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Sample records for active robotic training

  1. Active robotic training improves locomotor function in a stroke survivor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. One key factor responsible for this is the use of control strategies that provide substantial guidance. This strategy not only leads to a reduction in volitional physical effort, but also interferes with motor relearning. Methods We tested the feasibility of a novel training approach (active robotic training) using a powered gait orthosis (Lokomat) in mitigating post-stroke gait impairments of a 52-year-old male stroke survivor. This gait training paradigm combined patient-cooperative robot-aided walking with a target-tracking task. The training lasted for 4-weeks (12 visits, 3 × per week). The subject’s neuromotor performance and recovery were evaluated using biomechanical, neuromuscular and clinical measures recorded at various time-points (pre-training, post-training, and 6-weeks after training). Results Active robotic training resulted in considerable increase in target-tracking accuracy and reduction in the kinematic variability of ankle trajectory during robot-aided treadmill walking. These improvements also transferred to overground walking as characterized by larger propulsive forces and more symmetric ground reaction forces (GRFs). Training also resulted in improvements in muscle coordination, which resembled patterns observed in healthy controls. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in motor cortical excitability (MCE) of the vastus medialis, medial hamstrings, and gluteus medius muscles during treadmill walking. Importantly, active robotic training resulted in substantial improvements in several standard clinical and functional parameters. These improvements persisted during the follow-up evaluation at 6 weeks. Conclusions The results indicate that active robotic training appears to be a promising way of facilitating gait and physical function in moderately impaired stroke survivors. PMID:22906099

  2. Robotics Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettlie, John E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need for training and education in new skill areas. Points out that the right people often do not get the right training. Too often engineers and skilled workers are trained to the exclusion of supervisors and operators. (JOW)

  3. Competencies Identification for Robotics Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Le D.

    A study focused on the task of identifying competencies for robotics training. The level of robotics training was limited to that of robot technicians. Study objectives were to obtain a list of occupational competencies; to rank their order of importance; and to compare opinions from robot manufacturers, robot users, and robotics educators…

  4. A robotic system to train activities of daily living in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Guidali, Marco; Duschau-Wicke, Alexander; Broggi, Simon; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Nef, Tobias; Riener, Robert

    2011-10-01

    In the past decade, several arm rehabilitation robots have been developed to assist neurological patients during therapy. Early devices were limited in their number of degrees of freedom and range of motion, whereas newer robots such as the ARMin robot can support the entire arm. Often, these devices are combined with virtual environments to integrate motivating game-like scenarios. Several studies have shown a positive effect of game-playing on therapy outcome by increasing motivation. In addition, we assume that practicing highly functional movements can further enhance therapy outcome by facilitating the transfer of motor abilities acquired in therapy to daily life. Therefore, we present a rehabilitation system that enables the training of activities of daily living (ADL) with the support of an assistive robot. Important ADL tasks have been identified and implemented in a virtual environment. A patient-cooperative control strategy with adaptable freedom in timing and space was developed to assist the patient during the task. The technical feasibility and usability of the system was evaluated with seven healthy subjects and three chronic stroke patients. PMID:21796422

  5. A Sit-to-Stand Training Robot and Its Performance Evaluation: Dynamic Analysis in Lower Limb Rehabilitation Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Enguo; Inoue, Yoshio; Liu, Tao; Shibata, Kyoko

    In many countries in which the phenomenon of population aging is being experienced, motor function recovery activities have aroused much interest. In this paper, a sit-to-stand rehabilitation robot utilizing a double-rope system was developed, and the performance of the robot was evaluated by analyzing the dynamic parameters of human lower limbs. For the robot control program, an impedance control method with a training game was developed to increase the effectiveness and frequency of rehabilitation activities, and a calculation method was developed for evaluating the joint moments of hip, knee, and ankle. Test experiments were designed, and four subjects were requested to stand up from a chair with assistance from the rehabilitation robot. In the experiments, body segment rotational angles, trunk movement trajectories, rope tensile forces, ground reaction forces (GRF) and centers of pressure (COP) were measured by sensors, and the moments of ankle, knee and hip joint were real-time calculated using the sensor-measured data. The experiment results showed that the sit-to-stand rehabilitation robot with impedance control method could maintain the comfortable training postures of users, decrease the moments of limb joints, and enhance training effectiveness. Furthermore, the game control method could encourage collaboration between the brain and limbs, and allow for an increase in the frequency and intensity of rehabilitation activities.

  6. Robotics Programs: Automation Training in Disguise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehg, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Questions and answers from the book "Guidelines for Robotics Program Development" are presented, addressing some of the major issues confronted by the person setting the direction for a robotics training program. (CT)

  7. Robotics Technician Training at Macomb Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Edward J.

    Approved in 1979, the robotics technician training program at Macomb County Community College (MCC) in Warren (Michigan) provides students with training in hydraulics and electronics as well as with hands-on training in the area of robotics. Furthermore, the program faculty includes individuals with work experience in electronics, fluid power, and…

  8. Robotic Surgical Training in an Academic Institution

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W. Randolph; Nifong, L. Wiley; Chapman, William H. H.; Felger, Jason E.; Bailey, B. Marcus; Ballint, Tara; Mendleson, Kim G.; Kim, Victor B.; Young, James A.; Albrecht, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To detail robotic procedure development and clinical applications for mitral valve, biliary, and gastric reflux operations, and to implement a multispecialty robotic surgery training curriculum for both surgeons and surgical teams. Summary Background Data Remote, accurate telemanipulation of intracavitary instruments by general and cardiac surgeons is now possible. Complex technologic advancements in surgical robotics require well-designed training programs. Moreover, efficient robotic surgical procedures must be developed methodically and safely implemented clinically. Methods Advanced training on robotic systems provides surgeon confidence when operating in tiny intracavitary spaces. Three-dimensional vision and articulated instrument control are essential. The authors’ two da Vinci robotic systems have been dedicated to procedure development, clinical surgery, and training of surgical specialists. Their center has been the first United States site to train surgeons formally in clinical robotics. Results Established surgeons and residents have been trained using a defined robotic surgical educational curriculum. Also, 30 multispecialty teams have been trained in robotic mechanics and electronics. Initially, robotic procedures were developed experimentally and are described. In the past year the authors have performed 52 robotic-assisted clinical operations: 18 mitral valve repairs, 20 cholecystectomies, and 14 Nissen fundoplications. These respective operations required 108, 28, and 73 minutes of robotic telemanipulation to complete. Procedure times for the last half of the abdominal operations decreased significantly, as did the knot-tying time in mitral operations. There have been no deaths and few complications. One mitral patient had postoperative bleeding. Conclusion Robotic surgery can be performed safely with excellent results. The authors have developed an effective curriculum for training teams in robotic surgery. After training, surgeons

  9. Robotic surgical training.

    PubMed

    Ben-Or, Sharon; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2013-01-01

    In July 2000, the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc) received Food and Drug Administration approval for intracardiac applications, and the first mitral valve repair was done at the East Carolina Heart Institute in May 2000. The system is now approved and used in many surgical specialties. With this disruptive technology and accepted use, surgeons and hospitals are seeking the most efficacious training pathway leading to safe use and responsible credentialing.One of the most important issues related to safe use is assembling the appropriate team of professionals involved with patient care. Moreover, proper patient selection and setting obtainable goals are also important.Creation and maintenance of a successful program are discussed in the article focusing on realistic goals. This begins with a partnership between surgeon leaders, hospital administrators, and industry support. Through this partnership, an appropriate training pathway and clinical pathway for success can be outlined. A timeline can then be created with periods of data analysis and adjustments as necessary. A successful program is attainable by following this pathway and attending to every detail along the journey. PMID:23528718

  10. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality. PMID:26390078

  11. Effects of task-oriented robot training on arm function, activity, and quality of life in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over fifty percent of stroke patients experience chronic arm hand performance problems, compromising independence in daily life activities and quality of life. Task-oriented training may improve arm hand performance after stroke, whereby augmented therapy may lead to a better treatment outcome. Technology-supported training holds opportunities for increasing training intensity. However, the effects of robot-supported task-oriented training with real life objects in stroke patients are not known to date. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness and added value of the Haptic Master robot combined with task-oriented arm hand training in chronic stroke patients. Methods In a single-blind randomized controlled trial, 22 chronic stroke patients were randomly allocated to receive either task-oriented robot-assisted arm-hand training (experimental group) or task-oriented non-robotic arm-hand training (control group). For training, the T-TOAT (Technology-supported Task-Oriented Arm Training) method was applied. Training was provided during 8 weeks, 4 times/week, 2× 30 min/day. Results A significant improvement after training on the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) was demonstrated in the experimental group (p = 0.008). Results were maintained until 6 months after cessation of the training. On the perceived performance measure (Motor Activity Log (MAL)), both, the experimental and control group improved significantly after training (control group p = 0.008; experimental group p = 0.013). The improvements on MAL in both groups were maintained until 6 months after cessation of the training. With regard to quality of life, only in the control group a significant improvement after training was found (EuroQol-5D p = 0.015, SF-36 physical p = 0.01). However, the improvement on SF-36 in the control group was not maintained (p = 0.012). No between-group differences could be demonstrated on any of the outcome measures

  12. Trunk robot rehabilitation training with active stepping reorganizes and enriches trunk motor cortex representations in spinal transected rats.

    PubMed

    Oza, Chintan S; Giszter, Simon F

    2015-05-01

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we examine effects of robot rehabilitation that promotes recovery of hindlimb weight support functions on trunk motor cortex representations. Adult rats spinal transected as neonates (NTX rats) at the T9/10 level significantly improve function with our robot rehabilitation paradigm, whereas treadmill-only trained do not. We used intracortical microstimulation to map motor cortex in two NTX groups: (1) treadmill trained (control group); and (2) robot-assisted treadmill trained (improved function group). We found significant robot rehabilitation-driven changes in motor cortex: (1) caudal trunk motor areas expanded; (2) trunk coactivation at cortex sites increased; (3) richness of trunk cortex motor representations, as examined by cumulative entropy and mutual information for different trunk representations, increased; (4) trunk motor representations in the cortex moved toward more normal topography; and (5) trunk and forelimb motor representations that SCI-driven plasticity and compensations had caused to overlap were segregated. We conclude that effective robot rehabilitation training induces significant reorganization of trunk motor cortex and partially reverses some plastic changes that may be adaptive in non-stepping paraplegia after SCI. PMID:25948267

  13. Trunk Robot Rehabilitation Training with Active Stepping Reorganizes and Enriches Trunk Motor Cortex Representations in Spinal Transected Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Chintan S.

    2015-01-01

    Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. Robotic rehabilitation aimed at trunk shows promise in SCI animal models and patients. However, little is known about the effect of SCI and robot rehabilitation of trunk on cortical motor representations. We previously showed reorganization of trunk motor cortex after adult SCI. Non-stepping training also exacerbated some SCI-driven plastic changes. Here we examine effects of robot rehabilitation that promotes recovery of hindlimb weight support functions on trunk motor cortex representations. Adult rats spinal transected as neonates (NTX rats) at the T9/10 level significantly improve function with our robot rehabilitation paradigm, whereas treadmill-only trained do not. We used intracortical microstimulation to map motor cortex in two NTX groups: (1) treadmill trained (control group); and (2) robot-assisted treadmill trained (improved function group). We found significant robot rehabilitation-driven changes in motor cortex: (1) caudal trunk motor areas expanded; (2) trunk coactivation at cortex sites increased; (3) richness of trunk cortex motor representations, as examined by cumulative entropy and mutual information for different trunk representations, increased; (4) trunk motor representations in the cortex moved toward more normal topography; and (5) trunk and forelimb motor representations that SCI-driven plasticity and compensations had caused to overlap were segregated. We conclude that effective robot rehabilitation training induces significant reorganization of trunk motor cortex and partially reverses some plastic changes that may be adaptive in non-stepping paraplegia after SCI. PMID:25948267

  14. Development of Activity-Related Muscle Fatigue during Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Rehabilitation Training in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Robot-assisted rehabilitation facilitates high-intensity training of the impaired upper limb in neurological rehabilitation. It has been clinically observed that persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have difficulties in sustaining the training intensity during a session due to the development of activity-related muscle fatigue. An experimental observational pilot study was conducted to examine whether or not the muscle fatigue develops in MS patients during one session of robot-assisted training within a virtual learning environment. Six MS patients with upper limb impairment (motricity index ranging from 50 to 91/100) and six healthy persons completed five training bouts of three minutes each performing lifting tasks, while EMG signals of anterior deltoid and lower trapezius muscles were measured and their subjective perceptions on muscle fatigue were registered. Decreased performance and higher subjective fatigue perception were present in the MS group. Increased mean EMG amplitudes and subjective perception levels on muscle fatigue were observed in both groups. Muscle fatigue development during 15′ training has been demonstrated in the arm of MS patients, which influences the sustainability of training intensity in MS patients. To optimize the training performance, adaptivity based on the detection of MS patient's muscle fatigue could be provided by means of training program adjustment. PMID:26090229

  15. Effects of 4-Week Intensive Active-Resistive Training with an EMG-Based Exoskeleton Robot on Muscle Strength in Older People: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Son, Jongsang; Ryu, Jeseong; Ahn, Soonjae; Kim, Eun Joo; Lee, Jung Ah; Kim, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the idea that an active-resistive training with an EMG-based exoskeleton robot could be beneficial to muscle strength and antagonist muscle cocontraction control after 4-week intensive elbow flexion/extension training. Three older people over 65 years participated the training for an hour per session and completed total 20 sessions during four weeks. Outcome measures were chosen as the maximum joint torque and cocontraction ratio between the biceps/triceps brachii muscles at pre-/post-training. The Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was performed to evaluate paired difference for the outcome measures. As a result, there was no significant difference in the maximum flexion or extension torque at pre- and post-training. However, the cocontraction ratio of the triceps brachii muscle as the antagonist was significantly decreased by 9.8% after the 4-week intensive training. The active-resistive training with the exoskeleton robot in the older people yielded a promising result, showing significant changes in the antagonist muscle cocontraction. PMID:27006942

  16. Effects of 4-Week Intensive Active-Resistive Training with an EMG-Based Exoskeleton Robot on Muscle Strength in Older People: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jongsang; Ryu, Jeseong; Ahn, Soonjae; Kim, Eun Joo; Lee, Jung Ah; Kim, Youngho

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the idea that an active-resistive training with an EMG-based exoskeleton robot could be beneficial to muscle strength and antagonist muscle cocontraction control after 4-week intensive elbow flexion/extension training. Three older people over 65 years participated the training for an hour per session and completed total 20 sessions during four weeks. Outcome measures were chosen as the maximum joint torque and cocontraction ratio between the biceps/triceps brachii muscles at pre-/post-training. The Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was performed to evaluate paired difference for the outcome measures. As a result, there was no significant difference in the maximum flexion or extension torque at pre- and post-training. However, the cocontraction ratio of the triceps brachii muscle as the antagonist was significantly decreased by 9.8% after the 4-week intensive training. The active-resistive training with the exoskeleton robot in the older people yielded a promising result, showing significant changes in the antagonist muscle cocontraction. PMID:27006942

  17. Novel training methods for robotic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Andrew J.; Aron, Monish; Hung, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this review are to summarize the current training modalities and assessment tools used in urological robotic surgery and to propose principles to guide the formation of a comprehensive robotics curriculum. Materials and Methods: The PUBMED database was systematically searched for relevant articles and their citations utilized to broaden our search. These articles were reviewed and summarized with a focus on novel developments. Results: A multitude of training modalities including didactic, dry lab, wet lab, and virtual reality have been developed. The use of these modalities can be divided into basic skills-based exercises and more advanced procedure-based exercises. Clinical training has largely followed traditional methods of surgical teaching with the exception of the unique development of tele-mentoring for the da Vinci interface. Tools to assess both real-life and simulator performance have been developed, including adaptions from Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery and Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill, and novel tools such as Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotic Skills. Conclusions: The use of these different entities to create a standardized curriculum for robotic surgery remains elusive. Selection of training modalities and assessment tools should be based upon performance data-based validity and practical feasibility. Comparative assessment of different modalities (cross-modality validity) can help strengthen the development of common skill sets. Constant data collection must occur to guide continuing curriculum improvement. PMID:25097322

  18. From training to robot behavior: towards custom scenarios for robotics in training programs for ASD.

    PubMed

    Gillesen, J C C; Barakova, E I; Huskens, B E B M; Feijs, L M G

    2011-01-01

    Successful results have been booked with using robotics in therapy interventions for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, to make the best use of robots, the behavior of the robot needs to be tailored to the learning objectives and personal characteristics of each unique individual with ASD. Currently training practices include adaptation of the training programs to the condition of each individual client, based on the particular learning goals or the mood of the client. To include robots in such training will imply that the trainers are enabled to control a robot through an intuitive interface. For this purpose we use a visual programming environment called TiViPE as an interface between robot and trainer, where scenarios for specific learning objectives can easily be put together as if they were graphical LEGO-like building blocks. This programming platform is linked to the NAO robot from Aldebaran Robotics. A process flow for converting trainers' scenarios was developed to make sure the gist of the original scenarios was kept intact. We give an example of how a scenario is processed, and implemented into the clinical setting, and how detailed parts of a scenario can be developed. PMID:22275585

  19. Enhancing robotic gait training via augmented feedback.

    PubMed

    Patritti, Benjamin; Sicari, Monica; Deming, Lynn; Romaguera, Fernanda; Pelliccio, Marlena; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Nimec, Donna; Bonato, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has examined the feasibility of robotic-assisted gait training in pediatric patients, including children with cerebral palsy (CP). Herein we present a case series describing clinical outcomes in four children with CP who underwent gait training using a robotic driven gait orthosis (DGO) (Pediatric Lokomat©). Children had a diagnosis of spastic diplegia due to CP. They were paired based on functional abilities and observed gait characteristics. Two children had a GMFCS of III and showed excessive ankle plantarflexion during stance. The other two children had a GMFCS of II and displayed a crouch gait pattern. Each subject participated in a 6-week intervention of robotic-assisted gait training that involved three 30-minute sessions per week. Pre-and post-training evaluations were performed including clinical tests of standing and walking function, walking speed, and walking endurance. Clinical gait analysis was also performed using a motion capture system to assess changes in gait mechanics. All subjects showed an improvement in locomotor function. For lower functioning children, this may be mediated by improved trunk control. The use of augmented feedback was associated with larger. However, these results have to be considered with caution because of the limited sample size of the study. PMID:21097013

  20. Canadian space robotic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaberger, Christian; Space Plan Task Force, Canadian Space Agency

    The Canadian Space Agency has chosen space robotics as one of its key niche areas, and is currently preparing to deliver the first flight elements for the main robotic system of the international space station. The Mobile Servicing System (MSS) is the Canadian contribution to the international space station. It consists of three main elements. The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is a 7-metre, 7-dof, robotic arm. The Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a smaller 2-metre, 7-dof, robotic arm can be used independently, or attached to the end of the SSRMS. The Mobile Base System (MBS) will be used as a support platform and will also provide power and data links for both the SSRMS and the SPDM. A Space Vision System (SVS) has been tested on Shuttle flights, and is being further developed to enhance the autonomous capabilities of the MSS. The CSA also has a Strategic Technologies in Automation and Robotics Program which is developing new technologies to fulfill future robotic space mission needs. This program is currently developing in industry technological capabilities in the areas of automation of operations, autonomous robotics, vision systems, trajectory planning and object avoidance, tactile and proximity sensors, and ground control of space robots. Within the CSA, a robotic testbed and several research programs are also advancing technologies such as haptic devices, control via head-mounted displays, predictive and preview displays, and the dynamic characterization of robotic arms. Canada is also now developing its next Long Term Space Plan. In this context, a planetary exploration program is being considered, which would utilize Canadian space robotic technologies in this new arena.

  1. Minimally assistive robot training for proprioception enhancement.

    PubMed

    Casadio, Maura; Morasso, Pietro; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Giannoni, Psiche

    2009-04-01

    In stroke survivors, motor impairment is frequently associated with degraded proprioceptive and/or somatosensory functions. Here we address the question of how to use robots to improve proprioception in these patients. We used an 'assist-as-needed' protocol, in which robot assistance was kept to a minimum and was continuously adjusted during exercise. To specifically train proprioceptive functions, we alternated blocks of trials with and without vision. A total of nine chronic stroke survivors participated in the study, which consisted of a total of ten 1-h exercise sessions. We used a linear mixed-effects statistical model to account for the effects of exercise, vision and the degree of assistance on the overall performance, and to capture both the systematic effects and the individual variations. Although there was not always a complete recovery of autonomous movements, all subjects exhibited an increased amount of voluntary control. Moreover, training with closed eyes appeared to be beneficial for patients with abnormal proprioception. Our results indicate that training by alternating vision and no-vision blocks may improve the ability to use proprioception as well as the ability to integrate it with vision. We suggest that the approach may be useful in the more general case of motor skill acquisition, in which enhancing proprioception may improve the ability to physically interact with the external world. PMID:19139867

  2. Design and Development Issues for Educational Robotics Training Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucgul, Memet; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore critical design issues for educational robotics training camps and to describe how these factors should be implemented in the development of such camps. For this purpose, two robotics training camps were organized for elementary school students. The first camp had 30 children attendees, and the second had 22. As…

  3. Intensive Sensorimotor Arm Training Mediated by Therapist or Robot Improves Hemiparesis in Patients With Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Bruce T.; Lynch, Daniel; Rykman-Berland, Avrielle; Ferraro, Mark; Galgano, Michael; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I.

    2016-01-01

    Investigators have demonstrated that a variety of intensive movement training protocols for persistent upper limb paralysis in patients with chronic stroke (6 months or more after stroke) improve motor outcome. This randomized controlled study determined in patients with upper limb motor impairment after chronic stroke whether movement therapy delivered by a robot or by a therapist using an intensive training protocol was superior. Robotic training (n = 11) and an intensive movement protocol (n = 10) improved the impairment measures of motor outcome significantly and comparably; there were no significant changes in disability measures. Motor gains were maintained at the 3-month evaluation after training. These data contribute to the growing awareness that persistent impairments in those with chronic stroke may not reflect exhausted capacity for improvement. These new protocols, rendered by either therapist or robot, can be standardized, tested, and replicated, and potentially will contribute to rational activity-based programs. PMID:18184932

  4. Electromyographic response is altered during robotic surgical training with augmented feedback.

    PubMed

    Judkins, Timothy N; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Stergiou, Nick

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing prevalence of robotic systems for surgical laparoscopy. We previously developed quantitative measures to assess robotic surgical proficiency, and used augmented feedback to enhance training to reduce applied grip force and increase speed. However, there is also a need to understand the physiological demands of the surgeon during robotic surgery, and if training can reduce these demands. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use clinical biomechanical techniques via electromyography (EMG) to investigate the effects of real-time augmented visual feedback during short-term training on muscular activation and fatigue. Twenty novices were trained in three inanimate surgical tasks with the da Vinci Surgical System. Subjects were divided into five feedback groups (speed, relative phase, grip force, video, and control). Time- and frequency-domain EMG measures were obtained before and after training. Surgical training decreased muscle work as found from mean EMG and EMG envelopes. Grip force feedback further reduced average and total muscle work, while speed feedback increased average muscle work and decreased total muscle work. Training also increased the median frequency response as a result of increased speed and/or reduced fatigue during each task. More diverse motor units were recruited as revealed by increases in the frequency bandwidth post-training. We demonstrated that clinical biomechanics using EMG analysis can help to better understand the effects of training for robotic surgery. Real-time augmented feedback during training can further reduce physiological demands. Future studies will investigate other means of feedback such as biofeedback of EMG during robotic surgery training. PMID:19041972

  5. Incorporating resident/fellow training into a robotic surgery program.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Monica Hagan; Green, Isabel; Martino, Martin; Fowler, Jeffrey; Salani, Ritu

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid uptake of the robotic approach in gynecologic surgery, a thorough understanding of the technology, including its uses and limitations, is critical to maximize patient outcomes and safety. This review discusses the role of training modalities and development of curricula for robotic surgery. Furthermore, methods for incorporating the entire surgical team and the process of credentialing/maintaining privileges are described. PMID:26289120

  6. Rapid plasticity of motor corticospinal system with robotic reach training.

    PubMed

    Kantak, S S; Jones-Lush, L M; Narayanan, P; Judkins, T N; Wittenberg, G F

    2013-09-01

    Goal-directed reaching is important for the activities of daily living. Populations of neurons in the primary motor cortex that project to spinal motor circuits are known to represent the kinematics of reaching movements. We investigated whether repetitive practice of goal-directed reaching movements induces use-dependent plasticity of those kinematic characteristics, in a manner similar to finger movements, as had been shown previously. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to evoke upper extremity movements while the forearm was resting in a robotic cradle. Plasticity was measured by the change in kinematics of these evoked movements following goal-directed reaching practice. Baseline direction of TMS-evoked arm movements was determined for each subject. Subjects then practiced three blocks of 160 goal-directed reaching movements in a direction opposite to the baseline direction (14 cm reach 180° from baseline direction) against a 75-Nm spring field. Changes in TMS-evoked whole arm movements were assessed after each practice block and after 5 min following the end of practice. Direction and the position of the point of peak velocity of TMS-evoked movements were significantly altered following training and at a 5-min interval following training, while amplitude did not show significant changes. This was accompanied by changes in the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of the shoulder and elbow agonist muscles that partly explained the change in direction, mainly by increase in agonist MEP, without significant changes in antagonists. These findings demonstrate that the arm representation accessible by motor cortical stimulation under goes rapid plasticity induced by goal-directed robotic reach training in healthy subjects. PMID:23669007

  7. Rapid Plasticity of Motor Corticospinal system with Robotic Reach Training

    PubMed Central

    Kantak, Shailesh S.; Jones-Lush, Lauren M.; Narayanan, Priya; Judkins, Timothy N.; Wittenberg, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Goal-directed reaching is important for activities of daily living. Populations of neurons in the primary motor cortex (M1) that project to spinal motor circuits are known to represent kinematics of reaching movements. We investigated whether repetitive practice of goal-directed reaching movements induces use-dependent plasticity of those kinematic characteristics, in a manner similar to finger movements, as had been shown previously. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used over the scalp to evoke upper extremity movements while the forearm was resting in a robotic cradle. Plasticity was measured by the change in kinematics of these evoked movements following goal-directed reaching practice. Baseline direction of TMS-evoked arm movements was determined for each subject. Subjects then practiced 3 blocks of 160 goal-directed reaching movements in a direction opposite to the baseline direction (14 cm reach 180° from baseline direction) against a 75 N·m spring field. Changes in TMS-evoked whole arm movements were assessed after each practice block and after 5 minutes following the end of practice. Direction and the position of the point of peak velocity of TMS-evoked movements were significantly altered following training and at a 5-minute interval following training, while amplitude did not show significant changes. This was accompanied by changes in the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) of the shoulder and elbow agonist muscles that partly explained the change in direction, mainly by increase in agonist MEP, without significant changes in antagonists. These findings demonstrate that the arm representation accessible by motor cortical stimulation demonstrates rapid plasticity induced by goal-directed robotic reach training in healthy subjects. PMID:23669007

  8. Automation, robotics, and inflight training for manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1986-01-01

    The automation, robotics, and inflight training requirements of manned Mars missions will be supported by similar capabilities developed for the space station program. Evolutionary space station onboard training facilities will allow the crewmembers to minimize the amount of training received on the ground by providing extensive onboard access to system and experiment malfunction procedures, maintenance procedures, repair procedures, and associated video sequences. Considerable on-the-job training will also be conducted for space station management, mobile remote manipulator operations, proximity operations with the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (and later the Orbit Transfer Vehicle), and telerobotics and mobile robots. A similar approach could be used for manned Mars mission training with significant additions such as high fidelity image generation and simulation systems such as holographic projection systems for Mars landing, ascent, and rendezvous training. In addition, a substantial increase in the use of automation and robotics for hazardous and tedious tasks would be expected for Mars mission. Mobile robots may be used to assist in the assembly, test and checkout of the Mars spacecraft, in the handling of nuclear components and hazardous chemical propellent transfer operations, in major spacecraft repair tasks which might be needed (repair of a micrometeroid penetration, for example), in the construction of a Mars base, and for routine maintenance of the base when unmanned.

  9. An interactive Virtual Reality simulation system for robot control and operator training

    SciTech Connect

    Miner, N.E.; Stansfield, S.A.

    1993-11-01

    Robotic systems are often very complex and difficult to operate, especially as multiple robots are integrated to accomplish difficult tasks. In addition, training the operators of these complex robotic systems is time-consuming and costly. In this paper, a virtual reality based robotic control system is presented. The virtual reality system provides a means by which operators can operate, and be trained to operate, complex robotic systems in an intuitive, cost-effective way. Operator interaction with the robotic system is at a high, task-oriented, level. Continuous state monitoring prevents illegal robot actions and provides interactive feedback to the operator and real-time training for novice users.

  10. Positive effects of robotic exoskeleton training of upper limb reaching movements after stroke.

    PubMed

    Frisoli, Antonio; Procopio, Caterina; Chisari, Carmelo; Creatini, Ilaria; Bonfiglio, Luca; Bergamasco, Massimo; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    This study, conducted in a group of nine chronic patients with right-side hemiparesis after stroke, investigated the effects of a robotic-assisted rehabilitation training with an upper limb robotic exoskeleton for the restoration of motor function in spatial reaching movements. The robotic assisted rehabilitation training was administered for a period of 6 weeks including reaching and spatial antigravity movements. To assess the carry-over of the observed improvements in movement during training into improved function, a kinesiologic assessment of the effects of the training was performed by means of motion and dynamic electromyographic analysis of reaching movements performed before and after training. The same kinesiologic measurements were performed in a healthy control group of seven volunteers, to determine a benchmark for the experimental observations in the patients' group. Moreover degree of functional impairment at the enrolment and discharge was measured by clinical evaluation with upper limb Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FMA, 0-66 points), Modified Ashworth scale (MA, 0-60 pts) and active ranges of motion. The robot aided training induced, independently by time of stroke, statistical significant improvements of kinesiologic (movement time, smoothness of motion) and clinical (4.6 ± 4.2 increase in FMA, 3.2 ± 2.1 decrease in MA) parameters, as a result of the increased active ranges of motion and improved co-contraction index for shoulder extension/flexion. Kinesiologic parameters correlated significantly with clinical assessment values, and their changes after the training were affected by the direction of motion (inward vs. outward movement) and position of target to be reached (ipsilateral, central and contralateral peripersonal space). These changes can be explained as a result of the motor recovery induced by the robotic training, in terms of regained ability to execute single joint movements and of improved interjoint coordination of elbow

  11. Active control of robot manipulator compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Pooran, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed at Catholic University on the research grant entitled Active Control of Robot Manipulator Compliance, supported by NASA/Goddard space Flight Center during the period of May 15th, 1986 to November 15th, 1986 is described. The modelling of the two-degree-of-freedom robot is first presented. Then the complete system including the robot and the hybrid controller is simulated on an IBM-XT Personal Computer. Simulation results showed that proper adjustments of controller gains enable the robot to perform successful operations. Further research should focus on developing a guideline for the controller gain design to achieve system stability.

  12. Electromyographic correlates of learning during robotic surgical training in virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Suh, Irene H; Mukherjee, Mukul; Schrack, Ryan; Park, Shi-Hyun; Chien, Jung-Hung; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the muscle activation and the muscle frequency response of the dominant arm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and extensor digitorum) and hand muscles (abductor pollicis and first dorsal interosseous) during robotic surgical skills training in a virtual environment. The virtual surgical training tasks consisted of bimanual carrying, needle passing and mesh alignment. The experimental group (n=5) was trained by performing four blocks of the virtual surgical tasks using the da Vinci™ surgical robot. During the pre- and post-training tests, all subjects were tested by performing a suturing task on a "life-like" suture pad. The control group (n=5) performed only the suturing task without any virtual task training. Differences between pre- and post-training tests were significantly greater in the virtual reality group, as compared to the control group in the muscle activation of the hand muscle (abductor pollicis) for both the suture tying and the suture running (p<0.05). In conclusion, changes in electrographic activity shows that training in virtual reality leads to specific changes in neuromotor control of robotic surgical tasks. PMID:21335869

  13. Feasibility and Acceptance of a Robotic Surgery Ergonomic Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Renatta; Mosaly, Prithima; Gehrig, Paola A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Assessment of ergonomic strain during robotic surgery indicates there is a need for intervention. However, limited data exist detailing the feasibility and acceptance of ergonomic training (ET) for robotic surgeons. This prospective, observational pilot study evaluates the implementation of an evidence-based ET module. Methods: A two-part survey was conducted. The first survey assessed robotic strain using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Participants were given the option to participate in either an online or an in-person ET session. The ET was derived from Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and developed by a human factors engineer experienced with health care ergonomics. After ET, a follow-up survey including the NMQ and an assessment of the ET were completed. Results: The survey was sent to 67 robotic surgeons. Forty-two (62.7%) responded, including 18 residents, 8 fellows, and 16 attending physicians. Forty-five percent experienced strain resulting from performing robotic surgery and 26.3% reported persistent strain. Only 16.6% of surgeons reported prior ET in robotic surgery. Thirty-five (78%) surgeons elected to have in-person ET, which was successfully arranged for 32 surgeons (91.4%). Thirty-seven surgeons (88.1%) completed the follow-up survey. All surgeons participating in the in-person ET found it helpful and felt formal ET should be standard, 88% changed their practice as a result of the training, and 74% of those reporting strain noticed a decrease after their ET. Conclusion: Thus, at a high-volume robotics center, evidence-based ET was easily implemented, well-received, changed some surgeons' practice, and decreased self-reported strain related to robotic surgery. PMID:25489213

  14. Objective Measures for Longitudinal Assessment of Robotic Surgery Training

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jog, Amod; Vagvolgyi, Balazs; Nguyen, Hiep; Hager, Gregory; Chen, Chi Chiung Grace; Yuh, David

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Current robotic training approaches lack criteria for automatically assessing and tracking (over time) technical skills separately from clinical proficiency. We describe the development and validation of a novel automated and objective framework for assessment of training. Methods We are able to record all system variables (stereo instrument video, hand and instrument motion, buttons and pedal events) from the da Vinci surgical systems using a portable archival system integrated with the robotic surgical system. Data can be collected unsupervised, and the archival system does not change system operation in any way. Our open-ended multi-center protocol is collecting surgical skill benchmarking data from 24 trainees to surgical proficiency, subject only to their continued availability. Two independent experts performed structured (OSATS) assessments on longitudinal data from 8 novice and 4 expert surgeons to generate ground truth for training and to validate our computerized statistical analysis methods in identifying ranges of operational and clinical skill measures. Results Objective differences in operational and technical skill between known experts and other subjects were quantified. Longitudinal learning curves and statistical analysis for trainee performance measures are reported. Graphical representations of skills developed for feedback to the trainees are also included. Conclusions We describe an open-ended longitudinal study and automated motion recognition system capable of objectively differentiating between clinical and technical operational skills in robotic surgery. Our results demonstrate a convergence of trainee skill parameters towards those derived from expert robotic surgeons over the course of our training protocol. PMID:22172215

  15. Objective Assessment in Residency Based Training for Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Martin; Malpani, Anand; Li, Ryan; Tantillo, Thomas; Jog, Amod; Blanco, Ray; Ha, Patrick K; Califano, Joseph; Kumar, Rajesh; Richmon, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a robotic surgery training regimen integrating objective skill assessment for otolaryngology and head and neck surgery trainees consisting of training modules of increasing complexity and leading up to procedure specific training. In particular, we investigate applications of such a training approach for surgical extirpation of oropharyngeal tumors via a transoral approach using the da Vinci Robotic system. Study Design Prospective blinded data collection and objective evaluation (OSATS) of three distinct phases using the da Vinci Robotic surgical system. Setting Academic University Medical Engineering/Computer Science laboratory Methods Between September 2010 and July 2011, 8 Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery residents and 4 staff “experts” from an academic hospital participated in three distinct phases of robotic surgery training involving 1) robotic platform operational skills, 2) set-up of the patient side system, and 3) a complete ex-vivo surgical extirpation of an oropharyngeal “tumor” located in the base of tongue. Trainees performed multiple (4) approximately equally spaced training sessions in each stage of the training. In addition to trainees, baseline performance data was obtained for the experts. Each surgical stage was documented with motion and event data captured from the application programming interfaces (API) of the da Vinci system, as well as separate video cameras as appropriate. All data was assessed using automated skill measures of task efficiency, and correlated with structured assessment (OSATS, and similar Likert scale) from three experts to assess expert and trainee differences, and compute automated and expert assessed learning curves. Results Our data shows that such training results in an improved didactic robotic knowledge base and improved clinical efficiency with respect to the set-up and console manipulation. Experts (e.g. average OSATS 25, Stdev. 3.1, module 1 – suturing) and trainees (average

  16. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  17. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  18. Robot-assisted arm training in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the growing diffusion of robotic devices in neurorehabilitation, no previous study investigated the effects of robotic training on arm impairment due to Parkinson’s disease. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether robot-assisted arm training might improve upper limb function in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Findings Ten patients with Parkinson’s disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.5-3) received ten, 45-minute, treatment sessions, five days a week, for two consecutive weeks. Robot-assisted arm training was performed with the Bi-Manu-Track (Reha-Stim, Berlin, Germany) that provides a computer-controlled, repetitive, bilateral, mirror-like practice of forearm pronation/supination and wrist extension/flexion. Patients were trained according to the following modalities: passive-passive (both arms moved by the machine) and active-active (both arms actively moving against resistance). The dominant upper limb was evaluated before and immediately after treatment as well as at two weeks of follow-up. Outcomes were the nine-hole peg test, the Fugl-Meyer assessment (upper limb section) and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale. After treatment, a significant improvement was found in the nine-hole peg test (P = 0.007) as well as in the upper limb section of the Fugl-Meyer assessment (P = 0.012). Findings were confirmed at the 2-week follow-up evaluation only for the nine-hole peg test (P = 0.007). No significant improvement was found in the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale at both post-treatment and follow-up evaluations. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that robot-assisted arm training might be a promising tool in order to improve upper limb function in patients with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24597524

  19. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  20. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators.

    PubMed

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  1. Robot Guided 'Pen Skill' Training in Children with Motor Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Shire, Katy A; Hill, Liam J B; Snapp-Childs, Winona; Bingham, Geoffrey P; Kountouriotis, Georgios K; Barber, Sally; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Motor deficits are linked to a range of negative physical, social and academic consequences. Haptic robotic interventions, based on the principles of sensorimotor learning, have been shown previously to help children with motor problems learn new movements. We therefore examined whether the training benefits of a robotic system would generalise to a standardised test of 'pen-skills', assessed using objective kinematic measures [via the Clinical Kinematic Assessment Tool, CKAT]. A counterbalanced, cross-over design was used in a group of 51 children (37 male, aged 5-11 years) with manual control difficulties. Improved performance on a novel task using the robotic device could be attributed to the intervention but there was no evidence of generalisation to any of the CKAT tasks. The robotic system appears to have the potential to support motor learning, with the technology affording numerous advantages. However, the training regime may need to target particular manual skills (e.g. letter formation) in order to obtain clinically significant improvements in specific skills such as handwriting. PMID:26967993

  2. Locomotion training of legged robots using hybrid machine learning techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, William E.; Doerschuk, Peggy I.; Zhang, Wen-Ran; Li, Andrew L.

    1995-01-01

    In this study artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic are used to control the jumping behavior of a three-link uniped robot. The biped locomotion control problem is an increment of the uniped locomotion control. Study of legged locomotion dynamics indicates that a hierarchical controller is required to control the behavior of a legged robot. A structured control strategy is suggested which includes navigator, motion planner, biped coordinator and uniped controllers. A three-link uniped robot simulation is developed to be used as the plant. Neurocontrollers were trained both online and offline. In the case of on-line training, a reinforcement learning technique was used to train the neurocontroller to make the robot jump to a specified height. After several hundred iterations of training, the plant output achieved an accuracy of 7.4%. However, when jump distance and body angular momentum were also included in the control objectives, training time became impractically long. In the case of off-line training, a three-layered backpropagation (BP) network was first used with three inputs, three outputs and 15 to 40 hidden nodes. Pre-generated data were presented to the network with a learning rate as low as 0.003 in order to reach convergence. The low learning rate required for convergence resulted in a very slow training process which took weeks to learn 460 examples. After training, performance of the neurocontroller was rather poor. Consequently, the BP network was replaced by a Cerebeller Model Articulation Controller (CMAC) network. Subsequent experiments described in this document show that the CMAC network is more suitable to the solution of uniped locomotion control problems in terms of both learning efficiency and performance. A new approach is introduced in this report, viz., a self-organizing multiagent cerebeller model for fuzzy-neural control of uniped locomotion is suggested to improve training efficiency. This is currently being evaluated for a possible

  3. Successful incorporation of robotic surgery into gynecologic oncology fellowship training

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Pamela T.; Iglesias, David; Munsell, Mark F.; Frumovitz, Michael; Westin, Shannon N.; Nick, Alpa M.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing role of robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology may impact fellowship training. The purpose of this study was to review the proportion of robotic procedures performed by fellows at the console, and compare operative times and lymph node yields to faculty surgeons. Methods A prospective database of women undergoing robotic gynecologic surgery has been maintained since 2008. Intra-operative datasheets completed include surgical times and primary surgeon at the console. Operative times were compared between faculty and fellows for simple hysterectomy (SH), bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), pelvic (PLND) and paraaortic lymph node dissection (PALND) and vaginal cuff closure (VCC). Lymph nodes counts were also compared. Results Times were recorded for 239 SH, 43 BSOs, 105 right PLNDs, 104 left PLNDs, 34 PALND and 269 VCC. Comparing 2008 to 2011, procedures performed by the fellow significantly increased; SH 16% to 83% (p<0.001), BSO 7% to 75% (p=0.005), right PLND 4% to 44% (p<0.001), left PLND 0% to 56% (p<0.001), and VCC 59% to 82% (p=0.024). Console times (min) were similar for SH (60vs. 63, p= 0.73), BSO (48 vs. 43, p=0.55), and VCC (20 vs. 22, p=0.26). Faculty times (min) were shorter for PLND (right 26 vs. 30, p=0.04, left 23 vs. 27, p=0.02). Nodal counts were not significantly different (right 7 vs. 8, p=0.17 or left 7 vs. 7, p=0.87). Conclusions Robotic surgery can be successfully incorporated into gynecologic oncology fellowship training. With increased exposure to robotic surgery, fellows had similar operative times and lymph node yields as faculty surgeons. PMID:24055616

  4. Robot-Mediated Imitation Skill Training for Children With Autism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi; Young, Eric M; Swanson, Amy R; Weitlauf, Amy S; Warren, Zachary E; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) impacts 1 in 68 children in the U.S., with tremendous individual and societal costs. Technology-aided intervention, more specifically robotic intervention, has gained momentum in recent years due to the inherent affinity of many children with ASD towards technology. In this paper we present a novel robot-mediated intervention system for imitation skill learning, which is considered a core deficit area for children with ASD. The Robot-mediated Imitation Skill Training Architecture (RISTA) is designed in such a manner that it can operate either completely autonomously or in coordination with a human therapist depending on the intervention need. Experimental results are presented from small user studies validating system functionality, assessing user tolerance, and documenting subject performance. Preliminary results show that this novel robotic system draws more attention from the children with ASD and teaches gestures more effectively as compared to a human therapist. While no broad generalized conclusions can be made about the effectiveness of RISTA based on our small user studies, initial results are encouraging and justify further exploration in the future. PMID:26353376

  5. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention.

  6. DREV activities related to military vehicles robotization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montminy, B.

    The Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV) is involved in a number of activities aimed at improving the performance of systems installed aboard military vehicles, automating functions normally carried out by human operators, and adding new functions that become essential to cope with new scenarios and threats. These activities relate to the development of sensors that sense the surrounding environment, processors that interpret the sensor data, and actuators that perform various robotic actions. DREV research related to those activities is reviewed as they relate to robotics which continues to increase the portion of vehicular function that is carried out autonomously. Of special interest is the CF aircraft robotization project which aims to develop an autonomous integrated aircraft protection system to detect and counter threats without any human intervention. This research involves development of means for passive surveillance of the surrounding environment, processing of multisensor data, triggering of sensing-aid devices, and actuation of countermeasures that modify the environment.

  7. Modular Ankle Robotics Training in Early Sub-Acute Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Krywonis, Amanda; Kehs, Glenn; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Modular lower extremity (LE) robotics may offer a valuable avenue for restoring neuromotor control after hemiparetic stroke. Prior studies show that visually-guided and visually-evoked practice with an ankle robot (anklebot) improves paretic ankle motor control that translates into improved overground walking. Objective Assess the feasibility and efficacy of daily anklebot training during early sub-acute hospitalization post-stroke. Methods Thirty-four inpatients from a stroke unit were randomly assigned to anklebot (N=18) or passive manual stretching (N=16) treatments. All suffered a first stroke with residual hemiparesis (ankle manual muscle test grade 1/5 to 4/5), and at least trace muscle activation in plantar- or dorsiflexion. Anklebot training employed an “assist-as-needed” approach during > 200 volitional targeted paretic ankle movements, with difficulty adjusted to active range of motion and success rate. Stretching included >200 daily mobilizations in these same ranges. All sessions lasted 1 hour and assessments were not blinded. Results Both groups walked faster at discharge, however the robot group improved more in percent change of temporal symmetry (p=0.032) and also of step length symmetry (p=0.038), with longer nonparetic step lengths in the robot (133%) vs. stretching (31%) groups. Paretic ankle control improved in the robot group, with increased peak (p≤ 0.001) and mean (p≤ 0.01) angular speeds, and increased movement smoothness (p≤ 0.01). There were no adverse events. Conclusion Though limited by small sample size and restricted entry criteria, our findings suggest that modular lower extremity robotics during early sub-acute hospitalization is well tolerated and improves ankle motor control and gait patterning. PMID:24515923

  8. Robotic surgery training: construct validity of Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotic Skills (GEARS).

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Renata; Rodríguez, Omaira; Rosciano, José; Vegas, Liumariel; Bond, Verónica; Rojas, Aram; Sanchez-Ismayel, Alexis

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the ability of the GEARS scale (Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotic Skills) to differentiate individuals with different levels of experience in robotic surgery, as a fundamental validation. This is a cross-sectional study that included three groups of individuals with different levels of experience in robotic surgery (expert, intermediate, novice) their performance were assessed by GEARS applied by two reviewers. The difference between groups was determined by Mann-Whitney test and the consistency between the reviewers was studied by Kendall W coefficient. The agreement between the reviewers of the scale GEARS was 0.96. The score was 29.8 ± 0.4 to experts, 24 ± 2.8 to intermediates and 16 ± 3 to novices, with a statistically significant difference between all of them (p < 0.05). All parameters from the scale allow discriminating between different levels of experience, with exception of the depth perception item. We conclude that the scale GEARS was able to differentiate between individuals with different levels of experience in robotic surgery and, therefore, is a validated and useful tool to evaluate surgeons in training. PMID:27039189

  9. Unsupervised Trajectory Segmentation for Surgical Gesture Recognition in Robotic Training.

    PubMed

    Despinoy, Fabien; Bouget, David; Forestier, Germain; Penet, Cedric; Zemiti, Nabil; Poignet, Philippe; Jannin, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Dexterity and procedural knowledge are two critical skills that surgeons need to master to perform accurate and safe surgical interventions. However, current training systems do not allow us to provide an in-depth analysis of surgical gestures to precisely assess these skills. Our objective is to develop a method for the automatic and quantitative assessment of surgical gestures. To reach this goal, we propose a new unsupervised algorithm that can automatically segment kinematic data from robotic training sessions. Without relying on any prior information or model, this algorithm detects critical points in the kinematic data that define relevant spatio-temporal segments. Based on the association of these segments, we obtain an accurate recognition of the gestures involved in the surgical training task. We, then, perform an advanced analysis and assess our algorithm using datasets recorded during real expert training sessions. After comparing our approach with the manual annotations of the surgical gestures, we observe 97.4% accuracy for the learning purpose and an average matching score of 81.9% for the fully automated gesture recognition process. Our results show that trainees workflow can be followed and surgical gestures may be automatically evaluated according to an expert database. This approach tends toward improving training efficiency by minimizing the learning curve. PMID:26513773

  10. Training system for NOTES and SPS surgery robot that enables spatiotemporal retrospective analysis of the training process.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Asaki; Suzuki, Naoki; Ieiri, Satoshi; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Kenmotsu, Hajime; Hashizume, Makoro

    2012-01-01

    Within the digestive organ surgery robot R&D project, our research team aims to develop a surgical robot training device with an interface identical to that of the actual device. The training device uses an organ model that changes shape in real time to train operators to grab, cut open, and cut off soft tissues and close wounds using the actual device. To increase the effectiveness of the training device, we added functions to save the movements of the robot in training and changes in the operation field. By recreating the situation during training, we were able to analyze in four dimensions (4D) various changes in the operation field that the operator cannot see during training. This new function not only enabled us to analyze the contents of the training in detail, but also to report any problems in development and design of the actual device. PMID:22356980

  11. Accelerometry Measuring the Outcome of Robot-Supported Upper Limb Training in Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lemmens, Ryanne J. M.; Timmermans, Annick A. A.; Janssen-Potten, Yvonne J. M.; Pulles, Sanne A. N. T. D.; Geers, Richard P. J.; Bakx, Wilbert G. M.; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; Seelen, Henk A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to assess the extent to which accelerometers can be used to determine the effect of robot-supported task-oriented arm-hand training, relative to task-oriented arm-hand training alone, on the actual amount of arm-hand use of chronic stroke patients in their home situation. Methods This single-blind randomized controlled trial included 16 chronic stroke patients, randomly allocated using blocked randomization (n = 2) to receive task-oriented robot-supported arm-hand training or task-oriented (unsupported) arm-hand training. Training lasted 8 weeks, 4 times/week, 2×30 min/day using the (T-)TOAT ((Technology-supported)-Task-Oriented-Arm-Training) method. The actual amount of arm-hand use, was assessed at baseline, after 8 weeks training and 6 months after training cessation. Duration of use and intensity of use of the affected arm-hand during unimanual and bimanual activities were calculated. Results Duration and intensity of use of the affected arm-hand did not change significantly during and after training, with or without robot-support (i.e. duration of use of unimanual use of the affected arm-hand: median difference of −0.17% in the robot-group and −0.08% in the control group between baseline and after training cessation; intensity of the affected arm-hand: median difference of 3.95% in the robot-group and 3.32% in the control group between baseline and after training cessation). No significant between-group differences were found. Conclusions Accelerometer data did not show significant changes in actual amount of arm-hand use after task-oriented training, with or without robot-support. Next to the amount of use, discrimination between activities performed and information about quality of use of the affected arm-hand are essential to determine actual arm-hand performance. Trial Registration Controlled-trials.com ISRCTN82787126 PMID:24823925

  12. A Behavior-Based Approach for Educational Robotics Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Cristoforis, P.; Pedre, S.; Nitsche, M.; Fischer, T.; Pessacg, F.; Di Pietro, C.

    2013-01-01

    Educational robotics proposes the use of robots as a teaching resource that enables inexperienced students to approach topics in fields unrelated to robotics. In recent years, these activities have grown substantially in elementary and secondary school classrooms and also in outreach experiences to interest students in science, technology,…

  13. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses. PMID:26656575

  14. Training modalities in robot-mediated upper limb rehabilitation in stroke: a framework for classification based on a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Robot-mediated post-stroke therapy for the upper-extremity dates back to the 1990s. Since then, a number of robotic devices have become commercially available. There is clear evidence that robotic interventions improve upper limb motor scores and strength, but these improvements are often not transferred to performance of activities of daily living. We wish to better understand why. Our systematic review of 74 papers focuses on the targeted stage of recovery, the part of the limb trained, the different modalities used, and the effectiveness of each. The review shows that most of the studies so far focus on training of the proximal arm for chronic stroke patients. About the training modalities, studies typically refer to active, active-assisted and passive interaction. Robot-therapy in active assisted mode was associated with consistent improvements in arm function. More specifically, the use of HRI features stressing active contribution by the patient, such as EMG-modulated forces or a pushing force in combination with spring-damper guidance, may be beneficial. Our work also highlights that current literature frequently lacks information regarding the mechanism about the physical human-robot interaction (HRI). It is often unclear how the different modalities are implemented by different research groups (using different robots and platforms). In order to have a better and more reliable evidence of usefulness for these technologies, it is recommended that the HRI is better described and documented so that work of various teams can be considered in the same group and categories, allowing to infer for more suitable approaches. We propose a framework for categorisation of HRI modalities and features that will allow comparing their therapeutic benefits. PMID:25012864

  15. A Robotic Voice Simulator and the Interactive Training for Hearing-Impaired People

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Hideyuki; Kitani, Mitsuki; Hayashi, Yasumori

    2008-01-01

    A talking and singing robot which adaptively learns the vocalization skill by means of an auditory feedback learning algorithm is being developed. The robot consists of motor-controlled vocal organs such as vocal cords, a vocal tract and a nasal cavity to generate a natural voice imitating a human vocalization. In this study, the robot is applied to the training system of speech articulation for the hearing-impaired, because the robot is able to reproduce their vocalization and to teach them how it is to be improved to generate clear speech. The paper briefly introduces the mechanical construction of the robot and how it autonomously acquires the vocalization skill in the auditory feedback learning by listening to human speech. Then the training system is described, together with the evaluation of the speech training by auditory impaired people. PMID:18389073

  16. Troubleshooting of an Electromechanical System (Westinghouse PLC Controlling a Pneumatic Robot). High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, James D.

    This training module on the troubleshooting of an electromechanical system, The Westinghouse Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) controlling a pneumatic robot, is used for a troubleshooting unit in an electromechanical systems/robotics and automation systems course. In this unit, students locate and repair a defect in a PLC-operated machine. The…

  17. Functional impacts of exoskeleton-based rehabilitation in chronic stroke: multi-joint versus single-joint robotic training.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of disability in the world. The activities of upper limb segments are often compromised following a stroke, impairing most daily tasks. Robotic training is now considered amongst the rehabilitation methods applied to promote functional recovery. However, the implementation of robotic devices remains a major challenge for the bioengineering and clinical community. Latest exoskeletons with multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) may become particularly attractive, because of their low apparent inertia, the multiple actuators generating large torques, and the fact that patients can move the arm in the normal wide workspace. A recent study published in JNER by Milot and colleagues underlines that training with a 6-DOF exoskeleton impacts positively on motor function in patients being in stable phase of recovery after a stroke. Also, multi-joint robotic training was not found to be superior to single-joint robotic training. Although it is often considered that rehabilitation should start from simple movements to complex functional movements as the recovery evolves, this study challenges this widespread notion whose scientific basis has remained uncertain. PMID:24354518

  18. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    Lunar robotic functions include: 1. Transport of crew and payloads on the surface of the moon; 2. Offloading payloads from a lunar lander; 3. Handling the deployment of surface systems; with 4. Human commanding of these functions from inside a lunar vehicle, habitat, or extravehicular (space walk), with Earth-based supervision. The systems that will perform these functions may not look like robots from science fiction. In fact, robotic functions may be automated trucks, cranes and winches. Use of this equipment prior to the crew s arrival or in the potentially long periods without crews on the surface, will require that these systems be computer controlled machines. The public release of NASA's Exploration plans at the 2nd Space Exploration Conference (Houston, December 2006) included a lunar outpost with as many as four unique mobility chassis designs. The sequence of lander offloading tasks involved as many as ten payloads, each with a unique set of geometry, mass and interface requirements. This plan was refined during a second phase study concluded in August 2007. Among the many improvements to the exploration plan were a reduction in the number of unique mobility chassis designs and a reduction in unique payload specifications. As the lunar surface system payloads have matured, so have the mobility and offloading functional requirements. While the architecture work continues, the community can expect to see functional requirements in the areas of surface mobility, surface handling, and human-systems interaction as follows: Surface Mobility 1. Transport crew on the lunar surface, accelerating construction tasks, expanding the crew s sphere of influence for scientific exploration, and providing a rapid return to an ascent module in an emergency. The crew transport can be with an un-pressurized rover, a small pressurized rover, or a larger mobile habitat. 2. Transport Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) equipment and construction payloads. 3. Transport habitats and

  19. Simulation-based training in robot-assisted surgery: current evidence of value and potential trends for the future.

    PubMed

    Hanzly, Michael I; Al-Tartir, Tareq; Raza, Syed Johar; Khan, Atif; Durrani, Mohammad Manan; Fiorica, Thomas; Ginsberg, Phillip; Mohler, James L; Kuvshinoff, Boris; Guru, Khurshid A

    2015-06-01

    Robot-assisted surgery has changed the landscape of surgery. Implementation of robotics into most surgical specialties has left many educators challenged to develop the tools necessary to train and credential surgeons. Advances in robot-assisted surgery have led to the development of simulators and tools to assess skills that transfer to surgical practice. We report on current trends in robot-assisted surgical training, focus on simulation-based education, and anticipate future developments. PMID:26003110

  20. Brain network involved in visual processing of movement stimuli used in upper limb robotic training: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The potential of robot-mediated therapy and virtual reality in neurorehabilitation is becoming of increasing importance. However, there is limited information, using neuroimaging, on the neural networks involved in training with these technologies. This study was intended to detect the brain network involved in the visual processing of movement during robotic training. The main aim was to investigate the existence of a common cerebral network able to assimilate biological (human upper limb) and non-biological (abstract object) movements, hence testing the suitability of the visual non-biological feedback provided by the InMotion2 Robot. Methods A visual functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) task was administered to 22 healthy subjects. The task required observation and retrieval of motor gestures and of the visual feedback used in robotic training. Functional activations of both biological and non-biological movements were examined to identify areas activated in both conditions, along with differential activity in upper limb vs. abstract object trials. Control of response was also tested by administering trials with congruent and incongruent reaching movements. Results The observation of upper limb and abstract object movements elicited similar patterns of activations according to a caudo-rostral pathway for the visual processing of movements (including specific areas of the occipital, temporal, parietal, and frontal lobes). Similarly, overlapping activations were found for the subsequent retrieval of the observed movement. Furthermore, activations of frontal cortical areas were associated with congruent trials more than with the incongruent ones. Conclusions This study identified the neural pathway associated with visual processing of movement stimuli used in upper limb robot-mediated training and investigated the brain’s ability to assimilate abstract object movements with human motor gestures. In both conditions, activations were elicited in

  1. Ankle voluntary movement enhancement following robotic-assisted locomotor training in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI), sensorimotor impairments result in severe limitations to ambulation. To improve walking capacity, physical therapies using robotic-assisted locomotor devices, such as the Lokomat, have been developed. Following locomotor training, an improvement in gait capabilities—characterized by increases in the over-ground walking speed and endurance—is generally observed in patients. To better understand the mechanisms underlying these improvements, we studied the effects of Lokomat training on impaired ankle voluntary movement, known to be an important limiting factor in gait for iSCI patients. Methods Fifteen chronic iSCI subjects performed twelve 1-hour sessions of Lokomat training over the course of a month. The voluntary movement was qualified by measuring active range of motion, maximal velocity peak and trajectory smoothness for the spastic ankle during a movement from full plantar-flexion (PF) to full dorsi-flexion (DF) at the patient’s maximum speed. Dorsi- and plantar-flexor muscle strength was quantified by isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Clinical assessments were also performed using the Timed Up and Go (TUG), the 10-meter walk (10MWT) and the 6-minute walk (6MWT) tests. All evaluations were performed both before and after the training and were compared to a control group of fifteen iSCI patients. Results After the Lokomat training, the active range of motion, the maximal velocity, and the movement smoothness were significantly improved in the voluntary movement. Patients also exhibited an improvement in the MVC for their ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexor muscles. In terms of functional activity, we observed an enhancement in the mobility (TUG) and the over-ground gait velocity (10MWT) with training. Correlation tests indicated a significant relationship between ankle voluntary movement performance and the walking clinical assessments. Conclusions The improvements of the kinematic and kinetic

  2. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  3. Mobile robotics activities in DOE laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lujan, Ron; Harbour, Jerry; Feddema, John; Bailey, Sharon; Barhen, Jacob; Reister, David

    2005-05-01

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV"s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV's). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV's and UAV's. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  4. Robot-Assisted Task-Specific Training in Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Hermano I.; Ladenheim, Barbara; Hippolyte, Christopher; Monterroso, Linda; Mast, Joelle

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to examine the feasibility of applying therapeutic robotics to children and adults with severe to moderate impairment due to cerebral palsy (CP). Pilot results demonstrated significant gains for both groups. These results suggest that robot-mediated therapy may be an effective tool to ameliorate the debilitating effects of CP and…

  5. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    PubMed

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform. PMID:26994774

  6. Effect of Gravity on Robot-Assisted Motor Training After Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Susan S.; Whitall, Jill; Dipietro, Laura; Jones-Lush, Lauren M.; Zhan, Min; Finley, Margaret A.; Wittenberg, George F.; Krebs, Hermano I.; Bever, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the efficacy of 2 distinct 6-week robot-assisted reaching programs compared with an intensive conventional arm exercise program (ICAE) for chronic, stroke-related upper-extremity (UE) impairment. To examine whether the addition of robot-assisted training out of the horizontal plane leads to improved outcomes. Design Randomized controlled trial, single-blinded, with 12-week follow-up. Setting Research setting in a large medical center. Participants Adults (N=62) with chronic, stroke-related arm weakness stratified by impairment severity using baseline UE motor assessments. Interventions Sixty minutes, 3 times a week for 6 weeks of robot-assisted planar reaching (gravity compensated), combined planar with vertical robot-assisted reaching, or intensive conventional arm exercise program. Main Outcome Measure UE Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) mean change from baseline to final training. Results All groups showed modest gains in the FMA from baseline to final with no significant between group differences. Most change occurred in the planar robot group (mean change ± SD, 2.94± 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40 – 4.47). Participants with greater motor impairment (n=41) demonstrated a larger difference in response (mean change ± SD, 2.29±0.72; 95% CI, 0.85–3.72) for planar robot-assisted exercise compared with the intensive conventional arm exercise program (mean change ± SD, 0.43±0.72; 95% CI, −1.00 to 1.86). Conclusions Chronic UE deficits because of stroke are responsive to intensive motor task training. However, training outside the horizontal plane in a gravity present environment using a combination of vertical with planar robots was not superior to training with the planar robot alone. PMID:21849168

  7. Robot-assisted humanized passive rehabilitation training based on online assessment and regulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lizheng; Song, Aiguo; Duan, Suolin; Xu, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Robot-assisted rehabilitation has been developed and proved effective for motion function recovery. Humanization is one of the crucial issues in the designing of robot-based rehabilitation system. However, most of the previous investigations focus on the simplex position control when comes to the control system design of robot-assisted passive training, and pay little attention to the dynamic adjustment according to the patient's performances. This paper presents a novel method to design the passive training system using a developed assessing-and-regulating section to online assess the subject's performances. The motion regulating mechanism is designed to dynamically adjust the training range and motion speed according to the actual performances, which is helpful to improve the humanization of the rehabilitation training. Moreover, position-based impedance control is adopted to achieve compliant trajectory tracking movement. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method presents good performances not only in motion control but also in humanization. PMID:26406061

  8. Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Steve; Doty, Keith L.

    1999-01-01

    "Why Teach Robotics?" (Waddell) suggests that the United States lags behind Europe and Japan in use of robotics in industry and teaching. "Creating a Course in Mobile Robotics" (Doty) outlines course elements of the Intelligent Machines Design Lab. (SK)

  9. Conflicting results of robot-assisted versus usual gait training during postacute rehabilitation of stroke patients: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Taveggia, Giovanni; Borboni, Alberto; Mulé, Chiara; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Robot gait training has the potential to increase the effectiveness of walking therapy. Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. We evaluated the effectiveness of a robot training compared with a usual gait training physiotherapy during a standardized rehabilitation protocol in inpatient participants with poststroke hemiparesis. This was a randomized double-blind clinical trial in a postacute physical and rehabilitation medicine hospital. Twenty-eight patients, 39.3% women (72±6 years), with hemiparesis (<6 months after stroke) receiving a conventional treatment according to the Bobath approach were assigned randomly to an experimental or a control intervention of robot gait training to improve walking (five sessions a week for 5 weeks). Outcome measures included the 6-min walk test, the 10 m walk test, Functional Independence Measure, SF-36 physical functioning and the Tinetti scale. Outcomes were collected at baseline, immediately following the intervention period and 3 months following the end of the intervention. The experimental group showed a significant increase in functional independence and gait speed (10 m walk test) at the end of the treatment and follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. The control group showed a significant increase in the gait endurance (6-min walk test) at the follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. Both treatments were effective in the improvement of gait performances, although the statistical analysis of functional independence showed a significant improvement in the experimental group, indicating possible advantages during generic activities of daily living compared with overground treatment. PMID:26512928

  10. Conflicting results of robot-assisted versus usual gait training during postacute rehabilitation of stroke patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Taveggia, Giovanni; Borboni, Alberto; Mulé, Chiara; Villafañe, Jorge H; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Robot gait training has the potential to increase the effectiveness of walking therapy. Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. We evaluated the effectiveness of a robot training compared with a usual gait training physiotherapy during a standardized rehabilitation protocol in inpatient participants with poststroke hemiparesis. This was a randomized double-blind clinical trial in a postacute physical and rehabilitation medicine hospital. Twenty-eight patients, 39.3% women (72±6 years), with hemiparesis (<6 months after stroke) receiving a conventional treatment according to the Bobath approach were assigned randomly to an experimental or a control intervention of robot gait training to improve walking (five sessions a week for 5 weeks). Outcome measures included the 6-min walk test, the 10 m walk test, Functional Independence Measure, SF-36 physical functioning and the Tinetti scale. Outcomes were collected at baseline, immediately following the intervention period and 3 months following the end of the intervention. The experimental group showed a significant increase in functional independence and gait speed (10 m walk test) at the end of the treatment and follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. The control group showed a significant increase in the gait endurance (6-min walk test) at the follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. Both treatments were effective in the improvement of gait performances, although the statistical analysis of functional independence showed a significant improvement in the experimental group, indicating possible advantages during generic activities of daily living compared with overground treatment. PMID:26512928

  11. Timing of motor cortical stimulation during planar robotic training differentially impacts neuroplasticity in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Crystal L.; Kantak, Shailesh S.; Narayanan, Priya; Wittenberg, George F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective was to determine how stimulation timing applied during reaching influenced neuroplasticity related to practice. Older adult participants were studied to increase relevance for stroke rehabilitation and aging. Methods Sixteen participants completed 3 sessions of a reaching intervention with 480 planar robotic movement trials. Sub-threshold, single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulations (TMS) were delivered during the late reaction time (LRT) period, when muscle activity exceeded a threshold (EMG-triggered), or randomly. Assessments included motor evoked potentials (MEP), amplitude, and direction of supra-threshold TMS-evoked movements and were calculated as change scores from baseline. Results The direction of TMS-evoked movements significantly changed after reaching practice (p < 0.05), but was not significantly different between conditions. Movement amplitude changes were significantly different between conditions (p < 0.05), with significant increases following the LRT and random conditions. MEP for elbow extensors and flexors, and the shoulder muscle that opposed the practice movement were significantly different between conditions with positive changes following LRT, negative changes following EMG-triggered, and no changes following the random condition. Motor performance including movement time and peak velocity significantly improved following the training but did not differ between conditions. Conclusions The responsiveness of the motor cortex to stimulation was affected positively by stimulation during the late motor response period and negatively during the early movement period, when stimulation was combined with robotic reach practice. Significance The sensitivity of the activated motor cortex to additional stimulation is highly dynamic. PMID:25283712

  12. The effect of impedance-controlled robotic gait training on walking ability and quality in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury: an explorative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the use of robotic gait-training devices in walking rehabilitation of incomplete spinal cord injured (iSCI) individuals. These devices provide promising opportunities to increase the intensity of training and reduce physical demands on therapists. Despite these potential benefits, robotic gait-training devices have not yet demonstrated clear advantages over conventional gait-training approaches, in terms of functional outcomes. This might be due to the reduced active participation and step-to-step variability in most robotic gait-training strategies, when compared to manually assisted therapy. Impedance-controlled devices can increase active participation and step-to-step variability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of impedance-controlled robotic gait training on walking ability and quality in chronic iSCI individuals. Methods A group of 10 individuals with chronic iSCI participated in an explorative clinical trial. Participants trained three times a week for eight weeks using an impedance-controlled robotic gait trainer (LOPES: LOwer extremity Powered ExoSkeleton). Primary outcomes were the 10-meter walking test (10MWT), the Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI II), the six-meter walking test (6MWT), the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and the Lower Extremity Motor Scores (LEMS). Secondary outcomes were spatiotemporal and kinematics measures. All participants were tested before, during, and after training and at 8 weeks follow-up. Results Participants experienced significant improvements in walking speed (0.06 m/s, p = 0.008), distance (29 m, p = 0.005), TUG (3.4 s, p = 0.012), LEMS (3.4, p = 0.017) and WISCI after eight weeks of training with LOPES. At the eight-week follow-up, participants retained the improvements measured at the end of the training period. Significant improvements were also found in spatiotemporal measures and hip range of motion. Conclusion Robotic gait training

  13. Autonomous Motion Learning for Intra-Vehicular Activity Space Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yutaka; Yairi, Takehisa; Machida, Kazuo

    Space robots will be needed in the future space missions. So far, many types of space robots have been developed, but in particular, Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) space robots that support human activities should be developed to reduce human-risks in space. In this paper, we study the motion learning method of an IVA space robot with the multi-link mechanism. The advantage point is that this space robot moves using reaction force of the multi-link mechanism and contact forces from the wall as space walking of an astronaut, not to use a propulsion. The control approach is determined based on a reinforcement learning with the actor-critic algorithm. We demonstrate to clear effectiveness of this approach using a 5-link space robot model by simulation. First, we simulate that a space robot learn the motion control including contact phase in two dimensional case. Next, we simulate that a space robot learn the motion control changing base attitude in three dimensional case.

  14. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.78 Training activities. Native American... following: (a) Classroom training. This program activity is any training of the type normally conducted in... classroom training, employment and training services, or supportive services, costs for which the...

  15. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.78 Training activities. Native American... following: (a) Classroom training. This program activity is any training of the type normally conducted in... classroom training, employment and training services, or supportive services, costs for which the...

  16. Movement analysis of upper limb during resistance training using general purpose robot arm "PA10"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hirose, Akinori; Ukai, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Nobuyuki

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we perform movement analysis of an upper limb during resistance training. We selected sanding training, which is one type of resistance training for upper limbs widely performed in occupational therapy. Our final aims in the future are to quantitatively evaluate the therapeutic effect of upper limb motor function during training and to develop a new rehabilitation training support system. For these purposes, first of all we perform movement analysis using a conventional training tool. By measuring upper limb motion during the sanding training we perform feature abstraction. Next we perform movement analysis using the simulated sanding training system. This system is constructed using the general purpose robot arm "PA10". This system enables us to measure the force/torque exerted by subjects and to easily change the load of resistance. The control algorithm is based on impedance control. We found these features of the upper limb motion during the sanding training.

  17. Active Robotics for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dungy, Danton S; Netravali, Nathan A

    2016-01-01

    Robotics and computer-assisted navigation have been developed to increase the accuracy of hip implant placement and improve long-term outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA). These technologies have shown significant improvements in implant positioning when compared to conventional techniques. Currently, 3 robotic systems are cleared for use for THA in the US. The lead author (DSD) describes his preferred technique for using one of these systems, the TSolution One® (Think Surgical, Inc.). PMID:27327918

  18. A Pilot Study of Surgical Training Using a Virtual Robotic Surgery Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Tergas, Ana I.; Sheth, Sangini B.; Green, Isabel C.; Giuntoli, Robert L.; Winder, Abigail D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Our objectives were to compare the utility of learning a suturing task on the virtual reality da Vinci Skills Simulator versus the da Vinci Surgical System dry laboratory platform and to assess user satisfaction among novice robotic surgeons. Methods: Medical trainees were enrolled prospectively; one group trained on the virtual reality simulator, and the other group trained on the da Vinci dry laboratory platform. Trainees received pretesting and post-testing on the dry laboratory platform. Participants then completed an anonymous online user experience and satisfaction survey. Results: We enrolled 20 participants. Mean pretest completion times did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. Training with either platform was associated with a similar decrease in mean time to completion (simulator platform group, 64.9 seconds [P = .04]; dry laboratory platform group, 63.9 seconds [P < .01]). Most participants (58%) preferred the virtual reality platform. The majority found the training “definitely useful” in improving robotic surgical skills (mean, 4.6) and would attend future training sessions (mean, 4.5). Conclusion: Training on the virtual reality robotic simulator or the dry laboratory robotic surgery platform resulted in significant improvements in time to completion and economy of motion for novice robotic surgeons. Although there was a perception that both simulators improved performance, there was a preference for the virtual reality simulator. Benefits unique to the simulator platform include autonomy of use, computerized performance feedback, and ease of setup. These features may facilitate more efficient and sophisticated simulation training above that of the conventional dry laboratory platform, without loss of efficacy. PMID:23925015

  19. Review of control strategies for robotic movement training after neurologic injury

    PubMed Central

    Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using robotic devices to assist in movement training following neurologic injuries such as stroke and spinal cord injury. This paper reviews control strategies for robotic therapy devices. Several categories of strategies have been proposed, including, assistive, challenge-based, haptic simulation, and coaching. The greatest amount of work has been done on developing assistive strategies, and thus the majority of this review summarizes techniques for implementing assistive strategies, including impedance-, counterbalance-, and EMG- based controllers, as well as adaptive controllers that modify control parameters based on ongoing participant performance. Clinical evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of different types of robotic therapy controllers is limited, but there is initial evidence that some control strategies are more effective than others. It is also now apparent there may be mechanisms by which some robotic control approaches might actually decrease the recovery possible with comparable, non-robotic forms of training. In future research, there is a need for head-to-head comparison of control algorithms in randomized, controlled clinical trials, and for improved models of human motor recovery to provide a more rational framework for designing robotic therapy control strategies. PMID:19531254

  20. LOPES II--Design and Evaluation of an Admittance Controlled Gait Training Robot With Shadow-Leg Approach.

    PubMed

    Meuleman, Jos; van Asseldonk, Edwin; van Oort, Gijs; Rietman, Hans; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-03-01

    Robotic gait training is gaining ground in rehabilitation. Room for improvement lies in reducing donning and doffing time, making training more task specific and facilitating active balance control, and by allowing movement in more degrees of freedom. Our goal was to design and evaluate a robot that incorporates these improvements. LOPES II uses an end-effector approach with parallel actuation and a minimum amount of clamps. LOPES II has eight powered degrees of freedom (hip flexion/extension, hip abduction/adduction, knee flexion/extension, pelvis forward/aft and pelvis mediolateral). All other degrees of freedom can be left free and pelvis frontal- and transversal rotation can be constrained. Furthermore arm swing is unhindered. The end-effector approach eliminates the need for exact alignment, which results in a donning time of 10-14 min for first-time training and 5-8 min for recurring training. LOPES II is admittance controlled, which allows for the control over the complete spectrum from low to high impedance. When the powered degrees of freedom are set to minimal impedance, walking in the device resembles free walking, which is an important requisite to allow task-specific training. We demonstrated that LOPES II can provide sufficient support to let severely affected patients walk and that we can provide selective support to impaired aspects of gait of mildly affected patients. PMID:26731771

  1. Robotic-assisted gait training in neurological patients: who may benefit?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Isabella; Meiner, Zeev

    2015-05-01

    Regaining one's ability to walk is of great importance for neurological patients and is a major goal of all rehabilitation programs. Gait training of severely affected patients after the neurological event is technically difficult because of their motor weakness and balance disturbances. An innovative locomotor training that incorporates high repetitions of task-oriented practice by the use of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) was developed to overcome these obstacles. To facilitate the delivery of BWSTT, a motorized robotic driven gait orthosis (robotic-assisted gait training-RAGT) was developed. Two types of robotic gait devices were developed, end-effector and exoskeleton devices. Several randomized controlled trials have been published regarding the usage of RAGT in patients after stroke, spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological diseases. According to these trials, the usage of RAGT in combination with conventional rehabilitation treatment has some additive beneficial effect on the ambulation abilities mainly in sub-acute stroke and sub-acute SCI patients. No difference was found between the two types of robotic gait devices. No sufficient data regarding an optimal protocol of RAGT is available, however a longer duration and a higher intensity of RAGT seem to have more beneficial effect on the final functional ambulation outcomes. Larger controlled studies are still required to determine the optimal timing and protocol design for the maximal efficacy and long-term outcome of RAGT in neurological patients. PMID:25724733

  2. An update of military robotics activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lovece, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Military unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) are beginning to break new ground that will strongly affect the future development of robotics. Current and planned future demonstrations of new UGV technologies are aiding in the maturation of control and navigation technologies critical to remotely controlled, supervised, and autonomous robots. The United States and its allies are spending millions of dollars to develop UGVs for military applications. The first systems will be deployed by the year 2000. The United States is leading the way, and its program is focused on the tactical UGV (TUGV) for the US Army and Marine Corps.

  3. Adaptive training algorithm for robot-assisted upper-arm rehabilitation, applicable to individualised and therapeutic human-robot interaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation robotics is progressing towards developing robots that can be used as advanced tools to augment the role of a therapist. These robots are capable of not only offering more frequent and more accessible therapies but also providing new insights into treatment effectiveness based on their ability to measure interaction parameters. A requirement for having more advanced therapies is to identify how robots can 'adapt’ to each individual’s needs at different stages of recovery. Hence, our research focused on developing an adaptive interface for the GENTLE/A rehabilitation system. The interface was based on a lead-lag performance model utilising the interaction between the human and the robot. The goal of the present study was to test the adaptability of the GENTLE/A system to the performance of the user. Methods Point-to-point movements were executed using the HapticMaster (HM) robotic arm, the main component of the GENTLE/A rehabilitation system. The points were displayed as balls on the screen and some of the points also had a real object, providing a test-bed for the human-robot interaction (HRI) experiment. The HM was operated in various modes to test the adaptability of the GENTLE/A system based on the leading/lagging performance of the user. Thirty-two healthy participants took part in the experiment comprising of a training phase followed by the actual-performance phase. Results The leading or lagging role of the participant could be used successfully to adjust the duration required by that participant to execute point-to-point movements, in various modes of robot operation and under various conditions. The adaptability of the GENTLE/A system was clearly evident from the durations recorded. The regression results showed that the participants required lower execution times with the help from a real object when compared to just a virtual object. The 'reaching away’ movements were longer to execute when compared to the 'returning

  4. Active object programming for military autonomous mobile robot software prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.

    2001-10-01

    While designing mobile robots, we do think that the prototyping phase is really critical. Good and clever choices have to be made. Indeed, we may not easily upgrade such robots, and most of all, when the robot is on its own, any change in both the software and the physical body is going to be very difficult, if not impossible. Thus, a great effort has to be made when prototyping the robot. Furthermore, I think that the kind of programming is very important. If your programming model is not expressive enough, you may experience a great deal of difficulties to add all the features you want, in order to give your robot reactiveness and decision making autonomy. Moreover, designing, and prototyping the on-board software of a reactive robot brings other difficulties. A reactive robot does not include any matter of rapidity. A reactive system is a system able to respond to a huge panel of situations of which it does not have the schedule. In other words, for instance, the robot does not know when a particular situation may occur, and overall, what it would be doing at this time, and what would be its internal state. This kind of robot must be able to take a decision and to act even if they do not have all the contextual information. To do so, we use a computer language named oRis featuring object and active object oriented programming, but also parallel and dynamic code, (the code can be changed during its own execution). This last point has been made possible because oRis is fully interpreted. However oRis may call fully compiled code, but also Prolog and Java code. An oRis program may be distributed on several computers using TCP/IP network connections. The main issue in this paper is to show how active objet oriented programming, as a modern extension of object oriented programming, may help us in designing autonomous mobile robots. Based on a fully parallel software programming, an active object code allows us to give many features to a robot, and to easily solve

  5. Active objects programming for military autonomous mobile robots software prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.

    2001-09-01

    While designing mobile robots, we do think that the prototyping phase is really critical. Good and clever choices have to be made. Indeed, we may not easily upgrade such robots, and most of all, when the robot is on its own, any change in both the software and the physical body is going to be very difficult, if not impossible. Thus, a great effort has to be made when prototyping the robot. Furthermore, I think that the kind of programming is very important. If your programming model is not expressive enough, you may experience a great deal of difficulties to add all the features you want, in order to give your robot reactiveness and decision making autonomy. Moreover, designing, and prototyping the on-board software of a reactive robot brings other difficulties. A reactive robot does not include any matter of rapidity. A reactive system is a system able to respond to a huge pannel of situations of which it does not have the schedule. In other words, for instance, the robot does not know when a particular situation may occur, and overall, what it would be doing at this time, and what would be its internal state. This kind of robot must be able to take a decision and to act even if they do not have all the contextual information. To do so, we use a computer language named oRis featuring object and active object oriented programming, but also parallel and dynamic code, (the code can be changed during its own execution). This last point has been made possible because oRis is fully interpreted. However oRis may call fully compiled code, but also Prolog and Java code. An oRis program may be distributed on several computers using TCP/IP network connections. The main issue in this paper is to show how active objet oriented programming, as a modern extension of object oriented programming, may help us in designing autonomous mobile robots. Based on a fully parallel software programming, an active object code allows us to give many features to a robot, and to easily solve

  6. Pre-Apprenticeship Training Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Paul; Blomberg, Davinia

    2011-01-01

    Pre-apprenticeships are becoming an increasingly important component of the Australian vocational education and training (VET) system. The purpose of this report is to investigate the level of pre-apprenticeship activity occurring in Australia and to examine the characteristics of pre-apprenticeship courses and the students undertaking those…

  7. The reliability of evaluation of hip muscle strength in rehabilitation robot walking training.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuchen; Zhou, Yue; Yu, Lili; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Hu, Chunying

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the intraclass correlation coefficient in obtaining the torque of the hip muscle strength during a robot-assisted rehabilitation treatment. [Subjects] Twenty-four patients (15 males, 9 females) with spinal cord injury participated in the study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to walk during robot-assisted rehabilitation, and the torque of the muscle strength which was measured at hip joint flexion angles of -15, -10, -5, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 degrees. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient of the torque of the hip muscle strength measured by the rehabilitation training robot was excellent. [Conclusion] Our results show that measurement of torque can be used as an objective assessment of treatment with RAT. PMID:26644646

  8. Active constraint control for image-guided robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yen, P-L; Davies, B L

    2010-01-01

    The concept of active constraint control for image-guided robotic surgery is introduced, together with its benefits and a short outline of its history. The clinical use of active constraint control in orthopaedic surgery is discussed, together with the outcomes of a clinical trial for unicondylar knee replacement surgery. The evolution of the robotic design from large costly structures towards simpler, more cost-effective systems is also presented, leading to the design of the Acrobot 'Sculptor' system. A new approach to the achievement of robotic total knee replacement is also presented, in which a high-speed rotary cutter is used to slice through the bone to achieve a speedy resection. The control concept is presented, together with the results of trials on animal bones and a cadaver, showing that it is possible to remove large quantities of bone both quickly and accurately. PMID:20718267

  9. Effort, performance, and motivation: insights from robot-assisted training of human golf putting and rat grip strength.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Jaime E; Gebrekristos, Berkenesh; Perez, Sergi; Rowe, Justin B; Sharp, Kelli; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-06-01

    Robotic devices can modulate success rates and required effort levels during motor training, but it is unclear how this affects performance gains and motivation. Here we present results from training unimpaired humans in a virtual golf-putting task, and training spinal cord injured (SCI) rats in a grip strength task using robotically modulated success rates and effort levels. Robotic assistance in golf practice increased trainees feelings of competence, and, paradoxically, increased their sense effort, even though it had mixed effects on learning. Reducing effort during a grip strength training task led rats with SCI to practice the task more frequently. However, the more frequent practice of these rats did not cause them to exceed the strength gains achieved by rats that exercised less often at higher required effort levels. These results show that increasing success and decreasing effort with robots increases motivation, but has mixed effects on performance gains. PMID:24187278

  10. Self-organization via active exploration in robotic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogmen, H.; Prakash, R. V.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a neural network based robotic system. Unlike traditional robotic systems, our approach focussed on non-stationary problems. We indicate that self-organization capability is necessary for any system to operate successfully in a non-stationary environment. We suggest that self-organization should be based on an active exploration process. We investigated neural architectures having novelty sensitivity, selective attention, reinforcement learning, habit formation, flexible criteria categorization properties and analyzed the resulting behavior (consisting of an intelligent initiation of exploration) by computer simulations. While various computer vision researchers acknowledged recently the importance of active processes (Swain and Stricker, 1991), the proposed approaches within the new framework still suffer from a lack of self-organization (Aloimonos and Bandyopadhyay, 1987; Bajcsy, 1988). A self-organizing, neural network based robot (MAVIN) has been recently proposed (Baloch and Waxman, 1991). This robot has the capability of position, size rotation invariant pattern categorization, recognition and pavlovian conditioning. Our robot does not have initially invariant processing properties. The reason for this is the emphasis we put on active exploration. We maintain the point of view that such invariant properties emerge from an internalization of exploratory sensory-motor activity. Rather than coding the equilibria of such mental capabilities, we are seeking to capture its dynamics to understand on the one hand how the emergence of such invariances is possible and on the other hand the dynamics that lead to these invariances. The second point is crucial for an adaptive robot to acquire new invariances in non-stationary environments, as demonstrated by the inverting glass experiments of Helmholtz. We will introduce Pavlovian conditioning circuits in our future work for the precise objective of achieving the generation, coordination, and internalization

  11. Robot Guided ‘Pen Skill’ Training in Children with Motor Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Kountouriotis, Georgios K.; Barber, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Motor deficits are linked to a range of negative physical, social and academic consequences. Haptic robotic interventions, based on the principles of sensorimotor learning, have been shown previously to help children with motor problems learn new movements. We therefore examined whether the training benefits of a robotic system would generalise to a standardised test of ‘pen-skills’, assessed using objective kinematic measures [via the Clinical Kinematic Assessment Tool, CKAT]. A counterbalanced, cross-over design was used in a group of 51 children (37 male, aged 5–11 years) with manual control difficulties. Improved performance on a novel task using the robotic device could be attributed to the intervention but there was no evidence of generalisation to any of the CKAT tasks. The robotic system appears to have the potential to support motor learning, with the technology affording numerous advantages. However, the training regime may need to target particular manual skills (e.g. letter formation) in order to obtain clinically significant improvements in specific skills such as handwriting. PMID:26967993

  12. Neurophysiology of Robot-Mediated Training and Therapy: A Perspective for Future Use in Clinical Populations

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Duncan L.; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Birbaumer, Niels; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Luft, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of functional movements following injury to the central nervous system (CNS) is multifaceted and is accompanied by processes occurring in the injured and non-injured hemispheres of the brain or above/below a spinal cord lesion. The changes in the CNS are the consequence of functional and structural processes collectively termed neuroplasticity and these may occur spontaneously and/or be induced by movement practice. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying such brain plasticity may take different forms in different types of injury, for example stroke vs. spinal cord injury (SCI). Recovery of movement can be enhanced by intensive, repetitive, variable, and rewarding motor practice. To this end, robots that enable or facilitate repetitive movements have been developed to assist recovery and rehabilitation. Here, we suggest that some elements of robot-mediated training such as assistance and perturbation may have the potential to enhance neuroplasticity. Together the elemental components for developing integrated robot-mediated training protocols may form part of a neurorehabilitation framework alongside those methods already employed by therapists. Robots could thus open up a wider choice of options for delivering movement rehabilitation grounded on the principles underpinning neuroplasticity in the human CNS. PMID:24312073

  13. Corticospinal excitability as a predictor of functional gains at the affected upper limb following robotic training in chronic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Milot, Marie-Hélène; Spencer, Steven J.; Chan, Vicky; Allington, James P.; Klein, Julius; Chou, Cathy; Pearson-Fuhrhop, Kristin; Bobrow, James E.; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Cramer, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Robotic training can help improve function of a paretic limb following a stroke, but individuals respond differently to the training. A predictor of functional gains might improve the ability to select those individuals more likely to benefit from robot based therapy. Studies evaluating predictors of functional improvement after a robotic training are scarce. One study has found that white matter tract integrity predicts functional gains following a robotic training of the hand and wrist. Objective Determine the predictive ability of behavioral and brain measures to improve selection of individuals for robotic training. Methods Twenty subjects with chronic stroke participated in an 8-week course of robotic exoskeletal training for the arm. Before training, a clinical evaluation, fMRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) were each measured as predictors. Final functional gain was defined as change in the Box and Block Test (BBT). Measures significant in bivariate analysis were fed into a multivariate linear regression model. Results Training was associated with an average gain of 6±5 blocks on the BBT (p<0.0001). Bivariate analysis revealed that lower baseline motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude on TMS, and lower laterality M1 index on fMRI each significantly correlated with greater BBT change. In the multivariate linear regression analysis, baseline MEP magnitude was the only measure that remained significant. Conclusion Subjects with lower baseline MEP magnitude benefited the most from robotic training of the affected arm. These subjects might have reserve remaining for the training to boost corticospinal excitability, translating into functional gains. PMID:24642382

  14. Development and training of a learning expert system in an autonomous mobile robot via simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Lyness, E.; DeSaussure, G. . Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research)

    1989-11-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) conducts basic research in the area of intelligent machines. Recently at CESAR a learning expert system was created to operate on board an autonomous robot working at a process control panel. The authors discuss two-computer simulation system used to create, evaluate and train this learning system. The simulation system has a graphics display of the current status of the process being simulated, and the same program which does the simulating also drives the actual control panel. Simulation results were validated on the actual robot. The speed and safety values of using a computerized simulator to train a learning computer, and future uses of the simulation system, are discussed.

  15. Brain Stimulation Paired with Novel Locomotor Training with Robotic Gait Orthosis in Chronic Stroke: a Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Danzl, Megan M.; Chelette, Kenneth C.; Lee, Kara; Lykins, Dana; Sawaki, Lumy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives 1) to investigate the feasibility of combining transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the lower extremity (LE) motor cortex with novel locomotor training to facilitate gait in subjects with chronic stroke and low ambulatory status, and 2) to obtain insight from study subjects and their caregivers to inform future trial design. Methods Double-blind, randomized controlled study with additional qualitative exploratory descriptive design. One-month follow-up.10 subjects with stroke were recruited and randomized to active tDCS or sham tDCS for 12 sessions. Both groups participated in identical locomotor training with a robotic gait orthosis (RGO) following each tDCS session. RGO training protocol was designed to harness cortical neuroplasticity. Data analysis included assessment of functional and participation outcome measures and qualitative thematic analysis. Results Eight subjects completed the study. Both groups demonstrated trends toward improvement, but the active tDCS group showed greater improvement than the sham group. Qualitative analyses indicate beneficial effects of this combined intervention. Conclusions It is feasible to combine tDCS targeting the LE motor cortex with our novel locomotor training. It appears that tDCS has the potential to enhance the effectiveness of gait training in chronic stroke. Insights from participants provide additional guidance in designing future trials. PMID:23949035

  16. Complexity analysis of EMG signals for patients after stroke during robot-aided rehabilitation training using fuzzy approximate entropy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui; Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-yu

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents a novel viewpoint to monitor the motor function improvement during a robot-aided rehabilitation training. Eight chronic poststroke subjects were recruited to attend the 20-session training, and in each session, subjects were asked to perform voluntary movements of elbow flexion and extension together with the robotic system. The robotic system was continuously controlled by the electromyographic (EMG) signal from the affected triceps. Fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn) was applied to investigate the complexity of the EMG segment, and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) during elbow flexion and extension was applied to reflect force generating capacity of the affected muscles. The results showed that the group mean fApEn of EMG signals from triceps and biceps increased significantly after the robot-aided rehabilitation training . There was also significant increase in maximum voluntary flexion and extension torques after the robot-aided rehabilitation training . There was significant correlation between fApEn of agonist and MVC , which implied that the increase of motorneuron number is one of factors that may explain the increase in muscle strength. These findings based on fApEn of the EMG signals expand the existing interpretation of training-induced function improvement in patients after stroke, and help us to understand the neurological change induced by the robot-aided rehabilitation training. PMID:24240006

  17. Robotics in otolaryngology and head and neck surgery: Recommendations for training and credentialing

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Neil D.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Magnuson, J. Scott; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Genden, Eric M.; Ghanem, Tamer AH.; Yaremchuk, Kathleen L.; Goldenberg, David; Miller, Matthew C.; Moore, Eric J.; Morris, Luc GT.; Netterville, James; Weinstein, Gregory S.; Richmon, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Training and credentialing for robotic surgery in otolaryngology - head and neck surgery is currently not standardized, but rather relies heavily on industry guidance. This manuscript represents a comprehensive review of this increasingly important topic and outlines clear recommendations to better standardize the practice. The recommendations provided can be used as a reference by individuals and institutions alike, and are expected to evolve over time. PMID:26950771

  18. Mission Activity Planning for Humans and Robots on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisbin, C.; Shelton, K.; Lincoln, W.; Elfes, A.; Smith, J.H.; Mrozinski, J.; Hua, H.; Adumitroaie, V.; Silberg, R.

    2008-01-01

    A series of studies is conducted to develop a systematic approach to optimizing, both in terms of the distribution and scheduling of tasks, scenarios in which astronauts and robots accomplish a group of activities on the Moon, given an objective function (OF) and specific resources and constraints. An automated planning tool is developed as a key element of this optimization system.

  19. Robotics-Centered Outreach Activities: An Integrated Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-del-Solar, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, universities are making extensive efforts to attract prospective students to the fields of electrical, electronic, and computer engineering. Thus, outreach is becoming increasingly important, and activities with schoolchildren are being extensively carried out as part of this effort. In this context, robotics is a very attractive and…

  20. Design of active orthoses for a robotic gait rehabilitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa-Parra, A. C.; Broche, L.; Delisle-Rodríguez, D.; Sagaró, R.; Bastos, T.; Frizera-Neto, A.

    2015-09-01

    An active orthosis (AO) is a robotic device that assists both human gait and rehabilitation therapy. This work proposes portable AOs, one for the knee joint and another for the ankle joint. Both AOs will be used to complete a robotic system that improves gait rehabilitation. The requirements for actuator selection, the biomechanical considerations during the AO design, the finite element method, and a control approach based on electroencephalographic and surface electromyographic signals are reviewed. This work contributes to the design of AOs for users with foot drop and knee flexion impairment. However, the potential of the proposed AOs to be part of a robotic gait rehabilitation system that improves the quality of life of stroke survivors requires further investigation.

  1. A reinforcement learning trained fuzzy neural network controller for maintaining wireless communication connections in multi-robot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xu; Zhou, Yu

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a decentralized multi-robot motion control strategy to facilitate a multi-robot system, comprised of collaborative mobile robots coordinated through wireless communications, to form and maintain desired wireless communication coverage in a realistic environment with unstable wireless signaling condition. A fuzzy neural network controller is proposed for each robot to maintain the wireless link quality with its neighbors. The controller is trained through reinforcement learning to establish the relationship between the wireless link quality and robot motion decision, via consecutive interactions between the controller and environment. The tuned fuzzy neural network controller is applied to a multi-robot deployment process to form and maintain desired wireless communication coverage. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is verified through simulations under different wireless signal propagation conditions.

  2. Activities and Procedures for Teacher Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    1986-01-01

    Provides an analytical framework for describing various kinds of teacher-training activities and distinguishes between experiential and awareness-raising practices. Presents a taxonomy of awareness-raising practices in terms of activities and procedures. To illustrate the descriptive framework, a sample training activity and training plan for…

  3. Structural Brain Changes after Traditional and Robot-Assisted Multi-Domain Cognitive Training in Community-Dwelling Healthy Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geon Ha; Jeon, Seun; Im, Kiho; Kwon, Hunki; Lee, Byung Hwa; Kim, Ga Young; Jeong, Hana; Han, Noh Eul; Seo, Sang Won; Cho, Hanna; Noh, Young; Park, Sang Eon; Kim, Hojeong; Hwang, Jung Won; Yoon, Cindy W.; Kim, Hee Jin; Ye, Byoung Seok; Chin, Ju Hee; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Suh, Mee Kyung; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Tae; Choi, Mun-Taek; Kim, Mun Sang; Heilman, Kenneth M; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Na, Duk L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if multi-domain cognitive training, especially robot-assisted training, alters cortical thickness in the brains of elderly participants. A controlled trial was conducted with 85 volunteers without cognitive impairment who were 60 years old or older. Participants were first randomized into two groups. One group consisted of 48 participants who would receive cognitive training and 37 who would not receive training. The cognitive training group was randomly divided into two groups, 24 who received traditional cognitive training and 24 who received robot-assisted cognitive training. The training for both groups consisted of daily 90-min-session, five days a week for a total of 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the changes in cortical thickness. When compared to the control group, both groups who underwent cognitive training demonstrated attenuation of age related cortical thinning in the frontotemporal association cortices. When the robot and the traditional interventions were directly compared, the robot group showed less cortical thinning in the anterior cingulate cortices. Our results suggest that cognitive training can mitigate age-associated structural brain changes in the elderly. Trial Registration ClnicalTrials.gov NCT01596205 PMID:25898367

  4. Training toddlers seated on mobile robots to drive indoors amidst obstacles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Ragonesi, Christina; Galloway, James C; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2011-06-01

    Mobility is a causal factor in development. Children with mobility impairments may rely upon power mobility for independence and thus require advanced driving skills to function independently. Our previous studies show that while infants can learn to drive directly to a goal using conventional joysticks in several months of training, they are unable in this timeframe to acquire the advanced skill to avoid obstacles while driving. Without adequate driving training, children are unable to explore the environment safely, the consequences of which may in turn increase their risk for developmental delay. The goal of this research therefore is to train children seated on mobile robots to purposefully and safely drive indoors. In this paper, we present results where ten typically-developing toddlers are trained to drive a robot within an obstacle course. We also report a case study with a toddler with spina-bifida who cannot independently walk. Using algorithms based on artificial potential fields to avoid obstacles, we create force field on the joystick that trains the children to navigate while avoiding obstacles. In this "assist-as-needed" approach, if the child steers the joystick outside a force tunnel centered on the desired direction, the driver experiences a bias force on the hand. Our results suggest that the use of a force-feedback joystick may yield faster learning than the use of a conventional joystick. PMID:21324787

  5. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance.

  6. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance. PMID:26133875

  7. Robot-assisted training of the kinesthetic sense: enhancing proprioception after stroke.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Dalia; Zenzeri, Jacopo; Casadio, Maura; Masia, Lorenzo; Riva, Assunta; Morasso, Pietro; Squeri, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Proprioception has a crucial role in promoting or hindering motor learning. In particular, an intact position sense strongly correlates with the chances of recovery after stroke. A great majority of neurological patients present both motor dysfunctions and impairments in kinesthesia, but traditional robot and virtual reality training techniques focus either in recovering motor functions or in assessing proprioceptive deficits. An open challenge is to implement effective and reliable tests and training protocols for proprioception that go beyond the mere position sense evaluation and exploit the intrinsic bidirectionality of the kinesthetic sense, which refers to both sense of position and sense of movement. Modulated haptic interaction has a leading role in promoting sensorimotor integration, and it is a natural way to enhance volitional effort. Therefore, we designed a preliminary clinical study to test a new proprioception-based motor training technique for augmenting kinesthetic awareness via haptic feedback. The feedback was provided by a robotic manipulandum and the test involved seven chronic hemiparetic subjects over 3 weeks. The protocol included evaluation sessions that consisted of a psychometric estimate of the subject's kinesthetic sensation, and training sessions, in which the subject executed planar reaching movements in the absence of vision and under a minimally assistive haptic guidance made by sequences of graded force pulses. The bidirectional haptic interaction between the subject and the robot was optimally adapted to each participant in order to achieve a uniform task difficulty over the workspace. All the subjects consistently improved in the perceptual scores as a consequence of training. Moreover, they could minimize the level of haptic guidance in time. Results suggest that the proposed method is effective in enhancing kinesthetic acuity, but the level of impairment may affect the ability of subjects to retain their improvement in time

  8. Robot-Assisted Training of the Kinesthetic Sense: Enhancing Proprioception after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    De Santis, Dalia; Zenzeri, Jacopo; Casadio, Maura; Masia, Lorenzo; Riva, Assunta; Morasso, Pietro; Squeri, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Proprioception has a crucial role in promoting or hindering motor learning. In particular, an intact position sense strongly correlates with the chances of recovery after stroke. A great majority of neurological patients present both motor dysfunctions and impairments in kinesthesia, but traditional robot and virtual reality training techniques focus either in recovering motor functions or in assessing proprioceptive deficits. An open challenge is to implement effective and reliable tests and training protocols for proprioception that go beyond the mere position sense evaluation and exploit the intrinsic bidirectionality of the kinesthetic sense, which refers to both sense of position and sense of movement. Modulated haptic interaction has a leading role in promoting sensorimotor integration, and it is a natural way to enhance volitional effort. Therefore, we designed a preliminary clinical study to test a new proprioception-based motor training technique for augmenting kinesthetic awareness via haptic feedback. The feedback was provided by a robotic manipulandum and the test involved seven chronic hemiparetic subjects over 3 weeks. The protocol included evaluation sessions that consisted of a psychometric estimate of the subject’s kinesthetic sensation, and training sessions, in which the subject executed planar reaching movements in the absence of vision and under a minimally assistive haptic guidance made by sequences of graded force pulses. The bidirectional haptic interaction between the subject and the robot was optimally adapted to each participant in order to achieve a uniform task difficulty over the workspace. All the subjects consistently improved in the perceptual scores as a consequence of training. Moreover, they could minimize the level of haptic guidance in time. Results suggest that the proposed method is effective in enhancing kinesthetic acuity, but the level of impairment may affect the ability of subjects to retain their improvement in time

  9. A Preliminary Study Exploring the Use of Fictional Narrative in Robotics Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Douglas; Ma, Yuxin; Prejean, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Educational robotics activities are gaining in popularity. Though some research data suggest that educational robotics can be an effective approach in teaching mathematics, science, and engineering, research is needed to generate the best practices and strategies for designing these learning environments. Existing robotics activities typically do…

  10. Assessment of robotic patient simulators for training in manual physical therapy examination techniques.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shun; Okamoto, Shogo; Isogai, Kaoru; Akiyama, Yasuhiro; Yanagihara, Naomi; Yamada, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Robots that simulate patients suffering from joint resistance caused by biomechanical and neural impairments are used to aid the training of physical therapists in manual examination techniques. However, there are few methods for assessing such robots. This article proposes two types of assessment measures based on typical judgments of clinicians. One of the measures involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different severities of a specified disease. Experienced clinicians were requested to rate the simulated symptoms in terms of severity, and the consistency of their ratings was used as a performance measure. The other measure involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different types of symptoms. In this case, the clinicians were requested to classify the simulated resistances in terms of symptom type, and the average ratios of their answers were used as performance measures. For both types of assessment measures, a higher index implied higher agreement among the experienced clinicians that subjectively assessed the symptoms based on typical symptom features. We applied these two assessment methods to a patient knee robot and achieved positive appraisals. The assessment measures have potential for use in comparing several patient simulators for training physical therapists, rather than as absolute indices for developing a standard. PMID:25923719

  11. Assessment of Robotic Patient Simulators for Training in Manual Physical Therapy Examination Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shun; Okamoto, Shogo; Isogai, Kaoru; Akiyama, Yasuhiro; Yanagihara, Naomi; Yamada, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Robots that simulate patients suffering from joint resistance caused by biomechanical and neural impairments are used to aid the training of physical therapists in manual examination techniques. However, there are few methods for assessing such robots. This article proposes two types of assessment measures based on typical judgments of clinicians. One of the measures involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different severities of a specified disease. Experienced clinicians were requested to rate the simulated symptoms in terms of severity, and the consistency of their ratings was used as a performance measure. The other measure involves the evaluation of how well the simulator presents different types of symptoms. In this case, the clinicians were requested to classify the simulated resistances in terms of symptom type, and the average ratios of their answers were used as performance measures. For both types of assessment measures, a higher index implied higher agreement among the experienced clinicians that subjectively assessed the symptoms based on typical symptom features. We applied these two assessment methods to a patient knee robot and achieved positive appraisals. The assessment measures have potential for use in comparing several patient simulators for training physical therapists, rather than as absolute indices for developing a standard. PMID:25923719

  12. Thermal tracking in mobile robots for leak inspection activities.

    PubMed

    Ibarguren, Aitor; Molina, Jorge; Susperregi, Loreto; Maurtua, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance tasks are crucial for all kind of industries, especially in extensive industrial plants, like solar thermal power plants. The incorporation of robots is a key issue for automating inspection activities, as it will allow a constant and regular control over the whole plant. This paper presents an autonomous robotic system to perform pipeline inspection for early detection and prevention of leakages in thermal power plants, based on the work developed within the MAINBOT (http://www.mainbot.eu) European project. Based on the information provided by a thermographic camera, the system is able to detect leakages in the collectors and pipelines. Beside the leakage detection algorithms, the system includes a particle filter-based tracking algorithm to keep the target in the field of view of the camera and to avoid the irregularities of the terrain while the robot patrols the plant. The information provided by the particle filter is further used to command a robot arm, which handles the camera and ensures that the target is always within the image. The obtained results show the suitability of the proposed approach, adding a tracking algorithm to improve the performance of the leakage detection system. PMID:24113684

  13. Thermal Tracking in Mobile Robots for Leak Inspection Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ibarguren, Aitor; Molina, Jorge; Susperregi, Loreto; Maurtua, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance tasks are crucial for all kind of industries, especially in extensive industrial plants, like solar thermal power plants. The incorporation of robots is a key issue for automating inspection activities, as it will allow a constant and regular control over the whole plant. This paper presents an autonomous robotic system to perform pipeline inspection for early detection and prevention of leakages in thermal power plants, based on the work developed within the MAINBOT (http://www.mainbot.eu) European project. Based on the information provided by a thermographic camera, the system is able to detect leakages in the collectors and pipelines. Beside the leakage detection algorithms, the system includes a particle filter-based tracking algorithm to keep the target in the field of view of the camera and to avoid the irregularities of the terrain while the robot patrols the plant. The information provided by the particle filter is further used to command a robot arm, which handles the camera and ensures that the target is always within the image. The obtained results show the suitability of the proposed approach, adding a tracking algorithm to improve the performance of the leakage detection system. PMID:24113684

  14. A Combined Robotic and Cognitive Training for Locomotor Rehabilitation: Evidences of Cerebral Functional Reorganization in Two Chronic Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Cauda, Franco; D’Agata, Federico; Duca, Sergio; Zettin, Marina; Virgilio, Roberta; Nascimbeni, Alberto; Belforte, Guido; Eula, Gabriella; Gastaldi, Laura; Appendino, Silvia; Geminiani, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that automated locomotor training can improve walking capabilities in spinal cord-injured subjects but its effectiveness on brain damaged patients has not been well established. A possible explanation of the discordant results on the efficacy of robotic training in patients with cerebral lesions could be that these patients, besides stimulation of physiological motor patterns through passive leg movements, also need to train the cognitive aspects of motor control. Indeed, another way to stimulate cerebral motor areas in paretic patients is to use the cognitive function of motor imagery. A promising possibility is thus to combine sensorimotor training with the use of motor imagery. The aim of this paper is to assess changes in brain activations after a combined sensorimotor and cognitive training for gait rehabilitation. The protocol consisted of the integrated use of a robotic gait orthosis prototype with locomotor imagery tasks. Assessment was conducted on two patients with chronic traumatic brain injury and major gait impairments, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Physiatric functional scales were used to assess clinical outcomes. Results showed greater activation post-training in the sensorimotor and supplementary motor cortices, as well as enhanced functional connectivity within the motor network. Improvements in balance and, to a lesser extent, in gait outcomes were also found. PMID:22275890

  15. Should Body Weight–Supported Treadmill Training and Robotic-Assistive Steppers for Locomotor Training Trot Back to the Starting Gate?

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Duncan, Pamela W.

    2014-01-01

    Body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and robotic-assisted step training (RAST) have not, so far, led to better outcomes than a comparable dose of progressive over-ground training (OGT) for disabled persons with stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, or cerebral palsy. The conceptual bases for these promising rehabilitation interventions had once seemed quite plausible, but the results of well-designed, randomized clinical trials have been disappointing. The authors reassess the underpinning concepts for BWSTT and RAST, which were derived from mammalian studies of treadmill-induced hind-limb stepping associated with central pattern generation after low thoracic spinal cord transection, as well as human studies of the triple crown icons of task-oriented locomotor training, massed practice, and activity-induced neuroplasticity. The authors retrospectively consider where theory and practice may have fallen short in the pilot studies that aimed to produce thoroughbred interventions. Based on these shortcomings, the authors move forward with recommendations for the future development of workhorse interventions for walking. In the absence of evidence for physical therapists to employ these strategies, however, BWSTT and RAST should not be provided routinely to disabled, vulnerable persons in place of OGT outside of a scientifically conducted efficacy trial. PMID:22412172

  16. Influence of virtual reality soccer game on walking performance in robotic assisted gait training for children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Virtual reality (VR) offers powerful therapy options within a functional, purposeful and motivating context. Several studies have shown that patients' motivation plays a crucial role in determining therapy outcome. However, few studies have demonstrated the potential of VR in pediatric rehabilitation. Therefore, we developed a VR-based soccer scenario, which provided interactive elements to engage patients during robotic assisted treadmill training (RAGT). The aim of this study was to compare the immediate effect of different supportive conditions (VR versus non-VR conditions) on motor output in patients and healthy control children during training with the driven gait orthosis Lokomat®. Methods A total of 18 children (ten patients with different neurological gait disorders, eight healthy controls) took part in this study. They were instructed to walk on the Lokomat in four different, randomly-presented conditions: (1) walk normally without supporting assistance, (2) with therapists' instructions to promote active participation, (3) with VR as a motivating tool to walk actively and (4) with the VR tool combined with therapists' instructions. The Lokomat gait orthosis is equipped with sensors at hip and knee joint to measure man-machine interaction forces. Additionally, subjects' acceptance of the RAGT with VR was assessed using a questionnaire. Results The mixed ANOVA revealed significant main effects for the factor CONDITIONS (p < 0.001) and a significant interaction CONDITIONS × GROUP (p = 0.01). Tests of between-subjects effects showed no significant main effect for the GROUP (p = 0.592). Active participation in patients and control children increased significantly when supported and motivated either by therapists' instructions or by a VR scenario compared with the baseline measurement "normal walking" (p < 0.001). Conclusions The VR scenario used here induces an immediate effect on motor output to a similar degree as the effect resulting from

  17. Adaptive training of cortical feature maps for a robot sensorimotor controller.

    PubMed

    Adams, Samantha V; Wennekers, Thomas; Denham, Sue; Culverhouse, Phil F

    2013-08-01

    This work investigates self-organising cortical feature maps (SOFMs) based upon the Kohonen Self-Organising Map (SOM) but implemented with spiking neural networks. In future work, the feature maps are intended as the basis for a sensorimotor controller for an autonomous humanoid robot. Traditional SOM methods require some modifications to be useful for autonomous robotic applications. Ideally the map training process should be self-regulating and not require predefined training files or the usual SOM parameter reduction schedules. It would also be desirable if the organised map had some flexibility to accommodate new information whilst preserving previous learnt patterns. Here methods are described which have been used to develop a cortical motor map training system which goes some way towards addressing these issues. The work is presented under the general term 'Adaptive Plasticity' and the main contribution is the development of a 'plasticity resource' (PR) which is modelled as a global parameter which expresses the rate of map development and is related directly to learning on the afferent (input) connections. The PR is used to control map training in place of a traditional learning rate parameter. In conjunction with the PR, random generation of inputs from a set of exemplar patterns is used rather than predefined datasets and enables maps to be trained without deciding in advance how much data is required. An added benefit of the PR is that, unlike a traditional learning rate, it can increase as well as decrease in response to the demands of the input and so allows the map to accommodate new information when the inputs are changed during training. PMID:23545539

  18. Improved single pellet grasping using automated ad libitum full-time training robot.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacnicte; Hurd, Caitlin; Boychuk, Carolyn E; Kowalczewski, Jan; Bennett, David J; Whishaw, Ian Q; Fouad, Karim

    2015-03-15

    The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task commonly used to evaluate reaching and grasp kinematics and recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of CNS injuries and diseases. To train rats in the SPG task, the animals are usually food restricted then placed in an SPG task enclosure and presented food pellets on a platform located beyond a slit located at the front of the task enclosure for 10-30 min, normally every weekday for several weeks. When the SPG task is applied in studies involving various experimental groups, training quickly becomes labor intensive, and can yield results with significant day-to-day variability. Furthermore, training is frequently done during the animals' light-cycle, which for nocturnal rodents such as mice and rats could affect performance. Here we describe an automated pellet presentation (APP) robotic system to train and test rats in the SPG task that reduces some of the procedural weaknesses of manual training. We found that APP trained rats performed significantly more trials per 24 h period, and had higher success rates with less daily and weekly variability than manually trained rats. Moreover, the results show that success rates are positively correlated with the number of dark-cycle trials, suggesting that dark-cycle training has a positive effect on success rates. These results demonstrate that automated training is an effective method for evaluating and training skilled reaching performance of rats, opening up the possibility for new approaches to investigating the role of motor systems in enabling skilled forelimb use and new approaches to investigating rehabilitation following CNS injury. PMID:25523027

  19. Embodied Computation: An Active-Learning Approach to Mobile Robotics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riek, L. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a newly designed upper-level undergraduate and graduate course, Autonomous Mobile Robots. The course employs active, cooperative, problem-based learning and is grounded in the fundamental computational problems in mobile robotics defined by Dudek and Jenkin. Students receive a broad survey of robotics through lectures, weekly…

  20. Interactive Video Training and Development Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troy State Univ., AL.

    The Interactive Video Training and Development Activity of Troy State University (Troy, Alabama) is described in this report. The project has trained more than 30 people in the production of interactive video programs since its inception in 1983. Since 1985, training programs have been offered twice a year to individuals within and outside the…

  1. Industrial robots and robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Kafrissen, S.; Stephens, M.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the study of robotics. It provides information of hardware, software, applications and economics. Eleven chapters examine the following: Minicomputers, Microcomputers, and Microprocessors; The Servo-Control System; The Activators; Robot Vision Systems; and Robot Workcell Environments. Twelve appendices supplement the data.

  2. Muscular activity when walking in a non-anthropomorphic wearable robot.

    PubMed

    Tagliamonte, N L; Accoto, D; Sergi, F; Sudano, A; Formica, D; Guglielmelli, E

    2014-01-01

    Wearable robots should be designed not to alter human physiological motion. Perturbations introduced by a robot can be quantified by measuring EMG activity. This paper presents tests on the LENAR, an intrinsically back-drivable non-anthropomorphic lower limb wearable robot designed to provide hip and knee flexion/extension assistance. In previous works the robot was demonstrated to exhibit low mechanical impedance and to introduce minor alterations to human kinematic patterns during walking. In this paper muscular activity is assessed, demonstrating small alterations in the EMG patterns during the interaction with the robot, in both unpowered and assistive mode. PMID:25570640

  3. Effects of robot training on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Gu, Rui; Zhou, Yue; Hu, Chunying

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and robot-assisted rehabilitation (RAT) on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury with respect to defecation time and defecation drug dose (enema). [Subjects] Twenty-four patients with spinal cord injury participated in the study. All subjects had an incomplete injury ranging from level T8 to L2. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into BWSTT and RAT groups. Walking training was provided to both groups for 20 minutes, four times a week, for one month. The defecation time and enema dose were measured before and after the experiment. [Results] The RAT group showed significant shortening of defecation time and decrease of enema dose. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that significantly better improvement in bowel function can be achieved with RAT. PMID:26157223

  4. A pilot study of post-total knee replacement gait rehabilitation using lower limbs robot-assisted training system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Wu, Tao; Xu, Zhisheng; Gu, Xudong

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the application value of the lower limbs robot-assisted training system for post-total knee replacement (TKR) gait rehabilitation. A total of 60 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were equally randomized into the traditional and robot-assisted rehabilitation training groups within 1 week after TKR. All patients received 2-week training. Scores of hospital for special surgery (HSS), knee kinesthesia grades, knee proprioception grades, functional ambulation (FAC) scores, Berg balance scores, 10-m sitting-standing time, and 6-min walking distances were compared between the groups. The HSS score, Berg score, 10-m sitting-standing time, and 6-min walking distance of the robot-assisted training group were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05). Its knee kinesthesia grade, knee proprioception grade, and FAC score were better than the control group but not significantly (P > 0.05). Lower limbs robot-assisted rehabilitation training improves post-TKR patients' knee proprioception and stability more effectively compared with the traditional method. It improves patients' gait and symptoms, increases their walking speed, and prolongs their walking distances, which benefit their return to family and society. PMID:23412304

  5. Modulation of event-related desynchronization in robot-assisted hand performance: brain oscillatory changes in active, passive and imagined movements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robot-assisted therapy in patients with neurological disease is an attempt to improve function in a moderate to severe hemiparetic arm. A better understanding of cortical modifications after robot-assisted training could aid in refining rehabilitation therapy protocols for stroke patients. Modifications of cortical activity in healthy subjects were evaluated during voluntary active movement, passive robot-assisted motor movement, and motor imagery tasks performed under unimanual and bimanual protocols. Methods Twenty-one channel electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded with a video EEG system in 8 subjects. The subjects performed robot-assisted tasks using the Bi-Manu Track robot-assisted arm trainer. The motor paradigm was executed during one-day experimental sessions under eleven unimanual and bimanual protocols of active, passive and imaged movements. The event-related-synchronization/desynchronization (ERS/ERD) approach to the EEG data was applied to investigate where movement-related decreases in alpha and beta power were localized. Results Voluntary active unilateral hand movement was observed to significantly activate the contralateral side; however, bilateral activation was noted in all subjects on both the unilateral and bilateral active tasks, as well as desynchronization of alpha and beta brain oscillations during the passive robot-assisted motor tasks. During active-passive movement when the right hand drove the left one, there was predominant activation in the contralateral side. Conversely, when the left hand drove the right one, activation was bilateral, especially in the alpha range. Finally, significant contralateral EEG desynchronization was observed during the unilateral task and bilateral ERD during the bimanual task. Conclusions This study suggests new perspectives for the assessment of patients with neurological disease. The findings may be relevant for defining a baseline for future studies investigating the neural correlates of

  6. Effectiveness of Postgraduate Training for Learning Extraperitoneal Access for Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Achim, Mary; Munsell, Mark; Matin, Surena

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To determine the effectiveness of postgraduate training for learning extraperitoneal robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (EP-RARP) and to identify any unmet training needs. Materials and Methods The training resources used were live surgery observations, digital video disc instruction, postgraduate courses, and literature review. Modifications to the transperitoneal (TP) setup in equipment, patient positioning, port placement, and access technique were identified. A surgeon who had previous experience with 898 TP robot-assisted radical prostatectomies (TP-RARPs) performed EP-RARP in 30 patients. We evaluated setup results, emphasizing access-related difficulties, and compared the EP cohort with a nonrandomized, concurrent TP cohort of 62 patients for short-term outcomes. Results The median setup time for EP was 26 minutes (range 15–65 min) for EP compared with 14 to 17 minutes for the comparable TP setup and dropping the bladder. During EP setup and dissection, peritoneal entry occurred in 37%, incorrect port spacing in 10%, epigastric vessel injury in 10%, and other minor pitfalls in 10%. No significant differences were found between EP and TP in postsetup operative times, hospital stay, complications, surgical margin status with organ-confined disease, or lymph node dissection yield. EP had significantly higher estimated blood loss (300 vs 200 mL, P=0.001) and more symptomatic lymphoceles when extended pelvic lymph node dissection was performed (3/16 vs 0/47, P=0.001). Conclusions Using postgraduate education resources, an experienced TP-RARP surgeon successfully transitioned to EP-RARP, achieving the major objectives of safety and equivalent outcomes. We identified several minor nuances in the setup that need further refinement in future education models. PMID:21745117

  7. Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours for Continuum Robot Detection using 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional ultrasound is a promising imaging modality for minimally invasive robotic surgery. As the robots are typically metallic, they interact strongly with the sound waves in ways that are not modeled by the ultrasound system’s signal processing algorithms. Consequently, they produce substantial imaging artifacts that can make image guidance difficult, even for experienced surgeons. This paper introduces a new approach for detecting curved continuum robots in 3D ultrasound images. The proposed approach combines geodesic active contours with a speed function that is based on enhancing the “tubularity” of the continuum robot. In particular, it takes advantage of the known robot diameter along its length. It also takes advantage of the fact that the robot surface facing the ultrasound probe provides the most accurate image. This method, termed Tubular Enhanced Geodesic Active Contours (TEGAC), is demonstrated through ex vivo intracardiac experiments to offer superior performance compared to conventional active contours. PMID:24231880

  8. 20 CFR 632.78 - Training activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... information that occupational demand exists for planned training. The basic types of training activities... the technical skills and information required to perform a specific job or group of jobs. It may be... employer, and which occurs while the participant is engaged in productive work which provides knowledge...

  9. Clinical Characteristics of Proper Robot-Assisted Gait Training Group in Non-ambulatory Subacute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Hye Jin; Hwang, Seung Won; Pyo, Hannah; Yang, Sung Phil; Lim, Mun-Hee; Park, Gyu Lee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the clinical characteristics of proper robot-assisted gait training group using exoskeletal locomotor devices in non-ambulatory subacute stroke patients. Methods A total of 38 stroke patients were enrolled in a 4-week robotic training protocol (2 sessions/day, 5 times/week). All subjects were evaluated for their general characteristics, Functional Ambulatory Classification (FAC), Fugl-Meyer Scale (FMS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Modified Rankin Scale (MRS), Modified Barthel Index (MBI), and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) at 0, 2, and 4 weeks. Statistical analysis were performed to determine significant clinical characteristics for improvement of gait function after robot-assisted gait training. Results Paired t-test showed that all functional parameters except MMSE were improved significantly (p<0.05). The duration of disease and baseline BBS score were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with FAC score in multiple regression models. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that a baseline BBS score of '9' was a cutoff value (AUC, 0.966; sensitivity, 91%–100%; specificity, 85%). By repeated-measures ANOVA, the differences in improved walking ability according to time were significant between group of patients who had baseline BBS score of '9' and those who did not have baseline BBS score of '9' Conclusion Our results showed that a baseline BBS score above '9' and a short duration of disease were highly correlated with improved walking ability after robot-assisted gait training. Therefore, baseline BBS and duration of disease should be considered clinically for gaining walking ability in robot-assisted training group. PMID:27152266

  10. Effect of Robotic-Assisted Gait Training in Patients With Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Ji Yong; Park, Han Kyul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of robotic-assisted gait training (RAGT) compared to conventional overground training. Methods Sixty patients with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial by comparing RAGT to conventional overground training. The RAGT group received RAGT three sessions per week at duration of 40 minutes with regular physiotherapy in 4 weeks. The conventional group underwent regular physiotherapy twice a day, 5 times a week. Main outcomes were lower extremity motor score of American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (LEMS), ambulatory motor index (AMI), Spinal Cord Independence Measure III mobility section (SCIM3-M), and walking index for spinal cord injury version II (WISCI-II) scale. Results At the end of rehabilitation, both groups showed significant improvement in LEMS, AMI, SCIM3-M, and WISCI-II. Based on WISCI-II, statistically significant improvement was observed in the RAGT group. For the remaining variables, no difference was found. Conclusion RAGT combined with conventional physiotherapy could yield more improvement in ambulatory function than conventional therapy alone. RAGT should be considered as one additional tool to provide neuromuscular reeducation in patient with incomplete SCI. PMID:25566469

  11. Robotics in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, D. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technologies play a very important role in our lives. It is hard to imagine how people can get along without personal computers, and companies - without powerful computer centers. Nowadays, many devices make modern medicine more effective. Medicine is developing constantly, so introduction of robots in this sector is a very promising activity. Advances in technology have influenced medicine greatly. Robotic surgery is now actively developing worldwide. Scientists have been carrying out research and practical attempts to create robotic surgeons for more than 20 years, since the mid-80s of the last century. Robotic assistants play an important role in modern medicine. This industry is new enough and is at the early stage of development; despite this, some developments already have worldwide application; they function successfully and bring invaluable help to employees of medical institutions. Today, doctors can perform operations that seemed impossible a few years ago. Such progress in medicine is due to many factors. First, modern operating rooms are equipped with up-to-date equipment, allowing doctors to make operations more accurately and with less risk to the patient. Second, technology has enabled to improve the quality of doctors' training. Various types of robots exist now: assistants, military robots, space, household and medical, of course. Further, we should make a detailed analysis of existing types of robots and their application. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the most popular types of robots used in medicine.

  12. Views of physiatrists and physical therapists on the use of gait-training robots for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Gu; Chun, Min Ho; Jang, Min Cheol; Kim, Won; Do, Kyung Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Gait-training robots have been developed for stroke patients with gait disturbance. It is important to survey the views of physiatrists and physical therapists on the characteristics of these devices during their development. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 100 physiatrists and 100 physical therapists from 38 hospitals participated in our questionnaire survey. [Results] The most common answers about the merits of gait-training robots concern improving the treatment effects (28.5%), followed by standardizing treatment (19%), motivating patients about treatment (17%), and improving patients' self-esteem (14%). The subacute period (1-3 months post-stroke onset) was most often chosen as the ideal period (47.3%) for the use of these devices, and a functional ambulation classification of 0-2 was the most selected response for the optimal patient status (27%). The preferred model was the treadmill type (47.5%) over the overground walking type (40%). The most favored commercial price was $50,000-$100,000 (38.3%). The most selected optimal duration for robot-assisted gait therapy was 30-45 min (47%), followed by 15-30 min (29%), 45-60 min (18%), ≥ 60 min (5%), and < 15 min (1%). [Conclusion] Our study findings could guide the future designs of more effective gait-training robots for stroke patients. PMID:26957758

  13. Views of physiatrists and physical therapists on the use of gait-training robots for stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang Gu; Chun, Min Ho; Chang, Min Cheol; Kim, Won; Hee Do, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Gait-training robots have been developed for stroke patients with gait disturbance. It is important to survey the views of physiatrists and physical therapists on the characteristics of these devices during their development. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 100 physiatrists and 100 physical therapists from 38 hospitals participated in our questionnaire survey. [Results] The most common answers about the merits of gait-training robots concern improving the treatment effects (28.5%), followed by standardizing treatment (19%), motivating patients about treatment (17%), and improving patients’ self-esteem (14%). The subacute period (1–3 months post-stroke onset) was most often chosen as the ideal period (47.3%) for the use of these devices, and a functional ambulation classification of 0–2 was the most selected response for the optimal patient status (27%). The preferred model was the treadmill type (47.5%) over the overground walking type (40%). The most favored commercial price was $50,000–$100,000 (38.3%). The most selected optimal duration for robot-assisted gait therapy was 30–45 min (47%), followed by 15–30 min (29%), 45–60 min (18%), ≥ 60 min (5%), and < 15 min (1%). [Conclusion] Our study findings could guide the future designs of more effective gait-training robots for stroke patients. PMID:26957758

  14. Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's upper atmosphere is an extreme environment: dry, cold, and irradiated. It is unknown whether our aerobiosphere is limited to the transport of life, or there exist organisms that grow and reproduce while airborne (aerophiles); the microenvironments of suspended particles may harbor life at otherwise uninhabited altitudes[2]. The existence of aerophiles would significantly expand the range of planets considered candidates for life by, for example, including the cooler clouds of a hot Venus-like planet. The X project is an effort to engineer a robotic exploration and biosampling payload for a comprehensive survey of Earth's aerobiology. While many one-shot samples have been retrieved from above 15 km, their results are primarily qualitative; variations in method confound comparisons, leaving such major gaps in our knowledge of aerobiology as quantification of populations at different strata and relative species counts[1]. These challenges and X's preliminary solutions are explicated below. X's primary balloon payload is undergoing a series of calibrations before beginning flights in Spring 2012. A suborbital launch is currently planned for Summer 2012. A series of ground samples taken in Winter 2011 is being used to establish baseline counts and identify likely background contaminants.

  15. User-centric design of a personal assistance robot (FRASIER) for active aging.

    PubMed

    Padir, Taşkin; Skorinko, Jeanine; Dimitrov, Velin

    2015-01-01

    We present our preliminary results from the design process for developing the Worcester Polytechnic Institute's personal assistance robot, FRASIER, as an intelligent service robot for enabling active aging. The robot capabilities include vision-based object detection, tracking the user and help with carrying heavy items such as grocery bags or cafeteria trays. This work-in-progress report outlines our motivation and approach to developing the next generation of service robots for the elderly. Our main contribution in this paper is the development of a set of specifications based on the adopted user-centered design process, and realization of the prototype system designed to meet these specifications. PMID:26737419

  16. A Robotic System for Actively Stiffening Flexible Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Burke, Stephen F.; Zumbro, Emiko; Forelli, Alexandra R.; Howe, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    A system for actively changing the stiffness of a long, thin, flexible robotic manipulator has been designed for cardiologists to use in a range of diagnosis and treatment procedures. Low-stiffness manipulators, such as catheters, are ideal for steering through vasculature with low risk of tissue injury. However, such instruments are not well-suited for applying force to tissue. The proposed system solves this problem by using a series of bead-shaped vertebrae containing pull wires to actively change the stiffness of the catheter, similar to gooseneck surgical retractors. Individual wires steer the catheter to a desired location. All wires are then tensioned to create friction between each vertebra and prevent sliding, therefore resisting motion. While this design concept has been implemented manually in various settings for decades, fine robotic control of the friction and stiffness of the system relies on a thorough understanding of the friction properties between vertebral segments. We have developed an analytical model to understand the interactions between vertebrae and determine the relationships between system parameters and the overall stiffness of the catheter. Experiments validated the calculations from the model and the functionality of the system by applying known loads to the tip of the catheter and measuring the catheter displacement. The catheter stiffness was measured to range from 100 N/m to 800 N/m, which is sufficient for performing many surgical tasks on tissue. This system can be useful in minimally invasive procedures involving direct instrument contact with tissue by improving accuracy, safety, and work flow. PMID:26709364

  17. Initial Work Toward A Robotically Assisted Extravehicular Activity Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jonathan M.; Peters, Benjamin J.; Laske, Evans A.; McBryan, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Suit RoboGlove (SSRG) is a glove designed to provide additional grasp strength or endurance for an Extravehicular Activity (EVA) crew member, since a pressurized space suit gloved hand performance is a fraction of what the unencumbered human hand can achieve. There have been past efforts to improve space suit gloved hand performance by employing novel materials and construction techniques to the glove design, as well as integrating powered assistance devices into the gloves. These past efforts were not completely successful and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) decided to develop a new glove based on the NASA/General Motors RoboGlove technology. The resulting SSRG used a unique approach to integrate the robotic actuators and sensors into a Phase VI EVA glove that resulted in a space suit glove that provided grasp augmentation to the user while the augmentation is activated, and also functioned as a normal glove when the augmentation is disabled. Care was taken to avoid adding excessive bulk to the glove or affecting tactility by choosing low-profile sensors and locating the actuators at a distance from the fingers. Conduits were used to guide robotic tendons from linear actuators, across the wrist, and to the fingers. The electromechanical design, softgoods integration, control system, and early test results of the first generation SSRG are presented in this paper. These early test results showed that this sensor integration did not impact tactile feedback in the glove and that the actuators provided potential for increased grip strength and reduction in grasp fatigue over time.

  18. Using Haptic and Auditory Interaction Tools to Engage Students with Visual Impairments in Robot Programming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, A. M.; Park, Chung Hyuk; Remy, S.

    2012-01-01

    The robotics field represents the integration of multiple facets of computer science and engineering. Robotics-based activities have been shown to encourage K-12 students to consider careers in computing and have even been adopted as part of core computer-science curriculum at a number of universities. Unfortunately, for students with visual…

  19. Plasticity and alterations of trunk motor cortex following spinal cord injury and non-stepping robot and treadmill training.

    PubMed

    Oza, Chintan S; Giszter, Simon F

    2014-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces significant reorganization in the sensorimotor cortex. Trunk motor control is crucial for postural stability and propulsion after low thoracic SCI and several rehabilitative strategies are aimed at trunk stability and control. However little is known about the effect of SCI and rehabilitation training on trunk motor representations and their plasticity in the cortex. Here, we used intracortical microstimulation to examine the motor cortex representations of the trunk in relation to other representations in three groups of chronic adult complete low thoracic SCI rats: chronic untrained, treadmill trained (but 'non-stepping') and robot assisted treadmill trained (but 'non-stepping') and compared with a group of normal rats. Our results demonstrate extensive and significant reorganization of the trunk motor cortex after chronic adult SCI which includes (1) expansion and rostral displacement of trunk motor representations in the cortex, with the greatest significant increase observed for rostral (to injury) trunk, and slight but significant increase of motor representation for caudal (to injury) trunk at low thoracic levels in all spinalized rats; (2) significant changes in coactivation and the synergy representation (or map overlap) between different trunk muscles and between trunk and forelimb. No significant differences were observed between the groups of transected rats for the majority of the comparisons. However, (3) the treadmill and robot-treadmill trained groups of rats showed a further small but significant rostral migration of the trunk representations, beyond the shift caused by transection alone. We conclude that SCI induces a significant reorganization of the trunk motor cortex, which is not qualitatively altered by non-stepping treadmill training or non-stepping robot assisted treadmill training, but is shifted further from normal topography by the training. This shift may potentially make subsequent rehabilitation with

  20. Robotic unilateral and bilateral upper-limb movement training for stroke survivors afflicted by chronic hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Simkins, Matt; Kim, Hyuchul; Abrams, Gary; Byl, Nancy; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-06-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of long-term neurological disability and the principle reason for seeking rehabilitative services in the US. Learning based rehabilitation training enables independent mobility in the majority of patients post stroke, however, restoration of fine manipulation, motor function and task specific functions of the hemiplegic arm and hand is noted in fewer than 15% of the stroke patients. Brain plasticity is the innate mechanism enabling the recovery of motor skills through neurological reorganization of the brain as a response to limbs' manipulation. The objective of this research was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy for the upper limbs with a dual arm exoskeleton system (EXO-UL7) using three different modalities: bilateral mirror image with symmetric movements of both arms, unilateral movement of the affected arm and standard care. Five hemiparetic subjects were randomly assigned to each therapy modality. An upper limb exoskeleton was used to provide bilateral and unilateral treatments. Standard care was provided by a licensed physical therapist. Subjects were evaluated before and after the interventions using 13 different clinical measures. Following these treatments all of the subjects demonstrated significant improved of their fine motor control and gross control across all the treatment modalities. Subjects exhibited significant improvements in range of motion of the shoulder, and improved muscle strength for bilateral training and standard care, but not for unilateral training. In conclusion, a synergetic approach in which robotic treatments (unilateral and bilateral depending on the level of the motor control) are supplemented by the standard of care may maximize the outcome of the motor control recover following stroke. PMID:24187321

  1. Influence of robotic shoal size, configuration, and activity on zebrafish behavior in a free-swimming environment.

    PubMed

    Butail, Sachit; Polverino, Giovanni; Phamduy, Paul; Del Sette, Fausto; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-12-15

    In animal studies, robots have been recently used as a valid tool for testing a wide spectrum of hypotheses. These robots often exploit visual or auditory cues to modulate animal behavior. The propensity of zebrafish, a model organism in biological studies, toward fish with similar color patterns and shape has been leveraged to design biologically inspired robots that successfully attract zebrafish in preference tests. With an aim of extending the application of such robots to field studies, here, we investigate the response of zebrafish to multiple robotic fish swimming at different speeds and in varying arrangements. A soft real-time multi-target tracking and control system remotely steers the robots in circular trajectories during the experimental trials. Our findings indicate a complex behavioral response of zebrafish to biologically inspired robots. More robots produce a significant change in salient measures of stress, with a fast robot swimming alone causing more freezing and erratic activity than two robots swimming slowly together. In addition, fish spend more time in the proximity of a robot when they swim far apart than when the robots swim close to each other. Increase in the number of robots also significantly alters the degree of alignment of fish motion with a robot. Results from this study are expected to advance our understanding of robot perception by live animals and aid in hypothesis-driven studies in unconstrained free-swimming environments. PMID:25239605

  2. Integrating Robot Design Competitions into the Curriculum and K-12 Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzato, Robert

    The Penn State Abington campus has integrated several mobile robot design competitions into project-based design activities to provide enhancement for undergraduate engineering and information sciences and technology courses and also to provide outreach to K-12 institutions. The robot competitions, which encourage interdisciplinary design, teamwork, and rapid prototyping, support a wide range of educational outcomes in a variety of courses. A survey of undergraduate students was also implemented to identify the key lessons learned and overall educational quality of the robot competition activities. Overall, the responses on the quality of the robot competition experience were very positive. The strategic selection and implementation of robot design competitions, such as described in this paper, provide a cost-effective approach to enhancing the curriculum, promoting retention, and encouraging interest in science and technology (STEM) careers in K-12 students.

  3. The contribution of active body movement to visual development in evolutionary robots.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mototaka; Floreano, Dario; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by the pioneering work by Held and Hein (1963) on the development of kitten visuo-motor systems, we explore the role of active body movement in the developmental process of the visual system by using robots. The receptive fields in an evolved mobile robot are developed during active or passive movement with a Hebbian learning rule. In accordance to experimental observations in kittens, we show that the receptive fields and behavior of the robot developed under active condition significantly differ from those developed under passive condition. A possible explanation of this difference is derived by correlating receptive field formation and behavioral performance in the two conditions. PMID:16112555

  4. Locomotor training through a 3D cable-driven robotic system for walking function in children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Kim, Janis; Arora, Pooja; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J; Zhang, Yunhui

    2014-01-01

    Locomotor training using treadmill has been shown to elicit significant improvements in locomotor ability for some children with cerebral palsy (CP), the functional gains are relatively small and it requires greater involvement from a physical therapist. Current robotic gait training systems are effective in reducing the strenuous work of a physical therapist during locomotor training, but are less effective in improving locomotor function in some children with CP due to the limitations of the systems. Thus, a 3D cable-driven robotic gait training system was developed and tested in five children with CP through a 6 week of long-term gait training. Results indicated that both overground walking speed and 6 minute walking distance improved after robot assisted treadmill training through the cable-driven robotic system, and partially retained at 8 weeks after the end of training. Results from this pilot study indicated that it seems feasible to conduct locomotor training in children with CP through the 3D cable-driven robotic system. PMID:25570752

  5. A new active visual system for humanoid robots.

    PubMed

    Xu, De; Li, You Fu; Tan, Min; Shen, Yang

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a new active visual system is developed, which is based on bionic vision and is insensitive to the property of the cameras. The system consists of a mechanical platform and two cameras. The mechanical platform has two degrees of freedom of motion in pitch and yaw, which is equivalent to the neck of a humanoid robot. The cameras are mounted on the platform. The directions of the optical axes of the two cameras can be simultaneously adjusted in opposite directions. With these motions, the object's images can be located at the centers of the image planes of the two cameras. The object's position is determined with the geometry information of the visual system. A more general model for active visual positioning using two cameras without a neck is also investigated. The position of an object can be computed via the active motions. The presented model is less sensitive to the intrinsic parameters of cameras, which promises more flexibility in many applications such as visual tracking with changeable focusing. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:18348917

  6. Hybrid gait training with an overground robot for people with incomplete spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Del-Ama, Antonio J; Gil-Agudo, Angel; Pons, José L; Moreno, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Locomotor training has proved to provide beneficial effect in terms of mobility in incomplete paraplegic patients. Neuroprosthetic technology can contribute to increase the efficacy of a training paradigm in the promotion of a locomotor pattern. Robotic exoskeletons can be used to manage the unavoidable loss of performance of artificially driven muscles. Hybrid exoskeletons blend complementary robotic and neuro-prosthetic technologies. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effects of hybrid gait training in three case studies with persons with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) in terms of locomotion performance during assisted gait, patient-robot adaptations, impact on ambulation and assessment of lower limb muscle strength and spasticity. Participants with iSCI received interventions with a hybrid bilateral exoskeleton for 4 days. Assessment of gait function revealed that patients improved the 6 min and 10 m walking tests after the intervention, and further improvements were observed 1 week after the intervention. Muscle examination revealed improvements in knee and hip sagittal muscle balance scores and decreased score in ankle extensor balance. It is concluded that improvements in biomechanical function of the knee joint after the tested overground hybrid gait trainer are coherent with improvements in gait performance. PMID:24860478

  7. Chronic stroke survivors achieve comparable outcomes following virtual task specific repetitive training guided by a wearable robotic orthosis (UL-EXO7) and actual task specific repetitive training guided by a physical therapist.

    PubMed

    Byl, Nancy N; Abrams, Gary M; Pitsch, Erica; Fedulow, Irina; Kim, Hyunchul; Simkins, Matt; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Survivors post stroke commonly have upper limb impairments. Patients can drive neural reorganization, brain recovery and return of function with task specific repetitive training (TSRT). Fifteen community independent stroke survivors (25-75 years, >6 months post stroke, Upper Limb Fugl Meyer [ULFM] scores 16-39) participated in this randomized feasibility study to compare outcomes of upper limb TSRT guided by a robotic orthosis (bilateral or unilateral) or a physical therapist. After 6 weeks of training (18 h), across all subjects, there were significant improvements in depression, flexibility, strength, tone, pain and voluntary movement (ULFM) (p < 0.05; effect sizes 0.49-3.53). Each training group significantly improved ULFM scores and range of motion without significant group differences. Virtual or actual TSRT performed with a robotic orthosis or a physical therapist significantly reduced arm impairments around the shoulder and elbow without significant gains in fine motor hand control, activities of daily living or independence. PMID:23911077

  8. NOAA Climate Users Engagement Using Training Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Jones, J.; Pulwarty, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    climate-sensitive decisions. Course evaluation survey collected 20 responses and indicated a high level of satisfaction. Valuable written comments offered an input for further improvement of the training services. The course offers a prototype for the conduct of training activities developed in partnership with climate information providers and the intended user group(s), in this case the California DWR.

  9. Urology residents experience comparable workload profiles when performing live porcine nephrectomies and robotic surgery virtual reality training modules.

    PubMed

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Klein, Martina; Schommer, Eric; Thiel, David D; Samavedi, Srinivas; Kumar, Anup; Leveillee, Raymond J; Thomas, Raju; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Su, Li-Ming; Mui, Engy; Smith, Roger; Patel, Vipul

    2016-03-01

    In pursuit of improving the quality of residents' education, the Southeastern Section of the American Urological Association (SES AUA) hosts an annual robotic training course for its residents. The workshop involves performing a robotic live porcine nephrectomy as well as virtual reality robotic training modules. The aim of this study was to evaluate workload levels of urology residents when performing a live porcine nephrectomy and the virtual reality robotic surgery training modules employed during this workshop. Twenty-one residents from 14 SES AUA programs participated in 2015. On the first-day residents were taught with didactic lectures by faculty. On the second day, trainees were divided into two groups. Half were asked to perform training modules of the Mimic da Vinci-Trainer (MdVT, Mimic Technologies, Inc., Seattle, WA, USA) for 4 h, while the other half performed nephrectomy procedures on a live porcine model using the da Vinci Si robot (Intuitive Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). After the first 4 h the groups changed places for another 4-h session. All trainees were asked to complete the NASA-TLX 1-page questionnaire following both the MdVT simulation and live animal model sessions. A significant interface and TLX interaction was observed. The interface by TLX interaction was further analyzed to determine whether the scores of each of the six TLX scales varied across the two interfaces. The means of the TLX scores observed at the two interfaces were similar. The only significant difference was observed for frustration, which was significantly higher at the simulation than the animal model, t (20) = 4.12, p = 0.001. This could be due to trainees' familiarity with live anatomical structures over skill set simulations which remain a real challenge to novice surgeons. Another reason might be that the simulator provides performance metrics for specific performance traits as well as composite scores for entire exercises. Novice trainees experienced

  10. Assistive control system using continuous myoelectric signal in robot-aided arm training for patients after stroke.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-yu; Hu, Xiaoling; Li, Le

    2008-08-01

    In some stroke rehabilitation programs, robotic systems have been used to aid the patient to train. In this study, a myoelectrically controlled robotic system with 1 degree-of-freedom was developed to assist elbow training in a horizontal plane with intention involvement for people after stroke. The system could provide continuous assistance in extension torque, which was proportional to the amplitude of the subject's electromyographic (EMG) signal from the triceps, and could provide resistive torques during movement. This study investigated the system's effect on restoring the upper limb functions of eight subjects after chronic stroke in a twenty-session rehabilitation training program. In each session, there were 18 trials comprising different combinations of assistive and resistive torques and an evaluation trial. Each trial consisted of five cycles of repetitive elbow flexion and extension between 90 degrees and 0 degrees at a constant velocity of 10 degrees/s. With the assistive extension torque, subjects could reach a more extended position in the first session. After 20 sessions of training, there were statistically significant improvements in the modified Ashworth scale, Fugl-Meyer scale for shoulder and elbow, motor status scale, elbow extension range, muscle strength, and root mean square error between actual elbow angle and target angle. The results showed that the twenty-session training program improved upper limb functions. PMID:18701384

  11. Visual perception and grasping for the extravehicular activity robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starks, Scott A.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an approach to the visual perception of object surface information using laser range data in support of robotic grasping is discussed. This is a very important problem area in that a robot such as the EVAR must be able to formulate a grasping strategy on the basis of its knowledge of the surface structure of the object. A description of the problem domain is given as well as a formulation of an algorithm which derives an object surface description adequate to support robotic grasping. The algorithm is based upon concepts of differential geometry namely, Gaussian and mean curvature.

  12. Comparison of haptic guidance and error amplification robotic trainings for the learning of a timing-based motor task by healthy seniors

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Amy E.; Corriveau, Hélène; Milot, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    With age, a decline in the temporal aspect of movement is observed such as a longer movement execution time and a decreased timing accuracy. Robotic training can represent an interesting approach to help improve movement timing among the elderly. Two types of robotic training—haptic guidance (HG; demonstrating the correct movement for a better movement planning and improved execution of movement) and error amplification (EA; exaggerating movement errors to have a more rapid and complete learning) have been positively used in young healthy subjects to boost timing accuracy. For healthy seniors, only HG training has been used so far where significant and positive timing gains have been obtained. The goal of the study was to evaluate and compare the impact of both HG and EA robotic trainings on the improvement of seniors’ movement timing. Thirty-two healthy seniors (mean age 68 ± 4 years) learned to play a pinball-like game by triggering a one-degree-of-freedom hand robot at the proper time to make a flipper move and direct a falling ball toward a randomly positioned target. During HG and EA robotic trainings, the subjects’ timing errors were decreased and increased, respectively, based on the subjects’ timing errors in initiating a movement. Results showed that only HG training benefited learning, but the improvement did not generalize to untrained targets. Also, age had no influence on the efficacy of HG robotic training, meaning that the oldest subjects did not benefit more from HG training than the younger senior subjects. Using HG to teach the correct timing of movement seems to be a good strategy to improve motor learning for the elderly as for younger people. However, more studies are needed to assess the long-term impact of HG robotic training on improvement in movement timing. PMID:25873868

  13. United States Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) - artificial intelligence and robotics symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Various papers on artificial intelligence and robotics and their applications for the US Army are presented. Topics include US Army robotics development directions; mobile robots for surveillance, reconnaissance, and manipulative missions in hazardous environments; technology development in intelligent machine systems; control of a multi-robot process line using AI; land vehicles; remote control weapons platforms; expert systems for logistic analysis. Also addressed are software architecture for real-time, embedded expert systems; knowledge integrity maintenance; embedding AI systems into command and control; a natural language understanding system for maneuver control; and a design of a generic intelligent trainer.

  14. Guide to good practices for line and training manager activities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide direction for line and training managers in carrying out their responsibilities for training and qualifying personnel and to verify that existing training activities are effective.

  15. Exercise, training and neutrophil microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Telford, R D; Mason, I B; Weidemann, M J

    1990-06-01

    The concentration in human plasma of putative neutrophil-"priming" cytokines like endogenous pyrogens is known to increase significantly in response to moderate exercise (11). This is characteristic of an acute-phase response. The ability of blood neutrophils isolated from both trained and untrained human subjects (n = 11, 9) to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species was determined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence both before and after one hour of aerobic exercise at 60% VO2max. Irrespective of training and stimulus concentration, exercise nearly always caused significant "priming" of the capacity of neutrophils to produce H2O2 and HOCl upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan (P less than 0.01); however, compared to their untrained counterparts, the activity of cells isolated from trained individuals was depressed about 50% at unit stimulus concentration, both before and after exercise (P less than 0.075), whilst remaining unaltered at saturating concentrations. Although neutrophil oxygenation activity is only one parameter that contributes to immunological status, regular episodes of moderate exercise may increase resistance to infection by priming the "killing capacity" of neutrophils. In contrast, prolonged periods of intensive training may lead to increased susceptibility to common infections by diminishing this activity. PMID:2115507

  16. Robot Acquisition of Active Maps Through Teleoperation and Vector Space Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Richard Alan, II

    2003-01-01

    The work performed under this contract was in the area of intelligent robotics. The problem being studied was the acquisition of intelligent behaviors by a robot. The method was to acquire action maps that describe tasks as sequences of reflexive behaviors. Action maps (a.k.a. topological maps) are graphs whose nodes represent sensorimotor states and whose edges represent the motor actions that cause the robot to proceed from one state to the next. The maps were acquired by the robot after being teleoperated or otherwise guided by a person through a task several times. During a guided task, the robot records all its sensorimotor signals. The signals from several task trials are partitioned into episodes of static behavior. The corresponding episodes from each trial are averaged to produce a task description as a sequence of characteristic episodes. The sensorimotor states that indicate episode boundaries become the nodes, and the static behaviors, the edges. It was demonstrated that if compound maps are constructed from a set of tasks then the robot can perform new tasks in which it was never explicitly trained.

  17. A robotic gait training system integrating split-belt treadmill, footprint sensing and synchronous EEG recording for neuro-motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hung; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Quanquan; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Hsiao, Yu-Tsung; Su, Jui-Yiao; Kobayashi, Yo; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a robotic gait training system for neuro-motor rehabilitation of hemiplegic stroke survivors. The system is composed of a treadmill consisting of two separated belts, footprint array sensor attached below each belt for gait data acquisition, and an electroencephalography (EEG) device for monitoring brain activities during gait training. The split belt treadmill allow physical therapists to set different treadmill belt velocities to modify physical workload of the patients during walking, thus being able to better improve the symmetry of gait phases between affected and unaffected (sound) legs in comparison with conventional treadmills where there is only one single belt. In contrast to in-shoe pressure sensors, the under-belt footprint sensor array designed in this study not only reduces the preparation complexity of gait training but also collects more gait data for motion analysis. Recorded EEG is segmented synchronously with gait-related events. The processed EEG data can be used for monitoring brain-activities during gait training, providing a neurological approach for motion assessment. One subject with simulated stroke using an ankle-foot orthosis participated in this study. Preliminary results indicate the feasibility of the proposed system to improve gait function and monitor neuro-motor recovery. PMID:26737065

  18. Dimensionality Reduction in Controlling Articulated Snake Robot for Endoscopy Under Dynamic Active Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Ka-Wai; Tsoi, Kuen Hung; Vitiello, Valentina; Clark, James; Chow, Gary C. T.; Luk, Wayne; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time control framework for a snake robot with hyper-kinematic redundancy under dynamic active constraints for minimally invasive surgery. A proximity query (PQ) formulation is proposed to compute the deviation of the robot motion from predefined anatomical constraints. The proposed method is generic and can be applied to any snake robot represented as a set of control vertices. The proposed PQ formulation is implemented on a graphic processing unit, allowing for fast updates over 1 kHz. We also demonstrate that the robot joint space can be characterized into lower dimensional space for smooth articulation. A novel motion parameterization scheme in polar coordinates is proposed to describe the transition of motion, thus allowing for direct manual control of the robot using standard interface devices with limited degrees of freedom. Under the proposed framework, the correct alignment between the visual and motor axes is ensured, and haptic guidance is provided to prevent excessive force applied to the tissue by the robot body. A resistance force is further incorporated to enhance smooth pursuit movement matched to the dynamic response and actuation limit of the robot. To demonstrate the practical value of the proposed platform with enhanced ergonomic control, detailed quantitative performance evaluation was conducted on a group of subjects performing simulated intraluminal and intracavity endoscopic tasks. PMID:24741371

  19. Asynchronous decoding of finger position and of EMG during precision grip using CM cell activity: application to robot control.

    PubMed

    Ouanezar, Sofiane; Eskiizmirliler, Selim; Maier, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    Recent brain-machine interfaces (BMI) have demonstrated the use of intracortical signals for the kinematic control of robotic arms. However, for potential restoration of manual dexterity, two issues remain to be addressed: (1) Can hand and digit movements for dexterous manipulation be controlled in a similar way to arm movements? (2) Can the potentially large signal space for decoding of the many degrees of freedom (dof) of hand and digit movements be minimized? The first question addresses BMI control of dexterous prosthetic devices, while the second addresses the problem of whether few, but identified, neurons might provide adequate decoding. Asynchronous decoding of precision grip finger movement kinematics from identified corticomotoneuronal (CM) cell activity was performed with an artificial neural network (ANN). After training over a given session, the ANNs successfully decoded trial-by-trial movement kinematics. Average accuracy over sessions was in the order of 80% and 50% for data sets of two monkeys respectively. Decoding accuracy increased as a function of (1) number of simultaneously recorded CM cells used for prediction, and (2) size of the sliding input window. Subsequently, a robot digit actuated by pneumatic artificial muscles, fed with the predicted trajectory, mimicked the recorded movement offline. Furthermore, CM cell signals were used for decoding of time-varying hand muscle EMG activity. The performance of EMG prediction tended to increase if CM cells that facilitated this particular muscle (compared to CM cells that facilitated other muscles) were used. These results provide evidence that an anthropomorphic robot finger can be controlled offline by spike trains recorded from identified corticospinal neurons. This represents a step towards neuroprosthetic devices for dexterous hand movements. PMID:22262537

  20. Strength training versus robot-assisted gait training after incomplete spinal cord injury: a randomized pilot study in patients depending on walking assistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Task-specific locomotor training has been promoted to improve walking-related outcome after incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). However, there is also evidence that lower extremity strength training might lead to such improvements. The aim of this randomized cross-over pilot study was to compare changes in a broad spectrum of walking-related outcome measures and pain between robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) and strength training in patients with chronic iSCI, who depended on walking assistance. We hypothesized that task-specific locomotor training would result in better improvements compared to strength training. Methods Nine participants with a chronic iSCI were randomized to group 1 or 2. Group 1 received 16 sessions of RAGT (45 min each) within 4 weeks followed by 16 sessions of strength training (45 min each) within 4 weeks. Group 2 received the same interventions in reversed order. Main outcome measures were the 10 m Walk Test (10MWT) at preferred and maximal speed. Furthermore, we assessed several measures such as walking speed under different conditions, balance, strength, and 2 questionnaires that evaluate risk of falling and pain. Data were collected at baseline, between interventions after 4 weeks, directly after the interventions and at follow-up 6 months after the interventions. Pain was assessed repeatedly throughout the study. Results There were no significant differences in changes in scores between the 2 interventions, except for maximal walking speed (10MWT), which improved significantly more after strength training than after RAGT. Pain reduced after both interventions. Conclusion In patients with chronic iSCI dependent on walking assistance, RAGT was not more effective in improving walking-related outcome compared to lower extremity strength training. However, the low sample size limits generalizability and precision of data interpretation. Trial registration This study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01087918). PMID

  1. Influence of complementing a robotic upper limb rehabilitation system with video games on the engagement of the participants: a study focusing on muscle activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Rusák, Zoltán; Horváth, Imre; Ji, Linhong

    2014-12-01

    Efficacious stroke rehabilitation depends not only on patients' medical treatment but also on their motivation and engagement during rehabilitation exercises. Although traditional rehabilitation exercises are often mundane, technology-assisted upper-limb robotic training can provide engaging and task-oriented training in a natural environment. The factors that influence engagement, however, are not fully understood. This paper therefore studies the relationship between engagement and muscle activities as well as the influencing factors of engagement. To this end, an experiment was conducted using a robotic upper limb rehabilitation system with healthy individuals in three training exercises: (a) a traditional exercise, which is typically used for training the grasping function, (b) a tracking exercise, currently used in robot-assisted stroke patient rehabilitation for fine motor movement, and (c) a video game exercise, which is a proliferating approach of robot-assisted rehabilitation enabling high-level active engagement of stroke patients. These exercises differ not only in the characteristics of the motion that they use but also in their method of triggering engagement. To measure the level of engagement, we used facial expressions, motion analysis of the arm movements, and electromyography. The results show that (a) the video game exercise could engage the participants for a longer period than the other two exercises, (b) the engagement level decreased when the participants became too familiar with the exercises, and (c) analysis of normalized root mean square in electromyographic data indicated that muscle activities were more intense when the participants are engaged. This study shows that several sub-factors on engagement, such as versatility of feedback, cognitive tasks, and competitiveness, may influence engagement more than the others. To maintain a high level of engagement, the rehabilitation system needs to be adaptive, providing different exercises to

  2. Selective control of gait subtasks in robotic gait training: foot clearance support in stroke survivors with a powered exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robot-aided gait training is an emerging clinical tool for gait rehabilitation of neurological patients. This paper deals with a novel method of offering gait assistance, using an impedance controlled exoskeleton (LOPES). The provided assistance is based on a recent finding that, in the control of walking, different modules can be discerned that are associated with different subtasks. In this study, a Virtual Model Controller (VMC) for supporting one of these subtasks, namely the foot clearance, is presented and evaluated. Methods The developed VMC provides virtual support at the ankle, to increase foot clearance. Therefore, we first developed a new method to derive reference trajectories of the ankle position. These trajectories consist of splines between key events, which are dependent on walking speed and body height. Subsequently, the VMC was evaluated in twelve healthy subjects and six chronic stroke survivors. The impedance levels, of the support, were altered between trials to investigate whether the controller allowed gradual and selective support. Additionally, an adaptive algorithm was tested, that automatically shaped the amount of support to the subjects’ needs. Catch trials were introduced to determine whether the subjects tended to rely on the support. We also assessed the additional value of providing visual feedback. Results With the VMC, the step height could be selectively and gradually influenced. The adaptive algorithm clearly shaped the support level to the specific needs of every stroke survivor. The provided support did not result in reliance on the support for both groups. All healthy subjects and most patients were able to utilize the visual feedback to increase their active participation. Conclusion The presented approach can provide selective control on one of the essential subtasks of walking. This module is the first in a set of modules to control all subtasks. This enables the therapist to focus the support on the subtasks

  3. Robot-assisted vs. sensory integration training in treating gait and balance dysfunctions in patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Geroin, Christian; Picelli, Alessandro; Munari, Daniele; Waldner, Andreas; Tamburin, Stefano; Marchioretto, Fabio; Smania, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extensive research on both healthy subjects and patients with central nervous damage has elucidated a crucial role of postural adjustment reactions and central sensory integration processes in generating and “shaping” locomotor function, respectively. Whether robotic-assisted gait devices might improve these functions in Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is not fully investigated in literature. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of end-effector robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) and sensory integration balance training (SIBT) in improving walking and balance performance in patients with MS. Methods: Twenty-two patients with MS (EDSS: 1.5–6.5) were randomly assigned to two groups. The RAGT group (n = 12) underwent end-effector system training. The SIBT group (n = 10) underwent specific balance exercises. Each patient received twelve 50-min treatment sessions (2 days/week). A blinded rater evaluated patients before and after treatment as well as 1 month post treatment. Primary outcomes were walking speed and Berg Balance Scale. Secondary outcomes were the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Sensory Organization Balance Test, Stabilometric Assessment, Fatigue Severity Scale, cadence, step length, single and double support time, Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54. Results: Between groups comparisons showed no significant differences on primary and secondary outcome measures over time. Within group comparisons showed significant improvements in both groups on the Berg Balance Scale (P = 0.001). Changes approaching significance were found on gait speed (P = 0.07) only in the RAGT group. Significant changes in balance task-related domains during standing and walking conditions were found in the SIBT group. Conclusion: Balance disorders in patients with MS may be ameliorated by RAGT and by SIBT. PMID:24904361

  4. Visual sensor fusion for active security in robotic industrial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robla, Sandra; Llata, Jose R.; Torre-Ferrero, Carlos; Sarabia, Esther G.; Becerra, Victor; Perez-Oria, Juan

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a method of information fusion involving data captured by both a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a time-of-flight (ToF) camera to be used in the detection of the proximity between a manipulator robot and a human. Both cameras are assumed to be located above the work area of an industrial robot. The fusion of colour images and time-of-flight information makes it possible to know the 3D localization of objects with respect to a world coordinate system. At the same time, this allows to know their colour information. Considering that ToF information given by the range camera contains innacuracies including distance error, border error, and pixel saturation, some corrections over the ToF information are proposed and developed to improve the results. The proposed fusion method uses the calibration parameters of both cameras to reproject 3D ToF points, expressed in a common coordinate system for both cameras and a robot arm, in 2D colour images. In addition to this, using the 3D information, the motion detection in a robot industrial environment is achieved, and the fusion of information is applied to the foreground objects previously detected. This combination of information results in a matrix that links colour and 3D information, giving the possibility of characterising the object by its colour in addition to its 3D localisation. Further development of these methods will make it possible to identify objects and their position in the real world and to use this information to prevent possible collisions between the robot and such objects.

  5. Dry box training with three-dimensional vision for the assistant surgeon in robot-assisted urological surgery.

    PubMed

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Iwamoto, Hideto; Morizane, Shuichi; Hikita, Katsuya; Yao, Akihisa; Muraoka, Kuniyasu; Honda, Masashi; Isoyama, Tadahiro; Sejima, Takehiro; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed whether three-dimensional vision, practice or previous laparoscopic experience improves the surgical performance of the bedside assistant during robot-assisted surgery. Six experienced laparoscopic surgeons and 15 novices carried out three skills drills imitating an assistant's maneuvers in robot-assisted surgery, and times for completing the tasks were recorded. Both the novice and experienced groups showed significantly shorter manipulation times for each drill with three-dimensional vision compared with two-dimensional or glassless three-dimensional vision. The experienced group showed significantly shorter manipulation times than the novice group for all types of vision. A significant improvement was observed 14 out of 18 times in the novice group, but only one out of 18 times in the experienced group. We can conclude that the use of three-dimensional visualization facilitates the performance of the assistant surgeon, especially if a novice, during robot-assisted surgery. Laparoscopic experience also improves the performance, whereas training is beneficial for novice assistant surgeons before carrying out actual operations. PMID:23379309

  6. Biofeedback for robotic gait rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Lünenburger, Lars; Colombo, Gery; Riener, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Background Development and increasing acceptance of rehabilitation robots as well as advances in technology allow new forms of therapy for patients with neurological disorders. Robot-assisted gait therapy can increase the training duration and the intensity for the patients while reducing the physical strain for the therapist. Optimal training effects during gait therapy generally depend on appropriate feedback about performance. Compared to manual treadmill therapy, there is a loss of physical interaction between therapist and patient with robotic gait retraining. Thus, it is difficult for the therapist to assess the necessary feedback and instructions. The aim of this study was to define a biofeedback system for a gait training robot and test its usability in subjects without neurological disorders. Methods To provide an overview of biofeedback and motivation methods applied in gait rehabilitation, previous publications and results from our own research are reviewed. A biofeedback method is presented showing how a rehabilitation robot can assess the patients' performance and deliver augmented feedback. For validation, three subjects without neurological disorders walked in a rehabilitation robot for treadmill training. Several training parameters, such as body weight support and treadmill speed, were varied to assess the robustness of the biofeedback calculation to confounding factors. Results The biofeedback values correlated well with the different activity levels of the subjects. Changes in body weight support and treadmill velocity had a minor effect on the biofeedback values. The synchronization of the robot and the treadmill affected the biofeedback values describing the stance phase. Conclusion Robot-aided assessment and feedback can extend and improve robot-aided training devices. The presented method estimates the patients' gait performance with the use of the robot's existing sensors, and displays the resulting biofeedback values to the patients and

  7. Investigation of Fatigability during Repetitive Robot-Mediated Arm Training in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Severijns, Deborah; Octavia, Johanna Renny; Kerkhofs, Lore; Coninx, Karin; Lamers, Ilse; Feys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background People with multiple sclerosis (MS) are encouraged to engage in exercise programs but an increased experience of fatigue may impede sustained participation in training sessions. A high number of movements is, however, needed for obtaining optimal improvements after rehabilitation. Methods This cross-sectional study investigated whether people with MS show abnormal fatigability during a robot-mediated upper limb movement trial. Sixteen people with MS and sixteen healthy controls performed five times three minutes of repetitive shoulder anteflexion movements. Movement performance, maximal strength, subjective upper limb fatigue and surface electromyography (median frequency and root mean square of the amplitude of the electromyography (EMG) signal of the anterior deltoid) were recorded during or in-between these exercises. After fifteen minutes of rest, one extra movement bout was performed to investigate how rest influences performance. Results A fifteen minutes upper limb movement protocol increased the perceived upper limb fatigue and induced muscle fatigue, given a decline in maximal anteflexion strength and changes of both the amplitude and the median frequency of EMG the anterior deltoid. In contrast, performance during the 3 minutes of anteflexion movements did not decline. There was no relation between changes in subjective fatigue and the changes in the amplitude and the median frequency of the anterior deltoid muscle, however, there was a correlation between the changes in subjective fatigue and changes in strength in people with MS. People with MS with upper limb weakness report more fatigue due to the repetitive movements, than people with MS with normal upper limb strength, who are comparable to healthy controls. The weak group could, however, keep up performance during the 15 minutes of repetitive movements. Discussion and Conclusion Albeit a protocol of repetitive shoulder anteflexion movements did not elicit a performance decline, fatigue

  8. Clinical application of a robotic ankle training program for cerebral palsy compared to the research laboratory application: Does it translate to practice?

    PubMed Central

    Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Clancy, Theresa; Zhang, Li-Qun; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical efficacy of an ankle robotic rehabilitation protocol for patients with cerebral palsy. Design The clinic cohort was identified from a retrospective chart review in a before-after intervention trial design and compared to a previously published prospective research cohort. Setting Urban rehabilitation hospital outpatient clinic. Participants Children (n=28, 8.2 ± 3.62 years) with Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, II or III who were referred for ankle stretching and strengthening used an ankle rehabilitation robot in the clinic setting. Clinic results were compared to a previously published cohort of 12 participants (7.8 ± 2.91 years) seen in a research laboratory-based intervention protocol. Interventions Patients in the clinic cohort were seen 2 times per week for 75 minute sessions for a total of 6 weeks. The first 30 minutes of the session was spent using the robotic ankle device for ankle stretching and strengthening and the remaining 45 minutes were spent on functional movement activities. There was no control group. Main Outcome Measures We compared pre- and post-intervention measures of plantarflexor and dorsiflexor range of motion, strength, spasticity, mobility (timed up and go, 6-minute walk, 10-meter walk), balance (Pediatric Balance Scale), Selective Motor Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity (SCALE), and the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). Results Significant improvements were found for the clinic cohort in all main outcome measures except for the GMFM. These improvements were equivalent to those reported in the research cohort, except for larger SCALE test changes in the research cohort. Conclusion These findings suggest that translation of repetitive, goal directed biofeedback training into the clinic setting is both feasible and beneficial for patients with cerebral palsy. PMID:24792141

  9. Combined robotic-aided gait training and 3D gait analysis provide objective treatment and assessment of gait in children and adolescents with Acquired Hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Erika; Beretta, Elena; Altomonte, Daniele; Formica, Francesca; Strazzer, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a fully objective rehabilitative and assessment process of the gait abilities in children suffering from Acquired Hemiplegia (AH), we studied the combined employment of robotic-aided gait training (RAGT) and 3D-Gait Analysis (GA). A group of 12 patients with AH underwent 20 sessions of RAGT in addition to traditional manual physical therapy (PT). All the patients were evaluated before and after the training by using the Gross Motor Function Measures (GMFM), the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ), and the 6 Minutes Walk Test. They also received GA before and after RAGT+PT. Finally, results were compared with those obtained from a control group of 3 AH children who underwent PT only. After the training, the GMFM and FAQ showed significant improvement in patients receiving RAGT+PT. GA highlighted significant improvement in stance symmetry and step length of the affected limb. Moreover, pelvic tilt increased, and hip kinematics on the sagittal plane revealed statistically significant increase in the range of motion during the hip flex-extension. Our data suggest that the combined program RAGT+PT induces improvements in functional activities and gait pattern in children with AH, and it demonstrates that the combined employment of RAGT and 3D-GA ensures a fully objective rehabilitative program. PMID:26737310

  10. Robotics-Control Technology. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the materials required for presenting an 8-day competency-based technology learning activity (TLA) designed to introduce students in grades 6-10 to advances and career opportunities in the field of robotics-control technology. The guide uses hands-on exploratory experiences into which activities to help students develop…

  11. A novel self-guided approach to alpha activity training.

    PubMed

    van Boxtel, Geert J M; Denissen, Ad J M; Jäger, Mark; Vernon, David; Dekker, Marian K J; Mihajlović, Vojkan; Sitskoorn, Margriet M

    2012-03-01

    Fifty healthy participants took part in a double-blind placebo-controlled study in which they were either given auditory alpha activity (8-12Hz) training (N=18), random beta training (N=12), or no training at all (N=20). A novel wireless electrode system was used for training without instructions, involving water-based electrodes mounted in an audio headset. Training was applied approximately at central electrodes. Post-training measurement using a conventional full-cap EEG system revealed a 10% increase in alpha activity at posterior sites compared to pre-training levels, when using the conventional index of alpha activity and a non-linear regression fit intended to model individual alpha frequency. This statistically significant increase was present only in the group that received the alpha training, and remained evident at a 3 month follow-up session, especially under eyes open conditions where an additional 10% increase was found. In an exit interview, approximately twice as many participants in the alpha training group (53%) mentioned that the training was relaxing, compared to those in either the beta (20%) or no training (21%) control groups. Behavioural measures of stress and relaxation were indicative of effects of alpha activity training but failed to reach statistical significance. These results are discussed in terms of a lack of statistical power. Overall, results suggest that self-guided alpha activity training using this novel system is feasible and represents a step forward in the ease of instrumental conditioning of brain rhythms. PMID:22119661

  12. Periodic activations of behaviours and emotional adaptation in behaviour-based robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burattini, Ernesto; Rossi, Silvia

    2010-09-01

    The possible modulatory influence of motivations and emotions is of great interest in designing robotic adaptive systems. In this paper, an attempt is made to connect the concept of periodic behaviour activations to emotional modulation, in order to link the variability of behaviours to the circumstances in which they are activated. The impact of emotion is studied, described as timed controlled structures, on simple but conflicting reactive behaviours. Through this approach it is shown that the introduction of such asynchronies in the robot control system may lead to an adaptation in the emergent behaviour without having an explicit action selection mechanism. The emergent behaviours of a simple robot designed with both a parallel and a hierarchical architecture are evaluated and compared.

  13. Training Medical Novices in Spinal Microsurgery: Does the Modality Matter? A Pilot Study Comparing Traditional Microscopic Surgery and a Novel Robotic Optoelectronic Visualization Tool

    PubMed Central

    Tubbs, R. Shane; Page, Jeni; Chapman, Alexandra; Burgess, Brittni; Laws, Tyler; Warren, Haylie; Oskouian, Rod J

    2016-01-01

    The operative microscope has been a staple instrument in the neurosurgical operating room over the last 50 years. With advances in optoelectronics, options such as robotically controlled high magnification have become available. Such robotically controlled optoelectronic systems may offer new opportunities in surgical technique and teaching. However, traditionally trained surgeons may find it hard to accept newer technologies due to an inherent bias emerging from their previous background. We, therefore, studied how a medically naïve population in a pilot study would meet set microsurgical goals in a cadaver experiment using either a conventional operative microscope or BrightMatter™ Servo system, ​a robotically controlled optoelectronic system (Synaptive Medical, Toronto, Ontario, Canada). We found that the relative ease in teaching medical novices with a robotically controlled optoelectronic system was more valuable when compared to using a modern-day surgical microscope. PMID:26973804

  14. Performance of daily activities by older adults with dementia: the role of an assistive robot.

    PubMed

    Begum, Momotaz; Wang, Rosalie; Huq, Rajibul; Mihailidis, Alex

    2013-06-01

    Older adults with cognitive impairment often have difficulties in remembering the proper sequence of activities of daily living (ADLs) or how to use the tools necessary to perform ADLs. They, therefore, require reminders in a timely fashion while performing ADLs. This is a very stressful situation for the caregivers of people with dementia. In this paper we describe a pilot study where a tele-operated assistive robot helps a group of older adults with dementia (OAwD) to perform an ADL, namely making a cup of tea in the kitchen. Five OAwD along with their caregivers participated in this study which took place in a simulated-home setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and usability of a robotic system in assisting the OAwD to perform ADL in a home setting. The findings from this study will contribute to achieve our ultimate goal of designing a full-fledged assistive robot that assists OAwD aging in their own homes. The assistive robots designed for people with dementia mostly focus on companionship. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first attempt to design an assistive robot which will provide step-by-step guidance to people with dementia in their activities of daily living. PMID:24187224

  15. EFFECTS OF ROBOTIC-LOCOMOTOR TRAINING ON STRETCH REFLEX FUNCTION AND MUSCULAR PROPERTIES IN INDIVIDUALS WITH SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Mirbagheri, Mehdi M.; Kindig, Matthew W.; Niu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the therapeutic effect of robotic-assisted step training (RAST) on neuromuscular abnormalities associated with spasticity by characterization of their recovery patterns in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Twenty-three motor-incomplete SCI subjects received one-hour RAST sessions three times per week for four weeks, while an SCI control group received no training. Neuromuscular properties were assessed using ankle perturbations prior to and during the training, and a system-identification technique quantified stretch reflex and intrinsic stiffness magnitude and modulation with joint position. Growth-mixture modeling classified subjects based on similar intrinsic and reflex recovery patterns. Results All recovery classes in the RAST group presented significant (p<0.05) reductions in intrinsic and reflex stiffness magnitude and modulation with position; the control group presented no changes over time. Subjects with larger baseline abnormalities exhibited larger reductions, and over longer training periods. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that RAST can effectively reduce neuromuscular abnormalities, with greater improvements for subjects with higher baseline abnormalities. Significance Our findings suggest, in addition to its primary goal of improving locomotor patterns, RAST can also reduce neuromuscular abnormalities associated with spasticity. These findings also demonstrate that these techniques can be used to characterize neuromuscular recovery patterns in response to various types of interventions. PMID:25449559

  16. Program Activity/Training Plans. STIP II (Skill Training Improvement Programs Round II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Community Coll. District, CA.

    Detailed operational guidelines, training objectives, and learning activities are provided for the Los Angeles Community College District's Skill Training Improvement Programs (STIP II), which are designed to train students for immediate employment. The first of four reports covers Los Angeles Southwest College's computer programming trainee…

  17. Electronics/Robotics Displaced Worker Retraining and Technician Upgrade Training. Ohlone College Investment in People Project 1983-84. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moock, Lynn D.

    An evaluator studied the effectiveness of the displaced worker entry-level and the upgrade components of the electronics/robotics training program. Since the program was a pilot project with attendant trials and errors, a user-focused process of evaluation was selected. Entry-level students, administrators, the counselor, and instructors completed…

  18. Human-like Compliance for Dexterous Robot Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Active Electromechanical Compliance (AEC) system that was developed for the Jau-JPL anthropomorphic robot. The AEC system imitates the functionality of the human muscle's secondary function, which is to control the joint's stiffness: AEC is implemented through servo controlling the joint drive train's stiffness. The control strategy, controlling compliant joints in teleoperation, is described. It enables automatic hybrid position and force control through utilizing sensory feedback from joint and compliance sensors. This compliant control strategy is adaptable for autonomous robot control as well. Active compliance enables dual arm manipulations, human-like soft grasping by the robot hand, and opens the way to many new robotics applications.

  19. The cortical activation pattern by a rehabilitation robotic hand: a functional NIRS study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pyung-Hun; Lee, Seung-Hee; Gu, Gwang Min; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Jin, Sang-Hyun; Yeo, Sang Seok; Seo, Jeong Pyo; Jang, Sung Ho

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Clarification of the relationship between external stimuli and brain response has been an important topic in neuroscience and brain rehabilitation. In the current study, using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), we attempted to investigate cortical activation patterns generated during execution of a rehabilitation robotic hand. Methods: Ten normal subjects were recruited for this study. Passive movements of the right fingers were performed using a rehabilitation robotic hand at a frequency of 0.5 Hz. We measured values of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO), deoxy-hemoglobin (HbR) and total-hemoglobin (HbT) in five regions of interest: the primary sensory-motor cortex (SM1), hand somatotopy of the contralateral SM1, supplementary motor area (SMA), premotor cortex (PMC), and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Results: HbO and HbT values indicated significant activation in the left SM1, left SMA, left PMC, and left PFC during execution of the rehabilitation robotic hand (uncorrected, p < 0.01). By contrast, HbR value indicated significant activation only in the hand somatotopic area of the left SM1 (uncorrected, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Our results appear to indicate that execution of the rehabilitation robotic hand could induce cortical activation. PMID:24570660

  20. A Preliminary Examination of Science Backroom Roles and Activities for Robotic Lunar Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, T.; Deans, M.; Smith, T.; Lee, P.; Heldmann, J.; Pacis, E.; Schreckenghost, D.; Landis, R.; Osborn, J.; Kring, D.; Heggy, E.; Mishkin, A.; Snook, K.; Stoker, C.

    2008-07-01

    To understand the utility of a science backroom for the current lunar architecture, we are developing a new ground control structure for human and robot surface activity. In June 2008, we began examining this structure through a series of analog field tests.

  1. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robotic arm therapy devices that incorporate actuated assistance can enhance arm recovery, motivate patients to practice, and allow therapists to deliver semi-autonomous training. However, because such devices are often complex and actively apply forces, they have not achieved widespread use in rehabilitation clinics or at home. This paper describes the design and pilot testing of a simple, mechanically passive device that provides robot-like assistance for active arm training using the principle of mechanical resonance. Methods The Resonating Arm Exerciser (RAE) consists of a lever that attaches to the push rim of a wheelchair, a forearm support, and an elastic band that stores energy. Patients push and pull on the lever to roll the wheelchair back and forth by about 20 cm around a neutral position. We performed two separate pilot studies of the device. In the first, we tested whether the predicted resonant properties of RAE amplified a user’s arm mobility by comparing his or her active range of motion (AROM) in the device achieved during a single, sustained push and pull to the AROM achieved during rocking. In a second pilot study designed to test the therapeutic potential of the device, eight participants with chronic stroke (35 ± 24 months since injury) and a mean, stable, initial upper extremity Fugl-Meyer (FM) score of 17 ± 8 / 66 exercised with RAE for eight 45 minute sessions over three weeks. The primary outcome measure was the average AROM measured with a tilt sensor during a one minute test, and the secondary outcome measures were the FM score and the visual analog scale for arm pain. Results In the first pilot study, we found people with a severe motor impairment after stroke intuitively found the resonant frequency of the chair, and the mechanical resonance of RAE amplified their arm AROM by a factor of about 2. In the second pilot study, AROM increased by 66% ± 20% (p = 0.003). The mean FM score increase was 8.5 ± 4 pts (p = 0

  2. Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Brian Keith; Fischer, James; Falgout, Jane; Schweers, John

    2013-01-01

    The Basic Operational Robotics Instructional System (BORIS) is a six-degree-of-freedom rotational robotic manipulator system simulation used for training of fundamental robotics concepts, with in-line shoulder, offset elbow, and offset wrist. BORIS is used to provide generic robotics training to aerospace professionals including flight crews, flight controllers, and robotics instructors. It uses forward kinematic and inverse kinematic algorithms to simulate joint and end-effector motion, combined with a multibody dynamics model, moving-object contact model, and X-Windows based graphical user interfaces, coordinated in the Trick Simulation modeling environment. The motivation for development of BORIS was the need for a generic system for basic robotics training. Before BORIS, introductory robotics training was done with either the SRMS (Shuttle Remote Manipulator System) or SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) simulations. The unique construction of each of these systems required some specialized training that distracted students from the ideas and goals of the basic robotics instruction.

  3. Women and Training for Rural Gainful Activities (TRUGA). Training Discussion Paper No. 72.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baidya, Bhuchandra P. R.; Chaudhari, Gayatri

    An evaluative study was conducted of the Training for Rural Gainful Activities (TRUGA) project and methodology in Nepal regarding women's participation and benefits. The study analyzed TRUGA as a project and as a training methodology, assessed the effects of TRUGA activities on women, and evaluated project investment in and benefits to women.…

  4. SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: JUNE 2004 - SEPT. 2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, SESD provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students in EPA Region 4. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities and other Federal Agencies in the areas of Air Quality Monitoring, Hazardous Wast...

  5. Australian Small Business Participation in Training Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Beverley; Walker, Elizabeth; Brown, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of on-line training by small businesses in Australia. It explores the relationship between the owners acceptance and use of the Internet, and their current participation in training opportunities. Design/Methodology/Approach: A sample of small businesses which had participated in an…

  6. Robotics in otolaryngology and head and neck surgery: Recommendations for training and credentialing: A report of the 2015 AHNS education committee, AAO-HNS robotic task force and AAO-HNS sleep disorders committee.

    PubMed

    Gross, Neil D; Holsinger, F Christopher; Magnuson, J Scott; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Genden, Eric M; Ghanem, Tamer Ah; Yaremchuk, Kathleen L; Goldenberg, David; Miller, Matthew C; Moore, Eric J; Morris, Luc Gt; Netterville, James; Weinstein, Gregory S; Richmon, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Training and credentialing for robotic surgery in otolaryngology - head and neck surgery is currently not standardized, but rather relies heavily on industry guidance. This manuscript represents a comprehensive review of this increasingly important topic and outlines clear recommendations to better standardize the practice. The recommendations provided can be used as a reference by individuals and institutions alike, and are expected to evolve over time. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E151-E158. PMID:26950771

  7. Lower-Limb Rehabilitation Robot Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhabba, E. M.; Shafie, A. A.; Khan, M. R.; Ariffin, K.

    2013-12-01

    It is a general assumption that robotics will play an important role in therapy activities within rehabilitation treatment. In the last decade, the interest in the field has grown exponentially mainly due to the initial success of the early systems and the growing demand caused by increasing numbers of stroke patients and their associate rehabilitation costs. As a result, robot therapy systems have been developed worldwide for training of both the upper and lower extremities. This paper investigates and proposes a lower-limb rehabilitation robot that is used to help patients with lower-limb paralysis to improve and resume physical functions. The proposed rehabilitation robot features three rotary joints forced by electric motors providing linear motions. The paper covers mechanism design and optimization, kinematics analysis, trajectory planning, wearable sensors, and the control system design. The design and control system demonstrate that the proposed rehabilitation robot is safe and reliable with the effective design and better kinematic performance.

  8. Bioinspired active whisker sensor for robotic vibrissal tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2014-12-01

    A whisker transducer (WT) inspired by rat’s vibrissal tactile perception is proposed based on a transduction matrix model characterizing the electro-mechanical transduction process in both forward and backward directions. It is capable of acting as an actuator to sweep the whisker and simultaneously as a sensor to sense the force, motion, and mechanical impedance at whisker tip. Its validity is confirmed by numerical simulation using a finite element model. A prototype is then fabricated and its transduction matrix is determined by parameter identification. The calibrated WT can accurately sense mechanical impedance which is directly related to stiffness, mass and damping. Subsequent vibrissal tactile sensing of sandpaper texture reveals that the real part of mechanical impedance sensed by WT is correlated with sandpaper roughness. Texture discrimination is successfully achieved by inputting the real part to a k-means clustering algorithm. The mechanical impedance sensing ability as well as other features of the WT such as simultaneous-actuation-and-sensing makes it a good solution to robotic tactile sensing.

  9. Planning and Development of Lab Training Activities for Powerline Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drosopoulos, A.; Hatziprokopiou, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the planning and development of student training and activities for the Powerline Communications Laboratory at the Technical Education Institute (TEI), Patras, Greece. Powerline communications is currently an active area of research and development that combines three separate specializations from the standard training of…

  10. STS-109 Crew Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Footage shows the crew of STS-109 (Commander Scott Altman, Pilot Duane Carey, Payload Commander John Grunsfeld, and Mission Specialists Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, and Michael Massimino) during various parts of their training. Scenes show the crew's photo session, Post Landing Egress practice, training in Dome Simulator, Extravehicular Activity Training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), and using the Virtual Reality Laboratory Robotic Arm. The crew is also seen tasting food as they choose their menus for on-orbit meals.

  11. Robot-assisted motor training: assistance decreases exploration during reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Sans-Muntadas, Albert; Duarte, Jaime E; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2014-01-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL) is a form of motor learning that robotic therapy devices could potentially manipulate to promote neurorehabilitation. We developed a system that requires trainees to use RL to learn a predefined target movement. The system provides higher rewards for movements that are more similar to the target movement. We also developed a novel algorithm that rewards trainees of different abilities with comparable reward sizes. This algorithm measures a trainee's performance relative to their best performance, rather than relative to an absolute target performance, to determine reward. We hypothesized this algorithm would permit subjects who cannot normally achieve high reward levels to do so while still learning. In an experiment with 21 unimpaired human subjects, we found that all subjects quickly learned to make a first target movement with and without the reward equalization. However, artificially increasing reward decreased the subjects' tendency to engage in exploration and therefore slowed learning, particularly when we changed the target movement. An anti-slacking watchdog algorithm further slowed learning. These results suggest that robotic algorithms that assist trainees in achieving rewards or in preventing slacking might, over time, discourage the exploration needed for reinforcement learning. PMID:25570749

  12. An active damping control of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases by singular perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Huang, Z. Z.; Huang, P. H.

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with active damping control problems of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases. A first investigation of two-time scale fuzzy logic controller with vibration stabilizer for such structures has been proposed, where the dynamics of a robotic system is strongly affected by disturbances due to the base oscillation. Under the assumption of two-time scale, its stability and design procedures are presented for a multiple link manipulator with multiple dimension oscillation. The fast-subsystem controller will damp out the vibration of the oscillatory bases using a PD control method. Hence, the slow-subsystem fuzzy logic controller dominates the trajectory tracking. It can be guaranteed the stability of the internal dynamics by adding a boundary-layer correction based on singular perturbations approach. Experimental results have shown that the proposed control model offers several implementation advantages such as reduced effect of overshoot and chattering, smaller steady state error, and a fast convergent rate. The results of this study can be feasible to various mechanical systems, such as mobile robot, gantry cranes, underwater robot, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases.

  13. Working with Robots: The Real Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fey, Carol

    1986-01-01

    Looks at some of the realities of life with robots: robots aren't replacing entire shifts of workers; a robot is just a tool; regular plant personnel maintain robots; and job category and seniority dictate who is trained to maintain robots. (CT)

  14. Sequencing formally defined reactions for robotic activity: integrating RAPS and GAPPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Marc G.

    1992-11-01

    Construction of robots which operate in unstructured environments has of late produced a number of approaches for transforming sensor readings into activity in the world. Most of these approaches provide no formal semantics for discussing the way in which the internal state of the robot maps to the desired state of the world. We have been investigating the use of the GAPPS programming language as a mechanism for defining robotic reactions. This work has resulted in the creation of reactive modules which mediate between discrete statements about world states to achieve or maintain and the required continuous activity. While relatively complex goals have been achieved with this approach, the syntax and semantics of the GAPPS language is inappropriate for complicated dynamically changing goals. As a result, we have begun investigating the use of Reactive Action Packages (RAPs) as a mechanism for sequencing the activation of GAPPS-based reactive skills. The motivation for using RAPs is twofold. First, the syntax and semantics of the RAPs language integrates smoothly with a traditional non-linear planning system, allowing the construction and execution of plans for increasingly complex tasks. Second, GAPPS-based reactions fulfill a missing component of a RAPs-based controller system, namely the transformation of discrete RAP primitives (e.g., (maintain grasp ?thing)) into continuous physical activity. This paper presents the approach we are taking and discusses some of the issues involved in integrating these two systems.

  15. Restoring ADL function after wrist surgery in children with cerebral palsy: a novel Bilateral robot system design.

    PubMed

    Holley, D; Theriault, A; Kamara, S; Anewenter, V; Hughes, D; Johnson, M J

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral palsy is a leading cause of disability in children and reducing its effects on arm function will improve quality of life. Our goal is to train children with CP after wrist tendon transfer surgery using a robotic therapy system consisting of two robot arms and wrist robots. The therapeutic goal is to determine if the robot training combined with surgery intervention improved functional outcomes significantly more than surgery alone. To accomplish this long-term goal we have developed a Bilateral ADL Exercise Robot, BiADLER aimed at training children with CP in reach to grasp coordination on ADLs. Specifically, the robot will provide active training using an assist-as-needed. This paper presents the design concepts. PMID:24187280

  16. An active view planning method for mobile robots using a trinocular visual sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Y.; Cho, Hyungsuck

    2003-10-01

    The ability of mobile robots to perceive and recognize environments is essential for autonomous navigation. To improve the performance of autonomous environment perception for mobile robots, it is important to effectively plan the next pose (position and orientation) of the sensor system at a current navigation state. In this paper, we propose a next-view-planning method for autonomous map construction needed for mobile robots with visual range sensor systems. The proposed view-planning method mimics the decision-making method of human beings, and uses the occlusion information reduced from the geometric relationship between the sensor view and objects as an important clue for the next sensor view planning. The proposed view-planning algorithms are developed in the following steps: 1) Given a prior map and range measurements sensed at a current location of the mobile robot, it is determined which parts in the map are interested in a view of solving the map uncertainty. 2) Based on the selected potential regions, some candidate poses of the sensor system for the next environment sensing are carefully generated. 3) The created candidates are evaluated by using a specially designed evaluation parameter, and the best one of them is selected as a next sensor position based on a fuzzy decision-making method. In this work, the principle of the view planning method is described in detail, and a series of experimental tests is performed to show the feasibility of the method for autonomous map building. For sensing the environments, an active trinocular vision sensor using laser structured light is utilized, which is mounted on the pan-tilt mechanism of the mobile robot, which is composed of a laser stripe projector and two cameras.

  17. Autogenic training alters cerebral activation patterns in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Schlamann, Marc; Naglatzki, Ryan; de Greiff, Armin; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R

    2010-10-01

    Cerebral activation patterns during the first three auto-suggestive phases of autogenic training (AT) were investigated in relation to perceived experiences. Nineteen volunteers trained in AT and 19 controls were studied with fMRI during the first steps of autogenic training. FMRI revealed activation of the left postcentral areas during AT in those with experience in AT, which also correlated with the level of AT experience. Activation of prefrontal and insular cortex was significantly higher in the group with experience in AT while insular activation was correlated with number years of simple relaxation exercises. Specific activation in subjects experienced in AT may represent a training effect. Furthermore, the correlation of insular activation suggests that these subjects are different from untrained subjects in emotional processing or self-awareness. PMID:20799123

  18. Robot Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Tests with robots and the high-fidelity Hubble Space Telescope mockup astronauts use to train for servicing missions have convinced NASA managers it may be possible to maintain and upgrade the orbiting observatory without sending a space shuttle to do the job. In a formal request last week, the agency gave bidders until July 16 to sub-mit proposals for a robotic mission to the space telescope before the end of 2007. At a minimum, the mission would attach a rocket motor to deorbit the telescope safely when its service life ends. In the best case, it would use state-of-the- art robotics to prolong its life on orbit and install new instruments. With the space shuttle off-limits for the job under strict post-Columbia safety policies set by Administrator Sean O'Keefe, NASA has designed a "straw- man" robotic mission that would use an Atlas V or Delta N to launch a 20,ooO-lb. "Hubble Robotic Vehicle" to service the telescope. There, a robotic arm would grapple it, much as the shuttle does.

  19. Hessian-Regularized Co-Training for Social Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weifeng; Li, Yang; Lin, Xu; Tao, Dacheng; Wang, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Co-training is a major multi-view learning paradigm that alternately trains two classifiers on two distinct views and maximizes the mutual agreement on the two-view unlabeled data. Traditional co-training algorithms usually train a learner on each view separately and then force the learners to be consistent across views. Although many co-trainings have been developed, it is quite possible that a learner will receive erroneous labels for unlabeled data when the other learner has only mediocre accuracy. This usually happens in the first rounds of co-training, when there are only a few labeled examples. As a result, co-training algorithms often have unstable performance. In this paper, Hessian-regularized co-training is proposed to overcome these limitations. Specifically, each Hessian is obtained from a particular view of examples; Hessian regularization is then integrated into the learner training process of each view by penalizing the regression function along the potential manifold. Hessian can properly exploit the local structure of the underlying data manifold. Hessian regularization significantly boosts the generalizability of a classifier, especially when there are a small number of labeled examples and a large number of unlabeled examples. To evaluate the proposed method, extensive experiments were conducted on the unstructured social activity attribute (USAA) dataset for social activity recognition. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms baseline methods, including the traditional co-training and LapCo algorithms. PMID:25259945

  20. Parallel robots in a ground-based telescope active optics system: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Ferragina, L.; Marty, L.; Grado, A.; Di Fiore, L.; De Rosa, R.; La Rana, A.; Busatta, A.

    2007-10-01

    This work deals with the application of parallel robots for the correction of defocus and coma optical aberrations in the case study of the VST (VLT Survey Telescope) telescope, to be installed at the ESO observatory of Cerro Paranal (Chile). The parallel robots are used to change position and orientation of the secondary mirror. The secondary mirror positioning capability is a fundamental part in an active optics system, i.e. a closed loop control system for the minimization of the telescope optical aberrations, where the outer optical feedback coming from the wavefront sensor is used to generate references for the inner motion control loop of the secondary mirror positioning robots. Two devices are presented: a 6-6 Stewart platform where both fixed and mobile platforms are regular and similar hexagons whose vertexes belong to the same plane and are on a circle, and a two stages device composed by a XY table plus a tilt platform. The basic theory of active optics corrections is presented. The kinematics of both devices is solved in connection with the active optics application; first test data are presented.

  1. Active Ageing in a Greying Society: Training for All Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessel, Roger

    2008-01-01

    With the ageing of society, policy-makers are aware of the need to retain older workers in employment. Across Europe, lifelong learning is increasingly important. Adults who remain active longer need (re-)training to maintain their productivity. However, vocational training tends to decline with age. The article analyses European employment policy…

  2. Working Memory Training: Improving Intelligence--Changing Brain Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jausovec, Norbert; Jausovec, Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the study were: to investigate whether training on working memory (WM) could improve fluid intelligence, and to investigate the effects WM training had on neuroelectric (electroencephalography--EEG) and hemodynamic (near-infrared spectroscopy--NIRS) patterns of brain activity. In a parallel group experimental design,…

  3. Brain computer interface for operating a robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisar, Humaira; Balasubramaniam, Hari Chand; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2013-10-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a hardware/software based system that translates the Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals produced by the brain activity to control computers and other external devices. In this paper, we will present a non-invasive BCI system that reads the EEG signals from a trained brain activity using a neuro-signal acquisition headset and translates it into computer readable form; to control the motion of a robot. The robot performs the actions that are instructed to it in real time. We have used the cognitive states like Push, Pull to control the motion of the robot. The sensitivity and specificity of the system is above 90 percent. Subjective results show a mixed trend of the difficulty level of the training activities. The quantitative EEG data analysis complements the subjective results. This technology may become very useful for the rehabilitation of disabled and elderly people.

  4. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Sándor, József; Haidegger, Tamás; Kormos, Katalin; Ferencz, Andrea; Csukás, Domokos; Bráth, Endre; Szabó, Györgyi; Wéber, György

    2013-10-01

    Due to the fast spread of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgical procedures have been changed essentially. The new techniques applied for both abdominal and thoracic procedures provided the possibility for minimally invasive access with all its advantages. Robots - originally developed for industrial applications - were retrofitted for laparoscopic procedures. The currently prevailing robot-assisted surgery is ergonomically more advantageous for the surgeon, as well as for the patient through the more precise preparative activity thanks to the regained 3D vision. The gradual decrease of costs of robotic surgical systems and development of new generations of minimally invasive devices may lead to substantial changes in routine surgical procedures. PMID:24144815

  5. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  6. Human-Robot Interaction: Does Robotic Guidance Force Affect Gait-Related Brain Dynamics during Robot-Assisted Treadmill Walking?

    PubMed Central

    Knaepen, Kristel; Mierau, Andreas; Swinnen, Eva; Fernandez Tellez, Helio; Michielsen, Marc; Kerckhofs, Eric; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine optimal training parameters for robot-assisted treadmill walking, it is essential to understand how a robotic device interacts with its wearer, and thus, how parameter settings of the device affect locomotor control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different levels of guidance force during robot-assisted treadmill walking on cortical activity. Eighteen healthy subjects walked at 2 km.h-1 on a treadmill with and without assistance of the Lokomat robotic gait orthosis. Event-related spectral perturbations and changes in power spectral density were investigated during unassisted treadmill walking as well as during robot-assisted treadmill walking at 30%, 60% and 100% guidance force (with 0% body weight support). Clustering of independent components revealed three clusters of activity in the sensorimotor cortex during treadmill walking and robot-assisted treadmill walking in healthy subjects. These clusters demonstrated gait-related spectral modulations in the mu, beta and low gamma bands over the sensorimotor cortex related to specific phases of the gait cycle. Moreover, mu and beta rhythms were suppressed in the right primary sensory cortex during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking with 100% guidance force, indicating significantly larger involvement of the sensorimotor area during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking. Only marginal differences in the spectral power of the mu, beta and low gamma bands could be identified between robot-assisted treadmill walking with different levels of guidance force. From these results it can be concluded that a high level of guidance force (i.e., 100% guidance force) and thus a less active participation during locomotion should be avoided during robot-assisted treadmill walking. This will optimize the involvement of the sensorimotor cortex which is known to be crucial for motor learning. PMID:26485148

  7. Robotics for welding research

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, G.; Jones, J.

    1984-09-01

    The welding metallurgy research and education program at Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is helping industries make the transition toward automation by training students in robotics. Industry's interest is primarily in pick and place operations, although robotics can increase efficiency in areas other than production. Training students to develop fully automated robotic welding systems will usher in new curriculum requirements in the area of computers and microprocessors. The Puma 560 robot is CSM's newest acquisition for welding research 5 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  8. Robotic Technologies and Rehabilitation: New Tools for Stroke Patients' Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Patrizia; Morone, Giovanni; Rosati, Giulio; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The role of robotics in poststroke patients' rehabilitation has been investigated intensively. This paper presents the state-of-the-art and the possible future role of robotics in poststroke rehabilitation, for both upper and lower limbs. Materials and Methods. We performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, Cochrane, and PeDRO databases using as keywords “robot AND stroke AND rehabilitation.” Results and Discussion. In upper limb robotic rehabilitation, training seems to improve arm function in activities of daily living. In addition, electromechanical gait training after stroke seems to be effective. It is still unclear whether robot-assisted arm training may improve muscle strength, and which electromechanical gait-training device may be the most effective for walking training implementation. Conclusions. In the field of robotic technologies for stroke patients' rehabilitation we identified currently relevant growing points and areas timely for developing research. Among the growing points there is the development of new easily transportable, wearable devices that could improve rehabilitation also after discharge, in an outpatient or home-based setting. For developing research, efforts are being made to establish the ideal type of treatment, the length and amount of training protocol, and the patient's characteristics to be successfully enrolled to this treatment. PMID:24350244

  9. Targeted training modifies oscillatory brain activity in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Tzvetan G.; Carolus, Almut; Schubring, David; Popova, Petia; Miller, Gregory A.; Rockstroh, Brigitte S.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of both domain-specific and broader cognitive remediation protocols have been reported for neural activity and overt performance in schizophrenia (SZ). Progress is limited by insufficient knowledge of relevant neural mechanisms. Addressing neuronal signal resolution in the auditory system as a mechanism contributing to cognitive function and dysfunction in schizophrenia, the present study compared effects of two neuroplasticity-based training protocols targeting auditory–verbal or facial affect discrimination accuracy and a standard rehabilitation protocol on magnetoencephalographic (MEG) oscillatory brain activity in an auditory paired-click task. SZ were randomly assigned to either 20 daily 1-hour sessions over 4 weeks of auditory–verbal training (N = 19), similarly intense facial affect discrimination training (N = 19), or 4 weeks of treatment as usual (TAU, N = 19). Pre-training, the 57 SZ showed smaller click-induced posterior alpha power modulation than did 28 healthy comparison participants, replicating Popov et al. (2011b). Abnormally small alpha decrease 300–800 ms around S2 improved more after targeted auditory–verbal training than after facial affect training or TAU. The improvement in oscillatory brain dynamics with training correlated with improvement on a measure of verbal learning. Results replicate previously reported effects of neuroplasticity-based psychological training on oscillatory correlates of auditory stimulus differentiation, encoding, and updating and indicate specificity of cortical training effects. PMID:26082889

  10. Treadmill Training in Multiple Sclerosis: Can Body Weight Support or Robot Assistance Provide Added Value? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Swinnen, Eva; Beckwée, David; Pinte, Droesja; Meeusen, Romain; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This systematic review critically analyzes the literature on the effectiveness of treadmill training (TT), body-weight-supported TT (BWSTT), and robot-assisted TT (RATT) in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), with focus on gait-related outcome measurements. Method. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Pedro, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library) and reference lists of articles and narrative reviews were searched. Pre-, quasi- and true-experimental studies were included if adult persons with MS were involved in TT, BWSTT, or RATT intervention studies published before 2012. Descriptive analysis was performed and two researchers scored the methodological quality of the studies. Results. 5 true- and 3 preexperimental studies (mean quality score: 66%) have been included. In total 161 persons with MS were involved (TT, BWSTT, or RATT, 6–42 sessions; 2–5x/week; 3–21 weeks). Significant improvements in walking speed and endurance were reported. Furthermore, improvements of step length, double-support time, and Expanded Disability Status Scale were found. Conclusions. There is a limited number of published papers related to TT in persons with MS, concluding that TT, BWSTT, and RATT improve the walking speed and endurance. However, it is not clear what type of TT is most effective. RCTs with larger but more homogeneous populations are needed. PMID:22701177

  11. Robots, Bulldozers, and Other Map Activities for the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Sandra F.

    1984-01-01

    Described are activities which will increase fluency in the use of north, south, east, west, up, and down; reinforce the proper positioning of the cardinal directions on a map grid; relate map symbols to familiar surface features; give practice in identifying map symbols; and provide an opportunity to construct maps. (RM)

  12. Instructional games and activities for criticality safety training

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, B.; McBride, J. )

    1993-01-01

    During the past several years, the Training and Management Systems Division (TMSD) staff of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has designed and developed nuclear criticality safety (NCS) training programs that focus on high trainee involvement through the use of instructional games and activities. This paper discusses the instructional game, initial considerations for developing games, advantages and limitations of games, and how games may be used in developing and implementing NCS training. It also provides examples of the various instructional games and activities used in separate courses designed for Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES's) supervisors and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fuel facility inspectors.

  13. On the Role of Auditory Feedback in Robot-Assisted Movement Training after Stroke: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rodà, Antonio; Avanzini, Federico; Masiero, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to address a topic that is rarely investigated in the literature of technology-assisted motor rehabilitation, that is, the integration of auditory feedback in the rehabilitation device. After a brief introduction on rehabilitation robotics, the main concepts of auditory feedback are presented, together with relevant approaches, techniques, and technologies available in this domain. Current uses of auditory feedback in the context of technology-assisted rehabilitation are then reviewed. In particular, a comparative quantitative analysis over a large corpus of the recent literature suggests that the potential of auditory feedback in rehabilitation systems is currently and largely underexploited. Finally, several scenarios are proposed in which the use of auditory feedback may contribute to overcome some of the main limitations of current rehabilitation systems, in terms of user engagement, development of acute-phase and home rehabilitation devices, learning of more complex motor tasks, and improving activities of daily living. PMID:24382952

  14. Robotic and user interface solutions for hazardous and remote applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.

    1997-12-01

    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) is developing novel robotic and user interface systems to assist in the cleanup activities undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Under DOE`s EM-50 funding and administered by the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), CMU has developed a novel asbestos pipe-insulation abatement robot system, called BOA, and a novel generic user interface control and training console, dubbed RoboCon. The use of BOA will allow the speedier abatement of the vast DOE piping networks clad with hazardous and contaminated asbestos insulation by which overall job costs can be reduced by as much as 50%. RoboCon will allow the DOE to evaluate different remote and robotic system technologies from the overall man-machine performance standpoint, as well as provide a standardized training platform for training site operators in the operation of remote and robotic equipment.

  15. Evolution of Active Sensing for Wall-Following Navigation of Snake-Like Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanev, Ivan; Shimohara, Katsunori

    We propose an approach of automated co-evolution of the optimal values of attributes of active sensing (orientation, range and timing of activation of sensors) and the control of locomotion gaits of a simulated snake-like robot (Snakebot) that result in a fast speed of locomotion in a confined environment. The experimental results illustrate the emergence of a contactless wall-following navigation of fast sidewinding Snakebots. The wall-following is accomplished by means of differential steering, facilitated by the evolutionary defined control sequences incorporating the readings of evolutionary optimized sensors.

  16. Exploratorium: Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic robotics. It explains how to make a vibrating robotic bug and features articles on robots. Contents include: (1) "Where Robot Mice and Robot Men Run Round in Robot Towns" (Ray Bradbury); (2) "Robots at Work" (Jake Widman); (3) "Make a Vibrating Robotic Bug" (Modesto Tamez); (4) "The Robot…

  17. Ultrasonic Localization of Mobile Robot Using Active Beacons and Code Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peca, Marek

    Ultrasonic localization system for planar mobile robot inside of a restricted field is presented. System is based on stationary active beacons and measurement of distances between beacons and robot, using cross-correlation of pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBSes). Due to high demand of dynamic reserve imposed by range ratio in our specific task, both code- as well as frequency-divided media access has been utilized. For the same reason, 1-bit signal quantization has been abandoned in favor of higher resolution in receiver analog-to-digital conversion. Finally, dynamic estimation of the position is recommended over analytic calculation. The final solution uses the extended Kalman filter (EKF), equipped with erroneous measurement detection, initial state computation, and recovery from being lost. EKF also performs data-fusion with odometry measurement. Unlike the approach in majority of works on mobile robot localization, a model, actuated solely by additive process noise, is presented for the data-fusion. It offers estimation of heading angle, and remains locally observable. Simplistic double integrator model of motion dynamics is described, and the importance of clock dynamics is emphasized.

  18. 78 FR 67222 - Proposed Information Collection Activity; Comment Request: Other On-the-Job Training and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection Activity; Comment Request: Other On-the-Job Training and Apprenticeship Training Agreement and Standards and Employer's Application To Provide Job Training AGENCY... information needed to meet statutory requirements for job training program. DATES: Written comments...

  19. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... computer station and directs the movements of a robot. Small surgical tools are attached to the robot's ...

  20. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  1. Medical robotics.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Baroni, Guido; Casolo, Federico; De Momi, Elena; Gini, Giuseppina; Matteucci, Matteo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) and mechatronics play a basic role in medical robotics and computer-aided therapy. In the last three decades, in fact, ICT technology has strongly entered the health-care field, bringing in new techniques to support therapy and rehabilitation. In this frame, medical robotics is an expansion of the service and professional robotics as well as other technologies, as surgical navigation has been introduced especially in minimally invasive surgery. Localization systems also provide treatments in radiotherapy and radiosurgery with high precision. Virtual or augmented reality plays a role for both surgical training and planning and for safe rehabilitation in the first stage of the recovery from neurological diseases. Also, in the chronic phase of motor diseases, robotics helps with special assistive devices and prostheses. Although, in the past, the actual need and advantage of navigation, localization, and robotics in surgery and therapy has been in doubt, today, the availability of better hardware (e.g., microrobots) and more sophisticated algorithms(e.g., machine learning and other cognitive approaches)has largely increased the field of applications of these technologies,making it more likely that, in the near future, their presence will be dramatically increased, taking advantage of the generational change of the end users and the increasing request of quality in health-care delivery and management. PMID:21642033

  2. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  3. The economy of motion of the totally robotic gastric bypass: technique, learning curve, and outcomes of a fellowship-trained, robotic bariatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Starnes, Christopher Cody; Gochnour, David C; Hall, Brian; Wilson, Erik Browning; Snyder, Brad Elliot

    2015-05-01

    We present our technique for a totally robot-assisted laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Moreover, data are presented in relation to a single-surgeon experience with use of the robotic platform in bariatric surgery. We reviewed a single surgeon's console and room time from 2009 to 2013 for all robot-assisted Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (RARYGBs). Revision operations were excluded. There were in total 168 robotic bariatric operations in this time frame. The number of cases performed each year and the cumulative number of each operation were considered as well. The change in console time as related to the number of cases and the change in room time as related to the console time and number of cases were investigated. Complications during this time and their frequency were noted and described. The console time for RARYGB ranged from 131 ± 46 minutes in 2010 to 94 ± 29 minutes in 2013 (P<.05). There were in total 22 complications, for an overall complication rate of 13.1%: four anastomotic strictures (2.4%), seven marginal ulcerations (4.2%), two gastrointestinal bleeds (1.2%), five internal hernias (3.0%), two abdominal pains requiring diagnostic laparoscopy (1.2%), and two gastrointestinal leaks (1.2%). There were no deaths. In this series, the console surgeon performed 168 RARYGBs and had a leak rate of 1.2% and a mortality of 0% within the first 66 cases and a 0% leak rate over the next 102 cases. Thus, we believe that the robot has a decreased caseload requirement to reach proficiency with comparable outcomes versus both the hybrid and purely laparoscopic approaches. PMID:25853837

  4. Human-robot interaction: kinematics and muscle activity inside a powered compliant knee exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Kristel; Beyl, Pieter; Duerinck, Saartje; Hagman, Friso; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2014-11-01

    Until today it is not entirely clear how humans interact with automated gait rehabilitation devices and how we can, based on that interaction, maximize the effectiveness of these exoskeletons. The goal of this study was to gain knowledge on the human-robot interaction, in terms of kinematics and muscle activity, between a healthy human motor system and a powered knee exoskeleton (i.e., KNEXO). Therefore, temporal and spatial gait parameters, human joint kinematics, exoskeleton kinetics and muscle activity during four different walking trials in 10 healthy male subjects were studied. Healthy subjects can walk with KNEXO in patient-in-charge mode with some slight constraints in kinematics and muscle activity primarily due to inertia of the device. Yet, during robot-in-charge walking the muscular constraints are reversed by adding positive power to the leg swing, compensating in part this inertia. Next to that, KNEXO accurately records and replays the right knee kinematics meaning that subject-specific trajectories can be implemented as a target trajectory during assisted walking. No significant differences in the human response to the interaction with KNEXO in low and high compliant assistance could be pointed out. This is in contradiction with our hypothesis that muscle activity would decrease with increasing assistance. It seems that the differences between the parameter settings of low and high compliant control might not be sufficient to observe clear effects in healthy subjects. Moreover, we should take into account that KNEXO is a unilateral, 1 degree-of-freedom device. PMID:24846650

  5. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  6. Robotic Exploration of Moon and Mars: Thematic Education Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J S.; Tobola, K. W.; Lowes, L. L.; Betrue, R.

    2008-01-01

    Safe, sustained, affordable human and robotic exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond is a major NASA goal. Robotic exploration of the Moon and Mars will help pave the way for an expanded human presence in our solar system. To help share the robotic exploration role in the Vision for Space Exploration with classrooms, informal education groups, and the public, our team researched and consolidated the thematic story components and associated education activities into a useful education materials set for educators. We developed the set of materials for a workshop combining NASA Science Mission Directorate and Exploration Systems Mission Directorate engineering, science, and technology to train informal educators on education activities that support the robotic exploration themes. A major focus is on the use of robotic spacecraft and instruments to explore and prepare for the human exploration of the Moon and Mars.

  7. Outcome Evaluation of Active Support Training in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Harman, Anthony D.; Lin, Chwen-Jen; Lee, Wan-ping; Chang, Shu-chuan; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Active Support was implemented for the first time in Taiwan in March, 2009. This study aims to evaluate whether the supervisors and front line managers of residential services receiving Active Support Training (AST) caused a positive impact on their users with intellectual disabilities (ID) while comparing this with their counterparts with ID…

  8. Peer Listening in the Middle School: Training Activities for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazouri, Sandra Peyser; Smith, Miriam Frey

    This workbook presents activities for training middle school student peer listeners. The first of the workbook's 10 chapters contains an introduction to peer listening. Activities include a pretest on a series of true-false statements called the "Peer Listening Inventory," defining the meaning of the words that describe the qualities of a peer…

  9. 30 Years of Neurosurgical Robots: Review and Trends for Manipulators and Associated Navigational Systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, James Andrew; Jivraj, Jamil; Wong, Ronnie; Yang, Victor

    2016-04-01

    This review provides an examination of contemporary neurosurgical robots and the developments that led to them. Improvements in localization, microsurgery and minimally invasive surgery have made robotic neurosurgery viable, as seen by the success of platforms such as the CyberKnife and neuromate. Neurosurgical robots can now perform specific surgical tasks such as skull-base drilling and craniotomies, as well as pedicle screw and cochlear electrode insertions. Growth trends in neurosurgical robotics are likely to continue but may be tempered by concerns over recent surgical robot recalls, commercially-driven surgeon training, and studies that show operational costs for surgical robotic procedures are often higher than traditional surgical methods. We point out that addressing performance issues related to navigation-related registration is an active area of research and will aid in improving overall robot neurosurgery performance and associated costs. PMID:26467553

  10. Damping Control of Liquid Container by Swing-type Active Vibration Reducer on Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Takao

    This paper proposes a damping control of sloshing in a cylindrical container with a swing-type active vibration reducer on a wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The WMR runs along a straight path on a horizontal plane. The container is mounted on the active vibration reducer. A laser displacement sensor is used to observe the liquid level in the container. The container can be tilted in the running direction by the active vibration reducer. A sloshing model is obtained from a spherical pendulum-type sloshing model, which approximately expresses (1, 1)-mode sloshing. The sloshing model is used to design a damping control system. The control system of the active vibration reducer is designed with an inverse model of sloshing and an optimal regulator with a Kalman filter. The WMR is driven by an acceleration pattern designed with an input shaping method. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated through simulation and experimental results.

  11. Multi-robots to micro-surgery: Selected robotic applications at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.

    1996-11-01

    The Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center (ISRC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program organization, pursuing research, development and applications in a wide range of field. Activities range from large-scale applications such as nuclear facility dismantlement for the US Department of Energy (DOE), to aircraft inspection and refurbishment, to automated script and program generation for robotic manufacturing and assembly, to miniature robotic devices and sensors for remote sensing and micro-surgery. This paper describes six activities in the large and small scale that are underway and either nearing technology transfer stage or seeking industrial partners to continue application development. The topics of the applications include multiple arm coordination for intuitively maneuvering large, ungainly work pieces; simulation, analysis and graphical training capability for CP-5 research reactor dismantlement; miniature robots with volumes of 16 cubic centimeters and less developed for inspection and sensor deployment; and biomedical sensors to enhance automated prosthetic device production and fill laparoscopic surgery information gap.

  12. Towards better counselling. Keeping confidences. Training activities.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Presented are two training exercises for health personnel who counsel individuals about the results of blood tests for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The first exercise is preceded by remarks on the importance of trust and confidentiality in the clinical encounter. Then, participants are divided into pairs and instructed to think of a person they trust and to list 10 characteristics of that person. These attributes are compiled for the entire group. Next, small groups of 3-4 participants discuss the following questions: What do you need to say and do when you are counseling someone to help them have confidence in you? What do you need to do to enable them to keep trusting you? What might happen when confidentiality is broken? What are the benefits of maintaining confidentiality? Finally, the small groups are given case scenarios of breaches of client confidentiality and asked to imagine both how they would feel in such a situation and how it could have been prevented. The second exercise seeks to increase counselors' understanding of clients' risk-taking behaviors and their ability to suspend personal judgment by having them describe incidents from their own lives when they took a risk related to sex, relationships, or money. PMID:12291931

  13. Short-term Performance-based Error-augmentation versus Error-reduction Robotic Gait Training for Individuals with Chronic Stroke: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kao, PC; Srivastava, S; Higginson, JS; Agrawal, SK; Scholz, JP

    2016-01-01

    The success of locomotion training with robotic exoskeletons requires identifying control algorithms that effectively retrain gait patterns in neurologically impaired individuals. Here we report how the two training paradigms, performance-based error-augmentation versus error-reduction, modified walking patterns in four chronic post-stroke individuals as a proof-of-concept for future locomotion training following stroke. Stroke subjects were instructed to match a prescribed walking pattern template derived from neurologically intact individuals. Target templates based on the spatial paths of lateral ankle malleolus positions during walking were created for each subject. Robotic forces were applied that either decreased (error-reduction) or increased (error-augmentation) the deviation between subjects' instantaneous malleolus positions and their target template. Subjects' performance was quantified by the amount of deviation between their actual and target malleolus paths. After the error-reduction training, S1 showed a malleolus path with reduced deviation from the target template by 16%. In contrast, S4 had a malleolus path further away from the template with increased deviation by 12%. After the error-augmentation training, S2 had a malleolus path greatly approximating the template with reduced deviation by 58% whereas S3 walked with higher steps than his baseline with increased deviation by 37%. These findings suggest that an error-reduction force field has minimal effects on modifying subject's gait patterns whereas an error-augmentation force field may promote a malleolus path either approximating or exceeding the target walking template. Future investigation will need to evaluate the long-term training effects on over-ground walking and functional capacity. PMID:27336075

  14. Deploying the ODIS robot in Iraq and Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smuda, Bill; Schoenherr, Edward; Andrusz, Henry; Gerhart, Grant

    2005-05-01

    The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have shown the importance of robotic technology as a force multiplier and a tool for moving soldiers out of harms way. Situations on the ground make soldiers performing checkpoint operations easy targets for snipers and suicide bombers. Robotics technology reduces risk to soldiers and other personnel at checkpoints. Early user involvement in innovative and aggressive development and acquisition strategies are the key to moving robotic and associated technology into the hands of the user. This paper updates activity associated with rapid development of the Omni-Directional Inspection System (ODIS) robot for under vehicle inspection and reports on our field experience with robotics in Iraq and Afghanistan. In February of 2004, two TARDEC Engineers departed for a mission to Iraq and Afghanistan with ten ODIS Robots. Six robots were deployed in the Green Zone in Baghdad. Two Robots were deployed at Kandahar Army Airfield and two were deployed at Bagram Army Airfield in Afghanistan. The TARDEC Engineers who performed this mission trained the soldiers and provided initial on site support. They also trained Exponent employees assigned to the Rapid Equipping Force in ODIS repair. We will discuss our initial deployment, lessons learned and future plans.

  15. An arm for a leg: Adapting a robotic arm for gait rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Giulia; Viereck, Ulrich; Platt, Robert; Yen, Sheng-Che; Hasson, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt a multipurpose robotic arm for gait rehabilitation. An advantage of this approach is versatility: a robotic arm can be attached to almost any point on the body to assist with lower- and upper-extremity rehabilitation. This may be more cost-effective than purchasing and training rehabilitation staff to use several specialized rehabilitation robots. Robotic arms also have a more human-like morphology, which may make them less intimidating or alien to patients. In this study a mechanical interface was developed that allows a fast, secure, and safe attachment between a robotic arm and a human limb. The effectiveness of this interface was assessed by having two healthy subjects walk on a treadmill with and without a robotic arm attached to their legs. The robot's ability to follow the subjects' swinging legs was evaluated at slow and fast walking speeds. Two different control schemes were evaluated: one using the standard manufacturer-provided control algorithm, and another using a custom algorithm that actively compensated for robot-human interaction forces. The results showed that both robot control schemes performed well for slow walking. There were negligible differences between subjects' gait kinematics with and without the robot. During fast walking with the robot, similar results were obtained for one subject; however, the second subject demonstrated noticeable gait modifications. Together, these results show the feasibility of adapting a multipurpose robotic arm for gait rehabilitation. PMID:26737153

  16. Skylab 2 prime crew suit up during prelaunch training activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, prime crew pilot of the first manned Skylab mission, is suited up in bldg 5 at JSC during prelaunch training activity. He is assisted by Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., prime crew commander. The man in the left background is wearing a face mask to insure that Conrad, Joseph Kerwin, and Weitz are not exposed to disease prior to launch (25399); Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin (on left), and Weitz assist each other in suiting up in bldg 5 at JSC during pre-launch training activity (25400).

  17. Demonstration of a Spoken Dialogue Interface for Planning Activities of a Semi-autonomous Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowding, John; Frank, Jeremy; Hockey, Beth Ann; Jonsson, Ari; Aist, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling in the face of uncertainty and change pushes the capabilities of both planning and dialogue technologies by requiring complex negotiation to arrive at a workable plan. Planning for use of semi-autonomous robots involves negotiation among multiple participants with competing scientific and engineering goals to co-construct a complex plan. In NASA applications this plan construction is done under severe time pressure so having a dialogue interface to the plan construction tools can aid rapid completion of the process. But, this will put significant demands on spoken dialogue technology, particularly in the areas of dialogue management and generation. The dialogue interface will need to be able to handle the complex dialogue strategies that occur in negotiation dialogues, including hypotheticals and revisions, and the generation component will require an ability to summarize complex plans. This demonstration will describe a work in progress towards building a spoken dialogue interface to the EUROPA planner for the purposes of planning and scheduling the activities of a semi-autonomous robot. A prototype interface has been built for planning the schedule of the Personal Satellite Assistant (PSA), a mobile robot designed for micro-gravity environments that is intended for use on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. The spoken dialogue interface gives the user the capability to ask for a description of the plan, ask specific questions about the plan, and update or modify the plan. We anticipate that a spoken dialogue interface to the planner will provide a natural augmentation or alternative to the visualization interface, in situations in which the user needs very targeted information about the plan, in situations where natural language can express complex ideas more concisely than GUI actions, or in situations in which a graphical user interface is not appropriate.

  18. Robotic-locomotor training as a tool to reduce neuromuscular abnormality in spinal cord injury: the application of system identification and advanced longitudinal modeling.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, Mehdi M; Kindig, Matthew; Niu, Xun; Varoqui, Deborah; Conaway, Petra

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the effect of the LOKOMAT, a robotic-assisted locomotor training system, on the reduction of neuromuscular abnormalities associated with spasticity was examined, for the first time in the spinal cord injury (SCI) population. Twenty-three individuals with chronic incomplete SCI received 1-hour training sessions in the LOKOMAT three times per week, with up to 45 minutes of training per session; matched control group received no intervention. The neuromuscular properties of the spastic ankle were then evaluated prior to training and after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of training. A parallel-cascade system identification technique was used to determine the reflex and intrinsic stiffness of the ankle joint as a function of ankle position at each time point. The slope of the stiffness vs. joint angle curve, i.e. the modulation of stiffness with joint position, was then calculated and tracked over the four-week period. Growth Mixture Modeling (GMM), an advanced statistical method, was then used to classify subjects into subgroups based on similar trends in recovery pattern of slope over time, and Random Coefficient Regression (RCR) was used to model the recovery patterns within each subgroup. All groups showed significant reductions in both reflex and intrinsic slope over time, but subjects in classes with higher baseline values of the slope showed larger improvements over the four weeks of training. These findings suggest that LOKOMAT training may also be useful for reducing the abnormal modulation of neuromuscular properties that arises as secondary effects after SCI. This can advise clinicians as to which patients can benefit the most from LOKOMAT training prior to beginning the training. Further, this study shows that system identification and GMM/RCR can serve as powerful tools to quantify and track spasticity over time in the SCI population. PMID:24187312

  19. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  20. Predicting space telerobotic operator training performance from human spatial ability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Andrew M.; Oman, Charles M.; Galvan, Raquel; Natapoff, Alan

    2013-11-01

    Our goal was to determine whether existing tests of spatial ability can predict an astronaut's qualification test performance after robotic training. Because training astronauts to be qualified robotics operators is so long and expensive, NASA is interested in tools that can predict robotics performance before training begins. Currently, the Astronaut Office does not have a validated tool to predict robotics ability as part of its astronaut selection or training process. Commonly used tests of human spatial ability may provide such a tool to predict robotics ability. We tested the spatial ability of 50 active astronauts who had completed at least one robotics training course, then used logistic regression models to analyze the correlation between spatial ability test scores and the astronauts' performance in their evaluation test at the end of the training course. The fit of the logistic function to our data is statistically significant for several spatial tests. However, the prediction performance of the logistic model depends on the criterion threshold assumed. To clarify the critical selection issues, we show how the probability of correct classification vs. misclassification varies as a function of the mental rotation test criterion level. Since the costs of misclassification are low, the logistic models of spatial ability and robotic performance are reliable enough only to be used to customize regular and remedial training. We suggest several changes in tracking performance throughout robotics training that could improve the range and reliability of predictive models.

  1. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: Characteristics of Trained Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centeio, Erin E.; Erwin, Heather; Castelli, Darla M.

    2014-01-01

    As public health concerns about physical inactivity and childhood obesity continue to rise, researchers are calling for interventions that comprehensively lead to more opportunities to participate in physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics and attitudes of trained physical education teachers during the…

  2. Beyond Robotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tally, Beth; Laverdure, Nate

    2006-01-01

    Chantilly High School Academy Robotics Team Number 612 from Chantilly, Virginia, is an award-winning team of high school students actively involved with FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), a multinational nonprofit organization that inspires students to transform culture--making science, math, engineering and…

  3. Intelligent robots and computer vision XII: Active vision and 3D methods; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 8, 9, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Topics addressed include active vision for intelligent robots, 3D vision methods, tracking in robotic and vision, visual servoing and egomotion in robotics, egomotion and time-sequential processing, and control and planning in robotics and vision. Particular attention is given to invariant in visual motion, generic target tracking using color, recognizing 3D articulated-line-drawing objects, range data acquisition from an encoded structured light pattern, and 3D edge orientation detection. Also discussed are acquisition of randomly moving objects by visual guidance, fundamental principles of robot vision, high-performance visual servoing for robot end-point control, a long sequence analysis of human motion using eigenvector decomposition, and sequential computer algorithms for printed circuit board inspection.

  4. The Ideal Science Student: Exploring the Relationship of Students' Perceptions to Their Problem Solving Activity in a Robotics Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Florence; Lin, Xiadong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of middle school students' perceptions of the ideal science student to their problem solving activity and conceptual understanding in the applied science area of robotics. Twenty-six 11 and 12 year-olds (22 boys) attending a summer camp for academically advanced students participated in the…

  5. An Exploration of Developing Active Exploring and Problem Solving Skill Lego Robot Course by the Application of Anchored Instruction Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chen-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, researches had shown that the development of problem solving skill became important for education, and the educational robots are capable for promoting students not only understand the physical and mathematical concepts, but also have active and constructive learning. Meanwhile, the importance of situation in education is rising,…

  6. A complete solar eruption activity processing tool with robotization and real time (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ganghua; Zhao, Cui; Yang, Xiao

    2014-07-01

    Intense solar active events have made significant impacts on the modern high technology system and living environment of human being, therefore solar activities forecast and space weather forecast are getting more and more attention. Meanwhile, data volume acquisitioned by solar monitor facility is growing larger and larger due to the requirement of multiple dimensions observation and high temporal and spatial resolution. As staffs of a solar monitor data producer, we are encouraged to adopt new techniques and methods to provide valuable information to solar activities forecast organization and the other related users, and provide convenient products and tools to the users. In the previous paper "A complete solar eruption activities processing tool with robotization and real time (I)", we presented a fully automatic and real time detecting architecture for different solar erupt activities. In this paper, we present new components of new data sets in the architecture design, latest progresses on automatic recognition of solar flare, filament and magnetic field, and a newly introduced method with which solar photospheric magnetic nonpotentiality parameters are processed in real time, then its result directly can be used in solar active forecast.

  7. Design and control of active vision based mechanisms for intelligent robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liwei; Marefat, Michael M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a design of an active vision system for intelligent robot application purposes. The system has the degrees of freedom of pan, tilt, vergence, camera height adjustment, and baseline adjustment with a hierarchical control system structure. Based on this vision system, we discuss two problems involved in the binocular gaze stabilization process: fixation point selection and vergence disparity extraction. A hierarchical approach to determining point of fixation from potential gaze targets using evaluation function representing human visual behavior to outside stimuli is suggested. We also characterize different visual tasks in two cameras for vergence control purposes, and a phase-based method based on binarized images to extract vergence disparity for vergence control is presented. A control algorithm for vergence control is discussed.

  8. Using tethered robotics to launch flying and hovering robot agents for tactical air superiority in land warfare and anti-terrorist activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Danny; McKerrow, Phillip

    2004-08-01

    This paper discusses conceptual ideas and simple experiments with prototypes of an aerial tethered robot carried by a hovering platform with a long cable. The robot includes a gravity stabilized sensing head and can host a cluster of robotic agents which are deployed very near to the ground target without exposing the host platform to risk.

  9. Active relearning for robust supervised training of emphysema patterns.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, Sushravya; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Karwoski, Ronald A; Bartholmai, Brian J; Robb, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Radiologists are adept at recognizing the character and extent of lung parenchymal abnormalities in computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the inconsistent differential diagnosis due to subjective aggregation necessitates the exploration of automated classification based on supervised or unsupervised learning. The robustness of supervised learning depends on the training samples. Towards optimizing emphysema classification, we introduce a physician-in-the-loop feedback approach to minimize ambiguity in the selected training samples. An experienced thoracic radiologist selected 412 regions of interest (ROIs) across 15 datasets to represent 124, 129, 139 and 20 training samples of mild, moderate, severe emphysema and normal appearance, respectively. Using multi-view (multiple metrics to capture complementary features) inductive learning, an ensemble of seven un-optimized support vector models (SVM) each based on a specific metric was constructed in less than 6 s. The training samples were classified using seven SVM models and consensus labels were created using majority voting. In the active relearning phase, the ensemble-expert label conflicts were resolved by the expert. The efficacy and generality of active relearning feedback was assessed in the optimized parameter space of six general purpose classifiers across the seven dissimilarity metrics. The proposed just-in-time active relearning feedback with un-optimized SVMs yielded 15 % increase in classification accuracy and 25 % reduction in the number of support vectors. The average improvement in accuracy of six classifiers in their optimized parameter space was 21 %. The proposed cooperative feedback method enhances the quality of training samples used to construct automated classification of emphysematous CT scans. Such an approach could lead to substantial improvement in quantification of emphysema. PMID:24771303

  10. Teaching Human Poses Interactively to a Social Robot

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Pacheco, Victor; Malfaz, Maria; Fernandez, Fernando; Salichs, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The main activity of social robots is to interact with people. In order to do that, the robot must be able to understand what the user is saying or doing. Typically, this capability consists of pre-programmed behaviors or is acquired through controlled learning processes, which are executed before the social interaction begins. This paper presents a software architecture that enables a robot to learn poses in a similar way as people do. That is, hearing its teacher's explanations and acquiring new knowledge in real time. The architecture leans on two main components: an RGB-D (Red-, Green-, Blue- Depth) -based visual system, which gathers the user examples, and an Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) system, which processes the speech describing those examples. The robot is able to naturally learn the poses the teacher is showing to it by maintaining a natural interaction with the teacher. We evaluate our system with 24 users who teach the robot a predetermined set of poses. The experimental results show that, with a few training examples, the system reaches high accuracy and robustness. This method shows how to combine data from the visual and auditory systems for the acquisition of new knowledge in a natural manner. Such a natural way of training enables robots to learn from users, even if they are not experts in robotics. PMID:24048336

  11. Robot and robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E. (Inventor); Marzwell, Neville I. (Inventor); Wall, Jonathan N. (Inventor); Poole, Michael D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A robot and robot system that are capable of functioning in a zero-gravity environment are provided. The robot can include a body having a longitudinal axis and having a control unit and a power source. The robot can include a first leg pair including a first leg and a second leg. Each leg of the first leg pair can be pivotally attached to the body and constrained to pivot in a first leg pair plane that is substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body.

  12. Educational and training activities in personal dosimetry in Greece.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, P; Kalef-Ezra, J; Pafilis, C; Kamenopoulou, V

    2011-03-01

    An individual monitoring programme is one of the main components of any radiation protection programme since it constitutes the mean for assessing and thus optimising the doses of occupationally exposed workers. The Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the competent authority for radiation protection and nuclear safety in Greece. GAEC's educational and training activities in the field of occupational radiation protection at the national and regional (Eastern Europe) level are presented, along with the relevant activities of the University of Ioannina in the region of North-West Greece, as an example of a local education and training programme. The curricula of two postgraduate courses addressed to qualified experts and medical physics experts and mainly the modules dedicated to individual monitoring are discussed as well. PMID:21115448

  13. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods. PMID:22714030

  14. Combining Robotic Training and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Severe Upper Limb-Impaired Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Capone, Fioravante; Di Pino, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Florio, Lucia; Zollo, Loredana; Simonetti, Davide; Ranieri, Federico; Brunelli, Nicoletta; Corbetto, Marzia; Miccinilli, Sandra; Bravi, Marco; Milighetti, Stefano; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Sterzi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that both robot-assisted rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation can produce a slight improvement in severe chronic stroke patients. It is still unknown whether their combination can produce synergistic and more consistent improvements. Safety and efficacy of this combination has been assessed within a proof-of-principle, double-blinded, semi-randomized, sham-controlled trial. Inhibitory continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) was delivered on the affected hemisphere, in order to improve the response to the following robot-assisted therapy via a homeostatic increase of learning capacity. Twenty severe upper limb-impaired chronic stroke patients were randomized to robot-assisted therapy associated with real or sham cTBS, delivered for 10 working days. Eight real and nine sham patients completed the study. Change in Fugl-Meyer was chosen as primary outcome, while changes in several quantitative indicators of motor performance extracted by the robot as secondary outcomes. The treatment was well-tolerated by the patients and there were no adverse events. All patients achieved a small, but significant, Fugl-Meyer improvement (about 5%). The difference between the real and the sham cTBS groups was not significant. Among several secondary end points, only the Success Rate (percentage of targets reached by the patient) improved more in the real than in the sham cTBS group. This study shows that a short intensive robot-assisted rehabilitation produces a slight improvement in severe upper-limb impaired, even years after the stroke. The association with homeostatic metaplasticity-promoting non-invasive brain stimulation does not augment the clinical gain in patients with severe stroke. PMID:27013950

  15. Combining Robotic Training and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Severe Upper Limb-Impaired Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Capone, Fioravante; Di Pino, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Florio, Lucia; Zollo, Loredana; Simonetti, Davide; Ranieri, Federico; Brunelli, Nicoletta; Corbetto, Marzia; Miccinilli, Sandra; Bravi, Marco; Milighetti, Stefano; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Sterzi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that both robot-assisted rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation can produce a slight improvement in severe chronic stroke patients. It is still unknown whether their combination can produce synergistic and more consistent improvements. Safety and efficacy of this combination has been assessed within a proof-of-principle, double-blinded, semi-randomized, sham-controlled trial. Inhibitory continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) was delivered on the affected hemisphere, in order to improve the response to the following robot-assisted therapy via a homeostatic increase of learning capacity. Twenty severe upper limb-impaired chronic stroke patients were randomized to robot-assisted therapy associated with real or sham cTBS, delivered for 10 working days. Eight real and nine sham patients completed the study. Change in Fugl-Meyer was chosen as primary outcome, while changes in several quantitative indicators of motor performance extracted by the robot as secondary outcomes. The treatment was well-tolerated by the patients and there were no adverse events. All patients achieved a small, but significant, Fugl-Meyer improvement (about 5%). The difference between the real and the sham cTBS groups was not significant. Among several secondary end points, only the Success Rate (percentage of targets reached by the patient) improved more in the real than in the sham cTBS group. This study shows that a short intensive robot-assisted rehabilitation produces a slight improvement in severe upper-limb impaired, even years after the stroke. The association with homeostatic metaplasticity-promoting non-invasive brain stimulation does not augment the clinical gain in patients with severe stroke. PMID:27013950

  16. Humanlike robot hands controlled by brain activity arouse illusion of ownership in operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimardani, Maryam; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Operators of a pair of robotic hands report ownership for those hands when they hold image of a grasp motion and watch the robot perform it. We present a novel body ownership illusion that is induced by merely watching and controlling robot's motions through a brain machine interface. In past studies, body ownership illusions were induced by correlation of such sensory inputs as vision, touch and proprioception. However, in the presented illusion none of the mentioned sensations are integrated except vision. Our results show that during BMI-operation of robotic hands, the interaction between motor commands and visual feedback of the intended motions is adequate to incorporate the non-body limbs into one's own body. Our discussion focuses on the role of proprioceptive information in the mechanism of agency-driven illusions. We believe that our findings will contribute to improvement of tele-presence systems in which operators incorporate BMI-operated robots into their body representations.

  17. Humanlike robot hands controlled by brain activity arouse illusion of ownership in operators.

    PubMed

    Alimardani, Maryam; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Operators of a pair of robotic hands report ownership for those hands when they hold image of a grasp motion and watch the robot perform it. We present a novel body ownership illusion that is induced by merely watching and controlling robot's motions through a brain machine interface. In past studies, body ownership illusions were induced by correlation of such sensory inputs as vision, touch and proprioception. However, in the presented illusion none of the mentioned sensations are integrated except vision. Our results show that during BMI-operation of robotic hands, the interaction between motor commands and visual feedback of the intended motions is adequate to incorporate the non-body limbs into one's own body. Our discussion focuses on the role of proprioceptive information in the mechanism of agency-driven illusions. We believe that our findings will contribute to improvement of tele-presence systems in which operators incorporate BMI-operated robots into their body representations. PMID:23928891

  18. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury. PMID:26611563

  19. Recognition of user's activity for adaptive cooperative assistance in robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nessi, Federico; Beretta, Elisa; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; De Momi, Elena

    2015-01-01

    During hands-on robotic surgery it is advisable to know how and when to provide the surgeon with different assistance levels with respect to the current performed activity. Gesteme-based on-line classification requires the definition of a complete set of primitives and the observation of large signal percentage. In this work an on-line, gesteme-free activity recognition method is addressed. The algorithm models the guidance forces and the resulting trajectory of the manipulator with 26 low-level components of a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). Temporal switching among the components is modeled with a Hidden Markov Model (HMM). Tests are performed in a simplified scenario over a pool of 5 non-surgeon users. Classification accuracy resulted higher than 89% after the observation of a 300 ms-long signal. Future work will address the use of the current detected activity to on-line trigger different strategies to control the manipulator and adapt the level of assistance. PMID:26737482

  20. Contextual action recognition and target localization with an active allocation of attention on a humanoid robot.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, Dimitri; Chinellato, Eris; Sarabia, Miguel; Demiris, Yiannis

    2013-09-01

    Exploratory gaze movements are fundamental for gathering the most relevant information regarding the partner during social interactions. Inspired by the cognitive mechanisms underlying human social behaviour, we have designed and implemented a system for a dynamic attention allocation which is able to actively control gaze movements during a visual action recognition task exploiting its own action execution predictions. Our humanoid robot is able, during the observation of a partner's reaching movement, to contextually estimate the goal position of the partner's hand and the location in space of the candidate targets. This is done while actively gazing around the environment, with the purpose of optimizing the gathering of information relevant for the task. Experimental results on a simulated environment show that active gaze control, based on the internal simulation of actions, provides a relevant advantage with respect to other action perception approaches, both in terms of estimation precision and of time required to recognize an action. Moreover, our model reproduces and extends some experimental results on human attention during an action perception. PMID:23981534

  1. Parasuicidal behavior on an active duty army training post.

    PubMed

    Koshes, R J; Rothberg, J M

    1992-07-01

    The incidence of suicidal behavior among active duty Army personnel at a training post has not been the subject of analysis since the advent of the all-volunteer military. A review of admissions over 16 consecutive months showed most of the behaviors to be parasuicidal, with low levels of lethality and high rescuability. Compared to previously published studies, the characteristics of these soldiers are little changed over the past 25 years. This report suggests a standard method for handling suicidal behavior which includes an active role for psychiatric consultation to units and commanders. PMID:1528469

  2. Self-organization via active exploration in robotic applications. Phase 2: Hybrid hardware prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegmen, Haluk

    1993-01-01

    In many environments human-like intelligent behavior is required from robots to assist and/or replace human operators. The purpose of these robots is to reduce human time and effort in various tasks. Thus the robot should be robust and as autonomous as possible in order to eliminate or to keep to a strict minimum its maintenance and external control. Such requirements lead to the following properties: fault tolerance, self organization, and intelligence. A good insight into implementing these properties in a robot can be gained by considering human behavior. In the first phase of this project, a neural network architecture was developed that captures some fundamental aspects of human categorization, habit, novelty, and reinforcement behavior. The model, called FRONTAL, is a 'cognitive unit' regulating the exploratory behavior of the robot. In the second phase of the project, FRONTAL was interfaced with an off-the-shelf robotic arm and a real-time vision system. The components of this robotic system, a review of FRONTAL, and simulation studies are presented in this report.

  3. Laparoscopic gastric bypass to robotic gastric bypass: time and cost commitment involved in training and transitioning an academic surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Lyn-Sue, Jerome R; Winder, Josh S; Kotch, Shannon; Colello, Jacob; Docimo, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the gold standard procedure for weight loss. This relatively complex procedure has excellent outcomes when performed via laparoscopy. The advent of the DaVinci robotic platform has been a technological advancement. Our goal is to provide information regarding the cost, time commitment, and advantages of transitioning an LRYGB program to an RRYGB program in an academic setting. We retrospectively reviewed the last 25 laparoscopic gastric bypass procedures and the first 25 robotic gastric bypass procedures performed by a single surgeon. We compared clinical outcomes and focused on time and hospital cost during this transition phase. There was no significant demographic difference between the groups. The mean age was 41.7 (RRYGB) years vs 43.4 (LRYGM) years. The mean BMI were similar between groups, 45.3 vs 46.5 kg/m(2) for RRYGB and LRYGB. No anastomotic leaks or mortalities were noted. There was one anastomotic stricture in both groups. Excess weight loss was similar in both groups at 1 year. There was a significant increase in operative time with RRYGB, mean 241 min vs mean 174 min (p = 0.0005). Operative time fell by 25 min after the first 10 cases. The hospital cost was also increased with RRYGB mean $5922 vs $4395 (p = 0.03). Transitioning from a laparoscopic to a robotic practice can be done safely, however, the initial operative times were longer and the hospital cost was higher for robotic gastric bypass. We hope in the future that these will decrease after overcoming the learning and as the technology becomes widespread. PMID:26983848

  4. Robotics in shoulder rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sicuri, Chiara; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Merolla, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the last few decades, several researches have been conducted in the field of robotic rehabilitation to meet the intensive, repetitive and task-oriented training, with the goal to recover the motor function. Up to now, robotic rehabilitation studies of the upper extremity have generally focused on stroke survivors leaving less explored the field of orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. In this review we analyse the present status of robotic technologies, in order to understand which are the current indications and which may be the future perspective for their application in both neurological and orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. PMID:25332937

  5. 78 FR 40551 - Agency Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity Under OMB Review...: Title: Monthly Certification of Flight Training, VA Form 22-6553c. OMB Control Number: 2900-0162. Type... vocational flight training. VA Form 22-6553c serves as a report of flight training pursued and termination...

  6. Husar-8 Rover Swarm Collective Activity Around Hunveyor-8: Planetary Robotics at the Kecskemét College, GAMF Faculty, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasztor, A.; Simon, T.; Nagy, Sz.; Bérczi, Sz.

    2009-03-01

    By constructing the HUSAR-8 model the GAMF Faculty at Kecskemét College began student robotics program with swarm strategy for navigation on the field trip in order to develop teaching programming and trigger student personal activity.

  7. Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science in West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustina, C.; Fajri, P. N.; Fathoni, F.; Gusti, T. P.; Harifa, A. C.; Hendra, Y.; Hertanti, D. R.; Lusiana, N.; Rohmat, F. I.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Pandjaitan, N.; Santoso, R.; Suharyanto, A.

    2013-12-01

    In hydrologic science and engineering, one challenge is establishing a common framework for discussion among workers from different disciplines. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, nine current or recent graduate students from four Indonesian universities participated in a week of training activities during June 2013. Students had backgrounds in agricultural engineering, civil and environmental engineering, water resources engineering, natural resources management, and soil science. Professors leading the training, which was based at Bogor Agricultural University (IPB) in west Java, included an agricultural engineer, civil engineers, and geologists. Activities in surface-water hydrology included geomorphic assessment of streams (measuring slope, cross-section, and bed-clast size) and gauging stream flow (wading with top-setting rods and a current meter for a large stream, and using a bucket and stopwatch for a small stream). Groundwater-hydrology activities included measuring depth to water in wells, conducting a pumping test with an observation well, and performing vertical electrical soundings to infer hydrostratigraphy. Students also performed relatively simple water-quality measurements (temperature, electrical conductivity, pH, and alkalinity) in streams, wells, and springs. The group analyzed data with commercially-available software such as AQTESOLV for well hydraulics, freeware such as the U.S. Geological Survey alkalinity calculator, and Excel spreadsheets. Results were discussed in the context of landscape position, lithology, and land use.

  8. Behavior analysis and training-a methodology for behavior engineering.

    PubMed

    Colombetti, M; Dorigo, M; Borghi, G

    1996-01-01

    We propose Behavior Engineering as a new technological area whose aim is to provide methodologies and tools for developing autonomous robots. Building robots is a very complex engineering enterprise that requires the exact definition and scheduling of the activities which a designer, or a team of designers, should follow. Behavior Engineering is, within the autonomous robotics realm, the equivalent of more established disciplines like Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering. In this article we first give a detailed presentation of a Behavior Engineering methodology, which we call Behavior Analysis and Training (BAT), where we stress the role of learning and training. Then we illustrate the application of the BAT methodology to three cases involving different robots: two mobile robots and a manipulator. Results show the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:18263040

  9. Firefighter noise exposure during training activities and general equipment use.

    PubMed

    Root, Kyle S; Schwennker, Catherine; Autenrieth, Daniel; Sandfort, Delvin R; Lipsey, Tiffany; Brazile, William J

    2013-01-01

    Multiple noise measurements were taken on 6 types of fire station equipment and 15 types of emergency response vehicle-related equipment used by firefighters during routine and emergency operations at 10 fire stations. Five of the six types of fire station equipment, when measured at a distance of one meter and ear level, emitted noise equal to or greater than 85 dBA, including lawn maintenance equipment, snow blowers, compressors, and emergency alarms. Thirteen of 15 types of equipment located on the fire engines emitted noise levels equal to or greater than 85 dBA, including fans, saws, alarms, and extrication equipment. In addition, noise measurements were taken during fire engine operations, including the idling vehicle, vehicle sirens, and water pumps. Results indicated that idling fire-engine noise levels were below 85 dBA; however, during water pump and siren use, noise levels exceeded 85 dBA, in some instances, at different locations around the trucks where firefighters would be stationed during emergency operations. To determine if the duration and use of fire fighting equipment was sufficient to result in overexposures to noise during routine training activities, 93 firefighter personal noise dosimetry samples were taken during 10 firefighter training activities. Two training activities per sampling day were monitored during each sampling event, for a mean exposure time of 70 min per day. The noise dosimetry samples were grouped based on job description to compare noise exposures between the different categories of job tasks commonly associated with fire fighting. The three job categories were interior, exterior, and engineering. Mean personal dosimetry results indicated that the average noise exposure was 78 dBA during the training activities that lasted 70 min on average. There was no significant difference in noise exposure between each of the three job categories. Although firefighters routinely use equipment and emergency response vehicles that

  10. Applying robotics to HAZMAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Richard V.; Edmonds, Gary O.

    1994-01-01

    The use of robotics in situations involving hazardous materials can significantly reduce the risk of human injuries. The Emergency Response Robotics Project, which began in October 1990 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is developing a teleoperated mobile robot allowing HAZMAT (hazardous materials) teams to remotely respond to incidents involving hazardous materials. The current robot, called HAZBOT III, can assist in locating characterizing, identifying, and mitigating hazardous material incidents without risking entry team personnel. The active involvement of the JPL Fire Department HAZMAT team has been vital in developing a robotic system which enables them to perform remote reconnaissance of a HAZMAT incident site. This paper provides a brief review of the history of the project, discusses the current system in detail, and presents other areas in which robotics can be applied removing people from hazardous environments/operations.

  11. Applying robotics to HAZMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Richard V.; Edmonds, Gary O.

    1994-02-01

    The use of robotics in situations involving hazardous materials can significantly reduce the risk of human injuries. The Emergency Response Robotics Project, which began in October 1990 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is developing a teleoperated mobile robot allowing HAZMAT (hazardous materials) teams to remotely respond to incidents involving hazardous materials. The current robot, called HAZBOT III, can assist in locating characterizing, identifying, and mitigating hazardous material incidents without risking entry team personnel. The active involvement of the JPL Fire Department HAZMAT team has been vital in developing a robotic system which enables them to perform remote reconnaissance of a HAZMAT incident site. This paper provides a brief review of the history of the project, discusses the current system in detail, and presents other areas in which robotics can be applied removing people from hazardous environments/operations.

  12. An Overview of Propulsion Concept Studies and Risk Reduction Activities for Robotic Lunar Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Story, George; Burnside, Chris; Kudlach, Al

    2010-01-01

    In support of designing robotic lunar lander concepts, the propulsion team at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), with participation from industry, conducted a series of trade studies on propulsion concepts with an emphasis on light-weight, advanced technology components. The results suggest a high-pressure propulsion system may offer some benefits in weight savings and system packaging. As part of the propulsion system, a solid rocket motor was selected to provide a large impulse to reduce the spacecraft s velocity prior to the lunar descent. In parallel to this study effort, the team also began technology risk reduction testing on a high thrust-to-weight descent thruster and a high-pressure regulator. A series of hot-fire tests was completed on the descent thruster in vacuum conditions at NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in New Mexico in 2009. Preparations for a hot-fire test series on the attitude control thruster at WSTF and for pressure regulator testing are now underway. This paper will provide an overview of the concept trade study results along with insight into the risk mitigation activities conducted to date.

  13. Introducing the potential of antimicrobial materials for human and robotic spaceflight activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Claudia; Reitz, Guenther; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra; Hans, Michael; Muecklich, Frank

    their relative short reaction time, long efficiency and functionality, broad application to reduce (micro-)biological contamination, high inactivation rates, sustainability, and avoidance of microbial resistance. Methods like contact killing measurement are one of the reliable ways to examine the effect of metal surfaces on the inactivation of microorganisms. We conducted contact killing experiments, in which we exposed human-associated microorganisms like Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus sp. on copper and stainless steel to detect and evaluate the potential incorporation of those materials in future spacecraft components. In contrast to an exposure on stainless steel microorganisms exposed on copper died within a few hours and therefore do not have the ability to proliferate, build protecting biofilms or even survive. The application of different surfaces and antimicrobial substances such as copper and silver, as well as testing other model organisms are still under examination. The results of our experiments are also very promising to other research areas, e.g., clinical application. Here, we would like to present our first data and ideas on the utilization of antimicrobial metal-based surfaces for human and robotic spaceflight activities as a beneficial method to reduce microbial contamination. \\underline{References} Horneck G et al. (2010) Space microbiology. Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 74:121-156. Vaishampayan P et al. (2013) New perspectives on viable microbial communities in low-biomass cleanroom environments. ISME J. 7:312-324. van Houdt R et al. (2012) Microbial contamination monitoring and control during human space missions. Planet. Space Sci. 60:115-120.

  14. Effects of bail activation sequence and feed availability on cow traffic and milk harvesting capacity in a robotic rotary dairy.

    PubMed

    Kolbach, R; Kerrisk, K L; Garcia, S C; Dhand, N K

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different bail activation sequences in combination with feed availability on cow traffic and harvesting capacity in a novel prototype robotic rotary (RR; DeLaval AMR, Tumba, Sweden). The RR can milk up to 50 cows/h. However, in voluntary cow traffic systems, the number of cows presenting may be low at certain times of the day (or during certain months or seasons in seasonal calving systems). In these circumstances, the ratio of active bails to the number of cows available may be undesirably high, with consequential negative effects on system efficiency and milk quality (the RR does not flush individual units automatically after each milking). Activating only 50% of the bails may be a management strategy chosen to cope with periods of underutilization. Four treatments with a total activation of 50% of bails [8 bails with activation sequences of 8, 4, 2, or 1 consecutive bail(s)], with or without the presence of feed on the RR, were observed during sixteen 4-h observation periods after a system wash. The absence of feed resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of available bails remaining idle, but no significant differences were observed across the 4 bail activation sequences. Overall, the effect of bail activation sequence on cow traffic was negligible, but the sequences that had more consecutive bail activations resulted in more robot operations being conducted simultaneously and more milk being harvested per minute of robot operation time. A feeding function upon entry to the RR platform, in combination with bails activated sequentially, would lead to a more efficient use of the RR. PMID:23415530

  15. Robot Technicians: Is There a Need?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minty, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    The study attempted to determine needs for training robotic technicians in Michigan. The survey had three parts: (1) needed technical specialities, (2) current problems with robot maintenance and repair, and (3) number of robots needed to keep a full-time technician occupied. (CH)

  16. An overview of artificial intelligence and robotics. Volume 2: Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the rapidly changing field of robotics. The report incorporates definitions of the various types of robots, a summary of the basic concepts, utilized in each of the many technical areas, review of the state of the art and statistics of robot manufacture and usage. Particular attention is paid to the status of robot development, the organizations involved, their activities, and their funding.

  17. Virtual reality surgical simulators- a prerequisite for robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rajanbabu, Anupama; Drudi, Laura; Lau, Susie; Press, Joshua Z; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2014-06-01

    The field of computer assisted minimally invasive surgery is rapidly expanding worldwide, including in India. With more hospitals in India contemplating the acquisition of a robotic platform, training of robotic surgeons is becoming essential. Virtual reality simulators can be used for surgeons to become acquainted with the robotic console prior to live surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the amount of simulator training required before a surgeon first operates on the da Vinci® Surgical System. Simulations were conducted on the Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci® Robot Skill Simulator using the software obtained from Mimic Technologies. Participants included attending staff surgeons experienced in robotic surgery and novices. A set of seven activities were chosen for each participant. Based on the mean exercise score from the first attempt, staff surgeons outperformed the novices in all exercises. However, the difference in score between the staff and the novices decreased after the participants repeated the exercises and by the sixth attempt most of the novices obtained similar scores to the staff, suggesting that this might be at present the minimum set of repetitions indicated (or required) prior to performing life robotic surgery. PMID:25114465

  18. Humans and Robots. Educational Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This brief discusses human movement and robotic human movement simulators. The activity for students in grades 5-12 provides a history of robotic movement and includes making an End Effector for the robotic arms used on the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS). (MVL)

  19. Active vision system for planning and programming of industrial robots in one-of-a-kind manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Ulrich; Schmidt, Achim

    1995-10-01

    The aspects of automation technology in industrial one-of-a-kind manufacturing are discussed. An approach to improve the quality and cost relation is developed and an overview of an 3D- vision supported automation system is given. This system is based on an active vision sensor for 3D-geometry feedback. Its measurement principle, the coded light approach, is explained. The experimental environment for the technical validation of the automation approach is demonstrated, where robot based processes (assembly, arc welding and flame cutting) are graphically simulated and off-line programmed. A typical process sequence for automated one- of-a-kind manufacturing is described. The results of this research development are applied to a project on the automated disassembling of car parts for recycling using industrial robots.

  20. The Importance of TA Training in an Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, W. H.

    2000-05-01

    We are now in our fourth year of teaching a 1000+ student per year introductory physics course in an active-learning format. Students meet for five hours per week in what we call discussion/lab sections. They work in groups of five, with twenty five students in each section. The discussion/lab is truly the heart of the course, rather than the once-a-week lecture section. During a typical two and one-half hour discussion/lab, students typically complete three activity cycles. Each cycle consists of individual and small group work in response to written prompts, sometimes involving the carrying out of a measurement or lab-type activity. Then each small group arrives at their own consensus, presents and/or defends their work to the entire class, which often leads to animated whole-class discussion. The majority of these sections are taught by first and second year graduate student teaching assistants. The role of the instructor in these sections is much more as facilitator than presenter of information and/or lab procedures, the role a typical beginning graduate student is familiar with. However, we have found that the vast majority of our TAs quickly become effective instructors in their new role, if they participate in our first-quarter instructor professional development and training program. Our program begins with an intense three day workshop just prior to the start of classes and then continues with an approximately five/hour per week component during the first quarter. In this talk I will emphasize the interrelated and connected nature of the training program with the active-learning teaching experience of the TAs, and why we believe it achieves the success it does. Data on how the beliefs and practices of the new graduate students change and evolve will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge the support of a FIPSE grant #P116B70958

  1. 77 FR 22602 - Information Collection Activities: Well Control and Production Safety Training, Submitted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... paperwork requirements in the regulations under Subpart O, ``Well Control and Production Safety Training... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) Information Collection Activities: Well Control and Production Safety Training, Submitted for Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Review; Comment...

  2. Clinical application of a modular ankle robot for stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Goodman, Ronald N.; Rietschel, Jeremy; Barton, Joseph E.; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in our understanding of neuroplasticity and motor learning post-stroke are now being leveraged with the use of robotics technology to enhance physical rehabilitation strategies. Major advances have been made with upper extremity robotics, which have been tested for efficacy in multi-site trials across the subacute and chronic phases of stroke. In contrast, use of lower extremity robotics to promote locomotor re-learning has been more recent and presents unique challenges by virtue of the complex multi-segmental mechanics of gait. Objectives Here we review a programmatic effort to develop and apply the concept of joint-specific modular robotics to the paretic ankle as a means to improve underlying impairments in distal motor control that may have a significant impact on gait biomechanics and balance. Methods An impedance controlled ankle robot module (anklebot) is described as a platform to test the idea that a modular approach can be used to modify training and measure the time profile of treatment response. Results Pilot studies using seated visuomotor anklebot training with chronic patients are reviewed, along with results from initial efforts to evaluate the anklebot's utility as a clinical tool for assessing intrinsic ankle stiffness. The review includes a brief discussion of future directions for using the seated anklebot training in the earliest phases of sub-acute therapy, and to incorporate neurophysiological measures of cerebro-cortical activity as a means to reveal underlying mechanistic processes of motor learning and brain plasticity associated with robotic training. Conclusions Finally we conclude with an initial control systems strategy for utilizing the anklebot as a gait training tool that includes integrating an Internal Model-based adaptive controller to both accommodate individual deficit severities and adapt to changes in patient performance. PMID:23949045

  3. Put Your Robot In, Put Your Robot Out: Sequencing through Programming Robots in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazakoff, Elizabeth R.; Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of programming robots on sequencing ability in early childhood. Thirty-four children (ages 4.5-6.5 years) participated in computer programming activities with a developmentally appropriate tool, CHERP, specifically designed to program a robot's behaviors. The children learned to build and program robots over three…

  4. Robotic Arms. A Contribution to the Curriculum. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, W. F.; Carpenter, C. J.

    This report examines ways of providing technician training in the operating principles of robotic devices. The terms "robotics" and "robotic arms" are first defined. Some background information on the principal features of robotic arms is given, including their geometric arrangement, type of actuator used, control method, and software and teaching…

  5. Advanced robot locomotion.

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

  6. Energy Efficient Legged Robotics at Sandia Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Buerger, Steve

    2014-12-16

    Sandia is developing energy efficient actuation and drive train technologies to dramatically improve the charge life of legged robots. The work is supported by DARPA, and Sandia will demonstrate an energy efficient bipedal robot at the technology exposition section of the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals in June, 2015. This video, the first in a series, describes early development and initial integration of the Sandia Transmission Efficient Prototype Promoting Research (STEPPR) robot.

  7. Field studies of safety security rescue technologies through training and response activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Robin R.; Stover, Sam

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the field-oriented philosophy of the Institute for Safety Security Rescue Technology (iSSRT) and summarizes the activities and lessons learned during calendar year 2005 of its two centers: the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue and the NSF Safety Security Rescue industry/university cooperative research center. In 2005, iSSRT participated in four responses (La Conchita, CA, Mudslides, Hurricane Dennis, Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Wilma) and conducted three field experiments (NJTF-1, Camp Hurricane, Richmond, MO). The lessons learned covered mobility, operator control units, wireless communications, and general reliability. The work has collectively identified six emerging issues for future work. Based on these studies, a 10-hour, 1 continuing education unit credit course on rescue robotics has been created and is available. Rescue robots and sensors are available for loan upon request.

  8. Robotic Rehabilitator of the Rodent Upper Extremity: A System and Method for Assessing and Training Forelimb Force Production after Neurological Injury.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Kelli G; Duarte, Jaime E; Gebrekristos, Berkenesh; Perez, Sergi; Steward, Oswald; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2016-03-01

    Rodent models of spinal cord injury are critical for the development of treatments for upper limb motor impairment in humans, but there are few methods for measuring forelimb strength of rodents, an important outcome measure. We developed a novel robotic device--the Robotic Rehabilitator of the Rodent Upper Extremity (RUE)--that requires rats to voluntarily reach for and pull a bar to retrieve a food reward; the resistance of the bar can be programmed. We used RUE to train forelimb strength of 16 rats three times per week for 23 weeks before and 38 weeks after a mild (100 kdyne) unilateral contusion at the cervical level 5 (C5). We measured maximum force produced when RUE movement was unexpectedly blocked. We compared this blocked pulling force (BPF) to weekly measures of forelimb strength obtained with a previous, well-established method: the grip strength meter (GSM). Before injury, BPF was 2.6 times higher (BPF, 444.6 ± 19.1 g; GSM, 168.4 ± 3.1 g) and 4.9 times more variable (p < 0.001) than pulling force measured with the GSM; the two measurement methods were uncorrelated (R(2) = 0.03; p = 0.84). After injury, there was a significant decrease in BPF of 134.35 g ± 14.71 g (p < 0.001). Together, our findings document BPF as a repeatable measure of forelimb force production, sensitive to a mild spinal cord injury, which comes closer to measuring maximum force than the GSM and thus may provide a useful measure for quantifying the effects of treatment in rodent models of SCI. PMID:26414700

  9. Toward cognitive robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, John E.

    2009-05-01

    Our long-term goal is to develop autonomous robotic systems that have the cognitive abilities of humans, including communication, coordination, adapting to novel situations, and learning through experience. Our approach rests on the recent integration of the Soar cognitive architecture with both virtual and physical robotic systems. Soar has been used to develop a wide variety of knowledge-rich agents for complex virtual environments, including distributed training environments and interactive computer games. For development and testing in robotic virtual environments, Soar interfaces to a variety of robotic simulators and a simple mobile robot. We have recently made significant extensions to Soar that add new memories and new non-symbolic reasoning to Soar's original symbolic processing, which should significantly improve Soar abilities for control of robots. These extensions include episodic memory, semantic memory, reinforcement learning, and mental imagery. Episodic memory and semantic memory support the learning and recalling of prior events and situations as well as facts about the world. Reinforcement learning provides the ability of the system to tune its procedural knowledge - knowledge about how to do things. Mental imagery supports the use of diagrammatic and visual representations that are critical to support spatial reasoning. We speculate on the future of unmanned systems and the need for cognitive robotics to support dynamic instruction and taskability.

  10. Future of robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lendvay, Thomas Sean; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    In just over a decade, robotic surgery has penetrated almost every surgical subspecialty and has even replaced some of the most commonly performed open oncologic procedures. The initial reports on patient outcomes yielded mixed results, but as more medical centers develop high-volume robotics programs, outcomes appear comparable if not improved for some applications. There are limitations to the current commercially available system, and new robotic platforms, some designed to compete in the current market and some to address niche surgical considerations, are being developed that will change the robotic landscape in the next decade. Adoption of these new systems will be dependent on overcoming barriers to true telesurgery that range from legal to logistical. As additional surgical disciplines embrace robotics and open surgery continues to be replaced by robotic approaches, it will be imperative that adequate education and training keep pace with technology. Methods to enhance surgical performance in robotics through the use of simulation and telementoring promise to accelerate learning curves and perhaps even improve surgical readiness through brief virtual-reality warm-ups and presurgical rehearsal. All these advances will need to be carefully and rigorously validated through not only patient outcomes, but also cost efficiency. PMID:23528717

  11. Industrial robots on the line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, R.; Miller, S.

    1982-06-01

    The characteristics, applications, and operational capabilities of currently available robots are examined. Designed to function at tasks of a repetitive, hazardous, or uncreative nature, robot appendages are controlled by microprocessors which permit some simple decision-making on-the-job, and have served for sample gathering on the Mars Viking lander. Critical developmental areas concern active sensors at the robot grappler-object interface, where sufficient data must be gathered for the central processor to which the robot is attached to conclude the state of completion and suitability of the workpiece. Although present robots must be programmed through every step of a particular industrial process, thus limiting each robot to specialized tasks, the potential for closed cells of batch-processing robot-run units is noted to be close to realization. Finally, consideration is given to methods for retraining the human workforce that robots replace

  12. REGION 4-SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: OCTOBER 2006 – JULY 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, the Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities, Federal Agencies, and other audiences outs...

  13. Automatic learning by an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    de Saussure, G.; Spelt, P.F.; Killough, S.M.; Pin, F.G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes recent research in automatic learning by the autonomous mobile robot HERMIES-IIB at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR). By acting on the environment and observing the consequences during a set of training examples, the robot learns a sequence of successful manipulations on a simulated control panel. The robot learns to classify panel configurations in order to deal with new configurations that are not part of the original training set. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Curve Squeal of Train Wheels, Part 3: Active Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HECKL, MARIA A.; HUANG, X. Y.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to annul the squeal noise that is produced by trains traversing a curve. The method is a special form of active control, applied to suppress the bending oscillations of a squealing wheel. It is essentially a feedback system with the following components: sensor, narrowband filter, phase-shifter, amplifier and actuator. The control signal driving the actuator has only a single frequency (set at the filter), and that frequency typically corresponds to one of the bending modes of the wheel. Two versions of the feedback system are considered. In the first version, the actuator exerts a control force on the wheel, and in the second version, the actuator imposes a velocity on the rail. A mathematical model is presented and predictions are made for the performance of both versions. The coupling of the different wheel modes by the control system is discussed. A model rig is described which was used for a practical demonstration of this form of active control. Differences from more conventional forms of active control are pointed out.

  15. Self-Administered, Home-Based SMART (Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training) Arm Training: A Single-Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Neibling, Bridee A; Barker, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    This single-case, mixed-method study explored the feasibility of self-administered, home-based SMART (sensorimotor active rehabilitation training) Arm training for a 57-yr-old man with severe upper-limb disability after a right frontoparietal hemorrhagic stroke 9 mo earlier. Over 4 wk of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training, the participant completed 2,100 repetitions unassisted. His wife provided support for equipment set-up and training progressions. Clinically meaningful improvements in arm impairment (strength), activity (arm and hand tasks), and participation (use of arm in everyday tasks) occurred after training (at 4 wk) and at follow-up (at 16 wk). Areas for refinement of SMART Arm training derived from thematic analysis of the participant's and researchers' journals focused on enabling independence, ensuring home and user friendliness, maintaining the motivation to persevere, progressing toward everyday tasks, and integrating practice into daily routine. These findings suggest that further investigation of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training is warranted for people with stroke who have severe upper-limb disability. PMID:26114456

  16. Group Tasks, Activities, Dynamics, and Interactions in Collaborative Robotics Projects with Elementary and Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuen, Timothy T.; Boecking, Melanie; Stone, Jennifer; Tiger, Erin Price; Gomez, Alvaro; Guillen, Adrienne; Arreguin, Analisa

    2014-01-01

    Robotics provide the opportunity for students to bring their individual interests, perspectives and areas of expertise together in order to work collaboratively on real-world science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) problems. This paper examines the nature of collaboration that manifests in groups of elementary and middle school…

  17. 76 FR 73019 - Proposed Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans) Activity... comments on information needed to assure that on the job training establishments are providing veterans... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Agreement to Train on the Job Disabled...

  18. 77 FR 7242 - Agency Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans): Activity Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Agreement To Train on the Job Disabled Veterans): Activity Under....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Agreement to Train on the Job Disabled Veterans, VA Form 28- 1904. OMB Control...-1904 is a written agreement between an on the job training (OJT) establishments and VA. The...

  19. 75 FR 33898 - Agency Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity Under OMB Review....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Monthly Certification of Flight Training (under Chapters 30 and 32, Title 38 U... enrolling in or pursuing approved vocational flight training. VA Form 22-6553c serves as a report of...

  20. 75 FR 17832 - Proposed Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Monthly Certification of Flight Training) Activity: Comment... flight training is correct. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of... information technology. Title: Monthly Certification of Flight Training, VA Form 22-6553c. OMB Control...

  1. Architecture for robot intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, II, Richard Alan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for robot intelligence enables a robot to learn new behaviors and create new behavior sequences autonomously and interact with a dynamically changing environment. Sensory information is mapped onto a Sensory Ego-Sphere (SES) that rapidly identifies important changes in the environment and functions much like short term memory. Behaviors are stored in a DBAM that creates an active map from the robot's current state to a goal state and functions much like long term memory. A dream state converts recent activities stored in the SES and creates or modifies behaviors in the DBAM.

  2. Issues in intelligent robots for search and rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Jennifer L.; Micire, Mark; Murphy, Robin R.

    2000-07-01

    Since the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and Kobe, Japan, earthquake, robotics researchers have been considering search and rescue as a humanitarian research domain. The recent devastation in Turkey and Taiwan, compounded with the new Robocup Rescue and AAAI Urban Search and Rescue robot competition, may encourage more research. However, roboticists generally go not have access to domain experts: the emergency workers or first providers. This paper shares our understanding of urban search and rescue, based on our active research in this area and training sessions with rescue workers from the Hillsborough County (Florida) Fire Departments. The paper is intended to be a stepping stone for roboticists entering the field.

  3. CASSY Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, Anna; Wright, Ann; Rice, Aaron; Shyaka, Claude

    2014-03-01

    The CASSY Robot project involved two square robots coded in RobotC. The goal was to code a robot to do a certain set of tasks autonomously. To begin with, our task was to code the robot so that it would roam a certain area, marked off by black tape. When the robot hit the black tape, it knew to back up and turn around. It was able to do this thanks to the light sensor that was attached to the bottom of the robot. Also, whenever the robot hit an obstacle, it knew to stop, back up, and turn around. This was primarily to prevent the robot from hurting itself if it hit an obstacle. This was accomplished by using touch sensors set up as bumpers. Once that was accomplished, we attached sonar sensors and created code so that one robot was able to find and track the other robot in a sort of intruder/police scenario. The overall goal of this project was to code the robot so that we can test it against a robot coded exactly the same, but using Layered Mode Selection Logic. Professor.

  4. Stellar activity cycles from long-term data by robotic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, K.

    2014-03-01

    All results about stellar activity cycles stem from decades-long systematic observations that were done by small telescopes. Without these equipments we would not know much, if anything, about stellar activity cycles, like those we see and observe easily on the nearest star, the Sun. In the early 80's of the last century systematic photometric monitoring of active stars began with automated photometric telescopes (APTs), some of which continue the observations to date. The Vienna-Potsdam APT now works for about two decades (Strassmeier et al. 1997), similarly to the 4-College Consortium APT (Dukes et al. 1995), while the Catania APT (Rodono et al. 2001) was closed down a few years ago. These small tools with the same setups for decades do not cost much and are relatively cheap to maintain. The longest continuous photometric datasets of a few objects from APTs span now over 30 years, which, together with earlier, manually-obtained data allow to study those activity cycles of stars which are in the order of 10 years or shorter: to be sure in the timescale of a cycle it should be observed repeatedly at least 2-3 times. The spectroscopic automated telescope STELLA (Strassmeier et al. 2004), built in the first decade of this century, measured already a few dozens of radial velocity curves for long-period binary stars and measured their activity levels (Strassmeier et al. 2012); these results can be gathered only by robotic telescopes. Only with STELLA it is possible to study the decades-long behavior of starspots on active giants with long rotational periods via Doppler Imaging. As the databases were growing it became clear that stars, just as the Sun, had multiple cycles. It was also found that stellar cycles showed systematic changes and that the cycle lengths correlated with the rotational periods of the stars. Extensive summaries of stellar activity cycles are found in Baliunas et al. (1995) using the Mt. Wilson Ca-index survey, and Oláh et al. (2009) based on

  5. On the asynchronously continuous control of mobile robot movement by motor cortical spiking activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiming; So, Rosa Q; Toe, Kyaw Kyar; Ang, Kai Keng; Guan, Cuntai

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an asynchronously intracortical brain-computer interface (BCI) which allows the subject to continuously drive a mobile robot. This system has a great implication for disabled patients to move around. By carefully designing a multiclass support vector machine (SVM), the subject's self-paced instantaneous movement intents are continuously decoded to control the mobile robot. In particular, we studied the stability of the neural representation of the movement directions. Experimental results on the nonhuman primate showed that the overt movement directions were stably represented in ensemble of recorded units, and our SVM classifier could successfully decode such movements continuously along the desired movement path. However, the neural representation of the stop state for the self-paced control was not stably represented and could drift. PMID:25570634

  6. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  7. Industrial Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Dean; Harden, Thomas K.

    Robots are mechanical devices that can be programmed to perform some task of manipulation or locomotion under automatic control. This paper discusses: (1) early developments of the robotics industry in the United States; (2) the present structure of the industry; (3) noneconomic factors related to the use of robots; (4) labor considerations…

  8. Basic Robotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank

    This curriculum outline consists of instructional materials and information concerning resources for use in teaching a course in robotics. Addressed in the individual sections of the outline are the following topics: the nature of an industrial robot; the parts of an industrial robot (the manipulator, the power structure, and the control system);…

  9. Motor-response learning at a process control panel by an autonomous robot

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; de Saussure, G.; Lyness, E.; Pin, F.G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) was founded at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research/Division of Engineering and Geoscience (DOE-OER/DEG) to conduct basic research in the area of intelligent machines. Therefore, researchers at the CESAR Laboratory are engaged in a variety of research activities in the field of machine learning. In this paper, we describe our approach to a class of machine learning which involves motor response acquisition using feedback from trial-and-error learning. Our formulation is being experimentally validated using an autonomous robot, learning tasks of control panel monitoring and manipulation for effect process control. The CLIPS Expert System and the associated knowledge base used by the robot in the learning process, which reside in a hypercube computer aboard the robot, are described in detail. Benchmark testing of the learning process on a robot/control panel simulation system consisting of two intercommunicating computers is presented, along with results of sample problems used to train and test the expert system. These data illustrate machine learning and the resulting performance improvement in the robot for problems similar to, but not identical with, those on which the robot was trained. Conclusions are drawn concerning the learning problems, and implications for future work on machine learning for autonomous robots are discussed. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Active targeting in a random porous medium by chemical swarm robots with secondary chemical signaling.

    PubMed

    Grančič, Peter; Štěpánek, František

    2011-08-01

    The multibody dynamics of a system of chemical swarm robots in a porous environment is investigated. The chemical swarm robots are modeled as brownian particles capable of delivering an encapsulated chemical payload toward a given target location and releasing it in response to an external stimulus. The presence of chemical signals (chemo-attractant) in the system plays a crucial role in coordinating the collective movement of the particles via chemotaxis. For a number of applications, such as distributed chemical processing and targeted drug delivery, the understanding of factors that govern the collective behavior of the particles, especially their ability to localize a given target, is of immense importance. A hybrid modeling methodology based on the combination of the brownian dynamics method and diffusion problem coupled through the chemotaxis phenomena is used to analyze the impact of a varying signaling threshold and the strength of chemotaxis on the ability of the chemical robots to fulfill their target localization mission. The results demonstrate that the selected performance criteria (the localization half time and the success rate) can be improved when an appropriate signaling process is chosen. Furthermore, for an optimum target localization strategy, the topological complexity of the porous environment needs to be reflected. PMID:21929036

  11. Active targeting in a random porous medium by chemical swarm robots with secondary chemical signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grančič, Peter; Štěpánek, František

    2011-08-01

    The multibody dynamics of a system of chemical swarm robots in a porous environment is investigated. The chemical swarm robots are modeled as Brownian particles capable of delivering an encapsulated chemical payload toward a given target location and releasing it in response to an external stimulus. The presence of chemical signals (chemo-attractant) in the system plays a crucial role in coordinating the collective movement of the particles via chemotaxis. For a number of applications, such as distributed chemical processing and targeted drug delivery, the understanding of factors that govern the collective behavior of the particles, especially their ability to localize a given target, is of immense importance. A hybrid modeling methodology based on the combination of the Brownian dynamics method and diffusion problem coupled through the chemotaxis phenomena is used to analyze the impact of a varying signaling threshold and the strength of chemotaxis on the ability of the chemical robots to fulfill their target localization mission. The results demonstrate that the selected performance criteria (the localization half time and the success rate) can be improved when an appropriate signaling process is chosen. Furthermore, for an optimum target localization strategy, the topological complexity of the porous environment needs to be reflected.

  12. SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: AUGUST 2007 – SEPTEMBER 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, SESD provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities, Federal Agencies, and other audiences outside of Region 4, as requested, in the areas of Hazardo...

  13. REGION 4-SESD TRAINING ACTIVITIES: OCTOBER 2005 – SEPTEMBER 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Each year, the Science and Ecosytem Support Division (SESD) provides training and technical assistance to hundreds of students in EPA Region 4. Training courses are presented to Region 4 employees, Region 4 States, Indian Tribes, Universities and other Federal Agencies in the are...

  14. A Guide for Perceptual-Motor Training Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Euclid - Lyndhurst City Schools, Lyndhurst, OH.

    This document has been prepared as part of a kindergarten perceptual-training program of the South Euclid-Lyndhurst City School District near Cleveland, Ohio. The guide contains information on training and procedures related to perceptual-motor learning. This information is structured primarily into 150 lesson plans, devised as 30-minute sessions…

  15. Collecting "Total" Vocational Education and Training Activity. Position Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In this position paper, NCVER's Managing Director, Dr Tom Karmel, argues that the submission of vocational education and training student data should be mandated as a condition of registration for all registered training organisations, including private providers. This will ensure a comprehensive data collection that gives a realistic view of…

  16. Teaching Scholarly Activity in Psychiatric Training: Years 6 and 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Boland, Robert; Cowley, Deborah; Cyr, Rebecca L.; Pato, Michele T.; Thrall, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To address nationally recognized needs for increased numbers of psychiatric clinician-scholars and physician-scientists, the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) has provided a series of full-day conferences of psychiatry residency training directors designed to increase their competence in…

  17. Relaxation training affects success and activation on a teaching test.

    PubMed

    Helin, P; Hänninen, O

    1987-12-01

    We studied the effects of an audiocassette-relaxation training period (ART) and its timing on success at a teaching test (lecture type), on observed tension and on a number of physiological responses. The electrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (EMG), heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), of female and male instructor candidates, were examined before, during and after the teaching test as well as during its critique. The relaxation period (18 min) was presented either on the preceding night (ARTnt) or immediately before the teaching test (ARTimm). The influence of personality (types A-B and extrovert-introvert) was also studied. ART improved success at the teaching test in both sexes. In males (but not in females), ARTimm decreased EMG level during the test, but ARTnt increased EMG at the test period as compared to the control group. In females, both ARTnt and ARTimm lowered HR more than in the control group. ARTimm lowered systolic BP in both sexes. Personality types affected the ART responses; ART was more beneficial for type A than B subjects. PMID:3325481

  18. Active vibration control for high speed train bogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, Alexander; Storm, Stefan; Röder, Arno; Maier, Rudolf; Frank, Paul-Gerhard

    2005-02-01

    This report deals with the design of an active vibration control (AVC) system integrated into the primary suspension of the bogie of a German high-speed train (ICE). As a design case a prototype bogie (WU92) for the ICE2 was taken. This paper comprises all parts and stages of the development of an AVC system. First, a transfer path analysis was performed in order to identify the main paths of propagation and to determine the boundary conditions at the actuator contact points. A detailed FE-analysis performed on the basis of an already existing FE-model serves as a support to investigate the actuator performance and evaluate several actuator concepts. However, the evaluation of a multifold of varying configurations of actuator, error sensor and monitor sensor positions is obviously not possible in the experiment, but is in the simulation. Based on the simulations and the experiments the control system is implemented on a digital signal processor (DSP) system. The structure borne noise level was determined during running tests at the ICE3 and measurements at the WU92 installed in the test rig. The design of the actuator system includes the layout of the specific system as well as the selection of the piezoelectric elements. A specifically developed amplifier drives the actuators. Finally the system is integrated into one axle of the WU92 and tested during roller-rig measurements.

  19. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    SciTech Connect

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  20. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research...

  1. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research...

  2. 34 CFR 350.14 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Projects Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.14 What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity? In carrying out a training activity under this... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must a grantee do in carrying out a...

  3. 34 CFR 350.14 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Projects Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.14 What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity? In carrying out a training activity under this... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What must a grantee do in carrying out a...

  4. Capacity Building as a Tool for Assessing Training and Development Activity: An Indian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnaveni, R.; Sripirabaa, B.

    2008-01-01

    In recognition of its increasing importance, many organizations make periodic assessments of their training and development activity. The objective of the present study was to extend the concept of capacity building to the assessment of training and development activity in an automobile component manufacturing organization, using a developed and…

  5. Reduced posterior parietal cortex activation after training on a visual search task.

    PubMed

    Bueichekú, Elisenda; Miró-Padilla, Anna; Palomar-García, María-Ángeles; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Parcet, María-Antonia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Ávila, César

    2016-07-15

    Gaining experience on a cognitive task improves behavioral performance and is thought to enhance brain efficiency. Despite the body of literature already published on the effects of training on brain activation, less research has been carried out on visual search attention processes under well controlled conditions. Thirty-six healthy adults divided into trained and control groups completed a pre-post letter-based visual search task fMRI study in one day. Twelve letters were used as targets and ten as distractors. The trained group completed a training session (840 trials) with half the targets between scans. The effects of training were studied at the behavioral and brain levels by controlling for repetition effects using both between-subjects (trained vs. control groups) and within-subject (trained vs. untrained targets) controls. The trained participants reduced their response speed by 31% as a result of training, maintaining their accuracy scores, whereas the control group hardly changed. Neural results revealed that brain changes associated with visual search training were circumscribed to reduced activation in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) when controlling for group, and they included inferior occipital areas when controlling for targets. The observed behavioral and brain changes are discussed in relation to automatic behavior development. The observed training-related decreases could be associated with increased neural efficiency in specific key regions for task performance. PMID:27132048

  6. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE.

    PubMed

    Zahodne, Laura B; Meyer, Oanh L; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L; Willis, Sherry L; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Parisi, Jeanine M

    2015-09-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  7. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Meyer, Oanh L.; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L.; Willis, Sherry L.; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Parisi, Jeanine M.

    2015-01-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  8. STS-60 cosmonauts participate in mission training activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-60 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Russian Mission Specialist Sergei Krikalev and Russian backup Mission Specialist Vladimir Titov work with Training Instructor Richard M. Davis (holding space shuttle model) prior to entering the Building 16 Systems Engineering Simulator (SES).

  9. 20 CFR 633.302 - Training activities and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Job search assistance, including job clubs; (2) Job development; (3) Training, such as classroom, on-the-job, work experience, and tryout employment, in jobs skills for which demand exceeds supply;...

  10. 20 CFR 633.302 - Training activities and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Job search assistance, including job clubs; (2) Job development; (3) Training, such as classroom, on-the-job, work experience, and tryout employment, in jobs skills for which demand exceeds supply;...

  11. 20 CFR 633.302 - Training activities and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Job search assistance, including job clubs; (2) Job development; (3) Training, such as classroom, on-the-job, work experience, and tryout employment, in jobs skills for which demand exceeds supply;...

  12. Active Motor Training Has Long-term Effects on Infants' Object Exploration.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Sarah E; Watkins, Rachel M; Needham, Amy Work

    2016-01-01

    Long-term changes in infants' behavior as a result of active motor training were studied. Thirty-two infants completed three visits to the laboratory. At the first visit, infants were 3 months old and completed an object exploration assessment. Then the experimenter demonstrated the motor training procedures appropriate for the infant's experimental condition, and parents took home custom infant mittens (either sticky or non-sticky) and a bag of lightweight toys to practice with their infants. Over the course of the following 2 weeks, infants participated in 10 sessions of either active (sticky) or passive (non-sticky) mittens training at home with their parents. Infants who participated in active mittens training wore mittens with the palms covered in Velcro, allowing them to pick up and move around small toys. Infants who participated in passive mittens training wore non-sticky mittens, and their parents moved the toys through their visual fields on their behalf. After completing the training, infants returned to the lab for the second visit. At visit two, infants participated in another object exploration assessment as well as a reaching assessment. Parents returned the training materials to the lab at the second visit, and were told not to continue any specific training regimen from this point forward. Two months later, when infants were about 5.5 months of age, they returned to the lab for a third visit. At the third visit, infants completed the same two assessments as during the second visit. The results of this study indicate that infants who participated in active motor training engaged in more sophisticated object exploration when compared to infants who received passive training. These findings are consistent with others in the literature showing that active motor training at 3 months of age facilitates the processes of object exploration and engagement. The current results and others reveal that the effects of early experience can last long after

  13. Active Motor Training Has Long-term Effects on Infants’ Object Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Wiesen, Sarah E.; Watkins, Rachel M.; Needham, Amy Work

    2016-01-01

    Long-term changes in infants’ behavior as a result of active motor training were studied. Thirty-two infants completed three visits to the laboratory. At the first visit, infants were 3 months old and completed an object exploration assessment. Then the experimenter demonstrated the motor training procedures appropriate for the infant’s experimental condition, and parents took home custom infant mittens (either sticky or non-sticky) and a bag of lightweight toys to practice with their infants. Over the course of the following 2 weeks, infants participated in 10 sessions of either active (sticky) or passive (non-sticky) mittens training at home with their parents. Infants who participated in active mittens training wore mittens with the palms covered in Velcro, allowing them to pick up and move around small toys. Infants who participated in passive mittens training wore non-sticky mittens, and their parents moved the toys through their visual fields on their behalf. After completing the training, infants returned to the lab for the second visit. At visit two, infants participated in another object exploration assessment as well as a reaching assessment. Parents returned the training materials to the lab at the second visit, and were told not to continue any specific training regimen from this point forward. Two months later, when infants were about 5.5 months of age, they returned to the lab for a third visit. At the third visit, infants completed the same two assessments as during the second visit. The results of this study indicate that infants who participated in active motor training engaged in more sophisticated object exploration when compared to infants who received passive training. These findings are consistent with others in the literature showing that active motor training at 3 months of age facilitates the processes of object exploration and engagement. The current results and others reveal that the effects of early experience can last long after

  14. Needs for Robotic Assessments of Nuclear Disasters

    SciTech Connect

    Victor Walker; Derek Wadsworth

    2012-06-01

    Following the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima nuclear reactor plant in Japan, the need for systems which can assist in dynamic high-radiation environments such as nuclear incidents has become more apparent. The INL participated in delivering robotic technologies to Japan and has identified key components which are needed for success and obstacles to their deployment. In addition, we are proposing new work and methods to improve assessments and reactions to such events in the future. Robotics needs in disaster situations include phases such as: Assessment, Remediation, and Recovery Our particular interest is in the initial assessment activities. In assessment we need collection of environmental parameters, determination of conditions, and physical sample collection. Each phase would require key tools and efforts to develop. This includes study of necessary sensors and their deployment methods, the effects of radiation on sensors and deployment, and the development of training and execution systems.

  15. Classroom Challenge: Designing a Firefighting Robot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Robots provide teachers with opportunities to teach multidimensional thinking and critical thinking skills. In this article, the author presents a classroom activity wherein students are required to design a firefighting robot. This activity aims to demonstrate the complexity and interdisciplinary nature of the robotics technology.

  16. Interactive autonomy and robotic skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellner, A.; Maediger, B.

    1994-01-01

    Current concepts of robot-supported operations for space laboratories (payload servicing, inspection, repair, and ORU exchange) are mainly based on the concept of 'interactive autonomy' which implies autonomous behavior of the robot according to predefined timelines, predefined sequences of elementary robot operations and within predefined world models supplying geometrical and other information for parameter instantiation on the one hand, and the ability to override and change the predefined course of activities by human intervention on the other hand. Although in principle a very powerful and useful concept, in practice the confinement of the robot to the abstract world models and predefined activities appears to reduce the robot's stability within real world uncertainties and its applicability to non-predefined parts of the world, calling for frequent corrective interaction by the operator, which in itself may be tedious and time-consuming. Methods are presented to improve this situation by incorporating 'robotic skills' into the concept of interactive autonomy.

  17. Low-Cost Educational Robotics Applied to Physics Teaching in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Marcos A. M.; Duarte, José R. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose some of the strategies and methodologies for teaching high-school physics topics through an educational robotics show. This exhibition was part of a set of actions promoted by a Brazilian government program of incentive for teaching activities, whose primary focus is the training of teachers, the improvement of teaching…

  18. Home-based tele-assisted robotic rehabilitation of joint impairments in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Ren, Yupeng; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    A portable rehabilitation robot incorporating intelligent stretching, robot-guided voluntary movement training with motivating games and tele-rehabilitation was developed to provide convenient and cost-effective rehabilitation to children with cerebral palsy (CP) and extend rehabilitation care beyond hospital. Clinicians interact with the patients remotely for periodic evaluations and updated guidance. The tele-assisted stretching and active movement training was done over 6-week 18 sessions on the impaired ankle of 23 children with CP in their home setting. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated using biomechanical measures and clinical outcome measures. After the tele-assisted home robotic rehabilitation intervention, there were significant increases in the ankle passive and active range of motion, muscle strength, a decrease in spasticity, and increases in balance and selective control assessment of lower-extremity. PMID:25571187

  19. Isometric handgrip training reduces arterial pressure at rest without changes in sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carrasco, D. I.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether isometric handgrip (IHG) training reduces arterial pressure and whether reductions in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) mediate this drop in arterial pressure. Normotensive subjects were assigned to training (n = 9), sham training (n = 7), or control (n = 8) groups. The training protocol consisted of four 3-min bouts of IHG exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) separated by 5-min rest periods. Training was performed four times per week for 5 wk. Subjects' resting arterial pressure and heart rate were measured three times on 3 consecutive days before and after training, with resting MSNA (peroneal nerve) recorded on the third day. Additionally, subjects performed IHG exercise at 30% of MVC to fatigue followed by muscle ischemia. In the trained group, resting diastolic (67 +/- 1 to 62 +/- 1 mmHg) and mean arterial pressure (86 +/- 1 to 82 +/- 1 mmHg) significantly decreased, whereas systolic arterial pressure (116 +/- 3 to 113 +/- 2 mmHg), heart rate (67 +/- 4 to 66 +/- 4 beats/min), and MSNA (14 +/- 2 to 15 +/- 2 bursts/min) did not significantly change following training. MSNA and cardiovascular responses to exercise and postexercise muscle ischemia were unchanged by training. There were no significant changes in any variables for the sham training and control groups. The results indicate that IHG training is an effective nonpharmacological intervention in lowering arterial pressure.

  20. Control of robot manipulator compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Pooran, Farhad J.; Premack, Timothy

    1986-01-01

    Robotic assembly operations such as mating and fastening of parts are more successful if the robot manipulator compliance can be controlled so that various coordinates are free to comply with external constraints. This paper presents the design of a hybrid controller to provide active compliance to a six-degree-of-freedom robot built at NASA/GSFC using force and position feedback. Simulation results of a 2 degree-of-freedom model is presented and discussed.

  1. A decision-tree model to detect post-calving diseases based on rumination, activity, milk yield, BW and voluntary visits to the milking robot.

    PubMed

    Steensels, M; Antler, A; Bahr, C; Berckmans, D; Maltz, E; Halachmi, I

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of post-calving health problems is critical for dairy operations. Separating sick cows from the herd is important, especially in robotic-milking dairy farms, where searching for a sick cow can disturb the other cows' routine. The objectives of this study were to develop and apply a behaviour- and performance-based health-detection model to post-calving cows in a robotic-milking dairy farm, with the aim of detecting sick cows based on available commercial sensors. The study was conducted in an Israeli robotic-milking dairy farm with 250 Israeli-Holstein cows. All cows were equipped with rumination- and neck-activity sensors. Milk yield, visits to the milking robot and BW were recorded in the milking robot. A decision-tree model was developed on a calibration data set (historical data of the 10 months before the study) and was validated on the new data set. The decision model generated a probability of being sick for each cow. The model was applied once a week just before the veterinarian performed the weekly routine post-calving health check. The veterinarian's diagnosis served as a binary reference for the model (healthy-sick). The overall accuracy of the model was 78%, with a specificity of 87% and a sensitivity of 69%, suggesting its practical value. PMID:27221983

  2. Effects of resistance training on cardiovascular health in non-obese active adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Clare Chung-Wah; McManus, Alison Mary; So, Hung-Kwan; Chook, Ping; Au, Chun-Ting; Li, Albert Martin; Kam, Jack Tat-Chi; So, Raymond Chi-Hung; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei; Chan, Iris Hiu-Shuen; Sung, Rita Yn-Tz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the benefits of a 10-wk resistance training programme on cardiovascular health in non-obese and active adolescents. METHODS This is a pragmatic randomised controlled intervention. The study was carried out in a Hong Kong Government secondary school. Thirty-eight lean and active boys and girls were randomised to either the resistance training group or the control group. Students in the resistance training group received in-school 10-wk supervised resistance training twice per week, with each session lasting 70 min. Main outcome measures taken before and after training included brachial endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation, body composition, fasting serum lipids, fasting glucose and insulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure and aerobic fitness. RESULTS The only training related change was in endothelial dependent flow-mediated dilation which increased from 8.5% to 9.8%. A main effect of time and an interaction (P < 0.005) indicated that this improvement was a result of the 10-wk resistance training. Main effects for time (P < 0.05) in a number of anthropometric, metabolic and vascular variables were noted; however, there were no significant interactions indicating the change was more likely an outcome of normal growth and development as opposed to a training effect. CONCLUSION Ten weeks of resistance training in school appears to have some vascular benefit in active, lean children PMID:27610345

  3. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-02-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing approx. 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise ( SVI). Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training.

  4. Robotic control in knee joint replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Davies, B L; Rodriguez y Baena, F M; Barrett, A R W; Gomes, M P S F; Harris, S J; Jakopec, M; Cobb, J P

    2007-01-01

    A brief history of robotic systems in knee arthroplasty is provided. The place of autonomous robots is then discussed and compared to more recent 'hands-on' robotic systems that can be more cost effective. The case is made for robotic systems to have a clear justification, with improved benefits compared to those from cheaper navigation systems. A number of more recent, smaller, robot systems for knee arthroplasty are also described. A specific example is given of an active constraint medical robot, the ACROBOT system, used in a prospective randomized controlled trial of unicondylar robotic knee arthroplasty in which the robot was compared to conventional surgery. The results of the trial are presented together with a discussion of the need for measures of accuracy to be introduced so that the efficacy of the robotic surgery can be immediately identified, rather than have to wait for a number of years before long-term clinical improvements can be demonstrated. PMID:17315770

  5. Neural-Network Control Of Prosthetic And Robotic Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic neural networks proposed for use in controlling robotic and prosthetic hands and exoskeletal or glovelike electromechanical devices aiding intact but nonfunctional hands. Specific to patient, who activates grasping motion by voice command, by mechanical switch, or by myoelectric impulse. Patient retains higher-level control, while lower-level control provided by neural network analogous to that of miniature brain. During training, patient teaches miniature brain to perform specialized, anthropomorphic movements unique to himself or herself.

  6. Robotic Mirror Therapy System for Functional Recovery of Hemiplegic Arms.

    PubMed

    Beom, Jaewon; Koh, Sukgyu; Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Wonshik; Kim, Yoonjae; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy has been performed as effective occupational therapy in a clinical setting for functional recovery of a hemiplegic arm after stroke. It is conducted by eliciting an illusion through use of a mirror as if the hemiplegic arm is moving in real-time while moving the healthy arm. It can facilitate brain neuroplasticity through activation of the sensorimotor cortex. However, conventional mirror therapy has a critical limitation in that the hemiplegic arm is not actually moving. Thus, we developed a real-time 2-axis mirror robot system as a simple add-on module for conventional mirror therapy using a closed feedback mechanism, which enables real-time movement of the hemiplegic arm. We used 3 Attitude and Heading Reference System sensors, 2 brushless DC motors for elbow and wrist joints, and exoskeletal frames. In a feasibility study on 6 healthy subjects, robotic mirror therapy was safe and feasible. We further selected tasks useful for activities of daily living training through feedback from rehabilitation doctors. A chronic stroke patient showed improvement in the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale and elbow flexor spasticity after a 2-week application of the mirror robot system. Robotic mirror therapy may enhance proprioceptive input to the sensory cortex, which is considered to be important in neuroplasticity and functional recovery of hemiplegic arms. The mirror robot system presented herein can be easily developed and utilized effectively to advance occupational therapy. PMID:27583794

  7. Robots in operating theatres.

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, R. A.; Buckingham, R. O.

    1995-01-01

    Robots designed for surgery have three main advantages over humans. They have greater three dimensional spatial accuracy, are more reliable, and can achieve much greater precision. Although few surgical robots are yet in clinical trials one or two have advanced to the stage of seeking approval from the UK's Medical Devices Agency and the US Federal Drug Administration. Safety is a key concern. A robotic device can be designed in an intrinsically safe way by restricting its range of movement to an area where it can do no damage. Furthermore, safety can be increased by making it passive, guided at all times by a surgeon. Nevertheless, some of the most promising developments may come from robots that are active (monitored rather than controlled by the surgeon) and not limited to intrinsically safe motion. Images Fig 1 Fig 3 Fig 4 PMID:8520340

  8. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  9. Aerobic and resistance training do not influence plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Sanne; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P; Khandwala, Farah; Yard, Benito; De Heer, Emile; Baelde, Hans; Peersman, Wim; Derave, Wim

    2015-10-01

    A particular allele of the carnosinase gene (CNDP1) is associated with reduced plasma carnosinase activity and reduced risk for nephropathy in diabetic patients. On the one hand, animal and human data suggest that hyperglycemia increases plasma carnosinase activity. On the other hand, we recently reported lower carnosinase activity levels in elite athletes involved in high-intensity exercise compared with untrained controls. Therefore, this study investigates whether exercise training and the consequent reduction in hyperglycemia can suppress carnosinase activity and content in adults with type 2 diabetes. Plasma samples were taken from 243 males and females with type 2 diabetes (mean age = 54.3 yr, SD = 7.1) without major microvascular complications before and after a 6-mo exercise training program [4 groups: sedentary control (n = 61), aerobic exercise (n = 59), resistance exercise (n = 63), and combined exercise training (n = 60)]. Plasma carnosinase content and activity, hemoglobin (Hb) A1c, lipid profile, and blood pressure were measured. A 6-mo exercise training intervention, irrespective of training modality, did not decrease plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetic patients. Plasma carnosinase content and activity showed a high interindividual but very low intraindividual variability over the 6-mo period. Age and sex, but not Hb A1c, were significantly related to the activity or content of this enzyme. It can be concluded that the beneficial effects of exercise training on the incidence of diabetic complications are probably not related to a lowering effect on plasma carnosinase content or activity. PMID:26389600

  10. Structured Activities in Perceptual Training to Aid Retention of Visual and Auditory Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, James W.; And Others

    The experimental program in structured activities in perceptual training was said to have two main objectives: to train children in retention of visual and auditory images and to increase the children's motivation to learn. Eight boys and girls participated in the program for two hours daily for a 10-week period. The age range was 7.0 to 12.10…

  11. Annual Summary. Training and Technology Experimentation, Demonstration, and Utilization Program Activities (January 1-December 31, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Directed primarily toward increasing utilization of industrial resources for training and development of disadvantaged persons, Training and Technology (TAT) activities for 1971 included: (1) development and implementation of experimental approaches to program development and operation, (2) technical support for university-conducted related…

  12. 77 FR 2350 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Change of Program or Place of Training): Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ....Regulations.gov or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Request for Change of Program or Place of Training): Activity Under... INFORMATION: Title: Request for Change of Program or Place of Training, VA Form 22-1995. OMB Control...

  13. 75 FR 3541 - Agency Information Collection (Monthly Record of Training and Wages) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ....Regulations.gov ; or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Monthly Record of Training and Wages) Activity Under OMB Review....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Monthly Record of Training and Wages, VA Form 28-1905c. OMB Control...

  14. 78 FR 6850 - Agency Information Collection (Monthly Record of Training and Wages) Activities Under OMB

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Monthly Record of Training and Wages) Activities Under OMB AGENCY... Record of Training and Wages, VA Form 28-1905c. OMB Control Number: 2900-0176. Type of Review:...

  15. Designing Class Activities to Meet Specific Core Training Competencies: A Developmental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; McDonnell, Kelly A.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a developmental model for designing and utilizing class activities to meet specific Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) core training competencies for group workers. A review of the relevant literature about teaching group work and meeting core training standards is provided. The authors suggest a process by…

  16. A National Study of Training Content and Activities for Faculty Development for Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their practices for faculty development for online teaching and particularly the content and training activities used during 2011-2012. This study found that the most frequently offered training content (97% of the…

  17. 76 FR 73020 - Proposed Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment) Activity: Comment Request... Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20420 or email nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Contract for Training and Employment (Chapter...

  18. 77 FR 7242 - Agency Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment): Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Contract for Training and Employment): Activity Under OMB Review...-0487 or email denise.mclamb@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0677.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Contract for Training and Employment (Chapter 31, Title 38 U.S. Code), VA Form...

  19. Changes in Muscle Activation after Reach Training with Gravity Compensation in Chronic Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prange, Gerdienke B.; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Ijzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation…

  20. 34 CFR 642.10 - Activities the Secretary assists under the Training Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities the Secretary assists under the Training Program. 642.10 Section 642.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TRAINING PROGRAM FOR FEDERAL...

  1. Robotic Arm Manipulator Using Active Control for Sample Acquisition and Transfer, and Passive Mode for Surface Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jun; Underhill, Michael L.; Trease, Brian P.; Lindemann, Randel A.

    2010-01-01

    A robotic arm that consists of three joints with four degrees of freedom (DOF) has been developed. It can carry an end-effector to acquire and transfer samples by using active control and comply with surface topology in a passive mode during a brief surface contact. The three joints are arranged in such a way that one joint of two DOFs is located at the shoulder, one joint of one DOF is located at the elbow, and one joint of one DOF is located at the wrist. Operationally, three DOFs are moved in the same plane, and the remaining one on the shoulder is moved perpendicular to the other three for better compliance with ground surface and more flexibility of sample handling. Three out of four joints are backdriveable, making the mechanism less complex and more cost effective

  2. Decoding Sensorimotor Rhythms during Robotic-Assisted Treadmill Walking for Brain Computer Interface (BCI) Applications

    PubMed Central

    García-Cossio, Eliana; Severens, Marianne; Nienhuis, Bart; Duysens, Jacques; Desain, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Locomotor malfunction represents a major problem in some neurological disorders like stroke and spinal cord injury. Robot-assisted walking devices have been used during rehabilitation of patients with these ailments for regaining and improving walking ability. Previous studies showed the advantage of brain-computer interface (BCI) based robot-assisted training combined with physical therapy in the rehabilitation of the upper limb after stroke. Therefore, stroke patients with walking disorders might also benefit from using BCI robot-assisted training protocols. In order to develop such BCI, it is necessary to evaluate the feasibility to decode walking intention from cortical patterns during robot-assisted gait training. Spectral patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG) related to robot-assisted active and passive walking were investigated in 10 healthy volunteers (mean age 32.3±10.8, six female) and in three acute stroke patients (all male, mean age 46.7±16.9, Berg Balance Scale 20±12.8). A logistic regression classifier was used to distinguish walking from baseline in these spectral EEG patterns. Mean classification accuracies of 94.0±5.4% and 93.1±7.9%, respectively, were reached when active and passive walking were compared against baseline. The classification performance between passive and active walking was 83.4±7.4%. A classification accuracy of 89.9±5.7% was achieved in the stroke patients when comparing walking and baseline. Furthermore, in the healthy volunteers modulation of low gamma activity in central midline areas was found to be associated with the gait cycle phases, but not in the stroke patients. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of BCI-based robotic-assisted training devices for gait rehabilitation. PMID:26675472

  3. Decoding Sensorimotor Rhythms during Robotic-Assisted Treadmill Walking for Brain Computer Interface (BCI) Applications.

    PubMed

    García-Cossio, Eliana; Severens, Marianne; Nienhuis, Bart; Duysens, Jacques; Desain, Peter; Keijsers, Nöel; Farquhar, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Locomotor malfunction represents a major problem in some neurological disorders like stroke and spinal cord injury. Robot-assisted walking devices have been used during rehabilitation of patients with these ailments for regaining and improving walking ability. Previous studies showed the advantage of brain-computer interface (BCI) based robot-assisted training combined with physical therapy in the rehabilitation of the upper limb after stroke. Therefore, stroke patients with walking disorders might also benefit from using BCI robot-assisted training protocols. In order to develop such BCI, it is necessary to evaluate the feasibility to decode walking intention from cortical patterns during robot-assisted gait training. Spectral patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG) related to robot-assisted active and passive walking were investigated in 10 healthy volunteers (mean age 32.3±10.8, six female) and in three acute stroke patients (all male, mean age 46.7±16.9, Berg Balance Scale 20±12.8). A logistic regression classifier was used to distinguish walking from baseline in these spectral EEG patterns. Mean classification accuracies of 94.0±5.4% and 93.1±7.9%, respectively, were reached when active and passive walking were compared against baseline. The classification performance between passive and active walking was 83.4±7.4%. A classification accuracy of 89.9±5.7% was achieved in the stroke patients when comparing walking and baseline. Furthermore, in the healthy volunteers modulation of low gamma activity in central midline areas was found to be associated with the gait cycle phases, but not in the stroke patients. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of BCI-based robotic-assisted training devices for gait rehabilitation. PMID:26675472

  4. Analyzing Robotic Kinematics Via Computed Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    Computing system assists in evaluation of kinematics of conceptual robot. Displays positions and motions of robotic manipulator within work cell. Also displays interactions between robotic manipulator and other objects. Results of simulation displayed on graphical computer workstation. System includes both off-the-shelf software originally developed for automotive industry and specially developed software. Simulation system also used to design human-equivalent hand, to model optical train in infrared system, and to develop graphical interface for teleoperator simulation system.

  5. 2010 FIRST Robotics Bayou Regional Tournament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Student-built robots maneuver the course during the 2010 Bayou Regional FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics competition in Westwego on March 5-6. The annual competition drew 36 high school teams from eight states. NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center supports FIRST Robotics by providing financing, mentors and training, as well as competition judges and referees, audiovisual staff and other volunteer personnel.

  6. Hopping robot

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Martinez, Michael A.; Kuehl, Michael A.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a hopping robot that includes a misfire tolerant linear actuator suitable for long trips, low energy steering and control, reliable low energy righting, miniature low energy fuel control. The present invention provides a robot with hopping mobility, capable of traversing obstacles significant in size relative to the robot and capable of operation on unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides a hopping robot with misfire-tolerant combustion actuation, and with combustion actuation suitable for use in oxygen-poor environments.

  7. Robotics research

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.; Paul, R.

    1984-01-01

    Organized around a view of robotics as ''the intelligent connection of perception to action,'' the fifty-three contributions collected in this book present leading current research in one of the fastest moving fields of artificial intelligence. Readings Include: Hand-Eye Coordination in Rope Handling; 3-D Balance Using 2-D algorithms. A Model Driven Visual Inspection Module: Stereo Vision: Complexity and Constraints; Interpretation of Contact Geometers from Force Measurement; The Utah MIT Dextrous Hand: Work in Progress; Hierarchical Nonlinear Control for Robots; VAL-11; A Robot Programming Language and Control System; Technological Barriers in Robotics: A Perspective from Industry.

  8. Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranco, Anthony R.; Castellanos, Andres E.; Desai, Jaydev P.; Meyers, William C.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the history, development, and current applications of robotics in surgery. Background: Surgical robotics is a new technology that holds significant promise. Robotic surgery is often heralded as the new revolution, and it is one of the most talked about subjects in surgery today. Up to this point in time, however, the drive to develop and obtain robotic devices has been largely driven by the market. There is no doubt that they will become an important tool in the surgical armamentarium, but the extent of their use is still evolving. Methods: A review of the literature was undertaken using Medline. Articles describing the history and development of surgical robots were identified as were articles reporting data on applications. Results: Several centers are currently using surgical robots and publishing data. Most of these early studies report that robotic surgery is feasible. There is, however, a paucity of data regarding costs and benefits of robotics versus conventional techniques. Conclusions: Robotic surgery is still in its infancy and its niche has not yet been well defined. Its current practical uses are mostly confined to smaller surgical procedures. PMID:14685095

  9. Evaluation of an Outreach Activity of Pediatric Clerkship Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parcel, Guy S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    An opportunity for medical students to observe and interact with children in a setting outside the clinical environment was introduced as part of ambulatory pediatric clerkship training. Evaluation of the program indicated its overall effectiveness as well as areas for which changes are suggested. (LBH)

  10. Flexible Learning Activities Fostering Autonomy in Teaching Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupetz, Rita; Ziegenmeyer, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    The flexible use of digital recordings from EFL classrooms as well as online communication with teaching experts are two promising ways of implementing e-learning in the context of initial teacher training. Our research focuses on how to blend these elements efficiently with the different theoretical and practical content layers of an introductory…

  11. Robotics, motor learning, and neurologic recovery.

    PubMed

    Reinkensmeyer, David J; Emken, Jeremy L; Cramer, Steven C

    2004-01-01

    Robotic devices are helping shed light on human motor control in health and injury. By using robots to apply novel force fields to the arm, investigators are gaining insight into how the nervous system models its external dynamic environment. The nervous system builds internal models gradually by experience and uses them in combination with impedance and feedback control strategies. Internal models are robust to environmental and neural noise, generalized across space, implemented in multiple brain regions, and developed in childhood. Robots are also being used to assist in repetitive movement practice following neurologic injury, providing insight into movement recovery. Robots can haptically assess sensorimotor performance, administer training, quantify amount of training, and improve motor recovery. In addition to providing insight into motor control, robotic paradigms may eventually enhance motor learning and rehabilitation beyond the levels possible with conventional training techniques. PMID:15255778

  12. 75 FR 61452 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Military Training Activities at...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Activities at the Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility Boardman, OR, and To Announce Public Scoping... activities on and increasing usage of the Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility (NWSTF) Boardman, Oregon... training activities to include force structure changes associated with the introduction of new...

  13. Robot Would Reconfigure Modular Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, Lloyd R.

    1993-01-01

    Special-purpose sets of equipment, packaged in identical modules with identical interconnecting mechanisms, attached to or detached from each other by specially designed robot, according to proposal. Two-arm walking robot connects and disconnects modules, operating either autonomously or under remote supervision. Robot walks along row of connected modules by grasping successive attachment subassemblies in hand-over-hand motion. Intended application for facility or station in outer space; robot reconfiguration scheme makes it unnecessary for astronauts to venture outside spacecraft or space station. Concept proves useful on Earth in assembly, disassembly, or reconfiguration of equipment in such hostile environments as underwater, near active volcanoes, or in industrial process streams.

  14. Effects of a cognitive training on spatial learning and associated functional brain activations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both cognitive and physical exercise have been discussed as promising interventions for healthy cognitive aging. The present study assessed the effects of cognitive training (spatial vs. perceptual training) and physical training (endurance training vs. non-endurance training) on spatial learning and associated brain activation in 33 adults (40–55 years). Spatial learning was assessed with a virtual maze task, and at the same time neural correlates were measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results Only the spatial training improved performance in the maze task. These behavioral gains were accompanied by a decrease in frontal and temporal lobe activity. At posttest, participants of the spatial training group showed lower activity than participants of the perceptual training group in a network of brain regions associated with spatial learning, including the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. No significant differences were observed between the two physical intervention groups. Conclusions Functional changes in neural systems associated with spatial navigation can be induced by cognitive interventions and seem to be stronger than effects of physical exercise in middle-aged adults. PMID:23870447

  15. Robotics. Guidance for Further Education. FEU/PICKUP Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This report contains materials to assist teachers and others in designing curricula in robotics. The first section includes the results of a survey of technicians and supervisors in nine companies involved with robots that was designed to gather information concerning the education and training needed to prepare for a career in robotics. The…

  16. Attitude Changes of Specialist Students of Physical Education towards Physical Activity during Teacher-Training Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrell, G. V.; Holt, D.

    1982-01-01

    A longitudinal investigation of the attitudes towards physical activity of specialist students of physical education was undertaken during a course of training teachers. Significant changes of attitude with time were noted, particularly in the Vertigo and Ascetic dimensions. (Author)

  17. Robotics: Using Technology to Teach New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Karen C.; Meyer, Carol D.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of industrial robotics training materials, considering the need for such materials, preliminary curriculum design, the Piagetian approach followed, and the uses of computer assisted instruction. A list of robotics curriculum courses (with content and audience indicated) is included. (JN)

  18. Rapid Prototyping Platform for Robotics Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Kao-Shing; Hsiao, Wen-Hsu; Shing, Gaung-Ting; Chen, Kim-Joan

    2011-01-01

    For the past several years, a team in the Department of Electrical Engineering (EE), National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan, has been establishing a pedagogical approach to embody embedded systems in the context of robotics. To alleviate the burden on students in the robotics curriculum in their junior and senior years, a training platform on…

  19. Crew/Robot Coordinated Planetary EVA Operations at a Lunar Base Analog Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Bluethmann, W. J.; Delgado, F. J.; Herrera, E.; Kosmo, J. J.; Janoiko, B. A.; Wilcox, B. H.; Townsend, J. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Fong, T. W.; Bualat, M. G.; Lee, S. Y.; Dorsey, J. T.; Doggett, W. R.

    2007-01-01

    Under the direction of NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program, robots and space suited subjects from several NASA centers recently completed a very successful demonstration of coordinated activities indicative of base camp operations on the lunar surface. For these activities, NASA chose a site near Meteor Crater, Arizona close to where Apollo Astronauts previously trained. The main scenario demonstrated crew returning from a planetary EVA (extra-vehicular activity) to a temporary base camp and entering a pressurized rover compartment while robots performed tasks in preparation for the next EVA. Scenario tasks included: rover operations under direct human control and autonomous modes, crew ingress and egress activities, autonomous robotic payload removal and stowage operations under both local control and remote control from Houston, and autonomous robotic navigation and inspection. In addition to the main scenario, participants had an opportunity to explore additional robotic operations: hill climbing, maneuvering heaving loads, gathering geo-logical samples, drilling, and tether operations. In this analog environment, the suited subjects and robots experienced high levels of dust, rough terrain, and harsh lighting.

  20. Effect of motion smoothness on brain activity while observing a dance: An fMRI study using a humanoid robot.

    PubMed

    Miura, Naoki; Sugiura, Motoaki; Takahashi, Makoto; Sassa, Yuko; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Sato, Shigeru; Horie, Kaoru; Nakamura, Katsuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2010-01-01

    Motion smoothness is critical in transmitting implicit information of body action, such as aesthetic qualities in dance performances. We expected that the perception of motion smoothness would be characterized by great intersubject variability deriving from differences in personal backgrounds and attitudes toward expressive body actions. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a humanoid robot to investigate the effects of the motion smoothness of expressive body actions and the intersubject variability due to personal attitudes on perceptions during dance observation. The effect of motion smoothness was analyzed by both conventional subtraction analysis and functional connectivity analyses that detect cortical networks reflecting intersubject variability. The results showed that the cortical networks of motion- and body-sensitive visual areas showed increases in activity in areas corresponding with motion smoothness, but the intersubject variability of personal attitudes toward art did not influence these active areas. In contrast, activation of cortical networks, including the parieto-frontal network, has large intersubject variability, and this variability is associated with personal attitudes about the consciousness of art. Thus, our results suggest that activity in the cortical network involved in understanding action is influenced by personal attitudes about the consciousness of art during observations of expressive body actions. PMID:19585386

  1. Students Learn Programming Faster through Robotic Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Allison; Newsom, Jeff; Schunn, Chris; Shoop, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Schools everywhere are using robotics education to engage kids in applied science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) activities, but teaching programming can be challenging due to lack of resources. This article reports on using Robot Virtual Worlds (RVW) and curriculum available on the Internet to teach robot programming. It also…

  2. Robotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A robot having a plurality of interconnected sections is disclosed. Each of the sections includes components which are moveable relative to components of an adjacent section. A plurality of electric motors are operably connected to at least two of said relatively moveable components to effect relative movement. A fitted, removable protective covering surrounds the sections to protect the robot.

  3. Robotics 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sultan, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Robots are used in all kinds of industrial settings. They are used to rivet bolts to cars, to move items from one conveyor belt to another, to gather information from other planets, and even to perform some very delicate types of surgery. Anyone who has watched a robot perform its tasks cannot help but be impressed by how it works. This article…

  4. Does combined cognitive training and physical activity training enhance cognitive abilities more than either alone? A four-condition randomized controlled trial among healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Shatil, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive training and aerobic training are known to improve cognitive functions. To examine the separate and combined effects of such training on cognitive performance, four groups of healthy older adults embarked on a 4 months cognitive and/or mild aerobic training. A first group [n = 33, mean age = 80 (66–90)] engaged in cognitive training, a second [n = 29, mean age = 81 (65–89)] in mild aerobic training, a third [n = 29, mean age = 79 (70–93)] in the combination of both, and a fourth [n = 31, mean age = 79 (71–92)] control group engaged in book-reading activity. The outcome was a well-validated multi-domain computerized cognitive evaluation for older adults. The results indicate that, when compared to older adults who did not engage in cognitive training (the mild aerobic and control groups) older adults who engaged in cognitive training (separate or combined training groups) showed significant improvement in cognitive performance on Hand-Eye Coordination, Global Visual Memory (GVM; working memory and long-term memory), Speed of Information Processing, Visual Scanning, and Naming. Indeed, individuals who did not engage in cognitive training showed no such improvements. Those results suggest that cognitive training is effective in improving cognitive performance and that it (and not mild aerobic training) is driving the improvement in the combined condition. Results are discussed in terms of the special circumstances of aerobic and cognitive training for older adults who are above 80 years of age. PMID:23531885

  5. Advanced robotics for decontamination and dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, W.R.; Haley, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) robotics technology application area of the US Department of Energy`s Robotics Technology Development Program is explained and described. D&D robotic systems show real promise for the reduction of human exposure to hazards, for improvement of productivity, and for the reduction of secondary waste generation. Current research and development pertaining to automated floor characterization, robotic equipment removal, and special inspection is summarized. Future research directions for these and emerging activities is given.

  6. A robotics initiative at Commonwealth Edison

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, P.; Munson, R.

    1995-10-01

    Current and planned uses of robotic equipment at Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) nuclear reactors are described. The equipment is used primarily for maintenance activities. Robotics, video, and other forms of remote technology helps ComEd to be cost competitive and lower radiation exposures. A ComEd robotics initiative to further promote robotics is highlighted. ComEd has 12 nuclear reactors at six sites. Three sites operate General Electric boiling water reactors and three sites operate Westinghouse pressurized water reactors.

  7. Robotic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Automated Endoscopic System for Optimal Positioning, or AESOP, was developed by Computer Motion, Inc. under a SBIR contract from the Jet Propulsion Lab. AESOP is a robotic endoscopic positioning system used to control the motion of a camera during endoscopic surgery. The camera, which is mounted at the end of a robotic arm, previously had to be held in place by the surgical staff. With AESOP the robotic arm can make more precise and consistent movements. AESOP is also voice controlled by the surgeon. It is hoped that this technology can be used in space repair missions which require precision beyond human dexterity. A new generation of the same technology entitled the ZEUS Robotic Surgical System can make endoscopic procedures even more successful. ZEUS allows the surgeon control various instruments in its robotic arms, allowing for the precision the procedure requires.

  8. A psychology based approach for longitudinal development in cognitive robotics.

    PubMed

    Law, J; Shaw, P; Earland, K; Sheldon, M; Lee, M

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in robotics is the ability to learn, from novel experiences, new behavior that is useful for achieving new goals and skills. Autonomous systems must be able to learn solely through the environment, thus ruling out a priori task knowledge, tuning, extensive training, or other forms of pre-programming. Learning must also be cumulative and incremental, as complex skills are built on top of primitive skills. Additionally, it must be driven by intrinsic motivation because formative experience is gained through autonomous activity, even in the absence of extrinsic goals or tasks. This paper presents an approach to these issues through robotic implementations inspired by the learning behavior of human infants. We describe an approach to developmental learning and present results from a demonstration of longitudinal development on an iCub humanoid robot. The results cover the rapid emergence of staged behavior, the role of constraints in development, the effect of bootstrapping between stages, and the use of a schema memory of experiential fragments in learning new skills. The context is a longitudinal experiment in which the robot advanced from uncontrolled motor babbling to skilled hand/eye integrated reaching and basic manipulation of objects. This approach offers promise for further fast and effective sensory-motor learning techniques for robotic learning. PMID:24478693

  9. Feasibility and efficacy of high-speed gait training with a voluntary driven exoskeleton robot for gait and balance dysfunction in patients with chronic stroke: nonrandomized pilot study with concurrent control.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takahiko; Shimizu, Issei; Hiroi, Yasuhiro; Kawaki, Masahiro; Sato, Daichi; Nagasawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of high-speed gait training with an exoskeleton robot hybrid assistive limb (HAL) in patients with chronic stroke, and to examine the efficacy of eight sessions (8 weeks) of gait training with a HAL compared with conventional physical therapy. Eighteen patients with chronic stroke were included in this study (nine each in the HAL and control groups). The HAL group underwent high-speed gait training with the HAL once a week for 8 weeks (20 min/session). The control group underwent conventional physical therapy for gait disturbance. Outcome measures were walking speed, number of steps, and cadence during a 10 m walking test, a timed up and go test, a functional reach test, and the Berg Balance Scale. Assessments were performed in the absence of the HAL before training and after the fourth and eighth training sessions. All patients in the HAL group completed the high-speed gait training without adverse events. The HAL group improved significantly in walking speed (55.9% increase, P<0.001), number of steps (17.6% decrease, P<0.01), and cadence (32.8% increase, P<0.001) during the 10 m walking test. The patients also exhibited significant improvements in the timed up and go test, the functional reach test, and the Berg Balance Scale after HAL training (P<0.01 in all). No statistical time-dependent changes were observed in any parameter in the control group. For chronic stroke patients, high-speed gait training with a HAL appears to be feasible and effective in improving gait and balance dysfunction despite the limitations of this nonrandomized pilot study. PMID:26288120

  10. The Robotic Lumbar Spine: Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control

    PubMed Central

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The robotic lumbar spine (RLS) is a 15 degree-of-freedom, fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The design incorporates five active lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. It is actuated by 20 cables connected to electric motors. Every vertebra is connected to the neighboring vertebrae by spherical joints. Medical schools can benefit from a tool, system, or method that will help instructors train students and assess their tactile proficiency throughout their education. The robotic lumbar spine has the potential to satisfy these needs in palpatory diagnosis. Medical students will be given the opportunity to examine their own patient that can be programmed with many dysfunctions related to the lumbar spine before they start their professional lives as doctors. The robotic lumbar spine can be used to teach and test medical students in their capacity to be able to recognize normal and abnormal movement patterns of the human lumbar spine under flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. This paper presents the dynamics and nonlinear control of the RLS. A new approach to solve for positive and nonzero cable tensions that are also continuous in time is introduced. PMID:24151527

  11. Information Robots and Manipulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katys, G. P.; And Others

    In the modern concept a robot is a complex automatic cybernetics system capable of executing various operations in the sphere of human activity and in various respects combining the imitative capacity of the physical and mental activity of man. They are a class of automatic information systems intended for search, collection, processing, and…

  12. Pedagogical Synergetics as the Activity Approach Basis in Professional and Pedagogical Training at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serezhnikova, Raisa Kuzminichna; Fishman, Boris Entilyevich; Abramenko, Natalya Yurevna; Zhoglo, Lyubov Yakovlevna; Fishbein, Miron Honevich

    2015-01-01

    The article considers an idea of activity approach realization in professional training assuming not only change of the contents, forms and methods of students' educational activities, but also not less radical transformation of teacher's activities oriented at the students' development of creative self-realization experience. The authors…

  13. Control and Guidance of Low-Cost Robots via Gesture Perception for Monitoring Activities in the Home.

    PubMed

    Sempere, Angel D; Serna-Leon, Arturo; Gil, Pablo; Puente, Santiago; Torres, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a low-cost mini-robot that is controlled by visual gestures. The prototype allows a person with disabilities to perform visual inspections indoors and in domestic spaces. Such a device could be used as the operator's eyes obviating the need for him to move about. The robot is equipped with a motorised webcam that is also controlled by visual gestures. This camera is used to monitor tasks in the home using the mini-robot while the operator remains quiet and motionless. The prototype was evaluated through several experiments testing the ability to use the mini-robot's kinematics and communication systems to make it follow certain paths. The mini-robot can be programmed with specific orders and can be tele-operated by means of 3D hand gestures to enable the operator to perform movements and monitor tasks from a distance. PMID:26690448

  14. Impact of Inertial Training on Strength and Power Performance in Young Active Men.

    PubMed

    Naczk, Mariusz; Naczk, Alicja; Brzenczek-Owczarzak, Wioletta; Arlet, Jarosław; Adach, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    Naczk, M, Naczk, A, Brzenczek-Owczarzak, W, Arlet, J, and Adach, Z. Impact of inertial training on strength and power performance in young active men. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2107-2113, 2016-This study evaluated how 5 weeks of inertial training using 2 different loads influenced strength and power performance. Fifty-eight male physical education students were randomly divided into training and control groups. The 2 training groups (T0 and T10) performed inertial training 3 times per week for 5 weeks using the new Inertial Training and Measurement System (ITMS). Each training session included 3 exercise sets involving the knee extensors muscles. The T0 group used only the mass of the ITMS flywheel (19.4 kg), whereas the T10 group had an additional 10 kg on the flywheel. Before and after training, we evaluated maximum force and power of knee extensors muscles, countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), maximal power output achieved during ergometer test PVT, electromyography of quadriceps, and muscle mass. In T0 and T10, respectively, ITMS training induced significant increases in muscle force (25.2 and 23.3%), muscle power (33.2 and 27%), CMJ (3.8 and 6.7%), SJ (2.2 and 6.1%), PVT (8 and 7.4%), and muscle mass (9.8 and 15%). The changes did not significantly differ between T0 and T10. A 16% significant increase of electromyography amplitude (quadriceps muscle) was noted only in T0. The novel ITMS training method is effective for improving muscular strength and power. Improvements in PVT, CMJ, and SJ indicate that the increased strength and power elicited by ITMS training can translate to improvements in sport performance. The ITMS training can also be useful for building muscle mass. PMID:27457914

  15. Predicting Antitumor Activity of Peptides by Consensus of Regression Models Trained on a Small Data Sample

    PubMed Central

    Radman, Andreja; Gredičak, Matija; Kopriva, Ivica; Jerić, Ivanka

    2011-01-01

    Predicting antitumor activity of compounds using regression models trained on a small number of compounds with measured biological activity is an ill-posed inverse problem. Yet, it occurs very often within the academic community. To counteract, up to some extent, overfitting problems caused by a small training data, we propose to use consensus of six regression models for prediction of biological activity of virtual library of compounds. The QSAR descriptors of 22 compounds related to the opioid growth factor (OGF, Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met) with known antitumor activity were used to train regression models: the feed-forward artificial neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, sparseness constrained linear regression, the linear and nonlinear (with polynomial and Gaussian kernel) support vector machine. Regression models were applied on a virtual library of 429 compounds that resulted in six lists with candidate compounds ranked by predicted antitumor activity. The highly ranked candidate compounds were synthesized, characterized and tested for an antiproliferative activity. Some of prepared peptides showed more pronounced activity compared with the native OGF; however, they were less active than highly ranked compounds selected previously by the radial basis function support vector machine (RBF SVM) regression model. The ill-posedness of the related inverse problem causes unstable behavior of trained regression models on test data. These results point to high complexity of prediction based on the regression models trained on a small data sample. PMID:22272081

  16. Predicting antitumor activity of peptides by consensus of regression models trained on a small data sample.

    PubMed

    Radman, Andreja; Gredičak, Matija; Kopriva, Ivica; Jerić, Ivanka

    2011-01-01

    Predicting antitumor activity of compounds using regression models trained on a small number of compounds with measured biological activity is an ill-posed inverse problem. Yet, it occurs very often within the academic community. To counteract, up to some extent, overfitting problems caused by a small training data, we propose to use consensus of six regression models for prediction of biological activity of virtual library of compounds. The QSAR descriptors of 22 compounds related to the opioid growth factor (OGF, Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met) with known antitumor activity were used to train regression models: the feed-forward artificial neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, sparseness constrained linear regression, the linear and nonlinear (with polynomial and Gaussian kernel) support vector machine. Regression models were applied on a virtual library of 429 compounds that resulted in six lists with candidate compounds ranked by predicted antitumor activity. The highly ranked candidate compounds were synthesized, characterized and tested for an antiproliferative activity. Some of prepared peptides showed more pronounced activity compared with the native OGF; however, they were less active than highly ranked compounds selected previously by the radial basis function support vector machine (RBF SVM) regression model. The ill-posedness of the related inverse problem causes unstable behavior of trained regression models on test data. These results point to high complexity of prediction based on the regression models trained on a small data sample. PMID:22272081

  17. Does Lego Training Stimulate Pupils' Ability to Solve Logical Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindh, Jorgen; Holgersson, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of a one-year regular robotic toys (lego) training on school pupils' performance. The underlying pedagogical perspective is the "constructionist theory," where the main idea is that knowledge is constructed in the mind of the pupil by active learning. The investigation has been made in two…

  18. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  19. Energy Efficient Legged Robotics at Sandia Labs, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Buerger, Steve; Mazumdar, Ani; Spencer, Steve

    2015-06-02

    Sandia is developing energy efficient actuation and drive train technologies to dramatically improve the charge life of legged robots. The work is supported by DARPA, and Sandia will demonstrate an energy efficient bipedal robot at the technology exposition section of the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals in June, 2015. This video, the second in a series, describes the continued development and integration of the Sandia Transmission Efficient Prototype Promoting Research (STEPPR) robot.

  20. [Walking assist robot and its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Kakou, Hiroaki; Shitama, Hideo; Kimura, Yoshiko; Nakamoto, Yoko; Furuta, Nami; Honda, Kanae; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2009-06-01

    The walking assist robot was developed to improve gait disturbance in patients with severe disabilities. The robot had a trunk supporter, power generator and operating arms which held patient's lower extremities and simulated walking, a control unit, biofeedback system, and a treadmill. We applied the robot-aided gait training to three patients with severe gait disturbance induced by stroke, axonal Guillan-Barré syndrome or spinal cord injury, and the walking assist robot turned out to be effective in improving the gait disturbance. PMID:19530565

  1. 77 FR 60679 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for AFTT was made available to the public on May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27742... Specified Activities; U.S. Navy Training and Testing Activities in the Atlantic Fleet Training and Testing... Fleet Training and Testing (AFTT) study area from January 2014 through January 2019. Pursuant to...

  2. 20 CFR 641.660 - Who is eligible to participate in section 502(e) private sector training activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... community service portion of the program apply for participation in the private sector training activities...(e) private sector training activities? 641.660 Section 641.660 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE...

  3. Interactive Whiteboard Integration in Classrooms: Active Teachers Understanding about Their Training Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Meritxell Cortada; Quintana, Maria Graciela Badilla; Romaní, Jordi Riera

    With the incorporation in education of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), especially the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB), emerges the need for a proper teacher training process due to adequate the integration and the didactic use of this tool in the classroom. This article discusses the teachers' perception on the training process for ICT integration. Its main aim is to contribute to the unification of minimum criteria for effective ICT implementation in any training process for active teachers. This case study begins from the development of a training model called Eduticom which was putted into practice in 4 schools in Catalonia, Spain. Findings indicated different teachers' needs such as an appropriate infrastructure, a proper management and a flexible training model which essentially addresses methodological and didactic aspects of IWB uses in the classroom.

  4. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions. PMID:2208684

  5. Human-robot coordination using scripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Laura E.; Murphy, Robin R.; Craighead, Jeffrey D.

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes an extension of scripts, which have been used to control sequences of robot behavior, to facilitate human-robot coordination. The script mechanism permits the human to both conduct expected, complementary activities with the robot and to intervene opportunistically taking direct control. Scripts address the six major issues associated with human-robot coordination. They allow the human to visualize the robot's mental model of the situation and build a better overall understanding of the situation and what level of autonomy or intervention is needed. It also maintains synchronization of the world and robot models so that control can be seamlessly transferred between human and robot while eliminating "coordination surprise". The extended script mechanism and its implementation in Java on an Inuktun micro-VGTV robot for the technical search task in urban search and rescue is described.

  6. Brain state-dependent robotic reaching movement with a multi-joint arm exoskeleton: combining brain-machine interfacing and robotic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Brauchle, Daniel; Vukelić, Mathias; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    While robot-assisted arm and hand training after stroke allows for intensive task-oriented practice, it has provided only limited additional benefit over dose-matched physiotherapy up to now. These rehabilitation devices are possibly too supportive during the exercises. Neurophysiological signals might be one way of avoiding slacking and providing robotic support only when the brain is particularly responsive to peripheral input. We tested the feasibility of three-dimensional robotic assistance for reaching movements with a multi-joint exoskeleton during motor imagery (MI)-related desynchronization of sensorimotor oscillations in the β-band. We also registered task-related network changes of cortical functional connectivity by electroencephalography via the imaginary part of the coherence function. Healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed similar patterns—but different aptitudes—of controlling the robotic movement. All participants in this pilot study with nine healthy subjects and two stroke patients achieved their maximum performance during the early stages of the task. Robotic control was significantly higher and less variable when proprioceptive feedback was provided in addition to visual feedback, i.e., when the orthosis was actually attached to the subject’s arm during the task. A distributed cortical network of task-related coherent activity in the θ-band showed significant differences between healthy subjects and stroke patients as well as between early and late periods of the task. Brain-robot interfaces (BRIs) may successfully link three-dimensional robotic training to the participants’ efforts and allow for task-oriented practice of activities of daily living with a physiologically controlled multi-joint exoskeleton. Changes of cortical physiology during the task might also help to make subject-specific adjustments of task difficulty and guide adjunct interventions to facilitate motor learning for functional restoration, a proposal that

  7. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina; Kacsó, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  8. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina

    2015-01-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  9. Controlling robots with spoken commands

    SciTech Connect

    Beugelsdijk, T.; Phelan, P.

    1987-10-01

    A robotic system for handling radioactive materials has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Because of safety considerations, the robot must be under the control of a human operator continuously. In this paper we describe the implementation of a voice-recognition system that makes such control possible, yet permits the robot to perform preprogrammed manipulations without the operator's intervention. We also describe the training given both the operator and the voice recognition-system, as well as practical problems encountered during routine operation. A speech synthesis unit connected to the robot's control computer provides audible feedback to the operator. Thus, when a task is completed or if an emergency develops, the computer provides an appropriate spoken message. Implementation and operation of this commercially available hardware are discussed.

  10. Evidence of altered corticomotor excitability following targeted activation of gluteus maximus training in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Southam, Anna C; Kuo, Yi-Ling; Lee, Ya-Yun; Powers, Christopher M

    2016-04-13

    It has been proposed that strengthening and skill training of gluteus maximus (GM) may be beneficial in treating various knee injuries. Given the redundancy of the hip musculature and the small representational area of GM in the primary motor cortex (M1), learning to activate this muscle before prescribing strength exercises and modifying movement strategy would appear to be important. This study aimed to determine whether a short-term activation training program targeting the GM results in neuroplastic changes in M1. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were obtained in 12 healthy individuals at different stimulation intensities while they performed a double-leg bridge. Participants then completed a home exercise program for ∼1 h/day for 6 days that consisted of a single exercise designed to selectively target the GM. Baseline and post-training input-output curves (IOCs) were generated by graphing average MEP amplitudes and cortical silent period durations against corresponding stimulation intensities. Following the GM activation training, the linear slope of both the MEP IOC and cortical silent period IOC increased significantly. Short-term GM activation training resulted in a significant increase in corticomotor excitability as well as changes in inhibitory processes of the GM. We propose that the observed corticomotor plasticity will enable better utilization of the GM in the more advanced stages of a rehabilitation/training program. PMID:26981714

  11. Cellular immune activity in response to increased training of elite oarsmen prior to Olympic competition.

    PubMed

    Jakeman, P M; Weller, A; Warrington, G

    1995-06-01

    This study investigated the changes in urinary neopterin, a biochemical marker of cellular immune activity, in elite male rowers undertaking a progressive increase in training prior to Olympic competition. Twenty-seven male rowers of the 1992 Great Britain team provided daily urine samples for a 4-week period of training that included 17 days of altitude training and 10 days of heat acclimatization. The mean (+/- S.D.) ratio of neopterin/creatinine in urine increased from pre-training values of 135 +/- 32 to a peak of 219 +/- 121 mumol neopterin per mol creatinine on day 19 of training (P < 0.05). Changes in the ratio of neopterin/creatinine with training were found to be transient and highly variable between subjects, ranging from no change to peak values five-fold greater than baseline. On the basis of the in vivo measurement of cell-mediated immunity employed in this study, we conclude that elite athletes engaged in high-intensity training prior to competition show either no change or a moderate increase in cellular immune activation. PMID:7563287

  12. Changes in the exercise activation of diencephalic and brainstem cardiorespiratory areas after training.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Ronaldo M; Gilbert, Andrea B; Waldrop, Tony G; Iwamoto, Gary A

    2002-08-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise training changes the extent or pattern of activation of areas in the central nervous system (CNS) involved in cardiorespiratory control. Rats that spontaneously trained on running wheels for 80-100 days were compared to rats that were not provided an opportunity to exercise. Selected brain regions including the hypothalamic and mesencephalic locomotor regions, and ventrolateral medulla were studied using c-Fos-like immunocytochemistry. A single test bout of exercise evoked significantly less activation as indicated by Fos labeling in the posterior (caudal) hypothalamic area, periaqueductal gray, nucleus of the tractus solitarius and the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the trained rats when compared to sedentary rats. These results are consistent with the concept that the nervous system changes its responses to a given level of exercise after training. These changes may also be related to perceived exertion. PMID:12176165

  13. The Future Training Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbian, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    Looks at some of the electronic learning technology that has already been developed and will become common for training, including robots, lucid dreaming, tele-immersion, human interface technology, among others. (JOW)

  14. Pediatric Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Michael V.; Cho, Patricia S.; Yu, Richard N.

    2016-01-01

    The laparoscopic approach to the pyeloplasty procedure has proven to be safe and effective in the pediatric population. Multiple studies have revealed outcomes comparable to the open approach. However, a major drawback to laparoscopy is the technical challenge of precise suturing in the small working space in children. The advantages of robotic surgery when compared to conventional laparoscopy have been well established and include motion scaling, enhanced magnification, 3-dimensional stereoscopic vision, and improved instrument dexterity. As a result, surgeons with limited laparoscopic experience are able to more readily acquire robotic surgical skills. Limitations of the robotic platform include its high costs for acquisition and maintenance, as well as the need for additional robotic surgical training. In this article, we review the current status of the robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty, including a brief history, comparative outcomes, cost considerations, and training. PMID:27430017

  15. Strength Training Improves Body Image and Physical Activity Behaviors Among Midlife and Older Rural Women

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Rebecca A.; Eldridge, Galen; Lynch, Wesley; Paul, Lynn C.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of strength training on body image is understudied. The Strong Women Program, a 10-week, twice weekly strength-training program, was provided by Extension agents to 341 older rural women (62±12 years); changes in body image and other psychosocial variables were evaluated. Paired-sample t-test analyses were conducted to assess mean differences pre- to post-program. Strength training was associated with significant improvements in several dimensions of body image, health-related quality of life, and physical activity behaviors, satisfaction, and comfort among rural aging women—an often underserved population that stands to benefit considerably from similar programs. PMID:25767297

  16. Comparison of Activity Profiles and Physiological Demands Between International Rugby Sevens Matches and Training.

    PubMed

    Higham, Dean G; Pyne, David B; Anson, Judith M; Hopkins, Will G; Eddy, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    The specificity of contemporary training practices of international rugby sevens players is unknown. We quantified the positional group-specific activity profiles and physiological demands of on-field training activities and compared these with match demands. Twenty-two international matches and 63 rugby-specific training drills were monitored in 25 backs and 17 forwards from a national squad of male rugby sevens players over a 21-month period. Drills were classified into 3 categories: low-intensity skill refining (n = 23 drills, 560 observations), moderate- to high-intensity skill refining (n = 28 drills, 600 observations), and game simulation (n = 12 drills, 365 observations). Movement patterns (via Global Positioning System devices) and physiological load (via heart rate monitors) were recorded for all activities, and the differences between training and matches were quantified using magnitude-based inferential statistics. Distance covered in total and at ≥3.5 m·s, maximal velocity, and frequency of accelerations and decelerations were lower for forwards during competition compared with those for backs by a small but practically important magnitude. No clear positional group differences were observed for physiological load during matches. Training demands exceeded match demands only for frequency of decelerations of forwards during moderate- to high-intensity skill-refining drills and only by a small amount. Accelerations and distance covered at ≥6 m·s were closer to match values for forwards than for backs during all training activities, but training drills consistently fell below the demands of international competition. Coaches could therefore improve physical and physiological specificity by increasing the movement demands and intensity of training drills. PMID:27100167

  17. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  18. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  19. Robotic arm

    SciTech Connect

    Kwech, H.

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube is disclosed. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel. 23 figs.

  20. Robotic arm

    SciTech Connect

    Kwech, Horst

    1989-04-18

    A robotic arm positionable within a nuclear vessel by access through a small diameter opening and having a mounting tube supported within the vessel and mounting a plurality of arm sections for movement lengthwise of the mounting tube as well as for movement out of a window provided in the wall of the mounting tube. An end effector, such as a grinding head or welding element, at an operating end of the robotic arm, can be located and operated within the nuclear vessel through movement derived from six different axes of motion provided by mounting and drive connections between arm sections of the robotic arm. The movements are achieved by operation of remotely-controllable servo motors, all of which are mounted at a control end of the robotic arm to be outside the nuclear vessel.

  1. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1998-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  2. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  3. Lags in Training Response to Changes in Economic Activity: An Exploratory Inquiry for Five Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Ross E.; Park, Jin S.; Akdere, Mesut

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the length of time it takes training budgets in five industries to respond to changes in the demand for their services/activity and for their speed of response to changes in productive activity. The results indicate that for the industries studied, the length of lag between change in demand and median adjustment to that…

  4. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  5. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and... DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND CENTERS PROGRAM What Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.22 What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and...

  6. Professional Activities, Needed Competencies and Training Needs of Medical Librarians in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal; Bakhtar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to explore the professional activities, needed competencies and education/training needs of medical librarians in Pakistan. The following questions guided the study: what are the current professional activities of medical librarians in Pakistan? What is their perception of the competencies needed of medical librarians? And what are…

  7. Classroom-Directed Home Training Activities. Preschool Program: A Regional Demonstration Program for Preschool Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jacquelyn O.

    One of 10 documents developed for preschool programs for handicapped children, the manual presents classroom directed home training activities. The activities are based on such principles as the effectiveness of home instruction by a parent and the need for a parent to feel responsibility for the child's learning. Intended to provide teachers of…

  8. Learning Activity Packets for Auto Mechanics II. Section C--Drive Train.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    Five learning activity packets (LAPs) are provided for the instructional area of drive train in the auto mechanics II program. They accompany an instructor's guide available separately. The LAPs outline the study activities and performance tasks for these five units: (1) clutch assembly, (2) standard transmission, (3) drive lines, (4) rear axle,…

  9. Community College Involvement in Contract Training and Other Economic Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Robert; And Others

    In 1989-90, a national survey was conducted to assess the scope and nature of contract training and other economic development activities at community colleges and technical institutes. The survey was sent to a random sample of 246 community colleges, requesting information on the colleges' workforce and economic development activities in 1988-89.…

  10. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (Ramp): Training Persons with Dementia to Serve as Group Activity Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Cameron J.; Skrajner, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Design and Methods: Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders'…

  11. Change in performance in response to training load adjustment based on autonomic activity.

    PubMed

    Botek, M; McKune, A J; Krejci, J; Stejskal, P; Gaba, A

    2014-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess performance (Perf) changes in response to a new training strategy. Specifically, based on spectral analysis of heart rate variability (SA HRV) to determine autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, training doses were adjusted to maintain vagal activity at a high and relatively stable level during training preparation. Trained athletes (5 male and 5 female) aged 23.2±4.2 years voluntarily participated in the study. ANS activity was assessed during an orthoclinostatic test, and was represented by calculating HRV variables and a total score index. Over 17 weeks, improvement (1.4-8.5%) and deterioration (0.1-8.8%) in Perf were detected in 7 and 3 athletes, respectively. A relationship (rs=0.684; P<0.05) between the change in Perf (ΔPerf) and supine PHF during season was found. Supine HRV indices (PHF, PT, and MSSD) for the last 3 weeks of the HRV-adjusting period correlated (rs=0.636; 0.648; 0.648, P<0.05) with ΔPerf. Based on the results, a high and relative stable vagal activity during preparation may indicate a readiness to train or appropriate recovery that positively affects Perf. In conclusion, daily quantification of ANS activity by SA HRV seems to be a promising tool for the enhancement of Perf. PMID:24129989

  12. Enhanced pulmonary and active skeletal muscle gas exchange during intense exercise after sprint training in men.

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, M J; Heigenhauser, G J; McKelvie, R S; Obminski, G; MacDougall, J D; Jones, N L

    1997-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of 7 weeks of sprint training on gas exchange across the lungs and active skeletal muscle during and following maximal cycling exercise in eight healthy males. 2. Pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were measured before and after training during incremental exercise (n = 8) and during and in recovery from a maximal 30 s sprint exercise bout by breath-by-breath analysis (n = 6). To determine gas exchange by the exercising leg muscles, brachial arterial and femoral venous blood O2 and CO2 contents and lactate concentration were measured at rest, during the final 10 s of exercise and during 10 min of recovery. 3. Training increased (P < 0.05) the maximal incremental exercise values of ventilation (VE, by 15.7 +/- 7.1%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 15.0 +/- 4.2%). Sprint exercise peak power (3.9 +/- 1.0% increase) and cumulative 30 s work (11.7 +/- 2.8% increase) were increased and fatigue index was reduced (by -9.2 +/- 1.5%) after training (P < 0.05). The highest VE, VCO2 and VO2 values attained during sprint exercise were not significantly changed after training, but a significant (P < 0.05) training effect indicated increased VE (by 19.2 +/- 7.9%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 12.7 +/- 6.5%), primarily reflecting elevated post-exercise values after training. 4. Arterial O2 and CO2 contents were lower after training, by respective mean differences of 3.4 and 21.9 ml l-1 (P < 0.05), whereas the arteriovenous O2 and CO2 content differences and the respiratory exchange ratio across the leg were unchanged by training. 5. Arterial whole blood lactate concentration and the net lactate release by exercising muscle were unchanged by training. 6. The greater peak pulmonary VO2 and VCO2 with sprint exercise, the increased maximal incremental values, unchanged arterial blood lactate concentration and greater sprint performance all point strongly towards enhanced gas exchange across the lungs and in

  13. Enhancing Cognitive Abilities with Comprehensive Training: A Large, Online, Randomized, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Joseph L.; Nelson, Rolf A.; Thomason, Moriah E.; Sternberg, Daniel A.; Katovich, Kiefer; Farzin, Faraz; Scanlon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of studies have demonstrated gains in cognitive ability following cognitive training interventions. However, other studies have not shown such gains, and questions remain regarding the efficacy of specific cognitive training interventions. Cognitive training research often involves programs made up of just one or a few exercises, targeting limited and specific cognitive endpoints. In addition, cognitive training studies typically involve small samples that may be insufficient for reliable measurement of change. Other studies have utilized training periods that were too short to generate reliable gains in cognitive performance. Methods The present study evaluated an online cognitive training program comprised of 49 exercises targeting a variety of cognitive capacities. The cognitive training program was compared to an active control condition in which participants completed crossword puzzles. All participants were recruited, trained, and tested online (N = 4,715 fully evaluable participants). Participants in both groups were instructed to complete one approximately 15-minute session at least 5 days per week for 10 weeks. Results Participants randomly assigned to the treatment group improved significantly more on the primary outcome measure, an aggregate measure of neuropsychological performance, than did the active control group (Cohen’s d effect size = 0.255; 95% confidence interval = [0.198, 0.312]). Treatment participants showed greater improvements than controls on speed of processing, short-term memory, working memory, problem solving, and fluid reasoning assessments. Participants in the treatment group also showed greater improvements on self-reported measures of cognitive functioning, particularly on those items related to concentration compared to the control group (Cohen’s d = 0.249; 95% confidence interval = [0.191, 0.306]). Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that a varied training program composed of a number of

  14. Control and Guidance of Low-Cost Robots via Gesture Perception for Monitoring Activities in the Home

    PubMed Central

    Sempere, Angel D.; Serna-Leon, Arturo; Gil, Pablo; Puente, Santiago; Torres, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a low-cost mini-robot that is controlled by visual gestures. The prototype allows a person with disabilities to perform visual inspections indoors and in domestic spaces. Such a device could be used as the operator's eyes obviating the need for him to move about. The robot is equipped with a motorised webcam that is also controlled by visual gestures. This camera is used to monitor tasks in the home using the mini-robot while the operator remains quiet and motionless. The prototype was evaluated through several experiments testing the ability to use the mini-robot’s kinematics and communication systems to make it follow certain paths. The mini-robot can be programmed with specific orders and can be tele-operated by means of 3D hand gestures to enable the operator to perform movements and monitor tasks from a distance. PMID:26690448

  15. Strength training reduces arterial blood pressure but not sympathetic neural activity in young normotensive subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Jason R.; Ray, Chester A.; Downs, Emily M.; Cooke, William H.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of resistance training on arterial blood pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) at rest have not been established. Although endurance training is commonly recommended to lower arterial blood pressure, it is not known whether similar adaptations occur with resistance training. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that whole body resistance training reduces arterial blood pressure at rest, with concomitant reductions in MSNA. Twelve young [21 +/- 0.3 (SE) yr] subjects underwent a program of whole body resistance training 3 days/wk for 8 wk. Resting arterial blood pressure (n = 12; automated sphygmomanometer) and MSNA (n = 8; peroneal nerve microneurography) were measured during a 5-min period of supine rest before and after exercise training. Thirteen additional young (21 +/- 0.8 yr) subjects served as controls. Resistance training significantly increased one-repetition maximum values in all trained muscle groups (P < 0.001), and it significantly decreased systolic (130 +/- 3 to 121 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.01), diastolic (69 +/- 3 to 61 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.04), and mean (89 +/- 2 to 81 +/- 2 mmHg; P = 0.01) arterial blood pressures at rest. Resistance training did not affect MSNA or heart rate. Arterial blood pressures and MSNA were unchanged, but heart rate increased after 8 wk of relative inactivity for subjects in the control group (61 +/- 2 to 67 +/- 3 beats/min; P = 0.01). These results indicate that whole body resistance exercise training might decrease the risk for development of cardiovascular disease by lowering arterial blood pressure but that reductions of pressure are not coupled to resistance exercise-induced decreases of sympathetic tone.

  16. Active control of train bogies with MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotoohi, Abbas; Yousefi-Koma, Aghil; Yasrebi, Naser

    2006-03-01

    This research is conducted to demonstrate the advantages of skyhook semi-active dampers in railway vehicle suspension systems. This semi- active suspension system consists of four actuators on each bogie that locate in the secondary suspension position instead of passive dampers. Employing equations of skyhook control scheme, the semi- active damping force (actuator force) is determined by absolute velocity of car body instead of relative velocity. An integration of a control design tool, i.e. MATLAB, together with a tool for railway vehicle simulation, i.e. ADAMS/Rail is utilized for modeling and control analysis simultaneously. Analysis has been performed on a traditional bogie model with passive secondary suspension and on a new bogie model with semi-active suspension. The effects of suspension system on displacement and acceleration in passenger seats have been investigated in various points of car body. Results show that the semi-active suspension improves the ride comfort by reducing accelerations, in comparison with passive model. Finally, according to the damper force obtained from Sky-hook controller, a Magnetorheological (MR) damper has been designed for the semi-active suspension system.

  17. Simulation of robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Bills, K.C.; Kwon, D.S.; Schoenwald, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s development of an environment for the simulation of robotic manipulators. Simulation includes the modeling of kinematics, dynamics, sensors, actuators, control systems, operators, and environments. Models will be used for manipulator design, proposal evaluation, control system design and analysis, graphical preview of proposed motions, safety system development, and training. Of particular interest is the development of models for robotic manipulators having at least one flexible link. As a first application, models have been developed for the Pacific Northwest Laboratories` Flexible Beam Testbed which is a one-Degree-Of-Freedom, flexible arm with a hydraulic base actuator. Initial results show good agreement between model and experiment.

  18. Effects of the Alternate Combination of “Error-Enhancing” and “Active Assistive” Robot-Mediated Treatments on Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cesqui, Benedetta; Monaco, Vito; Aliboni, Sara; Posteraro, Federico; Micera, Silvestro

    2013-01-01

    This paper aimed at investigating the effects of a novel robotic-aided rehabilitation treatment for the recovery of the upper limb related capabilities in chronic post stroke patients. Eighteen post-stroke patients were enrolled in a six-week therapy program and divided into two groups. They were all required to perform horizontal pointing movements both in the presence of a robot-generated divergent force field (DF) that pushed their hands proportional to the trajectory error and perpendicular to the direction of motion, and according to the typical active assistive (AA) approach used in robotic therapy. We used a crossover experimental paradigm where the two groups switched from one therapy treatment to the other. The hypothesis underlying this paper was that the use of the destabilizing scenario forced the patient to keep the end-point position as close as possible to the ideal path, hence requiring a more active control of the arm with respect to the AA approach. Our findings confirmed this hypothesis. In addition, when the DF treatment was provided in the first therapy cycle, patients also showed straighter and smoother paths during the subsequent AA therapy cycle, while this was not true in the opposite case. In conclusion, the results herein reported provide evidence that the use of an unstable DF field can lead to better recovery outcomes, and therefore it potentially more effective than solely active assistance therapy alone. PMID:27170850

  19. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  20. Eclectic theory of intelligent robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E. L.; Ghaffari, M.; Liao, X.; Ali, S. M. Alhaj; Sarkar, Saurabh; Reynolds, Scott; Mathur, Kovid

    2007-09-01

    applications. The use of manipulators and mobile bases with a high-level control are potentially useful for space exploration, certain rescue robots, defense robots, medical robotics, and robots that aids older people in daily living activities.

  1. Preface: Terrestrial Fieldwork to Support in situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) and Robotic Resource Prospecting for Future Activities in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.

    2015-05-01

    Finding, extracting, and using resources at the site of robotic and human exploration activities holds the promise of enabling sustainable and affordable exploration of the Moon, Mars, and asteroids, and eventually allow humans to expand their economy and habitation beyond the surface of the Earth. Commonly referred to as in situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), mineral and volatile resources found in space can be converted into oxygen, water, metals, fuels, and manufacturing and construction materials (such as plastics and concrete) for transportation, power, life support, habitation construction, and part/logistics manufacturing applications. For every kilogram of payload landed on the surface of the Moon or Mars, 7.5-11 kg of payload (mostly propellant) needs to be launched into low Earth orbit. Therefore, besides promising long-term self-sufficiency and infrastructure growth, ISRU can provide significant reductions in launch costs and the number of launches required. Key to being able to use space resources is knowing where they are located, how much is there, and how the resources are distributed. While ISRU holds great promise, it has also never been demonstrated in an actual space mission. Therefore, operations and hardware associated with each ISRU prospecting, excavation, transportation, and processing step must be examined, tested, and finally integrated to enable the end goal of using space resources in future human space missions.

  2. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  3. Mobile robotic assistive balance trainer - an intelligent compliant and adaptive robotic balance assistant for daily living.

    PubMed

    Tiseo, Carlo; Lim, Zhen Yi; Shee, Cheng Yap; Ang, Wei Tech

    2014-01-01

    Balance control probably has the greatest impact on independence in activities of daily living (ADL), because it is a fundamental motor skill and prerequisite to the maintenance of a myriad of postures and mobile activities. We propose a new rehabilitation therapy to administer standing and mobile balance control training, enabled by a Mobile Robotic Assistive Balance Trainer (MRABT). The targeted group for this initial work is post stroke patients, although it can be extended to subjects with other neurological insults in the future. The proposed system consists of a mobile base and a parallel robotic arm which provides support to the patient at the hip. The compliant robotic arm with intelligent control algorithm will only provide support and assistance to the patient when the center of mass of the body deviates beyond the predefined safety boundary, mimicking the helping hands of a parent when a toddler learns to walk. In this paper, we present our initial work in the design and kinematic analysis of the system. PMID:25571190

  4. Entrainment of chaotic activities in brain and heart during MBSR mindfulness training.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junling; Fan, Jicong; Wu, Bonnie Wai Yan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chang, Chunqi; Hung, Yeung-Sam; Fung, Peter Chin Wan; Sik, Hin Hung

    2016-03-11

    The activities of the brain and the heart are dynamic, chaotic, and possibly intrinsically coordinated. This study aims to investigate the effect of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program on the chaoticity of electronic activities of the brain and the heart, and to explore their potential correlation. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded at the beginning of an 8-week standard MBSR training course and after the course. EEG spectrum analysis was carried out, wavelet entropies (WE) of EEG (together with reconstructed cortical sources) and heart rate were calculated, and their correlation was investigated. We found enhancement of EEG power of alpha and beta waves and lowering of delta waves power during MBSR training state as compared to normal resting state. Wavelet entropy analysis indicated that MBSR mindfulness meditation could reduce the chaotic activities of both EEG and heart rate as a change of state. However, longitudinal change of trait may need more long-term training. For the first time, our data demonstrated that the chaotic activities of the brain and the heart became more coordinated during MBSR training, suggesting that mindfulness training may increase the entrainment between mind and body. The 3D brain regions involved in the change in mental states were identified. PMID:26784361

  5. Robotic Surgical Skills: Acquisition, Maintenance, and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Karen M.; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Guy, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The degradation in robotic skills that occurs during periods of robotic surgical inactivity in newly trained surgeons was measured. The role of animate training in robotic skill was also assessed. Methods: Robotically naïve resident and attending surgeons underwent training with the da Vinci® robot on needle passage (DN), rocking ring transfer peg board (RPB), and running suture pod tasks (SP). Errors were established to convert actual time to adjusted time. Participants were deemed “proficient” once their adjusted times were within 80% of those set by experienced surgeons through repeated trials. Participants did not use the robot except for repeating the tasks once at 4, 8, and 12 weeks (tests). Participants then underwent animate training and completed a final test within 7 days. Results: Twenty-five attending and 29 resident surgeons enrolled; 3 withdrew. There were significant increases in time to complete each of the tasks, and in errors, by 4 weeks (Adjusted times: DN: 122.9 ± 2.2 to 204.2 ± 11.7, t=6.9, P<.001; RPB: 262.4 ± 2.5 to 364.7 ± 8.0, t=12.4, P<.001; SP: 91.4 ± 1.4 to 169.9 ± 6.8, t=11.3, P<.001). Times decreased following animate training, but not to levels observed after proficiency training for the RPB and SP modules. Conclusions: Robotic surgical skills degrade significantly within 4 weeks of inactivity in newly trained surgeons. Animate training may provide different skills than those acquired in the dry lab. PMID:23477169

  6. Low-cost educational robotics applied to physics teaching in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Marcos A. M.; Duarte, José R. R.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose some of the strategies and methodologies for teaching high-school physics topics through an educational robotics show. This exhibition was part of a set of actions promoted by a Brazilian government program of incentive for teaching activities, whose primary focus is the training of teachers, the improvement of teaching in public schools, the dissemination of science, and the formation of new scientists and researchers. By means of workshops, banners and the prototyping of robotics, we were able to create a connection between the study areas and their surroundings, making learning meaningful and accessible for the students involved and contributing to their cognitive development.

  7. The effects of inhibitory control training for preschoolers on reasoning ability and neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Zhu, Xinyi; Ziegler, Albert; Shi, Jiannong

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory control (including response inhibition and interference control) develops rapidly during the preschool period and is important for early cognitive development. This study aimed to determine the training and transfer effects on response inhibition in young children. Children in the training group (N = 20; 12 boys, mean age 4.87 ± 0.26 years) played “Fruit Ninja” on a tablet computer for 15 min/day, 4 days/week, for 3 weeks. Children in the active control group (N = 20; 10 boys, mean age 4.88 ± 0.20 years) played a coloring game on a tablet computer for 10 min/day, 1–2 days/week, for 3 weeks. Several cognitive tasks (involving inhibitory control, working memory, and fluid intelligence) were used to evaluate the transfer effects, and electroencephalography (EEG) was performed during a go/no-go task. Progress on the trained game was significant, while performance on a reasoning task (Raven’s Progressive Matrices) revealed a trend-level improvement from pre- to post-test. EEG indicated that the N2 effect of the go/no-go task was enhanced after training for girls. This study is the first to show that pure response inhibition training can potentially improve reasoning ability. Furthermore, gender differences in the training-induced changes in neural activity were found in preschoolers. PMID:26395158

  8. Effects of military training activities on shrub-steppe raptors in southwestern Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen; Kochert, Michael N.; Carpenter, L.B.

    1999-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1994, we assessed relative abundance, nesting success, and distribution of ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), northern harriers (Circus cyaneus), burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), and short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) inside and outside a military training site in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, southwestern Idaho. The Orchard Training Area is used primarily for armored vehicle training and artillery firing by the Idaho Army National Guard. Relative abundance of nesting pairs inside and outside the training site was not significantly different from 1991 to 1993 but was significantly higher on the training site in 1994 (Pa??a??a??0.03). Nesting success varied among years but was not significantly different inside and outside the training site (Pa??>a??0.26). In 1994, short-eared owl and burrowing owl nests were significantly closer to firing ranges used early in the spring before owls laid eggs than were random points (Pa??activity contributed to some nesting failures from 1992 to 1994, but some pairs nested successfully near military activity.

  9. The effects of inhibitory control training for preschoolers on reasoning ability and neural activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhu, Xinyi; Ziegler, Albert; Shi, Jiannong

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory control (including response inhibition and interference control) develops rapidly during the preschool period and is important for early cognitive development. This study aimed to determine the training and transfer effects on response inhibition in young children. Children in the training group (N = 20; 12 boys, mean age 4.87 ± 0.26 years) played "Fruit Ninja" on a tablet computer for 15 min/day, 4 days/week, for 3 weeks. Children in the active control group (N = 20; 10 boys, mean age 4.88 ± 0.20 years) played a coloring game on a tablet computer for 10 min/day, 1-2 days/week, for 3 weeks. Several cognitive tasks (involving inhibitory control, working memory, and fluid intelligence) were used to evaluate the transfer effects, and electroencephalography (EEG) was performed during a go/no-go task. Progress on the trained game was significant, while performance on a reasoning task (Raven's Progressive Matrices) revealed a trend-level improvement from pre- to post-test. EEG indicated that the N2 effect of the go/no-go task was enhanced after training for girls. This study is the first to show that pure response inhibition training can potentially improve reasoning ability. Furthermore, gender differences in the training-induced changes in neural activity were found in preschoolers. PMID:26395158

  10. Effects of Military Training Activities on Shrub-steppe Raptors in Southwestern Idaho, USA.

    PubMed

    LEHMAN; STEENHOF; KOCHERT; CARPENTER

    1999-04-01

    / Between 1991 and 1994, we assessed relative abundance, nesting success, and distribution of ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), northern harriers (Circus cyaneus), burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), and short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) inside and outside a military training site in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, southwestern Idaho. The Orchard Training Area is used primarily for armored vehicle training and artillery firing by the Idaho Army National Guard. Relative abundance of nesting pairs inside and outside the training site was not significantly different from 1991 to 1993 but was significantly higher on the training site in 1994 (P &le 0.03). Nesting success varied among years but was not significantly different inside and outside the training site (P > 0.26). In 1994, short-eared owl and burrowing owl nests were significantly closer to firing ranges used early in the spring before owls laid eggs than were random points (P < 0.001). In 1993, distances from occupied burrowing owl nests to firing ranges used early in the year were similar to those from random points to the same firing ranges (P = 0.16). Military activity contributed to some nesting failures from 1992 to 1994, but some pairs nested successfully near military activity. KEY WORDS: Distribution; Military impacts; Nesting success; Raptors; Relative abundance; Shrub-steppe PMID:9950702

  11. Augmented Dynamics and Motor Exploration as Training for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Patton, James L.

    2016-01-01

    With chronic stroke survivors (n = 30), we investigated how upper extremity training with negative viscosity affects coordination under unperturbed conditions. Subjects trained with a planar robotic interface simulating 1) negative viscosity augmented to elbow and shoulder joints; 2) negative viscosity combined with inertia; or 3) a null-field condition. Two treatment groups practiced with both force conditions (cross-over design), while a control group practiced with a null-field condition. Training (exploratory movement) and evaluations (prescribed circular movement) alternated in several phases to facilitate transfer from forces to the null field. Negative viscosity expanded exploration especially in the sagittal axis, and resulted in significant within-day improvements. Both treatment groups exhibited next day retention unobserved in the control. Our results suggest enhanced learning from forces that induce a broader range of kinematics. This study supports the use of robot-assisted training that encourages active patient involvement by preserving efferent commands for driving movement. PMID:22481803

  12. Microscopic Analysis of Plankton, Periphyton, and Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This manual is intended for professional personnel in the fields of water pollution control, limnology, water supply and waste treatment. Primary emphasis is given to practice in the identification and enumeration of microscopic organisms which may be encountered in water and activated sludge. Methods for the chemical and instrumental evaluation…

  13. Basic Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.115.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts, and transparency masters. This is the first of a three module series and considers definition of terms, design…

  14. Intermediate Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.116.3.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This is the second level of a three module series and considers aeration devices,…

  15. Detecting Synfire Chain Activity Using Massively Parallel Spike Train Recording

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Sven; Grün, Sonja; Diesmann, Markus; Gerstein, George L.

    2008-01-01

    The synfire chain model has been proposed as the substrate that underlies computational processes in the brain and has received extensive theoretical study. In this model cortical tissue is composed of a superposition of feedforward subnetworks (chains) each capable of transmitting packets of synchronized spikes with high reliability. Computations are then carried out by interactions of these chains. Experimental evidence for synfire chains has so far been limited to inference from detection of a few repeating spatiotemporal neuronal firing patterns in multiple single-unit recordings. Demonstration that such patterns actually come from synfire activity would require finding a meta organization among many detected patterns, as yet an untried approach. In contrast we present here a new method that directly visualizes the repetitive occurrence of synfire activity even in very large data sets of multiple single-unit recordings. We achieve reliability and sensitivity by appropriately averaging over neuron space (identities) and time. We test the method with data from a large-scale balanced recurrent network simulation containing 50 randomly activated synfire chains. The sensitivity is high enough to detect synfire chain activity in simultaneous single-unit recordings of 100 to 200 neurons from such data, enabling application to experimental data in the near future. PMID:18632888

  16. Advanced Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.117.4.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This is the third level of a three module series and considers design and operation…

  17. Biomimetic vibrissal sensing for robots

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Martin J.; Mitchinson, Ben; Sullivan, J. Charles; Pipe, Anthony G.; Prescott, Tony J.

    2011-01-01

    Active vibrissal touch can be used to replace or to supplement sensory systems such as computer vision and, therefore, improve the sensory capacity of mobile robots. This paper describes how arrays of whisker-like touch sensors have been incorporated onto mobile robot platforms taking inspiration from biology for their morphology and control. There were two motivations for this work: first, to build a physical platform on which to model, and therefore test, recent neuroethological hypotheses about vibrissal touch; second, to exploit the control strategies and morphology observed in the biological analogue to maximize the quality and quantity of tactile sensory information derived from the artificial whisker array. We describe the design of a new whiskered robot, Shrewbot, endowed with a biomimetic array of individually controlled whiskers and a neuroethologically inspired whisking pattern generation mechanism. We then present results showing how the morphology of the whisker array shapes the sensory surface surrounding the robot's head, and demonstrate the impact of active touch control on the sensory information that can be acquired by the robot. We show that adopting bio-inspired, low latency motor control of the rhythmic motion of the whiskers in response to contact-induced stimuli usefully constrains the sensory range, while also maximizing the number of whisker contacts. The robot experiments also demonstrate that the sensory consequences of active touch control can be usefully investigated in biomimetic robots. PMID:21969690

  18. Improvements to executive function during exercise training predict maintenance of physical activity over the following year

    PubMed Central

    Best, John R.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exercise training benefits cognitive, neural, and physical health markers in older adults. It is likely that these positive effects will diminish if participants return to sedentary lifestyles following training cessation. Theory posits that that the neurocognitive processes underlying self-regulation, namely executive function (EF), are important to maintaining positive health behaviors. Therefore, we examined whether better EF performance in older women would predict greater adherence to routine physical activity (PA) over 1 year following a 12-month resistance exercise training randomized controlled trial. The study sample consisted of 125 community-dwelling women aged 65–75 years old. Our primary outcome measure was self-reported PA, as measured by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE), assessed on a monthly basis from month 13 to month 25. Executive function was assessed using the Stroop Test at baseline (month 0) and post-training (month 12). Latent growth curve analyses showed that, on average, PA decreased during the follow-up period but at a decelerating rate. Women who made greater improvements to EF during the training period showed better adherence to PA during the 1-year follow-up period (β = −0.36, p < 0.05); this association was unmitigated by the addition of covariates (β = −0.44, p < 0.05). As expected, EF did not predict changes in PA during the training period (p > 0.10). Overall, these findings suggest that improving EF plays an important role in whether older women maintain higher levels of PA following exercise training and that this association is only apparent after training when environmental support for PA is low. PMID:24904387

  19. GLUT 4 and insulin receptor binding and kinase activity in trained human muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dela, F; Handberg, A; Mikines, K J; Vinten, J; Galbo, H

    1993-01-01

    1. Physical training enhances sensitivity and responsiveness of insulin-mediated glucose uptake in human muscle. This study examines if this effect of physical training is due to increased insulin receptor function or increased total concentration of insulin-recruitable glucose transporter protein (GLUT 4). 2. Seven healthy young subjects carried out single leg bicycle training for 10 weeks at 70% of one leg maximal oxygen uptake (VO2,max). Subsequently biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle of both legs. 3. Single leg VO2,max increased for the trained leg (46 +/- 3 to 52 +/- 2 ml min-1 kg-1 (means +/- S.E.M., P < 0.05), and cytochrome c oxidase activity was higher in this compared to the untrained leg (2.0 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.1 nmol s-1 (mg muscle)-1, P < 0.05). Insulin binding as well as basal- and insulin-stimulated receptor kinase activity did not differ between trained and untrained muscle. The concentration of GLUT 4 protein was higher in the former (14.9 +/- 1.9 vs. 11.6 +/- 1.0 arbitrary units (micrograms protein)-1 in crude membranes, P < 0.05). The training-induced increase in GLUT 4 (26 +/- 11%) matched a previously reported increase in maximum insulin-stimulated leg glucose uptake (25 +/- 7%) in the same subjects, and individual values of the two variables correlated (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.84, P < 0.05). 4. In conclusion, in human muscle training induces a local contraction-dependent increase in GLUT 4 protein, which enhances the effect of insulin on glucose uptake. On the other hand, insulin receptor function in muscle is unlikely to be affected by training. PMID:8271219

  20. CAM Curriculum Activities to Enhance Professionalism Training in Medical Schools

    PubMed Central

    Elder, W. G.; Hustedde, Carol; Rakel, Dave; Joyce, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Enhancing the professionalism of graduates is a major objective of most health care education institutions today. Educating conventional health care providers about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may directly and indirectly improve trainee professionalism by expanding trainees’ knowledge and appreciation of diverse health care beliefs and practices, improving physician-patient communication, enhancing self-care, and increasing sense of competence and job satisfaction. A survey based on professional competencies proposed by the Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine was administered to the grantees of the National Institutes of Health, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine R-25 CAM education project initiative. The survey’s aim was to identify project activities that taught professionalism skills. All projects reported curricular features that enhanced trainee professionalism, with substantial percentages of project effort directed toward professionalism-related activities. PMID:19412352

  1. Astronaut Thuot during extravehicular activity (EVA) training in CCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In Space Vehicle Mockup Facility, astronaut Pierre J. Thuot retrieves gear to rehearse a suit donning exercise on the middeck. Thuot's realistic environs are provided by the shuttle crew compartment trainer (CCT). Thuot, mission specialist, and four other NASA astronauts will spend two weeks in space aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia in March of 1994. He and astronaut Andrew M. Allen have been rehearsing contingency space walks. There is no scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA) for the STS-62 flight.

  2. 20 CFR 641.640 - How do the private sector training activities authorized under section 502(e) differ from other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM Private Sector Training Projects Under Section 502(e) of the OAA § 641...-enrolled in a community service assignment in a SCSEP project. (b) The private sector training activities... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do the private sector training...

  3. Intelligent control and cooperation for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stingu, Petru Emanuel

    The topic discussed in this work addresses the current research being conducted at the Automation & Robotics Research Institute in the areas of UAV quadrotor control and heterogenous multi-vehicle cooperation. Autonomy can be successfully achieved by a robot under the following conditions: the robot has to be able to acquire knowledge about the environment and itself, and it also has to be able to reason under uncertainty. The control system must react quickly to immediate challenges, but also has to slowly adapt and improve based on accumulated knowledge. The major contribution of this work is the transfer of the ADP algorithms from the purely theoretical environment to the complex real-world robotic platforms that work in real-time and in uncontrolled environments. Many solutions are adopted from those present in nature because they have been proven to be close to optimal in very different settings. For the control of a single platform, reinforcement learning algorithms are used to design suboptimal controllers for a class of complex systems that can be conceptually split in local loops with simpler dynamics and relatively weak coupling to the rest of the system. Optimality is enforced by having a global critic but the curse of dimensionality is avoided by using local actors and intelligent pre-processing of the information used for learning the optimal controllers. The system model is used for constructing the structure of the control system, but on top of that the adaptive neural networks that form the actors use the knowledge acquired during normal operation to get closer to optimal control. In real-world experiments, efficient learning is a strong requirement for success. This is accomplished by using an approximation of the system model to focus the learning for equivalent configurations of the state space. Due to the availability of only local data for training, neural networks with local activation functions are implemented. For the control of a formation

  4. Active training and driving-specific feedback improve older drivers' visual search prior to lane changes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some effects of aging that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there is evidence that classroom programs (driving refresher courses) do not improve the driving performance of older drivers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify visual search behaviors of older drivers while changing lanes in urban driving. Methods In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the video-based feedback training, 10 older drivers who received a driving refresher course and feedback about their driving performance were tested with an on-road standardized evaluation before and after participating to a simulator training program (Feedback group). Their results were compared to a Control group (12 older drivers) who received the same refresher course and in-simulator active practice as the Feedback group without receiving driving-specific feedback. Results After attending the training program, the Control group showed no increase in the frequency of the visual inspection of three regions of interests (rear view and left side mirrors, and blind spot). In contrast, for the Feedback group, combining active training and driving-specific feedbacks increased the frequency of blind spot inspection by 100% (32.3 to 64.9% of verification before changing lanes). Conclusions These results suggest that simulator training combined with driving-specific feedbacks helped older drivers to improve their visual inspection strategies, and that in-simulator training transferred positively to on-road driving. In order to be effective, it is claimed that driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving-specific feedbacks. Simulators offer a unique environment for developing such programs adapted to older drivers' needs. PMID:22385499

  5. Rehabilitation robotics

    PubMed Central

    KREBS, H.I.; VOLPE, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on rehabilitation robotics which can be used to augment the clinician’s toolbox in order to deliver meaningful restorative therapy for an aging population, as well as on advances in orthotics to augment an individual’s functional abilities beyond neurorestoration potential. The interest in rehabilitation robotics and orthotics is increasing steadily with marked growth in the last 10 years. This growth is understandable in view of the increased demand for caregivers and rehabilitation services escalating apace with the graying of the population. We will provide an overview on improving function in people with a weak limb due to a neurological disorder who cannot properly control it to interact with the environment (orthotics); we will then focus on tools to assist the clinician in promoting rehabilitation of an individual so that s/he can interact with the environment unassisted (rehabilitation robotics). We will present a few clinical results occurring immediately poststroke as well as during the chronic phase that demonstrate superior gains for the upper extremity when employing rehabilitation robotics instead of usual care. These include the landmark VA-ROBOTICS multisite, randomized clinical study which demonstrates clinical gains for chronic stroke that go beyond usual care at no additional cost. PMID:23312648

  6. Serendipitous Offline Learning in a Neuromorphic Robot

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Terrence C.; Kleinhans, Ashley; Mundy, Andrew; Conradt, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid neuromorphic learning paradigm that learns complex sensorimotor mappings based on a small set of hard-coded reflex behaviors. A mobile robot is first controlled by a basic set of reflexive hand-designed behaviors. All sensor data is provided via a spike-based silicon retina camera (eDVS), and all control is implemented via spiking neurons simulated on neuromorphic hardware (SpiNNaker). Given this control system, the robot is capable of simple obstacle avoidance and random exploration. To train the robot to perform more complex tasks, we observe the robot and find instances where the robot accidentally performs the desired action. Data recorded from the robot during these times is then used to update the neural control system, increasing the likelihood of the robot performing that task in the future, given a similar sensor state. As an example application of this general-purpose method of training, we demonstrate the robot learning to respond to novel sensory stimuli (a mirror) by turning right if it is present at an intersection, and otherwise turning left. In general, this system can learn arbitrary relations between sensory input and motor behavior. PMID:26913002

  7. Serendipitous Offline Learning in a Neuromorphic Robot.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Terrence C; Kleinhans, Ashley; Mundy, Andrew; Conradt, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid neuromorphic learning paradigm that learns complex sensorimotor mappings based on a small set of hard-coded reflex behaviors. A mobile robot is first controlled by a basic set of reflexive hand-designed behaviors. All sensor data is provided via a spike-based silicon retina camera (eDVS), and all control is implemented via spiking neurons simulated on neuromorphic hardware (SpiNNaker). Given this control system, the robot is capable of simple obstacle avoidance and random exploration. To train the robot to perform more complex tasks, we observe the robot and find instances where the robot accidentally performs the desired action. Data recorded from the robot during these times is then used to update the neural control system, increasing the likelihood of the robot performing that task in the future, given a similar sensor state. As an example application of this general-purpose method of training, we demonstrate the robot learning to respond to novel sensory stimuli (a mirror) by turning right if it is present at an intersection, and otherwise turning left. In general, this system can learn arbitrary relations between sensory input and motor behavior. PMID:26913002

  8. Robot Docking Based on Omnidirectional Vision and Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muse, David; Weber, Cornelius; Wermter, Stefan

    We present a system for visual robotic docking using an omnidirectional camera coupled with the actor critic reinforcement learning algorithm. The system enables a PeopleBot robot to locate and approach a table so that it can pick an object from it using the pan-tilt camera mounted on the robot. We use a staged approach to solve this problem as there are distinct sub tasks and different sensors used. Starting with random wandering of the robot until the table is located via a landmark, and then a network trained via reinforcement allows the robot to rum to and approach the table. Once at the table the robot is to pick the object from it. We argue that our approach has a lot of potential allowing the learning of robot control for navigation removing the need for internal maps of the environment. This is achieved by allowing the robot to learn couplings between motor actions and the position of a landmark.

  9. Blood phagocyte activity after race training sessions in Thoroughbred and Arabian horses.

    PubMed

    Cywinska, Anna; Szarska, Ewa; Degorski, Andrzej; Guzera, Maciej; Gorecka, Renata; Strzelec, Katarzyna; Kowalik, Sylwester; Schollenberger, Antoni; Winnicka, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Intensive exercise and exertion during competition promote many changes that may result in the impairment of immunity and increased susceptibility to infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of "the first line of defense": neutrophils and monocytes in racing Thoroughbred and Arabian horses after routine training sessions. Twenty-three (12 Thoroughbred and 11 Arabian) horses were examined. Routine haematological (number of red blood cells - RBC, haemoglobin concentration - HGB, haematocrit - HCT, total number of white blood cells - WBC), biochemical (creatine phosphokinase activity - CPK and total protein concentration - TP) parameters, cortisol concentration as well as phagocytic and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils and monocytes were determined. The values of basic parameters and the activity of phagocytes differed between breeds and distinct patterns of exercise-induced changes were observed. The training sessions did not produce the decrease in phagocyte activity that might lead to the suppression of immunity. PMID:23664016

  10. Developmental Word Acquisition through Self-Organized Incremental Neural Network with A Humanoid Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shogo; He, Xiaoyuan; Kojima, Ryo; Hasegawa, Osamu

    This paper presents an unsupervised approach of integrating speech and visual information without using any prepared data(training data). The approach enables a humanoid robot, Incremental Knowledge Robot 1 (IKR1), to learn words' meanings. The approach is different from most existing approaches in that the robot learns online from audio-visual input, rather than from stationary data provided in advance. In addition, the robot is capable of incremental learning, which is considered to be indispensable to lifelong learning. A noise-robust self-organized incremental neural network(SOINN) is developed to represent the topological structure of unsupervised online data. We are also developing an active learning mechanism, called ``desire for knowledge'', to let the robot select the object for which it possesses the least information for subsequent learning. Experimental results show that the approach raises the efficiency of the learning process. Based on audio and visual data, we construct a mental model for the robot, which forms a basis for constructing IKR1's inner world and builds a bridge connecting the learned concepts with current and past scenes.

  11. Generic robot architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, David J; Few, Douglas A

    2010-09-21

    The present invention provides methods, computer readable media, and apparatuses for a generic robot architecture providing a framework that is easily portable to a variety of robot platforms and is configured to provide hardware abstractions, abstractions for generic robot attributes, environment abstractions, and robot behaviors. The generic robot architecture includes a hardware abstraction level and a robot abstraction level. The hardware abstraction level is configured for developing hardware abstractions that define, monitor, and control hardware modules available on a robot platform. The robot abstraction level is configured for defining robot attributes and provides a software framework for building robot behaviors from the robot attributes. Each of the robot attributes includes hardware information from at least one hardware abstraction. In addition, each robot attribute is configured to substantially isolate the robot behaviors from the at least one hardware abstraction.

  12. [Development of a semi-autonomous mobile robot for reactor containments]. 1992 annual summary of activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wehe, D.K.

    1993-02-10

    The University of Michigan reports its progress on this project on a bimonthly or quarterly reporting frequency. As a result, the detailed annual summary of activity is derived from the integration of these progress reports. They are attached here to form a permanent record of the University`s contribution to this program.

  13. Robot Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (Canadarm) is a 50 foot robot arm used to deploy, retrieve or repair satellites in orbit. Initial spinoff version is designed to remove, inspect and replace large components of Ontario Hydro's CANDU nuclear reactors, which supply 50 percent of Ontario Hydro's total power reduction. CANDU robot is the first of SPAR's Remote Manipulator Systems intended for remote materials handling operations in nuclear servicing, chemical processing, smelting and manufacturing. Inco Limited used remote manipulator for remote control mining equipment to enhance safety and productivity of Inco's hardrock mining operations. System not only improves safety in a hazardous operation that costs more than a score of lives annually, it also increases productivity fourfold. Remote Manipulator System Division is also manufacturing a line of industrial robots and developing additional system for nuclear servicing, mining, defense and space operations.

  14. Robotic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A commercially available ANDROS Mark V-A robot was used by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as the departure point in the development of the HAZBOT III, a prototype teleoperated mobile robot designed for response to emergencies. Teleoperated robots contribute significantly to reducing human injury levels by performing tasks too hazardous for humans. ANDROS' manufacturer, REMOTEC, Inc., in turn, adopted some of the JPL concepts, particularly the control panel. HAZBOT III has exceptional mobility, employs solid state electronics and brushless DC motors for safer operation, and is designed so combustible gases cannot penetrate areas containing electronics and motors. Other features include the six-degree-of-freedom manipulator, the 30-pound squeeze force parallel jaw gripper and two video cameras, one for general viewing and navigation and the other for manipulation/grasping.

  15. Robot Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Engineers and interns at this NASA field center are building the prototype of a robotic rover that could go where no wheeled rover has gone before-into the dark cold craters at the lunar poles and across the Moon s rugged highlands-like a walking tetrahedron. With NASA pushing to meet President Bush's new exploration objectives, the robots taking shape here today could be on the Moon in a decade. In the longer term, the concept could lead to shape-shifting robot swarms designed to explore distant planetary surfaces in advance of humans. "If you look at all of NASA s projections of the future, anyone s projections of the space program, they re all rigid-body architecture," says Steven Curtis, principal investigator on the effort. "This is not rigid-body. The whole key here is flexibility and reconfigurability with a capital R."

  16. Robotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, H. I.; Hogan, N.

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a remarkable shift in the neuro-rehabilitation paradigm. Neuroscientists and clinicians moved away from the perception that the brain is static and hardwired, to a new dynamic understanding that plasticity is a fundamental property of the adult human brain and might be harnessed to remap or create new neural pathways. Capitalizing on this innovative understanding, we introduced a paradigm shift in the clinical practice in 1989 when we initiated the development of the MIT-Manus robot for neuro-rehabilitation and deployed it in the clinic in 1994 10. Since then, we and others have developed and tested a multitude of robotic devices for stroke, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Here we discuss whether robotic therapy has achieved a level of maturity to justify its broad adoption in the clinical realm as a tool for motor recovery. PMID:23080044

  17. Microneurosurgical Skills Training.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Ratre, Shailendra; Kher, Yatin; Iqbal, Mohmed

    2016-03-01

    Microneurosurgical operations differ from other surgery. Longer operative time, narrow and deep-seated operative corridors, hand-eye coordination, fine manipulation, and physiologic tremor present special problems. Proper understanding of visual feedback, control of physiologic tremor, better instrument design, and development of surgical skills with better precision is important for optimal surgical results. Using the pen-type precision grip with well-supported arm, wrist, hand, and fingers avoids fatigue and improves precision. Proper instrument design, patient positioning, hemostasis techniques, tilting operative table, good operative microscope, an adjustable chair, careful use of suction tube, bipolar forceps, and brain retraction play important roles in microneurosurgery. Sufficient clinical case volume or opportunity during routine operative hours may not be available in the beginning for young neurosurgeons; microsurgical training using various models can enable them to gain experience. Training models using deep-seated and narrow operative corridors, drilling, knot-tying technique, and anastomosis using fine sutures under high magnification can be practiced for skill improvement. Training laboratory and simulation modules can be useful for resident training and skill acquisition. Indigenously made inexpensive models and comparatively less expensive microscopes can be used in resource-constrained situations. The maintenance of microsurgical ability should be preserved by staying active in operative practice. The knowledge of ergonomics, proper training, observing hand movements of skillful surgeons, and the use of operative videos can improve skill. Endoscopic assistance, computer-assisted robot hand technique, and microtechnology can provide access to the smallest areas of the body. PMID:25915501

  18. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  19. Brain controlled robots.

    PubMed

    Kawato, Mitsuo

    2008-06-01

    In January 2008, Duke University and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) publicized their successful control of a brain-machine interface for a humanoid robot by a monkey brain across the Pacific Ocean. The activities of a few hundred neurons were recorded from a monkey's motor cortex in Miguel Nicolelis's lab at Duke University, and the kinematic features of monkey locomotion on a treadmill were decoded from neural firing rates in real time. The decoded information was sent to a humanoid robot, CB-i, in ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories located in Kyoto, Japan. This robot was developed by the JST International Collaborative Research Project (ICORP) as the "Computational Brain Project." CB-i's locomotion-like movement was video-recorded and projected on a screen in front of the monkey. Although the bidirectional communication used a conventional Internet connection, its delay was suppressed below one over several seconds, partly due to a video-streaming technique, and this encouraged the monkey's voluntary locomotion and influenced its brain activity. This commentary introduces the background and future directions of the brain-controlled robot. PMID:19404467

  20. Robotic Lung Resection for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Benjamin; Eldaif, Shady M; Cerfolio, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Robotic-assisted pulmonary lobectomy can be considered for patients able to tolerate conventional lobectomy. Contraindications to resection via thoracotomy apply to patients undergoing robotic lobectomy. Team training, familiarity with equipment, troubleshooting, and preparation are critical for successful robotic lobectomy. Robotic lobectomy is associated with decreased rates of blood loss, blood transfusion, air leak, chest tube duration, length of stay, and mortality compared with thoracotomy. Robotic lobectomy offers many of the same benefits in perioperative morbidity and mortality, and additional advantages in optics, dexterity, and surgeon ergonomics as video-assisted thoracic lobectomy. Long-term oncologic efficacy and cost implications remain areas of study. PMID:27261913

  1. Robot Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Mecanotron, now division of Robotics and Automation Corporation, developed a quick-change welding method called the Automatic Robotics Tool-change System (ARTS) under Marshall Space Flight Center and Rockwell International contracts. The ARTS system has six tool positions ranging from coarse sanding disks and abrasive wheels to cloth polishing wheels with motors of various horsepower. The system is used by fabricators of plastic body parts for the auto industry, by Texas Instruments for making radar domes, and for advanced composites at Aerospatiale in France.

  2. ROBOSIM: An intelligent simulator for robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R.; Cook, George E.; Biegl, Csaba; Springfield, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an update of an intelligent robotics simulator package, ROBOSIM, first introduced at Technology 2000 in 1990. ROBOSIM is used for three-dimensional geometrical modeling of robot manipulators and various objects in their workspace, and for the simulation of action sequences performed by the manipulators. Geometric modeling of robot manipulators has an expanding area of interest because it can aid the design and usage of robots in a number of ways, including: design and testing of manipulators, robot action planning, on-line control of robot manipulators, telerobotic user interface, and training and education. NASA developed ROBOSIM between 1985-88 to facilitate the development of robotics, and used the package to develop robotics for welding, coating, and space operations. ROBOSIM has been further developed for academic use by its co-developer Vanderbilt University, and has been in both classroom and laboratory environments for teaching complex robotic concepts. Plans are being formulated to make ROBOSIM available to all U.S. engineering/engineering technology schools (over three hundred total with an estimated 10,000+ users per year).

  3. Neural activity during emotion recognition after combined cognitive plus social cognitive training in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Christine I; Bruce, Lori; Fisher, Melissa; Verosky, Sara C; Miyakawa, Asako; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2012-08-01

    Cognitive remediation training has been shown to improve both cognitive and social cognitive deficits in people with schizophrenia, but the mechanisms that support this behavioral improvement are largely unknown. One hypothesis is that intensive behavioral training in cognition and/or social cognition restores the underlying neural mechanisms that support targeted skills. However, there is little research on the neural effects of cognitive remediation training. This study investigated whether a 50 h (10-week) remediation intervention which included both cognitive and social cognitive training would influence neural function in regions that support social cognition. Twenty-two stable, outpatient schizophrenia participants were randomized to a treatment condition consisting of auditory-based cognitive training (AT) [Brain Fitness Program/auditory module ~60 min/day] plus social cognition training (SCT) which was focused on emotion recognition [~5-15 min per day] or a placebo condition of non-specific computer games (CG) for an equal amount of time. Pre and post intervention assessments included an fMRI task of positive and negative facial emotion recognition, and standard behavioral assessments of cognition, emotion processing, and functional outcome. There were no significant intervention-related improvements in general cognition or functional outcome. fMRI results showed the predicted group-by-time interaction. Specifically, in comparison to CG, AT+SCT participants had a greater pre-to-post intervention increase in postcentral gyrus activity during emotion recognition of both positive and negative emotions. Furthermore, among all participants, the increase in postcentral gyrus activity predicted behavioral improvement on a standardized test of emotion processing (MSCEIT: Perceiving Emotions). Results indicate that combined cognition and social cognition training impacts neural mechanisms that support social cognition skills. PMID:22695257

  4. Peer education for advance care planning: volunteers’ perspectives on training and community engagement activities

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Jane E; Almack, Kathryn; Kennedy, Sheila; Froggatt, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Background Peer education by volunteers may aid attitudinal change, but there is little understanding of factors assisting the preparation of peer educators. This study contributes to conceptual understandings of how volunteers may be prepared to work as peer educators by drawing on an evaluation of a training programme for peer education for advance care planning (ACP). Objectives To report on volunteers’ perspectives on the peer education training programme, their feelings about assuming the role of volunteer peer educators and the community engagement activities with which they engaged during the year after training. To examine broader implications for peer education. Design Participatory action research employing mixed methods of data collection. Participants Twenty-four older volunteers and eight health and social care staff. Data collection methods Evaluative data were gathered from information provided during and at the end of training, a follow-up survey 4 months post-training; interviews and focus groups 6 and 12 months post-training. Findings Volunteers’ personal aims ranged from working within their communities to using what they had learnt within their own families. The personal impact of peer education was considerable. Two-thirds of volunteers reported community peer education activities 1 year after the training. Those who identified strongly with a community group had the most success. Conclusion We reflect on the extent to which the programme aided the development of ‘critical consciousness’ among the volunteers: a key factor in successful peer education programmes. More research is needed about the impact on uptake of ACP in communities. PMID:21615641

  5. Teachers' Views on the Potential Use of Online In-Service Education and Training Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokoc, Mehmet; Ozlu, Aysenur; Cimer, Atilla; Karal, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    This study examined teacher's views on the potential use of online in-service education and training (INSET) activities. The study used a qualitative approach. A total of 13 in-service teachers from primary school, vocational school, science and art center, high school in Trabzon (on the Black Sea coast of Turkey) participated in the study. To…

  6. 34 CFR 350.22 - What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What activities must a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center conduct? 350.22 Section 350.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH...

  7. 34 CFR 350.14 - What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What must a grantee do in carrying out a training activity? 350.14 Section 350.14 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROJECTS AND...

  8. Views of School Administrators Related to In-Service Training Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güngör, Semra Kiranli; Yildirim, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to specify the views of school administrators related to in-service training activities. In this research, semi-structured interview method, one of the qualitative research methods, has been used. Content analysis has been used in order to analyze the interview data and themes and sub-themes have been constituted. The…

  9. Enhancing Maritime Education and Training: Measuring a Ship Navigator's Stress Based on Salivary Amylase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murai, Koji; Wakida, Shin-Ichi; Miyado, Takashi; Fukushi, Keiichi; Hayashi, Yuji; Stone, Laurie C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose that the measurement of salivary amylase activity is an effective index to evaluate the stress of a ship navigator for safe navigation training and education. Design/methodology/approach: Evaluation comes from the simulator and actual on-board experiments. The subjects are real captains who have…

  10. 45 CFR 235.64 - FFP rates, and activities and costs matchable as training expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP rates, and activities and costs matchable as training expenditures. 235.64 Section 235.64 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION...

  11. Critical Incident Analysis Based Training: An Approach for Developing Active Racial/Cultural Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Noah M.; Pieterse, Alex L.

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss 2 perspectives on the Multicultural Counseling Competencies (D. W. Sue, P. Arredondo, & R. J. McDavis, 1992): fixed goal and process. Noting that the process has been underemphasized, they introduce active racial/cultural awareness as an operationalization of this perspective. Current training approaches are critiqued from this…

  12. Pre-Service Teacher Training Experiences Viewed as a Cultural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knorr, Ronald Marlin

    2010-01-01

    What are the experiences of career-changing pre-service middle school teachers undergoing a group-based activity as part of their training? This series of studies explored two aspects of answering this question. In the first manuscript, a methodology of a novel virtual phenomenology interview technique attempts to determine the influence of a…

  13. The Ideas of Geography Teachers about In-Service Geography Training Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the geography workshop (new approaches and new knowledge in geography), in view of the teachers, conducted within the in-service training activities for the geography teachers working in Sivas and Erzurum. The questionnaire, used as the data collection tool, was developed by the researcher. The questionnaire…

  14. Improving an Extended Day Care Environment through Staff Training and Activity Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Mary Kathryn

    The aim of this practicum was to increase parent, child, and caregiver satisfaction with the university lab elementary school site's extended day care program through training of caregivers and development of appropriate activities. Two groups participated, one for preschoolers through first graders, the other for second through fifth graders.…

  15. 32 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Areas D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued.... D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552—Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas 1. Fort... camping outside of DPCA sites (camping on DPCA sites is open to DoD members only, per above)....

  16. 32 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Areas D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued.... D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552—Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas 1. Fort... camping outside of DPCA sites (camping on DPCA sites is open to DoD members only, per above)....

  17. 32 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Areas D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued.... D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552—Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas 1. Fort... camping outside of DPCA sites (camping on DPCA sites is open to DoD members only, per above)....

  18. 32 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Areas D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued.... D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552—Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas 1. Fort... camping outside of DPCA sites (camping on DPCA sites is open to DoD members only, per above)....

  19. 32 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Areas D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued.... D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 552—Unauthorized Activities in Maneuver Training Areas 1. Fort... camping outside of DPCA sites (camping on DPCA sites is open to DoD members only, per above)....

  20. Leadership Enhancement for the Active Retired: A Community Leadership Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Carol M., Ed.; Olson, Philip, Ed.

    Developed for program facilitators in rural communities, Leadership Enhancement for the Active Retired (LEAR) is a training model that builds on the leadership skills and expertise of people who are retired from full-time employment, but are still willing to share their time and talent to benefit their community. Although other formats for the…