated as the only motive impulse at the molecular level. Binding of substrates and subsequent chemical reaction as the energy input may provide successive selection and fixation of alternative conformational states of the enzyme complex thus providing the directionality of the conveyance ("Brownian ratchet mechanism"). The following sequence of events "substrate binding--fixation of a certain conformational state--chemical reaction--fixation of an alternative conformational state--translocation (dissociation and downstream reassociation) of product-template duplex" is proposed as the principal scheme of the forward movement of RNA polymerase along DNA template.

  20. Relationships Between RNA Polymerase II Activity and Spt Elongation Factors to Spt- Phenotype and Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ping; Jin, Huiyan; Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Kaplan, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between adjacent transcription units can result in transcription-dependent alterations in chromatin structure or recruitment of factors that determine transcription outcomes, including the generation of intragenic or other cryptic transcripts derived from cryptic promoters. Mutations in a number of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confer both cryptic intragenic transcription and the Suppressor of Ty (Spt-) phenotype for the lys2-128∂ allele of the LYS2 gene. Mutants that suppress lys2-128∂ allow transcription from a normally inactive Ty1 ∂ promoter, conferring a LYS+ phenotype. The arrangement of transcription units at lys2-128∂ is reminiscent of genes containing cryptic promoters within their open reading frames. We set out to examine the relationship between RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) activity, functions of Spt elongation factors, and cryptic transcription because of the previous observation that increased-activity Pol II alleles confer an Spt- phenotype. We identify both cooperating and antagonistic genetic interactions between Pol II alleles and alleles of elongation factors SPT4, SPT5, and SPT6. We find that cryptic transcription at FLO8 and STE11 is distinct from that at lys2-128∂, though all show sensitivity to reduction in Pol II activity, especially the expression of lys2-128∂ found in Spt- mutants. We determine that the lys2-128∂ Spt- phenotypes for spt6-1004 and increased activity rpo21/rpb1 alleles each require transcription from the LYS2 promoter. Furthermore, we identify the Ty1 transcription start site (TSS) within the ∂ element as the position of Spt- transcription in tested Spt- mutants. PMID:27261007

  1. Relationships Between RNA Polymerase II Activity and Spt Elongation Factors to Spt- Phenotype and Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ping; Jin, Huiyan; Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-09

    The interplay between adjacent transcription units can result in transcription-dependent alterations in chromatin structure or recruitment of factors that determine transcription outcomes, including the generation of intragenic or other cryptic transcripts derived from cryptic promoters. Mutations in a number of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confer both cryptic intragenic transcription and the Suppressor of Ty (Spt(-)) phenotype for the lys2-128∂ allele of the LYS2 gene. Mutants that suppress lys2-128∂ allow transcription from a normally inactive Ty1 ∂ promoter, conferring a LYS(+) phenotype. The arrangement of transcription units at lys2-128∂ is reminiscent of genes containing cryptic promoters within their open reading frames. We set out to examine the relationship between RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) activity, functions of Spt elongation factors, and cryptic transcription because of the previous observation that increased-activity Pol II alleles confer an Spt(-) phenotype. We identify both cooperating and antagonistic genetic interactions between Pol II alleles and alleles of elongation factors SPT4, SPT5, and SPT6 We find that cryptic transcription at FLO8 and STE11 is distinct from that at lys2-128∂, though all show sensitivity to reduction in Pol II activity, especially the expression of lys2-128∂ found in Spt(-) mutants. We determine that the lys2-128∂ Spt(-) phenotypes for spt6-1004 and increased activity rpo21/rpb1 alleles each require transcription from the LYS2 promoter. Furthermore, we identify the Ty1 transcription start site (TSS) within the ∂ element as the position of Spt(-) transcription in tested Spt(-) mutants.

  2. Purification of bacterial RNA polymerase: tools and protocols

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial RNA polymerase is the first point of gene expression and a validated target for antibiotics. Studied for several decades, the Escherichia coli transcriptional apparatus is by far the best characterized, with numerous RNA polymerase mutants and auxiliary factors isolated and analyzed in great detail. Since the E. coli enzyme was refractory to crystallization, structural studies have been focused on Thermus RNA polymerase s, revealing atomic details of the catalytic center and RNA polymerase interactions with nucleic acids, antibiotics, and regulatory proteins. However, numerous differences between these enzymes, including resistance of Thermus RNA polymerases to some antibiotics, underscored the importance of the E. coli enzyme structures. Three groups published the se long awaited structures in 2013, enabling functional and structural studies of the same model system. This progress was made possible, in large part, by the use of multicistronic vectors for expression of the E. coli enzyme in large quantities and in a highly active form. Here we describe the commonly used vectors and procedures for purification of the E. coli RNA polymerase. PMID:25665556

  3. Testing promoter activity in the trypanosome genome: isolation of a metacyclic-type VSG promoter, and unexpected insights into RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, M; Graham, S; Hartmann, C; Clayton, C

    1998-09-01

    In trypanosomes, most genes are arranged in polycistronic transcription units. Individual mRNAs are generated by 5'-trans splicing and 3' polyadenylation. Remarkably, no regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription has been detected although many RNAs are differentially expressed during kinetoplastid life cycles. Demonstration of specific class II promoters is complicated by the difficulty in distinguishing between genuine promoter activity and stimulation of trans splicing. Using vectors that were designed to allow the detection of low promoter activities in a transcriptionally silent chromosomal context, we isolated a novel trypanosome RNA polymerase I promoter. We were however unable to detect class II promoter activity in any tested DNA fragment. We also integrated genes which were preceded by a T3 promoter into the genome of cells expressing bacteriophage T3 polymerase: surprisingly, transcription was alpha-amanitin sensitive. One possible interpretation of these results is that in trypanosomes, RNA polymerase II initiation is favored by genomic accessibility and double-strand melting. PMID:9709032

  4. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  5. Unusual interaction of RNA polymerase with the bacteriophage Mu middle promoter Pm in the absence of its activator protein Mor

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yongkai; Howe, Martha M

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage Mu Mor activator protein is absolutely required for transcription from the Mu middle promoter Pm. However, when RNA polymerase (RNAP) was incubated with Pm DNA in the absence of Mor, a band at promoter position −51 was hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, demonstrating an interaction of RNAP with the promoter DNA. The hypersensitivity was similar at four different lengths of Pm DNA assayed from −62 to +10, −62 to +46, −96 to +10, and −96 to +46. The hypersensitivity occurred equally well at 5°C, 15°C, and 30°C, indicating that it did not require open complex formation, which only occurred at 30°C. The −51 hypersensitivity at 5°C and 15°C was eliminated by the addition of heparin, consistent with the possibility that it arose by formation of unstable closed complexes of RNAP bound to Pm DNA. Generation of the hypersensitive band required the complete RNAP with its αCTDs, but neither the αCTD nor intact α were sufficient for the interaction and resulting hypersensitivity. There was no correlation between the level of hypersensitivity observed in vitro and the level of Pm activity in vivo, as assayed by the Mor-dependent production of β-galactosidase from a Pm-lacZ fusion. In an “order of addition” experiment, preincubation of Pm DNA with Mor followed by addition of RNAP led to the fastest open complex formation, whereas preincubation of Pm DNA with RNAP gave the slowest. These results support the conclusion that Mor recruits RNAP to Pm rather than reposition a prebound RNAP, as occurs for C-dependent repositioning of RNAP at the Mu late promoter Pmom. PMID:24916637

  6. Evolutionary connection between the catalytic subunits of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases and eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and the origin of RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    . In addition to the β' subunit, β subunit of DDRP also contains a DPBB domain, which is, however, distorted by large inserts and does not harbor a counterpart of the DbDGD motif. The DPBB domains of the two DDRP subunits together form the catalytic cleft, with the domain from the β' subunit supplying the metal-coordinating DbDGD motif and the one from the β subunit providing two lysine residues involved in catalysis. Given that the two DPBB domains of DDRP contribute completely different sets of active residues to the catalytic center, it is hypothesized that the ultimate ancestor of RNA polymerases functioned as a homodimer of a generic, RNA-binding DPBB domain. This ancestral protein probably did not have catalytic activity and served as a cofactor for a ribozyme RNA polymerase. Subsequent evolution of DDRP and RDRP involved accretion of distinct sets of additional domains. In the DDRPs, these included a RNA-binding Zn-ribbon, an AT-hook-like module and a sandwich-barrel hybrid motif (SBHM) domain. Further, lineage-specific accretion of SBHM domains and other, DDRP-specific domains is observed in bacterial DDRPs. In contrast, the orthologs of the β' subunit in archaea and eukaryotes contains a four-stranded α + β domain that is shared with the α-subunit of bacterial DDRP, eukaryotic DDRP subunit RBP11, translation factor eIF1 and type II topoisomerases. The additional domains of the RDRPs remain to be characterized. Conclusions Eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases share the catalytic double-psi β-barrel domain, containing a signature metal-coordinating motif, with the universally conserved β' subunit of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Beyond this core catalytic domain, the two classes of RNA polymerases do not have common domains, suggesting early divergence from a common ancestor, with subsequent independent domain accretion. The β-subunit of DDRP contains another, highly diverged DPBB domain. The presence of two distinct DPBB domains in two subunits

  7. A movie of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2012-06-22

    We provide here a molecular movie that captures key aspects of RNA polymerase II initiation and elongation. To create the movie, we combined structural snapshots of the initiation-elongation transition and of elongation, including nucleotide addition, translocation, pausing, proofreading, backtracking, arrest, reactivation, and inhibition. The movie reveals open questions about the mechanism of transcription and provides a useful teaching tool.

  8. Nucleolin Is Required for RNA Polymerase I Transcription In Vivo▿

    PubMed Central

    Rickards, Brenden; Flint, S. J.; Cole, Michael D.; LeRoy, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged with histones and accessory proteins in the form of chromatin. RNA polymerases and their accessory proteins are sufficient for transcription of naked DNA, but not of chromatin, templates in vitro. In this study, we purified and identified nucleolin as a protein that allows RNA polymerase II to transcribe nucleosomal templates in vitro. As immunofluorescence confirmed that nucleolin localizes primarily to nucleoli with RNA polymerase I, we demonstrated that nucleolin allows RNA polymerase I transcription of chromatin templates in vitro. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments established that nucleolin is associated with chromatin containing rRNA genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I but not with genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II or III. Knockdown of nucleolin by RNA interference resulted in specific inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription. We therefore propose that an important function of nucleolin is to permit RNA polymerase I to transcribe nucleolar chromatin. PMID:17130237

  9. AfsR recruits RNA polymerase to the afsS promoter: a model for transcriptional activation by SARPs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Takano, Yuji; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2007-06-01

    AfsR, a protein belonging to the Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family, is a global regulator of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). AfsR consists of three major functional domains: an N-terminal SARP domain, a central ATPase domain, and a C-terminal tetratrico peptide repeat (TPR) domain. Two truncated AfsR proteins, AfsRDeltaTPR containing the SARP and ATPase domains and AfsRDeltaC containing only the SARP domain, exhibited the same DNA-binding specificity as that of full-length AfsR. Two monomers bound cooperatively to a direct repeat located eight nucleotides 5' to the -10 element of the afsS promoter. Both truncated AfsR proteins, as well as full-length AfsR, were able to form ternary complexes with the afsS promoter and RNA polymerase (RNAP), although RNAP alone could not bind to the DNA. The DNA-(AfsRDeltaC)(2)-RNAP complex was capable of initiating afsS transcription in vitro, indicating that the ATPase and TPR domains are dispensable for the basic function of AfsR as a transcriptional activator. However, the ATPase domain was required to fully compensate for the defect in actinorhodin production in an afsR-disrupted mutant, suggesting that the ATPase domain exerts a regulatory function on the basic SARP domain. Deletion or addition of even a single nucleotide between the AfsR-binding site and the -10 element of the afsS promoter abolished afsS transcription both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that the recruitment of RNAP by AfsR to the correct location relative to the -10 element is critical for transcriptional activation. Since SARP-binding sites with similar direct repeats are located at the same position relative to the -10 element of their target promoters as is the afsS binding site, the SARP family members presumably activate transcription of their targets by recruiting RNAP to the promoter, where a ternary DNA-SARP-RNAP complex competent for transcriptional initiation is formed.

  10. RNA Polymerase Pausing during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Diego; Bauer, David L V; Fernandez, Laurent; Evans, Geraint; Robb, Nicole; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Tomescu, Alexandra; Zawadzki, Pawel; Morichaud, Zakia; Brodolin, Konstantin; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2016-09-15

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP) initiates transcription by synthesizing short transcripts that are either released or extended to allow RNAP to escape from the promoter. The mechanism of initial transcription is unclear due to the presence of transient intermediates and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we studied initial transcription on a lac promoter using single-molecule fluorescence observations of DNA scrunching on immobilized transcription complexes. Our work revealed a long pause ("initiation pause," ∼20 s) after synthesis of a 6-mer RNA; such pauses can serve as regulatory checkpoints. Region sigma 3.2, which contains a loop blocking the RNA exit channel, was a major pausing determinant. We also obtained evidence for RNA backtracking during abortive initial transcription and for additional pausing prior to escape. We summarized our work in a model for initial transcription, in which pausing is controlled by a complex set of determinants that modulate the transition from a 6- to a 7-nt RNA. PMID:27618490

  11. RNA Polymerase Pausing during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Diego; Bauer, David L V; Fernandez, Laurent; Evans, Geraint; Robb, Nicole; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Tomescu, Alexandra; Zawadzki, Pawel; Morichaud, Zakia; Brodolin, Konstantin; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2016-09-15

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP) initiates transcription by synthesizing short transcripts that are either released or extended to allow RNAP to escape from the promoter. The mechanism of initial transcription is unclear due to the presence of transient intermediates and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we studied initial transcription on a lac promoter using single-molecule fluorescence observations of DNA scrunching on immobilized transcription complexes. Our work revealed a long pause ("initiation pause," ∼20 s) after synthesis of a 6-mer RNA; such pauses can serve as regulatory checkpoints. Region sigma 3.2, which contains a loop blocking the RNA exit channel, was a major pausing determinant. We also obtained evidence for RNA backtracking during abortive initial transcription and for additional pausing prior to escape. We summarized our work in a model for initial transcription, in which pausing is controlled by a complex set of determinants that modulate the transition from a 6- to a 7-nt RNA.

  12. Eucaryotic RNA polymerase conditional mutant that rapidly ceases mRNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nonet, M; Scafe, C; Sexton, J; Young, R

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated a yeast conditional mutant which rapidly ceases synthesis of mRNA when subjected to the nonpermissive temperature. This mutant (rpb1-1) was constructed by replacing the wild-type chromosomal copy of the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II with one mutagenized in vitro. The rapid cessation of mRNA synthesis in vivo and the lack of RNA polymerase II activity in crude extracts indicate that the mutant possesses a functionally defective, rather than an assembly-defective, RNA polymerase II. The shutdown in mRNA synthesis in the rpb1-1 mutant has pleiotropic effects on the synthesis of other RNAs and on the heat shock response. This mutant provides direct evidence that the RPB1 protein has a functional role in mRNA synthesis. Images PMID:3299050

  13. Direct Characterization of Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Ucuncuoglu, Suleyman; Engel, Krysta L.; Purohit, Prashant K.; Dunlap, David D.; Schneider, David A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes ribosomal DNA and is responsible for more than 60% of transcription in a growing cell. Despite this fundamental role that directly impacts cell growth and proliferation, the kinetics of transcription by Pol I are poorly understood. This study provides direct characterization of S. Cerevisiae Pol I transcription elongation using tethered particle microscopy (TPM). Pol I was shown to elongate at an average rate of approximately 20 nt/s. However, the maximum speed observed was, in average, about 60 nt/s, comparable to the rate calculated based on the in vivo number of active genes, the cell division rate and the number of engaged polymerases observed in EM images. Addition of RNA endonucleases to the TPM elongation assays enhanced processivity. Together, these data suggest that additional transcription factors contribute to efficient and processive transcription elongation by RNA polymerase I in vivo. PMID:27455049

  14. Direct Characterization of Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Ucuncuoglu, Suleyman; Engel, Krysta L; Purohit, Prashant K; Dunlap, David D; Schneider, David A; Finzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes ribosomal DNA and is responsible for more than 60% of transcription in a growing cell. Despite this fundamental role that directly impacts cell growth and proliferation, the kinetics of transcription by Pol I are poorly understood. This study provides direct characterization of S. Cerevisiae Pol I transcription elongation using tethered particle microscopy (TPM). Pol I was shown to elongate at an average rate of approximately 20 nt/s. However, the maximum speed observed was, in average, about 60 nt/s, comparable to the rate calculated based on the in vivo number of active genes, the cell division rate and the number of engaged polymerases observed in EM images. Addition of RNA endonucleases to the TPM elongation assays enhanced processivity. Together, these data suggest that additional transcription factors contribute to efficient and processive transcription elongation by RNA polymerase I in vivo. PMID:27455049

  15. Effects of Transcription Elongation Rate and Xrn2 Exonuclease Activity on RNA Polymerase II Termination Suggest Widespread Kinetic Competition.

    PubMed

    Fong, Nova; Brannan, Kristopher; Erickson, Benjamin; Kim, Hyunmin; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Nguyen, Tram; Karp, Shai; Bentley, David L

    2015-10-15

    The torpedo model of transcription termination asserts that the exonuclease Xrn2 attacks the 5'PO4-end exposed by nascent RNA cleavage and chases down the RNA polymerase. We tested this mechanism using a dominant-negative human Xrn2 mutant and found that it delayed termination genome-wide. Xrn2 nuclease inactivation caused strong termination defects downstream of most poly(A) sites and modest delays at some histone and U snRNA genes, suggesting that the torpedo mechanism is not limited to poly(A) site-dependent termination. A central untested feature of the torpedo model is that there is kinetic competition between the exonuclease and the pol II elongation complex. Using pol II rate mutants, we found that slow transcription robustly shifts termination upstream, and fast elongation extends the zone of termination further downstream. These results suggest that kinetic competition between elongating pol II and the Xrn2 exonuclease is integral to termination of transcription on most human genes. PMID:26474067

  16. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1997-12-02

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  17. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.; Moffatt, B.A.; Dunn, J.J.

    1997-12-02

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells. 10 figs.

  18. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.; Moffatt, B.A.; Dunn, J.J.

    1999-02-09

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells. 10 figs.

  19. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1999-02-09

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the R7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  20. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Davanloo, Parichehre; Rosenberg, Alan H.; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Dunn, John J.

    1990-01-01

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the T7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties. T7 RNA polymerase is also used in a system for selective, high-level synthesis of RNAs and proteins in suitable host cells.

  1. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Influenza Virus RNA Polymerase-Genomic RNA Complex ▿

    PubMed Central

    Resa-Infante, Patricia; Recuero-Checa, María Ángeles; Zamarreño, Noelia; Llorca, Óscar; Ortín, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The replication and transcription of influenza A virus are carried out by ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) containing each genomic RNA segment associated with nucleoprotein monomers and the heterotrimeric polymerase complex. These RNPs are responsible for virus transcription and replication in the infected cell nucleus. Here we have expressed, purified, and analyzed, structurally and functionally, for the first time, polymerase-RNA template complexes obtained after replication in vivo. These complexes were generated by the cotransfection of plasmids expressing the polymerase subunits and a genomic plasmid expressing a minimal template of positive or negative polarity. Their generation in vivo was strictly dependent on the polymerase activity; they contained mainly negative-polarity viral RNA (vRNA) and could transcribe and replicate in vitro. The three-dimensional structure of the monomeric polymerase-vRNA complexes was similar to that of the RNP-associated polymerase and distinct from that of the polymerase devoid of template. These results suggest that the interaction with the template is sufficient to induce a significant conformation switch in the polymerase complex. PMID:20702645

  2. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-11-03

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  3. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Dubendorff, J.W.

    1998-10-20

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods. 12 figs.

  4. Cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7-like bacteriophages

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Dubendorff, John W.

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to the cloning and expression of autogenes encoding RNA polymerases of T7 and T7-like bacteriophages, in which the RNA polymerase gene is transcribed from a promoter which is recognized by the encoded RNA polymerase. Cloning of T7 autogenes was achieved by reducing the activity of the RNA polymerase sufficiently to permit host cell growth. T7 RNA polymerase activity was controlled by combining two independent methods: lac-repression of the recombinant lac operator-T7 promoter in the autogene and inhibition of the polymerase by T7 lysozyme. Expression systems for producing the RNA polymerases of T7 and other T7-like bacteriophages, and expression systems for producing selected gene products are described, as well as other related materials and methods.

  5. The RNA polymerase II CTD coordinates transcription and RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hsin, Jing-Ping; Manley, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit consists of multiple heptad repeats (consensus Tyr1–Ser2–Pro3–Thr4–Ser5–Pro6–Ser7), varying in number from 26 in yeast to 52 in vertebrates. The CTD functions to help couple transcription and processing of the nascent RNA and also plays roles in transcription elongation and termination. The CTD is subject to extensive post-translational modification, most notably phosphorylation, during the transcription cycle, which modulates its activities in the above processes. Therefore, understanding the nature of CTD modifications, including how they function and how they are regulated, is essential to understanding the mechanisms that control gene expression. While the significance of phosphorylation of Ser2 and Ser5 residues has been studied and appreciated for some time, several additional modifications have more recently been added to the CTD repertoire, and insight into their function has begun to emerge. Here, we review findings regarding modification and function of the CTD, highlighting the important role this unique domain plays in coordinating gene activity. PMID:23028141

  6. Temporal ChIP-on-Chip of RNA-Polymerase-II to detect novel gene activation events during photoreceptor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Padmaja; Mali, Raghuveer S.; Guzman, Eduardo; Zhang, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose During retinal development, post-mitotic neural progenitor cells must activate thousands of genes to complete synaptogenesis and terminal maturation. While many of these genes are known, others remain beyond the sensitivity of expression microarray analysis. Some of these elusive gene activation events can be detected by mapping changes in RNA polymerase-II (Pol-II) association around transcription start sites. Methods High-resolution (35 bp) chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip was used to map changes in Pol-II binding surrounding 26,000 gene transcription start sites during photoreceptor maturation of the mouse neural retina, comparing postnatal age 25 (P25) to P2. Coverage was 10–12 kb per transcription start site, including 2.5 kb downstream. Pol-II-active regions were mapped to the mouse genomic DNA sequence by using computational methods (Tiling Analysis Software-TAS program), and the ratio of maximum Pol-II binding (P25/P2) was calculated for each gene. A validation set of 36 genes (3%), representing a full range of Pol-II signal ratios (P25/P2), were examined with quantitative ChIP assays for transcriptionally active Pol-II. Gene expression assays were also performed for 19 genes of the validation set, again on independent samples. FLT-3 Interacting Zinc-finger-1 (FIZ1), a zinc-finger protein that associates with active promoter complexes of photoreceptor-specific genes, provided an additional ChIP marker to highlight genes activated in the mature neural retina. To demonstrate the use of ChIP-on-chip predictions to find novel gene activation events, four additional genes were selected for quantitative PCR analysis (qRT–PCR analysis); these four genes have human homologs located in unidentified retinal disease regions: Solute carrier family 25 member 33 (Slc25a33), Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (Lpcat1), Coiled-coil domain-containing 126 (Ccdc126), and ADP-ribosylation factor-like 4D (Arl4d). Results ChIP-on-chip Pol-II peak

  7. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Esyunina, D M; Kulbachinskiy, A V

    2015-10-01

    The radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most interesting models for studies of cell stress resistance. Analysis of the mechanisms of gene expression in D. radiodurans revealed some specific features of the transcription apparatus that might play a role in cell resistance to DNA-damaging conditions. In particular, RNA polymerase from D. radiodurans forms unstable promoter complexes and during transcription elongation has a much higher rate of RNA cleavage than RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli. Analysis of the structure and functions of D. radiodurans RNA polymerase is complicated due to the absence of convenient genetic systems for making mutations in the RNA polymerase genes and difficulties with enzyme purification. In this work, we developed a system for expression of D. radiodurans RNA polymerase in E. coli cells. We obtained an expression vector encoding all core RNA polymerase subunits and defined optimal conditions for the expression and purification of the RNA polymerase. It was found that D. radiodurans RNA polymerase has much higher rates of RNA cleavage than E. coli RNA polymerase under a wide range of conditions, including variations in the concentration of catalytic magnesium ions and pH values of the reaction buffer. The expression system can be used for further studies of the RNA cleavage reaction and the mechanisms of transcription regulation in D. radiodurans, including analysis of mutant RNA polymerase variants.

  8. E sub 1 BF is an essential RNA polymerase I transcription factor with an intrinsic protein kinase activity that can modulate rRNA gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhang; Huifeng Niu; Jacob, S.T. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors previously described the purification and characterization of E{sub 1}BF, a rat rRNA gene core promoter-binding factor that consists of two polypeptides of 89 and 79 kDa. When this factor was incubated in the absence of any exogenous protein kinase under conditions optimal for protein phosphorylation, the 79-kDa polypeptide of E{sub 1}BF was selectively phosphorylated. The labeled phosphate could be removed from the E{sub 1}BF polypeptide by treatment with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase or potato acid phosphatase. Elution of the protein from the E{sub 1}BF-promoter complex formed in an electrophoretic mobility-shift assay followed by incubation of the concentrated eluent with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the selective labeling o the 79-kDa band. The E{sub 1}BF-associated protein kinase did not phosphorylate casein or histone H1. These data demonstrate that (1) polymerase I promoter-binding factor E{sub 1}BF contains an intrinsic substrate-specific protein kinase and (2) E{sub 1}BF is an essential polymerase I transcription factor that can modulate rRNA gene transcription by protein phosphorylation. Further, these studies have provided a direct means to identify a protein kinase or any other enzyme that can interact with a specific DNA sequence.

  9. Discovery of an essential nucleotidylating activity associated with a newly delineated conserved domain in the RNA polymerase-containing protein of all nidoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Kathleen C.; Gulyaeva, Anastasia; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Janssen, George M. C.; Ruben, Mark; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Samborskiy, Dmitry V.; Kravchenko, Alexander A.; Leontovich, Andrey M.; Sidorov, Igor A.; Snijder, Eric J.; Posthuma, Clara C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that catalyzes the synthesis of their RNA(s). In the case of positive-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the order Nidovirales, the RdRp resides in a replicase subunit that is unusually large. Bioinformatics analysis of this non-structural protein has now revealed a nidoviral signature domain (genetic marker) that is N-terminally adjacent to the RdRp and has no apparent homologs elsewhere. Based on its conservation profile, this domain is proposed to have nucleotidylation activity. We used recombinant non-structural protein 9 of the arterivirus equine arteritis virus (EAV) and different biochemical assays, including irreversible labeling with a GTP analog followed by a proteomics analysis, to demonstrate the manganese-dependent covalent binding of guanosine and uridine phosphates to a lysine/histidine residue. Most likely this was the invariant lysine of the newly identified domain, named nidovirus RdRp-associated nucleotidyltransferase (NiRAN), whose substitution with alanine severely diminished the described binding. Furthermore, this mutation crippled EAV and prevented the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in cell culture, indicating that NiRAN is essential for nidoviruses. Potential functions supported by NiRAN may include nucleic acid ligation, mRNA capping and protein-primed RNA synthesis, possibilities that remain to be explored in future studies. PMID:26304538

  10. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of RNA Polymerase II Levels in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dalley, B. K.; Rogalski, T. M.; Tullis, G. E.; Riddle, D. L.; Golomb, M.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of RNA polymerase II levels in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have constructed nematode strains having one, two, or three copies of ama-1, the gene for the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II polypeptides and solubilized enzyme activity are invariant with gene dosage, indicating regulatory compensation. However, steady-state levels of ama-1 mRNA are directly proportional to gene dosage. These results imply that RNA polymerase II levels in C. elegans are regulated post-transcriptionally. PMID:8436272

  11. RNA polymerase molecular beacon as tool for studies of RNA polymerase-promoter interactions.

    PubMed

    Mekler, Vladimir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2015-09-15

    The molecular details of formation of transcription initiation complex upon the interaction of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) with promoters are not completely understood. One way to address this problem is to understand how RNAP interacts with different parts of promoter DNA. A recently developed fluorometric RNAP molecular beacon assay allows one to monitor the RNAP interactions with various unlabeled DNA probes and quantitatively characterize partial RNAP-promoter interactions. This paper focuses on methodological aspects of application of this powerful assay to study the mechanism of transcription initiation complex formation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase σ(70) holoenzyme and its regulation by bacterial and phage encoded factors.

  12. RNA polymerase molecular beacon as tool for studies of RNA polymerase - promoter interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mekler, Vladimir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    The molecular details of formation of transcription initiation complex upon the interaction of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) with promoters are not completely understood. One way to address this problem is to understand how RNAP interacts with different parts of promoter DNA. A recently developed fluorometric RNAP molecular beacon assay allows one to monitor the RNAP interactions with various unlabeled DNA probes and quantitatively characterize partial RNAP-promoter interactions. This paper focuses on methodological aspects of application of this powerful assay to study the mechanism of transcription initiation complex formation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase σ70 holoenzyme and its regulation by bacterial and phage encoded factors. PMID:25956222

  13. Domain movements of the enhancer-dependent sigma factor drive DNA delivery into the RNA polymerase active site: insights from single molecule studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Leach, Robert N; Gell, Christopher; Zhang, Nan; Burrows, Patricia C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Smith, David Alastair; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin; Stockley, Peter G; Tuma, Roman

    2014-04-01

    Recognition of bacterial promoters is regulated by two distinct classes of sequence-specific sigma factors, σ(70) or σ(54), that differ both in their primary sequence and in the requirement of the latter for activation via enhancer-bound upstream activators. The σ(54) version controls gene expression in response to stress, often mediating pathogenicity. Its activator proteins are members of the AAA+ superfamily and use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to remodel initially auto-inhibited holoenzyme promoter complexes. We have mapped this remodeling using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Initial remodeling is nucleotide-independent and driven by binding both ssDNA during promoter melting and activator. However, DNA loading into the RNA polymerase active site depends on co-operative ATP hydrolysis by the activator. Although the coupled promoter recognition and melting steps may be conserved between σ(70) and σ(54), the domain movements of the latter have evolved to require an activator ATPase. PMID:24553251

  14. Domain movements of the enhancer-dependent sigma factor drive DNA delivery into the RNA polymerase active site: insights from single molecule studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Leach, Robert N.; Gell, Christopher; Zhang, Nan; Burrows, Patricia C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Smith, David Alastair; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin; Stockley, Peter G.; Tuma, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of bacterial promoters is regulated by two distinct classes of sequence-specific sigma factors, σ70 or σ54, that differ both in their primary sequence and in the requirement of the latter for activation via enhancer-bound upstream activators. The σ54 version controls gene expression in response to stress, often mediating pathogenicity. Its activator proteins are members of the AAA+ superfamily and use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to remodel initially auto-inhibited holoenzyme promoter complexes. We have mapped this remodeling using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Initial remodeling is nucleotide-independent and driven by binding both ssDNA during promoter melting and activator. However, DNA loading into the RNA polymerase active site depends on co-operative ATP hydrolysis by the activator. Although the coupled promoter recognition and melting steps may be conserved between σ70 and σ54, the domain movements of the latter have evolved to require an activator ATPase. PMID:24553251

  15. Domain movements of the enhancer-dependent sigma factor drive DNA delivery into the RNA polymerase active site: insights from single molecule studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Leach, Robert N; Gell, Christopher; Zhang, Nan; Burrows, Patricia C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Smith, David Alastair; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin; Stockley, Peter G; Tuma, Roman

    2014-04-01

    Recognition of bacterial promoters is regulated by two distinct classes of sequence-specific sigma factors, σ(70) or σ(54), that differ both in their primary sequence and in the requirement of the latter for activation via enhancer-bound upstream activators. The σ(54) version controls gene expression in response to stress, often mediating pathogenicity. Its activator proteins are members of the AAA+ superfamily and use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to remodel initially auto-inhibited holoenzyme promoter complexes. We have mapped this remodeling using single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. Initial remodeling is nucleotide-independent and driven by binding both ssDNA during promoter melting and activator. However, DNA loading into the RNA polymerase active site depends on co-operative ATP hydrolysis by the activator. Although the coupled promoter recognition and melting steps may be conserved between σ(70) and σ(54), the domain movements of the latter have evolved to require an activator ATPase.

  16. DNA Bending and Wrapping around RNA Polymerase: a “Revolutionary” Model Describing Transcriptional Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, Benoit; Burton, Zachary F.

    1999-01-01

    A model is proposed in which bending and wrapping of DNA around RNA polymerase causes untwisting of the DNA helix at the RNA polymerase catalytic center to stimulate strand separation prior to initiation. During elongation, DNA bending through the RNA polymerase active site is proposed to lower the energetic barrier to the advance of the transcription bubble. Recent experiments with mammalian RNA polymerase II along with accumulating evidence from studies of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase indicate the importance of DNA bending and wrapping in transcriptional mechanisms. The DNA-wrapping model describes specific roles for general RNA polymerase II transcription factors (TATA-binding protein [TBP], TFIIB, TFIIF, TFIIE, and TFIIH), provides a plausible explanation for preinitiation complex isomerization, suggests mechanisms underlying the synergy between transcriptional activators, and suggests an unforseen role for TBP-associating factors in transcription. PMID:10357858

  17. Transcription termination by the eukaryotic RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G.; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes a multitude of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes as well as other small RNA genes distributed through the genome. By being sequence-specific, precise and efficient, transcription termination by pol III not only defines the 3′ end of the nascent RNA which directs subsequent association with the stabilizing La protein, it also prevents transcription into downstream DNA and promotes efficient recycling. Each of the RNA polymerases appears to have evolved unique mechanisms to initiate the process of termination in response to different types of termination signals. However, in eukaryotes much less is known about the final stage of termination, destabilization of the elongation complex with release of the RNA and DNA from the polymerase active center. By comparison to pols I & II, pol III exhibits the most direct coupling of the initial and final stages of termination, both of which occur at a short oligo(dT) tract on the non-template strand (dA on the template) of the DNA. While pol III termination is autonomous involving the core subunits C2 and probably C1, it also involves subunits C11, C37 and C53, which act on the pol III catalytic center and exhibit homology to the pol II elongation factor TFIIS, and TFIIFα/β respectively. Here we compile knowledge of pol III termination and associate mutations that affect this process with structural elements of the polymerase that illustrate the importance of C53/37 both at its docking site on the pol III lobe and in the active center. The models suggest that some of these features may apply to the other eukaryotic pols. PMID:23099421

  18. Structure-Function Relationships Underlying the Replication Fidelity of Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Campagnola, Grace; McDonald, Seth; Beaucourt, Stéphanie; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are considered to be low-fidelity enzymes, providing high mutation rates that allow for the rapid adaptation of RNA viruses to different host cell environments. Fidelity is tuned to provide the proper balance of virus replication rates, pathogenesis, and tissue tropism needed for virus growth. Using our structures of picornaviral polymerase-RNA elongation complexes, we have previously engineered more than a dozen coxsackievirus B3 polymerase mutations that significantly altered virus replication rates and in vivo fidelity and also provided a set of secondary adaptation mutations after tissue culture passage. Here we report a biochemical analysis of these mutations based on rapid stopped-flow kinetics to determine elongation rates and nucleotide discrimination factors. The data show a spatial separation of fidelity and replication rate effects within the polymerase structure. Mutations in the palm domain have the greatest effects on in vitro nucleotide discrimination, and these effects are strongly correlated with elongation rates and in vivo mutation frequencies, with faster polymerases having lower fidelity. Mutations located at the top of the finger domain, on the other hand, primarily affect elongation rates and have relatively minor effects on fidelity. Similar modulation effects are seen in poliovirus polymerase, an inherently lower-fidelity enzyme where analogous mutations increase nucleotide discrimination. These findings further our understanding of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase structure-function relationships and suggest that positive-strand RNA viruses retain a unique palm domain-based active-site closure mechanism to fine-tune replication fidelity. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses represent a major class of human and animal pathogens with significant health and economic impacts. These viruses replicate by using a virally encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase enzyme that has low fidelity, generating

  19. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  20. Modification of RNA polymerase IIO subspecies after poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, L M; Fernandez-Tomas, C; Dahmus, M E; Gariglio, P

    1987-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells with poliovirus results in a shutdown of host transcription. In an effort to understand the mechanism(s) that underlies this process, we analyzed the distribution of RNA polymerase IIO before and after viral infection. Analysis of free and chromatin-bound enzyme indicated that there is a significant reduction in RNA polymerase IIO following infection. This observation, together with increasing evidence that transcription is catalyzed by RNA polymerase IIO, supports the hypothesis that poliovirus-induced inhibition of host transcription occurs at the level of RNA chain initiation and involves the direct modification of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3029396

  1. Cloning and expression of the gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Davanloo, P.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1984-03-30

    This application describes a means to clone a functional gene for bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Active T7 RNA polymerase is produced from the cloned gene, and a plasmid has been constructed that can produce the active enzyme in large amounts. T7 RNA polymerase transcribes DNA very efficiently and is highly selective for a relatively long promoter sequence. This enzyme is useful for synthesizing large amounts of RNA in vivo or in vitro, and is capable of producing a single RNA selectively from a complex mixture of DNAs. The procedure used to obtain a clone of the T7 RNA polymerase gene can be applied to other T7-like phages to obtain clones that produce RNA polymerases having different promoter specificities, different bacterial hosts, or other desirable properties.

  2. Simultaneous measurement of genome-wide transcription elongation speeds and rates of RNA polymerase II transition into active elongation with 4sUDRB-seq.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Gilad; Voichek, Yoav; Rabani, Michal; Benjamin, Sima; Gilad, Shlomit; Amit, Ido; Oren, Moshe

    2015-04-01

    4sUDRB-seq separately measures, on a genomic scale, the distinct contributions of transcription elongation speed and rate of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transition into active elongation (TAE) to the overall mRNA production rate. It uses reversible inhibition of transcription elongation with 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), combined with a pulse of 4-thiouridine (4sU), to tag newly transcribed RNA. After DRB removal, cells are collected at several time points, and tagged RNA is biotinylated, captured on streptavidin beads and sequenced. 4sUDRB-seq enables the comparison of elongation speeds between different developmental stages or different cell types, and it allows the impact of specific transcription factors on transcription elongation speed versus TAE to be studied. RNA preparation takes ∼4 d to complete, with deep sequencing requiring an additional ∼4-11 d plus 1-3 d for bioinformatics analysis. The experimental protocol requires basic molecular biology skills, whereas data analysis requires knowledge in bioinformatics, particularly MATLAB and the Linux environment.

  3. PPNDS inhibits murine Norovirus RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase mimicking two RNA stacking bases.

    PubMed

    Croci, Romina; Tarantino, Delia; Milani, Mario; Pezzullo, Margherita; Rohayem, Jacques; Bolognesi, Martino; Mastrangelo, Eloise

    2014-05-01

    Norovirus (NV) is a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Antivirals against such important pathogens are on demand. Among the viral proteins that orchestrate viral replication, RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase (RdRp) is a promising drug development target. From an in silico-docking search focused on the RdRp active site, we selected the compound PPNDS, which showed low micromolar IC50vs. murine NV-RdRp in vitro. We report the crystal structure of the murine NV-RdRp/PPNDS complex showing that two molecules of the inhibitor bind in antiparallel stacking interaction, properly oriented to block exit of the newly synthesized RNA. Such inhibitor-binding mode mimics two stacked nucleotide-bases of the RdRp/ssRNA complex.

  4. Intergenic transcriptional interference is blocked by RNA polymerase III transcription factor TFIIIB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korde, Asawari; Rosselot, Jessica M; Donze, David

    2014-02-01

    The major function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase III is to transcribe transfer RNA, 5S ribosomal RNA, and other small non-protein-coding RNA molecules. Assembly of the RNA polymerase III complex on chromosomal DNA requires the sequential binding of transcription factor complexes TFIIIC and TFIIIB. Recent evidence has suggested that in addition to producing RNA transcripts, chromatin-assembled RNA polymerase III complexes may mediate additional nuclear functions that include chromatin boundary, nucleosome phasing, and general genome organization activities. This study provides evidence of another such "extratranscriptional" activity of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes, which is the ability to block progression of intergenic RNA polymerase II transcription. We demonstrate that the RNA polymerase III complex bound to the tRNA gene upstream of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATG31 gene protects the ATG31 promoter against readthrough transcriptional interference from the upstream noncoding intergenic SUT467 transcription unit. This protection is predominately mediated by binding of the TFIIIB complex. When TFIIIB binding to this tRNA gene is weakened, an extended SUT467-ATG31 readthrough transcript is produced, resulting in compromised ATG31 translation. Since the ATG31 gene product is required for autophagy, strains expressing the readthrough transcript exhibit defective autophagy induction and reduced fitness under autophagy-inducing nitrogen starvation conditions. Given the recent discovery of widespread pervasive transcription in all forms of life, protection of neighboring genes from intergenic transcriptional interference may be a key extratranscriptional function of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes and possibly other DNA binding proteins.

  5. Favipiravir (T-705), a novel viral RNA polymerase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B; Takahashi, Kazumi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Smee, Donald F; Barnard, Dale L

    2013-11-01

    Favipiravir (T-705; 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) is an antiviral drug that selectively inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus. It is phosphoribosylated by cellular enzymes to its active form, favipiravir-ribofuranosyl-5'-triphosphate (RTP). Its antiviral effect is attenuated by the addition of purine nucleic acids, indicating the viral RNA polymerase mistakenly recognizes favipiravir-RTP as a purine nucleotide. Favipiravir is active against a broad range of influenza viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H5N1) and the recently emerged A(H7N9) avian virus. It also inhibits influenza strains resistant to current antiviral drugs, and shows a synergistic effect in combination with oseltamivir, thereby expanding influenza treatment options. A Phase III clinical evaluation of favipiravir for influenza therapy has been completed in Japan and two Phase II studies have been completed in the United States. In addition to its anti-influenza activity, favipiravir blocks the replication of many other RNA viruses, including arenaviruses (Junin, Machupo and Pichinde); phleboviruses (Rift Valley fever, sandfly fever and Punta Toro); hantaviruses (Maporal, Dobrava, and Prospect Hill); flaviviruses (yellow fever and West Nile); enteroviruses (polio- and rhinoviruses); an alphavirus, Western equine encephalitis virus; a paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus; and noroviruses. With its unique mechanism of action and broad range of antiviral activity, favipiravir is a promising drug candidate for influenza and many other RNA viral diseases for which there are no approved therapies.

  6. Favipiravir (T-705), a novel viral RNA polymerase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B.; Takahashi, Kazumi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Smee, Donald F.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Favipiravir (T-705; 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) is an antiviral drug that selectively inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus. It is phosphoribosylated by cellular enzymes to its active form, favipiravir-ribofuranosyl-5′-triphosphate (RTP). Its antiviral effect is attenuated by the addition of purine nucleic acids, indicating the viral RNA polymerase mistakenly recognizes favipiravir-RTP as a purine nucleotide. Favipiravir is active against a broad range of influenza viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H5N1) and the recently emerged A(H7N9) avian virus. It also inhibits influenza strains resistant to current antiviral drugs, and shows a synergistic effect in combination with oseltamivir, thereby expanding influenza treatment options. A Phase III clinical evaluation of favipiravir for influenza therapy has been completed in Japan and two Phase II studies have been completed in the United States. In addition to its anti-influenza activity, favipiravir blocks the replication of many other RNA viruses, including arenaviruses (Junin, Machupo and Pichinde); phleboviruses (Rift Valley fever, sandfly fever and Punta Toro); hantaviruses (Maporal, Dobrava, and Prospect Hill); flaviviruses (yellow fever and West Nile); enteroviruses (polio- and rhinoviruses); an alphavirus, Western equine encephalitis virus; a paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus; and noroviruses. With its unique mechanism of action and broad range of antiviral activity, favipiravir is a promising drug candidate for influenza and many other RNA viral diseases for which there are no approved therapies. PMID:24084488

  7. Both cis and trans Activities of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus 3D Polymerase Are Essential for Viral RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Herod, Morgan R.; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Ward, Joseph C.; Verdaguer, Nuria; Rowlands, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Picornaviridae is a large family of positive-sense RNA viruses that contains numerous human and animal pathogens, including foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The picornavirus replication complex comprises a coordinated network of protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions involving multiple viral and host-cellular factors. Many of the proteins within the complex possess multiple roles in viral RNA replication, some of which can be provided in trans (i.e., via expression from a separate RNA molecule), while others are required in cis (i.e., expressed from the template RNA molecule). In vitro studies have suggested that multiple copies of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3D are involved in the viral replication complex. However, it is not clear whether all these molecules are catalytically active or what other function(s) they provide. In this study, we aimed to distinguish between catalytically active 3D molecules and those that build a replication complex. We report a novel nonenzymatic cis-acting function of 3D that is essential for viral-genome replication. Using an FMDV replicon in complementation experiments, our data demonstrate that this cis-acting role of 3D is distinct from the catalytic activity, which is predominantly trans acting. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that both cis- and trans-acting 3D molecules localize to the same cellular compartment. However, our genetic and structural data suggest that 3D interacts in cis with RNA stem-loops that are essential for viral RNA replication. This study identifies a previously undescribed aspect of picornavirus replication complex structure-function and an important methodology for probing such interactions further. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an important animal pathogen responsible for foot-and-mouth disease. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world with outbreaks within livestock resulting in major economic losses. Propagation of the viral genome

  8. Site size of cooperative single-stranded RNA binding by poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Beckman, M T; Kirkegaard, K

    1998-03-20

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase binds cooperatively to single-stranded RNA. We have determined the minimal RNA-binding site size of the poliovirus polymerase using binding titration with oligonucleotides of increasing length. A dramatic increase in affinity was observed when the length of the oligo(U) increased from 8 to 10 nucleotides (nt), arguing that the minimal size of RNA for polymerase binding is 10 nt. Another increase in affinity seen as the oligo(U) reached 24 nt suggests that a 24-nucleotide RNA can be occupied by two polymerase molecules. Direct binding of wild-type polymerase to oligo(U)12 and oligo(U)24 RNAs showed differences in affinity and cooperativity consistent with this model. The increase in binding affinity seen for oligo(U)10 suggests either that the RNA-binding determinants are widely spaced on the polymerase structure or that a substantial conformational change in the polymerase occurs upon the filling of its RNA-binding site.

  9. A heteromeric transcription factor required for mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, S; Tanaka, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Nagaoka, T; Weissman, S M; Yasukochi, Y

    1990-01-01

    A general transcription factor, FC, essential for specific initiation of in vitro transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase II was identified and a procedure developed to purify it to near homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei. Purified FC is composed of two polypeptides of apparent molecular masses 80 kDa and 30 kDa, on SDS-PAGE, and has a native size of 280 kDa estimated by gel filtration column. Both polypeptides were shown to be essential for reconstituting in vitro transcription activity. Biochemical analysis showed that the 80 kDa and 30 kDa components were present in a 1:1 molar ratio. FC was also demonstrated to interact directly or indirectly with purified RNA polymerase II. Similarities between FC and transcription factors reported by others from human, rat or Drosophila cells are discussed. Images PMID:2395645

  10. Recruitment of RNA polymerase III in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Marshall, Lynne; White, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III contains a dissociable subcomplex that is required for initiation, but not for elongation or termination of transcription. This subcomplex is composed of subunits RPC3, RPC6 and RPC7, and interacts with TFIIIB, a factor that is necessary and sufficient to support accurate pol III transcription in vitro. Direct binding of TFIIIB to RPC6 is believed to recruit pol III to its genetic templates. However, this has never been tested in vivo. Here we combine chromatin immunoprecipitation with RNA interference to demonstrate that the RPC3/6/7 subcomplex is required for pol III recruitment in mammalian cells. Specific knockdown of RPC6 by RNAi results in post-transcriptional depletion of the other components of the subcomplex, RPC3 and RPC7, without destabilizing core pol III subunits or TFIIIB. The resultant core enzyme is defective in associating with TFIIIB and target genes in vivo. Promoter occupancy by pol II is unaffected, despite sharing five subunits with the pol III core. These observations provide evidence for the validity in vivo of the model for pol III recruitment that was built on biochemical data.

  11. Molecular Evolution of Multi-subunit RNA Polymerases: Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, William J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription in all cellular organisms is performed by multi-subunit, DNA-dependent RNA polymerases that synthesize RNA from DNA templates. Previous sequence and structural studies have elucidated the importance of shared regions common to all multi-subunit RNA polymerases. In addition RNA polymerases contain multiple lineage-specific domain insertions involved in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. We have created comprehensive multiple sequence alignments using all available sequence data for the multi-subunit RNA polymerase large subunits, including the bacterial β and β′ subunits and their homologues from archaebacterial RNA polymerases, the eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the nuclear-cytoplasmic large double-stranded DNA Virus RNA polymerases, and plant plastid RNA polymerases. In order to overcome technical difficulties inherent to the large subunit sequences, including large sequence length, small and large lineage-specific insertions, split subunits, and fused proteins, we created an automated and customizable sequence retrieval and processing system. In addition, we used our alignments to create a more expansive set of shared sequence regions and bacterial lineage-specific domain insertions. We also analyzed the intergenic gap between the bacterial β and β′ genes. PMID:19895820

  12. Unusual promoter-independent transcription reactions with bacteriophage RNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, G

    1989-01-01

    Efficient transcription reactions of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases require the presence of a specific promoter sequence. This report shows that in the absence of their cognate promoter, two bacteriophage RNA polymerases are capable of performing unusual transcription reactions: (i) the DNA template serves also as a primer for RNA synthesis and this leads to hybrid DNA/RNA molecules, (ii) if the DNA template forms a hairpin structure, the linear DNA can be transcribed via the 'rolling circle' mechanism. Images PMID:2471146

  13. Transcriptional activation via DNA-looping: visualization of intermediates in the activation pathway of E. coli RNA polymerase x sigma 54 holoenzyme by scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rippe, K; Guthold, M; von Hippel, P H; Bustamante, C

    1997-07-11

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) has been used to study transcriptional activation of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase x sigma 54 (RNAP x sigma 54) at the glnA promoter by the constitutive mutant NtrC(D54E,S160F) of the NtrC Protein (nitrogen regulatory protein C). DNA-protein complexes were deposited on mica and images were recorded in air. The DNA template was a 726 bp linear fragment with two NtrC binding sites located at the end and about 460 bp away from the RNAP x sigma 54 glnA promoter. By choosing appropriate conditions the structure of various intermediates in the transcription process could be visualized and analyzed: (1) different multimeric complexes of NtrC(D54E,S160F) dimers bound to the DNA template; (2) the closed complex of RNAP x sigma 54 at the glnA promoter; (3) association between DNA bound RNAP x sigma 54 and NtrC(D54E,S160F) with the intervening DNA looped out; and (4) the activated open promoter complex of RNAP x sigma 54. Measurements of the DNA bending angle of RNAP x sigma 54 closed promoter complexes yielded an apparent bending angle of 49(+/-24) degrees. Under conditions that allowed the formation of the open promoter complex, the distribution of bending angles displayed two peaks at 50(+/-24) degrees and 114(+/-18) degrees, suggesting that the transition from the RNAP x sigma 54 closed complex to the open complex is accompanied by an increase of the DNA bending angle.

  14. The role of interleukin-6 in mitogenic T-cell activation: detection of interleukin-2 heteronuclear RNA by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Walz, G; Stevens, C; Zanker, B; Melton, L B; Clark, S C; Suthanthiran, M; Strom, T B

    1991-05-01

    It has been documented that interleukin-6 (IL-6) supports the proliferation of purified, anti-CD3-stimulated murine T cells. We found that stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with anti-CD3 induced a significant accumulation of IL-6 mRNA, indicating that antigen-mediated T-cell activation may involve IL-6 release from accessory cells. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) had little effect upon IL-6 gene expression. In keeping with these findings, anti-IL-6 reduced but did not abolish anti-CD3-mediated proliferation of PBMCs, but had no significant effect upon PHA-stimulated proliferation. The addition of recombinant (r) IL-6 enhanced the proliferation of anti-CD3-stimulated PBMCs and increased the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA in PHA-stimulated PBMCs during the first 5 hr of culture. Nuclear run-off experiments did not reveal significant changes in IL-2 transcription in PHA plus rIL-6-treated PBMCs attempting to assume that IL-6 mediates stabilization of IL-2 mRNA. However, monitoring of partially spliced IL-2 mRNA by polymerase chain reaction revealed a clear increase in IL-2 heteronuclear RNA. Thus IL-6 increases the rate of IL-2 transcription which was not detectable by conventional in vitro transcription assays. We conclude that anti-CD3 triggers T-cell proliferation through a process that is partially but not entirely dependent upon release of IL-6. IL-6, in turn, supports IL-2 transcription. Insofar as anti-CD3 mimics antigen-triggered activation of the T-cell receptor complex, IL-6 appears to support the early immune response by augmenting antigen-triggered IL-2 gene expression. PMID:1827050

  15. A third mitochondrial RNA polymerase in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Richter, Uwe; Richter, Björn; Weihe, Andreas; Börner, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    In most organisms, the mitochondrial genes are transcribed by RNA polymerases related to the single-subunit RNA polymerases of bacteriophages like T3 and T7. In flowering plants, duplication(s) of the RpoTm gene coding for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (RPOTm) led to the evolution of additional RNA polymerases transcribing genes in plastids (RPOTp) or in both mitochondria and plastids (RPOTmp). Two putative RPOTmp enzymes were previously described to be encoded by the nuclear genes RpoTmp1 and RpoTmp2 in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here, we report on a third Physcomitrella RpoT gene. We determined the sequence of the cDNA. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with sequences of plant organellar RNA polymerases suggests that this gene encodes a functional phage-type RNA polymerase. The 78 N-terminal amino acids of the putative RNA polymerase were fused to GFP and found to target the fusion protein exclusively to mitochondria in Arabidopsis protoplasts. P. patens is the only known organism to possess three mitochondrial RNA polymerases.

  16. Purification and Properties of Two RNA Polymerases from Physarum polycephalum

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ann Baker; Burgess, Richard R.

    1974-01-01

    Two RNA polymerases have been purified from the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, one sensitive and one resistant to α-amanitin. Both enzymes are more active with denatured DNA than native DNA as a template and prefer Mn++ rather than Mg++ as a divalent cation. The α-amanitin-sensitive enzyme shows maximum activity at 0.15 M KCl, whereas the resistant enzyme is most active at very low ionic strength. Analysis of the resistant enzyme on polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate shows two subunits present in a 1:1 ratio with molecular weights of 205,000 and 125,000. Images PMID:4524629

  17. An alternative RNA polymerase I structure reveals a dimer hinge.

    PubMed

    Kostrewa, Dirk; Kuhn, Claus-D; Engel, Christoph; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is the central, 14-subunit enzyme that synthesizes the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor in eukaryotic cells. The recent crystal structure of Pol I at 2.8 Å resolution revealed two novel elements: the `expander' in the active-centre cleft and the `connector' that mediates Pol I dimerization [Engel et al. (2013), Nature (London), 502, 650-655]. Here, a Pol I structure in an alternative crystal form that was solved by molecular replacement using the original atomic Pol I structure is reported. The resulting alternative structure lacks the expander but still shows an expanded active-centre cleft. The neighbouring Pol I monomers form a homodimer with a relative orientation distinct from that observed previously, establishing the connector as a hinge between Pol I monomers.

  18. The Rapid Turnover of RNA Polymerase of Rat Liver Nucleolus, and of Its Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fu-Li; Feigelson, Philip

    1972-01-01

    Turnover rates of the components of systems for RNA synthesis of rat-liver nucleus, nucleolus, and nucleoplasm were investigated. Cycloheximide administered in vivo selectively diminished nucleolar RNA synthesis in vitro. In contrast to the relatively stable nucleoplasmic RNA polymerase, nucleolar RNA polymerase (polymerase I) from rat liver decays rapidly upon cycloheximide administration, following pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of about 1.3 hr. Cycloheximide elicits this effect not through direct interaction with nucleolar RNA polymerase itself, nor by alteration of template function, but rather by inhibition of de novo synthesis of one or more of the protein components of nucleolar RNA polymerase. Similarly, when actinomycin-D was administered in vivo to inhibit RNA synthesis, the rate of decay of nucleolar RNA polymerase, assayed in the presence of exogenous poly d(A-T) template, was similar to that observed after cycloheximide administration. Thus, the messenger RNA(s) that codes for one or more of the catalytically essential polypeptide components of this enzyme turn over very rapidly with a half-life considerably shorter than 1.3 hr. The rapidity of turnover of both the enzyme protein and its messenger RNA(s) renders nucleolar RNA polymerase highly responsive to altered transcriptional, translational, or post-translational modulation. The marked differences in turnover rates of nucleolar and nucleoplasmic RNA polymerases indicate that at least certain of the protomeric components of nucleolar RNA polymerase I are distinct from those of nucleoplasmic RNA polymerases II and III. PMID:4507607

  19. Nature of DNA binding and RNA polymerase interaction of the Bordetella pertussis BvgA transcriptional activator at the fha promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, P E; Murakami, K; Ishihama, A; Stibitz, S

    1997-01-01

    The expression of virulence factor genes in Bordetella pertussis is mediated by the BvgA-BvgS two-component signal transduction system. The response regulator, BvgA, acts directly as a transcriptional activator at the loci encoding pertussis toxin (ptx) and filamentous hemagglutinin (fha). Previous studies have demonstrated that these two loci are differentially regulated by BvgA. As an initial step in gaining insight into the mechanism underlying this differential regulation, we initiated DNA binding and in vitro transcription analyses to examine the activities of BvgA and RNA polymerase (RNAP) purified from both B. pertussis and Escherichia coli at the fha promoter. We discovered that unphosphorylated BvgA binds to a single region (-100 to -70, relative to the start of transcription), whereas phosphorylated BvgA binds both this region and another, farther downstream, that extends to the -35 nucleotide. In the absence of BvgA, RNAP binds a region farther upstream than expected (-104 to -35). However, occupation of both sites by BvgA phosphate repositions RNAP to the site used in vivo. The binding of BvgA phosphate to the downstream site correlates with in vitro transcriptional activity at the fha promoter. As the DNA binding and transcription activities of the E. coli-derived RNAP are similar to those observed for the B. pertussis enzyme, we employed several mutant E. coli proteins in in vitro transcription analyses. We observed that polymerases carrying either a deletion of the C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit or substitution of alanine at either of two critical residues within this domain were severely impaired in the ability to mediate BvgA-activated transcription at fha. PMID:9045838

  20. MYC Regulation of Cell Growth through Control of Transcription by RNA Polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kirsteen J.; White, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    MYC’s tumorigenic potential involves increased ribosome biogenesis and translational capacity, which supply the cell with protein required for enhanced cell growth and subsequent cell division. In addition to activation of protein-encoding genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II, MYC must stimulate transcription by RNA polymerase I and RNA polymerase III to meet this synthetic demand. In the past decade our knowledge of the mechanisms and importance of MYC regulation of RNA polymerases I and III has flourished. Here we discuss MYC’s influence on transcription by these “odd” RNA polymerases and the physiological impact of this regulation is evaluated with relevance to cancer development and treatment. PMID:24789877

  1. The Selenocysteine tRNA Gene in Leishmania major Is Transcribed by both RNA Polymerase II and RNA Polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Mejía, Norma E.; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E.; Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Vizuet-de-Rueda, Juan C.; Cevallos, Ana M.; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Manning-Cela, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic tRNAs, transcribed by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), contain boxes A and B as internal promoter elements. One exception is the selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA (tRNA-Sec), whose transcription is directed by an internal box B and three extragenic sequences in vertebrates. Here we report on the transcriptional analysis of the tRNA-Sec gene in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. This organism has unusual mechanisms of gene expression, including Pol II polycistronic transcription and maturation of mRNAs by trans splicing, a process that attaches a 39-nucleotide miniexon to the 5′ end of all the mRNAs. In L. major, tRNA-Sec is encoded by a single gene inserted into a Pol II polycistronic unit, in contrast to most tRNAs, which are clustered at the boundaries of polycistronic units. 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends and reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that some tRNA-Sec transcripts contain the miniexon at the 5′ end and a poly(A) tail at the 3′ end, indicating that the tRNA-Sec gene is polycistronically transcribed by Pol II and processed by trans splicing and polyadenylation, as was recently reported for the tRNA-Sec genes in the related parasite Trypanosoma brucei. However, nuclear run-on assays with RNA polymerase inhibitors and with cells that were previously UV irradiated showed that the tRNA-Sec gene in L. major is also transcribed by Pol III. Thus, our results indicate that RNA polymerase specificity in Leishmania is not absolute in vivo, as has recently been found in other eukaryotes. PMID:25548151

  2. Paused RNA polymerase II as a developmental checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael

    2011-05-13

    The textbook view of gene activation is that the rate-limiting step is the interaction of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with the gene's promoter. However, studies in a variety of systems, including human embryonic stem cells and the early Drosophila embryo, have begun to challenge this view. There is increasing evidence that differential gene expression often depends on the regulation of transcription elongation via the release of Pol II from the proximal promoter. I review the implications of this mechanism of gene activation with respect to the orderly unfolding of complex gene networks governing animal development. PMID:21565610

  3. Chromosomal localization of human RNA polymerase II subunit genes

    SciTech Connect

    Acker, J.; Wintzerith, M.; Vigneron, M.; Kedinger, C. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N.; Depetris, D. )

    1994-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (or B) is composed of 10 to 14 polypeptides ranging from 220 to 10 kDa. To gain further insight into the molecular structure and function of these subunits, the authors have undertaken the molecular cloning of nucleotide sequences corresponding to the human enzyme. The cDNAs of five subunits (hRPB220, hRPB140, hRPB33, hRPB25, and hRPB14.5) have been isolated. Using in situ hybridization, they show that the genes of these subunits have distinct chromosomal locations (17p13, 4q12, 16q13-q21, 19p13.3, and 19q12, respectively). Thus, if assembly of active polymerase molecules requires coordinated expression from these independent genes, mechanisms that ensure tight coregulation of the corresponding promoters must exist. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases have homologous core subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D; Nonet, M; Young, R A

    1987-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are complex aggregates whose component subunits are functionally ill-defined. The gene that encodes the 140,000-dalton subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II was isolated and studied in detail to obtain clues to the protein's function. This gene, RPB2, exists in a single copy in the haploid genome. Disruption of the gene is lethal to the yeast cell. RPB2 encodes a protein of 138,750 daltons, which contains sequences implicated in binding purine nucleotides and zinc ions and exhibits striking sequence homology with the beta subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These observations suggest that the yeast and the E. coli subunit have similar roles in RNA synthesis, as the beta subunit contains binding sites for nucleotide substrates and a portion of the catalytic site for RNA synthesis. The subunit homologies reported here, and those observed previously with the largest RNA polymerase subunit, indicate that components of the prokaryotic RNA polymerase "core" enzyme have counterparts in eukaryotic RNA polymerases. PMID:3547406

  5. Activation and repression of transcription at two different phage phi29 promoters are mediated by interaction of the same residues of regulatory protein p4 with RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Monsalve, M; Mencia, M; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1996-01-01

    Phage phi29 regulatory protein p4 activates transcription from the late A3 promoter and represses the main early promoters, named A2b and A2c. Activation involves stabilization of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at the A3 promoter as a closed complex and is mediated by interaction between RNAP and a small domain of protein p4 in which residue Arg120 plays an essential role. We show that protein p4 represses the A2c promoter by binding to DNA immediately upstream from RNAP in a way that does not hinder RNAP binding; rather, the two proteins bind cooperatively to DNA. In the presence of protein p4, RNAP can form an initiated complex at the A2c promoter that generates short abortive transcripts, but cannot leave the promoter. Mutation of protein p4 residue Arg120, which relieves the contact between the two proteins, leads to a loss of repression. Therefore, the contact between protein p4 and RNAP through the protein p4 domain containing Arg120 can activate or repress transcription, depending on the promoter. The relative position of protein p4 and RNAP, which is different at each promoter, together with the distinct characteristics of the two promoters, may determine whether protein p4 activates or represses transcription. Images PMID:8617213

  6. An RNA polymerase II transcription factor has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1989-01-01

    A transcription factor required for synthesis of accurately initiated run-off transcripts by RNA polymerase II has been purified and shown to have an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity that is strongly stimulated by the TATA region of promoters. This transcription factor, designated delta, was purified more than 3000-fold from extracts of crude rat liver nuclei and has a native molecular mass of approximately 230 kDa. DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) and transcription activities copurify when delta is analyzed by hydrophobic interaction and ion-exchange HPLC, arguing that transcription factor delta possesses an ATPase (dATPase) activity. ATPase (dATPase) is specific for adenine nucleotides; ATP and dATP, but not CTP, UTP, or GTP, are hydrolyzed. ATPase (dATPase) is stimulated by both double-stranded and single-stranded DNAs, including pUC18, ssM13, and poly(dT); however, DNA fragments containing the TATA region of either the adenovirus 2 major late or mouse interleukin 3 promoters stimulate ATPase as much as 10-fold more effectively than DNA fragments containing nonpromoter sequences. These data suggest the intriguing possibility that delta plays a critical role in the ATP (dATP)-dependent activation of run-off transcription through a direct interaction with the TATA region of promoters. Images PMID:2552440

  7. Shared active site architecture between archaeal PolD and multi-subunit RNA polymerases revealed by X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Sauguet, Ludovic; Raia, Pierre; Henneke, Ghislaine; Delarue, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Archaeal replicative DNA polymerase D (PolD) constitute an atypical class of DNA polymerases made of a proofreading exonuclease subunit (DP1) and a larger polymerase catalytic subunit (DP2), both with unknown structures. We have determined the crystal structures of Pyrococcus abyssi DP1 and DP2 at 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, revealing a catalytic core strikingly different from all other known DNA polymerases (DNAPs). Rather, the PolD DP2 catalytic core has the same ‘double-psi β-barrel' architecture seen in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) superfamily, which includes multi-subunit transcriptases of all domains of life, homodimeric RNA-silencing pathway RNAPs and atypical viral RNAPs. This finding bridges together, in non-viral world, DNA transcription and DNA replication within the same protein superfamily. This study documents further the complex evolutionary history of the DNA replication apparatus in different domains of life and proposes a classification of all extant DNAPs. PMID:27548043

  8. RNA-directed DNA polymerase from particles released by normal goose cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, G; Temin, H M

    1979-01-01

    Cells from a goose embryo were shown to release particle-associated RNA-directed DNA polymerase and RNase H activities that required the presence of Nonidet P-40 for detection. The particles were not infectious and did not have endogenous DNA synthesis. The goose particle DNA polymerase was related to the DNA polymerase of spleen necrosis virus with respect to size and was inhibited by immunoglobulin G to spleen necrosis virus DNA polymerase. However, goose cells producing DNA polymerase-containing particles did not contain reticuloendotheliosis virus-related nucleotide sequences in their DNA. PMID:87517

  9. Novel application of Phi29 DNA polymerase: RNA detection and analysis in vitro and in situ by target RNA-primed RCA

    PubMed Central

    Lagunavicius, Arunas; Merkiene, Egle; Kiveryte, Zivile; Savaneviciute, Agne; Zimbaite-Ruskuliene, Vilma; Radzvilavicius, Tomas; Janulaitis, Arvydas

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel Phi29 DNA polymerase application in RCA-based target RNA detection and analysis. The 3′→5′ RNase activity of Phi29 DNA polymerase converts target RNA into a primer and the polymerase uses this newly generated primer for RCA initiation. Therefore, using target RNA-primed RCA, padlock probes may be targeted to inner RNA sequences and their peculiarities can be analyzed directly. We demonstrate that the exoribonucleolytic activity of Phi29 DNA polymerase can be successfully applied in vitro and in situ. These findings expand the potential for detection and analysis of RNA sequences distanced from 3′-end. PMID:19244362

  10. Role of DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases II and III in Transcription of the Adenovirus Genome Late in Productive Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weinmann, Roberto; Raskas, Heschel J.; Roeder, Robert G.

    1974-01-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II, and III were isolated and partially purified from KB (human) cells 18 hr after infection with adenovirus 2. As reported previously for the enzymes from other animal cells, RNA polymerase II was completely sensitive to low concentrations of α-amanitin (50% inhibition at 0.02 μg/ml), RNA polymerase III was completely sensitive to high concentrations of α-amanitin (50% inhibition at 20 μg/ml) and RNA polymerase I was totally resistant to concentrations of α-amanitin less than or equal to 200 μg/ml. RNA synthesis by the endogenous RNA polymerase activities in nuclei isolated from infected cells was completely sensitive to α-amanitin, thus suggesting that RNA polymerase I is not involved in viral DNA transcription even though it is present in these cells. The α-amanitin inhibition curve was biphasic and showed inflection points at about 0.02 and 20 μg/ml, suggesting the participation of both RNA polymerases II and III in the synthesis of RNA in these nuclei. Furthermore, at least a large fraction of the synthesis of the nuclear precursors to viral mRNA, monitored by hybridization to viral DNA, showed the same sensitivity to α-amanitin as did RNA polymerase II; and the synthesis of both viral 5.5S RNA and (presumably cellular) 5S RNA in the isolated nuclei exhibited the same sensitivity to α-amanitin as did purified RNA polymerase III. Thus, these data provide strong supporting evidence for previous studies which suggested the involvement of an RNA polymerase II in transcription of the adenovirus genome and demonstrate the role of an RNA polymerase III activity in the synthesis of viral 5.5S RNA and cellular 5S RNA. PMID:4530313

  11. Analysis of S. cerevisiae RNA Polymerase I Transcription In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Pilsl, Michael; Merkl, Philipp E; Milkereit, Philipp; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) activity is crucial to provide cells with sufficient amounts of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Synthesis of rRNA takes place in the nucleolus, is tightly regulated and is coordinated with synthesis and assembly of ribosomal proteins, finally resulting in the formation of mature ribosomes. Many studies on Pol I mechanisms and regulation in the model organism S. cerevisiae were performed using either complex in vitro systems reconstituted from more or less purified fractions or genetic analyses. While providing many valuable insights these strategies did not always discriminate between direct and indirect effects in transcription initiation and termination, when mutated forms of Pol I subunits or transcription factors were investigated. Therefore, a well-defined minimal system was developed which allows to reconstitute highly efficient promoter-dependent Pol I initiation and termination of transcription. Transcription can be initiated at a minimal promoter only in the presence of recombinant core factor and extensively purified initiation competent Pol I. Addition of recombinant termination factors triggers transcriptional pausing and release of the ternary transcription complex. This minimal system represents a valuable tool to investigate the direct impact of (lethal) mutations in components of the initiation and termination complexes on the mechanism and regulation of rRNA synthesis. PMID:27576713

  12. Involvement of region 4 of the sigma70 subunit of RNA polymerase in transcriptional activation of the lux operon during quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Deborah C; Ishihama, Akira; Stevens, Ann M

    2003-11-21

    Quorum sensing-dependent activation of the luminescence (lux) genes of Vibrio fischeri relies on the formation of a complex between the autoinducer molecule, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, and the autoinducer-dependent transcriptional activator LuxR. In its active conformation, LuxR binds to a site known as the lux box centered at position -42.5 relative to the luxI transcriptional start site and is thought to function as an ambidextrous activator capable of making multiple contacts with RNA polymerase (RNAP). The specific role of region 4 of the Escherichia coli sigma70 subunit of RNAP in LuxR-dependent activation of the luxI promoter has been investigated. Single-round transcription assays were performed in the presence of purified LuxRDeltaN, the autoinducer-independent C-terminal domain of LuxR, and a variant RNAP which contained a C-terminally truncated sigma70 subunit devoid of region 4. Results indicated that region 4 is essential for LuxRDeltaN-dependent luxI transcription, therefore 16 single and two triple alanine substitutions in region 4.2 of sigma70 between amino acid residues 590 and 613 were examined for their effects on LuxR- and LuxRDeltaN-dependent transcription at the luxI promoter. Taken together, the analyses performed on these variants of RpoD suggest that some individual residues in region 4.2 are important to the mechanism of activator-dependent transcription initiation under investigation.

  13. Identification of distinct biological functions for four 3'-5' RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Long, Yicheng; Abad, Maria G; Olson, Erik D; Carrillo, Elisabeth Y; Jackman, Jane E

    2016-09-30

    The superfamily of 3'-5' polymerases synthesize RNA in the opposite direction to all other DNA/RNA polymerases, and its members include eukaryotic tRNA(His) guanylyltransferase (Thg1), as well as Thg1-like proteins (TLPs) of unknown function that are broadly distributed, with family members in all three domains of life. Dictyostelium discoideum encodes one Thg1 and three TLPs (DdiTLP2, DdiTLP3 and DdiTLP4). Here, we demonstrate that depletion of each of the genes results in a significant growth defect, and that each protein catalyzes a unique biological reaction, taking advantage of specialized biochemical properties. DdiTLP2 catalyzes a mitochondria-specific tRNA(His) maturation reaction, which is distinct from the tRNA(His) maturation reaction typically catalyzed by Thg1 enzymes on cytosolic tRNA. DdiTLP3 catalyzes tRNA repair during mitochondrial tRNA 5'-editing in vivo and in vitro, establishing template-dependent 3'-5' polymerase activity of TLPs as a bona fide biological activity for the first time since its unexpected discovery more than a decade ago. DdiTLP4 is cytosolic and, surprisingly, catalyzes robust 3'-5' polymerase activity on non-tRNA substrates, strongly implying further roles for TLP 3'-5' polymerases in eukaryotes.

  14. Activating the expression of bacterial cryptic genes by rpoB mutations in RNA polymerase or by rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kozo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Tojo, Shigeo

    2014-02-01

    Since bacteria were found to contain genes encoding enzymes that synthesize a plethora of potential secondary metabolites, interest has grown in the activation of these cryptic pathways. Homologous and heterologous expression of these cryptic secondary metabolite-biosynthetic genes, often "silent" under ordinary laboratory fermentation conditions, may lead to the discovery of novel secondary metabolites. We review current progress on this topic, describing concepts for activating silent genes. We especially focus on genetic manipulation of transcription and translation, as well as the utilization of rare earth elements as a novel method to activate the silent genes. The possible roles of silent genes in bacterial physiology are also discussed. PMID:24127067

  15. Structural basis of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalysis and translocation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bo; Gong, Peng

    2016-07-12

    Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) play essential roles in viral genome replication and transcription. We previously reported several structural states of the poliovirus RdRP nucleotide addition cycle (NAC) that revealed a unique palm domain-based active site closure mechanism and proposed a six-state NAC model including a hypothetical state representing translocation intermediates. Using the RdRP from another human enterovirus, enterovirus 71, here we report seven RdRP elongation complex structures derived from a crystal lattice that allows three NAC events. These structures suggested a key order of events in initial NTP binding and NTP-induced active site closure and revealed a bona fide translocation intermediate featuring asymmetric movement of the template-product duplex. Our work provides essential missing links in understanding NTP recognition and translocation mechanisms in viral RdRPs and emphasizes the uniqueness of the viral RdRPs compared with other processive polymerases. PMID:27339134

  16. DNA and RNA polymerase activities of nuclei and hypotonic extracts of nuclei isolated from tomato golden mosaic virus infected tobacco leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Coutts, R H; Buck, K W

    1985-01-01

    Nuclei and hypotonically leached extracts of nuclei prepared from tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV)-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves have been used in in vitro DNA and RNA polymerisation reactions. The synthesis of virus-specific DNA was resistant to aphidicolin, sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide and dideoxy TTP, and stimulated by KC1 and ATP. Variably virion (+) and complementary (-) strand DNA of both the A and B genomic components were synthesised. Virus-specific RNA was synthesised in reactions which were initiated prior to nuclei isolation and leaching. From inhibitor studies and salt requirements RNA synthesis appeared to be catalysed by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase type II enzyme. Both components of the TGMV genome were transcribed in a bidirectional fashion with a prevalence in some experiments of transcripts derived from DNA component A. Images PMID:4069999

  17. Splicing Factors Associate with Hyperphosphorylated RNA Polymerase II in the Absence of Pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Euikyung; Du, Lei; Bregman, David B.; Warren, Stephen L.

    1997-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) contains multiple tandem copies of the consensus heptapeptide, TyrSerProThrSerProSer. Concomitant with transcription initiation the CTD is phosphorylated. Elongating polymerase has a hyperphosphorylated CTD, but the role of this modification is poorly understood. A recent study revealed that some hyperphosphorylated polymerase molecules (Pol IIo) are nonchromosomal, and hence transcriptionally unengaged (Bregman, D.B., L. Du, S. van der Zee, S.L. Warren. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 129: 287–298). Pol IIo was concentrated in discrete splicing factor domains, suggesting a possible relationship between CTD phosphorylation and splicing factors, but no evidence beyond immunolocalization data was provided to support this idea. Here, we show that Pol IIo co-immunoprecipitates with members of two classes of splicing factors, the Sm snRNPs and non-snRNP SerArg (SR) family proteins. Significantly, Pol IIo's association with splicing factors is maintained in the absence of pre-mRNA, and the polymerase need not be transcriptionally engaged. We also provide definitive evidence that hyperphosphorylation of Pol II's CTD is poorly correlated with its transcriptional activity. Using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) H5 and H14, which are shown here to recognize phosphoepitopes on Pol II's CTD, we have quantitated the level of Pol IIo at different stages of the cell cycle. The level of Pol IIo is similar in interphase and mitotic cells, which are transcriptionally active and inactive, respectively. Finally, complexes containing Pol IIo and splicing factors can be prepared from mitotic as well as interphase cells. The experiments reported here establish that hyperphosphorylation of the CTD is a good indicator of polymerase's association with snRNP and SR splicing factors, but not of its transcriptional activity. Most importantly, the present study suggests that splicing factors may associate with the

  18. Role of DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase III in the Transcription of the tRNA and 5S RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Weinmann, Roberto; Roeder, Robert G.

    1974-01-01

    Mouse myeloma cells have previously been shown (L. B. Schwartz, V. E. F. Sklar, J. A. Jaehning, R. Weinmann & R. G. Roeder, submitted for publication) to contain two chromatographically distinct forms of RNA polymerase III (designated IIIA and IIIB). The enzymes are unaffected by low α-amanitin concentrations which completely inhibit RNA polymerase II, but they exhibit characteristic inhibition curves (identical for IIIA and IIIB) at higher toxin concentrations. RNA polymerase I was unaffected at all α-amanitin concentrations tested. Myeloma RNA polymerases II, IIIA, and IIIB appear to be inhibited by the same mechanism, since the toxin rapidly blocks chain elongation by each enzyme. The characteristic α-amanitin sensitivity of RNA polymerase III has been employed in studies of the function(s) of the class III RNA polymerases. Isolated myeloma nuclei and nucleoli contińue to synthesize RNA via the endogenous RNA polymerases when incubated in vitro. With nuclei, newly synthesized 4S precursor (pre-4S) and 5S RNA species were detected by electrophoretic analysis either of the total nuclear RNA or of the RNA released into the supernatant during incubation. The synthesis of both pre-4S and 5S RNA species was inhibited by α-amanitin, but only at high concentrations; and the α-amanitin inhibition curves for these RNAs were identical to those obtained for solubilized RNA polymerases IIIA and IIIB. In control experiments it was shown that the endogenous RNA polymerase II activity of isolated nuclei was inhibited by α-amanitin concentrations similar to those required to inhibit purified enzyme II. However, 40-50% of the endogenous activity of nuclei and 100% of the endogenous activity of purified nucleoli was completely resistant to the high α-amanitin concentrations necessary to inhibit the RNA polymerase III activities. These experiments rule out nonspecific inhibitory effects in the endogenous systems. These results unequivocally demonstrate the role of RNA

  19. Tethering σ70 to RNA polymerase reveals high in vivo activity of σ factors and σ70-dependent pausing at promoter-distal locations

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Rachel Anne; Landick, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial σ factors compete for binding to RNA polymerase (RNAP) to control promoter selection, and in some cases interact with RNAP to regulate at least the early stages of transcript elongation. However, the effective concentration of σs in vivo, and the extent to which σ can regulate transcript elongation generally, are unknown. We report that tethering σ70 to all RNAP molecules via genetic fusion of rpoD to rpoC (encoding σ70 and RNAP's β′ subunit, respectively) yields viable Escherichia coli strains in which alternative σ-factor function is not impaired. β′::σ70 RNAP transcribed DNA normally in vitro, but allowed σ70-dependent pausing at extended -10-like sequences anywhere in a transcriptional unit. Based on measurement of the effective concentration of tethered σ70, we conclude that the effective concentration of σ70 in E. coli (i.e., its thermodynamic activity) is close to its bulk concentration. At this level, σ70 would be a bona fide elongation factor able to direct transcriptional pausing even after its release from RNAP during promoter escape. PMID:14630944

  20. Initiation of RNA Polymerization and Polymerase Encapsidation by a Small dsRNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yusong R.; Toh, Yukimatsu; Poranen, Minna M.; Tao, Yizhi J.

    2016-01-01

    During the replication cycle of double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) replicates and transcribes the viral genome from within the viral capsid. How the RdRP molecules are packaged within the virion and how they function within the confines of an intact capsid are intriguing questions with answers that most likely vary across the different dsRNA virus families. In this study, we have determined a 2.4 Å resolution structure of an RdRP from the human picobirnavirus (hPBV). In addition to the conserved polymerase fold, the hPBV RdRP possesses a highly flexible 24 amino acid loop structure located near the C-terminus of the protein that is inserted into its active site. In vitro RNA polymerization assays and site-directed mutagenesis showed that: (1) the hPBV RdRP is fully active using both ssRNA and dsRNA templates; (2) the insertion loop likely functions as an assembly platform for the priming nucleotide to allow de novo initiation; (3) RNA transcription by the hPBV RdRP proceeds in a semi-conservative manner; and (4) the preference of virus-specific RNA during transcription is dictated by the lower melting temperature associated with the terminal sequences. Co-expression of the hPBV RdRP and the capsid protein (CP) indicated that, under the conditions used, the RdRP could not be incorporated into the recombinant capsids in the absence of the viral genome. Additionally, the hPBV RdRP exhibited higher affinity towards the conserved 5’-terminal sequence of the viral RNA, suggesting that the RdRP molecules may be encapsidated through their specific binding to the viral RNAs during assembly. PMID:27078841

  1. The RNA polymerase II of an alpha-amanitin-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    PubMed

    Lobban, P E; Siminovitch, L; Ingles, C J

    1976-05-01

    Amal, an alpha-amanitin-resistant mutant of the Chinese hamster ovary cell line, contains an RNA polymerase activity which elutes from DEAE-Sephadex at a salt concentration characteristic of an RNA polymerase II, but which is not sensitive to alpha-amanitin at levels where the polymerase II of wild-type cells is strongly inhibited. This result suggests that Amal owes its amanitin-resistant phenotype to a mutation affecting one of its genes for RNA polymerase II. To test this hypothesis, we purified the enzyme from Amal and then compared its properties with those of the wild-type enzyme. The mutant enzyme is indeed a polymerase II, and is over 600 times less sensitive to alpha-amanitin and more thermolabile than the wild-type enzyme. PMID:954093

  2. Evolution of Tertiary Structure of Viral RNA Dependent Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Valdés, James J.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA dependent polymerases (vRdPs) are present in all RNA viruses; unfortunately, their sequence similarity is too low for phylogenetic studies. Nevertheless, vRdP protein structures are remarkably conserved. In this study, we used the structural similarity of vRdPs to reconstruct their evolutionary history. The major strength of this work is in unifying sequence and structural data into a single quantitative phylogenetic analysis, using powerful a Bayesian approach. The resulting phylogram of vRdPs demonstrates that RNA-dependent DNA polymerases (RdDPs) of viruses within Retroviridae family cluster in a clearly separated group of vRdPs, while RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) of dsRNA and +ssRNA viruses are mixed together. This evidence supports the hypothesis that RdRPs replicating +ssRNA viruses evolved multiple times from RdRPs replicating +dsRNA viruses, and vice versa. Moreover, our phylogram may be presented as a scheme for RNA virus evolution. The results are in concordance with the actual concept of RNA virus evolution. Finally, the methods used in our work provide a new direction for studying ancient virus evolution. PMID:24816789

  3. Characterization of new RNA polymerase III and RNA polymerase II transcriptional promoters in the Bovine Leukemia Virus genome.

    PubMed

    Van Driessche, Benoit; Rodari, Anthony; Delacourt, Nadège; Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Vanhulle, Caroline; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus latency is a viral strategy used to escape from the host immune system and contribute to tumor development. However, a highly expressed BLV micro-RNA cluster has been reported, suggesting that the BLV silencing is not complete. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo recruitment of RNA polymerase III to the BLV miRNA cluster both in BLV-latently infected cell lines and in ovine BLV-infected primary cells, through a canonical type 2 RNAPIII promoter. Moreover, by RPC6-knockdown, we showed a direct functional link between RNAPIII transcription and BLV miRNAs expression. Furthermore, both the tumor- and the quiescent-related isoforms of RPC7 subunits were recruited to the miRNA cluster. We showed that the BLV miRNA cluster was enriched in positive epigenetic marks. Interestingly, we demonstrated the in vivo recruitment of RNAPII at the 3'LTR/host genomic junction, associated with positive epigenetic marks. Functionally, we showed that the BLV LTR exhibited a strong antisense promoter activity and identified cis-acting elements of an RNAPII-dependent promoter. Finally, we provided evidence for an in vivo collision between RNAPIII and RNAPII convergent transcriptions. Our results provide new insights into alternative ways used by BLV to counteract silencing of the viral 5'LTR promoter. PMID:27545598

  4. Characterization of new RNA polymerase III and RNA polymerase II transcriptional promoters in the Bovine Leukemia Virus genome

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, Benoit; Rodari, Anthony; Delacourt, Nadège; Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Vanhulle, Caroline; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus latency is a viral strategy used to escape from the host immune system and contribute to tumor development. However, a highly expressed BLV micro-RNA cluster has been reported, suggesting that the BLV silencing is not complete. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo recruitment of RNA polymerase III to the BLV miRNA cluster both in BLV-latently infected cell lines and in ovine BLV-infected primary cells, through a canonical type 2 RNAPIII promoter. Moreover, by RPC6-knockdown, we showed a direct functional link between RNAPIII transcription and BLV miRNAs expression. Furthermore, both the tumor- and the quiescent-related isoforms of RPC7 subunits were recruited to the miRNA cluster. We showed that the BLV miRNA cluster was enriched in positive epigenetic marks. Interestingly, we demonstrated the in vivo recruitment of RNAPII at the 3′LTR/host genomic junction, associated with positive epigenetic marks. Functionally, we showed that the BLV LTR exhibited a strong antisense promoter activity and identified cis-acting elements of an RNAPII-dependent promoter. Finally, we provided evidence for an in vivo collision between RNAPIII and RNAPII convergent transcriptions. Our results provide new insights into alternative ways used by BLV to counteract silencing of the viral 5′LTR promoter. PMID:27545598

  5. Crystal structure of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Hengrung, Narin; El Omari, Kamel; Serna Martin, Itziar; Vreede, Frank T; Cusack, Stephen; Rambo, Robert P; Vonrhein, Clemens; Bricogne, Gérard; Stuart, David I; Grimes, Jonathan M; Fodor, Ervin

    2015-11-01

    Negative-sense RNA viruses, such as influenza, encode large, multidomain RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that can both transcribe and replicate the viral RNA genome. In influenza virus, the polymerase (FluPol) is composed of three polypeptides: PB1, PB2 and PA/P3. PB1 houses the polymerase active site, whereas PB2 and PA/P3 contain, respectively, cap-binding and endonuclease domains required for transcription initiation by cap-snatching. Replication occurs through de novo initiation and involves a complementary RNA intermediate. Currently available structures of the influenza A and B virus polymerases include promoter RNA (the 5' and 3' termini of viral genome segments), showing FluPol in transcription pre-initiation states. Here we report the structure of apo-FluPol from an influenza C virus, solved by X-ray crystallography to 3.9 Å, revealing a new 'closed' conformation. The apo-FluPol forms a compact particle with PB1 at its centre, capped on one face by PB2 and clamped between the two globular domains of P3. Notably, this structure is radically different from those of promoter-bound FluPols. The endonuclease domain of P3 and the domains within the carboxy-terminal two-thirds of PB2 are completely rearranged. The cap-binding site is occluded by PB2, resulting in a conformation that is incompatible with transcription initiation. Thus, our structure captures FluPol in a closed, transcription pre-activation state. This reveals the conformation of newly made apo-FluPol in an infected cell, but may also apply to FluPol in the context of a non-transcribing ribonucleoprotein complex. Comparison of the apo-FluPol structure with those of promoter-bound FluPols allows us to propose a mechanism for FluPol activation. Our study demonstrates the remarkable flexibility of influenza virus RNA polymerase, and aids our understanding of the mechanisms controlling transcription and genome replication.

  6. Crystal structure of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from influenza C virus

    PubMed Central

    Hengrung, Narin; El Omari, Kamel; Martin, Itziar Serna; Vreede, Frank T.; Cusack, Stephen; Rambo, Robert P.; Vonrhein, Clemens; Bricogne, Gérard; Stuart, David I.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Fodor, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    Negative-sense RNA viruses, such as influenza, encode large, multidomain RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that can both transcribe and replicate the viral RNA genome1. In influenza virus, the polymerase (FluPol) is composed of three polypeptides: PB1, PB2 and PA/P3. PB1 houses the polymerase active site, whereas PB2 and PA/P3 contain, respectively, cap-binding and endonuclease domains required for transcription initiation by cap-snatching2. Replication occurs through de novo initiation and involves a complementary RNA intermediate. Currently available structures of the influenza A and B virus polymerases include promoter RNA (the 5′ and 3′ termini of viral genome segments), showing FluPol in transcription pre-initiation states3,4. Here we report the structure of apo-FluPol from an influenza C virus, solved by X-ray crystallography to 3.9 Å, revealing a new ‘closed’ conformation. The apo-FluPol forms a compact particle with PB1 at its centre, capped on one face by PB2 and clamped between the two globular domains of P3. Notably, this structure is radically different from those of promoter-bound FluPols3,4. The endonuclease domain of P3 and the domains within the carboxy-terminal two-thirds of PB2 are completely rearranged. The cap-binding site is occluded by PB2, resulting in a conformation that is incompatible with transcription initiation. Thus, our structure captures FluPol in a closed, transcription pre-activation state. This reveals the conformation of newly made apo-FluPol in an infected cell, but may also apply to FluPol in the context of a non-transcribing ribonucleoprotein complex. Comparison of the apo-FluPol structure with those of promoter-bound FluPols allows us to propose a mechanism for FluPol activation. Our study demonstrates the remarkable flexibility of influenza virus RNA polymerase, and aids our understanding of the mechanisms controlling transcription and genome replication. PMID:26503046

  7. Continuous in vitro evolution of bacteriophage RNA polymerase promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Banerji, A.; Joyce, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid in vitro evolution of bacteriophage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase promoters was achieved by a method that allows continuous enrichment of DNAs that contain functional promoter elements. This method exploits the ability of a special class of nucleic acid molecules to replicate continuously in the presence of both a reverse transcriptase and a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Replication involves the synthesis of both RNA and cDNA intermediates. The cDNA strand contains an embedded promoter sequence, which becomes converted to a functional double-stranded promoter element, leading to the production of RNA transcripts. Synthetic cDNAs, including those that contain randomized promoter sequences, can be used to initiate the amplification cycle. However, only those cDNAs that contain functional promoter sequences are able to produce RNA transcripts. Furthermore, each RNA transcript encodes the RNA polymerase promoter sequence that was responsible for initiation of its own transcription. Thus, the population of amplifying molecules quickly becomes enriched for those templates that encode functional promoters. Optimal promoter sequences for phage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase were identified after a 2-h amplification reaction, initiated in each case with a pool of synthetic cDNAs encoding greater than 10(10) promoter sequence variants.

  8. RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P A; Woychik, N; Liao, S M; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation were investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by attaching an epitope coding sequence to a well-characterized RNA polymerase II subunit gene (RPB3) and by immunoprecipitating the product of this gene with its associated polypeptides. The immunopurified enzyme catalyzed alpha-amanitin-sensitive RNA synthesis in vitro. The 10 polypeptides that immunoprecipitated were identical in size and number to those previously described for RNA polymerase II purified by conventional column chromatography. The relative stoichiometry of the subunits was deduced from knowledge of the sequence of the subunits and from the extent of labeling with [35S]methionine. Immunoprecipitation from 32P-labeled cell extracts revealed that three of the subunits, RPB1, RPB2, and RPB6, are phosphorylated in vivo. Phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of RPB1 could be distinguished; approximately half of the RNA polymerase II molecules contained a phosphorylated RPB1 subunit. These results more precisely define the subunit composition and phosphorylation of a eucaryotic RNA polymerase II enzyme. Images PMID:2183013

  9. Functional Evolution in Orthologous Cell-encoded RNA-dependent RNA Polymerases*

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xinlei; Hamid, Fursham M.; El Sahili, Abbas; Darwis, Dina Amallia; Wong, Yee Hwa; Bhushan, Shashi; Makeyev, Eugene V.; Lescar, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic organisms encode more than one RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) that probably emerged as a result of gene duplication. Such RdRP paralogs often participate in distinct RNA silencing pathways and show characteristic repertoires of enzymatic activities in vitro. However, to what extent members of individual paralogous groups can undergo functional changes during speciation remains an open question. We show that orthologs of QDE-1, an RdRP component of the quelling pathway in Neurospora crassa, have rapidly diverged in evolution at the amino acid sequence level. Analyses of purified QDE-1 polymerases from N. crassa (QDE-1Ncr) and related fungi, Thielavia terrestris (QDE-1Tte) and Myceliophthora thermophila (QDE-1Mth), show that all three enzymes can synthesize RNA, but the precise modes of their action differ considerably. Unlike their QDE-1Ncr counterpart favoring processive RNA synthesis, QDE-1Tte and QDE-1Mth produce predominantly short RNA copies via primer-independent initiation. Surprisingly, a 3.19 Å resolution crystal structure of QDE-1Tte reveals a quasisymmetric dimer similar to QDE-1Ncr. Further electron microscopy analyses confirm that QDE-1Tte occurs as a dimer in solution and retains this status upon interaction with a template. We conclude that divergence of orthologous RdRPs can result in functional innovation while retaining overall protein fold and quaternary structure. PMID:26907693

  10. Metalloregulator CueR biases RNA polymerase's kinetic sampling of dead-end or open complex to repress or activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Martell, Danya J; Joshi, Chandra P; Gaballa, Ahmed; Santiago, Ace George; Chen, Tai-Yen; Jung, Won; Helmann, John D; Chen, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Metalloregulators respond to metal ions to regulate transcription of metal homeostasis genes. MerR-family metalloregulators act on σ(70)-dependent suboptimal promoters and operate via a unique DNA distortion mechanism in which both the apo and holo forms of the regulators bind tightly to their operator sequence, distorting DNA structure and leading to transcription repression or activation, respectively. It remains unclear how these metalloregulator-DNA interactions are coupled dynamically to RNA polymerase (RNAP) interactions with DNA for transcription regulation. Using single-molecule FRET, we study how the copper efflux regulator (CueR)--a Cu(+)-responsive MerR-family metalloregulator--modulates RNAP interactions with CueR's cognate suboptimal promoter PcopA, and how RNAP affects CueR-PcopA interactions. We find that RNAP can form two noninterconverting complexes at PcopA in the absence of nucleotides: a dead-end complex and an open complex, constituting a branched interaction pathway that is distinct from the linear pathway prevalent for transcription initiation at optimal promoters. Capitalizing on this branched pathway, CueR operates via a "biased sampling" instead of "dynamic equilibrium shifting" mechanism in regulating transcription initiation; it modulates RNAP's binding-unbinding kinetics, without allowing interconversions between the dead-end and open complexes. Instead, the apo-repressor form reinforces the dominance of the dead-end complex to repress transcription, and the holo-activator form shifts the interactions toward the open complex to activate transcription. RNAP, in turn, locks CueR binding at PcopA into its specific binding mode, likely helping amplify the differences between apo- and holo-CueR in imposing DNA structural changes. Therefore, RNAP and CueR work synergistically in regulating transcription.

  11. Metalloregulator CueR biases RNA polymerase's kinetic sampling of dead-end or open complex to repress or activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Martell, Danya J; Joshi, Chandra P; Gaballa, Ahmed; Santiago, Ace George; Chen, Tai-Yen; Jung, Won; Helmann, John D; Chen, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Metalloregulators respond to metal ions to regulate transcription of metal homeostasis genes. MerR-family metalloregulators act on σ(70)-dependent suboptimal promoters and operate via a unique DNA distortion mechanism in which both the apo and holo forms of the regulators bind tightly to their operator sequence, distorting DNA structure and leading to transcription repression or activation, respectively. It remains unclear how these metalloregulator-DNA interactions are coupled dynamically to RNA polymerase (RNAP) interactions with DNA for transcription regulation. Using single-molecule FRET, we study how the copper efflux regulator (CueR)--a Cu(+)-responsive MerR-family metalloregulator--modulates RNAP interactions with CueR's cognate suboptimal promoter PcopA, and how RNAP affects CueR-PcopA interactions. We find that RNAP can form two noninterconverting complexes at PcopA in the absence of nucleotides: a dead-end complex and an open complex, constituting a branched interaction pathway that is distinct from the linear pathway prevalent for transcription initiation at optimal promoters. Capitalizing on this branched pathway, CueR operates via a "biased sampling" instead of "dynamic equilibrium shifting" mechanism in regulating transcription initiation; it modulates RNAP's binding-unbinding kinetics, without allowing interconversions between the dead-end and open complexes. Instead, the apo-repressor form reinforces the dominance of the dead-end complex to repress transcription, and the holo-activator form shifts the interactions toward the open complex to activate transcription. RNAP, in turn, locks CueR binding at PcopA into its specific binding mode, likely helping amplify the differences between apo- and holo-CueR in imposing DNA structural changes. Therefore, RNAP and CueR work synergistically in regulating transcription. PMID:26483469

  12. Genetics of eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II, and III.

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, J; Friesen, J D

    1993-01-01

    The transcription of nucleus-encoded genes in eukaryotes is performed by three distinct RNA polymerases termed I, II, and III, each of which is a complex enzyme composed of more than 10 subunits. The isolation of genes encoding subunits of eukaryotic RNA polymerases from a wide spectrum of organisms has confirmed previous biochemical and immunological data indicating that all three enzymes are closely related in structures that have been conserved in evolution. Each RNA polymerase is an enzyme complex composed of two large subunits that are homologous to the two largest subunits of prokaryotic RNA polymerases and are associated with smaller polypeptides, some of which are common to two or to all three eukaryotic enzymes. This remarkable conservation of structure most probably underlies a conservation of function and emphasizes the likelihood that information gained from the study of RNA polymerases from one organism will be applicable to others. The recent isolation of many mutations affecting the structure and/or function of eukaryotic and prokaryotic RNA polymerases now makes it feasible to begin integrating genetic and biochemical information from various species in order to develop a picture of these enzymes. The picture of eukaryotic RNA polymerases depicted in this article emphasizes the role(s) of different polypeptide regions in interaction with other subunits, cofactors, substrates, inhibitors, or accessory transcription factors, as well as the requirement for these interactions in transcription initiation, elongation, pausing, termination, and/or enzyme assembly. Most mutations described here have been isolated in eukaryotic organisms that have well-developed experimental genetic systems as well as amenable biochemistry, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans. When relevant, mutations affecting regions of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase that are conserved among eukaryotes and prokaryotes are also presented

  13. Looking for inhibitors of the dengue virus NS5 RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase using a molecular docking approach

    PubMed Central

    Galiano, Vicente; Garcia-Valtanen, Pablo; Micol, Vicente; Encinar, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) contains both an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain. Polymerase activity is responsible for viral RNA synthesis by a de novo initiation mechanism and represents an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The incidence of DENV has grown rapidly and it is now estimated that half of the human population is at risk of becoming infected with this virus. Despite this, there are no effective drugs to treat DENV infections. The present in silico study aimed at finding new inhibitors of the NS5 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the four serotypes of DENV. We used a chemical library comprising 372,792 nonnucleotide compounds (around 325,319 natural compounds) to perform molecular docking experiments against a binding site of the RNA template tunnel of the virus polymerase. Compounds with high negative free energy variation (ΔG <−10.5 kcal/mol) were selected as putative inhibitors. Additional filters for favorable druggability and good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity were applied. Finally, after the screening process was completed, we identified 39 compounds as lead DENV polymerase inhibitor candidates. Potentially, these compounds could act as efficient DENV polymerase inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27784988

  14. Primer-Dependent and Primer-Independent Initiation of Double Stranded RNA Synthesis by Purified Arabidopsis RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    PubMed Central

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maïna; Canard, Bruno; Robaglia, Christophe; Crété, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer-independent and primer-dependent RNA polymerase activities with different efficiencies. We further show that RDR2 and RDR6 can initiate dsRNA synthesis either by elongation of 21- to 24- nucleotides RNAs hybridized to complementary RNA template or by elongation of self-primed RNA template. These findings provide new insights into our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of RNA silencing in plants. PMID:25793874

  15. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified Arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6.

    PubMed

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maïna; Canard, Bruno; Robaglia, Christophe; Crété, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer-independent and primer-dependent RNA polymerase activities with different efficiencies. We further show that RDR2 and RDR6 can initiate dsRNA synthesis either by elongation of 21- to 24- nucleotides RNAs hybridized to complementary RNA template or by elongation of self-primed RNA template. These findings provide new insights into our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of RNA silencing in plants. PMID:25793874

  16. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases of Picornaviruses: From the Structure to Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Ferrero, Diego; Verdaguer, Núria

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses typically encode their own RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to ensure genome replication within the infected cells. RdRP function is critical not only for the virus life cycle but also for its adaptive potential. The combination of low fidelity of replication and the absence of proofreading and excision activities within the RdRPs result in high mutation frequencies that allow these viruses a rapid adaptation to changing environments. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about structural and functional aspects on RdRP catalytic complexes, focused mainly in the Picornaviridae family. The structural data currently available from these viruses provided high-resolution snapshots for a range of conformational states associated to RNA template-primer binding, rNTP recognition, catalysis and chain translocation. As these enzymes are major targets for the development of antiviral compounds, such structural information is essential for the design of new therapies. PMID:26258787

  17. Activation of RNA polymerase III transcription of human Alu repetitive elements by adenovirus type 5: requirement for the E1b 58-kilodalton protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6.

    PubMed Central

    Panning, B; Smiley, J R

    1993-01-01

    We found that transcription of endogenous human Alu elements by RNA polymerase III was strongly stimulated following infection of HeLa cells with adenovirus type 5, leading to the accumulation of high levels of Alu transcripts initiated from Alu polymerase III promoters. In contrast to previously reported cases of adenovirus-induced activation of polymerase III transcription, induction required the E1b 58-kDa protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6 in addition to the 289-residue E1a protein. In addition, E1a function was not required at high multiplicities of infection, suggesting that E1a plays an indirect role in Alu activation. These results suggest previously unsuspected regulatory properties of the adenovirus E1b and E4 gene products and provide a novel approach to the study of the biology of the most abundant class of dispersed repetitive DNA in the human genome. Images PMID:7684492

  18. VP1 of infectious bursal disease virus is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    von Einem, Ursula I; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Schirrmeier, Horst; Behrens, Sven-Erik; Letzel, Tobias; Mundt, Egbert

    2004-08-01

    Segment B of the bisegmented, double-stranded RNA genome of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) encodes the viral protein VP1. This has been presumed to represent the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) as it contains motifs that are typical for the RdRp of plus-strand RNA viruses. Here it is demonstrated that baculovirus-expressed wild-type but not motif A mutated VP1 acts as an RdRp on IBDV-specific RNA templates. Thus, on a plus-strand IBDV segment A cRNA template, minus-strand synthesis occurred in such a way that a covalently linked double-stranded RNA product was generated (by a 'copy-back' mechanism). Importantly, enzyme activity was observed only with templates that comprised the 3' non-coding region of plus-strand RNAs transcribed from IBDV segments A and B, indicating template specificity. RdRp activity was shown to have a temperature optimum of 37 degrees C and required magnesium ions for enzyme activity. Thus, it has been demonstrated unequivocally that VP1 represents the RdRp of IBDV.

  19. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kris; Bentley, David L

    2012-01-01

    The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5' ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression. PMID:22567377

  20. Gliotoxin: inhibitor of poliovirus RNA synthesis that blocks the viral RNA polymerase 3Dpol.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, P L; Carrasco, L

    1992-01-01

    The mode of action of gliotoxin against poliovirus has been analyzed in detail. This fungal metabolite inhibits the appearance of poliovirus proteins when present from the beginning of infection but has no effect on viral translation when added at late times. In agreement with previous findings, this toxin potently inhibited the incorporation of [3H]uridine into poliovirus RNA soon after its addition to the culture medium. Analysis of the synthesis of poliovirus plus- or minus-stranded RNA in the presence of gliotoxin suggests that this compound effectively hampered both processes. This result contrasts with the mode of action of other inhibitors of poliovirus RNA synthesis, such as guanidine or flavones, that selectively block plus-stranded RNA synthesis and suggests that the target of gliotoxin differs from the target of guanidine, i.e., poliovirus protein 2C. Indeed, gliotoxin was found to be a potent inhibitor of poliovirus RNA synthesis in cell-free systems, using membranous crude replication complexes, a reaction that is not blocked by guanidine or Ro 09-0179. Moreover, in vitro activity of the purified poliovirus polymerase 3Dpol was efficiently inhibited by gliotoxin. These results indicate that this toxin acts on the poliovirus polymerase 3Dpol, providing the first description of an inhibitor of this viral enzyme. Images PMID:1372367

  1. Definition of the minimal viral components required for the initiation of unprimed RNA synthesis by influenza virus RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Lee, M T Michael; Bishop, Konrad; Medcalf, Liz; Elton, Debra; Digard, Paul; Tiley, Laurence

    2002-01-15

    The first 11 nt at the 5' end of influenza virus genomic RNA were shown to be both necessary and sufficient for specific binding by the influenza virus polymerase. A novel in vitro transcription assay, in which the polymerase was bound to paramagnetic beads via a biotinylated 5'-vRNA oligonucleotide, was used to study the activities of different forms of the polymerase. Complexes composed of co-expressed PB1/PB2/PA proteins and a sub-complex composed of PB1/PA bound to the 5'-vRNA oligonucleotide, whereas PB1 expressed alone did not. The enriched 5'-vRNA/PB1/PB2/PA complex was highly active for ApG and globin mRNA primed transcription on a model 3'-vRNA template. RNA synthesis in the absence of added primers produced products with 5'-terminal tri- or diphosphate groups, indicating that genuine unprimed initiation of transcription also occurred. No transcriptase activity was detected for the PB1/PA complex. These results demonstrate a role for PA in the enhancement of 5' end binding activity of PB1, a role for PB2 in the assembly of a polymerase complex able to perform both cap-dependent and -independent synthesis and that NP is not required for the initiation of replicative transcription.

  2. Conformational selection and induced fit for RNA polymerase and RNA/DNA hybrid backtracked recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jingxu; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15, and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) P-test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein. PMID:26594643

  3. ELL facilitates RNA polymerase II pause site entry and release.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jung S; Fufa, Temesgen D; Wakano, Clay; Fernandez, Alfonso; Haggerty, Cynthia M; Sung, Myong-Hee; Gardner, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Transcription is a multi-stage process that coordinates several steps within the transcription cycle including chromatin reorganization, RNA polymerase II recruitment, initiation, promoter clearance and elongation. Recent advances have identified the super elongation complex, containing the eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia (ELL) protein, as a key regulator of transcriptional elongation. Here we show that ELL has a diverse and kinetically distinct role before its assembly into the super elongation complex by stabilizing Pol II recruitment/initiation and entry into the pause site. Loss of ELL destabilizes the pre-initiation complexes and results in disruption of early elongation and promoter proximal chromatin structure before recruitment of AFF4 and other super elongation complex components. These changes result in significantly reduced transcriptional activation of rapidly induced genes. Thus, ELL has an early and essential role during rapid high-amplitude gene expression that is required for both Pol II pause site entry and release. PMID:22252557

  4. Structure of a bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme open promoter complex

    DOE PAGES

    Bae, Brian; Feklistov, Andrey; Lass-Napiorkowska, Agnieszka; Landick, Robert; Darst, Seth A.

    2015-09-08

    Initiation of transcription is a primary means for controlling gene expression. In bacteria, the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds and unwinds promoter DNA, forming the transcription bubble of the open promoter complex (RPo). We have determined crystal structures, refined to 4.14 Å-resolution, of RPo containing Thermus aquaticus RNAP holoenzyme and promoter DNA that includes the full transcription bubble. The structures, combined with biochemical analyses, reveal key features supporting the formation and maintenance of the double-strand/single-strand DNA junction at the upstream edge of the -10 element where bubble formation initiates. The results also reveal RNAP interactions with duplex DNA just upstreammore » of the -10 element and potential protein/DNA interactions that direct the DNA template strand into the RNAP active site. Additionally a RNA primer to yield a 4 base-pair post-translocated RNA:DNA hybrid mimics an initially transcribing complex at the point where steric clash initiates abortive initiation and σA dissociation.« less

  5. Structure of a bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme open promoter complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Feklistov, Andrey; Lass-Napiorkowska, Agnieszka; Landick, Robert; Darst, Seth A.

    2015-09-08

    Initiation of transcription is a primary means for controlling gene expression. In bacteria, the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds and unwinds promoter DNA, forming the transcription bubble of the open promoter complex (RPo). We have determined crystal structures, refined to 4.14 Å-resolution, of RPo containing Thermus aquaticus RNAP holoenzyme and promoter DNA that includes the full transcription bubble. The structures, combined with biochemical analyses, reveal key features supporting the formation and maintenance of the double-strand/single-strand DNA junction at the upstream edge of the -10 element where bubble formation initiates. The results also reveal RNAP interactions with duplex DNA just upstream of the -10 element and potential protein/DNA interactions that direct the DNA template strand into the RNAP active site. Additionally a RNA primer to yield a 4 base-pair post-translocated RNA:DNA hybrid mimics an initially transcribing complex at the point where steric clash initiates abortive initiation and σA dissociation.

  6. Regulation of Human RNA Polymerase III Transcription by DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Tharakeswari; Gjidoda, Alison; Hovde, Stacy L.; Henry, R. William

    2012-01-01

    The human small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and small cytoplasmic RNA (scRNA) gene families encode diverse non-coding RNAs that influence cellular growth and division. Many snRNA and scRNA genes are related via their compact and yet powerful promoters that support RNA polymerase III transcription. We have utilized the human U6 snRNA gene family to examine the mechanism for regulated transcription of these potent transcription units. Analysis of nine U6 family members showed enriched CpG density within the promoters of actively transcribed loci relative to inert genes, implying a relationship between gene potency and DNA methylation. Indeed, both pharmacological inhibition of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and the forced diminution of DNMT-1, DNMT-3a, and DNMT-3b by siRNA targeting resulted in increased U6 levels in asynchronously growing MCF7 adenocarcinoma cells. In vitro transcription assays further showed that template methylation impedes U6 transcription by RNA polymerase III. Both DNMT-1 and DNMT-3a were detected at the U6-1 locus by chromatin immunoprecipitation directly linking these factors to RNA polymerase III regulation. Despite this association, the endogenous U6-1 locus was not substantially methylated in actively growing cells. However, both DNMT occupancy and low frequency methylation were correlated with increased Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) expression, suggesting that the RB status can influence specific epigenetic marks. PMID:22219193

  7. Rotavirus RNA polymerase requires the core shell protein to synthesize the double-stranded RNA genome.

    PubMed

    Patton, J T; Jones, M T; Kalbach, A N; He, Y W; Xiaobo, J

    1997-12-01

    Rotavirus cores contain the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome, RNA polymerase VP1, and guanylyltransferase VP3 and are enclosed within a lattice formed by the RNA-binding protein VP2. Analysis of baculovirus-expressed core-like particles (CLPs) has shown that VP1 and VP2 assemble into the simplest core-like structures with replicase activity and that VP1, but not VP3, is essential for replicase activity. To further define the role of VP1 and VP2 in the synthesis of dsRNA from viral mRNA, recombinant baculoviruses containing gene 1 (rBVg1) and gene 2 (rBVg2) of SA11 rotavirus were generated and used to express recombinant VP1 (rVP1) and rVP2, respectively. After purification, the proteins were assayed individually and together for the ability to catalyze the synthesis of dsRNA in a cell-free replication system. The results showed that dsRNA was synthesized only in assays containing rVP1 and rVP2, thus establishing that both proteins are essential for replicase activity. Even in assays containing a primer-linked mRNA template, neither rVP1 nor rVP2 alone directed RNA synthesis. Characterization of the cis-acting replication signals in mRNA recognized by the replicase of rVP1 and rVP2 showed that they were the same as those recognized by the replicase of virion-derived cores, thus excluding a role for VP3 in recognition of the mRNA template by the replicase. Analysis of RNA-protein interactions indicated that the mRNA template binds strongly to VP2 in replicase assays but that the majority of the dsRNA product neither is packaged nor stably associates with VP2. The results of replicase assays performed with mutant VP2 containing a deletion in its RNA-binding domain suggests that the essential role for VP2 in replication is linked to the protein's ability to bind the mRNA template for minus-strand synthesis.

  8. ALFALFA MOSAIC VIRUS COAT PROTEIN BRIDGES RNA AND RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Vienna L.; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E.; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3' termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution (“far-northwestern blotting”). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  9. Identification of distinct biological functions for four 3′-5′ RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yicheng; Abad, Maria G.; Olson, Erik D.; Carrillo, Elisabeth Y.; Jackman, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The superfamily of 3′-5′ polymerases synthesize RNA in the opposite direction to all other DNA/RNA polymerases, and its members include eukaryotic tRNAHis guanylyltransferase (Thg1), as well as Thg1-like proteins (TLPs) of unknown function that are broadly distributed, with family members in all three domains of life. Dictyostelium discoideum encodes one Thg1 and three TLPs (DdiTLP2, DdiTLP3 and DdiTLP4). Here, we demonstrate that depletion of each of the genes results in a significant growth defect, and that each protein catalyzes a unique biological reaction, taking advantage of specialized biochemical properties. DdiTLP2 catalyzes a mitochondria-specific tRNAHis maturation reaction, which is distinct from the tRNAHis maturation reaction typically catalyzed by Thg1 enzymes on cytosolic tRNA. DdiTLP3 catalyzes tRNA repair during mitochondrial tRNA 5′-editing in vivo and in vitro, establishing template-dependent 3′-5′ polymerase activity of TLPs as a bona fide biological activity for the first time since its unexpected discovery more than a decade ago. DdiTLP4 is cytosolic and, surprisingly, catalyzes robust 3′-5′ polymerase activity on non-tRNA substrates, strongly implying further roles for TLP 3′-5′ polymerases in eukaryotes. PMID:27484477

  10. Stochastic resetting in backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Édgar; Lisica, Ana; Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Grill, Stephan W.

    2016-06-01

    Transcription is a key process in gene expression, in which RNA polymerases produce a complementary RNA copy from a DNA template. RNA polymerization is frequently interrupted by backtracking, a process in which polymerases perform a random walk along the DNA template. Recovery of polymerases from the transcriptionally inactive backtracked state is determined by a kinetic competition between one-dimensional diffusion and RNA cleavage. Here we describe backtrack recovery as a continuous-time random walk, where the time for a polymerase to recover from a backtrack of a given depth is described as a first-passage time of a random walker to reach an absorbing state. We represent RNA cleavage as a stochastic resetting process and derive exact expressions for the recovery time distributions and mean recovery times from a given initial backtrack depth for both continuous and discrete-lattice descriptions of the random walk. We show that recovery time statistics do not depend on the discreteness of the DNA lattice when the rate of one-dimensional diffusion is large compared to the rate of cleavage.

  11. Stochastic resetting in backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Édgar; Lisica, Ana; Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Grill, Stephan W

    2016-06-01

    Transcription is a key process in gene expression, in which RNA polymerases produce a complementary RNA copy from a DNA template. RNA polymerization is frequently interrupted by backtracking, a process in which polymerases perform a random walk along the DNA template. Recovery of polymerases from the transcriptionally inactive backtracked state is determined by a kinetic competition between one-dimensional diffusion and RNA cleavage. Here we describe backtrack recovery as a continuous-time random walk, where the time for a polymerase to recover from a backtrack of a given depth is described as a first-passage time of a random walker to reach an absorbing state. We represent RNA cleavage as a stochastic resetting process and derive exact expressions for the recovery time distributions and mean recovery times from a given initial backtrack depth for both continuous and discrete-lattice descriptions of the random walk. We show that recovery time statistics do not depend on the discreteness of the DNA lattice when the rate of one-dimensional diffusion is large compared to the rate of cleavage. PMID:27415302

  12. Modeling RNA polymerase interaction in mitochondria of chordates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In previous work, we introduced a concept, a mathematical model and its computer realization that describe the interaction between bacterial and phage type RNA polymerases, protein factors, DNA and RNA secondary structures during transcription, including transcription initiation and termination. The model accurately reproduces changes of gene transcription level observed in polymerase sigma-subunit knockout and heat shock experiments in plant plastids. The corresponding computer program and a user guide are available at http://lab6.iitp.ru/en/rivals. Here we apply the model to the analysis of transcription and (partially) translation processes in the mitochondria of frog, rat and human. Notably, mitochondria possess only phage-type polymerases. We consider the entire mitochondrial genome so that our model allows RNA polymerases to complete more than one circle on the DNA strand. Results Our model of RNA polymerase interaction during transcription initiation and elongation accurately reproduces experimental data obtained for plastids. Moreover, it also reproduces evidence on bulk RNA concentrations and RNA half-lives in the mitochondria of frog, human with or without the MELAS mutation, and rat with normal (euthyroid) or hyposecretion of thyroid hormone (hypothyroid). The transcription characteristics predicted by the model include: (i) the fraction of polymerases terminating at a protein-dependent terminator in both directions (the terminator polarization), (ii) the binding intensities of the regulatory protein factor (mTERF) with the termination site and, (iii) the transcription initiation intensities (initiation frequencies) of all promoters in all five conditions (frog, healthy human, human with MELAS syndrome, healthy rat, and hypothyroid rat with aberrant mtDNA methylation). Using the model, absolute levels of all gene transcription can be inferred from an arbitrary array of the three transcription characteristics, whereas, for selected genes only

  13. Back-priming mode of phi6 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Minni R L; Salgado, Paula S; Stuart, David I; Grimes, Jonathan M; Bamford, Dennis H

    2005-02-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the double-stranded RNA bacteriophage phi6 is capable of primer-independent initiation, as are many RNA polymerases. The structure of this polymerase revealed an initiation platform, composed of a loop in the C-terminal domain (QYKW, aa 629-632), that was essential for de novo initiation. A similar element has been identified in hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Biochemical studies have addressed the role of this platform, revealing that a mutant version can utilize a back-priming initiation mechanism, where the 3' terminus of the template adopts a hairpin-like conformation. Here, the mechanism of back-primed initiation is studied further by biochemical and structural methods.

  14. Defining the RNA polymerase III transcriptome: Genome-wide localization of the RNA polymerase III transcription machinery in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Donatella; Praz, Viviane; Reina, Jaime H.; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-01-01

    Our view of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription machinery in mammalian cells arises mostly from studies of the RN5S (5S) gene, the Ad2 VAI gene, and the RNU6 (U6) gene, as paradigms for genes with type 1, 2, and 3 promoters. Recruitment of Pol III onto these genes requires prior binding of well-characterized transcription factors. Technical limitations in dealing with repeated genomic units, typically found at mammalian Pol III genes, have so far hampered genome-wide studies of the Pol III transcription machinery and transcriptome. We have localized, genome-wide, Pol III and some of its transcription factors. Our results reveal broad usage of the known Pol III transcription machinery and define a minimal Pol III transcriptome in dividing IMR90hTert fibroblasts. This transcriptome consists of some 500 actively transcribed genes including a few dozen candidate novel genes, of which we confirmed nine as Pol III transcription units by additional methods. It does not contain any of the microRNA genes previously described as transcribed by Pol III, but reveals two other microRNA genes, MIR886 (hsa-mir-886) and MIR1975 (RNY5, hY5, hsa-mir-1975), which are genuine Pol III transcription units. PMID:20413673

  15. Single-molecule Studies of RNA Polymerase: Motoring Along

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Kristina M.; Greenleaf, William J.; Block, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques have advanced our understanding of transcription by RNA polymerase. A new arsenal of approaches, including single-molecule fluorescence, atomic-force microscopy, magnetic tweezers, and optical traps have been employed to probe the many facets of the transcription cycle. These approaches supply fresh insights into the means by which RNA polymerase identifies a promoter; initiates transcription, translocates and pauses along the DNA template, proofreads errors, and ultimately terminates transcription. Results from single-molecule experiments complement knowledge gained from biochemical and genetic assays by facilitating the observation of states that are otherwise obscured by ensemble averaging, such as those resulting from heterogeneity in molecular structure, elongation rate, or pause propensity. Most studies to date have been performed with bacterial RNA polymerase, but work is also being carried out with eukaryotic polymerase (Pol II) and single-subunit polymerases from bacteriophages. We discuss recent progress achieved by single-molecule studies, highlighting some of the unresolved questions and ongoing debates. PMID:18410247

  16. Bacterial RNA polymerase can retain σ70 throughout transcription

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Timothy T.; Wells, Christopher D.; Friedman, Larry J.; Landick, Robert; Hochschild, Ann; Kondev, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Production of a messenger RNA proceeds through sequential stages of transcription initiation and transcript elongation and termination. During each of these stages, RNA polymerase (RNAP) function is regulated by RNAP-associated protein factors. In bacteria, RNAP-associated σ factors are strictly required for promoter recognition and have historically been regarded as dedicated initiation factors. However, the primary σ factor in Escherichia coli, σ70, can remain associated with RNAP during the transition from initiation to elongation, influencing events that occur after initiation. Quantitative studies on the extent of σ70 retention have been limited to complexes halted during early elongation. Here, we used multiwavelength single-molecule fluorescence-colocalization microscopy to observe the σ70–RNAP complex during initiation from the λ PR′ promoter and throughout the elongation of a long (>2,000-nt) transcript. Our results provide direct measurements of the fraction of actively transcribing complexes with bound σ70 and the kinetics of σ70 release from actively transcribing complexes. σ70 release from mature elongation complexes was slow (0.0038 s−1); a substantial subpopulation of elongation complexes retained σ70 throughout transcript elongation, and this fraction depended on the sequence of the initially transcribed region. We also show that elongation complexes containing σ70 manifest enhanced recognition of a promoter-like pause element positioned hundreds of nucleotides downstream of the promoter. Together, the results provide a quantitative framework for understanding the postinitiation roles of σ70 during transcription. PMID:26733675

  17. Nuclear Distribution of RNA Polymerase II and mRNA Processing Machinery in Early Mammalian Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bogolyubova, Irina O.; Bogolyubov, Dmitry S.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distribution of components of nuclear metabolism provides a significant impact on regulation of the processes of gene expression. While distribution of the key nuclear antigens and their association with the defined nuclear domains were thoroughly traced in mammalian somatic cells, similar data for the preimplantation embryos are scanty and fragmental. However, the period of cleavage is characterized by the most drastic and dynamic nuclear reorganizations accompanying zygotic gene activation. In this minireview, we try to summarize the results of studies concerning distribution of major factors involved in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, pre-mRNA splicing mRNA export that have been carried out on early embryos of mammals. PMID:24868542

  18. Glycosylation of RNA polymerase II from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Cervoni, L; Turano, C; Ferraro, A; Ciavatta, P; Marmocchi, F; Eufemi, M

    1997-11-10

    RNA polymerase II from wheat germ was analyzed for the presence of sugars. The two largest subunits and the 27 and 25 kDa subunits were found to be glycosylated by a variety of sugars. However, no N-acetylglucosamine was detected, which was found by Kelly et al. (J. Biol. Chem. (1993) 268, 10416-10424) in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II from calf thymus. Thus it appears that the regulatory function of this sugar, postulated by Kelly et al., is performed in the wheat germ enzyme by other monosaccharides. Carbohydrate analysis of the two largest subunits of the calf thymus enzyme also revealed the presence, beside N-acetylglucosamine, of other sugars. Some similarities in the features of glycosylation of the two polymerases, isolated from very different organisms, suggest that the sugar moieties have an important role in the structure and/or function of these enzymes. PMID:9395301

  19. Mechanisms of backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases I and II

    PubMed Central

    Lisica, Ana; Engel, Christoph; Jahnel, Marcus; Roldán, Édgar; Galburt, Eric A.; Cramer, Patrick; Grill, Stephan W.

    2016-01-01

    During DNA transcription, RNA polymerases often adopt inactive backtracked states. Recovery from backtracks can occur by 1D diffusion or cleavage of backtracked RNA, but how polymerases make this choice is unknown. Here, we use single-molecule optical tweezers experiments and stochastic theory to show that the choice of a backtrack recovery mechanism is determined by a kinetic competition between 1D diffusion and RNA cleavage. Notably, RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and Pol II recover from shallow backtracks by 1D diffusion, use RNA cleavage to recover from intermediary depths, and are unable to recover from extensive backtracks. Furthermore, Pol I and Pol II use distinct mechanisms to avoid nonrecoverable backtracking. Pol I is protected by its subunit A12.2, which decreases the rate of 1D diffusion and enables transcript cleavage up to 20 nt. In contrast, Pol II is fully protected through association with the cleavage stimulatory factor TFIIS, which enables rapid recovery from any depth by RNA cleavage. Taken together, we identify distinct backtrack recovery strategies of Pol I and Pol II, shedding light on the evolution of cellular functions of these key enzymes. PMID:26929337

  20. A Perspective on the Enhancer Dependent Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Here we review recent findings and offer a perspective on how the major variant RNA polymerase of bacteria, which contains the sigma54 factor, functions for regulated gene expression. We consider what gaps exist in our understanding of its genetic, biochemical and biophysical functioning and how they might be addressed. PMID:26010401

  1. Mammalian Cells with Altered Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Chan, V. L.; Whitmore, G. F.; Siminovitch, Louis

    1972-01-01

    Mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells that are resistant to α-amanitin can be isolated. At least some of these mutants contain an altered form of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II, as indicated by its resistance to α-amanitin. These results indicate that mutation to α-amanitin resistance involves a change of a structural gene. PMID:4508306

  2. A perspective on the enhancer dependent bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Here we review recent findings and offer a perspective on how the major variant RNA polymerase of bacteria, which contains the sigma54 factor, functions for regulated gene expression. We consider what gaps exist in our understanding of its genetic, biochemical and biophysical functioning and how they might be addressed. PMID:26010401

  3. RNA cleavage and chain elongation by Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in a binary enzyme.RNA complex.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, C R; Solow-Cordero, D E; Chamberlin, M J

    1994-01-01

    In the absence of DNA, Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) can bind RNA to form an equimolar binary complex with the concomitant release of the sigma factor. We show now that E. coli RNA polymerase binds at a region near the 3' terminus of the RNA and that an RNA in such RNA.RNA polymerase complexes undergoes reactions previously thought to be unique to nascent RNA in ternary complexes with DNA. These include GreA/GreB-dependent cleavage of the RNA and elongation by 3'-terminal addition of NMP from NTP. Both of these reactions are inhibited by rifampicin. Hence, by several criteria, the RNA in binary complexes is bound to the polymerase in a manner quite similar to that in ternary complexes. These findings can be explained by a model for the RNA polymerase ternary complex in which the RNA is bound at the 3' terminus through two protein binding sites located up to 10 nt apart. In this model, the stability of RNA binding to the polymerase in the ternary complex is due primarily to its interaction with the protein. Images PMID:7513426

  4. Degradation of DNA RNA Hybrids by Ribonuclease H and DNA Polymerases of Cellular and Viral Origin

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Walter; Crouch, Robert

    1972-01-01

    Ribonuclease H from human KB cells, chick embryos, calf thymus, avian myeloblastosis virus, and Rous associated virus specifically degrades the RNA of DNA·RNA hybrids, producing mono- and oligoribonucleotides terminated in 5′-phosphates. The cellular RNase H is an endonuclease, whereas the viral enzyme appears to be an exonuclease. Viral DNA polymerase and RNase H copurify through all separation steps. Therefore, RNase H activity is an intrinsic part of the viral DNA polymerase. DNA·RNA hybrids are also degraded by nucleases associated with cellular DNA polymerases and by exonuclease III. However, these nucleases differ from RNase H in their ability to degrade both strands of DNA·RNA hybrids. Images PMID:4343966

  5. New insights into the promoterless transcription of DNA coligo templates by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Seidl, Christine I; Ryan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Chemically synthesized DNA can carry small RNA sequence information but converting that information into small RNA is generally thought to require large double-stranded promoters in the context of plasmids, viruses and genes. We previously found evidence that circularized oligodeoxynucleotides (coligos) containing certain sequences and secondary structures can template the synthesis of small RNA by RNA polymerase III in vitro and in human cells. By using immunoprecipitated RNA polymerase III we now report corroborating evidence that this enzyme is the sole polymerase responsible for coligo transcription. The immobilized polymerase enabled experiments showing that coligo transcripts can be formed through transcription termination without subsequent 3' end trimming. To better define the determinants of productive transcription, a structure-activity relationship study was performed using over 20 new coligos. The results show that unpaired nucleotides in the coligo stem facilitate circumtranscription, but also that internal loops and bulges should be kept small to avoid secondary transcription initiation sites. A polymerase termination sequence embedded in the double-stranded region of a hairpin-encoding coligo stem can antagonize transcription. Using lessons learned from new and old coligos, we demonstrate how to convert poorly transcribed coligos into productive templates. Our findings support the possibility that coligos may prove useful as chemically synthesized vectors for the ectopic expression of small RNA in human cells.

  6. Discovery of alpha,gamma-diketo acids as potent selective and reversible inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5b RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Summa, Vincenzo; Petrocchi, Alessia; Pace, Paola; Matassa, Victor G; De Francesco, Raffaele; Altamura, Sergio; Tomei, Licia; Koch, Uwe; Neuner, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    alpha,gamma-Diketo acids (DKA) were discovered from screening as selective and reversible inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5b RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The diketo acid moiety proved essential for activity, while substitution on the gamma position was necessary for selectivity and potency. Optimization led to the identification of a DKA inhibitor of NS5b polymerase with IC(50) = 45 nM, one of the most potent HCV NS5b polymerase inhibitors reported.

  7. Single molecule studies of RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Horn, Abigail E; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is the first step in gene expression and a key determinant of cellular regulation. Elucidating the mechanism by which RNAP II synthesizes RNA is therefore vital to determining how genes are controlled under diverse biological conditions. Significant advances in understanding RNAP II transcription have been achieved using classical biochemical and structural techniques; however, aspects of the transcription mechanism cannot be assessed using these approaches. The application of single-molecule techniques to study RNAP II transcription has provided new insight only obtainable by studying molecules in this complex system one at a time.

  8. The Structure of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase of a Permutotetravirus Suggests a Link between Primer-Dependent and Primer-Independent Polymerases.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Diego S; Buxaderas, Mònica; Rodríguez, José F; Verdaguer, Núria

    2015-12-01

    Thosea asigna virus (TaV), an insect virus belonging to the Permutatetraviridae family, has a positive-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome with two overlapping open reading frames, encoding for the replicase and capsid proteins. The particular TaV replicase includes a structurally unique RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) with a sequence permutation in the palm sub-domain, where the active site is anchored. This non-canonical arrangement of the RdRP palm is also found in double-stranded RNA viruses of the Birnaviridae family. Both virus families also share a conserved VPg sequence motif at the polymerase N-terminus which in birnaviruses appears to be used to covalently link a fraction of the replicase molecules to the 5'-end of the genomic segments. Birnavirus VPgs are presumed to be used as primers for replication initiation. Here we have solved the crystal structure of the TaV RdRP, the first non-canonical RdRP of a ssRNA virus, in its apo- form and bound to different substrates. The enzyme arranges as a stable dimer maintained by mutual interactions between the active site cleft of one molecule and the flexible N-terminal tail of the symmetrically related RdRP. The latter, partially mimicking the RNA template backbone, is involved in regulating the polymerization activity. As expected from previous sequence-based bioinformatics predictions, the overall architecture of the TaV enzyme shows important resemblances with birnavirus polymerases. In addition, structural comparisons and biochemical analyses reveal unexpected similarities between the TaV RdRP and those of Flaviviruses. In particular, a long loop protruding from the thumb domain towards the central enzyme cavity appears to act as a platform for de novo initiation of RNA replication. Our findings strongly suggest an unexpected evolutionary relationship between the RdRPs encoded by these distant ssRNA virus groups. PMID:26625123

  9. Structure-based inhibition of Norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, Eloise; Pezzullo, Margherita; Tarantino, Delia; Petazzi, Roberto; Germani, Francesca; Kramer, Dorothea; Robel, Ivonne; Rohayem, Jacques; Bolognesi, Martino; Milani, Mario

    2012-06-01

    Caliciviridae are RNA viruses with a single-stranded, positively oriented polyadenylated genome, responsible for a broad spectrum of diseases such as acute gastroenteritis in humans. Recently, analyses on the structures and functionalities of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) from several Caliciviruses have been reported. The RdRp is predicted to play a key role in genome replication, as well as in synthesis and amplification of additional subgenomic RNA. Starting from the crystal structures of human Norovirus (hNV) RdRp, we performed an in silico docking search to identify synthetic compounds with predicted high affinity for the enzyme active site. The best-ranked candidates were tested in vitro on murine Norovirus (MNV) and hNV RdRps to assay their inhibition of RNA polymerization. The results of such combined computational and experimental screening approach led to the identification of two high-potency inhibitors: Suramin and NF023, both symmetric divalent molecules hosting two naphthalene-trisulfonic acid heads. We report here the crystal structure of MNV RdRp alone and in the presence of the two identified inhibitors. Both inhibitory molecules occupy the same RdRp site, between the fingers and thumb domains, with one inhibitor head close to residue 42 and to the protein active site. To further validate the structural results, we mutated Trp42 to Ala in MNV RdRp and the corresponding residue (i.e., Tyr41 to Ala) in hNV RdRp. Both NF023 and Suramin displayed reduced inhibitory potency versus the mutated hNV RdRp, thus hinting at a conserved inhibitor binding mode in the two polymerases.

  10. Bacterial control of host gene expression through RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Lutay, Nataliya; Ambite, Ines; Hernandez, Jenny Grönberg; Rydström, Gustav; Ragnarsdóttir, Bryndís; Puthia, Manoj; Nadeem, Aftab; Zhang, Jingyao; Storm, Petter; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    The normal flora furnishes the host with ecological barriers that prevent pathogen attack while maintaining tissue homeostasis. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) constitute a highly relevant model of microbial adaptation in which some patients infected with Escherichia coli develop acute pyelonephritis, while other patients with bacteriuria exhibit an asymptomatic carrier state similar to bacterial commensalism. It remains unclear if the lack of destructive inflammation merely reflects low virulence or if carrier strains actively inhibit disease-associated responses in the host. Here, we identify a new mechanism of bacterial adaptation through broad suppression of RNA polymerase II–dependent (Pol II–dependent) host gene expression. Over 60% of all genes were suppressed 24 hours after human inoculation with the prototype asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) strain E. coli 83972, and inhibition was verified by infection of human cells. Specific repressors and activators of Pol II–dependent transcription were modified, Pol II phosphorylation was inhibited, and pathogen-specific signaling was suppressed in cell lines and inoculated patients. An increased frequency of strains inhibiting Pol II was epidemiologically verified in ABU and fecal strains compared with acute pyelonephritis, and a Pol II antagonist suppressed the disease-associated host response. These results suggest that by manipulating host gene expression, ABU strains promote tissue integrity while inhibiting pathology. Such bacterial modulation of host gene expression may be essential to sustain asymptomatic bacterial carriage by ensuring that potentially destructive immune activation will not occur. PMID:23728172

  11. Rifampicin-resistance, rpoB polymorphism and RNA polymerase genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Alifano, Pietro; Palumbo, Carla; Pasanisi, Daniela; Talà, Adelfia

    2015-05-20

    Following its introduction in 1967, rifampicin has become a mainstay of therapy in the treatment of tuberculosis, leprosy and many other widespread diseases. Its potent antibacterial activity is due to specific inhibition of bacterial RNA polymerase. However, resistance to rifampicin was reported shortly after its introduction in the medical practice. Studies in the model organism Escherichia coli helped to define the molecular mechanism of rifampicin-resistance demonstrating that resistance is mostly due to chromosomal mutations in rpoB gene encoding the RNA polymerase β chain. These studies also revealed the amazing potential of the molecular genetics to elucidate the structure-function relationships in bacterial RNA polymerase. The scope of this paper is to illustrate how rifampicin-resistance has been recently exploited to better understand the regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial cell physiology and virulence, and how this information has been used to maneuver, on a global scale, gene expression in bacteria of industrial interest. In particular, we reviewed recent literature regarding: (i) the effects of rpoB mutations conferring rifampicin-resistance on transcription dynamics, bacterial fitness, physiology, metabolism and virulence; (ii) the occurrence in nature of "mutant-type" or duplicated rifampicin-resistant RNA polymerases; and (iii) the RNA polymerase genetic engineering method for strain improvement and drug discovery.

  12. Inhibition of RNA polymerase by captan at both DNA and substrate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, G; Lewis, R A

    1992-12-01

    RNA synthesis carried out in vitro by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase was inhibited irreversibly by captan when T7 DNA was used as template. An earlier report and this one show that captan blocks the DNA binding site on the enzyme. Herein, it is also revealed that captan acts at the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site, and kinetic relationships of the action of captan at the two sites are detailed. The inhibition by captan via the DNA binding site of the enzyme was confirmed by kinetic studies and it was further shown that [14C]captan bound to the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase. This subunit contains the DNA binding site. Competitive-like inhibition by captan versus UTP led to the conclusion that captan also blocked the NTP binding site. In support of this conclusion, [14C]captan was observed to bind to the beta subunit which contains the NTP binding site. Whereas, preincubation of RNA polymerase with both DNA and NTPs prevented captan inhibition, preincubation with either DNA or NTPs alone was insufficient to protect the enzyme from the action of captan. Furthermore, the interaction of [14C]captan with the beta and beta' subunits was not prevented by a similar preincubation. Captan also bound, to a lesser extent, to the alpha and sigma subunits. Therefore, captan binding appears to involve interaction with RNA polymerase at sites in addition to those for DNA and NTP; however, this action does not inhibit the polymerase activity.

  13. UV light-induced DNA lesions cause dissociation of yeast RNA polymerases-I and establishment of a specialized chromatin structure at rRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Maxime; Charton, Romain; Wittner, Manuel; Levasseur, Geneviève; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Conconi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of UV light-induced DNA lesions results from their interference with transcription and replication. DNA lesions arrest elongating RNA polymerases, an event that triggers transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. Since arrested RNA polymerases reduce the accessibility of repair factors to DNA lesions, they might be displaced. The fate of arrested RNA polymerases-II at DNA lesions has been extensively studied, yielding partially contradictory results. Considerably less is known about RNA polymerases-I that transcribe nucleosomes-depleted rRNA genes at very high rate. To investigate the fate of arrested RNA polymerases-I at DNA lesions, chromatin-immunoprecipitation, electron microscopy, transcription run-on, psoralen-cross-linking and chromatin-endogenous cleavage were employed. We found that RNA polymerases-I density increased at the 5′-end of the gene, likely due to continued transcription initiation followed by elongation and pausing/release at the first DNA lesion. Most RNA polymerases-I dissociated downstream of the first DNA lesion, concomitant with chromatin closing that resulted from deposition of nucleosomes. Although nucleosomes were deposited, the high mobility group-box Hmo1 (component of actively transcribed rRNA genes) remained associated. After repair of DNA lesions, Hmo1 containing chromatin might help to restore transcription elongation and reopening of rRNA genes chromatin. PMID:24097442

  14. Hypoxic stress suppresses RNA polymerase III recruitment and tRNA gene transcription in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ernens, Isabelle; Goodfellow, Sarah J.; Innes, Fiona; Kenneth, Niall S.; Derblay, Louise E.; White, Robert J.; Scott, Pamela H.

    2006-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription decreases when primary cultures of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes are exposed to low oxygen tension. Previous studies in fibroblasts have shown that the pol III-specific transcription factor IIIB (TFIIIB) is bound and regulated by the proto-oncogene product c-Myc, the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK and the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor protein, RB. The principal function of TFIIIB is to recruit pol III to its cognate gene template, an activity that is known to be inhibited by RB and stimulated by ERK. We demonstrate by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) that c-Myc also stimulates pol III recruitment by TFIIIB. However, hypoxic conditions cause TFIIIB dissociation from c-Myc and ERK, at the same time as increasing its interaction with RB. Consistent with this, ChIP assays indicate that the occupancy of tRNA genes by pol III is significantly reduced, whereas promoter binding by TFIIIB is undiminished. The data suggest that hypoxia can inhibit pol III transcription by altering the interactions between TFIIIB and its regulators and thus compromising its ability to recruit the polymerase. These effects are independent of cell cycle changes. PMID:16407335

  15. Human Nopp140, Which Interacts with RNA Polymerase I: Implications for rRNA Gene Transcription and Nucleolar Structural Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Kai; Pai, Chi-Yun; Huang, Jing-Yi; Yeh, Ning-Hsing

    1999-01-01

    Nopp140 is thought to shuttle between nucleolus and cytoplasm. However, the predominant nucleolar localization of Nopp140 homologues from different species suggests that Nopp140 is also involved in events occurring within the nucleolus. In this study, we demonstrated that the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I, RPA194, was coimmunoprecipitated with the human Nopp140 (hNopp140). Such an interaction is mediated through amino acids 204 to 382 of hNopp140. By double immunofluorescence, hNopp140 was colocalized with RNA polymerase I at the rDNA (rRNA genes) transcription active foci in the nucleolus. These results suggest that Nopp140 can interact with RNA polymerase I in vivo. Transfected cells expressing the amino-terminal half of hNopp140, hNopp140N382 (amino acids 1 to 382), displayed altered nucleoli with crescent-shaped structures. This phenotype is reminiscent of the segregated nucleoli induced by actinomycin D treatment, which is known to inhibit rRNA synthesis. Consistently, the hNopp140N382 protein mislocalized the endogenous RNA polymerase I and shut off cellular rRNA gene transcription as revealed by an in situ run-on assay. These dominant negative effects of the mutant hNopp140N382 suggest that Nopp140 plays an essential role in rDNA transcription. Interestingly, ectopic expression of hNopp140 to a very high level caused the formation of a transcriptionally inactive spherical structure occupying the entire nucleolar area which trapped the RNA polymerase I, fibrillarin, and hNopp140 but excluded the nucleolin. The mislocalizations of these nucleolar proteins after hNopp140 overexpression imply that Nopp140 may also play roles in maintenance of nucleolar integrity. PMID:10567578

  16. RNA Polymerase Backtracking in Gene Regulation and Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Nudler, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase is a ratchet machine that oscillates between productive and backtracked states at numerous DNA positions. The amount of backtracking (reversible sliding of the enzyme along DNA and RNA) varies from one to many nucleotides. Since its first description 15 years ago, backtracking has been implicated in a plethora of critical processes in bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Here we review the most fundamental roles of this phenomenon in controlling transcription elongation, pausing, termination, fidelity, and genome instability. We also discuss recent progress in understanding the structural and mechanistic properties of the backtracking process. PMID:22726433

  17. Inositol pyrophosphates regulate RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Thota, Swarna Gowri; Unnikannan, C P; Thampatty, Sitalakshmi R; Manorama, R; Bhandari, Rashna

    2015-02-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is an essential cellular process regulated by the metabolic state of a cell. We examined whether inositol pyrophosphates, energy-rich derivatives of inositol that act as metabolic messengers, play a role in ribosome synthesis in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains lacking the inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) kinase Kcs1, which is required for the synthesis of inositol pyrophosphates, display increased sensitivity to translation inhibitors and decreased protein synthesis. These phenotypes are reversed on expression of enzymatically active Kcs1, but not on expression of the inactive form. The kcs1Δ yeast cells exhibit reduced levels of ribosome subunits, suggesting that they are defective in ribosome biogenesis. The rate of rRNA synthesis, the first step of ribosome biogenesis, is decreased in kcs1Δ yeast strains, suggesting that RNA polymerase I (Pol I) activity may be reduced in these cells. We determined that the Pol I subunits, A190, A43 and A34.5, can accept a β-phosphate moiety from inositol pyrophosphates to undergo serine pyrophosphorylation. Although there is impaired rRNA synthesis in kcs1Δ yeast cells, we did not find any defect in recruitment of Pol I on rDNA, but observed that the rate of transcription elongation was compromised. Taken together, our findings highlight inositol pyrophosphates as novel regulators of rRNA transcription.

  18. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  19. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  20. Nascent Transcription Affected by RNA Polymerase IV in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Erhard, Karl F.; Talbot, Joy-El R. B.; Deans, Natalie C.; McClish, Allison E.; Hollick, Jay B.

    2015-01-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3ʹ-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. PMID:25653306

  1. Recent advances in understanding transcription termination by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Travis J.; Reines, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Transcription termination is a fundamental process in which RNA polymerase ceases RNA chain extension and dissociates from the chromatin template, thereby defining the end of the transcription unit. Our understanding of the biological role and functional importance of termination by RNA polymerase II and the range of processes in which it is involved has grown significantly in recent years. A large set of nucleic acid-binding proteins and enzymes have been identified as part of the termination machinery. A greater appreciation for the coupling of termination to RNA processing and metabolism has been recognized. In addition to serving as an essential step at the end of the transcription cycle, termination is involved in the regulation of a broad range of cellular processes. More recently, a role for termination in pervasive transcription, non-coding RNA regulation, genetic stability, chromatin remodeling, the immune response, and disease has come to the fore. Interesting mechanistic questions remain, but the last several years have resulted in significant insights into termination and an increasing recognition of its biological importance. PMID:27408690

  2. Interactions between the Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase Components and Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weizhong; Chen, Hongjun; Sutton, Troy; Obadan, Adebimpe

    2014-01-01

    responsible for the binding and subsequent activation of RIG-I, this structure is supposedly wrapped by RNA polymerase complex (PB2, PB1, and PA), which may interfere with the induction of RIG-I signaling pathway. In the present study, PB2, PB1, and PA were found to individually interact with RIG-Is from multiple mammalian and avian species in an RNA-independent manner, without significantly affecting the generation of IFN. The data suggest that although RIG-I binding by RNA polymerase complex is conserved in different species, it does not appear to play crucial role in the modulation of IFN in vitro. PMID:24942585

  3. An HDAC inhibitor enhances cancer therapeutic efficiency of RNA polymerase III promoter-driven IDO shRNA.

    PubMed

    Yen, M-C; Weng, T-Y; Chen, Y-L; Lin, C-C; Chen, C-Y; Wang, C-Y; Chao, H-L; Chen, C-S; Lai, M-D

    2013-06-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are used in treating certain human malignancies. Our laboratories demonstrated their capability in enhancing antitumor effect of DNA vaccine driven by an RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) promoter. However, it is unknown whether HDAC inhibitors enhance the therapeutic short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expressed by an RNA polymerase III (RNA pol III) promoter. We investigated whether HDAC inhibitors augmented antitumor effect of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) shRNA. HDAC inhibitor OSU-HDAC42 and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid enhanced RNA pol III-driven U6 and H1 promoter activity in three different cell types in vitro: 293, NIH3T3 and dendritic cell line DC2.4. Subcutaneous injection of OSU-HDAC42 enhanced U6 and H1 promoter activity on abdominal skin of mice in vivo. Combination of IDO shRNA and OSU-HDAC42 increased antitumor effect of IDO shRNA in MBT-2 murine bladder tumor model. IDO shRNA induced tumor-infiltrating CD8⁺ and CD4⁺ T cells, whereas OSU-HDAC42 treatment induced tumor-infiltrating CD4⁺ T cells. Combination of OSU-HDAC42 and IDO shRNA further induced tumor-infiltrating natural killer cells and enhanced interferon-γ in lymphocytes, but suppressed interleukin (IL)-4 expression of lymphocytes. In addition, OSU-HDAC42 treatment did not alter mRNA expression of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In conclusion, HDAC inhibitor OSU-HDAC42 may serve as adjuvant of the therapeutic shRNA expressed by an RNA pol III promoter.

  4. The methyltransferase domain of dengue virus protein NS5 ensures efficient RNA synthesis initiation and elongation by the polymerase domain.

    PubMed

    Potisopon, Supanee; Priet, Stéphane; Collet, Axelle; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno; Selisko, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) responsible for the replication of single-strand RNA virus genomes exert their function in the context of complex replication machineries. Within these replication complexes the polymerase activity is often highly regulated by RNA elements, proteins or other domains of multi-domain polymerases. Here, we present data of the influence of the methyltransferase domain (NS5-MTase) of dengue virus (DENV) protein NS5 on the RdRp activity of the polymerase domain (NS5-Pol). The steady-state polymerase activities of DENV-2 recombinant NS5 and NS5-Pol are compared using different biochemical assays allowing the dissection of the de novo initiation, transition and elongation steps of RNA synthesis. We show that NS5-MTase ensures efficient RdRp activity by stimulating the de novo initiation and the elongation phase. This stimulation is related to a higher affinity of NS5 toward the single-strand RNA template indicating NS5-MTase either completes a high-affinity RNA binding site and/or promotes the correct formation of the template tunnel. Furthermore, the NS5-MTase increases the affinity of the priming nucleotide ATP upon de novo initiation and causes a higher catalytic efficiency of the polymerase upon elongation. The complex stimulation pattern is discussed under the perspective that NS5 adopts several conformations during RNA synthesis. PMID:25209234

  5. The methyltransferase domain of dengue virus protein NS5 ensures efficient RNA synthesis initiation and elongation by the polymerase domain

    PubMed Central

    Potisopon, Supanee; Priet, Stéphane; Collet, Axelle; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno; Selisko, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) responsible for the replication of single-strand RNA virus genomes exert their function in the context of complex replication machineries. Within these replication complexes the polymerase activity is often highly regulated by RNA elements, proteins or other domains of multi-domain polymerases. Here, we present data of the influence of the methyltransferase domain (NS5-MTase) of dengue virus (DENV) protein NS5 on the RdRp activity of the polymerase domain (NS5-Pol). The steady-state polymerase activities of DENV-2 recombinant NS5 and NS5-Pol are compared using different biochemical assays allowing the dissection of the de novo initiation, transition and elongation steps of RNA synthesis. We show that NS5-MTase ensures efficient RdRp activity by stimulating the de novo initiation and the elongation phase. This stimulation is related to a higher affinity of NS5 toward the single-strand RNA template indicating NS5-MTase either completes a high-affinity RNA binding site and/or promotes the correct formation of the template tunnel. Furthermore, the NS5-MTase increases the affinity of the priming nucleotide ATP upon de novo initiation and causes a higher catalytic efficiency of the polymerase upon elongation. The complex stimulation pattern is discussed under the perspective that NS5 adopts several conformations during RNA synthesis. PMID:25209234

  6. RNA polymerase II subunit RPB4 is essential for high- and low-temperature yeast cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Woychik, N A; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    RPB4 encodes the fourth-largest RNA polymerase II subunit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The RPB4 gene was cloned and sequenced, and its identity was confirmed by amino acid sequence analysis of tryptic peptides from the purified subunit. The RPB4 DNA sequence predicted a protein of 221 amino acids with a molecular mass of 25,414 daltons. The central 100 amino acids of the RPB4 protein were found to be similar to a segment of the major sigma subunit in Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. Deletion of RPB4 produced cells that were heat and cold sensitive but could grow, albeit slowly, at intermediate temperatures. RNA polymerase II lacking the RPB4 subunit exhibited markedly reduced activity in crude extracts in vitro. The RPB4 subunit, although not essential for mRNA synthesis or enzyme assembly, was essential for normal levels of RNA polymerase II activity and indispensable for cell viability over a wide temperature range. Images PMID:2674672

  7. Human MAF1 targets and represses active RNA polymerase III genes by preventing recruitment rather than inducing long-term transcriptional arrest

    PubMed Central

    Orioli, Andrea; Praz, Viviane; Lhôte, Philippe; Hernandez, Nouria

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) is tightly controlled in response to environmental cues, yet a genomic-scale picture of Pol III regulation and the role played by its repressor MAF1 is lacking. Here, we describe genome-wide studies in human fibroblasts that reveal a dynamic and gene-specific adaptation of Pol III recruitment to extracellular signals in an mTORC1-dependent manner. Repression of Pol III recruitment and transcription are tightly linked to MAF1, which selectively localizes at Pol III loci, even under serum-replete conditions, and increasingly targets transcribing Pol III in response to serum starvation. Combining Pol III binding profiles with EU-labeling and high-throughput sequencing of newly synthesized small RNAs, we show that Pol III occupancy closely reflects ongoing transcription. Our results exclude the long-term, unproductive arrest of Pol III on the DNA as a major regulatory mechanism and identify previously uncharacterized, differential coordination in Pol III binding and transcription under different growth conditions. PMID:26941251

  8. Comparative overview of RNA polymerase II and III transcription cycles, with focus on RNA polymerase III termination and reinitiation.

    PubMed

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (RNAP) III transcribes hundreds of genes for tRNAs and 5S rRNA, among others, which share similar promoters and stable transcription initiation complexes (TIC), which support rapid RNAP III recycling. In contrast, RNAP II transcribes a large number of genes with highly variable promoters and interacting factors, which exert fine regulatory control over TIC lability and modifications of RNAP II at different transitional points in the transcription cycle. We review data that illustrate a relatively smooth continuity of RNAP III initiation-elongation-termination and reinitiation toward its function to produce high levels of tRNAs and other RNAs that support growth and development.

  9. Physical isolation of nascent RNA chains transcribed by RNA polymerase II: evidence for cotranscriptional splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Wuarin, J; Schibler, U

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine whether splicing can occur cotranscriptionally in mammalian nuclei, we mapped exon-intron boundaries on nascent RNA chains transcribed by RNA polymerase II. A procedure that allows fractionation of nuclei into a chromatin pellet containing DNA, histones, and ternary transcription complexes and a supernatant containing the bulk of the nonhistone proteins and RNAs that are released from their DNA templates was developed. The transcripts of the genes encoding DBP, a transcriptional activator protein, and HMG coenzyme A reductase recovered from the chromatin pellet and the supernatant were analyzed by S1 nuclease mapping. The large majority of the RNA molecules from the pellet appeared to be nascent transcripts, since, in contrast to the transcripts present in the supernatant, they were not cleaved at the polyadenylation site but rather contained heterogeneous 3' termini encompassing this site. Splicing intermediates could be detected among nascent and released transcripts, suggesting that splicing occurs both cotranscriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Our results also indicate that polyadenylation is not required for the splicing of the last DBP intron. In addition to allowing detailed structural analysis of nascent RNA chains, the physical isolation of nascent transcripts also yields reliable measurements of relative transcription rates. Images PMID:7523861

  10. Molecular structures of unbound and transcribing RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Niklas A.; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Moreno-Morcillo, Maria; Glatt, Sebastian; Kosinski, Jan; Hagen, Wim J. H.; Sachse, Carsten; Müller, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of genes encoding small structured RNAs such as tRNAs, spliceosomal U6 snRNA and ribosomal 5S RNA is carried out by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), the largest yet structurally least characterized eukaryotic RNA polymerase. The cryo-EM structures of the S. cerevisiae Pol III elongating complex at 3.9 Å resolution and the apo Pol III enzyme in two different conformations at 4.6 and 4.7 Å resolution, respectively, allow for the first time to build a 17-subunit atomic model of Pol III. The reconstructions reveal the precise orientation of the C82/C34/C31 heterotrimer in close proximity to the stalk. The C53/C37 heterodimer positions residues involved in transcription termination close to the non-template DNA strand. In the apo Pol III structures, the stalk adopts different orientations coupled with closed and open conformations of the clamp. Our results provide novel insights into Pol III-specific transcription and the adaptation of Pol III towards its small transcriptional targets. PMID:26605533

  11. Nuclear import of RNA polymerase II is coupled with nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the RNA polymerase II-associated protein 2.

    PubMed

    Forget, Diane; Lacombe, Andrée-Anne; Cloutier, Philippe; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Blanchette, Mathieu; Coulombe, Benoit

    2013-08-01

    The RNA polymerase II (RNAP II)-associated protein (RPAP) 2 has been discovered through its association with various subunits of RNAP II in affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry experiments. Here, we show that RPAP2 is a mainly cytoplasmic protein that shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. RPAP2 shuttling is tightly coupled with nuclear import of RNAP II, as RPAP2 silencing provokes abnormal accumulation of RNAP II in the cytoplasmic space. Most notably, RPAP4/GPN1 silencing provokes the retention of RPAP2 in the nucleus. Our results support a model in which RPAP2 enters the nucleus in association with RNAP II and returns to the cytoplasm in association with the GTPase GPN1/RPAP4. Although binding of RNAP II to RPAP2 is mediated by an N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-170) that contains a nuclear retention domain, and binding of RPAP4/GPN1 to RPAP2 occurs through a C-terminal domain (amino acids 156-612) that has a dominant cytoplasmic localization domain. In conjunction with previously published data, our results have important implications, as they indicate that RPAP2 controls gene expression by two distinct mechanisms, one that targets RNAP II activity during transcription and the other that controls availability of RNAP II in the nucleus.

  12. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  13. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template.

    PubMed

    Pai, Dave A; Kaplan, Craig D; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C; Engelke, David R

    2014-05-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template.

  14. Production of RNA by a polymerase protein encapsulated within phospholipid vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Catalyzed polymerization reactions represent a primary anabolic activity of all cells. It can be assumed that early cells carried out such reactions, in which macromolecular catalysts were encapsulated within some type of boundary membrane. In the experiments described here, we show that a template-independent RNA polymerase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) can be encapsulated in dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles without substrate. When the substrate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was provided externally, long-chain RNA polymers were synthesized within the vesicles. Substrate flux was maximized by maintaining the vesicles at the phase transition temperature of the component lipid. A protease was introduced externally as an additional control. Free enzyme was inactivated under identical conditions. RNA products were visualized in situ by ethidium bromide fluorescence. The products were harvested from the liposomes, radiolabeled, and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Encapsulated catalysts represent a model for primitive cellular systems in which an RNA polymerase was entrapped within a protected microenvironment.

  15. Structural bases of norovirus RNA dependent RNA polymerase inhibition by novel suramin-related compounds.

    PubMed

    Croci, Romina; Pezzullo, Margherita; Tarantino, Delia; Milani, Mario; Tsay, Shwu-Chen; Sureshbabu, Radhakrishnan; Tsai, Yi-Jin; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Rohayem, Jacques; Bolognesi, Martino; Hwu, Jih Ru

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NV) are +ssRNA viruses responsible for severe gastroenteritis; no effective vaccines/antivirals are currently available. We previously identified Suramin (9) as a potent inhibitor of NV-RNA dependent RNA polymerase (NV-RdRp). Despite significant in vitro activities versus several pharmacological targets, Suramin clinical use is hampered by pharmacokinetics/toxicity problems. To improve Suramin access to NV-RdRp in vivo, a Suramin-derivative, 8, devoid of two sulphonate groups, was synthesized, achieving significant anti-human-NV-RdRp activity (IC50 = 28 nM); the compound inhibits also murine NV (mNV) RdRp. The synthesis process led to the isolation/characterization of lower molecular weight intermediates (3-7) hosting only one sulphonate head. The crystal structures of both hNV/mNV-RdRps in complex with 6, were analyzed, providing new knowledge on the interactions that a small fragment can establish with NV-RdRps, and establishing a platform for structure-guided optimization of potency, selectivity and drugability.

  16. Structural Bases of Norovirus RNA Dependent RNA Polymerase Inhibition by Novel Suramin-Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Delia; Milani, Mario; Tsay, Shwu-Chen; Sureshbabu, Radhakrishnan; Tsai, Yi-Jin; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Rohayem, Jacques; Bolognesi, Martino; Hwu, Jih Ru

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NV) are +ssRNA viruses responsible for severe gastroenteritis; no effective vaccines/antivirals are currently available. We previously identified Suramin (9) as a potent inhibitor of NV-RNA dependent RNA polymerase (NV-RdRp). Despite significant in vitro activities versus several pharmacological targets, Suramin clinical use is hampered by pharmacokinetics/toxicity problems. To improve Suramin access to NV-RdRp in vivo, a Suramin-derivative, 8, devoid of two sulphonate groups, was synthesized, achieving significant anti-human-NV-RdRp activity (IC50 = 28 nM); the compound inhibits also murine NV (mNV) RdRp. The synthesis process led to the isolation/characterization of lower molecular weight intermediates (3–7) hosting only one sulphonate head. The crystal structures of both hNV/mNV-RdRps in complex with 6, were analyzed, providing new knowledge on the interactions that a small fragment can establish with NV-RdRps, and establishing a platform for structure-guided optimization of potency, selectivity and drugability. PMID:24622391

  17. Unique double-stranded RNAs associated with the Trichomonas vaginalis virus are synthesized by viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnan, A; Provenzano, D; Alderete, J F

    1994-01-01

    Most Trichomonas vaginalis isolates are carriers of the multisegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus. In vitro polymerase assays were performed to demonstrate the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) activity of purified particles. Transcripts which comigrated with the dsRNAs of the virus were readily detected as synthesized products, indicating viral RDRP activity. In addition, smaller-sized dsRNA species, possibly two of approximately 700 bp (s1) and one of 500 bp (s2), were synthesized by purified virus particles of the CsCl gradient surrounding the virus peak. No cross-hybridization with either s1 or s2 and the dsRNA segments occurred, suggesting that s1 and s2 were synthesized from different templates. An RNase A protection assay revealed that the synthesized s1 and s2 polymerase products were double stranded. Furthermore, hybridization of products with strand-specific RNA of s1 generated from cDNA indicated that only one strand was synthesized in vitro. s1 and s2 were not visualized in ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels of dsRNA of infected trichomonads grown in batch cultures. However, dsRNA profiles of the same infected organisms cultivated under defined continuous-flow conditions contained readily detectable levels of s1 and s2, indicating that amplification of s1 and s2 occurred under specific environmental conditions. These newly discovered dsRNAs were not detected in all of the virus-carrying isolates. Finally, it is noteworthy that the s1 and s2 dsRNAs and the RDRP activity were not detected in trichomonal isolates without virus or in virus-negative progeny derived from virus-positive parental isolates. These data indicate the possibility of variations in the number of dsRNAs and/or of the presence of satellites in trichomonads infected with the multisegmented virus. Images PMID:7933092

  18. Synergistic action of RNA polymerases in overcoming the nucleosomal barrier.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Bai, Lu; Johnson, Daniel S; Fulbright, Robert M; Kireeva, Maria L; Kashlev, Mikhail; Wang, Michelle D

    2010-06-01

    During gene expression, RNA polymerase (RNAP) encounters a major barrier at a nucleosome and yet must access the nucleosomal DNA. Previous in vivo evidence has suggested that multiple RNAPs might increase transcription efficiency through nucleosomes. Here we have quantitatively investigated this hypothesis using Escherichia coli RNAP as a model system by directly monitoring its location on the DNA via a single-molecule DNA-unzipping technique. When an RNAP encountered a nucleosome, it paused with a distinctive 10-base pair periodicity and backtracked by approximately 10-15 base pairs. When two RNAPs elongate in close proximity, the trailing RNAP apparently assists in the leading RNAP's elongation, reducing its backtracking and enhancing its transcription through a nucleosome by a factor of 5. Taken together, our data indicate that histone-DNA interactions dictate RNAP pausing behavior, and alleviation of nucleosome-induced backtracking by multiple polymerases may prove to be a mechanism for overcoming the nucleosomal barrier in vivo.

  19. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification.

    PubMed

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Blewett, Nathan H; Iben, James R; Lamichhane, Tek N; Cherkasova, Vera; Hafner, Markus; Maraia, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP) III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR) that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m(2)2G26) modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m(2)2G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m(2)2G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m(2)2G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m(2)2G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells. PMID:26720005

  20. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification

    PubMed Central

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G.; Blewett, Nathan H.; Iben, James R.; Lamichhane, Tek N.; Cherkasova, Vera; Hafner, Markus; Maraia, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP) III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR) that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m2 2G26) modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m2 2G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m2 2G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m2 2G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m2 2G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells. PMID:26720005

  1. Synthesis of infectious poliovirus RNA by purified T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, S; Bradley, J; Wimmer, E; Studier, F W; Dunn, J J

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids containing the entire cDNA sequence of poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) under control of a promoter for T7 RNA polymerase have been constructed. Purified T7 RNA polymerase efficiently transcribes the entire poliovirus cDNA in either direction to produce full-length poliovirus RNA [(+)RNA] or its complement [(-)RNA]. The (+)RNA produced initially had 60 nucleotides on the 5' side of the poliovirus RNA sequence, including a string of 18 consecutive guanine residues generated in the original cloning and an additional 626 nucleotides of pBR322 sequence beyond the poly(A) tract at the 3' end. Such RNA, while much more infectious than the plasmid DNA, is only about 0.1% as infectious as RNA isolated from the virus. Subsequently, a T7 promoter was placed only 2 base pairs ahead of the poliovirus sequence, so that T7 RNA polymerase synthesizes poliovirus RNA with only 2 additional guanine residues at the 5' end and no more than seven nucleotides past the poly(A) tract at the 3' end. Such RNA has much higher specific infectivity, about 5% that of RNA isolated from the virus. The ability to make infectious poliovirus RNA efficiently from cloned DNA makes it possible to apply techniques of in vitro mutagenesis to the analysis of poliovirus functions and the construction of novel and perhaps useful derivatives of poliovirus. A source of variant RNAs should also allow detailed study of the synthesis and processing of poliovirus proteins in vitro. Images PMID:3010307

  2. Nonnucleoside Inhibitor of Measles Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complex Activity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura K.; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Lee, Jin K.; Sun, Aiming; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian; Snyder, James P.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses comprise several major human pathogens. Although a live-attenuated vaccine protects against measles virus (MV), a member of the paramyxovirus family, the virus remains a principal cause of worldwide mortality and accounts for approximately 21 million cases and 300,000 to 400,000 deaths annually. The development of novel antivirals that allow improved case management of severe measles and silence viral outbreaks is thus highly desirable. We have previously described the development of novel MV fusion inhibitors. The potential for preexisting or emerging resistance in the field constitutes the rationale for the identification of additional MV inhibitors with a diverse target spectrum. Here, we report the development and implementation of a cell-based assay for high-throughput screening of MV antivirals, which has yielded several hit candidates. Following confirmation by secondary assays and chemical synthesis, the most potent hit was found to act as a target-specific inhibitor of MV replication with desirable drug-like properties. The compound proved highly active against multiple primary isolates of diverse MV genotypes currently circulating worldwide, showing active concentrations of 35 to 145 nM. Significantly, it does not interfere with viral entry and lacks cross-resistance with the MV fusion inhibitor class. Mechanistic characterization on a subinfection level revealed that the compound represents a first-in-class nonnucleoside inhibitor of MV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex activity. Singly or in combination with the fusion inhibitors, this novel compound class has high developmental potential as a potent therapeutic against MV and will likely further the mechanistic characterization of the viral polymerase complex. PMID:17470652

  3. Potent Host-Directed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Myxovirus RNA-Dependent RNA-Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Stefanie A.; Ndungu, J. Maina; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Dochow, Melanie; Sun, Aiming; Natchus, Michael; Snyder, James P.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid adaptation to a pathogen

  4. RNA polymerase B from Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Purification and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Greenleaf, A L; Bautz, E K

    1975-12-01

    A purification procedure is described by which we obtained DNA-dependent RNA polymerase B (or II) from third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster in essentially pure form. The enzyme is similar to the analogous polymerases from other eukaryotes in its enzymic and structural properties. It preferentially transcribes DNAs containing single-stranded regions, and it is inhibited by low amounts of the toxin alpha-amanitin; 50% inhibition occurs at an alpha-amanitin concentration of 0.03 mug/ml. Dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolves the purified Drosophila polymerase B into ten polypeptides with molecular weights as follows: 1 (174000), 2 (137000), 3 (34000), 4 (22000), 5 (18000), 6 and 7 (16000), 8 (15000), and 9 and 10 (less than 15000). The relative amounts of polypeptides 1-4 were constant at molar ratios of approximately 1:1:1:2 in different preparations of the enzyme, while the amounts of polypeptides 5-10 showed more variation. An antiserum directed against the Drosophila RNA polymerase B inhibited the activity in vitro of the B enzymes from Drosophila, yeast, and calf thymus. However, only the Drosophila enzyme gave a precipitin reaction with the antiserum. When the antiserum was added to Drosophila RNA polymerase B at different stages of the purification, the resulting precipitates were found to contain nearly constant proportions of seven of the ten polypeptides present in the purified enzyme. PMID:812697

  5. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel.

    PubMed

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-06-25

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  6. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    PubMed Central

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-01-01

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries. PMID:26120903

  7. Polycistronic RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNA interference based on BIC/miR-155.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kwan-Ho; Hart, Christopher C; Al-Bassam, Sarmad; Avery, Adam; Taylor, Jennifer; Patel, Paresh D; Vojtek, Anne B; Turner, David L

    2006-01-01

    Vector-based RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a valuable tool for analysis of gene function. We have developed new RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNAi, designated SIBR vectors, based upon the non-coding RNA BIC. BIC contains the miR-155 microRNA (miRNA) precursor, and we find that expression of a short region of the third exon of mouse BIC is sufficient to produce miR-155 in mammalian cells. The SIBR vectors use a modified miR-155 precursor stem-loop and flanking BIC sequences to express synthetic miRNAs complementary to target RNAs. Like RNA polymerase III driven short hairpin RNA vectors, the SIBR vectors efficiently reduce target mRNA and protein expression. The synthetic miRNAs can be expressed from an intron, allowing coexpression of a marker or other protein with the miRNAs. In addition, intronic expression of a synthetic miRNA from a two intron vector enhances RNAi. A SIBR vector can express two different miRNAs from a single transcript for effective inhibition of two different target mRNAs. Furthermore, at least eight tandem copies of a synthetic miRNA can be expressed in a polycistronic transcript to increase the inhibition of a target RNA. The SIBR vectors are flexible tools for a variety of RNAi applications.

  8. Polycistronic RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNA interference based on BIC/miR-155

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwan-Ho; Hart, Christopher C.; Al-Bassam, Sarmad; Avery, Adam; Taylor, Jennifer; Patel, Paresh D.; Vojtek, Anne B.; Turner, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Vector-based RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a valuable tool for analysis of gene function. We have developed new RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNAi, designated SIBR vectors, based upon the non-coding RNA BIC. BIC contains the miR-155 microRNA (miRNA) precursor, and we find that expression of a short region of the third exon of mouse BIC is sufficient to produce miR-155 in mammalian cells. The SIBR vectors use a modified miR-155 precursor stem–loop and flanking BIC sequences to express synthetic miRNAs complementary to target RNAs. Like RNA polymerase III driven short hairpin RNA vectors, the SIBR vectors efficiently reduce target mRNA and protein expression. The synthetic miRNAs can be expressed from an intron, allowing coexpression of a marker or other protein with the miRNAs. In addition, intronic expression of a synthetic miRNA from a two intron vector enhances RNAi. A SIBR vector can express two different miRNAs from a single transcript for effective inhibition of two different target mRNAs. Furthermore, at least eight tandem copies of a synthetic miRNA can be expressed in a polycistronic transcript to increase the inhibition of a target RNA. The SIBR vectors are flexible tools for a variety of RNAi applications. PMID:16614444

  9. Bacterial Transcription Inhibitor of RNA Polymerase Holoenzyme Formation by Structure-Based Drug Design: From in Silico Screening to Validation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial transcription is a proven target for antibacterial research. However, most of the known inhibitors targeting transcription are from natural extracts or are hits from screens where the binding site remains unidentified. Using an RNA polymerase holoenzyme homology structure from the model Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis, we created a pharmacophore model and used it for in silico screening of a publicly available library for compounds able to inhibit holoenzyme formation. The hits demonstrated specific affinity to bacterial RNA polymerase and excellent activity using in vitro assays and showed no binding to the equivalent structure from human RNA polymerase II. The target specificity in live cells and antibacterial activity was demonstrated in microscopy and growth inhibition experiments. This is the first example of targeted inhibitor development for a bacterial RNA polymerase, outlining a complete discovery process from virtual screening to biochemical validation. This approach could serve as an appropriate platform for the future identification of inhibitors of bacterial transcription. PMID:27622946

  10. Double strand breaks: hurdles for RNA polymerase II transcription?

    PubMed

    Pankotai, Tibor; Soutoglou, Evi

    2013-01-01

    DNA lesions pose a physical obstacle to DNA-dependent cellular transactions such as replication and transcription. A great deal is known regarding RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcription stalling in the presence of lesions induced by UV, but recent studies have uncovered previously uncharacterized behavior of the RNAP II machinery in the presence of double strand breaks (DSBs). These new data, although contradictory, contribute to our understanding of a vital cellular mechanism that defends against the production of aberrant transcripts and protects cell viability.

  11. Chromatin modification by the RNA Polymerase II elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Tanny, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) involves the coordinated action of numerous regulatory factors. Among these are chromatin-modifying enzymes, which generate a stereotypic and conserved pattern of histone modifications along transcribed genes. This pattern implies a precise coordination between regulators of histone modification and the RNAP II elongation complex. Here I review the pathways and molecular events that regulate co-transcriptional histone modifications. Insight into these events will illuminate the assembly of functional RNAP II elongation complexes and how the chromatin landscape influences their composition and function. PMID:25494544

  12. Optimization of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis RNA polymerase expression and purification.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rajdeep; Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the human pathogen that causes tuberculosis, warrants enormous attention due to the emergence of multi drug resistant and extremely drug resistant strains. RNA polymerase (RNAP), the key enzyme in gene regulation, is an attractive target for anti-TB drugs. Understanding the structure-function relationship of M. tuberculosis RNAP and the mechanism of gene regulation by RNAP in conjunction with different σ factors and transcriptional regulators would provide significant information for anti-tuberculosis drug development targeting RNAP. Studies with M. tuberculosis RNAP remain tedious because of the extremely slow-growing nature of the bacteria and requirement of special laboratory facility. Here, we have developed and optimized recombinant methods to prepare M. tuberculosis RNAP core and RNAP holo enzymes assembled in vivo in Escherichia coli. These methods yield high amounts of transcriptionally active enzymes, free of E. coli RNAP contamination. The recombinant M. tuberculosis RNAP is used to develop a highly sensitive fluorescence based in vitro transcription assay that could be easily adopted in a high-throughput format to screen RNAP inhibitors. These recombinant methods would be useful to set a platform for M. tuberculosis RNAP targeted anti TB drug development, to analyse the structure/function of M. tuberculosis RNAP and to analyse the interactions among promoter DNA, RNAP, σ factors, and transcription regulators of M. tuberculosis in vitro, avoiding the hazard of handling of pathogenic bacteria.

  13. Transcription inactivation through local refolding of the RNA polymerase structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Appleman, James R.; Xiang, Alan X.; Lira, Ricardo; Webber, Stephen E.; Klyuyev, Sergiy; Nudler, Evgeny; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.

    2009-02-12

    Structural studies of antibiotics not only provide a shortcut to medicine allowing for rational structure-based drug design, but may also capture snapshots of dynamic intermediates that become 'frozen' after inhibitor binding. Myxopyronin inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) by an unknown mechanism. Here we report the structure of dMyx - a desmethyl derivative of myxopyronin B - complexed with a Thermus thermophilus RNAP holoenzyme. The antibiotic binds to a pocket deep inside the RNAP clamp head domain, which interacts with the DNA template in the transcription bubble. Notably, binding of dMyx stabilizes refolding of the {beta}'-subunit switch-2 segment, resulting in a configuration that might indirectly compromise binding to, or directly clash with, the melted template DNA strand. Consistently, footprinting data show that the antibiotic binding does not prevent nucleation of the promoter DNA melting but instead blocks its propagation towards the active site. Myxopyronins are thus, to our knowledge, a first structurally characterized class of antibiotics that target formation of the pre-catalytic transcription initiation complex - the decisive step in gene expression control. Notably, mutations designed in switch-2 mimic the dMyx effects on promoter complexes in the absence of antibiotic. Overall, our results indicate a plausible mechanism of the dMyx action and a stepwise pathway of open complex formation in which core enzyme mediates the final stage of DNA melting near the transcription start site, and that switch-2 might act as a molecular checkpoint for DNA loading in response to regulatory signals or antibiotics. The universally conserved switch-2 may have the same role in all multisubunit RNAPs.

  14. Mechanism for Coordinated RNA Packaging and Genome Replication by Rotavirus Polymerase VP1

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaohui; McDonald, Sarah M.; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Tao, Yizhi Jane; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Nibert, Max L.; Patton, John T.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2009-04-08

    Rotavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1 catalyzes RNA synthesis within a subviral particle. This activity depends on core shell protein VP2. A conserved sequence at the 3' end of plus-strand RNA templates is important for polymerase association and genome replication. We have determined the structure of VP1 at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, as apoenzyme and in complex with RNA. The cage-like enzyme is similar to reovirus {lambda}3, with four tunnels leading to or from a central, catalytic cavity. A distinguishing characteristic of VP1 is specific recognition, by conserved features of the template-entry channel, of four bases, UGUG, in the conserved 3' sequence. Well-defined interactions with these bases position the RNA so that its 3' end overshoots the initiating register, producing a stable but catalytically inactive complex. We propose that specific 3' end recognition selects rotavirus RNA for packaging and that VP2 activates the autoinhibited VP1/RNA complex to coordinate packaging and genome replication.

  15. RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells reveals requirements for de novo initiation and protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Tragesser, Brady; Xu, Zhili; Stein, Barry; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a model positive-strand RNA virus whose replication has been studied in a number of surrogate hosts. In transiently transfected human cells, the BMV polymerase 2a activated signaling by the innate immune receptor RIG-I, which recognizes de novo-initiated non-self-RNAs. Active-site mutations in 2a abolished RIG-I activation, and coexpression of the BMV 1a protein stimulated 2a activity. Mutations previously shown to abolish 1a and 2a interaction prevented the 1a-dependent enhancement of 2a activity. New insights into 1a-2a interaction include the findings that helicase active site of 1a is required to enhance 2a polymerase activity and that negatively charged amino acid residues between positions 110 and 120 of 2a contribute to interaction with the 1a helicase-like domain but not to the intrinsic polymerase activity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the BMV 1a and 2a colocalized to perinuclear region in human cells. However, no perinuclear spherule-like structures were detected in human cells by immunoelectron microscopy. Sequencing of the RNAs coimmunoprecipitated with RIG-I revealed that the 2a-synthesized short RNAs are derived from the message used to translate 2a. That is, 2a exhibits a strong cis preference for BMV RNA2. Strikingly, the 2a RNA products had initiation sequences (5'-GUAAA-3') identical to those from the 5' sequence of the BMV genomic RNA2 and RNA3. These results show that the BMV 2a polymerase does not require other BMV proteins to initiate RNA synthesis but that the 1a helicase domain, and likely helicase activity, can affect RNA synthesis by 2a.

  16. Transcription elongation factor SII interacts with a domain of the large subunit of human RNA polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, J.; Cho, K.; Saltzman, A.; Prenger, J.; Golomb, M.; Weinmann, R.

    1988-08-01

    Genomic sequences for the large subunit of human RNA polymerase II corresponding to a part of the fifth exon were inserted into an expression vector at the carboxy-terminal end of the ..beta..-galactosidase gene. The in-frame construct produced a 125-kilodalton fusion protein, containing approximately 10 kilodaltons of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II and 116 kilodaltons of ..beta..-galactosidase. The purified bacterially produced fusion protein inhibited specific transcription from the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter, while ..beta..-galactosidase had no effect. The effect of the fusion protein was during RNA elongation, not at the level of initiation, resembling the faithfully initiated but incomplete transcripts produced with purified factors in the absence of SII. Similarly, monoclonal antibody 2-7B, which reacts with the RNA polymerase II region represented in the fusion protein, inhibited specific transcription at the level of elongation in a whole-cell extract. Both monoclonal antibody 2-7B and the fusion protein, although unable to inhibit purified RNA polymerase II in a nonspecific transcription assay, selectively blocked the stimulation elicited by transcription elongation factor SII on the activity of the purified enzyme in vitro. This suggests that the fusion protein traps the SII in nonstimulatory interactions and that anitibody 2-7B inhibits SII binding to RNA polymerase II. Thus, this suggests that an SII-binding contact required for specific RNA elongation resides within the fifth exon region of the largest RNA polymerase II subunit.

  17. In situ structures of the segmented genome and RNA polymerase complex inside a dsRNA virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Ding, Ke; Yu, Xuekui; Chang, Winston; Sun, Jingchen; Hong Zhou, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Viruses in the Reoviridae, like the triple-shelled human rotavirus and the single-shelled insect cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV), all package a genome of segmented double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) inside the viral capsid and carry out endogenous messenger RNA synthesis through a transcriptional enzyme complex (TEC). By direct electron-counting cryoelectron microscopy and asymmetric reconstruction, we have determined the organization of the dsRNA genome inside quiescent CPV (q-CPV) and the in situ atomic structures of TEC within CPV in both quiescent and transcribing (t-CPV) states. We show that the ten segmented dsRNAs in CPV are organized with ten TECs in a specific, non-symmetric manner, with each dsRNA segment attached directly to a TEC. The TEC consists of two extensively interacting subunits: an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and an NTPase VP4. We find that the bracelet domain of RdRP undergoes marked conformational change when q-CPV is converted to t-CPV, leading to formation of the RNA template entry channel and access to the polymerase active site. An amino-terminal helix from each of two subunits of the capsid shell protein (CSP) interacts with VP4 and RdRP. These findings establish the link between sensing of environmental cues by the external proteins and activation of endogenous RNA transcription by the TEC inside the virus.

  18. A synthetic growth switch based on controlled expression of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Izard, Jérôme; Gomez Balderas, Cindy D C; Ropers, Delphine; Lacour, Stephan; Song, Xiaohu; Yang, Yifan; Lindner, Ariel B; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2015-11-23

    The ability to control growth is essential for fundamental studies of bacterial physiology and biotechnological applications. We have engineered an Escherichia coli strain in which the transcription of a key component of the gene expression machinery, RNA polymerase, is under the control of an inducible promoter. By changing the inducer concentration in the medium, we can adjust the RNA polymerase concentration and thereby switch bacterial growth between zero and the maximal growth rate supported by the medium. We show that our synthetic growth switch functions in a medium-independent and reversible way, and we provide evidence that the switching phenotype arises from the ultrasensitive response of the growth rate to the concentration of RNA polymerase. We present an application of the growth switch in which both the wild-type E. coli strain and our modified strain are endowed with the capacity to produce glycerol when growing on glucose. Cells in which growth has been switched off continue to be metabolically active and harness the energy gain to produce glycerol at a twofold higher yield than in cells with natural control of RNA polymerase expression. Remarkably, without any further optimization, the improved yield is close to the theoretical maximum computed from a flux balance model of E. coli metabolism. The proposed synthetic growth switch is a promising tool for gaining a better understanding of bacterial physiology and for applications in synthetic biology and biotechnology.

  19. A synthetic growth switch based on controlled expression of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Izard, Jérôme; Gomez Balderas, Cindy D C; Ropers, Delphine; Lacour, Stephan; Song, Xiaohu; Yang, Yifan; Lindner, Ariel B; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2015-11-01

    The ability to control growth is essential for fundamental studies of bacterial physiology and biotechnological applications. We have engineered an Escherichia coli strain in which the transcription of a key component of the gene expression machinery, RNA polymerase, is under the control of an inducible promoter. By changing the inducer concentration in the medium, we can adjust the RNA polymerase concentration and thereby switch bacterial growth between zero and the maximal growth rate supported by the medium. We show that our synthetic growth switch functions in a medium-independent and reversible way, and we provide evidence that the switching phenotype arises from the ultrasensitive response of the growth rate to the concentration of RNA polymerase. We present an application of the growth switch in which both the wild-type E. coli strain and our modified strain are endowed with the capacity to produce glycerol when growing on glucose. Cells in which growth has been switched off continue to be metabolically active and harness the energy gain to produce glycerol at a twofold higher yield than in cells with natural control of RNA polymerase expression. Remarkably, without any further optimization, the improved yield is close to the theoretical maximum computed from a flux balance model of E. coli metabolism. The proposed synthetic growth switch is a promising tool for gaining a better understanding of bacterial physiology and for applications in synthetic biology and biotechnology. PMID:26596932

  20. Initiation of minus-strand RNA synthesis by the brome mosaicvirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: use of oligoribonucleotide primers.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, C C; Sun, J H

    1996-01-01

    Various DNA- and RNA-dependent RNA polymerases have been reported to use oligoribonucleotide primers to initiate nucleic acid synthesis. For the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), we determined that in reactions performed with limited GTP concentrations, minus-strand RNA synthesis can be stimulated by the inclusion of guanosine monophosphate or specific oligoribonucleotides. Furthermore, guanylyl-3',5'-guanosine (GpG) was incorporated into minus-strand RNA and increased the rate of minus-strand RNA synthesis. In the presence of GpG, RdRp's Km for GTP decreased from 50 microM to approximately 3 microM while the Kms for other nucleotides were unaffected. These results have implications for the mechanism of initiation by RdRp. PMID:8794323

  1. Unusual properties of adenovirus E2E transcription by RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenlin; Flint, S J

    2003-04-01

    In adenovirus type 5-infected cells, RNA polymerase III transcription of a gene superimposed on the 5' end of the E2E RNA polymerase II transcription unit produces two small (<100-nucleotide) RNAs that accumulate to low steady-state concentrations (W. Huang, R. Pruzan, and S. J. Flint, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:1265-1269, 1984). To gain a better understanding of the function of this RNA polymerase III transcription, we have examined the properties of the small E2E RNAs and E2E RNA polymerase III transcription in more detail. The accumulation of cytoplasmic E2E RNAs and the rates of E2E transcription by the two RNA polymerases during the infectious cycle were analyzed by using RNase T(1) protection and run-on transcription assays, respectively. Although the RNA polymerase III transcripts were present at significantly lower concentrations than E2E mRNA throughout the period examined, E2E transcription by RNA polymerase III was found to be at least as efficient as that by RNA polymerase II. The short half-lifes of the small E2E RNAs estimated by using the actinomycin D chase method appear to account for their limited accumulation. The transcription of E2E sequences by RNA polymerase II and III in cells infected by recombinant adenoviruses carrying ectopic E2E-CAT (chloramphenicol transferase) reporter genes with mutations in E2E promoter sequences was also examined. The results of these experiments indicate that recognition of the E2E promoter by the RNA polymerase II transcriptional machinery in infected cells limits transcription by RNA polymerase III, and vice versa. Such transcriptional competition and the properties of E2E RNAs made by RNA polymerase III suggest that the function of this viral RNA polymerase III transcription unit is unusual. PMID:12634361

  2. The Structure of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase of a Permutotetravirus Suggests a Link between Primer-Dependent and Primer-Independent Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Diego S.; Buxaderas, Mònica; Rodríguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Thosea asigna virus (TaV), an insect virus belonging to the Permutatetraviridae family, has a positive-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome with two overlapping open reading frames, encoding for the replicase and capsid proteins. The particular TaV replicase includes a structurally unique RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) with a sequence permutation in the palm sub-domain, where the active site is anchored. This non-canonical arrangement of the RdRP palm is also found in double-stranded RNA viruses of the Birnaviridae family. Both virus families also share a conserved VPg sequence motif at the polymerase N-terminus which in birnaviruses appears to be used to covalently link a fraction of the replicase molecules to the 5’-end of the genomic segments. Birnavirus VPgs are presumed to be used as primers for replication initiation. Here we have solved the crystal structure of the TaV RdRP, the first non-canonical RdRP of a ssRNA virus, in its apo- form and bound to different substrates. The enzyme arranges as a stable dimer maintained by mutual interactions between the active site cleft of one molecule and the flexible N-terminal tail of the symmetrically related RdRP. The latter, partially mimicking the RNA template backbone, is involved in regulating the polymerization activity. As expected from previous sequence-based bioinformatics predictions, the overall architecture of the TaV enzyme shows important resemblances with birnavirus polymerases. In addition, structural comparisons and biochemical analyses reveal unexpected similarities between the TaV RdRP and those of Flaviviruses. In particular, a long loop protruding from the thumb domain towards the central enzyme cavity appears to act as a platform for de novo initiation of RNA replication. Our findings strongly suggest an unexpected evolutionary relationship between the RdRPs encoded by these distant ssRNA virus groups. PMID:26625123

  3. Fidelity of RNA polymerase II transcription controlled by elongation factor TFIIS

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, ChoonJu; Agarwal, Kan

    1996-01-01

    Fidelity of DNA and protein synthesis is regulated by a proofreading mechanism but function of a similar mechanism during RNA synthesis has not been demonstrated. Analysis of transcriptional fidelity and its control has been hampered by the necessity to employ complex DNA templates requiring either a promoter and initiation factors or 3′-extended templates. To circumvent this difficulty, we have created an RNA–DNA dumbbell template that can be recognized as a template-primer and extended by RNA polymerase II. By employing this system, we demonstrate that RNA polymerase II can misincorporate a nucleotide and carry out template-dependent elongation at the mispaired end. The transcripts containing misincorporated residues can be cleaved by the very slow 3′ → 5′ ribonuclease activity of the RNA polymerase II, but enhancement of this activity by the elongation factor TFIIS generates RNA with a high degree of fidelity. This enhanced preferential cleavage of misincorporated transcripts suggests an important role for TFIIS in maintaining transcriptional fidelity. PMID:8942993

  4. A dynamic model for PC4 coactivator function in RNA polymerase II transcription

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sohail; Guermah, Mohamed; Roeder, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Human positive cofactor (PC4) acts as a general coactivator for activator-dependent transcription by RNA polymerase II. Here we show that PC4 coactivator function, in contrast to basal (activator-independent) transcription, is dependent both on TATA binding protein (TBP)-associated factors (TAFs) in TFIID and on TFIIH. Surprisingly, PC4 strongly represses transcription initiation by minimal preinitiation complexes in the absence of TAFs and TFIIH, while simultaneously promoting the formation of these complexes. Furthermore, TFIIH and TAFII250, the largest subunit of TFIID, can both phosphorylate PC4. These results provide evidence for an inactive, PC4-induced intermediate in preinitiation complex assembly and point to TFIIH and TAF requirements for its progression into a functional preinitiation complex. Thus PC4 coactivator activity is realized in a stepwise series of events reminiscent of prokaryotic activation pathways involving conversion of inactive RNA polymerase-promoter complexes to an initiation-competent state. PMID:9482861

  5. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene in bat genomes derived from an ancient negative-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Kan; Akasaka, Takumi; Kohl, Claudia; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Kurth, Andreas; Müller, Marcel A; Corman, Victor M; Gillich, Nadine; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Schwemmle, Martin; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous bornavirus-like L (EBLL) elements are inheritable sequences derived from ancient bornavirus L genes that encode a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in many eukaryotic genomes. Here, we demonstrate that bats of the genus Eptesicus have preserved for more than 11.8 million years an EBLL element named eEBLL-1, which has an intact open reading frame of 1,718 codons. The eEBLL-1 coding sequence revealed that functional motifs essential for mononegaviral RdRp activity are well conserved in the EBLL-1 genes. Genetic analyses showed that natural selection operated on eEBLL-1 during the evolution of Eptesicus. Notably, we detected efficient transcription of eEBLL-1 in tissues from Eptesicus bats. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report showing that the eukaryotic genome has gained a riboviral polymerase gene from an ancient virus that has the potential to encode a functional RdRp. PMID:27174689

  6. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene in bat genomes derived from an ancient negative-strand RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Kan; Akasaka, Takumi; Kohl, Claudia; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Kurth, Andreas; Müller, Marcel A.; Corman, Victor M.; Gillich, Nadine; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Schwemmle, Martin; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous bornavirus-like L (EBLL) elements are inheritable sequences derived from ancient bornavirus L genes that encode a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in many eukaryotic genomes. Here, we demonstrate that bats of the genus Eptesicus have preserved for more than 11.8 million years an EBLL element named eEBLL-1, which has an intact open reading frame of 1,718 codons. The eEBLL-1 coding sequence revealed that functional motifs essential for mononegaviral RdRp activity are well conserved in the EBLL-1 genes. Genetic analyses showed that natural selection operated on eEBLL-1 during the evolution of Eptesicus. Notably, we detected efficient transcription of eEBLL-1 in tissues from Eptesicus bats. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report showing that the eukaryotic genome has gained a riboviral polymerase gene from an ancient virus that has the potential to encode a functional RdRp. PMID:27174689

  7. Genetic exploration of interactive domains in RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Okamura, S; Young, R

    1990-01-01

    The two large subunits of RNA polymerase II, RPB1 and RPB2, contain regions of extensive homology to the two large subunits of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These homologous regions may represent separate protein domains with unique functions. We investigated whether suppressor genetics could provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of RPB1 and RPB2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A plasmid shuffle method was used to screen thoroughly for mutations in RPB2 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, which is located in region H of RPB1. All six RPB2 mutations that suppress rpb1-1 were clustered in region I of RPB2. The location of these mutations and the observation that they were allele specific for suppression of rpb1-1 suggests an interaction between region H of RPB1 and region I of RPB2. A similar experiment was done to isolate and map mutations in RPB1 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb2-2, which occurs in region I of RPB2. These suppressor mutations were not clustered in a particular region. Thus, fine structure suppressor genetics can provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of two proteins, but the results of this type of analysis can depend on the conditional mutation to be suppressed. Images PMID:2183012

  8. Improved crystallization of the coxsackievirus B3 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Jabafi, Ilham; Selisko, Barbara; Coutard, Bruno; De Palma, Armando M.; Neyts, Johan; Egloff, Marie-Pierre; Grisel, Sacha; Dalle, Karen; Campanacci, Valerie; Spinelli, Silvia; Cambillau, Christian; Canard, Bruno; Gruez, Arnaud

    2007-06-01

    The first crystal of a coxsackievirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is reported. The Picornaviridae virus family contains a large number of human pathogens such as poliovirus, hepatitis A virus and rhinoviruses. Amongst the viruses belonging to the genus Enterovirus, several serotypes of coxsackievirus coexist for which neither vaccine nor therapy is available. Coxsackievirus B3 is involved in the development of acute myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy and is thought to be an important cause of sudden death in young adults. Here, the first crystal of a coxsackievirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is reported. Standard crystallization methods yielded crystals that were poorly suited to X-ray diffraction studies, with one axis being completely disordered. Crystallization was improved by testing crystallization solutions from commercial screens as additives. This approach yielded crystals that diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and that were suitable for structure determination.

  9. Growth hormone and drug metabolism. Acute effects on nuclear ribonucleic acid polymerase activity and chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Spelsberg, T C; Wilson, J T

    1976-01-01

    Adult male rats, subjected either to sham operation or to hypophysectomy and adrenalectomy were maintained for 10 days before treatment with growth hormone. Results of the acute effects of growth hormone on the rat liver nuclear RNA polymerase I (nucleolar) and II (nucleoplasmic) activities as well as the chromatin template capacity were then studied and compared with the growth-hormone effects on the drug metabolism described in the preceding paper (Wilson & Spelsberg, 1976). 2. Conditions for isolation and storage of nuclei for maintenance of optimal polymerase activities are described. It is verified that the assays for polymerase activities require a DNA template, all four nucleoside triphosphates, and a bivalent cation, and that the acid-insoluble radioactive product represents RNA. Proof is presented that under high-salt conditions DNA-like RNA (polymerase II) is synthesized, and that under low-salt conditions in the presence of alpha-amanitin, rRNA (polymerase I) is synthesized. 3. In the livers of hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats, growth hormone increases the activity of both RNA polymerase enzymes and the chromatin template capacity within 1h after treatment. The effects last for 12h in the case of polymerase II but for only 6h in the case of polymerase I. Sham-operated rats respond to growth hormone in a manner somewhat similar to that shown by hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats. These results, which demonstrate an enhancement of RNA polymerase I activity in response to growth hormone, support those from other laboratories. 4. Growth-hormone enhancement of the chromatin template capacity in the liver of hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats contrasts with previous reports. The growth-hormone-induced de-repression of the chromatin DNA could represent the basis of the growth-hormone-induced enhancement of RNA polymerase II activity in the hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats, although some effect of growth-hormone on the polymerase enzymes

  10. Structure of a Complete Mediator-RNA Polymerase II Pre-Initiation Complex.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip J; Trnka, Michael J; Bushnell, David A; Davis, Ralph E; Mattei, Pierre-Jean; Burlingame, Alma L; Kornberg, Roger D

    2016-09-01

    A complete, 52-protein, 2.5 million dalton, Mediator-RNA polymerase II pre-initiation complex (Med-PIC) was assembled and analyzed by cryo-electron microscopy and by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry. The resulting complete Med-PIC structure reveals two components of functional significance, absent from previous structures, a protein kinase complex and the Mediator-activator interaction region. It thereby shows how the kinase and its target, the C-terminal domain of the polymerase, control Med-PIC interaction and transcription. PMID:27610567

  11. Structural and Biochemical Investigation of Bacteriophage N4-Encoded RNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Lenneman, Bryan R.; Rothman-Denes, Lucia B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage N4 regulates the temporal expression of its genome through the activity of three distinct RNA polymerases (RNAP). Expression of the early genes is carried out by a phage-encoded, virion-encapsidated RNAP (vRNAP) that is injected into the host at the onset of infection and transcribes the early genes. These encode the components of new transcriptional machinery (N4 RNAPII and cofactors) responsible for the synthesis of middle RNAs. Both N4 RNAPs belong to the T7-like “single-subunit” family of polymerases. Herein, we describe their mechanisms of promoter recognition, regulation, and roles in the phage life cycle. PMID:25924224

  12. Class II ribonuclease H comigrates with, but is distinct from, the third largest subunit of calf thymus RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Vonwirth, H; Frank, P; Kedinger, C; Büsen, W

    1990-09-10

    It has been reported (Iborra et al. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 10920-10924) that the third and the fifth largest subunit of yeast RNA polymerase I exhibit ribonuclease H activity. The authors suggested that the third largest subunit is identical with the chromatin-associated ribonuclease H49, the putative yeast equivalent of bovine ribonuclease H IIb. Although the third largest subunit of calf thymus RNA polymerase I and ribonuclease H IIb display nearly identical molecular masses under denaturing conditions, serological analysis reveals that, in contrast to their counterparts in yeast, these mammalian proteins are distinct entities. Interestingly, sera from some patients with mixed connective tissue disease which contain antibodies directed against RNA polymerase I, also react with ribonuclease H IIb epitopes. This observation suggests that a protein displaying ribonuclease H IIb antigenicity could be associated with RNA polymerase I. Additional indications supporting this conclusion are discussed.

  13. Specific binding of tryptophan transfer RNA to avian myeloblastosis virus RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase).

    PubMed Central

    Panet, A; Haseltine, W A; Baltimore, D; Peters, G; Harada, F; Dahlberg, J E

    1975-01-01

    The ability of tryptophan tRNA (tRNATrp) to initiate reverse transcription of the 70S RNA of avian RNA tumor viruses suggested that the reverse transcriptase (RNA-dependent DNA polymerase; deoxynucleosidetriphosphate: DNA deoxynucleotidyltransferase; EC 2.7.7.7) might have a specific binding site for the tRNA. A complex of tRNATrp and the avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase has been demonstrated using chromatography on Sephadex G-100 columns. Of all the chicken tRNAs, only tRNATrp and a tRNA4Met bind to the enzyme with high enough affinity to be selected from a mixture of the chicken cell tRNAs. The ability of tRNATrp to change the sedimentation rate of the enzyme indicates that tRNATrp is not binding to a contaminant in the enzyme preparation. Treatment of the enzyme with monospecific antibody to reverse transcriptase prevented binding of tRNA as well as inhibited the DNA polymerase activity of the enzyme. The ability of reverse transcriptase to utilize tRNATrp aa a primer for DNA synthesis, therefore, appears to involve a highly specific site on the enzyme. Images PMID:52156

  14. Aire unleashes stalled RNA polymerase to induce ectopic gene expression in thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Matthieu; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Abramson, Jakub; Rahl, Peter B; Young, Richard A; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2012-01-10

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of peripheral tissue antigens (PTA) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (MECs), driving immunological self-tolerance in differentiating T cells. To elucidate its mechanistic pathways, we examined its transcriptional impact in MECs in vivo by microarray analysis with mRNA-spanning probes. This analysis revealed initiation of Aire-activated genes to be comparable in Aire-deficient and wild-type MECs, but with a block to elongation after 50-100 bp in the absence of Aire, suggesting activation by release of stalled polymerases by Aire. In contrast, patterns of activation by transcription factors such as Klf4 were consistent with regulation of initiation. Mapping of Aire and RNA polymerase-II (Pol-II) by ChIP and high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that Aire bound all Pol-II-rich transcriptional start sites (TSS), irrespective of its eventual effect. However, the genes it preferentially activated were characterized by a relative surfeit of stalled polymerases at the TSS, which resolved once Aire was introduced into cells. Thus, transcript mapping and ChIP-seq data indicate that Aire activates ectopic transcription not through specific recognition of PTA gene promoters but by releasing stalled polymerases.

  15. Organization, Function, and Therapeutic Targeting of the Morbillivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sourimant, Julien; Plemper, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    The morbillivirus genus comprises major human and animal pathogens, including the highly contagious measles virus. Morbilliviruses feature single stranded negative sense RNA genomes that are wrapped by a plasma membrane-derived lipid envelope. Genomes are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes, and only the encapsidated RNA is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs towards the structural and functional understanding of the morbillivirus polymerase complex. Considering the clinical burden imposed by members of the morbillivirus genus, the development of novel antiviral therapeutics is urgently needed. The viral polymerase complex presents unique structural and enzymatic properties that can serve as attractive candidates for druggable targets. We evaluate distinct strategies for therapeutic intervention and examine how high-resolution insight into the organization of the polymerase complex may pave the path towards the structure-based design and optimization of next-generation RdRp inhibitors. PMID:27626440

  16. Organization, Function, and Therapeutic Targeting of the Morbillivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complex.

    PubMed

    Sourimant, Julien; Plemper, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    The morbillivirus genus comprises major human and animal pathogens, including the highly contagious measles virus. Morbilliviruses feature single stranded negative sense RNA genomes that are wrapped by a plasma membrane-derived lipid envelope. Genomes are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes, and only the encapsidated RNA is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs towards the structural and functional understanding of the morbillivirus polymerase complex. Considering the clinical burden imposed by members of the morbillivirus genus, the development of novel antiviral therapeutics is urgently needed. The viral polymerase complex presents unique structural and enzymatic properties that can serve as attractive candidates for druggable targets. We evaluate distinct strategies for therapeutic intervention and examine how high-resolution insight into the organization of the polymerase complex may pave the path towards the structure-based design and optimization of next-generation RdRp inhibitors. PMID:27626440

  17. Comparative modeling of DNA and RNA polymerases from Moniliophthora perniciosa mitochondrial plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Bruno S; Taranto, Alex G; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; Duarte, Angelo A

    2009-01-01

    Background The filamentous fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa (Stahel) Aime & Phillips-Mora is a hemibiotrophic Basidiomycota that causes witches' broom disease of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.). This disease has resulted in a severe decrease in Brazilian cocoa production, which changed the position of Brazil in the market from the second largest cocoa exporter to a cocoa importer. Fungal mitochondrial plasmids are usually invertrons encoding DNA and RNA polymerases. Plasmid insertions into host mitochondrial genomes are probably associated with modifications in host generation time, which can be involved in fungal aging. This association suggests activity of polymerases, and these can be used as new targets for drugs against mitochondrial activity of fungi, more specifically against witches' broom disease. Sequencing and modeling: DNA and RNA polymerases of M. perniciosa mitochondrial plasmid were completely sequenced and their models were carried out by Comparative Homology approach. The sequences of DNA and RNA polymerase showed 25% of identity to 1XHX and 1ARO (pdb code) using BLASTp, which were used as templates. The models were constructed using Swiss PDB-Viewer and refined with a set of Molecular Mechanics (MM) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) in water carried out with AMBER 8.0, both working under the ff99 force fields, respectively. Ramachandran plots were generated by Procheck 3.0 and exhibited models with 97% and 98% for DNA and RNA polymerases, respectively. MD simulations in water showed models with thermodynamic stability after 2000 ps and 300 K of simulation. Conclusion This work contributes to the development of new alternatives for controlling the fungal agent of witches' broom disease. PMID:19744344

  18. Transcriptional bypass of regioisomeric ethylated thymidine lesions by T7 RNA polymerase and human RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    You, Changjun; Wang, Pengcheng; Dai, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Alkylative damage to DNA can be induced by environmental chemicals, endogenous metabolites and some commonly prescribed chemotherapeutic agents. The regioisomeric N3-, O2- and O4-ethylthymidine (N3-, O2- and O4-EtdT, respectively) represent an important class of ethylated DNA lesions. Using nonreplicative double-stranded vectors containing an N3-EtdT, O2-EtdT or O4-EtdT at a defined site in the template strand, herein we examined the effects of these lesions on DNA transcription mediated by single-subunit T7 RNA polymerase or multisubunit human RNA polymerase II in vitro and in human cells. We found that O4-EtdT is highly mutagenic and exclusively induces the misincorporation of guanine opposite the lesion, whereas N3-EtdT and O2-EtdT display promiscuous miscoding properties during transcription. In addition, N3-EtdT and O2-EtdT were found to inhibit strongly DNA transcription in vitro and in certain human cells. Moreover, N3-EtdT, but not O2-EtdT or O4-EtdT, is an efficient substrate for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair. These findings provide new important insights into how these alkylated DNA lesions compromise the flow of genetic information, which may help to understand the risk of these lesions in living cells. PMID:25404131

  19. Characterization of a 7-kilodalton subunit of vaccinia virus DNA-dependent RNA polymerase with structural similarities to the smallest subunit of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Amegadzie, B Y; Ahn, B Y; Moss, B

    1992-05-01

    A previously unrecognized 7-kDa polypeptide copurified with the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase of vaccinia virus virions. Internal amino acid sequences of the small protein matched a viral genomic open reading frame of 63 codons. Antipeptide antiserum was used to confirm the specific and complete association of the 7-kDa protein with RNA polymerase. The amino acid sequence predicted from the viral gene, named rpo7, was 23% identical to that of the smallest subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II, and a metal-binding motif, Cys-X-X-Cys-Gly, was located at precisely the same location near the N terminus in the two proteins. RNA analyses demonstrated early transcriptional initiation and termination signals in the rpo7 gene sequence. The viral RNA polymerase subunit was synthesized during the early phase of infection and continued to accumulate during the late phase.

  20. Direct observation of base-pair stepping by RNA polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbondanzieri, Elio A.; Greenleaf, William J.; Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M.

    2005-11-01

    During transcription, RNA polymerase (RNAP) moves processively along a DNA template, creating a complementary RNA. Here we present the development of an ultra-stable optical trapping system with ångström-level resolution, which we used to monitor transcriptional elongation by single molecules of Escherichia coli RNAP. Records showed discrete steps averaging 3.7 +/- 0.6Å, a distance equivalent to the mean rise per base found in B-DNA. By combining our results with quantitative gel analysis, we conclude that RNAP advances along DNA by a single base pair per nucleotide addition to the nascent RNA. We also determined the force-velocity relationship for transcription at both saturating and sub-saturating nucleotide concentrations; fits to these data returned a characteristic distance parameter equivalent to one base pair. Global fits were inconsistent with a model for movement incorporating a power stroke tightly coupled to pyrophosphate release, but consistent with a brownian ratchet model incorporating a secondary NTP binding site.

  1. Direct observation of base-pair stepping by RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Abbondanzieri, Elio A; Greenleaf, William J; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M

    2005-11-24

    During transcription, RNA polymerase (RNAP) moves processively along a DNA template, creating a complementary RNA. Here we present the development of an ultra-stable optical trapping system with ångström-level resolution, which we used to monitor transcriptional elongation by single molecules of Escherichia coli RNAP. Records showed discrete steps averaging 3.7 +/- 0.6 A, a distance equivalent to the mean rise per base found in B-DNA. By combining our results with quantitative gel analysis, we conclude that RNAP advances along DNA by a single base pair per nucleotide addition to the nascent RNA. We also determined the force-velocity relationship for transcription at both saturating and sub-saturating nucleotide concentrations; fits to these data returned a characteristic distance parameter equivalent to one base pair. Global fits were inconsistent with a model for movement incorporating a power stroke tightly coupled to pyrophosphate release, but consistent with a brownian ratchet model incorporating a secondary NTP binding site.

  2. Retrotransposon profiling of RNA polymerase III initiation sites

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaojie; Daily, Kenneth; Nguyen, Kim; Wang, Haoyi; Mayhew, David; Rigor, Paul; Forouzan, Sholeh; Johnston, Mark; Mitra, Robi David; Baldi, Pierre; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Although retroviruses are relatively promiscuous in choice of integration sites, retrotransposons can display marked integration specificity. In yeast and slime mold, some retrotransposons are associated with tRNA genes (tDNAs). In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, the long terminal repeat retrotransposon Ty3 is found at RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription start sites of tDNAs. Ty1, 2, and 4 elements also cluster in the upstream regions of these genes. To determine the extent to which other Pol III–transcribed genes serve as genomic targets for Ty3, a set of 10,000 Ty3 genomic retrotranspositions were mapped using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Integrations occurred at all known tDNAs, two tDNA relics (iYGR033c and ZOD1), and six non-tDNA, Pol III–transcribed types of genes (RDN5, SNR6, SNR52, RPR1, RNA170, and SCR1). Previous work in vitro demonstrated that the Pol III transcription factor (TF) IIIB is important for Ty3 targeting. However, seven loci that bind the TFIIIB loader, TFIIIC, were not targeted, underscoring the unexplained absence of TFIIIB at those sites. Ty3 integrations also occurred in two open reading frames not previously associated with Pol III transcription, suggesting the existence of a small number of additional sites in the yeast genome that interact with Pol III transcription complexes. PMID:22287102

  3. Retrotransposon profiling of RNA polymerase III initiation sites.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaojie; Daily, Kenneth; Nguyen, Kim; Wang, Haoyi; Mayhew, David; Rigor, Paul; Forouzan, Sholeh; Johnston, Mark; Mitra, Robi David; Baldi, Pierre; Sandmeyer, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    Although retroviruses are relatively promiscuous in choice of integration sites, retrotransposons can display marked integration specificity. In yeast and slime mold, some retrotransposons are associated with tRNA genes (tDNAs). In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, the long terminal repeat retrotransposon Ty3 is found at RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription start sites of tDNAs. Ty1, 2, and 4 elements also cluster in the upstream regions of these genes. To determine the extent to which other Pol III-transcribed genes serve as genomic targets for Ty3, a set of 10,000 Ty3 genomic retrotranspositions were mapped using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Integrations occurred at all known tDNAs, two tDNA relics (iYGR033c and ZOD1), and six non-tDNA, Pol III-transcribed types of genes (RDN5, SNR6, SNR52, RPR1, RNA170, and SCR1). Previous work in vitro demonstrated that the Pol III transcription factor (TF) IIIB is important for Ty3 targeting. However, seven loci that bind the TFIIIB loader, TFIIIC, were not targeted, underscoring the unexplained absence of TFIIIB at those sites. Ty3 integrations also occurred in two open reading frames not previously associated with Pol III transcription, suggesting the existence of a small number of additional sites in the yeast genome that interact with Pol III transcription complexes. PMID:22287102

  4. Specific Inhibitors of the Three RNA Polymerases from the Aquatic Fungus Blastocladiella emersonii

    PubMed Central

    Horgen, Paul A.; Griffin, David H.

    1971-01-01

    Specific inhibitors of each of the three RNA polymerases of Blastocladiella emersonii have been found. Cycloheximide specifically inhibited the in vitro activity of the DEAE-fraction I enzyme, alpha-amanitin specifically inhibited the DEAE-fraction II enzyme, and rifampicin specifically inhibited the fraction III enzyme. DNA stimulation and dependency on the four riboside triphosphates were shown to be characteristic of each of the three fractions. Optimum concentrations of magnesium ions required were shown to differ among the three fractions and to be somewhat higher than optimum concentrations of manganese ions. The effect of pH on activity was essentially identical for each of the three fractions. Kinetic experiments and nuclease assays indicated the presence of some interfering substances in the partially purified RNA polymerase fractions. PMID:5277081

  5. RNA polymerase II pauses and associates with pre-mRNA processing factors at both ends of genes

    PubMed Central

    Glover-Cutter, Kira; Kim, Soojin; Espinosa, Joaquin; Bentley, David L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated co-transcriptional recruitment of pre-mRNA processing factors to human genes. Capping factors associate with paused RNA pol II at the 5′ ends of quiescent genes. They also track throughout actively transcribed genes, and accumulate with paused polymerase in the 3′ flanking region. 3′ processing factors CstF and CPSF are maximally recruited 0.5-1.5 kb downstream of poly(A) sites where they coincide with capping factors, Spt5, and Ser2 hyperphosphorylated, paused pol II. 3′ end processing factors also localize at transcription start sites, and this early recruitment is enhanced after polymerase arrest with DRB. These results suggest that promoters may help specify recruitment of 3′ end processing factors. We propose a dual pausing model where elongation arrests near the transcription start site and in the 3′ flank to allow co-transcriptional processing by factors recruited to the pol II ternary complex. PMID:18157150

  6. RNA polymerase II interacts with the promoter region of the noninduced hsp70 gene in Drosophila melanogaster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, D.S.; Lis, J.T.

    1986-11-01

    By using a protein-DNA cross-linking method, we examined the in vivo distribution of RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 cells. In heat shock-induced cells, a high level of RNA polymerase II was detected on the entire gene, while in noninduced cells, the RNA polymerase II was confined to the 5' end of the hsp70 gene, predominantly between nucleotides -12 and +65 relative to the start of transcription. This association of RNA polymerase II was apparent whether the cross-linking was performed by a 10-min UV irradiation of chilled cells with mercury vapor lamps or by a 40-microsecond irradiation of cells with a high-energy xenon flash lamp. We hypothesize that RNA polymerase II has access to, and a high affinity for, the promoter region of this gene before induction, and this poised RNA polymerase II may be critical in the mechanism of transcription activation.

  7. Defining the status of RNA polymerase at promoters.

    PubMed

    Core, Leighton J; Waterfall, Joshua J; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Fargo, David C; Kwak, Hojoong; Adelman, Karen; Lis, John T

    2012-10-25

    Recent genome-wide studies in metazoans have shown that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) accumulates to high densities on many promoters at a rate-limited step in transcription. However, the status of this Pol II remains an area of debate. Here, we compare quantitative outputs of a global run-on sequencing assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays and demonstrate that the majority of the Pol II on Drosophila promoters is transcriptionally engaged; very little exists in a preinitiation or arrested complex. These promoter-proximal polymerases are inhibited from further elongation by detergent-sensitive factors, and knockdown of negative elongation factor, NELF, reduces their levels. These results not only solidify the notion that pausing occurs at most promoters, but demonstrate that it is the major rate-limiting step in early transcription at these promoters. Finally, the divergent elongation complexes seen at mammalian promoters are far less prevalent in Drosophila, and this specificity in orientation correlates with directional core promoter elements, which are abundant in Drosophila. PMID:23062713

  8. Defining the status of RNA polymerase at promoters.

    PubMed

    Core, Leighton J; Waterfall, Joshua J; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Fargo, David C; Kwak, Hojoong; Adelman, Karen; Lis, John T

    2012-10-25

    Recent genome-wide studies in metazoans have shown that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) accumulates to high densities on many promoters at a rate-limited step in transcription. However, the status of this Pol II remains an area of debate. Here, we compare quantitative outputs of a global run-on sequencing assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays and demonstrate that the majority of the Pol II on Drosophila promoters is transcriptionally engaged; very little exists in a preinitiation or arrested complex. These promoter-proximal polymerases are inhibited from further elongation by detergent-sensitive factors, and knockdown of negative elongation factor, NELF, reduces their levels. These results not only solidify the notion that pausing occurs at most promoters, but demonstrate that it is the major rate-limiting step in early transcription at these promoters. Finally, the divergent elongation complexes seen at mammalian promoters are far less prevalent in Drosophila, and this specificity in orientation correlates with directional core promoter elements, which are abundant in Drosophila.

  9. Cockayne syndrome protein A is a transcription factor of RNA polymerase I and stimulates ribosomal biogenesis and growth.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sylvia; Garcia Gonzalez, Omar; Assfalg, Robin; Schelling, Adrian; Schäfer, Patrick; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) protein account for 20% of Cockayne syndrome (CS) cases, a childhood disorder of premature aging and early death. Hitherto, CSA has exclusively been described as DNA repair factor of the transcription-coupled branch of nucleotide excision repair. Here we show a novel function of CSA as transcription factor of RNA polymerase I in the nucleolus. Knockdown of CSA reduces pre-rRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase I. CSA associates with RNA polymerase I and the active fraction of the rDNA and stimulates re-initiation of rDNA transcription by recruiting the Cockayne syndrome proteins TFIIH and CSB. Moreover, compared with CSA deficient parental CS cells, CSA transfected CS cells reveal significantly more rRNA with induced growth and enhanced global translation. A previously unknown global dysregulation of ribosomal biogenesis most likely contributes to the reduced growth and premature aging of CS patients.

  10. Cockayne syndrome protein A is a transcription factor of RNA polymerase I and stimulates ribosomal biogenesis and growth

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sylvia; Garcia Gonzalez, Omar; Assfalg, Robin; Schelling, Adrian; Schäfer, Patrick; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) protein account for 20% of Cockayne syndrome (CS) cases, a childhood disorder of premature aging and early death. Hitherto, CSA has exclusively been described as DNA repair factor of the transcription-coupled branch of nucleotide excision repair. Here we show a novel function of CSA as transcription factor of RNA polymerase I in the nucleolus. Knockdown of CSA reduces pre-rRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase I. CSA associates with RNA polymerase I and the active fraction of the rDNA and stimulates re-initiation of rDNA transcription by recruiting the Cockayne syndrome proteins TFIIH and CSB. Moreover, compared with CSA deficient parental CS cells, CSA transfected CS cells reveal significantly more rRNA with induced growth and enhanced global translation. A previously unknown global dysregulation of ribosomal biogenesis most likely contributes to the reduced growth and premature aging of CS patients. PMID:24781187

  11. Structural insights into transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Sebastian; Hahn, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is one of the most important steps in control of cell identity, growth, differentiation and development. Many signaling pathways controlling these processes ultimately target the core transcription machinery that, for protein coding genes, consists of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors (GTFs). New studies on the structure and mechanism of the core assembly and how it interfaces with promoter DNA and coactivator complexes have given tremendous insight into early steps in the initiation process, genome-wide binding, and mechanisms conserved for all nuclear and archaeal Pols. Here we review recent developments in dissecting the architecture of the Pol II core machinery with a focus on early and regulated steps in transcription initiation. PMID:24120742

  12. Is actin a transcription initiation factor for RNA polymerase B?

    PubMed Central

    Egly, J M; Miyamoto, N G; Moncollin, V; Chambon, P

    1984-01-01

    We have previously reported that two fractions derived from HeLa cell S100 extracts, the heparin flow-through and the heparin 0.6 M KCl eluate are required in vitro for efficient and accurate transcription by RNA polymerase class B (II). We have further purified a factor present in the heparin flow-through fraction, which markedly stimulates specific transcription catalyzed by the heparin 0.6 M KCl eluate. We report here that some of the properties of the stimulatory factor present in our most purified fractions are strikingly similar to those of actin. We demonstrate also that this factor acts at the pre-initiation level of the transcription reaction. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. PMID:6499833

  13. Biogenesis of RNA polymerases II and III requires the conserved GPN small GTPases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Minaker, Sean W; Filiatrault, Megan C; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2013-03-01

    The GPN proteins are a poorly characterized and deeply evolutionarily conserved family of three paralogous small GTPases, Gpn1, 2, and 3. The founding member, GPN1/NPA3/XAB1, is proposed to function in nuclear import of RNA polymerase II along with a recently described protein called Iwr1. Here we show that the previously uncharacterized protein Gpn2 binds both Gpn3 and Npa3/Gpn1 and that temperature-sensitive alleles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPN2 and GPN3 exhibit genetic interactions with RNA polymerase II mutants, hypersensitivity to transcription inhibition, and defects in RNA polymerase II nuclear localization. Importantly, we identify previously unrecognized RNA polymerase III localization defects in GPN2, GPN3, and IWR1 mutant backgrounds but find no localization defects of unrelated nuclear proteins or of RNA polymerase I. Previously, it was unclear whether the GPN proteins and Iwr1 had overlapping function in RNA polymerase II assembly or import. In this study, we show that the nuclear import defect of iwr1Δ, but not the GPN2 or GPN3 mutant defects, is partially suppressed by fusion of a nuclear localization signal to the RNA polymerase II subunit Rpb3. These data, combined with strong genetic interactions between GPN2 and IWR1, suggest that the GPN proteins function upstream of Iwr1 in RNA polymerase II and III biogenesis. We propose that the three GPN proteins execute a common, and likely essential, function in RNA polymerase assembly and transport.

  14. Biogenesis of RNA Polymerases II and III Requires the Conserved GPN Small GTPases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Minaker, Sean W.; Filiatrault, Megan C.; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    The GPN proteins are a poorly characterized and deeply evolutionarily conserved family of three paralogous small GTPases, Gpn1, 2, and 3. The founding member, GPN1/NPA3/XAB1, is proposed to function in nuclear import of RNA polymerase II along with a recently described protein called Iwr1. Here we show that the previously uncharacterized protein Gpn2 binds both Gpn3 and Npa3/Gpn1 and that temperature-sensitive alleles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPN2 and GPN3 exhibit genetic interactions with RNA polymerase II mutants, hypersensitivity to transcription inhibition, and defects in RNA polymerase II nuclear localization. Importantly, we identify previously unrecognized RNA polymerase III localization defects in GPN2, GPN3, and IWR1 mutant backgrounds but find no localization defects of unrelated nuclear proteins or of RNA polymerase I. Previously, it was unclear whether the GPN proteins and Iwr1 had overlapping function in RNA polymerase II assembly or import. In this study, we show that the nuclear import defect of iwr1Δ, but not the GPN2 or GPN3 mutant defects, is partially suppressed by fusion of a nuclear localization signal to the RNA polymerase II subunit Rpb3. These data, combined with strong genetic interactions between GPN2 and IWR1, suggest that the GPN proteins function upstream of Iwr1 in RNA polymerase II and III biogenesis. We propose that the three GPN proteins execute a common, and likely essential, function in RNA polymerase assembly and transport. PMID:23267056

  15. Rotavirus VP2 core shell regions critical for viral polymerase activation.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Sarah M; Patton, John T

    2011-04-01

    The innermost VP2 core shell of the triple-layered, icosahedral rotavirus particle surrounds the viral genome and RNA processing enzymes, including the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1). In addition to anchoring VP1 within the core, VP2 is also an essential cofactor that triggers the polymerase to initiate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) synthesis using packaged plus-strand RNA templates. The VP2 requirement effectively couples packaging with genome replication and ensures that VP1 makes dsRNA only within an assembling previrion particle. However, the mechanism by which the rotavirus core shell protein activates the viral polymerase remains very poorly understood. In the current study, we sought to elucidate VP2 regions critical for VP1-mediated in vitro dsRNA synthesis. By comparing the functions of proteins from several different rotaviruses, we found that polymerase activation by the core shell protein is specific. Through truncation and chimera mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the VP2 amino terminus, which forms a decameric, internal hub underneath each 5-fold axis, plays an important but nonspecific role in VP1 activation. Our results indicate that the VP2 residues correlating with polymerase activation specificity are located on the inner face of the core shell, distinct from the amino terminus. Based on these findings, we predict that several regions of VP2 engage the polymerase during the concerted processes of rotavirus core assembly and genome replication.

  16. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and its relationship to other plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Lydia J R; Brockington, Samuel F; Murphy, Alex M; Pate, Adrienne E; Gruden, Kristina; MacFarlane, Stuart A; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P

    2016-01-01

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) catalyze synthesis of double-stranded RNAs that can serve to initiate or amplify RNA silencing. Arabidopsis thaliana has six RDR genes; RDRs 1, 2 and 6 have roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. RDR6 is constitutively expressed but RDR1 expression is elevated following plant treatment with defensive phytohormones. RDR1 also contributes to basal virus resistance. RDR1 has been studied in several species including A. thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), N. benthamiana, N. attenuata and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) but not to our knowledge in potato (S. tuberosum). StRDR1 was identified and shown to be salicylic acid-responsive. StRDR1 transcript accumulation decreased in transgenic potato plants constitutively expressing a hairpin construct and these plants were challenged with three viruses: potato virus Y, potato virus X, and tobacco mosaic virus. Suppression of StRDR1 gene expression did not increase the susceptibility of potato to these viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of RDR genes present in potato and in a range of other plant species identified a new RDR gene family, not present in potato and found only in Rosids (but apparently lost in the Rosid A. thaliana) for which we propose the name RDR7. PMID:26979928

  17. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and its relationship to other plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Lydia J R; Brockington, Samuel F; Murphy, Alex M; Pate, Adrienne E; Gruden, Kristina; MacFarlane, Stuart A; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P

    2016-03-16

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) catalyze synthesis of double-stranded RNAs that can serve to initiate or amplify RNA silencing. Arabidopsis thaliana has six RDR genes; RDRs 1, 2 and 6 have roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. RDR6 is constitutively expressed but RDR1 expression is elevated following plant treatment with defensive phytohormones. RDR1 also contributes to basal virus resistance. RDR1 has been studied in several species including A. thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), N. benthamiana, N. attenuata and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) but not to our knowledge in potato (S. tuberosum). StRDR1 was identified and shown to be salicylic acid-responsive. StRDR1 transcript accumulation decreased in transgenic potato plants constitutively expressing a hairpin construct and these plants were challenged with three viruses: potato virus Y, potato virus X, and tobacco mosaic virus. Suppression of StRDR1 gene expression did not increase the susceptibility of potato to these viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of RDR genes present in potato and in a range of other plant species identified a new RDR gene family, not present in potato and found only in Rosids (but apparently lost in the Rosid A. thaliana) for which we propose the name RDR7.

  18. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and its relationship to other plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lydia J. R.; Brockington, Samuel F.; Murphy, Alex M.; Pate, Adrienne E.; Gruden, Kristina; MacFarlane, Stuart A.; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) catalyze synthesis of double-stranded RNAs that can serve to initiate or amplify RNA silencing. Arabidopsis thaliana has six RDR genes; RDRs 1, 2 and 6 have roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. RDR6 is constitutively expressed but RDR1 expression is elevated following plant treatment with defensive phytohormones. RDR1 also contributes to basal virus resistance. RDR1 has been studied in several species including A. thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), N. benthamiana, N. attenuata and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) but not to our knowledge in potato (S. tuberosum). StRDR1 was identified and shown to be salicylic acid-responsive. StRDR1 transcript accumulation decreased in transgenic potato plants constitutively expressing a hairpin construct and these plants were challenged with three viruses: potato virus Y, potato virus X, and tobacco mosaic virus. Suppression of StRDR1 gene expression did not increase the susceptibility of potato to these viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of RDR genes present in potato and in a range of other plant species identified a new RDR gene family, not present in potato and found only in Rosids (but apparently lost in the Rosid A. thaliana) for which we propose the name RDR7. PMID:26979928

  19. A Mechanistic Model for Cooperative Behavior of Co-transcribing RNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Heberling, Tamra; Davis, Lisa; Gedeon, Jakub; Morgan, Charles; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    In fast-transcribing prokaryotic genes, such as an rrn gene in Escherichia coli, many RNA polymerases (RNAPs) transcribe the DNA simultaneously. Active elongation of RNAPs is often interrupted by pauses, which has been observed to cause RNAP traffic jams; yet some studies indicate that elongation seems to be faster in the presence of multiple RNAPs than elongation by a single RNAP. We propose that an interaction between RNAPs via the torque produced by RNAP motion on helically twisted DNA can explain this apparent paradox. We have incorporated the torque mechanism into a stochastic model and simulated transcription both with and without torque. Simulation results illustrate that the torque causes shorter pause durations and fewer collisions between polymerases. Our results suggest that the torsional interaction of RNAPs is an important mechanism in maintaining fast transcription times, and that transcription should be viewed as a cooperative group effort by multiple polymerases. PMID:27517607

  20. A Mechanistic Model for Cooperative Behavior of Co-transcribing RNA Polymerases.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Tamra; Davis, Lisa; Gedeon, Jakub; Morgan, Charles; Gedeon, Tomáš

    2016-08-01

    In fast-transcribing prokaryotic genes, such as an rrn gene in Escherichia coli, many RNA polymerases (RNAPs) transcribe the DNA simultaneously. Active elongation of RNAPs is often interrupted by pauses, which has been observed to cause RNAP traffic jams; yet some studies indicate that elongation seems to be faster in the presence of multiple RNAPs than elongation by a single RNAP. We propose that an interaction between RNAPs via the torque produced by RNAP motion on helically twisted DNA can explain this apparent paradox. We have incorporated the torque mechanism into a stochastic model and simulated transcription both with and without torque. Simulation results illustrate that the torque causes shorter pause durations and fewer collisions between polymerases. Our results suggest that the torsional interaction of RNAPs is an important mechanism in maintaining fast transcription times, and that transcription should be viewed as a cooperative group effort by multiple polymerases.

  1. Regulation of the Nucleolar DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase by Amino Acids in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Franze-Fernández, M. T.; Pogo, A. O.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were performed to ascertain the degree to which the amount of amino acids might be one of the regulatory factors that control the activity of the nucleolar RNA polymerase. Assays of the enzymatic activity were done with isolated nuclei from cells incubated with low and high concentrations of amino acids. Soon after the cells were exposed to a medium enriched in amino acids, a rapid increase of nucleolar RNA polymerase activity occurred. A similar result was obtained in cells incubated with lower concentrations of amino acids. However, the rate of ribosomal RNA synthesized was regularly much higher in cells incubated in a medium enriched with amino acids than in a medium low in amino acids. Apparently, the amino acids only controlled ribosomal RNA synthesis. Thus, neither maturation, processing, and transport of nuclear precursors into cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA, nor the synthesis of rapidly labeled RNA was affected. PMID:4108870

  2. Plastid RNA polymerases: orchestration of enzymes with different evolutionary origins controls chloroplast biogenesis during the plant life cycle.

    PubMed

    Pfannschmidt, Thomas; Blanvillain, Robert; Merendino, Livia; Courtois, Florence; Chevalier, Fabien; Liebers, Monique; Grübler, Björn; Hommel, Elisabeth; Lerbs-Mache, Silva

    2015-12-01

    Chloroplasts are the sunlight-collecting organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes that energetically drive the biosphere of our planet. They are the base for all major food webs by providing essential photosynthates to all heterotrophic organisms including humans. Recent research has focused largely on an understanding of the function of these organelles, but knowledge about the biogenesis of chloroplasts is rather limited. It is known that chloroplasts develop from undifferentiated precursor plastids, the proplastids, in meristematic cells. This review focuses on the activation and action of plastid RNA polymerases, which play a key role in the development of new chloroplasts from proplastids. Evolutionarily, plastids emerged from the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium-like ancestor into a heterotrophic eukaryote. As an evolutionary remnant of this process, they possess their own genome, which is expressed by two types of plastid RNA polymerase, phage-type and prokaryotic-type RNA polymerase. The protein subunits of these polymerases are encoded in both the nuclear and plastid genomes. Their activation and action therefore require a highly sophisticated regulation that controls and coordinates the expression of the components encoded in the plastid and nucleus. Stoichiometric expression and correct assembly of RNA polymerase complexes is achieved by a combination of developmental and environmentally induced programmes. This review highlights the current knowledge about the functional coordination between the different types of plastid RNA polymerases and provides working models of their sequential expression and function for future investigations. PMID:26355147

  3. Purification of Xenopus laevis mitochondrial RNA polymerase and identification of a dissociable factor required for specific transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Bogenhagen, D F; Insdorf, N F

    1988-01-01

    The Xenopus laevis mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) polymerase was purified to near homogeneity with an overall yield approaching 50%. The major polypeptides in the final fraction were a doublet of proteins of approximately 140 kilodaltons that copurified with the mtRNA polymerase activity. It appeared likely that the smaller polypeptide is a breakdown product of the larger one. The highly purified polymerase was active in nonspecific transcription but required a dissociable factor for specific transcription of X. laevis mtDNA. The factor could be resolved from mtRNA polymerase by hydrophobic chromatography and had a sedimentation coefficient of 3.0 S. The transcription factor eluted from both the hydrophobic column and a Mono Q anion-exchange column as a single symmetrical peak. The mtRNA polymerase and this factor together are necessary and sufficient for active transcription from four promoters located in a noncoding region of the mtDNA genome between the gene for tRNA(Phe) and the displacement loop. Images PMID:2457154

  4. Transcription by single molecules of RNA polymerase observed by light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schafer, D A; Gelles, J; Sheetz, M P; Landick, R

    1991-08-01

    The kinetics of transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase relate directly to the regulation of transcription and to the properties of processive enzymes in general, but analysis of RNA polymerase movement along the DNA template has so far been limited to the study of populations of enzyme molecules. The ability to view nanometre-sized particles with the light microscope suggested a method of monitoring transcription by individual RNA polymerase molecules. We describe here the behaviour of 40-nm-diameter particles of colloidal gold attached to the ends of DNA molecules being transcribed by RNA polymerase immobilized on a glass surface. The tethered gold particles are released from the surface at times after addition of nucleoside triphosphates that are consistent with the kinetics of transcription by RNA polymerase in solution. Analysis of the brownian motion of the gold particles enabled us to measure the movement along the template DNA of individual polymerase molecules.

  5. The influenza A virus PB2 polymerase subunit is required for the replication of viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Perales, B; Ortín, J

    1997-01-01

    The transcription and replication of influenza virus RNA (vRNA) were reconstituted in vivo. The experimental approach involved the transfection of plasmids encoding the viral subunits of the polymerase and the nucleoprotein into cells infected with a vaccinia virus recombinant virus expressing the T7 RNA polymerase. As templates, one of two model RNAs was transfected: vNSZ or cNSZ RNA. The RNAs were 240 nucleotides in length, contained the terminal sequences of the NS viral segment, and were of negative or positive polarity, respectively. The accumulation of cRNA and mRNA in cells transfected with vNSZ RNA and the accumulation of vRNA and mRNA in cells transfected with cNSZ RNA were determined by RNase protection assays with labeled vNSZ-L or cNSZ-L probes. The patterns of protected bands obtained indicated that both cRNA replication intermediate and mRNA accumulated when the system was reconstituted with vNSZ RNA. Likewise, both vRNA and mRNA accumulated after reconstitution with cNSZ RNA. The reconstitution of incomplete systems in which any of the subunits of the polymerase or the model RNA were omitted was completely negative for the accumulation of cRNA or vRNA, indicating that the presence of the PB2 subunit in the polymerase is required for replication of vRNA. PMID:8995663

  6. Subgenomic promoter recognition by the norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoyan; Thorne, Lucy; Jin, Zhinan; Hammad, Loubna A.; Li, Serena; Deval, Jerome; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Kao, C. Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The replication enzyme of RNA viruses must preferentially recognize their RNAs in an environment that contains an abundance of cellular RNAs. The factors responsible for specific RNA recognition are not well understood, in part because viral RNA synthesis takes place within enzyme complexes associated with modified cellular membrane compartments. Recombinant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) from the human norovirus and the murine norovirus (MNV) were found to preferentially recognize RNA segments that contain the promoter and a short template sequence for subgenomic RNA synthesis. Both the promoter and template sequence contribute to stable RdRp binding, accurate initiation of the subgenomic RNAs and efficient RNA synthesis. Using a method that combines RNA crosslinking and mass spectrometry, residues near the template channel of the MNV RdRp were found to contact the hairpin RNA motif. Mutations in the hairpin contact site in the MNV RdRp reduced MNV replication and virus production in cells. This work demonstrates that the specific recognition of the norovirus subgenomic promoter is through binding by the viral RdRp. PMID:25520198

  7. A multiplicity of factors contributes to selective RNA polymerase III occupancy of a subset of RNA polymerase III genes in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Canella, Donatella; Bernasconi, David; Gilardi, Federica; LeMartelot, Gwendal; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Delorenzi, Mauro; Hernandez, Nouria

    2012-04-01

    The genomic loci occupied by RNA polymerase (RNAP) III have been characterized in human culture cells by genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitations, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq). These studies have shown that only ∼40% of the annotated 622 human tRNA genes and pseudogenes are occupied by RNAP-III, and that these genes are often in open chromatin regions rich in active RNAP-II transcription units. We have used ChIP-seq to characterize RNAP-III-occupied loci in a differentiated tissue, the mouse liver. Our studies define the mouse liver RNAP-III-occupied loci including a conserved mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) as a potential regulator of an RNAP-III subunit-encoding gene. They reveal that synteny relationships can be established between a number of human and mouse RNAP-III genes, and that the expression levels of these genes are significantly linked. They establish that variations within the A and B promoter boxes, as well as the strength of the terminator sequence, can strongly affect RNAP-III occupancy of tRNA genes. They reveal correlations with various genomic features that explain the observed variation of 81% of tRNA scores. In mouse liver, loci represented in the NCBI37/mm9 genome assembly that are clearly occupied by RNAP-III comprise 50 Rn5s (5S RNA) genes, 14 known non-tRNA RNAP-III genes, nine Rn4.5s (4.5S RNA) genes, and 29 SINEs. Moreover, out of the 433 annotated tRNA genes, half are occupied by RNAP-III. Transfer RNA gene expression levels reflect both an underlying genomic organization conserved in dividing human culture cells and resting mouse liver cells, and the particular promoter and terminator strengths of individual genes.

  8. Bacteriophage λ N protein inhibits transcription slippage by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Parks, Adam R; Court, Carolyn; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Jin, Ding J; Kashlev, Mikhail; Court, Donald L

    2014-05-01

    Transcriptional slippage is a class of error in which ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase incorporates nucleotides out of register, with respect to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) template. This phenomenon is involved in gene regulation mechanisms and in the development of diverse diseases. The bacteriophage λ N protein reduces transcriptional slippage within actively growing cells and in vitro. N appears to stabilize the RNA/DNA hybrid, particularly at the 5' end, preventing loss of register between transcript and template. This report provides the first evidence of a protein that directly influences transcriptional slippage, and provides a clue about the molecular mechanism of transcription termination and N-mediated antitermination.

  9. Bacteriophage λ N protein inhibits transcription slippage by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Parks, Adam R; Court, Carolyn; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Jin, Ding J; Kashlev, Mikhail; Court, Donald L

    2014-05-01

    Transcriptional slippage is a class of error in which ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase incorporates nucleotides out of register, with respect to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) template. This phenomenon is involved in gene regulation mechanisms and in the development of diverse diseases. The bacteriophage λ N protein reduces transcriptional slippage within actively growing cells and in vitro. N appears to stabilize the RNA/DNA hybrid, particularly at the 5' end, preventing loss of register between transcript and template. This report provides the first evidence of a protein that directly influences transcriptional slippage, and provides a clue about the molecular mechanism of transcription termination and N-mediated antitermination. PMID:24711367

  10. Global analysis of transcriptionally engaged yeast RNA polymerase III reveals extended tRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Leśniewska, Ewa; Delan-Forino, Clementine; Sayou, Camille; Boguta, Magdalena; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes a range of highly abundant small stable RNAs, principally pre-tRNAs. Here we report the genome-wide analysis of nascent transcripts attached to RNAPIII under permissive and restrictive growth conditions. This revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distributions across transcription units, generally with a predominant 5′ peak. This peak was higher for more heavily transcribed genes, suggesting that initiation site clearance is rate-limiting during RNAPIII transcription. Down-regulation of RNAPIII transcription under stress conditions was found to be uneven; a subset of tRNA genes showed low response to nutrient shift or loss of the major transcription regulator Maf1, suggesting potential “housekeeping” roles. Many tRNA genes were found to generate long, 3′-extended forms due to read-through of the canonical poly(U) terminators. The degree of read-through was anti-correlated with the density of U-residues in the nascent tRNA, and multiple, functional terminators can be located far downstream. The steady-state levels of 3′-extended pre-tRNA transcripts are low, apparently due to targeting by the nuclear surveillance machinery, especially the RNA binding protein Nab2, cofactors for the nuclear exosome, and the 5′-exonuclease Rat1. PMID:27206856

  11. Positive modulation of RNA polymerase III transcription by ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dieci, Giorgio; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Ottonello, Simone

    2009-02-06

    A yeast nuclear fraction of unknown composition, named TFIIIE, was reported previously to enhance transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes in vitro. We show that TFIIIE activity co-purifies with a specific subset of ribosomal proteins (RPs) which, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, generally interact with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, but not with a Pol II-specific promoter. Only Rpl6Ap and Rpl6Bp, among the tested RPs, were found associated to a TATA-containing tRNA{sup Ile}(TAT) gene. The RPL6A gene also emerged as a strong multicopy suppressor of a conditional mutation in the basal transcription factor TFIIIC, while RPL26A and RPL14A behaved as weak suppressors. The data delineate a novel extra-ribosomal role for one or a few RPs which, by influencing 5S rRNA and tRNA synthesis, could play a key role in the coordinate regulation of the different sub-pathways required for ribosome biogenesis and functionality.

  12. RNA polymerase II ternary transcription complexes generated in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, S; Bunick, D; Zandomeni, R; Weinmann, R

    1983-01-01

    Ternary transcription complexes have been formed with a HeLa cell extract, a specific DNA template, and nucleoside triphosphates. The assay depends on the formation of sarkosyl-resistant initiation complexes which contain RNA polymerase II, template DNA, and radioactive nucleoside triphosphates. Separation from the other elements in the in vitro reaction is achieved by electrophoresis in agarose - 0.25% sarkosyl gels. The mobility of the ternary complexes in this system cannot be distinguished from naked DNA. Formation of this complex is dependent on all parameters necessary for faithful in vitro transcription. Complexes are formed with both the plasmid vector and the specific adenovirus DNA insert containing a eucaryotic promoter. The formation of the complex on the eucaryotic DNA is sequence-dependent. An undecaribonucleotide predicted from the template DNA sequence remains associated with the DNA in the ternary complex and can be isolated if the chain terminator 3'-0-methyl GTP is used, or after T1 ribonuclease treatment of the RNA, or if exogenous GTP is omitted from the in vitro reaction. This oligonucleotide is not detected in association with the plasmid vector. Phosphocellulose fractionation of the extract indicates that at least one of the column fractions required for faithful runoff transcription is required for complex formation. A large molar excess of abortive initiation events was detected relative to the level of productive transcription events, indicating a 40-fold higher efficiency of transcription initiation vs. elongation. Images PMID:6193489

  13. Activation of P2 late transcription by P2 Ogr protein requires a discrete contact site on the C terminus of the alpha subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Wood, L F; Tszine, N Y; Christie, G E

    1997-11-21

    Bacteriophage P2 late transcription requires the product of the P2 ogr gene. Ogr-dependent transcription from P2 late promoters is blocked by certain point mutations affecting the alpha subunits of the host RNA polymerase. An alanine scan spanning the putative activation target in the alpha C-terminal domain (alphaCTD) was carried out to identify individual residues essential for Ogr-dependent transcription from P2 late promoters. In addition, the effects of alanine substitutions in the regions of the alphaCTD previously reported to affect CAP-dependent activation of the lac promoter and UP-element DNA binding were examined. Residues E286, V287, L289 and L290 in helix 3, and residue L300 at the beginning of helix 4, define a surface-exposed patch on the alphaCTD important for Ogr-dependent activation. These residues, adjacent to the recently identified DNA-binding determinants, constitute a newly identified activation surface for protein:protein contact. Alanine substitutions at some of the residues that affect UP-element DNA binding also impaired activation. This suggests that upstream DNA-alpha contacts, in addition to alpha-Ogr contacts, may be important in P2 late transcription. Other residues implicated in the interaction of alpha with CAP are not required for activation by Ogr, consistent with previous genetic evidence suggesting that these activators contact different sites on the alphaCTD. PMID:9398509

  14. Synthesis of reinitiated transcripts by mammalian RNA polymerase II is controlled by elongation factor SII.

    PubMed Central

    Szentirmay, M N; Sawadogo, M

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the in vitro synthesis of reinitiated transcripts by RNA polymerase II requires an additional activity, designated reinitiation transcription factor (RTF), which is distinct from all of the general class II initiation factors. While further characterizing this activity, it was found that RTF displays properties indistinguishable from those of the RNA polymerase II elongation factor SII. In addition, Western blot analysis using SII-specific antibodies revealed that human SII is a major component in purified RTF preparations. The functional equivalence of the two proteins was established using recombinant SII, which proved fully capable of substituting for RTF in the reinitiation assay. In these reconstituted reactions, transcription complexes resulting from reinitiation events required SII to proceed through a 400 bp G-free cassette, while complexes resulting from the first round of initiations were SII-independent. Reinitiations can take place in the absence of SII; however, addition of the elongation factor is essential for full extension of the reinitiated transcripts. These results suggest that events taking place at the promoter (e.g. first-round initiations versus reinitiations) can create marked differences in the properties of RNA polymerase II elongation complexes. Images PMID:8223477

  15. Remodeling of Bacterial RNA Polymerase Supramolecular Complex in Response to Environmental Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Seema; Xiong, Yijia; Mayer, M. Uljana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-03-20

    Directed binding of RNA polymerase to distinct promoter elements controls transcription and promotes adaptive responses to changing environmental conditions. To identify proteins that modulate transcription, we have expressed a tagged alpha-subunit of RNA polymerase in Shewanella oneidensis under controlled growth conditions, isolated the protein complex using newly developed multiuse affinity probes, and used LC-MS/MS to identify proteins in the complex. Complementary fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements were used to determine the average size of the RNA polymerase complex in cellular lysates. We find that RNA polymerase exists as a large supramolecular complex with an apparent mass in excess of 1.4 MDa, whose protein composition substantially changes in response to growth conditions. Enzymes that copurify with RNA polymerase include those associated with tRNA processing, nucleotide metabolism, and energy biosynthesis, which we propose to be necessary for optimal transcriptional rates.

  16. Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase NS5B

    PubMed Central

    Powdrill, Megan H.; Bernatchez, Jean A.; Götte, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    More than 20 years after the identification of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a novel human pathogen, the only approved treatment remains a combination of pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. This rather non-specific therapy is associated with severe side effects and by far not everyone benefits from treatment. Recently, progress has been made in the development of specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C). A major target for such direct acting antivirals (DAAs) is the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or non-structural protein 5B (NS5B), which is essential for viral replication. This review will examine the current state of development of inhibitors targeting the polymerase and issues such as the emergence of antiviral resistance during treatment, as well as strategies to address this problem. PMID:21994615

  17. Molecular Structures of DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases (II) from Calf Thymus and Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, R. F.; Blatti, S. P.; Rutter, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II has been purified to high specific activity and apparent homogeneity from both calf thymus and rat liver. Two form II enzymes are present in rat-liver preparations, one with the molecular structure [(190,000)1(150,000)1(35,000)1(25,000)1], the other with a molecular structure of [(170,000)1(150,000)1(35,000)1(25,000)1] (molecular weights are within ±5% but the absolute values are approximate). Inclusion of a proteolytic inhibitor during the isolation procedure decreases the proportion of the molecule containing the 170,000 subunit. Calf-thymus RNA polymerase preparations typically exhibit four components on polyacrylamide gels that contain sodium dodecyl sulfate, with an apparent molecular structure of [(190,000)1(150,000)1(35,000)1(25,000)1]. In addition, some calf-thymus polymerase II preparations contain small quantities of the [(170,000)1(150,000)1(35,000)1(25,000)1] species; the quantity of this species may also be increased from less than 5% in the normal preparation to at least 40% in an “aged” preparation. Thus, the 170,000 subunit may be derived from the 190,000 subunit in both tissues. Until unequivocal evidence is obtained on this point, however, the possibility that the large subunits are unique species should not be eliminated. The general structural similarity of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II with that of the prokaryotic polymerase suggests that the modes of action and regulation may be analogous. Images PMID:5289245

  18. Preparation of Chromatin Templates to Study RNA Polymerase I Transcription In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Längst, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Cellular DNA is packaged into chromatin, which is the substrate of all DNA-dependent processes in eukaryotes. The regulation of chromatin requires specialized enzyme activities to allow the access of sequence-specific binding proteins and RNA polymerases. In order to dissect chromatin-dependent features of transcription regulation in detail, in vitro systems to generate defined chromatin templates for transcription are required. I present a protocol that allows the assembly of nucleosomes on ribosomal RNA (rRNA) minigenes by salt gradient dialysis and subsequent sucrose gradient centrifugation. This procedure yields high nucleosome occupancy and high dynamic response in subsequent transcriptional analysis. It provides an invaluable tool to study rRNA gene transcription, as transcription on free DNA is clearly different from the more in vivo-like transcription on reconstituted chromatin templates. PMID:27576714

  19. Initiation of (-)-strand RNA synthesis catalyzed by the BMV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: synthesis of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Sun, J H; Adkins, S; Faurote, G; Kao, C C

    1996-12-01

    RNA replication, a process of fundamental importance for pathogenesis by many viruses, remains poorly understood at the mechanistic level because relatively few of the responsible enzymes have been purified and characterized biochemically. Partially purified RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) from brome mosaic virus (BMV)-infected barley leaves is able to synthesize (-)-strand RNAs from input (+)-strand templates. In resolving RdRp products generated during (-)-strand BMV RNA synthesis, we found that an RNA of eight nucleotides was generated at approximately 10-fold molar excess to the full-length (-)-strand RNA. Production of the 8-mer was dependent upon and specific to BMV RNA templates. Furthermore, inhibitors of full-length (-)-strand RNA synthesis by RdRp also affected the production of the 8-mer. Analysis of the sequence of the 8-mer suggests that it is initiated at the authentic initiation site on the BMV RNA template, consistent with the possibility that the 8-mer is an abortive initiation product of RNA synthesis by RdRp in vitro. Addition of heparin or Mn2+ differentially affected production of the 8-mer and full-length (-)-strand RNA, as did some nucleotide changes near the site of RNA initiation. These studies further define the initiation process of (-)-strand RNA synthesis.

  20. RNA Polymerase II cluster dynamics predict mRNA output in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; English, Brian P; Inoue, Takuma; Andrews, J Owen; Conway, William; Grimm, Jonathan B; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Lavis, Luke D; Lionnet, Timothée; Cisse, Ibrahim I

    2016-01-01

    Protein clustering is a hallmark of genome regulation in mammalian cells. However, the dynamic molecular processes involved make it difficult to correlate clustering with functional consequences in vivo. We developed a live-cell super-resolution approach to uncover the correlation between mRNA synthesis and the dynamics of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) clusters at a gene locus. For endogenous β-actin genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we observe that short-lived (~8 s) Pol II clusters correlate with basal mRNA output. During serum stimulation, a stereotyped increase in Pol II cluster lifetime correlates with a proportionate increase in the number of mRNAs synthesized. Our findings suggest that transient clustering of Pol II may constitute a pre-transcriptional regulatory event that predictably modulates nascent mRNA output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13617.001 PMID:27138339

  1. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  2. Structure and sequence of the gene for the largest subunit of trypanosomal RNA polymerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Köck, J; Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1988-01-01

    As the first step in the analysis of the transcription process in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, we have started to characterise the trypanosomal RNA polymerases. We have previously described the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and found that two almost identical RNA polymerase II genes are encoded within the genome of T. brucei. Here we present the identification, cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III. This gene contains a single open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a Mr of 170 kD. In total, eight encoding a polypeptide with a Mr of 170 kD. In total, eight highly conserved regions with significant homology to those previously reported in other eukaryotic RNA polymerase largest subunits were identified. Some of these domains contain functional sites, which are conserved among all eukaryotic largest subunit genes analysed thus far. Since these domains make up a large part of each polypeptide, independent of the RNA polymerase class, these data strongly support the hypothesis that these domains provide a major part of the transcription machinery of the RNA polymerase complex. The additional domains which are uniquely present in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I and II, respectively, two large hydrophylic insertions and a C-terminal extension, might be a determining factor in specific transcription of the gene classes. Images PMID:3174432

  3. Biochemical Effect of Resistance Mutations against Synergistic Inhibitors of RSV RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Amy; Stevens, Sarah K.; Jordan, Paul C.; Gromova, Tatiana; Taylor, Joshua S.; Hong, Jin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Guangyi; Dyatkina, Natalia; Prhavc, Marija; Symons, Julian A.; Beigelman, Leo

    2016-01-01

    ALS-8112 is the parent molecule of ALS-8176, a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in the clinic against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The antiviral activity of ALS-8112 is mediated by its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP, or 2'F-4'ClCH2-cytidine triphosphate) inhibiting the RNA polymerase activity of the RSV L-P protein complex through RNA chain termination. Four amino acid mutations in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of L (QUAD: M628L, A789V, L795I, and I796V) confer in vitro resistance to ALS-8112-TP by increasing its discrimination relative to natural CTP. In this study, we show that the QUAD mutations specifically recognize the ClCH2 group of ALS-8112-TP. Among the four mutations, A789V conferred the greatest resistance phenotype, which was consistent with its putative position in the active site of the RdRp domain. AZ-27, a non-nucleoside inhibitor of RSV, also inhibited the RdRp activity, with decreased inhibition potency in the presence of the Y1631H mutation. The QUAD mutations had no effect on the antiviral activity of AZ-27, and the Y1631H mutation did not significantly increase the discrimination of ALS-8112-TP. Combining ALS-8112 with AZ-27 in vitro resulted in significant synergistic inhibition of RSV replication. Overall, this is the first mechanistic study showing a lack of cross-resistance between mutations selected by different classes of RSV polymerase inhibitors acting in synergy, opening the door to future potential combination therapies targeting different regions of the L protein. PMID:27163448

  4. Biochemical Effect of Resistance Mutations against Synergistic Inhibitors of RSV RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Deval, Jerome; Fung, Amy; Stevens, Sarah K; Jordan, Paul C; Gromova, Tatiana; Taylor, Joshua S; Hong, Jin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Guangyi; Dyatkina, Natalia; Prhavc, Marija; Symons, Julian A; Beigelman, Leo

    2016-01-01

    ALS-8112 is the parent molecule of ALS-8176, a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in the clinic against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The antiviral activity of ALS-8112 is mediated by its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP, or 2'F-4'ClCH2-cytidine triphosphate) inhibiting the RNA polymerase activity of the RSV L-P protein complex through RNA chain termination. Four amino acid mutations in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of L (QUAD: M628L, A789V, L795I, and I796V) confer in vitro resistance to ALS-8112-TP by increasing its discrimination relative to natural CTP. In this study, we show that the QUAD mutations specifically recognize the ClCH2 group of ALS-8112-TP. Among the four mutations, A789V conferred the greatest resistance phenotype, which was consistent with its putative position in the active site of the RdRp domain. AZ-27, a non-nucleoside inhibitor of RSV, also inhibited the RdRp activity, with decreased inhibition potency in the presence of the Y1631H mutation. The QUAD mutations had no effect on the antiviral activity of AZ-27, and the Y1631H mutation did not significantly increase the discrimination of ALS-8112-TP. Combining ALS-8112 with AZ-27 in vitro resulted in significant synergistic inhibition of RSV replication. Overall, this is the first mechanistic study showing a lack of cross-resistance between mutations selected by different classes of RSV polymerase inhibitors acting in synergy, opening the door to future potential combination therapies targeting different regions of the L protein. PMID:27163448

  5. The RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase, an emerging antiviral drug target for the Hendra virus.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Carbone, Vincenzo; Akter, Jesmin; Sivanesan, Sivashangarie; Li, Jian; Beddoe, Travis; Marsh, Glenn A

    2014-01-01

    Australia is facing a major national medical challenge with the emergence of the Hendra virus (HeV) as a medically and economically important pathogen of humans and animals. Clinical symptoms of human HeV infection can include fever, hypotension, dizziness, encephalitis, respiratory haemorrhage and edema. The window of opportunity for successful patient treatment remains unknown, but is likely to be very narrow. Currently, very few effective therapeutic options are available for the case management of severe HeV infections or the rapid silencing of local outbreaks. This underscores the need for more activity in the drug discovery arena to develop much needed therapeutics that specifically targets this deadly disease. The structural analysis of HeV is very much in its infancy, which leaves many gaps in our understanding of the biology of HeV and makes structure-guided drug design difficult. Structural studies of the viral RNAdependent- RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is the heart of the viral replication machinery, will set the stage for rational drug design and fill a major gap in our understanding of the HeV replication machinery. This review examines the current knowledge based on the multi-domain architecture of the Hendra RdRp and highlights which essential domain functions represent tangible targets for drug development against this deadly disease.

  6. The RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase, an emerging antiviral drug target for the Hendra virus.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Carbone, Vincenzo; Akter, Jesmin; Sivanesan, Sivashangarie; Li, Jian; Beddoe, Travis; Marsh, Glenn A

    2014-01-01

    Australia is facing a major national medical challenge with the emergence of the Hendra virus (HeV) as a medically and economically important pathogen of humans and animals. Clinical symptoms of human HeV infection can include fever, hypotension, dizziness, encephalitis, respiratory haemorrhage and edema. The window of opportunity for successful patient treatment remains unknown, but is likely to be very narrow. Currently, very few effective therapeutic options are available for the case management of severe HeV infections or the rapid silencing of local outbreaks. This underscores the need for more activity in the drug discovery arena to develop much needed therapeutics that specifically targets this deadly disease. The structural analysis of HeV is very much in its infancy, which leaves many gaps in our understanding of the biology of HeV and makes structure-guided drug design difficult. Structural studies of the viral RNAdependent- RNA polymerase (RdRp), which is the heart of the viral replication machinery, will set the stage for rational drug design and fill a major gap in our understanding of the HeV replication machinery. This review examines the current knowledge based on the multi-domain architecture of the Hendra RdRp and highlights which essential domain functions represent tangible targets for drug development against this deadly disease. PMID:24102407

  7. Real-time dynamics of RNA Polymerase II clustering in live human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisse, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the central dogma of molecular biology, when genetic information encoded on DNA is made into messenger RNA. How this fundamental process occurs within living cells (in vivo) is poorly understood,[1] despite extensive biochemical characterizations with isolated biomolecules (in vitro). For high-order organisms, like humans, transcription is reported to be spatially compartmentalized in nuclear foci consisting of clusters of RNA Polymerase II, the enzyme responsible for synthesizing all messenger RNAs. However, little is known of when these foci assemble or their relative stability. We developed an approach based on photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM) combined with a temporal correlation analysis, which we refer to as tcPALM. The tcPALM method enables the real-time characterization of biomolecular spatiotemporal organization, with single-molecule sensitivity, directly in living cells.[2] Using tcPALM, we observed that RNA Polymerase II clusters form transiently, with an average lifetime of 5.1 (+/- 0.4) seconds. Stimuli affecting transcription regulation yielded orders of magnitude changes in the dynamics of the polymerase clusters, implying that clustering is regulated and plays a role in the cells ability to effect rapid response to external signals. Our results suggest that the transient crowding of enzymes may aid in rate-limiting steps of genome regulation.

  8. Relationship between RNA polymerase II and efficiency of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, S; Dales, S

    1989-01-01

    It is clear from previous studies that host transcriptase or RNA polymerase II (pol II) has a role in poxvirus replication. To elucidate the participation of this enzyme further, in this study we examined several parameters related to pol II during the cycle of vaccinia virus infection in L-strain fibroblasts, HeLa cells, and L6H9 rat myoblasts. Nucleocytoplasmic transposition of pol II into virus factories and virions was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting by using anti-pol II immunoglobulin G. RNA polymerase activities were compared in nuclear extracts containing crude enzyme preparations. Rates of translation into cellular or viral polypeptides were ascertained by labeling with [35S]methionine. In L and HeLa cells, which produced vaccinia virus more abundantly, the rates of RNA polymerase and translation in controls and following infection were higher than in myoblasts. The data on synthesis and virus formation could be correlated with observations on transmigration of pol II, which was more efficient and complete in L and HeLa cells. The stimulus for pol II to leave the nucleus required the expression of both early and late viral functions. On the basis of current and past information, we suggest that mobilization of pol II depends on the efficiency of vaccina virus replication and furthermore that control over vaccinia virus production by the host is related to the content or availability (or both) of pol II in different cell types. Images PMID:2648021

  9. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex influences transcription by RNA polymerase I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Anderson, Susan J; French, Sarah L; Sikes, Martha L; Viktorovskaya, Olga V; Huband, Jacalyn; Holcomb, Katherine; Hartman, John L; Beyer, Ann L; Schneider, David A

    2013-01-01

    SWI/SNF is a chromatin remodeling complex that affects transcription initiation and elongation by RNA polymerase II. Here we report that SWI/SNF also plays a role in transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of the genes encoding the Snf6p or Snf5p subunits of SWI/SNF was lethal in combination with mutations that impair Pol I transcription initiation and elongation. SWI/SNF physically associated with ribosomal DNA (rDNA) within the coding region, with an apparent peak near the 5' end of the gene. In snf6Δ cells there was a ∼2.5-fold reduction in rRNA synthesis rate compared to WT, but there was no change in average polymerase occupancy per gene, the number of rDNA gene repeats, or the percentage of transcriptionally active rDNA genes. However, both ChIP and EM analyses showed a small but reproducible increase in Pol I density in a region near the 5' end of the gene. Based on these data, we conclude that SWI/SNF plays a positive role in Pol I transcription, potentially by modifying chromatin structure in the rDNA repeats. Our findings demonstrate that SWI/SNF influences the most robust transcription machinery in proliferating cells.

  10. Relationship between RNA polymerase II and efficiency of vaccinia virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Wilton, S.; Dales, S.

    1989-04-01

    It is clear from previous studies that host transcriptase or RNA polymerase II (pol II) has a role in poxvirus replication. To elucidate the participation of this enzyme further, in this study the authors examined several parameters related to pol II during the cycle of vaccinia virus infection in L-strain fibroblasts, HeLa cells, and L/sub 6/H/sub 9/ rat myoblasts. Nucleocytoplasmic transposition of pol II into virus factories and virions was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting by using anti-pol II immunoglobulin G. RNA polymerase activities were compared in nuclear extracts containing cured enzyme preparations. Rates of translation into cellular or viral polypeptides were ascertained by labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine. In L and HeLa cells, which produced vaccinia virus more abundantly, the rate of RNA polymerase and translation in controls and following infection were higher than in myoblasts. The data on synthesis and virus formation could be correlated with observations on transmigration of pol II, which was more efficient and complete in L and HeLa cells. The stimulus for pol II to leave the nucleus required the expression of both early and late viral functions. On the basis of current and past information, the authors suggest that mobilization of pol II depends on the efficiency of vaccinia virus replication and furthermore that control over vaccinia virus production by the host is related to the content or availability (or both) of pol II in different cell types.

  11. A split intein T7 RNA polymerase for transcriptional AND-logic.

    PubMed

    Schaerli, Yolanda; Gili, Magüi; Isalan, Mark

    2014-10-29

    Synthetic biology has developed numerous parts for building synthetic gene circuits. However, few parts have been described for prokaryotes to integrate two signals at a promoter in an AND fashion, i.e. the promoter is only activated in the presence of both signals. Here we present a new part for this function: a split intein T7 RNA polymerase. We divide T7 RNA polymerase into two expression domains and fuse each to a split intein. Only when both domains are expressed does the split intein mediate protein trans-splicing, yielding a full-length T7 RNA polymerase that can transcribe genes via a T7 promoter. We demonstrate an AND gate with the new part: the signal-to-background ratio is very high, resulting in an almost digital signal. This has utility for more complex circuits and so we construct a band-pass filter in Escherichia coli. The split intein approach should be widely applicable for engineering artificial gene circuit parts. PMID:25262348

  12. Fragment-based discovery of hepatitis C virus NS5b RNA polymerase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Antonysamy, Stephen S.; Aubol, Brandon; Blaney, Jeff; Browner, Michelle F.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Harris, Seth F.; Hébert, Normand; Hendle, Jörg; Hopkins, Stephanie; Jefferson, Elizabeth; Kissinger, Charles; Leveque, Vincent; Marciano, David; McGee, Ethel; Nájera, Isabel; Nolan, Brian; Tomimoto, Masaki; Torres, Eduardo; Wright, Tobi

    2009-07-22

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HCV NS5b RNA polymerase were discovered by a fragment-based lead discovery approach, beginning with crystallographic fragment screening. The NS5b binding affinity and biochemical activity of fragment hits and inhibitors was determined by surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) and an enzyme inhibition assay, respectively. Crystallographic fragment screening hits with {approx}1-10 mM binding affinity (K{sub D}) were iteratively optimized to give leads with {approx}200 nM biochemical activity and low {micro}M cellular activity in a Replicon assay.

  13. Interaction of amatoxins with plant cells and RNA polymerases II: selection of amanitin-resistant cell lines and synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Little, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments directed toward deriving basic information regarding plant RNA polymerase II is presented. The experiments described relate to the potential of isolating RNA polymerase II mutants in plants, using carrot cell cultures as models. Additionally, the synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands to immobilize isolated plant RNA polymerase II and associated transcriptional complexes is described. RNA polymerase II activities have been isolated from suspension cultures of carrot and compared to other plant RNA polymerases II with respect to subunit analysis and inhibition with ..cap alpha..-amanitin. RNA polymerase II purified by polymin P absorption, DE52, phosphocellulose, and RNA-agarose chromatography is shown to copurify with proteins of 175 (and 200), 135, 70, 43, 28, 22, and 17 kdaltons apparent molecular weights. Conditions for accurate determination of amanitin inhibition of the enzyme are established using /sup 3/H-amanitin and are presented for the first time for plant RNA polymerase II; RNA polymerase II from these cultures is shown to be inhibited by 50% at 3-5 nM by ..cap alpha..-amanitin, a value 10-50 times lower than previously reported.

  14. Cell penetrable humanized-VH/V(H)H that inhibit RNA dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) of HCV.

    PubMed

    Thueng-in, Kanyarat; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Srimanote, Potjanee; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Poungpair, Ornnuthchar; Maneewatch, Santi; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2012-01-01

    NS5B is pivotal RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of HCV and NS5B function interfering halts the virus infective cycle. This work aimed to produce cell penetrable humanized single domain antibodies (SdAb; VH/V(H)H) that interfere with the RdRp activity. Recombinant NS5BΔ55 of genotype 3a HCV with de novo RNA synthetic activity was produced and used in phage biopanning for selecting phage clones that displayed NS5BΔ55 bound VH/V(H)H from a humanized-camel VH/V(H)H display library. VH/V(H)H from E. coli transfected with four selected phage clones inhibited RdRp activity when tested by ELISA inhibition using 3'di-cytidylate 25 nucleotide directed in vitro RNA synthesis. Deduced amino acid sequences of two clones showed V(H)H hallmark and were designated V(H)H6 and V(H)H24; other clones were conventional VH, designated VH9 and VH13. All VH/V(H)H were linked molecularly to a cell penetrating peptide, penetratin. The cell penetrable VH9, VH13, V(H)H6 and V(H)H24 added to culture of Huh7 cells transfected with JHF-1 RNA of genotype 2a HCV reduced the amounts of RNA intracellularly and in culture medium implying that they inhibited the virus replication. VH/V(H)H mimotopes matched with residues scattered on the polymerase fingers, palm and thumb which were likely juxtaposed to form conformational epitopes. Molecular docking revealed that the antibodies covered the RdRp catalytic groove. The transbodies await further studies for in vivo role in inhibiting HCV replication.

  15. Structure of an RNA Polymerase II-TFIIB Complex and the Transcription Initiation Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Wang, Dong; Calero, Guillermo; Kornberg, Roger D

    2010-01-14

    Previous x-ray crystal structures have given insight into the mechanism of transcription and the role of general transcription factors in the initiation of the process. A structure of an RNA polymerase II-general transcription factor TFIIB complex at 4.5 angstrom resolution revealed the amino-terminal region of TFIIB, including a loop termed the 'B finger,' reaching into the active center of the polymerase where it may interact with both DNA and RNA, but this structure showed little of the carboxyl-terminal region. A new crystal structure of the same complex at 3.8 angstrom resolution obtained under different solution conditions is complementary with the previous one, revealing the carboxyl-terminal region of TFIIB, located above the polymerase active center cleft, but showing none of the B finger. In the new structure, the linker between the amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions can also be seen, snaking down from above the cleft toward the active center. The two structures, taken together with others previously obtained, dispel long-standing mysteries of the transcription initiation process.

  16. Human AP-endonuclease (APE1/Ref-1) and its acetylation regulate YB-1/p300 recruitment and RNA polymerase II loading in the drug induced activation of multidrug resistance gene MDR1

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mantha, Anil K.; Mitra, Sankar; Bhakat, Kishor K.

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression of human AP-endonuclease (APE1/Ref-1), a key enzyme in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway, is often associated with tumor cell resistance to various anticancer drugs. In this study, we examined the molecular basis of transcriptional regulatory (non repair) function of APE1 in promoting resistance to certain types of drugs. We have recently shown that APE1 stably interacts with Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1), and acts as its coactivator for the expression of multidrug resistance gene MDR1, thereby causing drug-resistance. Here we show for the first time that APE1 is stably associated with the basic transcription factor RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) and the coactivator p300 on the endogenous MDR1 promoter. APE1’s depletion significantly reduces YB-1/p300 recruitment to the promoter, resulting in reduced RNA pol II loading. Drug-induced APE1 acetylation which is mediated by p300 enhances formation of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1)/YB-1/p300 complex on the MDR1 promoter. Enhanced recruitment of this complex increases MDR1 promoter dependent luciferase activity and its endogenous expression. Using APE1 downregulated cells and cells overexpressing wild type APE1 or its nonacetylable mutant we have demonstrated that the loss of APE1’s acetylation impaired MDR1 activation and sensitizes the cells to cisplatin or etoposide. We have thus established the basis for APE1’s acetylation-dependent regulatory function in inducing MDR1-mediated drug resistance. PMID:20856196

  17. Elongation factor SII-dependent transcription by RNA polymerase II through a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Reines, D; Mote, J

    1993-01-01

    In eukaryotes the genetic material is contained within a coiled, protein-coated structure known as chromatin. RNA polymerases must recognize specific nucleoprotein assemblies and maintain contact with the underlying DNA duplex for many thousands of base pairs. Template-bound lac operon repressor from Escherichia coli arrests RNA polymerase II in vitro and in vivo [Kuhn, A., Bartsch, I. & Grummt, I. (1990) Nature (London) 344, 559-562; Deuschele, U., Hipskind, R. A. & Bujard, H. (1990) Science 248, 480-483]. We show that in a reconstituted transcription system, elongation factor SII enables RNA polymerase II to proceed through this blockage at high efficiency. lac repressor-arrested elongation complexes display an SII-activated transcript cleavage reaction, an activity associated with transcriptional read-through of a previously characterized region of bent DNA. This demonstrates factor-dependent transcription by RNA polymerase II through a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. Nascent transcript cleavage may be a general mechanism by which RNA polymerase II can bypass many transcriptional impediments. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8446609

  18. Molecular characterization of genome segment 2 encoding RNA dependent RNA polymerase of Antheraea mylitta cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Suvankar; Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Roy, Sobhan; Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Bagchi, Abhisek; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar

    2010-08-15

    Genome segment 2 (S2) from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) was converted into cDNA, cloned and sequenced. S2 consisted of 3798 nucleotides with a long ORF encoding a 1116 amino acid long protein (123 kDa). BLAST and phylogenetic analysis showed 29% sequence identity and close relatedness of AmCPV S2 with RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of other insect cypoviruses, suggesting a common origin of all insect cypoviruses. The ORF of S2 was expressed as 123 kDa soluble His-tagged fusion protein in insect cells via baculovirus recombinants which exhibited RdRp activity in an in vitro RNA polymerase assay without any intrinsic terminal transferase activity. Maximum activity was observed at 37 deg. C at pH 6.0 in the presence of 3 mM MgCl{sub 2.} Site directed mutagenesis confirmed the importance of the conserved GDD motif. This is the first report of functional characterization of a cypoviral RdRp which may lead to the development of anti-viral agents.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Thosea asigna virus.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Diego; Buxaderas, Mònica; Rodriguez, José F; Verdaguer, Núria

    2012-10-01

    Thosea asigna virus (TaV) is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus that belongs to the Permutotetravirus genera within the recently created Permutotetraviridae family. The genome of TaV consists of an RNA segment of about 5.700 nucleotides with two open reading frames, encoding for the replicase and capsid protein. The particular TaV replicase does not contain N7-methyl transferase and helicase domains but includes a structurally unique RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) with a sequence permutation in the domain where the active site is anchored. This architecture is also found in double-stranded RNA viruses of the Birnaviridae family. Here we report the purification and preliminary crystallographic studies TaV RdRp. The enzyme was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour diffusion method using PEG 8K and lithium sulfate as precipitants. Two different crystal forms were obtained: native RdRp crystallized in space group P2(1)2(1)2 and diffracts up to 2.1 Å and the RdRp-Lu(3+) derivative co-crystals belong to the C222(1) space group, diffracting to 3.0 Å resolution. The structure of TaV RdRp represents the first structure of a non-canonical RdRp from ssRNA viruses. PMID:23027763

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Thosea asigna virus

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Diego; Buxaderas, Mònica; Rodriguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria

    2012-01-01

    Thosea asigna virus (TaV) is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus that belongs to the Permutotetravirus genera within the recently created Permutotetraviridae family. The genome of TaV consists of an RNA segment of about 5.700 nucleotides with two open reading frames, encoding for the replicase and capsid protein. The particular TaV replicase does not contain N7-methyl transferase and helicase domains but includes a structurally unique RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) with a sequence permutation in the domain where the active site is anchored. This architecture is also found in double-stranded RNA viruses of the Birnaviridae family. Here we report the purification and preliminary crystallographic studies TaV RdRp. The enzyme was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour diffusion method using PEG 8K and lithium sulfate as precipitants. Two different crystal forms were obtained: native RdRp crystallized in space group P21212 and diffracts up to 2.1 Å and the RdRp-Lu3+ derivative co-crystals belong to the C2221 space group, diffracting to 3.0 Å resolution. The structure of TaV RdRp represents the first structure of a non-canonical RdRp from ssRNA viruses. PMID:23027763

  1. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Bryant, Jack A

    2016-11-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'. PMID:27672157

  2. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J.; Bryant, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli. By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672157

  3. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Bryant, Jack A

    2016-11-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  4. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:24406346

  5. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  6. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  7. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  8. Genome-Wide Mapping of Yeast RNA Polymerase II Termination

    PubMed Central

    Schaughency, Paul; Merran, Jonathan; Corden, Jeffry L.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) terminates transcription of coding transcripts through the polyadenylation (pA) pathway and non-coding transcripts through the non-polyadenylation (non-pA) pathway. We have used PAR-CLIP to map the position of Pol II genome-wide in living yeast cells after depletion of components of either the pA or non-pA termination complexes. We show here that Ysh1, responsible for cleavage at the pA site, is required for efficient removal of Pol II from the template. Depletion of Ysh1 from the nucleus does not, however, lead to readthrough transcription. In contrast, depletion of the termination factor Nrd1 leads to widespread runaway elongation of non-pA transcripts. Depletion of Sen1 also leads to readthrough at non-pA terminators, but in contrast to Nrd1, this readthrough is less processive, or more susceptible to pausing. The data presented here provide delineation of in vivo Pol II termination regions and highlight differences in the sequences that signal termination of different classes of non-pA transcripts. PMID:25299594

  9. Recombinant Thermus aquaticus RNA Polymerase for Structural Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Juznedelov,K.; Lamour, V.; Patikoglou, G.; Chlenov, M.; Darst, S.; Severinov, K.

    2006-01-01

    Advances in the structural biology of bacterial transcription have come from studies of RNA polymerases (RNAPs) from the thermophilic eubacteria Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and Thermus thermophilus (Tth). These structural studies have been limited by the fact that only endogenous Taq or Tth RNAP, laboriously purified from large quantities of Taq or Tth cell paste and offering few options for genetic modification, is suitable for structural studies. Recombinant systems for the preparation of Taq RNAP by co-overexpression and assembly in the heterologous host, Escherichia coli, have been described, but these did not yield enzyme suitable for crystallographic studies. Here we describe recombinant systems for the preparation of Taq RNAP harboring full or partial deletions of the Taq {beta}' non-conserved domain (NCD), yielding enzyme suitable for crystallographic studies. This opens the way for structural studies of genetically manipulated enzymes, allowing the preparation of more crystallizable enzymes and facilitating detailed structure/function analysis. Characterization of the Taq{beta}'NCD deletion mutants generated in this study showed that the {beta}'NCD is important for the efficient binding of the s subunit, confirming previous hypotheses. Finally, preliminary structural analysis (at 4.1 Angstroms resolution) of one of the recombinant mutants revealed a previously unobserved conformation of the {beta}-flap, further defining the range of conformations accessible to this flexible structural element.

  10. Stable RNA-DNA-RNA polymerase complexes can accompany formation of a single phosphodiester bond.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, J E; Cashel, M

    1980-03-18

    Incubation of RNA polymerase with poly[d(A-T)n] template results in a binary enzyme-DNA complex. Further addition of the dinucleotide UpA and [alpha-32P]UTP results in catalytic formation of the labeled trinucleotide UpApU until substrate exhaustion. In contrast, incubation of binary enzyme-DNA complexes with ApU and [alpha-32P]ATP results in labeled ApUpA formation to an extent that is stoichiometric with the amount of enzyme present despite an excess of substrates. The occurrence of ApUpA in a stable DNA-enzyme-RNA ternary complex is shown by gel exclusion chromatography, Millipore filtration, and the ability of ternary complexes to support subsequent RNA chain elongation. Radioactivity is not bound to Millipore filters when purified, labeled ApUpA is added to enzyme-DNA binary complexes. Hence, phosphodiester bond formation is required for stable ternary complex formation. The absence of the delta subunit of RNA polymerase or the addition of rifampicin to the reaction before ribonucleotide substrates results in catalytic ApUpA formation instead of stable ternary complexes.

  11. Structure and function of the polymerase core of TRAMP, a RNA surveillance complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, Stephanie; Wolin, Sandra L.; Reinisch, Karin M.

    2010-09-03

    The Trf4p/Air2p/Mtr4p polyadenylation (TRAMP) complex recognizes aberrant RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and targets them for degradation. A TRAMP subcomplex consisting of a noncanonical poly(A) RNA polymerase in the Pol {beta} superfamily of nucleotidyl transferases, Trf4p, and a zinc knuckle protein, Air2p, mediates initial substrate recognition. Trf4p and related eukaryotic poly(A) and poly(U) polymerases differ from other characterized enzymes in the Pol {beta} superfamily both in sequence and in the lack of recognizable nucleic acid binding motifs. Here we report, at 2.7-{angstrom} resolution, the structure of Trf4p in complex with a fragment of Air2p comprising two zinc knuckle motifs. Trf4p consists of a catalytic and central domain similar in fold to those of other noncanonical Pol {beta} RNA polymerases, and the two zinc knuckle motifs of Air2p interact with the Trf4p central domain. The interaction surface on Trf4p is highly conserved across eukaryotes, providing evidence that the Trf4p/Air2p complex is conserved in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast and that the TRAMP complex may also function in RNA surveillance in higher eukaryotes. We show that Air2p, and in particular sequences encompassing a zinc knuckle motif near its N terminus, modulate Trf4p activity, and we present data supporting a role for this zinc knuckle in RNA binding. Finally, we show that the RNA 3{prime} end plays a role in substrate recognition.

  12. Splicing of Nascent RNA Coincides with Intron Exit from RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Carrillo Oesterreich, Fernando; Herzel, Lydia; Straube, Korinna; Hujer, Katja; Howard, Jonathon; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-04-01

    Protein-coding genes in eukaryotes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and introns are removed from pre-mRNA by the spliceosome. Understanding the time lag between Pol II progression and splicing could provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of gene expression. Here, we present two single-molecule nascent RNA sequencing methods that directly determine the progress of splicing catalysis as a function of Pol II position. Endogenous genes were analyzed on a global scale in budding yeast. We show that splicing is 50% complete when Pol II is only 45 nt downstream of introns, with the first spliced products observed as introns emerge from Pol II. Perturbations that slow the rate of spliceosome assembly or speed up the rate of transcription caused splicing delays, showing that regulation of both processes determines in vivo splicing profiles. We propose that matched rates streamline the gene expression pathway, while allowing regulation through kinetic competition.

  13. RNA polymerase pausing regulates translation initiation by providing additional time for TRAP-RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2006-11-17

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) pause sites have been identified in several prokaryotic genes. Although the presumed biological function of RNAP pausing is to allow synchronization of RNAP position with regulatory factor binding and/or RNA folding, a direct causal link between pausing and changes in gene expression has been difficult to establish. RNAP pauses at two sites in the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon leader. Pausing at U107 and U144 participates in transcription attenuation and trpE translation control mechanisms, respectively. Substitution of U144 caused a substantial pausing defect in vitro and in vivo. These mutations led to increased trp operon expression that was suppressed by overproduction of TRAP, indicating that pausing at U144 provides additional time for TRAP to bind to the nascent transcript and promote formation of an RNA structure that blocks translation of trpE. These results establish that pausing is capable of playing a role in regulating translation in bacteria. PMID:17114058

  14. Interplay of positive and negative effectors in function of the C-terminal repeat domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Kornberg, R D

    1994-01-01

    RNA polymerase II lacking a C-terminal domain (CTD) was active in transcription with purified proteins from yeast but failed to support transcription in a yeast extract. CTD dependence could be reconstituted in the purified system by addition of two fractions from the extract. An inhibitory fraction abolished transcription by both wild-type and CTD-less RNA polymerases; a stimulatory fraction restored activity of the wild-type polymerase but had a much lesser effect on the CTD-less enzyme. Parallel results were obtained with the use of a kinase inhibitor that prevents phosphorylation of the CTD by RNA polymerase II initiation factor b. The kinase inhibitor abolished transcription by wild-type polymerase in yeast extract but had no significant effect in the purified system. The requirement for both the CTD and kinase action for transcription in an extract indicates that CTD phosphorylation is involved in opposing the negative effector in the extract. Factor b must play a role(s) in addition to phosphorylation of the CTD because it was still required for transcription with polymerase lacking a CTD in the purified system. Images PMID:8134400

  15. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Jácome, Rodrigo; Becerra, Arturo; Ponce de León, Samuel; Lazcano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  16. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jácome, Rodrigo; Becerra, Arturo; Ponce de León, Samuel; Lazcano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, “fingertips” that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection. PMID:26397100

  17. Episodic adaptive diversification of classical swine fever virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the pathogen that causes a highly infectious disease of pigs and has led to disastrous losses to pig farms and related industries. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NS5B is a central component of the replicase complex (RC) in some single-stranded RNA viruses, including CSFV. On the basis of genetic variation, the CSFV RdRps could be clearly divided into 2 major groups and a minor group, which is consistent with the phylogenetic relationships and virulence diversification of the CSFV isolates. However, the adaptive signature underlying such an evolutionary profile of the polymerase and the virus is still an interesting open question. We analyzed the evolutionary trajectory of the CSFV RdRps over different timescales to evaluate the potential adaptation. We found that adaptive selection has driven the diversification of the RdRps between, but not within, CSFV major groups. Further, the major adaptive divergence-related sites are located in the surfaces relevant to the interaction with other component(s) of RC and the entrance and exit of the template-binding channel. These results might shed some light on the nature of the RdRp in virulence diversification of CSFV groups.

  18. Episodic adaptive diversification of classical swine fever virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the pathogen that causes a highly infectious disease of pigs and has led to disastrous losses to pig farms and related industries. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NS5B is a central component of the replicase complex (RC) in some single-stranded RNA viruses, including CSFV. On the basis of genetic variation, the CSFV RdRps could be clearly divided into 2 major groups and a minor group, which is consistent with the phylogenetic relationships and virulence diversification of the CSFV isolates. However, the adaptive signature underlying such an evolutionary profile of the polymerase and the virus is still an interesting open question. We analyzed the evolutionary trajectory of the CSFV RdRps over different timescales to evaluate the potential adaptation. We found that adaptive selection has driven the diversification of the RdRps between, but not within, CSFV major groups. Further, the major adaptive divergence-related sites are located in the surfaces relevant to the interaction with other component(s) of RC and the entrance and exit of the template-binding channel. These results might shed some light on the nature of the RdRp in virulence diversification of CSFV groups. PMID:26485449

  19. Distinguishing Core and Holoenzyme Mechanisms of Transcription Termination by RNA Polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription termination by RNA polymerase (Pol) III serves multiple purposes; it delimits interference with downstream genes, forms 3′ oligo(U) binding sites for the posttranscriptional processing factor, La protein, and resets the polymerase complex for reinitiation. Although an interplay of several Pol III subunits is known to collectively control these activities, how they affect molecular function of the active center during termination is incompletely understood. We have approached this using immobilized Pol III-nucleic acid scaffolds to examine the two major components of termination, transcription pausing and RNA release. This allowed us to distinguish two mechanisms of termination by isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol III. A core mechanism can operate in the absence of C53/37 and C11 subunits but requires synthesis of 8 or more 3′ U nucleotides, apparently reflecting inherent sensitivity to an oligo(rU·dA) hybrid that is the termination signal proper. The holoenzyme mechanism requires fewer U nucleotides but uses C53/37 and C11 to slow elongation and prevent terminator arrest. N-terminal truncation of C53 or point mutations that disable the cleavage activity of C11 impair their antiarrest activities. The data are consistent with a model in which C53, C37, and C11 activities are functionally integrated with the active center of Pol III during termination. PMID:23401852

  20. Binding sites for abundant nuclear factors modulate RNA polymerase I-dependent enhancer function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kang, J J; Yokoi, T J; Holland, M J

    1995-12-01

    The 190-base pair (bp) rDNA enhancer within the intergenic spacer sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA cistrons activates synthesis of the 35S-rRNA precursor about 20-fold in vivo (Mestel,, R., Yip, M., Holland, J. P., Wang, E., Kang, J., and Holland, M. J. (1989) Mol. Cell. Biol. 9, 1243-1254). We now report identification and analysis of transcriptional activities mediated by three cis-acting sites within a 90-bp portion of the rDNA enhancer designated the modulator region. In vivo, these sequences mediated termination of transcription by RNA polymerase I and potentiated the activity of the rDNA enhancer element. Two trans-acting factors, REB1 and REB2, bind independently to sites within the modulator region (Morrow, B. E., Johnson, S. P., and Warner, J. R. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 9061-9068). We show that REB2 is identical to the ABF1 protien. Site-directed mutagenesis of REB1 and ABF1 binding sites demonstrated uncoupling of RNA polymerase I-dependent termination from transcriptional activation in vivo. We conclude that REB1 and ABF1 are required for RNA polymerase I-dependent termination and enhancer function, respectively, Since REB1 and ABF1 proteins also regulate expression of class II genes and other nuclear functions, our results suggest further similarities between RNA polymerase I and II regulatory mechanisms. Two rDNA enhancers flanking a rDNA minigene stimulated RNA polymerase I transcription in a "multiplicative" fashion. Deletion mapping analysis showed that similar cis-acting sequences were required for enhancer function when positioned upstream or downstream from a rDNA minigene.

  1. A carboxyl-terminal-domain kinase associated with RNA polymerase II transcription factor delta from rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Serizawa, H; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1992-01-01

    We previously purified RNA polymerase II transcription factor delta from rat liver and found that it has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity. In this report, we show that delta is also closely associated with a protein kinase activity that catalyzes phosphorylation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Kinase activity copurifies with transcription and DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activities when delta is analyzed by anion- and cation-exchange HPLC as well as by sucrose gradient sedimentation, arguing that delta possesses all three activities. Phosphorylation of the largest subunits of both rat and yeast RNA polymerase II is stimulated by DNA, whereas phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide containing multiple copies of the carboxyl-terminal heptapeptide repeat is not. Although both ATP and GTP appear to function as phosphate donors, GTP is utilized less than 10% as well as ATP. These findings suggest that delta may exert its action in transcription at least in part through a mechanism involving phosphorylation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:1386928

  2. Suppressor analysis of temperature-sensitive mutations of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a suppressor gene encodes the second-largest subunit of RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Yano, R; Nomura, M

    1991-01-01

    The SRP3-1 mutation is an allele-specific suppressor of temperature-sensitive mutations in the largest subunit (A190) of RNA polymerase I from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two mutations known to be suppressed by SRP3-1 are in the putative zinc-binding domain of A190. We have cloned the SRP3 gene by using its suppressor activity and determined its complete nucleotide sequence. We conclude from the following evidence that the SRP3 gene encodes the second-largest subunit (A135) of RNA polymerase I. First, the deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product contains several regions with high homology to the corresponding regions of the second-largest subunits of RNA polymerases of various origins, including those of RNA polymerase II and III from S. cerevisiae. Second, the deduced amino acid sequence contains known amino acid sequences of two tryptic peptides from the A135 subunit of RNA polymerase I purified from S. cerevisiae. Finally, a strain was constructed in which transcription of the SRP3 gene was controlled by the inducible GAL7 promoter. When this strain, which can grow on galactose but not on glucose, was shifted from galactose medium to glucose medium, a large decrease in the cellular concentration of A135 was observed by Western blot analysis. We have also identified the specific amino acid alteration responsible for suppression by SRP3-1 and found that it is located within the putative zinc-binding domain conserved among the second-largest subunits of eucaryotic RNA polymerases. From these results, it is suggested that this putative zinc-binding domain is in physical proximity to and interacts with the putative zinc-binding domain of the A190 subunit. Images PMID:1990281

  3. Preparation of fluorinated RNA nucleotide analogs potentially stable to enzymatic hydrolysis in RNA and DNA polymerase assays

    PubMed Central

    Shakhmin, Anton; Jones, John-Paul; Bychinskaya, Inessa; Zibinsky, Mikhail; Oertell, Keriann; Goodman, Myron F.; Prakash, G.K. Surya

    2015-01-01

    Analogs of ribonucleotides (RNA) stable to enzymatic hydrolysis were prepared and characterized. Computational investigations revealed that this class of compounds with a modified triphosphate exhibits the correct polarity and minimal steric effects compared to the natural molecule. Non-hydrolysable properties as well as the ability of the modified nucleotide to be recognized by enzymes were probed by performing single-turnover gap filling assays with T7 RNA polymerase and DNA polymerase β. PMID:26279588

  4. Catching RNA Polymerase in the act of Binding: Intermediates in Transcription Illuminated by Synchrotron Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Brenowitz,M.; Erie, D.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    The article by Sclavi et al. in this issue of PNAS addresses 'initiation, ' the first step in transcription. Gene transcription is catalyzed in cells by large multisubunit proteins called RNA polymerases (RNAP). The eubacteria holoenzyme of RNAP is composed of five core subunits ({alpha}, {alpha}2, {beta}, {beta}', and {omega}) that contain the amino acid residues required for the enzyme's catalytic activity. A sixth subunit ({sigma}) guides RNAP to specific sequences on the genomic DNA (promoters) that mark the beginning of a gene or group of genes.

  5. Acetylation of RNA Polymerase II Regulates Growth-Factor-Induced Gene Transcription in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S.; Capra, John A.; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A.; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G.; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes. PMID:24207025

  6. The RNA Template Channel of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as a Target for Development of Antiviral Therapy of Multiple Genera within a Virus Family

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Vives-Adrián, Laia; Selisko, Barbara; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Liu, Xinran; Lanke, Kjerstin; Ulferts, Rachel; De Palma, Armando M.; Tanchis, Federica; Goris, Nesya; Lefebvre, David; De Clercq, Kris; Leyssen, Pieter; Lacroix, Céline; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Boehr, David D.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Verdaguer, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71) for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Nucleoside-based inhibitors have broad-spectrum activity but often exhibit off-target effects. Most non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNIs) target surface cavities, which are structurally more flexible than the nucleotide-binding pocket, and hence have a more narrow spectrum of activity and are more prone to resistance development. Here, we report a novel NNI, GPC-N114 (2,2'-[(4-chloro-1,2-phenylene)bis(oxy)]bis(5-nitro-benzonitrile)) with broad-spectrum activity against enteroviruses and cardioviruses (another genus in the picornavirus family). Surprisingly, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and poliovirus displayed a high genetic barrier to resistance against GPC-N114. By contrast, EMCV, a cardiovirus, rapidly acquired resistance due to mutations in 3Dpol. In vitro polymerase activity assays showed that GPC-N114 i) inhibited the elongation activity of recombinant CVB3 and EMCV 3Dpol, (ii) had reduced activity against EMCV 3Dpol with the resistance mutations, and (iii) was most efficient in inhibiting 3Dpol when added before the RNA template-primer duplex. Elucidation of a crystal structure of the inhibitor bound to CVB3 3Dpol confirmed the RNA-binding channel as the target for GPC-N114. Docking studies of the compound into the crystal structures of the compound-resistant EMCV 3Dpol mutants suggested that the resistant phenotype is due to subtle changes that interfere with the binding of GPC-N114 but not of the RNA template-primer. In conclusion, this study presents the first NNI that targets the RNA template channel of the picornavirus polymerase and identifies a new pocket that can be used for the design of broad-spectrum inhibitors. Moreover, this study provides important new insight into the

  7. The RNA template channel of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase as a target for development of antiviral therapy of multiple genera within a virus family.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Vives-Adrián, Laia; Selisko, Barbara; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Liu, Xinran; Lanke, Kjerstin; Ulferts, Rachel; De Palma, Armando M; Tanchis, Federica; Goris, Nesya; Lefebvre, David; De Clercq, Kris; Leyssen, Pieter; Lacroix, Céline; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Boehr, David D; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Verdaguer, Nuria; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-03-01

    The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71) for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Nucleoside-based inhibitors have broad-spectrum activity but often exhibit off-target effects. Most non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNIs) target surface cavities, which are structurally more flexible than the nucleotide-binding pocket, and hence have a more narrow spectrum of activity and are more prone to resistance development. Here, we report a novel NNI, GPC-N114 (2,2'-[(4-chloro-1,2-phenylene)bis(oxy)]bis(5-nitro-benzonitrile)) with broad-spectrum activity against enteroviruses and cardioviruses (another genus in the picornavirus family). Surprisingly, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and poliovirus displayed a high genetic barrier to resistance against GPC-N114. By contrast, EMCV, a cardiovirus, rapidly acquired resistance due to mutations in 3Dpol. In vitro polymerase activity assays showed that GPC-N114 i) inhibited the elongation activity of recombinant CVB3 and EMCV 3Dpol, (ii) had reduced activity against EMCV 3Dpol with the resistance mutations, and (iii) was most efficient in inhibiting 3Dpol when added before the RNA template-primer duplex. Elucidation of a crystal structure of the inhibitor bound to CVB3 3Dpol confirmed the RNA-binding channel as the target for GPC-N114. Docking studies of the compound into the crystal structures of the compound-resistant EMCV 3Dpol mutants suggested that the resistant phenotype is due to subtle changes that interfere with the binding of GPC-N114 but not of the RNA template-primer. In conclusion, this study presents the first NNI that targets the RNA template channel of the picornavirus polymerase and identifies a new pocket that can be used for the design of broad-spectrum inhibitors. Moreover, this study provides important new insight into the

  8. Purification and lipid-layer crystallization of yeast RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A M; Darst, S A; Feaver, W J; Thompson, N E; Burgess, R R; Kornberg, R D

    1990-01-01

    Yeast RNA polymerase II was purified to homogeneity by a rapid procedure involving immunoaffinity chromatography. The purified enzyme contained 10 subunits, as reported for conventional preparations, but with no detectable proteolysis of the largest subunit. In assays of initiation of transcription at the yeast CYC1 promoter, the enzyme complemented the deficiency of an extract from a strain that produces a temperature-sensitive polymerase II. Mammalian RNA polymerase II was inactive in this initiation assay. The purified yeast enzyme formed two-dimensional crystals on positively charged lipid layers, as previously found for Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Image analysis of electron micrographs of crystals in negative stain, which diffracted to about 30-A resolution, showed protein densities of dimensions consistent with those of single polymerase molecules. Images PMID:2179949

  9. Highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes are impediments to replication fork progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Azvolinsky, Anna; Giresi, Paul G.; Lieb, Jason D.; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Replication forks face multiple obstacles that slow their progression. By two-dimensional gel analysis, yeast forks pause at stable DNA protein complexes, and this pausing is greatly increased in the absence of the Rrm3 helicase. We used a genome wide approach to identify 96 sites of very high DNA polymerase binding in wild type cells. Most of these binding sites were not previously identified pause sites. Rather, the most highly represented genomic category among high DNA polymerase binding sites was the open reading frames (ORFs) of highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes. Twice as many pause sites were identified in rrm3 compared to wild type cells as pausing in this strain occurred at both highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes and the previously identified protein DNA complexes. ORFs of highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes are the first class of natural pause sites that are not exacerbated in rrm3 cells. PMID:19560424

  10. RNA as an RNA Polymerase: Net Elongation of an RNA Primer Catalyzed by the Tetrahymena Ribozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Michael D.; Cech, Thomas R.

    1988-03-01

    A catalytic RNA (ribozyme) derived from an intervening sequence (IVS) RNA of Tetrahymena thermophila will catalyze an RNA polymerization reaction in which pentacytidylic acid (C5) is extended by the successive addition of mononucleotides derived from a guanylyl-(3', 5')-nucleotide (GpN). Cytidines or uridines are added to C5 to generate chain lengths of 10 to 11 nucleotides, with longer products being generated at greatly reduced efficiency. The reaction is analogous to that catalyzed by a replicase with C5 acting as the primer, GpNs as the nucleoside triphosphates, and a sequence in the ribozyme providing a template. The demonstration that an RNA enzyme can catalyze net elongation of an RNA primer supports theories of prebiotic RNA self-replication.

  11. Mutations in the CRE pocket of bacterial RNA polymerase affect multiple steps of transcription.

    PubMed

    Petushkov, Ivan; Pupov, Danil; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2015-07-13

    During transcription, the catalytic core of RNA polymerase (RNAP) must interact with the DNA template with low-sequence specificity to ensure efficient enzyme translocation and RNA extension. Unexpectedly, recent structural studies of bacterial promoter complexes revealed specific interactions between the nontemplate DNA strand at the downstream edge of the transcription bubble (CRE, core recognition element) and a protein pocket formed by core RNAP (CRE pocket). We investigated the roles of these interactions in transcription by analyzing point amino acid substitutions and deletions in Escherichia coli RNAP. The mutations affected multiple steps of transcription, including promoter recognition, RNA elongation and termination. In particular, we showed that interactions of the CRE pocket with a nontemplate guanine immediately downstream of the active center stimulate RNA-hairpin-dependent transcription pausing but not other types of pausing. Thus, conformational changes of the elongation complex induced by nascent RNA can modulate CRE effects on transcription. The results highlight the roles of specific core RNAP-DNA interactions at different steps of RNA synthesis and suggest their importance for transcription regulation in various organisms.

  12. Mutations in the CRE pocket of bacterial RNA polymerase affect multiple steps of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Petushkov, Ivan; Pupov, Danil; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    During transcription, the catalytic core of RNA polymerase (RNAP) must interact with the DNA template with low-sequence specificity to ensure efficient enzyme translocation and RNA extension. Unexpectedly, recent structural studies of bacterial promoter complexes revealed specific interactions between the nontemplate DNA strand at the downstream edge of the transcription bubble (CRE, core recognition element) and a protein pocket formed by core RNAP (CRE pocket). We investigated the roles of these interactions in transcription by analyzing point amino acid substitutions and deletions in Escherichia coli RNAP. The mutations affected multiple steps of transcription, including promoter recognition, RNA elongation and termination. In particular, we showed that interactions of the CRE pocket with a nontemplate guanine immediately downstream of the active center stimulate RNA-hairpin-dependent transcription pausing but not other types of pausing. Thus, conformational changes of the elongation complex induced by nascent RNA can modulate CRE effects on transcription. The results highlight the roles of specific core RNAP–DNA interactions at different steps of RNA synthesis and suggest their importance for transcription regulation in various organisms. PMID:25990734

  13. Translocation by T7 RNA polymerase: a sensitively poised Brownian ratchet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Sousa, Rui

    2006-04-21

    Studies of halted T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) elongation complexes (ECs) or of T7RNAP transcription against roadblocks due to DNA-bound proteins indicate that T7RNAP translocates via a passive Brownian ratchet mechanism. Crystal structures of T7RNAP ECs suggest that translocation involves an active power-stroke. However, neither solution studies of halted or slowed T7RNAP ECs, nor crystal structures of static complexes, are necessarily relevant to how T7RNAP translocates during rapid elongation. A recent single molecule study of actively elongating T7RNAPs provides support for the Brownian ratchet mechanism. Here, we obtain additional evidence for the existence of a Brownian ratchet during active T7RNAP elongation by showing that both rapidly elongating and halted complexes are equally sensitive to pyrophosphate. Using chemical nucleases tethered to the polymerase we achieve sub-ångström resolution in measuring the average position of halted T7RNAP ECs and find that the positional equilibrium of the EC is sensitively poised between pre-translocated and post-translocated states. This may be important in maximizing the sensitivity of the polymerase to sequences that cause pausing or termination. We also confirm that a crystallographically observed disorder to order transition in a loop formed by residues 589-612 also occurs in solution and is coupled to pyrophosphate or NTP release. This transition allows the loop to make interactions with the DNA that help stabilize the laterally mobile, ligand-free EC against dissociation.

  14. Relationships among the positive strand and double-strand RNA viruses as viewed through their RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Bruenn, J A

    1991-01-25

    The sequences of 50 RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRPs) from 43 positive strand and 7 double strand RNA (dsRNA) viruses have been compared. The alignment permitted calculation of distances among the 50 viruses and a resultant dendrogram based on every amino acid, rather than just those amino acids in the conserved motifs. Remarkably, a large subgroup of these viruses, including vertebrate, plant, and insect viruses, forms a single cluster whose only common characteristic is exploitation of insect hosts or vectors. This similarity may be due to molecular constraints associated with a present and/or past ability to infect insects and/or to common descent from insect viruses. If common descent is important, as it appears to be, all the positive strand RNA viruses of eucaryotes except for the picornaviruses may have evolved from an ancestral dsRNA virus. Viral RDRPs appear to be inherited as modules rather than as portions of single RNA segments, implying that RNA recombination has played an important role in their dissemination.

  15. Photoaffinity labeling of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli with 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Woody, A Y; Vader, C R; Woody, R W; Haley, B E

    1984-06-19

    A photoaffinity analogue of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8-N3ATP), has been used to elucidate the role of the various subunits involved in forming the active site of Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. 8-N3ATP was found to be a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to the incorporation of ATP with Ki = 42 microM, while uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) incorporation was not affected. UV irradiation of the reaction mixture containing RNA polymerase and [gamma-32P]-8-N3ATP induced covalent incorporation of radioactive label into the enzyme. Analysis by gel filtration and nitrocellulose filter binding indicated specific binding. Subunit analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of the labeled enzyme showed that the major incorporation of radioactive label was in beta' and sigma, with minor incorporation in beta and alpha. The same pattern was observed in both the presence and absence of poly[d(A-T)] and poly[d(A-T)] plus ApU. Incorporation of radioactive label in all bands was significantly reduced by 100-150 microM ATP, while 100-200 microM UTP did not show a noticeable effect. Our results indicate major involvement of the beta' and sigma subunits in the active site of RNA polymerase. The observation of a small extent of labeling of the beta and alpha subunits, which was prevented by saturating levels of ATP, suggests that these subunits are in close proximity to the catalytic site.

  16. 5'-deoxy-5'-hydrazinylguanosine as an initiator of T7 Rna polymerase-catalyzed transcriptions for the preparation of labeling-ready RNAs.

    PubMed

    Skipsey, Mark; Hack, Gordon; Hooper, Thomas A; Shankey, Mark C; Conway, Louis P; Schröder, Martin; Hodgson, David R W

    2013-01-01

    5'-deoxy-5'-hydrazinylguanosine was incorporated into the 5'-termini of RNA transcripts using T7 RNA polymerase. Transcriptions provided 5'-hydrazinyl-RNA that was readily labeled and purified. The use of fluorophore-labeled material was validated in an endoribonuclease activity assay.

  17. RNA-Free and Ribonucleoprotein-Associated Influenza Virus Polymerases Directly Bind the Serine-5-Phosphorylated Carboxyl-Terminal Domain of Host RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Hengrung, Narin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viruses subvert the transcriptional machinery of their hosts to synthesize their own viral mRNA. Ongoing transcription by cellular RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is required for viral mRNA synthesis. By a process known as cap snatching, the virus steals short 5′ capped RNA fragments from host capped RNAs and uses them to prime viral transcription. An interaction between the influenza A virus RNA polymerase and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of Pol II has been established, but the molecular details of this interaction remain unknown. We show here that the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex binds to the CTD of transcriptionally engaged Pol II. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the viral polymerase binds directly to the serine-5-phosphorylated form of the Pol II CTD, both in the presence and in the absence of viral RNA, and show that this interaction is conserved in evolutionarily distant influenza viruses. We propose a model in which direct binding of the viral RNA polymerase in the context of vRNPs to Pol II early in infection facilitates cap snatching, while we suggest that binding of free viral polymerase to Pol II late in infection may trigger Pol II degradation. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses cause yearly epidemics and occasional pandemics that pose a threat to human health, as well as represent a large economic burden to health care systems globally. Existing vaccines are not always effective, as they may not exactly match the circulating viruses. Furthermore, there are a limited number of antivirals available, and development of resistance to these is a concern. New measures to combat influenza are needed, but before they can be developed, it is necessary to better understand the molecular interactions between influenza viruses and their host cells. By providing further insights into the molecular details of how influenza viruses hijack the host transcriptional machinery, we aim to uncover novel targets for

  18. Sub1 associates with Spt5 and influences RNA polymerase II transcription elongation rate.

    PubMed

    García, Alicia; Collin, Alejandro; Calvo, Olga

    2012-11-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Sub1 has been implicated in several steps of mRNA metabolism in yeast, such as the activation of transcription, termination, and 3'-end formation. In addition, Sub1 globally regulates RNA polymerase II phosphorylation, and most recently it has been shown that it is a functional component of the preinitiation complex. Here we present evidence that Sub1 plays a significant role in transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with the gene encoding the elongation factor Spt5, that Sub1 influences Spt5 phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of RNAPII largest subunit by the kinase Bur1, and that both Sub1 and Spt5 copurify in the same complex, likely during early transcription elongation. Indeed, our data indicate that Sub1 influences Spt5-Rpb1 interaction. In addition, biochemical and molecular data show that Sub1 influences transcription elongation of constitutive and inducible genes and associates with coding regions in a transcription-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that Sub1 associates with Spt5 and influences Spt5-Rpb1 complex levels and consequently transcription elongation rate.

  19. Sub1 associates with Spt5 and influences RNA polymerase II transcription elongation rate

    PubMed Central

    García, Alicia; Collin, Alejandro; Calvo, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Sub1 has been implicated in several steps of mRNA metabolism in yeast, such as the activation of transcription, termination, and 3′-end formation. In addition, Sub1 globally regulates RNA polymerase II phosphorylation, and most recently it has been shown that it is a functional component of the preinitiation complex. Here we present evidence that Sub1 plays a significant role in transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with the gene encoding the elongation factor Spt5, that Sub1 influences Spt5 phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of RNAPII largest subunit by the kinase Bur1, and that both Sub1 and Spt5 copurify in the same complex, likely during early transcription elongation. Indeed, our data indicate that Sub1 influences Spt5–Rpb1 interaction. In addition, biochemical and molecular data show that Sub1 influences transcription elongation of constitutive and inducible genes and associates with coding regions in a transcription-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that Sub1 associates with Spt5 and influences Spt5–Rpb1 complex levels and consequently transcription elongation rate. PMID:22973055

  20. Intrinsic translocation barrier as an initial step in pausing by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Kireeva, Maria L; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Gotte, Deanna; Parks, Adam R; Strathern, Jeffrey N; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2013-02-22

    Pausing of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) by backtracking on DNA is a major regulatory mechanism in control of eukaryotic transcription. Backtracking occurs by extrusion of the 3' end of the RNA from the active center after bond formation and before translocation of RNAP II on DNA. In several documented cases, backtracking requires a special signal such as A/T-rich sequences forming an unstable RNA-DNA hybrid in the elongation complex. However, other sequence-dependent backtracking signals and conformations of RNAP II leading to backtracking remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate with S. cerevisiae RNAP II that a cleavage-deficient elongation factor TFIIS (TFIIS(AA)) enhances backtracked pauses during regular transcription. This is due to increased efficiency of formation of an intermediate that leads to backtracking. This intermediate may involve misalignment at the 3' end of the nascent RNA in the active center of the yeast RNAP II, and TFIIS(AA) promotes formation of this intermediate at the DNA sequences, presenting a high-energy barrier to translocation. We proposed a three-step mechanism for RNAP II pausing in which a prolonged dwell time in the pre-translocated state increases the likelihood of the 3' RNA end misalignment facilitating a backtrack pausing. These results demonstrate an important role of the intrinsic blocks to forward translocation in pausing by RNAP II.

  1. Structural Dynamics as a Contributor to Error-prone Replication by an RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase*

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M.; Korboukh, Victoria K.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Smidansky, Eric D.; Marcotte, Laura L.; Gohara, David W.; Yang, Xiaorong; Sánchez-Farrán, María Antonieta; Filman, David; Maranas, Janna K.; Boehr, David D.; Hogle, James M.; Colina, Coray M.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    RNA viruses encoding high- or low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are attenuated. The ability to predict residues of the RdRp required for faithful incorporation of nucleotides represents an essential step in any pipeline intended to exploit perturbed fidelity as the basis for rational design of vaccine candidates. We used x-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, NMR spectroscopy, and pre-steady-state kinetics to compare a mutator (H273R) RdRp from poliovirus to the wild-type (WT) enzyme. We show that the nucleotide-binding site toggles between the nucleotide binding-occluded and nucleotide binding-competent states. The conformational dynamics between these states were enhanced by binding to primed template RNA. For the WT, the occluded conformation was favored; for H273R, the competent conformation was favored. The resonance for Met-187 in our NMR spectra reported on the ability of the enzyme to check the correctness of the bound nucleotide. Kinetic experiments were consistent with the conformational dynamics contributing to the established pre-incorporation conformational change and fidelity checkpoint. For H273R, residues comprising the active site spent more time in the catalytically competent conformation and were more positively correlated than the WT. We propose that by linking the equilibrium between the binding-occluded and binding-competent conformations of the nucleotide-binding pocket and other active-site dynamics to the correctness of the bound nucleotide, faithful nucleotide incorporation is achieved. These studies underscore the need to apply multiple biophysical and biochemical approaches to the elucidation of the physical basis for polymerase fidelity. PMID:25378410

  2. Molecular structure of yeast RNA polymerase III: demonstration of the tripartite transcriptive system in lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, P; Hager, G L; Weinberg, F; Rutter, W J

    1976-01-01

    Homogeneous RNA polymerase III (RNA nucleotidyltransferase III) has been obtained from yeast. The subunit composition of the enzyme was examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The enzyme is composed of 12 putative subunits with molecular weights 160,000, 128,000, 82,000, 41,000, 40,500, 37,000, 34,000, 28,000, 24,000, 20,000, 14,500, and 11,000. The high-molecular-weight subunits and several of the smaller subunits of yeast RNA polymerase III are clearly different from those of enzymes I and II, indicating a distinct molecular structure. However, the molecular weights of some of the small subunits (41,000, 28,000, 24,000, and 14,500) appear to be identical to those of polymerases I and II. Thus, it is possible that the three classes of enzymes in yeast have some common subunits. As in other eukaryotes, yeast polymerase II is inhibited by relatively low concentrations of alpha-amanitin; however, contrary to what has been found in higher eukaryotes, yeast polymerase III is resistant (up to 2 mg/ml) to alpha-amanitin, while yeast polymerase I is sensitive to high concentrations of the drug (50% inhibition at 0.3 mg/ml). These results establish the existence of RNA polymerase III in yeast and provide a structural basis for the discrimination of the three functional polymerases in eukaryotes. Images PMID:772675

  3. Use of DNA, RNA, and Chimeric Templates by a Viral RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase: Evolutionary Implications for the Transition from the RNA to the DNA World

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Robert W.; Bellon, Laurent; Beigelman, Leonid; Kao, C. Cheng

    1999-01-01

    All polynucleotide polymerases have a similar structure and mechanism of catalysis, consistent with their evolution from one progenitor polymerase. Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) are expected to have properties comparable to those from this progenitor and therefore may offer insight into the commonalities of all classes of polymerases. We examined RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RdRp on DNA, RNA, and hybrid templates and found that precise initiation of RNA synthesis can take place from all of these templates. Furthermore, initiation can take place from either internal or penultimate initiation sites. Using a template competition assay, we found that the BMV RdRp interacts with DNA only three- to fourfold less well than it interacts with RNA. Moreover, a DNA molecule with a ribonucleotide at position −11 relative to the initiation nucleotide was able to interact with RdRp at levels comparable to that observed with RNA. These results suggest that relatively few conditions were needed for an ancestral RdRp to replicate DNA genomes. PMID:10400735

  4. Substitution of Ribonucleotides in the T7 RNA Polymerase Promoter Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic analysis was carried out to examine the effects of ribonucleotide substitution at various locations within the promoter element for T7 RNA polymerase. Ribonucleotides could be introduced at most positions without significantly decreasing transcription efficiency. A critical window of residues that were intolerant of RNA substitution was defined for both the non-template and template strands of the promoter. These residues are involved in important contacts with the AT-rich recognition loop, specificity loop, and P-intercalating hairpin of the polymerase. These results highlight the malleability of T7 RNA polymerase in recognizing its promoter element and suggest that promoters with altered backbone conformations may be used in molecular biology applications that employ T7 RNA polymerase for in vitro transcription.

  5. RNA polymerase II subunit RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    To improve our understanding of RNA polymerase II, the gene that encodes its third-largest subunit, RPB3, was isolated from a lambda gt11 DNA library by using antibody probes. The RPB3 DNA sequence predicts a 318-amino-acid protein whose sequence was confirmed, in part, by microsequence analysis of the gel-purified RNA polymerase II subunit. RPB3 was found to be an essential single-copy gene that is tightly linked to HIS6 on chromosome IX. An RPB3 temperature-sensitive mutant that arrested growth after three to four generations at the restrictive temperature was isolated. When the mutant was shifted to the restrictive temperature, RNA polymerase II could no longer assemble, previously assembled functional enzyme was depleted, and mRNA levels were consequently reduced. These results demonstrate that RPB3 is an essential component of the mRNA transcription apparatus. Finally, the RPB3 protein is similar in sequence and length to RPC5, a subunit common to RNA polymerases I and III, suggesting that these subunits may play similar roles in RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Images PMID:2685562

  6. Using the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as a Model to Understand Viral Polymerase Structure, Function and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sesmero, Ester; Thorpe, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Viral polymerases replicate and transcribe the genomes of several viruses of global health concern such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Ebola virus. For this reason they are key targets for therapies to treat viral infections. Although there is little sequence similarity across the different types of viral polymerases, all of them present a right-hand shape and certain structural motifs that are highly conserved. These features allow their functional properties to be compared, with the goal of broadly applying the knowledge acquired from studying specific viral polymerases to other viral polymerases about which less is known. Here we review the structural and functional properties of the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) in order to understand the fundamental processes underlying the replication of viral genomes. We discuss recent insights into the process by which RNA replication occurs in NS5B as well as the role that conformational changes play in this process. PMID:26193306

  7. In vitro RNA interference targeting the DNA polymerase gene inhibits orf virus replication in primary ovine fetal turbinate cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaili; He, Wenqi; Song, Deguang; Li, Jida; Bao, Yingfu; Lu, Rongguang; Bi, Jingying; Zhao, Kui; Gao, Feng

    2014-05-01

    Orf, which is caused by orf virus (ORFV), is distributed worldwide and is endemic in most sheep- and/or goat-raising countries. RNA interference (RNAi) pathways have emerged as important regulators of virus-host cell interactions. In this study, the specific effect of RNAi on the replication of ORFV was explored. The application of RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited the replication of ORFV in cell culture by targeting the ORF025 gene of ORFV, which encodes the viral polymerase. Three small interfering RNA (siRNA) (named siRNA704, siRNA1017 and siRNA1388) were prepared by in vitro transcription. The siRNAs were evaluated for antiviral activity against the ORFV Jilin isolate by the observation of cytopathic effects (CPE), virus titration, and real-time PCR. After 48 h of infection, siRNA704, siRNA1017 and siRNA1388 reduced virus titers by 59- to 199-fold and reduced the level of viral replication by 73-89 %. These results suggest that these three siRNAs can efficiently inhibit ORFV genome replication and infectious virus production. RNAi targeting of the DNA polymerase gene is therefore potentially useful for studying the replication of ORFV and may have potential therapeutic applications.

  8. Role of Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase in the Toxicity of Nucleotide Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yili; Barauskas, Ona; Perry, Jason K.; Ahmadyar, Shekeba; Stepan, George; Yu, Helen; Babusis, Darius; Park, Yeojin; McCutcheon, Krista; Perron, Michel; Schultz, Brian E.; Sakowicz, Roman; Ray, Adrian S.

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity has emerged during the clinical development of many but not all nucleotide inhibitors (NI) of hepatitis C virus (HCV). To better understand the mechanism for adverse events, clinically relevant HCV NI were characterized in biochemical and cellular assays, including assays of decreased viability in multiple cell lines and primary cells, interaction with human DNA and RNA polymerases, and inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis and respiration. NI that were incorporated by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (PolRMT) inhibited mitochondrial protein synthesis and showed a corresponding decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption in cells. The nucleoside released by the prodrug balapiravir (R1626), 4′-azido cytidine, was a highly selective inhibitor of mitochondrial RNA transcription. The nucleotide prodrug of 2′-C-methyl guanosine, BMS-986094, showed a primary effect on mitochondrial function at submicromolar concentrations, followed by general cytotoxicity. In contrast, NI containing multiple ribose modifications, including the active forms of mericitabine and sofosbuvir, were poor substrates for PolRMT and did not show mitochondrial toxicity in cells. In general, these studies identified the prostate cell line PC-3 as more than an order of magnitude more sensitive to mitochondrial toxicity than the commonly used HepG2 cells. In conclusion, analogous to the role of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma in toxicity caused by some 2′-deoxynucleotide analogs, there is an association between HCV NI that interact with PolRMT and the observation of adverse events. More broadly applied, the sensitive methods for detecting mitochondrial toxicity described here may help in the identification of mitochondrial toxicity prior to clinical testing. PMID:26596942

  9. Substrate-induced DNA polymerase β activation.

    PubMed

    Beard, William A; Shock, David D; Batra, Vinod K; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H

    2014-11-01

    DNA polymerases and substrates undergo conformational changes upon forming protein-ligand complexes. These conformational adjustments can hasten or deter DNA synthesis and influence substrate discrimination. From structural comparison of binary DNA and ternary DNA-dNTP complexes of DNA polymerase β, several side chains have been implicated in facilitating formation of an active ternary complex poised for chemistry. Site-directed mutagenesis of these highly conserved residues (Asp-192, Arg-258, Phe-272, Glu-295, and Tyr-296) and kinetic characterization provides insight into the role these residues play during correct and incorrect insertion as well as their role in conformational activation. The catalytic efficiencies for correct nucleotide insertion for alanine mutants were wild type ∼ R258A > F272A ∼ Y296A > E295A > D192A. Because the efficiencies for incorrect insertion were affected to about the same extent for each mutant, the effects on fidelity were modest (<5-fold). The R258A mutant exhibited an increase in the single-turnover rate of correct nucleotide insertion. This suggests that the wild-type Arg-258 side chain generates a population of non-productive ternary complexes. Structures of binary and ternary substrate complexes of the R258A mutant and a mutant associated with gastric carcinomas, E295K, provide molecular insight into intermediate structural conformations not appreciated previously. Although the R258A mutant crystal structures were similar to wild-type enzyme, the open ternary complex structure of E295K indicates that Arg-258 stabilizes a non-productive conformation of the primer terminus that would decrease catalysis. Significantly, the open E295K ternary complex binds two metal ions indicating that metal binding cannot overcome the modified interactions that have interrupted the closure of the N-subdomain. PMID:25261471

  10. Ancient Origin and Recent Innovations of RNA Polymerase IV and V

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Kendall, Timmy; Forsythe, Evan S.; Dorantes-Acosta, Ana; Li, Shaofang; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Chen, Xuemei; Arteaga-Vázquez, Mario; Beilstein, Mark A.; Mosher, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA-mediated chromatin modification is a conserved feature of eukaryotes. In flowering plants, the short interfering (si)RNAs that direct transcriptional silencing are abundant and subfunctionalization has led to specialized machinery responsible for synthesis and action of these small RNAs. In particular, plants possess polymerase (Pol) IV and Pol V, multi-subunit homologs of the canonical DNA-dependent RNA Pol II, as well as specialized members of the RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR), Dicer-like (DCL), and Argonaute (AGO) families. Together these enzymes are required for production and activity of Pol IV-dependent (p4-)siRNAs, which trigger RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) at homologous sequences. p4-siRNAs accumulate highly in developing endosperm, a specialized tissue found only in flowering plants, and are rare in nonflowering plants, suggesting that the evolution of flowers might coincide with the emergence of specialized RdDM machinery. Through comprehensive identification of RdDM genes from species representing the breadth of the land plant phylogeny, we describe the ancient origin of Pol IV and Pol V, suggesting that a nearly complete and functional RdDM pathway could have existed in the earliest land plants. We also uncover innovations in these enzymes that are coincident with the emergence of seed plants and flowering plants, and recent duplications that might indicate additional subfunctionalization. Phylogenetic analysis reveals rapid evolution of Pol IV and Pol V subunits relative to their Pol II counterparts and suggests that duplicates were retained and subfunctionalized through Escape from Adaptive Conflict. Evolution within the carboxy-terminal domain of the Pol V largest subunit is particularly striking, where illegitimate recombination facilitated extreme sequence divergence. PMID:25767205

  11. Analyses of in vivo interactions between transcription factors and the archaeal RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Walker, Julie E; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2015-09-15

    Transcription factors regulate the activities of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at each stage of the transcription cycle. Many basal transcription factors with common ancestry are employed in eukaryotic and archaeal systems that directly bind to RNAP and influence intramolecular movements of RNAP and modulate DNA or RNA interactions. We describe and employ a flexible methodology to directly probe and quantify the binding of transcription factors to RNAP in vivo. We demonstrate that binding of the conserved and essential archaeal transcription factor TFE to the archaeal RNAP is directed, in part, by interactions with the RpoE subunit of RNAP. As the surfaces involved are conserved in many eukaryotic and archaeal systems, the identified TFE-RNAP interactions are likely conserved in archaeal-eukaryal systems and represent an important point of contact that can influence the efficiency of transcription initiation.

  12. Iron inactivates the RNA polymerase NS5B and suppresses subgenomic replication of hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Rivas-Estilla, Ana Maria; Bisaillon, Martin; Ponka, Prem; Muckenthaler, Martina; Hentze, Matthias W; Koromilas, Antonis E; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2005-03-11

    Clinical data suggest that iron is a negative factor in chronic hepatitis C; however, the molecular mechanisms by which iron modulates the infectious cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) remain elusive. To explore this, we utilized cells expressing a HCV replicon as a well-established model for viral replication. We demonstrate that iron administration dramatically inhibits the expression of viral proteins and RNA, without significantly affecting its translation or stability. Experiments with purified recombinant HCV RNA polymerase (NS5B) revealed that iron binds specifically and with high affinity (apparent Kd: 6 and 60 microM for Fe2+ and Fe3+, respectively) to the protein's Mg2+-binding pocket, thereby inhibiting its enzymatic activity. We propose that iron impairs HCV replication by inactivating NS5B and that its negative effects in chronic hepatitis C may be primarily due to attenuation of antiviral immune responses. Our data provide a direct molecular link between iron and HCV replication.

  13. Picornavirus RNA polyadenylation by 3Dpol, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Brian J; Barton, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Poly(A) tails are functionally important features of all picornavirus RNA genomes. Some viruses have genomes with relatively short poly(A) tails (encephalomyocarditis virus) whereas others have genomes with longer poly(A) tails (polioviruses and rhinoviruses). Here we review the polyadenylation of picornavirus RNA as it relates to the structure and function of 3Dpol. Poliovirus 3Dpol uses template-dependent reiterative transcription mechanisms as it replicates the poly(A) tails of viral RNA (Steil et al., 2010). These mechanisms are analogous to those involved in the polyadenylation of vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza virus mRNAs. 3Dpol residues intimately associated with viral RNA templates and products regulate the size of poly(A) tails in viral RNA (Kempf et al., 2013). Consistent with their ancient evolutionary origins, picornavirus 3Dpol and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) share structural and functional features. Structurally, both 3Dpol and TERT assume a “right-hand” conformation with thumb, palm and fingers domains encircling templates and products. Functionally, both 3Dpol and TERT use template-dependent reiterative transcription mechanisms to synthesize repetitive sequences: poly(A) tails in the case of picornavirus RNA genomes and DNA telomeres in the case of eukaryotic chromosomes. Thus, picornaviruses and their eukaryotic hosts (humans & animals) maintain the 3’ ends of their respective genomes via evolutionarily related mechanisms. PMID:25559071

  14. Purification and Biochemical Characterisation of Rabbit Calicivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases and Identification of Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urakova, Nadya; Netzler, Natalie; Kelly, Andrew G.; Frese, Michael; White, Peter A.; Strive, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus that causes acute infections in both domestic and wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The virus causes significant economic losses in rabbit farming and reduces wild rabbit populations. The recent emergence of RHDV variants capable of overcoming immunity to other strains emphasises the need to develop universally effective antivirals to enable quick responses during outbreaks until new vaccines become available. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a primary target for the development of such antiviral drugs. In this study, we used cell-free in vitro assays to examine the biochemical characteristics of two rabbit calicivirus RdRps and the effects of several antivirals that were previously identified as human norovirus RdRp inhibitors. The non-nucleoside inhibitor NIC02 was identified as a potential scaffold for further drug development against rabbit caliciviruses. Our experiments revealed an unusually high temperature optimum (between 40 and 45 °C) for RdRps derived from both a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus, possibly demonstrating an adaptation to a host with a physiological body temperature of more than 38 °C. Interestingly, the in vitro polymerase activity of the non-pathogenic calicivirus RdRp was at least two times higher than that of the RdRp of the highly virulent RHDV. PMID:27089358

  15. Purification and Biochemical Characterisation of Rabbit Calicivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases and Identification of Non-Nucleoside Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Urakova, Nadya; Netzler, Natalie; Kelly, Andrew G; Frese, Michael; White, Peter A; Strive, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a calicivirus that causes acute infections in both domestic and wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The virus causes significant economic losses in rabbit farming and reduces wild rabbit populations. The recent emergence of RHDV variants capable of overcoming immunity to other strains emphasises the need to develop universally effective antivirals to enable quick responses during outbreaks until new vaccines become available. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a primary target for the development of such antiviral drugs. In this study, we used cell-free in vitro assays to examine the biochemical characteristics of two rabbit calicivirus RdRps and the effects of several antivirals that were previously identified as human norovirus RdRp inhibitors. The non-nucleoside inhibitor NIC02 was identified as a potential scaffold for further drug development against rabbit caliciviruses. Our experiments revealed an unusually high temperature optimum (between 40 and 45 °C) for RdRps derived from both a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic rabbit calicivirus, possibly demonstrating an adaptation to a host with a physiological body temperature of more than 38 °C. Interestingly, the in vitro polymerase activity of the non-pathogenic calicivirus RdRp was at least two times higher than that of the RdRp of the highly virulent RHDV. PMID:27089358

  16. Structure of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and its implication for transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilsl, Michael; Crucifix, Corinne; Papai, Gabor; Krupp, Ferdinand; Steinbauer, Robert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert; Schultz, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is specialized in rRNA gene transcription synthesizing up to 60% of cellular RNA. High level rRNA production relies on efficient binding of initiation factors to the rRNA gene promoter and recruitment of Pol I complexes containing initiation factor Rrn3. Here, we determine the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 7.5 Å resolution, and compare it with Rrn3-free monomeric and dimeric Pol I. We observe that Rrn3 contacts the Pol I A43/A14 stalk and subunits A190 and AC40, that association re-organizes the Rrn3 interaction interface, thereby preventing Pol I dimerization; and Rrn3-bound and monomeric Pol I differ from the dimeric enzyme in cleft opening, and localization of the A12.2 C-terminus in the active centre. Our findings thus support a dual role for Rrn3 in transcription initiation to stabilize a monomeric initiation competent Pol I and to drive pre-initiation complex formation.

  17. Structure of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and its implication for transcription.

    PubMed

    Pilsl, Michael; Crucifix, Corinne; Papai, Gabor; Krupp, Ferdinand; Steinbauer, Robert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert; Schultz, Patrick

    2016-07-15

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is specialized in rRNA gene transcription synthesizing up to 60% of cellular RNA. High level rRNA production relies on efficient binding of initiation factors to the rRNA gene promoter and recruitment of Pol I complexes containing initiation factor Rrn3. Here, we determine the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 7.5 Å resolution, and compare it with Rrn3-free monomeric and dimeric Pol I. We observe that Rrn3 contacts the Pol I A43/A14 stalk and subunits A190 and AC40, that association re-organizes the Rrn3 interaction interface, thereby preventing Pol I dimerization; and Rrn3-bound and monomeric Pol I differ from the dimeric enzyme in cleft opening, and localization of the A12.2 C-terminus in the active centre. Our findings thus support a dual role for Rrn3 in transcription initiation to stabilize a monomeric initiation competent Pol I and to drive pre-initiation complex formation.

  18. Structure of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and its implication for transcription

    PubMed Central

    Pilsl, Michael; Crucifix, Corinne; Papai, Gabor; Krupp, Ferdinand; Steinbauer, Robert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert; Schultz, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is specialized in rRNA gene transcription synthesizing up to 60% of cellular RNA. High level rRNA production relies on efficient binding of initiation factors to the rRNA gene promoter and recruitment of Pol I complexes containing initiation factor Rrn3. Here, we determine the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 7.5 Å resolution, and compare it with Rrn3-free monomeric and dimeric Pol I. We observe that Rrn3 contacts the Pol I A43/A14 stalk and subunits A190 and AC40, that association re-organizes the Rrn3 interaction interface, thereby preventing Pol I dimerization; and Rrn3-bound and monomeric Pol I differ from the dimeric enzyme in cleft opening, and localization of the A12.2 C-terminus in the active centre. Our findings thus support a dual role for Rrn3 in transcription initiation to stabilize a monomeric initiation competent Pol I and to drive pre-initiation complex formation. PMID:27418187

  19. Transient-State Kinetic Analysis of the RNA Polymerase I Nucleotide Incorporation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Appling, Francis D; Lucius, Aaron L; Schneider, David A

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotes express three or more multisubunit nuclear RNA polymerases (Pols) referred to as Pols I, II, and III, each of which synthesizes a specific subset of RNAs. Consistent with the diversity of their target genes, eukaryotic cells have evolved divergent cohorts of transcription factors and enzymatic properties for each RNA polymerase system. Over the years, many trans-acting factors that orchestrate transcription by the individual Pols have been described; however, little effort has been devoted to characterizing the molecular mechanisms of Pol I activity. To begin to address this gap in our understanding of eukaryotic gene expression, here we establish transient-state kinetic approaches to characterize the nucleotide incorporation mechanism of Pol I. We collected time courses for single turnover nucleotide incorporation reactions over a range of substrate ATP concentrations that provide information on both Pol I's nucleotide addition and nuclease activities. The data were analyzed by model-independent and model-dependent approaches, resulting in, to our knowledge, the first minimal model for the nucleotide addition pathway for Pol I. Using a grid searching approach we provide rigorous bounds on estimated values of the individual elementary rate constants within the proposed model. This work reports the most detailed analysis of Pol I mechanism to date. Furthermore, in addition to their use in transient state kinetic analyses, the computational approaches applied here are broadly applicable to global optimization problems. PMID:26636949

  20. Deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid polymerase activity in rat liver after protein restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, G M; von der Decken, A

    1975-01-01

    Rats were fed for 6 days on a diet containing either 3 or 20% high-quality protein. Nuclei were isolated from liver and DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (EC 2.7.7.6) extracted with 1 M-(NH4)2SO4. The proteins were then precipitated with 3.5 M-(NH4)2SO4 and after dialysis applied to a DEAE-Sephadex column. The column was developed with a gradient of (NH4)2SO4. Polymerase I separated well from alpha-amanitin-sensitive polymerase II. The enzyme activities were compared between the two dietary groups. Rats that had received 3% protein showed a lower polymerase I activity per g wet wt. of liver, per mg of DNA and per mg of protein. Polymerase II was lower in activity per g wet wt. of liver and per mg of DNA, but was higher per mg of protein. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoretograms showed a higher proportion of contaminating proteins in polymerase II fractions isolated from 20%-protein-fed rats. The data explain the lower activity obtained per mg of protein in these rats. It is concluded that a decrease in dietary protein content from 20 to 3% induces a fall in content and specific activity of RNA polymerase I and II in liver. PMID:1156400

  1. Genetic Transformation of Citrus Paradisi with Antisense and untranslatable RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Genes of Citrus Tristeza Closterovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was studied in vivo and in vitro using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant CTV-RdRp protein. Although 56 kDa CTV-RdRp is thought to be expressed by a +1 translational frameshift at the carboxyl te...

  2. Effect of DNA-interacting drugs on phage T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Piestrzeniewicz, M; Studzian, K; Wilmańska, D; Płucienniczak, G; Gniazdowski, M

    1998-01-01

    9-Aminoacridine carboxamide derivatives studied here form with DNA intercalative complexes which differ in the kinetics of dissociation. Inhibition of total RNA synthesis catalyzed by phage T7 and Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerases correlates with the formation of slowly dissociating acridine-DNA complex of time constant of 0.4-2.3 s. Their effect on RNA synthesis is compared with other ligands which form with DNA stable complexes of different steric properties. T7 RNA polymerase is more sensitive to distamycin A and netropsin than the E. coli enzyme while less sensitive to actinomycin D. Actinomycin induces terminations in the transcript synthesized by T7 RNA polymerase. Despite low dissociation rates of DNA complexes with acridines and pyrrole antibiotics no drug dependent terminations are observed with these ligands. PMID:9701505

  3. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Polymerase Domain of the Bacteriophage N4 Virion RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami,K.; Davydova, E.; Rothman-Denes, L.

    2008-01-01

    Coliphage N4 virion RNA polymerase (vRNAP), which is injected into the host upon infection, transcribes the phage early genes from promoters that have a 5-bp stem-3 nt loop hairpin structure. Here, we describe the 2.0- Angstroms resolution x-ray crystal structure of N4 mini-vRNAP, a member of the T7-like, single-unit RNAP family and the minimal component having all RNAP functions of the full-length vRNAP. The structure resembles a 'fisted right hand' with Fingers, Palm and Thumb subdomains connected to an N-terminal domain. We established that the specificity loop extending from the Fingers along with W129 of the N-terminal domain play critical roles in hairpin-promoter recognition. A comparison with the structure of the T7 RNAP initiation complex reveals that the pathway of the DNA to the active site is blocked in the apo-form vRNAP, indicating that vRNAP must undergo a large-scale conformational change upon promoter DNA binding and explaining the highly restricted promoter specificity of vRNAP that is essential for phage early transcription.

  4. Significance of the C-terminal amino acid residue in mengovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, Tatiana M; Alexeevski, Andrei V; Shatskaya, Galina S; Tolskaya, Elena A; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Khitrina, Elena V; Agol, Vadim I

    2007-08-15

    Replication of picornavirus genomes is accomplished by the virally encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). Although the primary structure of this enzyme exhibits a high level of conservation, there are several significant differences among different picornavirus genera. In particular, a comparative alignment indicates that the C-terminal sequences of cardiovirus RdRP (known also as 3D(pol)), are 1-amino-acid residue (arginine or tryptophan) longer than that of the enterovirus or rhinovirus enzymes. Here, it is shown that alterations of the last codon of the RdRP-encoding sequence of mengovirus RNA leading to deletion of the C-terminal Trp460 or its replacement by Ala or Phe dramatically impaired viral RNA replication and, in the former case, resulted in a quasi-infectious phenotype (i.e., the mutant RNA might generate a low yield of pseudorevertants acquiring a Tyr residue in place of the deleted Trp460). The replacement of Trp460 by His or Tyr did not appreciably alter the viral growth potential. Homology modeling of three-dimensional structure of mengovirus RdRP suggested that Trp460 may be involved in interaction between the thumb and palm domains of the enzyme. Specifically, Trp460 of the thumb may form a hydrogen bond with Thr219 and hydrophobically interact with Val216 of the palm. The proposed interactions were consistent with the results of in vivo SELEX experiment, which demonstrated that infectious virus could contain Ser or Thr at position 219 and hydrophobic Val, Leu, Ile, as well as Arg (whose side chain has a nonpolar part) at position 216. A similar thumb-palm domain interaction may be a general feature of several RdRPs and its possible functional significance is discussed. PMID:17467026

  5. Long non-coding RNA produced by RNA polymerase V determines boundaries of heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Sethuraman, Shriya; Rowley, M Jordan; Krzyszton, Michal; Rothi, M Hafiz; Bouzit, Lilia; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T

    2016-01-01

    RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing is a conserved process where small RNAs target transposons and other sequences for repression by establishing chromatin modifications. A central element of this process are long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), which in Arabidopsis thaliana are produced by a specialized RNA polymerase known as Pol V. Here we show that non-coding transcription by Pol V is controlled by preexisting chromatin modifications located within the transcribed regions. Most Pol V transcripts are associated with AGO4 but are not sliced by AGO4. Pol V-dependent DNA methylation is established on both strands of DNA and is tightly restricted to Pol V-transcribed regions. This indicates that chromatin modifications are established in close proximity to Pol V. Finally, Pol V transcription is preferentially enriched on edges of silenced transposable elements, where Pol V transcribes into TEs. We propose that Pol V may play an important role in the determination of heterochromatin boundaries. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19092.001 PMID:27779094

  6. DksA regulates RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli through a network of interactions in the secondary channel that includes Sequence Insertion 1

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Andrey; Shiver, Anthony L.; Lee, Jookyung; Ozerova, Maria; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Gross, Carol A.; Borukhov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Sensing and responding to nutritional status is a major challenge for microbial life. In Escherichia coli, the global response to amino acid starvation is orchestrated by guanosine-3′,5′-bisdiphosphate and the transcription factor DksA. DksA alters transcription by binding to RNA polymerase and allosterically modulating its activity. Using genetic analysis, photo–cross-linking, and structural modeling, we show that DksA binds and acts upon RNA polymerase through prominent features of both the nucleotide-access secondary channel and the active-site region. This work is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a molecular function for Sequence Insertion 1 in the β subunit of RNA polymerase and significantly advances our understanding of how DksA binds to RNA polymerase and alters transcription. PMID:26604313

  7. CBR antimicrobials inhibit RNA polymerase via at least two bridge-helix cap-mediated effects on nucleotide addition

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Nayak, Dhananjaya; Ray, Ananya; Mustaev, Arkady; Landick, Robert; Darst, Seth A.

    2015-07-20

    RNA polymerase inhibitors like the CBR class that target the enzyme’s complex catalytic center are attractive leads for new antimicrobials. The catalysis by RNA polymerase involves multiple rearrangements of bridge helix, trigger loop, and active-center side chains that isomerize the triphosphate of bound NTP and two Mg2+ ions from a preinsertion state to a reactive configuration. CBR inhibitors target a crevice between the N-terminal portion of the bridge helix and a surrounding cap region within which the bridge helix is thought to rearrange during the nucleotide addition cycle. Here, we report crystal structures of CBR inhibitor/Escherichia coli RNA polymerase complexes as well as biochemical tests that establish two distinct effects of the inhibitors on the RNA polymerase catalytic site. One effect involves inhibition of trigger-loop folding via the F loop in the cap, which affects both nucleotide addition and hydrolysis of 3'-terminal dinucleotides in certain backtracked complexes. The second effect is trigger-loop independent, affects only nucleotide addition and pyrophosphorolysis, and may involve inhibition of bridge-helix movements that facilitate reactive triphosphate alignment.

  8. Live-cell superresolution microscopy reveals the organization of RNA polymerase in the bacterial nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Stracy, Mathew; Lesterlin, Christian; Garza de Leon, Federico; Uphoff, Stephan; Zawadzki, Pawel; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of transcription, a comprehensive analysis of RNA polymerase (RNAP) behavior and its role in the nucleoid organization in vivo is lacking. Here, we used superresolution microscopy to study the localization and dynamics of the transcription machinery and DNA in live bacterial cells, at both the single-molecule and the population level. We used photoactivated single-molecule tracking to discriminate between mobile RNAPs and RNAPs specifically bound to DNA, either on promoters or transcribed genes. Mobile RNAPs can explore the whole nucleoid while searching for promoters, and spend 85% of their search time in nonspecific interactions with DNA. On the other hand, the distribution of specifically bound RNAPs shows that low levels of transcription can occur throughout the nucleoid. Further, clustering analysis and 3D structured illumination microscopy (SIM) show that dense clusters of transcribing RNAPs form almost exclusively at the nucleoid periphery. Treatment with rifampicin shows that active transcription is necessary for maintaining this spatial organization. In faster growth conditions, the fraction of transcribing RNAPs increases, as well as their clustering. Under these conditions, we observed dramatic phase separation between the densest clusters of RNAPs and the densest regions of the nucleoid. These findings show that transcription can cause spatial reorganization of the nucleoid, with movement of gene loci out of the bulk of DNA as levels of transcription increase. This work provides a global view of the organization of RNA polymerase and transcription in living cells. PMID:26224838

  9. Structural Basis for DNA-Hairpin Promoter Recognition by the Bacteriophage N4 Virion RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Gleghorn, M.; Davydova, E; Rothman-Denes, L; Murakami, K

    2008-01-01

    Coliphage N4 virion-encapsidated RNA polymerase (vRNAP) is a member of the phage T7-like single-subunit RNA polymerase (RNAP) family. Its central domain (mini-vRNAP) contains all RNAP functions of the full-length vRNAP, which recognizes a 5 to 7 base pair stem and 3 nucleotide loop hairpin DNA promoter. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of mini-vRNAP bound to promoters. Mini-vRNAP uses four structural motifs to recognize DNA sequences at the hairpin loop and stem and to unwind DNA. Despite their low sequence similarity, three out of four motifs are shared with T7 RNAP that recognizes a double-stranded DNA promoter. The binary complex structure and results of engineered disulfide linkage experiments reveal that the plug and motif B loop, which block the access of template DNA to the active site in the apo-form mini-vRNAP, undergo a large-scale conformational change upon promoter binding, explaining the restricted promoter specificity that is critical for N4 phage early transcription.

  10. Structure of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-González, Samuel; Birktoft, Jens J.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2010-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dimethyllysine derivative of the E. coli RNA polymerase α subunit C-terminal domain is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The α subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) of RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a key element in transcription activation in Escherichia coli, possessing determinants responsible for the interaction of RNAP with DNA and with transcription factors. Here, the crystal structure of E. coli αCTD (α subunit residues 245–329) determined to 2.0 Å resolution is reported. Crystals were obtained after reductive methylation of the recombinantly expressed domain. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and possessed both pseudo-translational symmetry and pseudo-merohedral twinning. The refined coordinate model (R factor = 0.193, R{sub free} = 0.236) has improved geometry compared with prior lower resolution determinations of the αCTD structure [Jeon et al. (1995 ▶), Science, 270, 1495–1497; Benoff et al. (2002 ▶), Science, 297, 1562–1566]. An extensive dimerization interface formed primarily by N- and C-terminal residues is also observed. The new coordinates will facilitate the improved modeling of αCTD-containing multi-component complexes visualized at lower resolution using X-ray crystallography and electron-microscopy reconstruction.

  11. The presence of an RNA:DNA hybrid that is prone to slippage promotes termination by T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Molodtsov, Vadim; Anikin, Michael; McAllister, William T

    2014-09-01

    Intrinsic termination signals for multisubunit bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAPs) encode a GC-rich stem-loop structure followed by a polyuridine [poly(U)] tract, and it has been proposed that steric clash of the stem-loop with the exit pore of the RNAP imposes a shearing force on the RNA in the downstream RNA:DNA hybrid, resulting in misalignment of the active site. The structurally unrelated T7 RNAP terminates at a similar type of signal (TΦ), suggesting a common mechanism for termination. In the absence of a hairpin (passive conditions), T7 RNAP slips efficiently in both homopolymeric A and U tracts, and we have found that replacement of the U tract in TΦ with a slippage-prone A tract still allows efficient termination. Under passive conditions, incorporation of a single G residue following a poly(U) tract (which is the situation during termination at TΦ) results in a "locked" complex that is unable to extend the transcript. Our results support a model in which transmission of the shearing force generated by steric clash of the hairpin with the exit pore is promoted by the presence of a slippery tracts downstream, resulting in alterations in the active site and the formation of a locked complex that represents an early step in the termination pathway. PMID:24976131

  12. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II from Acanthamoeba castellanii. Comparison of the catalytic properties and subunit architectures of the trophozoite and cyst enzymes.

    PubMed

    Detke, S; Paule, M R

    1978-09-27

    The actively growing cells (trophozoites) of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii were found to contain three or perhaps four different forms of class II DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6). The chromatographic and catalytic properties of all forms of the Acanthamoeba class II polymerases suggest them to be cognates of the class II polymerases previously reported. The predominant form was purified to near homogeneity and its subunit composition determined. Nine different polypeptides were found associated with the purified enzyme: 21 000; 185 000; 140 000; 70 000; 35 000; 21 000; 19 000; 18 500 and 16 200. These polypeptides were interpreted in terms of two class II RNA polymerases which differ in the molecular weight of their largest subunit. When A. castellanii is transferred to a medium lacking nutrients, the cells undergo cellular differentiation resulting in the formation of metabolically inactive cells (cyst formation). During this process there are significant changes in the RNA sequences transcribed. In contrast to this, we find that the chromatographic and catalytic properties of all of the class II RNA polymerases remain unchanged. Further, the subunit architecture of the predominant form(s) of polymerase II is unaltered. These findings suggest that although new RNA sequences are transcribed during encystment their appearance is not a consequence of extensive alterations in the subunit composition of the major class II RNA polymerase. PMID:708741

  13. In Vitro Synthesis of Rous Sarcoma Virus-Specific RNA is Catalyzed by a DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rymo, L.; Parsons, J. T.; Coffin, J. M.; Weissmann, C.

    1974-01-01

    Synthesis of Rous sarcoma virus RNA was examined in vitro with a new assay for radioactive virus-specific RNA. Nuclei from infected and uninfected cells were incubated with ribonucleoside [α-32P]triphosphates, Mn++, Mg++ and (NH4)2SO4. Incorporation into total and viral RNA proceeded with similar kinetics for up to 25 min at 37°. About 0.5% of the RNA synthesized by the infected system was scored as virus-specific, compared to 0.03% of the RNA from the uninfected system and 0.005% of the RNA synthesized by monkey kidney cell nuclei. Preincubation with DNase or actinomycin D completely suppressed total and virus-specific RNA synthesis. α-Amanitin, a specific inhibitor of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, completely inhibited virus-specific RNA synthesis, while reducing total RNA synthesis by only 50%. We conclude that tumor virus-specific RNA is synthesized on a DNA template, most probably by the host's RNA polymerase II. PMID:4368801

  14. Subunit Compositions of the RNA-Silencing Enzymes Pol IV and Pol V Reveal Their Origins as Specialized Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, J. R.; Wierzbicki, A. T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Zhu, J. K.; Hagen, G.; Guilfoyle, T. J.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2009-01-30

    In addition to RNA polymerases I, II and III, which are multi-subunit RNA polymerases found in all eukaryotes, plants have catalytic subunits for two additional nuclear RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol IV and Pol V (formerly Pol IVa and Pol IVb, respectively). Pol IV and Pol V play non-redundant roles in siRNA-directed DNA methylation and gene silencing pathways.

  15. Five checkpoints maintaining the fidelity of transcription by RNA polymerases in structural and energetic details.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Opron, Kristopher; Burton, Zachary F; Cukier, Robert I; Feig, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional fidelity, which prevents the misincorporation of incorrect nucleoside monophosphates in RNA, is essential for life. Results from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of eukaryotic RNA polymerase (RNAP) II and bacterial RNAP with experimental data suggest that fidelity may involve as many as five checkpoints. Using MD simulations, the effects of different active site NTPs in both open and closed trigger loop (TL) structures of RNAPs are compared. Unfavorable initial binding of mismatched substrates in the active site with an open TL is proposed to be the first fidelity checkpoint. The leaving of an incorrect substrate is much easier than a correct one energetically from the umbrella sampling simulations. Then, the closing motion of the TL, required for catalysis, is hindered by the presence of mismatched NTPs. Mismatched NTPs also lead to conformational changes in the active site, which perturb the coordination of magnesium ions and likely affect the ability to proceed with catalysis. This step appears to be the most important checkpoint for deoxy-NTP discrimination. Finally, structural perturbations in the template DNA and the nascent RNA in the presence of mismatches likely hinder nucleotide addition and provide the structural foundation for backtracking followed by removing erroneously incorporated nucleotides during proofreading.

  16. Biochemical properties of full-length hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Han-Byul; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Oh, Jong-Won

    2003-12-31

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, NS5B protein, is the key viral enzyme responsible for replication of the HCV viral RNA genome. Although several full-length and truncated forms of the HCV NS5B proteins have been expressed previously in insect cells, contamination of host terminal transferase (TNTase) has hampered analysis of the RNA synthesis initiation mechanism using natural HCV RNA templates. We have expressed the HCV NS5B protein in insect cells using a recombinant baculovirus and purified it to near homogeneity without contaminated TNTase. The highly purified recombinant HCV NS5B was capable of copying 9.6-kb full-length HCV RNA template, and mini-HCV RNA carrying both 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the HCV genome. In the absence of a primer, and other cellular and viral factors, the NS5B could elongate over HCV RNA templates, but the synthesized products were primarily in the double stranded form, indicating that no cyclic replication occurred with NS5B alone. RNA synthesis using RNA templates representing the 3'-end region of HCV minus-strand RNA and the X-RNA at the 3'-end of HCV RNA genome was also initiated de novo. No formation of dimer-size self-primed RNA products resulting from extension of the 3'-end hydroxyl group was observed. Despite the internal de novo initiation from the X-RNA, the NS5B could not initiate RNA synthesis from the internal region of oligouridylic acid (U)(20), suggesting that HCV RNA polymerase initiates RNA synthesis from the selected region in the 3'-UTR of HCV genome.

  17. Myogenic differentiation of L6 rat myoblasts: evidence for pleiotropic effects on myogenesis by RNA polymerase II mutations to alpha-amanitin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Crerar, M M; Leather, R; David, E; Pearson, M L

    1983-01-01

    To assess the functional role of RNA polymerase II in the regulation of transcription during muscle differentiation, we isolated and characterized a large number of independent alpha-amanitin-resistant (AmaR) mutants of L6 rat myoblasts that express both wild-type and altered RNA polymerase II activities. We also examined their myogenic (Myo) phenotype by determining their ability to develop into mature myotubes, to express elevated levels of muscle creatine kinase, and to synthesize muscle-characteristic proteins as detected by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We found a two- to threefold increase in the frequency of clones with a myogenic-defective phenotype in the AmaR (RNA polymerase II) mutants as compared to control ethyl methane sulfonate-induced, 6-thioguanine-resistant (hypoxanthine, guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutants or to unselected survivors also exposed to ethyl methane sulfonate. Subsequent analysis showed that about half of these myogenic-defective AmaR mutants had a conditional Myo(ama) phenotype; when cultured in the presence of amanitin, they exhibited a Myo- phenotype; in its absence they exhibited a Myo+ phenotype. This conditional Myo(ama) phenotype is presumably caused by the inactivation by amanitin of the wild-type amanitin-sensitive RNA polymerase II activity and the subsequent rise in the level of mutant amanitin-resistant RNA polymerase II activity. In these Myo(ama) mutants, the wild-type RNA polymerase II is normally dominant with respect to the Myo+ phenotype, whereas the mutant RNA polymerase II is recessive and results in a Myo- phenotype only when the wild-type enzyme is inactivated. These findings suggest that certain mutations in the amaR structural gene for the amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II can selectively impair the transcription of genes specific for myogenic differentiation but not those specific for myoblast proliferation. Images PMID:6865946

  18. Correlations between the activities of DNA polymerase alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T J; Bollum, F J; Litwack, G

    1982-01-01

    Specific inhibitors and anti-DNA polymerase alpha IgG have been utilized to probe for similarities between cytoplasmic rat hepatic glucocorticoid receptors and DNA polymerase alpha [DNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.7]. Rifamycin AF/013, an inhibitor of RNA and DNA polymerase activities, significantly inhibited the binding of activated [6,7-3H]-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) receptor complexes to DNA-cellulose. beta-Lapachone, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha and reverse transcriptase activities, inhibited the specific binding of [6,7-3H]TA when preincubated with unbound receptors. Aphidicolin, another DNA polymerase alpha inhibitor, failed to inhibit any of the glucocorticoid-receptor functions tested. Two specific anti-DNA polymerase alpha IgGs interfered with glucocorticoid receptor functions as measured by their ability to inhibit the binding of [6,7-3H]TA to unbound receptors (85% maximal inhibition) and, to a lesser extent, to inhibit the binding of activated [6,7-3H]TA receptor complexes to DNA-cellulose (50% maximal inhibition). The anti-DNA polymerase alpha IgG and beta-lapachone failed to affect the binding of tritiated estradiol, progesterone, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone to their receptors in appropriate rat target tissues or the binding of [1,2-3H]hydrocortisone to serum transcortin. The most obvious interpretation of these data is that cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptors and DNA polymerase alpha share antigenic determinants. An alternative interpretation is that the polyclonal anti-DNA polymerase alpha antibody contains IgG molecules raised against calf thymus cytoplasmic activated glucocorticoid-receptor complexes that copurified with DNA polymerase alpha used as the antigen. Taken collectively, however, the antibody and inhibitor data suggest a relationship between DNA polymerase alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. PMID:6812051

  19. Transcription of ribosomal RNA: the role of antitermination of RNA polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Stefan; Hwa, Terry

    2007-03-01

    The genes encoding ribosomal RNA are transcribed at high rates of 1-2 transcripts per second. These high transcription rates are crucial to maintain the large concentration of ribosomes necessary in fast growing bacteria. To understand how transcription is regulated under these conditions, we developed a model for the traffic of transcribing RNA polymerases (RNAP). Our simulations show that the transcription rate is limited by the elongation stage of transcription rather than by transcript initiation. The maximal transcription rate is severly impaired by RNAP pausing with pause durations in the second range which is ubiquitous under single-molecule conditions. We propose that ribosomal antitermination reduces pauses and thereby increases the transcription rate. This idea is in quantitative agreement with the observed increase of the elongation rate due to antitermination and predicts a two-fold increase of the transcription rate. Antitermination must be highly efficient, since incomplete antitermination with only a few percent of non-antiterminated, i.e. slow, RNAPs completely abolishes its effect. This result suggests that rho-dependent termination may selectively terminate slow RNAPs.

  20. Nucleobase but not Sugar Fidelity is Maintained in the Sabin I RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinran; Musser, Derek M.; Lee, Cheri A.; Yang, Xiaorong; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Boehr, David D.

    2015-01-01

    The Sabin I poliovirus live, attenuated vaccine strain encodes for four amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E, and T362I) in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). We have previously shown that the T362I substitution leads to a lower fidelity RdRp, and viruses encoding this variant are attenuated in a mouse model of poliovirus. Given these results, it was surprising that the nucleotide incorporation rate and nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp is similar to that of wild-type enzyme, although the Sabin I RdRp is less selective against nucleotides with modified sugar groups. We suggest that the other Sabin amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E) help to re-establish nucleotide incorporation rates and nucleotide discrimination near wild-type levels, which may be a requirement for the propagation of the virus and its efficacy as a vaccine strain. These results also suggest that the nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp likely does not contribute to viral attenuation. PMID:26516899

  1. The RNA Polymerase ‘‘Switch Region’’ Is a Target for Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Das, K; Ismail, S; Koppstein, D; Jang, M; Hudson, B; Sarafianos, S; Tuske, S; Patel, J; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    The ?-pyrone antibiotic myxopyronin (Myx) inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). Here, through a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that Myx interacts with the RNAP 'switch region'-the hinge that mediates opening and closing of the RNAP active center cleft-to prevent interaction of RNAP with promoter DNA. We define the contacts between Myx and RNAP and the effects of Myx on RNAP conformation and propose that Myx functions by interfering with opening of the RNAP active-center cleft during transcription initiation. We further show that the structurally related ?-pyrone antibiotic corallopyronin (Cor) and the structurally unrelated macrocyclic-lactone antibiotic ripostatin (Rip) function analogously to Myx. The RNAP switch region is distant from targets of previously characterized RNAP inhibitors, and, correspondingly, Myx, Cor, and Rip do not exhibit crossresistance with previously characterized RNAP inhibitors. The RNAP switch region is an attractive target for identification of new broad-spectrum antibacterial therapeutic agents.

  2. Mechanism of RNA polymerase II bypass of oxidative cyclopurine DNA lesions

    DOE PAGES

    Walmacq, Celine; Wang, Lanfeng; Chong, Jenny; Scibelli, Kathleen; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Gnatt, Averell; Brooks, Philip J.; Wang, Dong; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2015-01-20

    In human cells, the oxidative DNA lesion 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (CydA) induces prolonged stalling of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) followed by transcriptional bypass, generating both error-free and mutant transcripts with AMP misincorporated immediately downstream from the lesion. Here, we present biochemical and crystallographic evidence for the mechanism of CydA recognition. Pol II stalling results from impaired loading of the template base (5') next to CydA into the active site, leading to preferential AMP misincorporation. Such predominant AMP insertion, which also occurs at an abasic site, is unaffected by the identity of the 5´-templating base, indicating that it derives from nontemplated synthesismore » according to an A rule known for DNA polymerases and recently identified for Pol II bypass of pyrimidine dimers. Subsequent to AMP misincorporation, Pol II encounters a major translocation block that is slowly overcome. The translocation block combined with the poor extension of the dA.rA mispair reduce transcriptional mutagenesis. Moreover, increasing the active-site flexibility by mutation in the trigger loop, which increases the ability of Pol II to accommodate the bulky lesion, and addition of transacting factor TFIIF facilitate CydA bypass. Thus, blocking lesion entry to the active site, trans-lesion A rule synthesis, and translocation block are common features of transcription across different bulky DNA lesions.« less

  3. Mechanism of RNA polymerase II bypass of oxidative cyclopurine DNA lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Walmacq, Celine; Wang, Lanfeng; Chong, Jenny; Scibelli, Kathleen; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Gnatt, Averell; Brooks, Philip J.; Wang, Dong; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2015-01-20

    In human cells, the oxidative DNA lesion 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (CydA) induces prolonged stalling of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) followed by transcriptional bypass, generating both error-free and mutant transcripts with AMP misincorporated immediately downstream from the lesion. Here, we present biochemical and crystallographic evidence for the mechanism of CydA recognition. Pol II stalling results from impaired loading of the template base (5') next to CydA into the active site, leading to preferential AMP misincorporation. Such predominant AMP insertion, which also occurs at an abasic site, is unaffected by the identity of the 5´-templating base, indicating that it derives from nontemplated synthesis according to an A rule known for DNA polymerases and recently identified for Pol II bypass of pyrimidine dimers. Subsequent to AMP misincorporation, Pol II encounters a major translocation block that is slowly overcome. The translocation block combined with the poor extension of the dA.rA mispair reduce transcriptional mutagenesis. Moreover, increasing the active-site flexibility by mutation in the trigger loop, which increases the ability of Pol II to accommodate the bulky lesion, and addition of transacting factor TFIIF facilitate CydA bypass. Thus, blocking lesion entry to the active site, trans-lesion A rule synthesis, and translocation block are common features of transcription across different bulky DNA lesions.

  4. A DNA polymerase activity is associated with Cauliflower Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed Central

    Menissier, J; Laquel, P; Lebeurier, G; Hirth, L

    1984-01-01

    A DNA polymerase activity is found within the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) particle. Analysis of the reaction product reveals that the linear form of the virion DNA is preferentially labelled. The molecular weight of the DNA polymerase as determined on an "activity gel" is 76 kDa. Images PMID:6514573

  5. Identifying the RNA polymerases that synthesize specific transcripts of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Huh, N E; Weaver, R F

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear run-on assays carried out in the presence and absence of the RNA polymerase II inhibitor, alpha-amanitin, were used to determine the exact timing of the switch from inhibitor-sensitive transcription catalysed by host RNA polymerase II, to inhibitor-resistant transcription catalysed by the baculovirus-induced RNA polymerase. These studies revealed that the onset of alpha-amanitin-resistant transcription is just after 6 h post-infection, simultaneous with the beginning of the late phase of infection. They also showed that transcripts from the p26 gene in the HindIII Q/P region and the p35 gene in the HindIII K/Q region of the viral genome are synthesized by the host RNA polymerase II both early and late in infection. On the other hand, transcripts of the p10 gene in the HindIII Q/P region and the gamma transcripts in the HindIII K region are synthesized by the alpha-amanitin-resistant, virus-induced RNA polymerase late in infection. PMID:2106003

  6. HIV Tat controls RNA Polymerase II and the epigenetic landscape to transcriptionally reprogram target immune cells.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Jonathan E; Kwak, Youn-Tae; McNamara, Ryan P; Forst, Christian V; D'Orso, Iván

    2015-01-01

    HIV encodes Tat, a small protein that facilitates viral transcription by binding an RNA structure (trans-activating RNA [TAR]) formed on nascent viral pre-messenger RNAs. Besides this well-characterized mechanism, Tat appears to modulate cellular transcription, but the target genes and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We report here that Tat uses unexpected regulatory mechanisms to reprogram target immune cells to promote viral replication and rewire pathways beneficial for the virus. Tat functions through master transcriptional regulators bound at promoters and enhancers, rather than through cellular 'TAR-like' motifs, to both activate and repress gene sets sharing common functional annotations. Despite the complexity of transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in the cell, Tat precisely controls RNA polymerase II recruitment and pause release to fine-tune the initiation and elongation steps in target genes. We propose that a virus with a limited coding capacity has optimized its genome by evolving a small but 'multitasking' protein to simultaneously control viral and cellular transcription.

  7. Transposable B2 SINE elements can provide mobile RNA polymerase II promoters.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, O; Virolle, T; Djabari, Z; Ortonne, J P; White, R J; Aberdam, D

    2001-05-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are highly abundant components of mammalian genomes that are propagated by retrotransposition. SINEs are recognized as a causal agent of human disease and must also have had a profound influence in shaping eukaryotic genomes. The B2 SINE family constitutes approximately 0.7% of total mouse genomic DNA (ref. 2) and is also found at low abundance in humans. It resembles the Alu family in several respects, such as its mechanism of propagation. B2 SINEs are derived from tRNA and are transcribed by RNA polymerase (pol) III to generate short transcripts that are not translated. We find here, however, that one B2 SINE also carries an active pol II promoter located outside the tRNA region. Indeed, a B2 element is responsible for the production of a mouse Lama3 transcript. The B2 pol II promoters can be bound and stimulated by the transcription factor USF (for upstream stimulatory factor), as shown by transient transfection experiments. Moreover, this pol II activity does not preclude the pol III transcription necessary for retrotransposition. Dispersal of B2 SINEs by retrotransposition may therefore have provided numerous opportunities for creating regulated pol II transcription at novel genomic sites. This mechanism may have allowed the evolution of new transcription units and new genes. PMID:11326281

  8. HIV Tat controls RNA Polymerase II and the epigenetic landscape to transcriptionally reprogram target immune cells

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Ryan P; Forst, Christian V; D'Orso, Iván

    2015-01-01

    HIV encodes Tat, a small protein that facilitates viral transcription by binding an RNA structure (trans-activating RNA [TAR]) formed on nascent viral pre-messenger RNAs. Besides this well-characterized mechanism, Tat appears to modulate cellular transcription, but the target genes and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We report here that Tat uses unexpected regulatory mechanisms to reprogram target immune cells to promote viral replication and rewire pathways beneficial for the virus. Tat functions through master transcriptional regulators bound at promoters and enhancers, rather than through cellular ‘TAR-like’ motifs, to both activate and repress gene sets sharing common functional annotations. Despite the complexity of transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in the cell, Tat precisely controls RNA polymerase II recruitment and pause release to fine-tune the initiation and elongation steps in target genes. We propose that a virus with a limited coding capacity has optimized its genome by evolving a small but ‘multitasking’ protein to simultaneously control viral and cellular transcription. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08955.001 PMID:26488441

  9. Structure of wild-type yeast RNA polymerase II and location of Rpb4 and Rpb7.

    PubMed

    Jensen, G J; Meredith, G; Bushnell, D A; Kornberg, R D

    1998-04-15

    The three-dimensional structure of wild-type yeast RNA polymerase II has been determined at a nominal resolution of 24 A. A difference map between this structure and that of the polymerase lacking subunits Rpb4 and Rpb7 showed these two subunits forming part of the floor of the DNA-binding (active center) cleft, and revealed a slight inward movement of the protein domain surrounding the cleft. Surface plasmon resonance measurements showed that Rpb4 and Rpb7 stabilize a minimal pre-initiation complex containing promoter DNA, TATA box-binding protein (TBP), transcription factor TFIIB and the polymerase. These findings suggest that Rpb4 and Rpb7 play a role in coupling the entry of DNA into the active center cleft to closure of the cleft. Such a role can explain why these subunits are necessary for promoter-specific transcription in vitro and for a normal stress response in vivo.

  10. Ccr4-Not Regulates RNA Polymerase I Transcription and Couples Nutrient Signaling to the Control of Ribosomal RNA Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laribee, R. Nicholas; Hosni-Ahmed, Amira; Workman, Jason J.; Chen, Hongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA synthesis is controlled by nutrient signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. mTORC1 regulates ribosomal RNA expression by affecting RNA Polymerase I (Pol I)-dependent transcription of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) but the mechanisms involved remain obscure. This study provides evidence that the Ccr4-Not complex, which regulates RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) transcription, also functions downstream of mTORC1 to control Pol I activity. Ccr4-Not localizes to the rDNA and physically associates with the Pol I holoenzyme while Ccr4-Not disruption perturbs rDNA binding of multiple Pol I transcriptional regulators including core factor, the high mobility group protein Hmo1, and the SSU processome. Under nutrient rich conditions, Ccr4-Not suppresses Pol I initiation by regulating interactions with the essential transcription factor Rrn3. Additionally, Ccr4-Not disruption prevents reduced Pol I transcription when mTORC1 is inhibited suggesting Ccr4-Not bridges mTORC1 signaling with Pol I regulation. Analysis of the non-essential Pol I subunits demonstrated that the A34.5 subunit promotes, while the A12.2 and A14 subunits repress, Ccr4-Not interactions with Pol I. Furthermore, ccr4Δ is synthetically sick when paired with rpa12Δ and the double mutant has enhanced sensitivity to transcription elongation inhibition suggesting that Ccr4-Not functions to promote Pol I elongation. Intriguingly, while low concentrations of mTORC1 inhibitors completely inhibit growth of ccr4Δ, a ccr4Δ rpa12Δ rescues this growth defect suggesting that the sensitivity of Ccr4-Not mutants to mTORC1 inhibition is at least partially due to Pol I deregulation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a novel role for Ccr4-Not in Pol I transcriptional regulation that is required for bridging mTORC1 signaling to ribosomal RNA synthesis. PMID:25815716

  11. Identification of proteins associated with the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase by tandem affinity purification

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Dmitriy A; Savkina, Maria; Anikin, Michael; Del Campo, Mark; Ecker, Karen; Lambowitz, Alan M; De Gnore, Jon P; McAllister, William T

    2009-01-01

    The abundance of mitochondrial (mt) transcripts varies under different conditions, and is thought to depend upon rates of transcription initiation, transcription termination/attenuation and RNA processing/degradation. The requirement to maintain the balance between RNA synthesis and processing may involve coordination between these processes; however, little is known about factors that regulate the activity of mtRNA polymerase (mtRNAP). Recent attempts to identify mtRNAP–protein interactions in yeast by means of a generalized tandem affinity purification (TAP) protocol were not successful, most likely because they involved a C-terminal mtRNAP–TAP fusion (which is incompatible with mtRNAP function) and because of the use of whole-cell solubilization protocols that did not preserve the integrity of mt protein complexes. Based upon the structure of T7 RNAP (to which mtRNAPs show high sequence similarity), we identified positions in yeast mtRNAP that allow insertion of a small affinity tag, confirmed the mature N-terminus, constructed a functional N-terminal TAP–mtRNAP fusion, pulled down associated proteins, and identified them by LC–MS–MS. Among the proteins found in the pull-down were a DEAD-box protein (Mss116p) and an RNA-binding protein (Pet127p). Previous genetic experiments suggested a role for these proteins in linking transcription and RNA degradation, in that a defect in the mt degradadosome could be suppressed by overexpression of either of these proteins or, independently, by mutations in either mtRNAP or its initiation factor Mtf1p. Further, we found that Mss116p inhibits transcription by mtRNAP in vitro in a steady-state reaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Mss116p and Pet127p are involved in modulation of mtRNAP activity. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19536766

  12. Transcription elongation. Heterogeneous tracking of RNA polymerase and its biological implications.

    PubMed

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity.

  13. Progesterone receptor induces bcl-x expression through intragenic binding sites favoring RNA polymerase II elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, Paola Y.; Nacht, A. Silvina; Alló, Mariano; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Ballaré, Cecilia; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Zaurin, Roser; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Pecci, Adali

    2013-01-01

    Steroid receptors were classically described for regulating transcription by binding to target gene promoters. However, genome-wide studies reveal that steroid receptors-binding sites are mainly located at intragenic regions. To determine the role of these sites, we examined the effect of progestins on the transcription of the bcl-x gene, where only intragenic progesterone receptor-binding sites (PRbs) were identified. We found that in response to hormone treatment, the PR is recruited to these sites along with two histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein (CBP) and GCN5, leading to an increase in histone H3 and H4 acetylation and to the binding of the SWI/SNF complex. Concomitant, a more relaxed chromatin was detected along bcl-x gene mainly in the regions surrounding the intragenic PRbs. PR also mediated the recruitment of the positive elongation factor pTEFb, favoring RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation activity. Together these events promoted the re-distribution of the active Pol II toward the 3′-end of the gene and a decrease in the ratio between proximal and distal transcription. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which PR regulates gene expression by facilitating the proper passage of the polymerase along hormone-dependent genes. PMID:23640331

  14. Human RNA Polymerase II Promoter Recruitment in Vitro Is Regulated by O-Linked N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase (OGT).

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brian A; Burlingame, Alma L; Myers, Samuel A

    2016-07-01

    Although the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain was described 20 years ago, the function of this RNA polymerase II (pol II) species is not known. We show here that an O-GlcNAcylated pol II species (pol IIγ) exists on promoters in vitro Inhibition of O-GlcNAc-transferase activity and O-GlcNAcylation prevents pol II entry into the promoter, and O-GlcNAc removal from pol II is an ATP-dependent step during initiation. These data indicate that O-GlcNAc-transferase activity is essential for RNA pol II promoter recruitment and that pol II goes through a cycling of O-GlcNAcylation at the promoter. Mass spectrometry shows that serine residues 2 and 5 of the pol II C-terminal domain are O-GlcNAcylated, suggesting an overlap with the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH)-dependent serine 5 phosphorylation events during initiation and P-TEFb (positive transcriptional elongation factor b) events during elongation. These data provide unexpected and important insights into the role of a previously ill-defined species of RNA polymerase II in regulating transcription.

  15. Small molecule BMH-compounds that inhibit RNA polymerase I and cause nucleolar stress.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, Karita; Colis, Laureen; Liu, Hester; Jäämaa, Sari; Zhang, Zhewei; Af Hällström, Taija; Moore, Henna M; Sirajuddin, Paul; Laiho, Marikki

    2014-11-01

    Activation of the p53 pathway has been considered a therapeutic strategy to target cancers. We have previously identified several p53-activating small molecules in a cell-based screen. Two of the compounds activated p53 by causing DNA damage, but this modality was absent in the other four. We recently showed that one of these, BMH-21, inhibits RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription, causes the degradation of Pol I catalytic subunit RPA194, and has potent anticancer activity. We show here that three remaining compounds in this screen, BMH-9, BMH-22, and BMH-23, cause reorganization of nucleolar marker proteins consistent with segregation of the nucleolus, a hallmark of Pol I transcription stress. Further, the compounds destabilize RPA194 in a proteasome-dependent manner and inhibit nascent rRNA synthesis and expression of the 45S rRNA precursor. BMH-9- and BMH-22-mediated nucleolar stress was detected in ex vivo-cultured human prostate tissues indicating good tissue bioactivity. Testing of closely related analogues showed that their activities were chemically constrained. Viability screen for BMH-9, BMH-22, and BMH-23 in the NCI60 cancer cell lines showed potent anticancer activity across many tumor types. Finally, we show that the Pol I transcription stress by BMH-9, BMH-22, and BMH-23 is independent of p53 function. These results highlight the dominant impact of Pol I transcription stress on p53 pathway activation and bring forward chemically novel lead molecules for Pol I inhibition, and, potentially, cancer targeting.

  16. Small Molecule BMH-compounds that Inhibit RNA Polymerase I and Cause Nucleolar Stress

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Karita; Colis, Laureen; Liu, Hester; Jäämaa, Sari; Zhang, Zhewei; Hällström, Taija af; Moore, Henna M.; Sirajuddin, Paul; Laiho, Marikki

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the p53 pathway has been considered a therapeutic strategy to target cancers. We have previously identified several p53 activating small molecules in a cell-based screen. Two of the compounds activated p53 by causing DNA damage, but this modality was absent in the other four. We recently showed that one of these, BMH-21, inhibits RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription, causes the degradation of Pol I catalytic subunit RPA194 and has potent anticancer activity. We show here that three remaining compounds in this screen, BMH-9, BMH-22 and BMH-23, cause reorganization of nucleolar marker proteins consistent with segregation of the nucleolus, a hallmark of Pol I transcription stress. Further, the compounds destabilize RPA194 in a proteasome-dependent manner and inhibit nascent rRNA synthesis and expression of the 45S rRNA precursor. BMH-9 and BMH-22 –mediated nucleolar stress was detected in ex vivo-cultured human prostate tissues indicating good tissue bioactivity. Testing of closely related analogs showed that their activities were chemically constrained. Viability screen for BMH-9, BMH-22 and BMH-23 in the NCI60 cancer cell lines showed potent anticancer activity across many tumor types. Finally we show that the Pol I transcription stress by BMH-9, BMH-22 and BMH-23 is independent of p53 function. These results highlight the dominant impact of Pol I transcription stress on p53 pathway activation and bring forward chemically novel lead molecules for Pol I inhibition, and potentially, cancer targeting. PMID:25277384

  17. The C-terminal domain revealed in the structure of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Meredith, G D; Chang, W H; Li, Y; Bushnell, D A; Darst, S A; Kornberg, R D

    1996-05-10

    The location of the CTD in the structure of RNA polymerase II has been determined by electron crystallography at 16 A resolution. Difference maps between wild-type enzyme and that lacking the CTD, or with an antibody fragment bound in place of the CTD, disclose the site of attachment of the CTD to the polymerase. Appropriate display of the polymerase structure reveals the CTD as an element projecting from this site of attachment into solution. A low relative density and large volume of this element identify the CTD as a conformationally mobile region.

  18. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  19. Mapping of Protein-Protein Interactions of E. coli RNA Polymerase with Microfluidic Mechanical Trapping

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Steven R.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    The biophysical details of how transcription factors and other proteins interact with RNA polymerase are of great interest as they represent the nexus of how structure and function interact to regulate gene expression in the cell. We used an in vitro microfluidic approach to map interactions between a set of ninety proteins, over a third of which are transcription factors, and each of the four subunits of E. coli RNA polymerase, and we compared our results to those of previous large-scale studies. We detected interactions between RNA polymerase and transcription factors that earlier high-throughput screens missed; our results suggest that such interactions can occur without DNA mediation more commonly than previously appreciated. PMID:24643045

  20. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J.

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  1. HCV NS5b RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors: from alpha,gamma-diketoacids to 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine- or 3-methyl-5-hydroxypyrimidinonecarboxylic acids. Design and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Summa, Vincenzo; Petrocchi, Alessia; Matassa, Victor G; Taliani, Marina; Laufer, Ralph; De Francesco, Raffaele; Altamura, Sergio; Pace, Paola

    2004-10-21

    A new class of the HCV NS5b RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors, the dihyroxypyrimidinecarboxylic acid derivative, was designed from a diketoacid and meconic acid derivative discovered by screening. Mechanism of action and essential moieties required for activity were identified. The corresponding N-methylpyrimidinone was also prepared; both classes are novel, reversible, and selective inhibitors of the HCV NS5b polymerase with improved druglike characteristics.

  2. Identification of a Pyridoxine-Derived Small-Molecule Inhibitor Targeting Dengue Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P.; Hassounah, Said; Quashie, Peter K.; Han, Yingshan; Oliveira, Maureen; Stranix, Brent R.

    2015-01-01

    The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity of the dengue virus (DENV) NS5 protein is an attractive target for drug design. Here, we report the identification of a novel class of inhibitor (i.e., an active-site metal ion chelator) that acts against DENV RdRp activity. DENV RdRp utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism of catalysis; therefore, we constructed a small library of compounds, through mechanism-based drug design, aimed at chelating divalent metal ions in the catalytic site of DENV RdRp. We now describe a pyridoxine-derived small-molecule inhibitor that targets DENV RdRp and show that 5-benzenesulfonylmethyl-3-hydroxy-4-hydroxymethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid hydroxyamide (termed DMB220) inhibited the RdRp activity of DENV serotypes 1 to 4 at low micromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s of 5 to 6.7 μM) in an enzymatic assay. The antiviral activity of DMB220 against DENV infection was also verified in a cell-based assay and showed a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of <3 μM. Enzyme assays proved that DMB220 was competitive with nucleotide incorporation. DMB220 did not inhibit the enzymatic activity of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and showed only weak inhibition of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer activity, indicating high specificity for DENV RdRp. S600T substitution in the DENV RdRp, which was previously shown to confer resistance to nucleoside analogue inhibitors (NI), conferred 3-fold hypersusceptibility to DMB220, and enzymatic analyses showed that this hypersusceptibility may arise from the decreased binding/incorporation efficiency of the natural NTP substrate without significantly impacting inhibitor binding. Thus, metal ion chelation at the active site of DENV RdRp represents a viable anti-DENV strategy, and DMB220 is the first of a new class of DENV inhibitor. PMID:26574011

  3. Functional interplay between MSL1 and CDK7 controls RNA polymerase II Ser5 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chlamydas, Sarantis; Holz, Herbert; Samata, Maria; Chelmicki, Tomasz; Georgiev, Plamen; Pelechano, Vicent; Dündar, Friederike; Dasmeh, Pouria; Mittler, Gerhard; Cadete, Filipe Tavares; Ramírez, Fidel; Conrad, Thomas; Wei, Wu; Raja, Sunil; Manke, Thomas; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Steinmetz, Lars M; Akhtar, Asifa

    2016-06-01

    Proper gene expression requires coordinated interplay among transcriptional coactivators, transcription factors and the general transcription machinery. We report here that MSL1, a central component of the dosage compensation complex in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila virilis, displays evolutionarily conserved sex-independent binding to promoters. Genetic and biochemical analyses reveal a functional interaction of MSL1 with CDK7, a subunit of the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Importantly, MSL1 depletion leads to decreased phosphorylation of Ser5 of RNA polymerase II. In addition, we demonstrate that MSL1 is a phosphoprotein, and transgenic flies expressing MSL1 phosphomutants show mislocalization of the histone acetyltransferase MOF and histone H4 K16 acetylation, thus ultimately causing male lethality due to a failure of dosage compensation. We propose that, by virtue of its interaction with components of the general transcription machinery, MSL1 exists in different phosphorylation states, thereby modulating transcription in flies. PMID:27183194

  4. Sensitivity of Carrot Cell Cultures and RNA Polymerase II to Amatoxins 1

    PubMed Central

    Little, Michael C.; Preston, James F.

    1985-01-01

    Protoplast and cell suspension cultures of Daucus carota L. were evaluated for their sensitivity toward the three amatoxin derivatives, α-amanitin, 6′-deoxy-α-amanitin, and 6′-O-methyl-α-amanitin using inhibition of DNA synthesis to measure cell viability. Protoplasts appeared approximately 10-fold more refractory than suspension cells and α-amanitin was much less effective than the other two amatoxins, even though Ki values for isolated RNA polymerase II were similar (4-5 nanomolar). Additional studies evaluating the recoveries of all three amatoxins from cell suspension supernates indicate one basis for these differences to be the selective degradation of α-amanitin. A mechanism involving the activation of the hydroxyindole moiety of the α-amanitin is thus invoked to explain these differences and we postulate the involvement of plant oxidases in this role. PMID:16664072

  5. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ambite, Ines; Lutay, Nataliya; Stork, Christoph; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes). Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease–associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT) strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an environment that

  6. The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Miron, Paul; Abrahem, Abrahem; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2007-01-05

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that depends on DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) for its transcription and replication. While it is generally accepted that RNAP II is involved in HDV replication, its interaction with HDV RNA requires confirmation. A monoclonal antibody specific to the carboxy terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNAP II was used to establish the association of RNAP II with both polarities of HDV RNA in HeLa cells. Co-immunoprecipitations using HeLa nuclear extract revealed that RNAP II interacts with HDV-derived RNAs at sites located within the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Analysis of these regions revealed a strong selection to maintain a rod-like conformation and demonstrated several conserved features. These results provide the first direct evidence of an association between human RNAP II and HDV RNA and suggest two transcription start sites on both polarities of HDV RNA.

  7. CarD: a new RNA polymerase modulator in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Christina L; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteria CarD is an essential RNAP binding protein that regulates many transcripts including rRNA. This article will review our present state of knowledge regarding CarD and compare the known functions of CarD with other RNAP binding proteins in E. coli, emphasizing how this information can guide future investigations.

  8. Topoisomerase I deficiency causes RNA polymerase II accumulation and increases AID abundance in immunoglobulin variable genes.

    PubMed

    Maul, Robert W; Saribasak, Huseyin; Cao, Zheng; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2015-06-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is a DNA cytosine deaminase that diversifies immunoglobulin genes in B cells. Recent work has shown that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) accumulation correlates with AID recruitment. However, a direct link between Pol II and AID abundance has not been tested. We used the DT40 B-cell line to manipulate levels of Pol II by decreasing topoisomerase I (Top1), which relaxes DNA supercoiling in front of the transcription complex. Top1 was decreased by stable transfection of a short hairpin RNA against Top1, which produced an accumulation of Pol II in transcribed genes, compared to cells transfected with sh-control RNA. The increased Pol II density enhanced AID recruitment to variable genes in the λ light chain locus, and resulted in higher levels of somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. It has been proposed by another lab that AID itself might directly suppress Top1 to increase somatic hypermutation. However, we found that in both AID(+/+) and AID(-/-) B cells from DT40 and mice, Top1 protein levels were identical, indicating that the presence or absence of AID did not decrease Top1 expression. Rather, our results suggest that the mechanism for increased diversity when Top1 is reduced is that Pol II accumulates and recruits AID to variable genes.

  9. Redox Signaling by the RNA Polymerase III TFIIB-Related Factor Brf2.

    PubMed

    Gouge, Jerome; Satia, Karishma; Guthertz, Nicolas; Widya, Marcella; Thompson, Andrew James; Cousin, Pascal; Dergai, Oleksandr; Hernandez, Nouria; Vannini, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    TFIIB-related factor 2 (Brf2) is a member of the family of TFIIB-like core transcription factors. Brf2 recruits RNA polymerase (Pol) III to type III gene-external promoters, including the U6 spliceosomal RNA and selenocysteine tRNA genes. Found only in vertebrates, Brf2 has been linked to tumorigenesis but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We have solved crystal structures of a human Brf2-TBP complex bound to natural promoters, obtaining a detailed view of the molecular interactions occurring at Brf2-dependent Pol III promoters and highlighting the general structural and functional conservation of human Pol II and Pol III pre-initiation complexes. Surprisingly, our structural and functional studies unravel a Brf2 redox-sensing module capable of specifically regulating Pol III transcriptional output in living cells. Furthermore, we establish Brf2 as a central redox-sensing transcription factor involved in the oxidative stress pathway and provide a mechanistic model for Brf2 genetic activation in lung and breast cancer. PMID:26638071

  10. The Structure of a Transcribing T7 RNA Polymerase in Transition from Initiation to Elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Durniak, K.; Bailey, S; Steitz, T

    2008-01-01

    Structural studies of the T7 bacteriophage DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (T7 RNAP) have shown that the conformation of the amino-terminal domain changes substantially between the initiation and elongation phases of transcription, but how this transition is achieved remains unclear. We report crystal structures of T7 RNAP bound to promoter DNA containing either a 7- or an 8-nucleotide (nt) RNA transcript that illuminate intermediate states along the transition pathway. The amino-terminal domain comprises the C-helix subdomain and the promoter binding domain (PBD), which consists of two segments separated by subdomain H. The structures of the intermediate complex reveal that the PBD and the bound promoter rotate by 45 degrees upon synthesis of an 8-nt